Science.gov

Sample records for academic clinical research

  1. A Division of Research in an Academic Clinical Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traystman, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses in general the importance of a research division, whether basic or clinical, in an academic setting and factors to consider in establishing one. Uses John Hopkins' newly created research division for Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine to specifically address funding and intra- and interdepartmental clinical research programs. (DC)

  2. Decline of clinical research in academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Meador, Kimford J

    2015-09-29

    Marked changes in US medical school funding began in the 1960s with progressively increasing revenues from clinical services. The growth of clinical revenues slowed in the mid-1990s, creating a funding crisis for US academic health care centers, who responded by having their faculty increase their clinical duties at the expense of research activities. Surveys document the resultant stresses on the academic clinician researcher. The NIH provides greater funding for basic and translational research than for clinical research, and the new Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute is inadequately funded to address the scope of needed clinical research. An increasing portion of clinical research is funded by industry, which leaves many important clinical issues unaddressed. There is an inadequate supply of skilled clinical researchers and a lack of external support for clinical research. The impact on the academic environment in university medical centers is especially severe on young faculty, who have a shrinking potential to achieve successful academic careers. National health care research funding policies should encourage the right balance of life-science investigations. Medical universities need to improve and highlight education on clinical research for students, residents, fellows, and young faculty. Medical universities also need to provide appropriate incentives for clinical research. Without training to ensure an adequate supply of skilled clinical researchers and a method to adequately fund clinical research, discoveries from basic and translational research cannot be clinically tested and affect patient care. Thus, many clinical problems will continue to be evaluated and treated with inadequate or even absent evidence-based knowledge.

  3. Decline of clinical research in academic medical centers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Marked changes in US medical school funding began in the 1960s with progressively increasing revenues from clinical services. The growth of clinical revenues slowed in the mid-1990s, creating a funding crisis for US academic health care centers, who responded by having their faculty increase their clinical duties at the expense of research activities. Surveys document the resultant stresses on the academic clinician researcher. The NIH provides greater funding for basic and translational research than for clinical research, and the new Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute is inadequately funded to address the scope of needed clinical research. An increasing portion of clinical research is funded by industry, which leaves many important clinical issues unaddressed. There is an inadequate supply of skilled clinical researchers and a lack of external support for clinical research. The impact on the academic environment in university medical centers is especially severe on young faculty, who have a shrinking potential to achieve successful academic careers. National health care research funding policies should encourage the right balance of life-science investigations. Medical universities need to improve and highlight education on clinical research for students, residents, fellows, and young faculty. Medical universities also need to provide appropriate incentives for clinical research. Without training to ensure an adequate supply of skilled clinical researchers and a method to adequately fund clinical research, discoveries from basic and translational research cannot be clinically tested and affect patient care. Thus, many clinical problems will continue to be evaluated and treated with inadequate or even absent evidence-based knowledge. PMID:26156509

  4. My Librarian: Personalized Research Clinics and the Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardwell, Catherine; Furlong, Katherine; O'Keeffe, Julie

    2002-01-01

    Describes personalized research clinics (PRC) programs at three diverse institutions: Gettysburg College (Pennsylvania), Marquette University (Wisconsin), and Bowling Green State University (Ohio). Addresses logistics, publicity methods, program analysis, and assessment issues, and weighs the benefits of the labor-intensive service against other…

  5. Going for growth: improvement in the infrastructural and management support for clinical academic research.

    PubMed

    Fowler Davis, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to implement a directorate research strategy to improve and grow clinical academic capacity and capability and ensure that the organisational systems and processes enabled clinical staff and managers to increase grant capture, undertake clinically relevant research, including the adoption of NIHR portfolio sites and established a culture in which research was an accepted part of professional practice. An initial evaluation of senior and middle manager attitudes and understanding of the research infrastructure and benefits of research identified that the directorate had a deeply segmented view of research and only a partial view of how research could benefit patients and improve their services. A significant number of staff claimed to be research active but this activity was not contributing to the service knowledge or being translated into grant capture, leading to income that could be used to invest in patient facing research. Few managers had appreciated the challenge of implementing the research strategy or the potential of enabling research active staff to generate clinical academic careers. A quality improvement methodology was adopted, based on four equally important elements [1]; involving people (staff and patients) in research, developing people's research knowledge and skills, promoting an understanding of the complex systems and processes associated with research, and using an organisational research strategy with leadership to drive change. This improvement method suggests an equal and proportional range of activity to engage staff, amend and adapt processes and systems, carry out organisational change and "make it a habit". The improvement measures were selected by a number of managers who acted as "research champions" and shared these with all staff across the directorate; the focus was on delivering sustained improvements in performance targets agreed with the organisation. The interventions were introduced to assist managers in

  6. Going for growth: improvement in the infrastructural and management support for clinical academic research.

    PubMed

    Fowler Davis, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to implement a directorate research strategy to improve and grow clinical academic capacity and capability and ensure that the organisational systems and processes enabled clinical staff and managers to increase grant capture, undertake clinically relevant research, including the adoption of NIHR portfolio sites and established a culture in which research was an accepted part of professional practice. An initial evaluation of senior and middle manager attitudes and understanding of the research infrastructure and benefits of research identified that the directorate had a deeply segmented view of research and only a partial view of how research could benefit patients and improve their services. A significant number of staff claimed to be research active but this activity was not contributing to the service knowledge or being translated into grant capture, leading to income that could be used to invest in patient facing research. Few managers had appreciated the challenge of implementing the research strategy or the potential of enabling research active staff to generate clinical academic careers. A quality improvement methodology was adopted, based on four equally important elements [1]; involving people (staff and patients) in research, developing people's research knowledge and skills, promoting an understanding of the complex systems and processes associated with research, and using an organisational research strategy with leadership to drive change. This improvement method suggests an equal and proportional range of activity to engage staff, amend and adapt processes and systems, carry out organisational change and "make it a habit". The improvement measures were selected by a number of managers who acted as "research champions" and shared these with all staff across the directorate; the focus was on delivering sustained improvements in performance targets agreed with the organisation. The interventions were introduced to assist managers in

  7. Going for growth: improvement in the infrastructural and management support for clinical academic research

    PubMed Central

    Fowler Davis, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to implement a directorate research strategy to improve and grow clinical academic capacity and capability and ensure that the organisational systems and processes enabled clinical staff and managers to increase grant capture, undertake clinically relevant research, including the adoption of NIHR portfolio sites and established a culture in which research was an accepted part of professional practice. An initial evaluation of senior and middle manager attitudes and understanding of the research infrastructure and benefits of research identified that the directorate had a deeply segmented view of research and only a partial view of how research could benefit patients and improve their services. A significant number of staff claimed to be research active but this activity was not contributing to the service knowledge or being translated into grant capture, leading to income that could be used to invest in patient facing research. Few managers had appreciated the challenge of implementing the research strategy or the potential of enabling research active staff to generate clinical academic careers. A quality improvement methodology was adopted, based on four equally important elements [1]; involving people (staff and patients) in research, developing people's research knowledge and skills, promoting an understanding of the complex systems and processes associated with research, and using an organisational research strategy with leadership to drive change. This improvement method suggests an equal and proportional range of activity to engage staff, amend and adapt processes and systems, carry out organisational change and “make it a habit”. The improvement measures were selected by a number of managers who acted as “research champions” and shared these with all staff across the directorate; the focus was on delivering sustained improvements in performance targets agreed with the organisation. The interventions were introduced to assist

  8. Current state of information technologies for the clinical research enterprise across academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Shawn N; Dubey, Anil; Embi, Peter J; Harris, Paul A; Richter, Brent G; Turisco, Fran; Weber, Griffin M; Tcheng, James E; Keogh, Diane

    2012-06-01

    Information technology (IT) to support clinical research has steadily grown over the past 10 years. Many new applications at the enterprise level are available to assist with the numerous tasks necessary in performing clinical research. However, it is not clear how rapidly this technology is being adopted or whether it is making an impact upon how clinical research is being performed. The Clinical Research Forum's IT Roundtable performed a survey of 17 representative academic medical centers (AMCs) to understand the adoption rate and implementation strategies within this field. The results were compared with similar surveys from 4 and 6 years ago. We found the adoption rate for four prominent areas of IT-supported clinical research had increased remarkably, specifically regulatory compliance, electronic data capture for clinical trials, data repositories for secondary use of clinical data, and infrastructure for supporting collaboration. Adoption of other areas of clinical research IT was more irregular with wider differences between AMCs. These differences appeared to be partially due to a set of openly available applications that have emerged to occupy an important place in the landscape of clinical research enterprise-level support at AMC's. PMID:22686207

  9. The General Electric-Association of University Radiologists Radiology Research Academic Fellowship (GERRAF). An industry-academic collaboration to improve clinical research in radiology.

    PubMed

    Hillman, B J; Fryback, D G; Holden, R W; McNeil, B J; Molitor, R M; Moss, A A; Peck, P V; Putman, C E; Thompson, W M

    1993-05-01

    The association of GE Medical Systems and the AUR represents a unique collaboration between academic radiology and industry that bears important potential for elevating the quality of clinical research in radiology and developing a cadre of high-quality radiologist researchers for the future. The establishment of the GERRAF is especially timely given the new imperatives of the rapidly changing health care environment, with its emphasis on expenditure reduction. The ultimate goals of GERRAF are to develop research leaders for radiology that will provide guidance for appropriate clinical practice, better train future researchers, and secure the role of radiologists in caring for patients.

  10. Developing a clinical trial unit to advance research in an academic institution.

    PubMed

    Croghan, Ivana T; Viker, Steven D; Limper, Andrew H; Evans, Tamara K; Cornell, Alissa R; Ebbert, Jon O; Gertz, Morie A

    2015-11-01

    Research, clinical care, and education are the three cornerstones of academic health centers in the United States. The research climate has always been riddled with ebbs and flows, depending on funding availability. During a time of reduced funding, the number and scope of research studies have been reduced, and in some instances, a field of study has been eliminated. Recent reductions in the research funding landscape have led institutions to explore new ways to continue supporting research. Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN has developed a clinical trial unit within the Department of Medicine, which provides shared resources for many researchers and serves as a solution for training and mentoring new investigators and study teams. By building on existing infrastructure and providing supplemental resources to existing research, the Department of Medicine clinical trial unit has evolved into an effective mechanism for conducting research. This article discusses the creation of a central unit to provide research support in clinical trials and presents the advantages, disadvantages, and required building blocks for such a unit.

  11. Developing a clinical trial unit to advance research in an academic institution.

    PubMed

    Croghan, Ivana T; Viker, Steven D; Limper, Andrew H; Evans, Tamara K; Cornell, Alissa R; Ebbert, Jon O; Gertz, Morie A

    2015-11-01

    Research, clinical care, and education are the three cornerstones of academic health centers in the United States. The research climate has always been riddled with ebbs and flows, depending on funding availability. During a time of reduced funding, the number and scope of research studies have been reduced, and in some instances, a field of study has been eliminated. Recent reductions in the research funding landscape have led institutions to explore new ways to continue supporting research. Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN has developed a clinical trial unit within the Department of Medicine, which provides shared resources for many researchers and serves as a solution for training and mentoring new investigators and study teams. By building on existing infrastructure and providing supplemental resources to existing research, the Department of Medicine clinical trial unit has evolved into an effective mechanism for conducting research. This article discusses the creation of a central unit to provide research support in clinical trials and presents the advantages, disadvantages, and required building blocks for such a unit. PMID:26454064

  12. Assessing research impact in academic clinical medicine: a study using Research Excellence Framework pilot impact indicators

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Funders of medical research the world over are increasingly seeking, in research assessment, to complement traditional output measures of scientific publications with more outcome-based indicators of societal and economic impact. In the United Kingdom, the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) developed proposals for the Research Excellence Framework (REF) to allocate public research funding to higher education institutions, inter alia, on the basis of the social and economic impact of their research. In 2010, it conducted a pilot exercise to test these proposals and refine impact indicators and criteria. Methods The impact indicators proposed in the 2010 REF impact pilot exercise are critically reviewed and appraised using insights from the relevant literature and empirical data collected for the University of Oxford’s REF pilot submission in clinical medicine. The empirical data were gathered from existing administrative sources and an online administrative survey carried out by the university’s Medical Sciences Division among 289 clinical medicine faculty members (48.1% response rate). Results The feasibility and scope of measuring research impact in clinical medicine in a given university are assessed. Twenty impact indicators from seven categories proposed by HEFCE are presented; their strengths and limitations are discussed using insights from the relevant biomedical and research policy literature. Conclusions While the 2010 pilot exercise has confirmed that the majority of the proposed indicators have some validity, there are significant challenges in operationalising and measuring these indicators reliably, as well as in comparing evidence of research impact across different cases in a standardised manner. It is suggested that the public funding agencies, medical research charities, universities, and the wider medical research community work together to develop more robust methodologies for capturing and describing impact

  13. Compensating and providing incentives for academic physicians: balancing earning, clinical, research, teaching, and administrative responsibilities.

    PubMed

    Ceriani, P J

    1992-04-01

    Providing a comprehensive compensation and incentive plan for a group of faculty members in a department with multiple goals provides a challenge that few administrators may take. Many academic departments have given up on implementing a comprehensive compensation and incentive plan since department goals generate competing uses of a faculty member's time. Whatever the plan design your department adopts, you can be sure that it will generate controversy. The JPN department has attempted to reward and encourage faculty members to pursue scholarly activities balanced with clinical activities. As a result, this strategy has only considered physicians who can generate both clinical income and research funding. Thus far, the JPN department faculty have embraced the plan. Long-term effects are not known as this is the first year of the plan. The measure of a successful total compensation program is one that develops a sense of entrepreneurship among its members to develop new clinical programs, to pursue new research collaborations, and to devise innovative methods of training. The program described in this article is not intended to serve as the ideal model for all departments, even in academic institutions, but rather to provide a strategy that may have applicability to many other departments where the goals induce inherent conflict for faculty members attempting to decide where to place their time commitments. In addition, this strategy does not work well on an individual basis for young, beginning faculty members but does work well in the collective--to promote the goals of the department. Be prepared, however, to modify your plan after a trial period of perhaps two years. You must allow time to monitor the effects of your compensation plan and its impact on the goals and direction of the department.

  14. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Matter, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials. PMID:26779369

  15. Bridging academic science and clinical research in the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Matter, Alex

    2015-12-01

    This review starts with a brief history of drug discovery & development, and the place of Asia in this worldwide effort discussed. The conditions and constraints of a successful translational R&D involving academic basic research and clinical research are discussed and the Singapore model for pursuit of open R&D described. The importance of well-characterized, validated drug targets for the search for novel targeted anti-cancer agents is emphasized, as well as a structured, high quality translational R&D. Furthermore, the characteristics of an attractive preclinical development drug candidate are discussed laying the foundation of a successful preclinical development. The most frequent sources of failures are described and risk management at every stage is highly recommended. Organizational factors are also considered to play an important role. The factors to consider before starting a new drug discovery & development project are described, and an example is given of a successful clinical project that has had its roots in local universities and was carried through preclinical development into phase I clinical trials. PMID:26779369

  16. Becoming an Academic Researcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angervall, Petra; Gustafsson, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The neo-liberal restructuring of academia justifies research concerning what constitutes academic work, what it means to be an academic researcher and how researchers manoeuvre in academia. The aim of this article is to investigate how this reshaping of higher education affects how research careers are formed and impacts on "becoming…

  17. Academic Researchers Speak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergom, Inger; Waltman, Jean; August, Louise; Hollenshead, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Non-tenure-track (NTT) research faculty are perhaps the most under-recognized group of academic professionals on the campuses today, despite their increasingly important role within the expanding academic research enterprise. The American Association for the Advancement of Science reports that the amount of federal spending on R&D has more than…

  18. Academic physiatry. Balancing clinical practice and academic activities.

    PubMed

    Grabois, M

    1992-04-01

    The need for continued and diversified growth of both scholarly and clinical activities within academic physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) departments is discussed with reference to the demands placed on academic departments by the various components of their mission, such as administration, clinical service, education and research. The expansion and improvement of clinical services should include the following components: program development, resources needed, finances required and marketing. Clinical subspecialization of faculty and solid affiliation with nonacademic hospitals and rehabilitation facilities is essential for academic PM&R. The faculty should include three categories: clinical faculty, clinical-research faculty and research faculty. Adequate financial resources must comprise an appropriate balance of academic funds, clinical income and grant sources. Clinical funds will play a greater role as other sources of funds diminish. Any practice plan must recognize the equality of the differing faculty members' practices, whether their interests are clinical, educational or research-oriented. The expansion and intensification of clinical programs by academy PM&R departments could increase competition in the medical community. Sensitivity to the perceptions of other practitioners and institutions, careful planning and cooperation will help the field grow and improve levels of care for the patients we serve in light of the changing medical care environment.

  19. The Impact of VA's Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Centers on Academic Affiliates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Elizabeth J.; Meganathan, Karthikeyan; Shay, Kenneth; Gilman, Stuart C.; Zeiss, Robert A.; Hettler, Debbie L.

    2011-01-01

    The education mission of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is to train health professionals to benefit VA and the United States. One approach for achieving that mission, along with VA's research and clinical missions, was the establishment of Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Centers (GRECCs) in 1975. These were developed at VA…

  20. Academic profile, beliefs, and self-efficacy in research of clinical nurses: implications for the Nursing Research Program in a Magnet Journey™ hospital

    PubMed Central

    Leão, Eliseth Ribeiro; Farah, Olga Guilhermina; Reis, Elisa Aparecida Alves; de Barros, Claudia Garcia; Mizoi, Cristina Satoko

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the academic profile, research experience, beliefs, and self-efficacy in research of clinical nurses in a Magnet Journey™ hospital. Methods: Quantitative descriptive designed to assess research experience of clinical nurses. The survey was divided into demographics characteristics; scientific/academic profile (Nursing degree; membership in academic research groups, involvement in papers, teaching activities, scientific conferences, and posters presented); beliefs related to nursing research (about skills, benefits to career, reputation of institution, patient care; job satisfaction level); and Research Self-Efficacy (conducting literature review; evaluating quality of studies; using theory; understanding evidence; and scientific writing: putting ideas on paper easily; recognize and adapt the text to the reader; write to the standards required by science; write with objectivity, logical sequence, coherence, simplicity, clarity, and precision; insert the references in the text correctly; write the references appropriately; use correct spelling and grammar; write texts in English). Results: Most clinical nurses had low research experience, yet had positive beliefs in and perception of well-developed research skills. Conclusion: Our findings should contribute to the preparation of research programs aimed at facilitating the engagement of clinical nurses in the development of scientific projects. PMID:24488393

  1. Academic Listening: Research Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowerdew, John, Ed.

    A collection of essays address a variety of issues in listening in the academic context, particularly in a foreign or second language. Articles include: "Research of Relevance to Second Language Lecture Comprehension--An Overview" (John Flowerdew); "Expectation-Driven Understanding in Information Systems Lecture Comprehension" (Steve Tauroza,…

  2. Institutional Research and Academic Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron, Ed.

    The theme of the 8th Annual Forum on Institutional Research was "Institutional Research and Academic Outcomes"--intended as a continuation of the 1966 Forum discussion dealing with academic inputs and the 1967 Forum on the instructional process. After an address by the Associations's president in which he urged his academic colleagues to…

  3. 06. Facilitating Collection of Research and Quality Data in Integrative Medicine Clinical Settings: Views From Academic, Health System and Private Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Dolor, Rowena; Victorson, David; Amoils, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Focus Areas: Integrative Approaches to Care The purpose of this panel discussion is to share successful efforts from a practice-based research network (PBRN) including ten integrative medicine clinics. The BraveNet PBRN includes integrative medicine clinics with academic health centers, large health systems, and a stand-alone private practice clinic. While clinical care is prioritized across all of these centers, introducing research into clinical sites oriented to providing care poses challenges that vary by clinic environment. We will highlight some of the unique issues encountered when trying to standardize data collection in sites practicing a patient-centered, whole-systems approach to healing as well as the solutions used to overcome these issues. We will present some operational solutions and data collected from the PBRN's ongoing data registry, entitled PRIMIER. The panel will engage attendees in a dialogue centering on potential for future analyses of existing results, ideas for possible upcoming studies, and creative ways to expand the PBRN data registry to include additional sites that may have expertise and interest in participating.

  4. CPTAC Establishes Formal Relationships with Two Academic Institutions in Taiwan - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) has entered into memorandum of understandings (MOUs) with Chang Gung University and Academia Sinica, in Taipei, Taiwan.

  5. Developing a clinical academic career pathway for nursing.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Maureen; Latter, Sue; Richardson, Alison

    Since the publication of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration's (UKRC, 2007) recommendations on careers in clinical research, interest has grown in the concept of clinical academic nursing careers, with increased debate on how such roles might be developed and sustained (Department of Health, 2012). To embed clinical academic nursing roles in the NHS and universities, a clear understanding and appreciation of the contribution that such posts might make to organisational objectives and outcomes must be developed. This paper outlines an initiative to define the potential practice and research contribution of clinical academic roles through setting out role descriptors. This exercise was based on our experience of a clinical academic career initiative at the University of Southampton run in partnership with NHS organisations. Role descriptors were developed by a group of service providers, academics and two clinical academic award-holders from the local programme. This paper outlines clinical academic roles from novice to professor and describes examples of role descriptors at the different levels of a career pathway. These descriptors are informed by clinical academic posts in place at Southampton as well as others at the planning stage. Understanding the nature of clinical academic posts and the contribution that these roles can make to healthcare will enable them to become embedded into organisational structures and career pathways.

  6. Use of a data warehouse at an academic medical center for clinical pathology quality improvement, education, and research

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.; Schriever, Andy; Mathur, Gagan; Blau, John L.; Stauffer, Stephanie L.; Ford, Bradley A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pathology data contained within the electronic health record (EHR), and laboratory information system (LIS) of hospitals represents a potentially powerful resource to improve clinical care. However, existing reporting tools within commercial EHR and LIS software may not be able to efficiently and rapidly mine data for quality improvement and research applications. Materials and Methods: We present experience using a data warehouse produced collaboratively between an academic medical center and a private company. The data warehouse contains data from the EHR, LIS, admission/discharge/transfer system, and billing records and can be accessed using a self-service data access tool known as Starmaker. The Starmaker software allows users to use complex Boolean logic, include and exclude rules, unit conversion and reference scaling, and value aggregation using a straightforward visual interface. More complex queries can be achieved by users with experience with Structured Query Language. Queries can use biomedical ontologies such as Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine. Result: We present examples of successful searches using Starmaker, falling mostly in the realm of microbiology and clinical chemistry/toxicology. The searches were ones that were either very difficult or basically infeasible using reporting tools within the EHR and LIS used in the medical center. One of the main strengths of Starmaker searches is rapid results, with typical searches covering 5 years taking only 1–2 min. A “Run Count” feature quickly outputs the number of cases meeting criteria, allowing for refinement of searches before downloading patient-identifiable data. The Starmaker tool is available to pathology residents and fellows, with some using this tool for quality improvement and scholarly projects. Conclusion: A data warehouse has significant potential for improving utilization of clinical pathology testing. Software

  7. Career pathways in research: academic.

    PubMed

    Kenkre, J E; Foxcroft, D R

    The academic pathway is the fourth in this series on career pathways and might be considered the most traditional career related to research. However, as is demonstrated in this series, research is every nurse's business and not a discipline to be conducted solely through academic institutions.

  8. A Community Translational Research Pilot Grants Program to Facilitate Community–Academic Partnerships: Lessons From Colorado’s Clinical Translational Science Awards

    PubMed Central

    Main, Deborah S.; Felzien, Maret C.; Magid, David J.; Calonge, B. Ned; O’Brien, Ruth A.; Kempe, Allison; Nearing, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Background National growth in translational research has increased the need for practical tools to improve how academic institutions engage communities in research. Methods One used by the Colorado Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CCTSI) to target investments in community-based translational research on health disparities is a Community Engagement (CE) Pilot Grants program. Innovative in design, the program accepts proposals from either community or academic applicants, requires that at least half of requested grant funds go to the community partner, and offers two funding tracks: One to develop new community–academic partnerships (up to $10,000), the other to strengthen existing partnerships through community translational research projects (up to $30,000). Results and Conclusion We have seen early success in both traditional and capacity building metrics: the initial investment of $272,742 in our first cycle led to over $2.8 million dollars in additional grant funding, with grantees reporting strengthening capacity of their community–academic partnerships and the rigor and relevance of their research. PMID:22982851

  9. Research Productivity and Academics' Conceptions of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela; Boud, David; Namgung, Sang Un; Lucas, Lisa; Crawford, Karin

    2016-01-01

    This paper asks the question: do people with different levels of research productivity and identification as a researcher think of research differently? It discusses a study that differentiated levels of research productivity among English and Australian academics working in research-intensive environments in three broad discipline areas: science,…

  10. Practice-based research: necessary intersection between academics and practice.

    PubMed

    Darden, Paul M

    2008-08-01

    Practice-based research networks are an exciting way for pediatric practitioners to contribute to the knowledge necessary to provide the best care to their patients. Academic pediatricians should view research networks a necessary and essential aspect of clinical research.

  11. Contradictions in Irish Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrams, Steve; Donovan, John

    2005-01-01

    The conditions that govern academic research vary greatly from country to country and research in the Republic of Ireland was and remains markedly different from that of its larger European neighbours and the United States. Despite the quality of its education system and the excellent reputation of its universities, until recently Ireland had…

  12. Academic Research Integration System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surugiu, Iula; Velicano, Manole

    2008-01-01

    This paper comprises results concluding the research activity done so far regarding enhanced web services and system integration. The objective of the paper is to define the software architecture for a coherent framework and methodology for enhancing existing web services into an integrated system. This document presents the research work that has…

  13. Opening up Academic Biomedical Research

    NASA Video Gallery

    Eva Guinan, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Associate Direction, Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Harvard Medical School, was featured during the September 7, 2011 Innovatio...

  14. The Value of Research in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, Gay Helen; Slowik, Amy J. W.

    2013-01-01

    In the summer of 2010, two researchers interviewed twenty-three library administrators of comparable academic libraries at American universities for their views of the value of research in academic libraries. The interview questions focused on the administrators' perceived value of academic librarians' research, incentives given to academic…

  15. Clinical Research and Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can get involved. Doing your own clinical research project? Then select the Guidance for Clinical Researchers link to learn more about the NICHD's clinical research processes and policies. Last Reviewed: 03/06/2012 ...

  16. Clinical trial design principles and endpoint definitions for transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement: part 2: endpoint definitions: A consensus document from the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregg W; Adams, David H; Abraham, William T; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Généreux, Philippe; Vranckx, Pascal; Mehran, Roxana; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Leon, Martin B; Piazza, Nicolo; Head, Stuart J; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Vahanian, Alec S

    2015-08-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous aetiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodelling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of trans- catheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives.

  17. Clinical trial design principles and endpoint definitions for transcatheter mitral valve repair and replacement: part 2: endpoint definitions: A consensus document from the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregg W; Adams, David H; Abraham, William T; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Généreux, Philippe; Vranckx, Pascal; Mehran, Roxana; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Leon, Martin B; Piazza, Nicolo; Head, Stuart J; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Vahanian, Alec S

    2015-08-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous aetiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodelling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of trans- catheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26170468

  18. Understanding Chinese TEFL Academics' Capacity for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Li; Hudson, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to benchmark Chinese TEFL academics' research productivities to identify and address research productivity issues. Using a literature-based survey, this study examined 182 Chinese TEFL academics' research output, perceptions about research, personal dispositions for conducting research and workplace context for conducting research…

  19. Unpredictable Feelings: Academic Women under Research Audit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Barbara M.; Elizabeth, Vivienne

    2015-01-01

    Academic research is subject to audit in many national settings. In Aotearoa/New Zealand, the government regulates the flow of publicly funded research income into tertiary institutions through the Performance-Based Research Fund (PBRF). This article enquires into the effects of the PBRF by exploring data collected from 16 academic women of…

  20. Clinical research in allied health.

    PubMed

    Selker, L G

    1994-01-01

    Allied health professionals in nutrition and medical dietetics, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and speech-language pathology and audiology play both unique and key cross-cutting roles in the furtherance of clinical research. Clinical research in nutrition and medical dietetics uniquely focuses on food nutrient intake and the metabolic utilization of nutrients. Clinical research in occupational therapy has a special focus on the relationship of impairment to disability, the adaptation to disability and the maximization of function. Physical therapy clinical research uniquely targets movement dysfunction and its evaluation and treatment within the context of quality and effective care. Clinical research in speech-language pathology and audiology is singular in its focus on deafness and hearing disorders, voice, speech, language and related disorders, and intersections among these and other neurological and physical conditions. Thus, all of these disciplines are making unique contributions to clinical research. Clinical research in these allied health professions is much more than the above specific foci. Inasmuch as these disciplines are rooted in practice, their contributions to research are inherently clinical. Many, if not most, of these contributions represent further validations of clinical practice or its underlying knowledge base. This means that, at a macro level, clinical research in allied health is very much "applied" research. Within allied health clinical research, this emphasis is redoubled at the "person," or individual level, where considerable attention is given to concepts of function and effectiveness. Clinical research in allied health has played a key cross-cutting role through its emphasis on collaboration. Possibly due to their professional maturation within multidisciplinary academic units, allied health professionals have demonstrated a level of comfort with multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary collaborations unique within many

  1. Academic Research in the Cyberspace Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Discusses research in the cyberspace era, exploring why academics may be naive about what information they are being allowed to access on the academic databases they rely on for research. Asserts that the real issue of the cyberspace age is the marketing of knowledge. (EV)

  2. Doctors currently in jobs with academic content and their future intentions to pursue clinical academic careers: questionnaire surveys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Our aim was to report on doctors’ descriptions of their current post at about 12 years after qualification, in respect of academic content, and to compare this with their long-term intentions. By academic content, we mean posts that are designated as clinical academic posts or clinical service posts that include research and/or teaching commitments. Design Questionnaire survey. Participants All UK medical graduates of 1996 contacted in 2007, graduates of 1999 in 2012, and graduates of 2000 in 2012. Setting UK. Main outcome measures Responses about current posts and future intentions. Method Postal and email questionnaires. Results The response rate was 61.9% (6713/10844). Twenty eight per cent were working in posts with academic content (3.3% as clinical academics, 25% in clinical posts with some academic content). Seventeen per cent of women were working in clinical posts with some teaching and research, compared with 29% of men. A higher percentage of men than women intended to be clinical academics as their eventual career choice (3.9% overall, 5.4% of men, 2.7% of women). More doctors wished to move to a job with an academic component than away from one (N = 824 compared with 236). This was true for both men (433 compared with 118) and women (391 compared with 118). Conclusions Women are under-represented both in holding posts with academic content and in aspirations to do so. It is noteworthy that many more doctors hoped to move into an academic role than to move out of one. Policy should facilitate this wish in order to address current shortfalls in clinical academic medicine. PMID:25780595

  3. Clinical Physiology: A Successful Academic and Clinical Discipline is Threatened in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arheden, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    Clinical physiologists in Sweden are physicians (the majority with a PhD degree) with thorough training in system physiology and pathophysiology. They investigate patients in a functional approach and are engaged in basic and applied physiology teaching and research. In 1954, clinical physiology was founded as an independent academic and clinical…

  4. Criteria for Assessing Quality in Academic Research: The Views of Biomedical Scientists, Clinical Scientists and Social Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Mathieu; Laberge, Suzanne; McGuire, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    This study empirically addresses the claim made by Gibbons et al ("The new production of knowledge: The dynamics of science and research in contemporary societies." Sage, Thousand Oaks, 1994) that a novel form of quality control (associated with Mode 2 knowledge production) is supplementing the "traditional" peer-review process (associated with…

  5. Linking academic and clinical missions: UC Davis' integrated AHC.

    PubMed

    Pomeroy, Claire; Rice, Ann; McGowan, William; Osburn, Nathan

    2008-09-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) rely on cross-subsidization of education and research programs by the clinical enterprise, but this is becoming more challenging as clinical reimbursements decline. These new realities provide an important opportunity to reevaluate the relationships between medical schools and academic medical centers. The authors examine the benefits of their ongoing commitment to create a fully integrated AHC at the University of California (UC) Davis, discussing strategies that serve as catalysts for continued growth. They explore how investments of proceeds from the clinical enterprise directly enhance educational and research initiatives, which, in turn, increase the success of patient-care programs. This has created a cycle of excellence that leads to an enhanced reputation for the entire health system. One strategy involves using clinical margins to "prime the pump" in anticipation of major research initiatives, resulting in rapid increases in external research funding and academic recognition. In turn, this facilitates recruitment of high-quality faculty and staff, improving the ability to deliver expert clinical care. The overall enhanced institutional reputation positions both the clinical and academic programs for further success. The authors posit that such approaches require executive-level commitment to a single strategic vision, unified leadership, and collaborative financial and operational decision making. Adopting such changes is not without challenges, which are discussed, but the authors suggest that an integrated AHC fosters optimized operations, enhanced reputation, and stronger performance across all mission areas. They also provide examples of how the UC Davis Health System has thus attracted philanthropists and investments from the private sector.

  6. Clinical trials in neonates and children: Report of the pulmonary hypertension academic research consortium pediatric advisory committee

    PubMed Central

    Adatia, Ian; Haworth, Sheila G.; Wegner, Max; Barst, Robyn J.; Ivy, Dunbar; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Karkowsky, Abraham; Rosenzweig, Erika; Aguilar, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Drug trials in neonates and children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease pose unique but not insurmountable challenges. Childhood is defined by growth and development. Both may influence disease and outcomes of drug trials. The developing pulmonary vascular bed and airways may be subjected to maldevelopment, maladaptation, growth arrest, or dysregulation that influence the disease phenotype. Drug therapy is influenced by developmental changes in renal and hepatic blood flow, as well as in metabolic systems such as cytochrome P450. Drugs may affect children differently from adults, with different clearance, therapeutic levels and toxicities. Toxicity may not be manifested until the child reaches physical, endocrine and neurodevelopmental maturity. Adverse effects may be revealed in the next generation, should the development of ova or spermatozoa be affected. Consideration of safe, age-appropriate tablets and liquid formulations is an obvious but often neglected prerequisite to any pediatric drug trial. In designing a clinical trial, precise phenotyping and genotyping of disease is required to ensure appropriate and accurate inclusion and exclusion criteria. We need to explore physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and simulations together with statistical techniques to reduce sample size requirements. Clinical endpoints such as exercise capacity, using traditional classifications and testing cannot be applied routinely to children. Many lack the necessary neurodevelopmental skills and equipment may not be appropriate for use in children. Selection of endpoints appropriate to encompass the developmental spectrum from neonate to adolescent is particularly challenging. One possible solution is the development of composite outcome scores that include age and a developmentally specific functional classification, growth and development scores, exercise data, biomarkers and hemodynamics with repeated evaluation throughout the period of growth and

  7. Academic Freedom: Problems in Conceptualization and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdel Latif, Muhammad M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Academic freedom is of central importance to higher education and it affects all aspects of work at universities. It symbolizes academics' acceptance of the need for openness and flexibility (Balyer, 2011) and it protects the conditions leading to the creation of good teaching and learning, sound research, and scholarship (Atkinson, 2004).…

  8. Artist Academics: Performing the Australian Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Dawn; Wright, David; Blom, Diana

    2009-01-01

    Despite the recent focus on creativity and innovation as the backbone of Western knowledge economies, the presence of the creative arts within universities remains problematic. Australian artist academics who seek a balance between their artistic and academic lives work within a government-directed research environment that is unable to quantify;…

  9. Proposed career pathway for clinical academic general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vishal R; Palmer, Nikolaus Oa; Nelson, Pamela; Ladwa, Russ; Fortune, Farida

    2011-10-01

    The Modernising Medical Careers framework provides the opportunity for both medical specialists and general medical practitioners to follow training pathways that lead to appointments as National Health Service (NHS) consultants and to senior academic posts. Similar opportunities are available for dentists who wish to specialise. However, they are not available to dentists working in primary dental care who wish to become NHS consultants or senior academics in general dentistry. An alternative pathway is required that does not force committed primary care dentists who wish to become NHS consultants or senior academics down a path of specialisation. In this paper, the authors explore the situation in some detail and propose a career pathway with appropriate competencies for primary care dentists who aspire to become NHS consultants or senior academics. They justify why such posts should be created. The competencies have been developed using key guidelines and documents from the European Bologna Process and the Association for Dental Education in Europe, the Curriculum for UK Dental Foundation Programme Training, and the General Dental Council monospecialty curricula. It is hoped that the proposed pathway will produce highly trained generalists who will: (a) encourage and undertake research in primary dental care, where over 90% of dentistry is delivered, (b) support and lead outreach centres so that teaching and clinical cases reflect primary dental care, where students will spend their working lives post-qualification, and (c) provide a means of increasing the numbers of clinical dental academics, which have been in decline over the last 10 years.

  10. Clinical Trial Design Principles and Endpoint Definitions for Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair and Replacement: Part 1: Clinical Trial Design Principles: A Consensus Document From the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregg W; Vahanian, Alec S; Adams, David H; Abraham, William T; Borer, Jeffrey S; Bax, Jeroen J; Schofer, Joachim; Cutlip, Donald E; Krucoff, Mitchell W; Blackstone, Eugene H; Généreux, Philippe; Mack, Michael J; Siegel, Robert J; Grayburn, Paul A; Enriquez-Sarano, Maurice; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Kappetein, Arie Pieter

    2015-07-21

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous etiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodeling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of transcatheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives.

  11. Recommending Research Profiles for Multidisciplinary Academic Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunawardena, Sidath Deepal

    2013-01-01

    This research investigates how data on multidisciplinary collaborative experiences can be used to solve a novel problem: recommending research profiles of potential collaborators to academic researchers seeking to engage in multidisciplinary research collaboration. As the current domain theories of multidisciplinary collaboration are insufficient…

  12. A clinical academic practice partnership: a clinical education redesign.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Pamela R; Rose, Linda; Belcher, Anne E; Dang, Deborah; Hochuli, Jo Fava; Fleischmann, Debbie; Gerson, Linda; Greene, Mary Ann; Jordan, Elizabeth Betty T; Krohn, Vicki L; Sartorius-Merganthaler, Susan; Walrath, Jo M

    2013-01-01

    The clinical academic practice partnership (CAPP), a clinical redesign based on the dedicated education unit concept, was developed and implemented by large, private school of nursing in collaboration with 4 clinical partners to provide quality clinical education, to explore new clinical models for the future, and to test an innovative clinical education design. An executive steering committee consisting of nursing leaders and educators from the school of nursing and the clinical institutions was established as the decision-making and planning components, with several collaborative task forces initiated to conduct the work and to accomplish the goals. This article will describe methods to initiate and to organize the key elements of this dedicated education unit-type clinical model, providing examples and an overview of the steps and elements needed as the development proceeded. After 18 months of implementation in 4 different nursing programs in 4 different clinical institutions, the clinical redesign has shown to be a positive initiative, with students actively requesting CAPP units for their clinical experiences. Preliminary findings and outcomes will be discussed, along with nursing education implications for this new clinical redesign.

  13. Bionic limbs: clinical reality and academic promises.

    PubMed

    Farina, Dario; Aszmann, Oskar

    2014-10-01

    Three recent articles in Science Translational Medicine (Tan et al. and Ortiz-Catalan et al., this issue; Raspopovic et al., 5 Feb 2014 issue, 222ra19) present neuroprosthetic systems in which sensory information is delivered through direct nerve stimulation while controlling an action of the prosthesis--in all three cases, arm and hand movement. We discuss such sensory-motor integration and other key issues in prosthetic reconstruction, with an emphasis on the gap existing between clinically available systems and more advanced, custom-designed academic systems. In the near future, osseointegration, implanted muscle, and nerve electrodes for decoding and stimulation may be components of prosthetic systems for clinical use, available to a large patient population.

  14. Action Research and Academic Writing: A Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Richard; Badley, Graham

    2007-01-01

    Here is a conversation between two former colleagues about action research and academic writing. Richard Winter opens the discussion with a series of reflections on his work as an action researcher. These reflections include the key argument that action research is a noble cause because it is relevant to working life, has a practical impact and…

  15. The critical need for academic health centers to assess the training, support, and career development requirements of clinical research coordinators: recommendations from the Clinical and Translational Science Award Research Coordinator Taskforce.

    PubMed

    Speicher, Lisa A; Fromell, Gregg; Avery, Sue; Brassil, Donna; Carlson, Lori; Stevens, Erika; Toms, Michele

    2012-12-01

    Clinical Research Coordinators (CRCs) are a vital component of the clinical research enterprise providing a pivotal role in human subject protection through the numerous activities and responsibilities assigned to them. In 2006, the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Research resources (NCRR) implemented the Clinical and Translational Science Awards program (CTSA) to advance biomedical research. As a part of this endeavor, many workgroups were formed among the Consortium to support translational research. The Research Coordinator Taskforce was created as part of the Regulatory Knowledge group of the Clinical Research Innovation Key Function Committee, and focuses on enhancing CTSA capabilities to provide support and training for CRCs. In the spring of 2008, this taskforce conducted two surveys of the then 24 CTSA Consortium members to better understand the current expectations and responsibilities of research coordinators in addition to the mechanism for providing education, training, and support in order for CRCs to successfully meet the study responsibilities placed upon them. The results of these surveys are summarized in this article and provide context to the recommendations of the Research Coordinator Taskforce for institutional considerations, approaches, and best practices for providing education, training, and support the expanding role of CRCs in fulfilling their responsibilities delegated to them by investigators. PMID:23253669

  16. Making clinical academic careers more attractive: views from questionnaire surveys of senior UK doctors

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives To report on doctors’ reasons, as expressed to our research group, for choosing academic careers and on factors that would make a career in clinical academic medicine more attractive to them. Design Postal, email and web questionnaires. Setting UK. Participants A total of 6936 UK-trained doctors who graduated in 1996, 1999 and 2000. Main outcome measures Open-ended comments about a career in clinical academic medicine. Results Of doctors who provided reasons for pursuing a long-term career in clinical academic medicine, the main reasons were enjoyment of academic work and personal satisfaction, whether expressed directly in those terms, or in terms of intellectual stimulation, enjoyment of research, teaching and the advancement of medicine, and the job being more varied than and preferable to clinical work alone. Doctors’ suggestions for making clinical academic medicine more attractive included improved pay and job security, better funding of research, greater availability of academic posts, more dedicated time for research (and less service work) and more support and mentoring. Women were more likely than men to prioritise flexible working hours and part-time posts. Conclusions Medical schools could provide more information, as part of student teaching, about the opportunities for and realities of a career in clinical academic medicine. Women, in particular, commented that they lacked the role models and information which would encourage them to consider seriously an academic career. Employers could increase academic opportunities by allowing more time for teaching, research and study and should assess whether job plans make adequate allowance for academic work. PMID:26380103

  17. Fostering Research and Publication in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassen, Catherine; Wahl, Diane

    2014-01-01

    This study concerns administrative support provided to encourage the research and publishing activities of academic librarians working in Association of Research Libraries member libraries. Deans and directors of these libraries were asked to respond to an online survey concerning the support measures that their libraries provide, as well as their…

  18. Leadership of Academics in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Leadership is a key issue for universities and is increasingly regarded as beneficial to improved performance across all activities, including research. This article reports on part of a completed doctoral study that had the aim of developing a deeper understanding of the role of leadership as it relates to hospitality management research by…

  19. Childhood Developmental Disorders: An Academic and Clinical Convergence Point for Psychiatry, Neurology, Psychology and Pediatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, Allan L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Significant advances in understanding brain development and behavior have not been accompanied by revisions of traditional academic structure. Disciplinary isolation and a lack of meaningful interdisciplinary opportunities are persistent barriers in academic medicine. To enhance clinical practice, research, and training for the next…

  20. Moving from Clinical Practice to Academe: An Analysis of Career Change for Physician Assistants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marciano, Gerard Jude

    2013-01-01

    Recruitment of qualified and motivated faculty for physician assistant education programs is difficult. While the causes of the difficulty may be many, the primary one is the physician assistants (PAs) must choose between clinical and academic practice in order to pursue a career in academe. Little if any research has been conducted in this area.…

  1. Leadership Practices of Clinical Trials Office Leaders in Academic Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naser, Diana D.

    2012-01-01

    In the ever-changing clinical research environment, academic health centers seek leaders who are visionary and innovative. Clinical trials offices across the country are led by individuals who are charged with promoting growth and change in order to maximize performance, develop unique research initiatives, and help institutions achieve a…

  2. Integration of small-molecule discovery in academic biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Ohlmeyer, Michael; Zhou, Ming-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Rapid advances in biomedical sciences in recent years have drastically accelerated the discovery of the molecular basis of human diseases. The great challenge is how to translate the newly acquired knowledge into new medicine for disease prevention and treatment. Drug discovery is a long and expensive process, and the pharmaceutical industry has not been very successful at it, despite its enormous resources and spending on the process. It is increasingly realized that academic biomedical research institutions ought to be engaged in early-stage drug discovery, especially when it can be coupled to their basic research. To leverage the productivity of new-drug development, a substantial acceleration in validation of new therapeutic targets is required, which would require small molecules that can precisely control target functions in complex biological systems in a temporal and dose-dependent manner. In this review, we describe a process of integration of small-molecule discovery and chemistry in academic biomedical research that will ideally bring together the elements of innovative approaches to new molecular targets, existing basic and clinical research, screening infrastructure, and synthetic and medicinal chemistry to follow up on small-molecule hits. Such integration of multidisciplinary resources and expertise will enable academic investigators to discover novel small molecules that are expected to facilitate their efforts in both mechanistic research and new-drug target validation. More broadly academic drug discovery should contribute new entities to therapy for intractable human diseases, especially for orphan diseases, and hopefully stimulate and synergize with the commercial sector.

  3. Deepening Our Understanding of Academic Inbreeding Effects on Research Information Exchange and Scientific Output: New Insights for Academic Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horta, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of academic inbreeding in relation to academic research, and proposes a new conceptual framework for its analysis. We find that mobility (or lack of) at the early research career stage is decisive in influencing academic behaviors and scientific productivity. Less mobile academics have more inward oriented…

  4. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Cancer.gov

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  5. Disease Surveillance and the Academic, Clinical, and Public Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Rebmann, Catherine A.; Schuchat, Anne; Hughes, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The Emerging Infections Programs (EIPs), a population-based network involving 10 state health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, complement and support local, regional, and national surveillance and research efforts. EIPs depend on collaboration between public health agencies and clinical and academic institutions to perform active, population-based surveillance for infectious diseases; conduct applied epidemiologic and laboratory research; implement and evaluate pilot prevention and intervention projects; and provide capacity for flexible public health response. Recent EIP work has included monitoring the impact of a new conjugate vaccine on the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease, providing the evidence base used to derive new recommendations to prevent neonatal group B streptococcal disease, measuring the impact of foodborne diseases in the United States, and developing a systematic, integrated laboratory and epidemiologic method for syndrome-based surveillance. PMID:12890317

  6. Clinical Research Methodology 2: Observational Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Sessler, Daniel I; Imrey, Peter B

    2015-10-01

    Case-control and cohort studies are invaluable research tools and provide the strongest feasible research designs for addressing some questions. Case-control studies usually involve retrospective data collection. Cohort studies can involve retrospective, ambidirectional, or prospective data collection. Observational studies are subject to errors attributable to selection bias, confounding, measurement bias, and reverse causation-in addition to errors of chance. Confounding can be statistically controlled to the extent that potential factors are known and accurately measured, but, in practice, bias and unknown confounders usually remain additional potential sources of error, often of unknown magnitude and clinical impact. Causality-the most clinically useful relation between exposure and outcome-can rarely be definitively determined from observational studies because intentional, controlled manipulations of exposures are not involved. In this article, we review several types of observational clinical research: case series, comparative case-control and cohort studies, and hybrid designs in which case-control analyses are performed on selected members of cohorts. We also discuss the analytic issues that arise when groups to be compared in an observational study, such as patients receiving different therapies, are not comparable in other respects.

  7. Children with ADHD and Depression: A Multisource, Multimethod Assessment of Clinical, Social, and Academic Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackman, Gabrielle L.; Ostrander, Rick; Herman, Keith C.

    2005-01-01

    Although ADHD and depression are common comorbidities in youth, few studies have examined this particular clinical presentation. To address method bias limitations of previous research, this study uses multiple informants to compare the academic, social, and clinical functioning of children with ADHD, children with ADHD and depression, and…

  8. Academic Library Services Support for Research Information Seeking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Jia Tina; Evans, Nina

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the use of a university library academic service to assist in research information seeking, and the role and value of the academic services in support of research from the viewpoints of both academic users and librarians. Ten Ph.D. students completed questionnaires followed by face-to-face discussions and four academic…

  9. Fulfilling the promise of academic research

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R.W. )

    1991-01-01

    In Science: The End of the Frontier , a report published by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) this past January, it was said that American science and technology will do the following important things for their country: provide the basis for new industry, improve the health of the population, elucidate ecological and environmental issues, develop alternative energy sources and substitutes for scarce materials, and enhance their culture. These are good, pragmatic reasons for strongly supporting science and technology in general and academic research in particular. But the challenge to the science community is to fill in the blanks. They have to persuade their political and industrial supporters that academic research contributes to practical applications and to the education of students in sufficient measure to warrant the level of support they seek-particularly now when adjusting to finite resources is fast becoming society's watchword. There is no single magic bullet or master plan that can achieve this objective. Rather, there are many specific actions that need to be strengthened or initiated. They fall into several groups: improving advocacy in the federal, state, and industrial arenas; making better use of resources; improving the linkage and synergy of research and education; and devising innovative new initiatives to attract new resources. This article addresses these actions.

  10. The Academic Researcher Role: Enhancing Expectations and Improved Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyvik, Svein

    2013-01-01

    This article distinguishes between six tasks related to the academic researcher role: (1) networking; (2) collaboration; (3) managing research; (4) doing research; (5) publishing research; and (6) evaluation of research. Data drawn from surveys of academic staff, conducted in Norwegian universities over three decades, provide evidence that the…

  11. Clinical Trial Design Principles and Endpoint Definitions for Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair and Replacement: Part 2: Endpoint Definitions: A Consensus Document From the Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium.

    PubMed

    Stone, Gregg W; Adams, David H; Abraham, William T; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Généreux, Philippe; Vranckx, Pascal; Mehran, Roxana; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Leon, Martin B; Piazza, Nicolo; Head, Stuart J; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Vahanian, Alec S

    2015-07-21

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is one of the most prevalent valve disorders and has numerous etiologies, including primary (organic) MR, due to underlying degenerative/structural mitral valve (MV) pathology, and secondary (functional) MR, which is principally caused by global or regional left ventricular remodeling and/or severe left atrial dilation. Diagnosis and optimal management of MR requires integration of valve disease and heart failure specialists, MV cardiac surgeons, interventional cardiologists with expertise in structural heart disease, and imaging experts. The introduction of transcatheter MV therapies has highlighted the need for a consensus approach to pragmatic clinical trial design and uniform endpoint definitions to evaluate outcomes in patients with MR. The Mitral Valve Academic Research Consortium is a collaboration between leading academic research organizations and physician-scientists specializing in MV disease from the United States and Europe. Three in-person meetings were held in Virginia and New York during which 44 heart failure, valve, and imaging experts, MV surgeons and interventional cardiologists, clinical trial specialists and statisticians, and representatives from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration considered all aspects of MV pathophysiology, prognosis, and therapies, culminating in a 2-part document describing consensus recommendations for clinical trial design (Part 1) and endpoint definitions (Part 2) to guide evaluation of transcatheter and surgical therapies for MR. The adoption of these recommendations will afford robustness and consistency in the comparative effectiveness evaluation of new devices and approaches to treat MR. These principles may be useful for regulatory assessment of new transcatheter MV devices, as well as for monitoring local and regional outcomes to guide quality improvement initiatives.

  12. An Academic Formulas List: New Methods in Phraseology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson-Vlach, Rita; Ellis, Nick C.

    2010-01-01

    This research creates an empirically derived, pedagogically useful list of formulaic sequences for academic speech and writing, comparable with the Academic Word List (Coxhead 2000), called the Academic Formulas List (AFL). The AFL includes formulaic sequences identified as (i) frequent recurrent patterns in corpora of written and spoken language,…

  13. Interactions Between the Academic Business Library and Research Data Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Terrence B.; Nicholson, Shawn W.

    2004-01-01

    The use of numeric data has historical significance in the research of many academic disciplines, but today it is burgeoning. Responses from academic business librarians to a 33-item questionnaire are the basis for this study that investigates the interactions between academic business libraries and other local units supplying numeric data…

  14. Establishing a 'track record': research productivity and nursing academe.

    PubMed

    Emden, C

    1998-01-01

    Many nursing academics in Australia are finding to their dismay that an outstanding teaching career and exemplary professional contribution to their field--and a PhD--are not enough to achieve promotion within their university, or secure a new academic post. One must also possess a proven or established 'track record' in research and publication. The operational funding arrangements for Australian universities rely in part on the research productivity of their academic staff members. This places special expectation upon the way academics conduct their scholarly work. Nursing academics are under particular pressure: as relative newcomers to the university scene, most find themselves considered as early career researchers with weak track records. This paper reviews relevant research and draws upon personal experience in the area of research development, to highlight how nursing academics may most strategically establish a research and publication record with a view to career advancement.

  15. Increasing the ranks of academic researchers in mental health: a multisite approach to postdoctoral fellowship training.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Ruth; Cassidy-Eagle, Erin L; Beaudreau, Sherry A; Eyler, Lisa T; Gray, Heather L; Giese-Davis, Janine; Hubbard, Jeffrey; Yesavage, Jerome A

    2010-01-01

    This report highlights the use of multisite training for psychiatry and psychology postdoctoral fellows developing careers in academic clinical research in the field of mental health. The objective is to describe a model of training for young investigators to establish independent academic clinical research careers, including (1) program structure and eligibility, (2) program goals and development of a multisite curriculum, (3) use of technology for implementing the program across multiple sites, and (4) advantages and challenges of this multisite approach. In 2000, in collaboration with the Veterans Affairs (VA) Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Centers (MIRECCs), the VA Office of Academic Affiliations launched the Special Fellowship Program in Advanced Psychiatry and Psychology. Each of the 10 currently participating VA sites across the United States is affiliated with a MIRECC and an academic medical institution. In the first five years of this fellowship program, 83 fellows (34 psychiatrists and 49 psychologists) have participated. The success of this multisite approach is evidenced by the 58 fellows who have already graduated from the program: 70% have entered academic clinical research positions, and over 25 have obtained independent extramural grant support from the VA or the National Institutes of Health. Multisite training results in a greater transfer of knowledge and capitalizes on the nationwide availability of experts, creating unique networking and learning opportunities for trainees. The VA's multisite fellowship program plays a valuable role in preparing substantial numbers of psychiatry and psychology trainees for a range of academic clinical research and leadership positions in the field of mental health.

  16. Biomedical Research and Corporate Interests: A Question of Academic Freedom

    PubMed Central

    McHenry, Leemon

    2008-01-01

    The current situation in medicine has been described as a crisis of credibility, as the profit motive of industry has taken control of clinical trials and the dissemination of data. Pharmaceutical companies maintain a stranglehold over the content of medical journals in three ways: (1) by ghostwriting articles that bias the results of clinical trials, (2) by the sheer economic power they exert on journals due to the purchase of drug advertisements and journal reprints, and (3) by the threat of legal action against those researchers who seek to correct the misrepresentation of study results. This paper argues that Karl Popper's critical rationalism provides a corrective to the failure of academic freedom in biomedical research. PMID:22013356

  17. Biomedical research and corporate interests: a question of academic freedom.

    PubMed

    McHenry, Leemon

    2008-01-01

    The current situation in medicine has been described as a crisis of credibility, as the profit motive of industry has taken control of clinical trials and the dissemination of data. Pharmaceutical companies maintain a stranglehold over the content of medical journals in three ways: (1) by ghostwriting articles that bias the results of clinical trials, (2) by the sheer economic power they exert on journals due to the purchase of drug advertisements and journal reprints, and (3) by the threat of legal action against those researchers who seek to correct the misrepresentation of study results. This paper argues that Karl Popper's critical rationalism provides a corrective to the failure of academic freedom in biomedical research.

  18. Retooling institutional support infrastructure for clinical research.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Denise C; Brouwer, Rebecca N; Ennis, Cory L; Spangler, Lindsey L; Ainsworth, Terry L; Budinger, Susan; Mullen, Catherine; Hawley, Jeffrey; Uhlenbrauck, Gina; Stacy, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Clinical research activities at academic medical centers are challenging to oversee. Without effective research administration, a continually evolving set of regulatory and institutional requirements can divert investigator and study team attention away from a focus on scientific gain, study conduct, and patient safety. However, even when the need for research administration is recognized, there can be struggles over what form it should take. Central research administration may be viewed negatively, with individual groups preferring to maintain autonomy over processes. Conversely, a proliferation of individualized approaches across an institution can create inefficiencies or invite risk. This article describes experiences establishing a unified research support office at the Duke University School of Medicine based on a framework of customer support. The Duke Office of Clinical Research was formed in 2012 with a vision that research administration at academic medical centers should help clinical investigators navigate the complex research environment and operationalize research ideas. The office provides an array of services that have received high satisfaction ratings. The authors describe the ongoing culture change necessary for success of the unified research support office. Lessons learned from implementation of the Duke Office of Clinical Research may serve as a model for other institutions undergoing a similar transition.

  19. Retooling institutional support infrastructure for clinical research.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Denise C; Brouwer, Rebecca N; Ennis, Cory L; Spangler, Lindsey L; Ainsworth, Terry L; Budinger, Susan; Mullen, Catherine; Hawley, Jeffrey; Uhlenbrauck, Gina; Stacy, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Clinical research activities at academic medical centers are challenging to oversee. Without effective research administration, a continually evolving set of regulatory and institutional requirements can divert investigator and study team attention away from a focus on scientific gain, study conduct, and patient safety. However, even when the need for research administration is recognized, there can be struggles over what form it should take. Central research administration may be viewed negatively, with individual groups preferring to maintain autonomy over processes. Conversely, a proliferation of individualized approaches across an institution can create inefficiencies or invite risk. This article describes experiences establishing a unified research support office at the Duke University School of Medicine based on a framework of customer support. The Duke Office of Clinical Research was formed in 2012 with a vision that research administration at academic medical centers should help clinical investigators navigate the complex research environment and operationalize research ideas. The office provides an array of services that have received high satisfaction ratings. The authors describe the ongoing culture change necessary for success of the unified research support office. Lessons learned from implementation of the Duke Office of Clinical Research may serve as a model for other institutions undergoing a similar transition. PMID:27125563

  20. The Cost Function and Scale Economies in Academic Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Lewis G.

    2003-01-01

    This empirical research examined scale economies of academic research libraries and developed a total cost function for estimating economies of scale. Suggests that libraries in general, and academic research libraries in particular, are information provision organizations that provide multiproducts and multiservices. Findings indicate that slight…

  1. The Relevance of Academic Research in OSCM Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raffield, Wiliam D.; Vang, David O.; Lundsten, Lorman L.

    2016-01-01

    The authors examine the relevance of academic research for operations and supply chain management (OSCM) professionals. Members of a major metropolitan APICS chapter were surveyed. Consistent with prior research, findings indicate that OSCM practitioners prefer trade journal articles to academic research. Nonetheless, respondents indicate interest…

  2. A Career Success Model for Academics at Malaysian Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu Said, Al-Mansor; Mohd Rasdi, Roziah; Abu Samah, Bahaman; Silong, Abu Daud; Sulaiman, Suzaimah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to develop a career success model for academics at the Malaysian research universities. Design/methodology/approach: Self-administered and online surveys were used for data collection among 325 academics from Malaysian research universities. Findings: Based on the analysis of structural equation modeling, the…

  3. Research Policy and Academic Performativity: Compliance, Contestation and Complicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leathwood, Carole; Read, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Research, a major purpose of higher education, has become increasingly important in a context of global economic competitiveness. In this paper, we draw on data from email interviews with academics in Britain to explore responses to current research policy trends. Although the majority of academics expressed opposition to current policy…

  4. The Contribution of Academics' Engagement in Research to Undergraduate Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajdarpasic, Ademir; Brew, Angela; Popenici, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Can current trends to develop teaching-only academic positions be reconciled with the notion of the interrelationship of teaching and research as a defining characteristic of universities? In particular, what does academics' engagement in research add to students' learning? A study of 200 undergraduates' perceptions of the role of staff research…

  5. The Economic Behavior of Academic Research Libraries: Toward a Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Lewis G.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the economic behavior of academic research libraries, arguing that academic research libraries seek to maximize universities' utility by expanding library collections. Findings are consistent with those from a previous study using a different ranking system and sample data and reconfirm that library collections contribute significantly to…

  6. A Creative Approach to the Research Paper: Combining Creative Writing with Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blue, Tim

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a combination of a research essay and a creative writing assignment that encourages rigorous academic research while allowing students to get "outside the box" of traditional academic research papers. This assignment has five steps. The first two steps offer the chance to introduce academic research along with summary and…

  7. Academic Achievement Survey and Educational Assessment Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Koji

    2009-01-01

    The recent "Nationwide academic achievement and study situation survey" was clearly influenced by the idea of "authentic assessment", an educational assessment perspective focused on "quality" and "engagement". However, when "performance assessment", the assessment method corresponding to this focus, is adopted in academic achievement surveys, it…

  8. Annotated Bibliography of Recent Research Related to Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mottarella, Karen, Comp.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an annotated bibliography of recent research related to academic advising. It includes research papers that focus on advising and a special section of the "Journal of Career Development" that is devoted to multicultural graduate advising relationships.

  9. Integrating Academic and Clinical Learning Using a Clinical Swallowing Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an experiential learning activity designed to integrate classroom knowledge and a clinical swallowing assessment. Twenty master's-level graduate students in a dysphagia course conducted a clinical swallowing assessment with a resident of an independent retirement community. The exercise was designed to allow students an…

  10. Academic Maturation and Metacognitive Strategies in Academic Research and Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filipovic, Jelena; Jovanovic, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative research aims at linking recent findings related to cognition and self-regulated learning with complexity-driven educational framework that promotes Teacher-Learner communities of practice, in which knowledge is generated and constructed through a complex process of reflection and negotiation. Building on the data that was…

  11. Developing a clinical research career.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Caroline

    The National Institute for Health Research helps to promote clinical research careers for health professionals working in clinical practice, and has developed a structure to support new researchers. This article explains how nurses can get involved in clinical research and the support available to them. PMID:27491187

  12. Academic success, clinical failure: struggling practices of a failing student.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Alix

    2007-11-01

    In the deficit model approach to clinical evaluation, failures to achieve established academic or clinical standards are attributed to a flawed educational process or, more commonly, to nursing students' personal characteristics. Little is known about the meaning and significance of failing to students. Their perspective is lost among the plethora of clinical-like external criteria that predict the pathway to failure. Not all nursing students can be successful, yet when failure is the outcome, students' dignity, self-worth, and future possibilities must be preserved. Through a Heideggerian interpretative reanalysis of a individual example of an academically successful nursing student who failed clinically, this article discusses the consequences of disconnection in student-faculty relationships. The theme Preserving Personhood: Closing Down on a Future of New Possibilities is presented, as well as two subthemes--Struggling as Adopting a Chameleon Cloak and Struggling as Disconnecting Relations. A deeper understanding of students' clinical failure can help explain why failure, a socially constructed phenomenon, matters to nursing. Relational pedagogical practices to guide clinical educators in helping students at risk of failing are also discussed.

  13. Research Productivity by Career Stage among Korean Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jisun

    2014-01-01

    This study explores Korean academics' changes in research productivity by career stage. Career stage in this study is defined as a specific cohort based on one's length of job experience, with those in the same stage sharing similar interests, values, needs, and tasks; it is categorized into fledglings, maturing academics, established…

  14. Academic Development, SoTL and Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geertsema, Johan

    2016-01-01

    This essay considers the relation between academic development, the scholarship of teaching and learning, and educational research. It does so with reference to questions of academic identity and disciplinary expertise, arguing that as developers we need to consider carefully the ways in which we frame how we approach attempts to foster reflective…

  15. An Applied Introduction to Qualitative Research Methods in Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurt, Robert L.; McLaughlin, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Academic advising research aids faculty members and advisors in detecting, explaining, and addressing macro-level trends beyond their local campus. It also helps legitimize the professional nature of academic advising, moving it beyond mere prescriptive models that focus on rules and course selection. Due to the erroneous belief that skills in…

  16. Faculty Research Productivity in Hong Kong across Academic Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jisun

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the research productivity of Hong Kong academics. Specifically, it explores the individual and institutional factors that contribute to their productivity while also comparing determinants across academic disciplines. We have conducted OLS regression analysis using the international survey data from "The Changing Academics…

  17. Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... RDCRN? Aims of the Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network Contact Us RDCRN Members Login Accessibility Disclaimer The Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network is an initiative of the Office of Rare ...

  18. Gaining approval for clinical research.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Vanessa; Srinivasan, Neil; Lambiase, Pier

    2016-07-01

    Set-up and delivery of a clinical research project can be complicated and difficult. This article introduces the regulatory processes involved in gaining approval for clinical research and discusses the obstacles that may be encountered. PMID:27388381

  19. Report of the 1st meeting of the "Vienna Initiative to Save European Academic Research (VISAER)".

    PubMed

    Druml, Christiane; Singer, Ernst A; Wolzt, Michael

    2006-04-01

    The European Directive 2001/20/EC ("Clinical Trials Directive") was aimed at simplifying and harmonising European clinical research. The directive's attempt represents an important step because many European Member States lack national laws that specifically address details of research, but the goal has been only partly achieved. For academic investigators doing national or multi-national research the new European law and the requirements following its implementation are likely to have the opposite effect. Some areas seem to be of particular concern: trial sponsorship, the ethical review process, the participation of patients who are temporarily not able to consent in clinical trials, in particular the informed consent process, an accepted European registry for all clinical trials, insurance and pharmacovigilance. Furthermore there are fundamental problems of the conduct of clinical trials that could have been foreseen at the time of implementation of the new law, which are impeding academic basic clinical research. The bureaucratic burden for academic investigators has tremendously increased without representing any contribution to patients' safety or to the scientific value of research. Furthermore some large European academic trials cannot be conducted anymore due to the new regulations. This result in a reduction in the number of trials and additionally in a reduction in the number of patients enrolled in a study. European research and thus European patients will suffer from the loss of potential benefits of research. The Vienna Initiative to Save European Academic Research (VISEAR) brings together leading stakeholders from academic research groups and interested parties from industry, international organisations and regulatory authorities to focus on the issues of concern regarding the organisational and funding of academic clinical research in order to improve the development and use of medicines in Europe. The first step of the initiative was a meeting held

  20. Research ethics for clinical researchers.

    PubMed

    Harnett, John D; Neuman, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the history of the development of modern research ethics. The governance of research ethics is discussed and varies according to geographical location. However, the guidelines used for research ethics review are very similar across a wide variety of jurisdictions. The paramount importance of protecting the privacy and confidentiality of research participants is discussed at length. Particular emphasis is placed on the process of informed consent, and step-by-step practical guidelines are described. The issue of research in vulnerable populations is touched upon and guidelines are provided. Practical advice is provided for researchers to guide their interactions with research ethics boards. Issues related to scientific misconduct and research fraud are not dealt with in this paper.

  1. Clinical research in medical schools: seizing the opportunity.

    PubMed

    Meyer, R E; Griner, P F; Weissman, J

    1998-01-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) face challenges to the achievement of their potential in clinical research. These challenges include reduced support of research from clinical revenue, cultural impediments to clinical research within the traditional value system of research-intensive AMCs, and potential problems of patient access to clinical research in intensive managed care environments. This article considers options to strengthen clinical research that have been developed at some medical centers. While much attention is being directed to the expansion of clinical trials in many AMCs, this effort needs to be linked to a cohesive strategy for clinical research being conducted in an academic environment. The article also addresses the subject of training and career development. It concludes with the opinion that the "crisis" in clinical research in academic medical centers provides the opportunity to define, more explicitly, the nature and scope of the investment in clinical research, and to define strategies that will bring added value to knowledge generated from basic research and to the teaching and patient care missions of these centers.

  2. The financial impact of a clinical academic practice partnership.

    PubMed

    Greene, Mary Ann; Turner, James

    2014-01-01

    New strategies to provide clinical experiences for nursing students have caused nursing schools and hospitals to evaluate program costs. A Microsoft Excel model, which captures costs and associated benefits, was developed and is described here. The financial analysis shows that the Clinical Academic Practice Program framework for nursing clinical education, often preferred by students, can offer financial advantages to participating hospitals and schools of nursing. The model is potentially a tool for schools of nursing to enlist hospitals and to help manage expenses of clinical education. Hospitals may also use the Hospital Nursing Unit Staffing and Expense Worksheet in planning staffing when students are assigned to units and the cost/benefit findings to enlist management support.

  3. Postgraduate Research Students and Academic Integrity: "It's about Good Research Training"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmud, Saadia; Bretag, Tracey

    2013-01-01

    Findings from a study on academic integrity at Australian universities challenge the presumption that postgraduate research students have prior knowledge of academic integrity. A review of online academic integrity policy in 39 Australian universities found that one in five policies had no mention of higher degree by research (HDR) students.…

  4. Interprofessional primary care in academic family medicine clinics

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, Neil; Abbott, Karen; Williamson, Tyler; Somji, Behnaz

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the status and processes of interprofessional work environments and the implications for interprofessional education in a sample of family medicine teaching clinics. Design Focus group interviews using a purposive sampling procedure. Setting Four academic family medicine clinics in Alberta. Participants Seven family physicians, 9 registered nurses, 5 licensed practical nurses, 2 residents, 1 psychologist, 1 informatics specialist, 1 pharmacist, 1 dietitian, 1 nurse practitioner, 1 receptionist, and 1 respiratory therapist. Methods Assessment of clinic status and performance in relation to established principles of interprofessional work and education was explored using semistructured focus group interviews. Main findings Our data supported the D’Amour and Oandasan model of successful interprofessional collaborative practice in terms of the model’s main “factors” (ie, shared goals and vision, sense of belonging, governance, and the structuring of clinical care) and their constituent “elements.” It is reasonable to conclude that the extent to which these factors and elements are both present and positively oriented in academic clinic settings is an important contributory factor to the establishment of interprofessional collaborative practice in primary care. Using this model, 2 of the 4 clinics were rated as expressing substantial progress in relation to interprofessional work, while the other 2 clinics were rated as less successful on that dimension. None of the clinics was identified as having a clear and explicit focus on providing interprofessional education. Conclusion The key factor in relation to the implementation of interprofessional work in primary care appears to be the existence of clear and explicit leadership in that direction. Substantial scope exists for improvement in the organization, conduct, and promotion of interprofessional education for Canadian primary care. PMID:22893347

  5. Career pathways in research: clinical research.

    PubMed

    Kenkre, J E; Foxcroft, D R

    This article, the second in a series on career pathways, informs readers of the knowledge they require to conduct clinical therapeutic trials to recognised standards. Many nurses start their careers in research as clinical research nurses. The skills and knowledge they develop through conducting multi-centre studies gives them an excellent grounding in the discipline, organisation and management of research.

  6. The Competitive Environment of Academic Productivity and the Academic Research Enterprise in the Case of Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arimoto, Akira

    2009-01-01

    This article deals with the various problems related to the given title from four sections. Section "Social function of the academic research enterprise (ARE)" focuses on three problems: Framework of the research on the ARE; Functions of the graduate school in the ARE; and Centers of learning and Japanese ARE. Section "Structure of ARE" discusses…

  7. Herding the Academic Cats: The Challenges of "Managing" Academic Research in the Contemporary UK University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deem, Rosemary

    2010-01-01

    This article explores some aspects of and challenges faced by those academics and administrators who undertake the leadership and management of research activity in contemporary UK universities. This analysis is set in the context of almost three decades of reforms to the UK's higher education systems in general and to research funding and audit…

  8. The Cost Function and Scale Economies in Academic Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Lewis Guodo

    2002-01-01

    This empirical research examined scale economies of academic research libraries that belong to the Association of Research Libraries and developed a total cost function for estimating economies of scale. Argues that libraries are information provision organizations that provide multiproducts and multiservices and compares this study with previous…

  9. New Strategies of Control: Academic Freedom and Research Ethics Boards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Magda

    2008-01-01

    This article, detailing the implications of "ethics drift" for critical work in the academy, reports on an ethics challenge to a non-research-based scholarly text. It analyzes how General Research Ethics Boards (GREBs) can threaten academic freedom when they lack a clear definition of "human subject" research, fail to distinguish between empirical…

  10. Negotiating the University Research Culture: Collaborative Voices of New Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tynan, Belinda R.; Garbett, Dawn L.

    2007-01-01

    This paper contributes to the wider discussion of the collaborative research process and the situation of new academics in the early stages of their research careers. It draws on our lived experience through several collaborative research projects and is descriptive and autobiographical in nature. As such, it provides an opportunity for our voices…

  11. Alternative Model of Funding for Academic Research in Nigerian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olayiwola, Shina

    2010-01-01

    Funding of academic research in Nigerian universities by Government (5 per cent recurrent grants) is a policy dictated by the National Universities Commission (NUC) as the central body for allocating research funds. This research fund, little as it is, is irregular and inadequate and to make it worse is difficult to access. These aforementioned…

  12. Assessment as Action Research: Bridging Academic Scholarship and Everyday Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malenfant, Kara J.; Hinchliffe, Lisa Janicke; Gilchrist, Debra

    2016-01-01

    This introductory essay to this special issue demonstrates that action research has a vital role in evidence-informed practice in academic libraries. This special issue of "College and Research Libraries" ("C&RL") proudly features a selection of action research studies by participants of the Association of College and…

  13. [Science and research in academic plastic surgery in Germany].

    PubMed

    Giunta, R E; Machens, H-G

    2009-12-01

    Plastic surgery has passed through a very positive evolution in the last decades on the solid fundament of constantly developing academic plastic surgery. Aim of this paper is an objective evaluation of the current status of academic plastic surgery regarding research topics, currently available ressources and scientific outcome based on a questionnaire. The return rate of the questionnaire in academic departments was 92%. Main topics in research besides wound healing were topics from regenerative medicine such as tissue engineering, biomaterials, genetherapy and angiogenesis with the main focus on skin and fat tissues. In the past five years a total of 25 million Euros of third party research grants were raised. Research relied mainly on interdisciplinary research facilities. Regarding the scientific outcome more than 200 scientific papers were published in basic science research journals having an impactfactor higher than two. These results clearly demonstrate that plastic surgery is scientifically highly productive in academic surroundings where independent departments are established. Considering that independent units of plastic surgery exist in a relatively small number of all 36 university hospitals in germany, it has to be claimed for further independent departments so to provide adequate research facilities for further evolution of academic plastic surgery. PMID:20029742

  14. Clinical revenues used to support the academic mission of medical schools, 1992-93.

    PubMed

    Jones, R F; Sanderson, S C

    1996-03-01

    This is the report of a study undertaken by the Association of America n Medical Colleges to estimate the total amount of clinical revenues that are used to support the academic mission of U.S. medical schools. The study was prompted by an awareness that recent market-driven changes in health care organization and financing threaten the structure of medical school financing that has evolved over the last half-century. A total of 60 medical schools (48%) participated in the study. The results, projected for all 126 U.S. medical schools, indicate that faculty practice plans in 1992-93 provided an estimated $2.4 billion in support for medical school academic programs. (1992-93 was the latest year for which complete financial data were available.) This amount represents 28 cents of every faculty-practice-plan dollar collected that year. The primary way in which faculty practice plans support academic programs is by underwriting clinical faculty time spent in academic activities, but direct transfers of funds, from the practice plan to the school and departments, also play a major role. The major beneficiary of faculty-practice-plan support is research, defined broadly to include a range of scholarly activities, at an estimated level of $816 million for all U.S. schools. This is followed by undergraduate medical education, at $702 million, graduate medical education, at $594 million, and other, largely undifferentiated academic support at $244 million. In addition to faculty practice plan revenues, teaching by volunteer faculty contributed another $545 million in imputed-dollar support of academic programs, bringing the total level of support to nearly $3 billion. Volunteer faculty teaching was divided nearly evenly between undergraduate and graduate medical education. Hospitals may also provide clinical revenues in support of the academic mission by applying hospital funds to academic programs and by absorbing academic-program expenses that are not otherwise reimbursed

  15. Clinical pharmacy: is it a credible academic discipline?

    PubMed

    Walker, R

    1996-11-01

    A review of the development of clinical pharmacy in the UK reveals that its origins stem from the mid 70's when many undergraduates received short clinical attachments with physicians. The evolution was accelerated by the appointment of pharmacists who held joint university and hospital contracts. Innovative postgraduate diploma and masters programmes in clinical pharmacy established in the early 80's secured a steady supply of skilled individuals to undertake the various roles that arose. Acceptance within academia was marked by the establishment of a series of Chairs in clinical pharmacy in the late 80's and early 90's along with PhD research programmes in clinical pharmacy. As an emerging discipline the forthcoming university research assessment exercise will mark a milestone in the progress of clinical pharmacy. There is, however, concern that the assessment exercise will use criteria not entirely sympathetic to the uniqueness of clinical pharmacy. PMID:8973164

  16. Reputational Risk, Academic Freedom and Research Ethics Review

    PubMed Central

    Hedgecoe, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Drawing on scholarship around academic freedom and new public management, this article explores the way in which research ethics committees in UK universities (URECs) can come to exhibit behaviour – common in their US equivalents – that prioritises the reputational protection of their host institution over and above academic freedom and the protection of research subjects. Drawing on two case studies the article shows both how URECs can serve to restrict research that may be ‘embarrassing’ for a university and how, in high profile cases, university management come to use such committees as mechanisms for internal discipline. PMID:27330226

  17. Exercise Science Academic Programs and Research in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    MADRIGAL, NORBERTO; REYES, JOSEPHINE JOY; PAGADUAN, JEFFREY; ESPINO, REIL VINARD

    2010-01-01

    In this invited editorial, professors from leading institutions in the Philippines, share information regarding their programs relating to Exercise Science. They have provided information on academic components such as entrance requirements, progression through programs, and professional opportunities available to students following completion; as well as details regarding funding available to students to participate in research, collaboration, and specific research interests. PMID:27182343

  18. The Research Paper: From Personal to Academic Writing (Instructional Note).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malinowski, Patricia A.

    1990-01-01

    Describes a research project designed to take students from personal writing to academic writing requiring research and application of documentation skills. Explains that the project involves choosing a career, is divided into four parts, and is completed over a four- to five-week period. (MG)

  19. Applying DEA Technique to Library Evaluation in Academic Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shim, Wonsik

    2003-01-01

    This study applied an analytical technique called Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) to calculate the relative technical efficiency of 95 academic research libraries, all members of the Association of Research Libraries. DEA, with the proper model of library inputs and outputs, can reveal best practices in the peer groups, as well as the technical…

  20. Strategic Planning for Academic Research: A Canadian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sa, Creso M.; Tamtik, Merli

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on an empirical study of research planning in Canadian universities. Drawing on data compiled during interviews with senior administrators from 27 academic units in 10 universities, the paper analyses how strategic planning has been applied to the research mission over the past decade. Findings reveal variability in processes…

  1. The Origins of Academic Physics Research in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Robert W.

    1976-01-01

    Traces individual physicists and financial considerations associated with the historical development of academic research and research facilities in physics at the University of California (Berkeley), California Institute of Technology, and Stanford University from the 1890's to the 1930's. (SL)

  2. Fair Use Challenges in Academic and Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes research into the current application of fair use to meet the missions of U.S. academic and research libraries. Sixty-five librarians were interviewed confidentially by telephone for around one hour each. They were asked about their employment of fair use in five key areas of practice: support for teaching and learning,…

  3. Academic Conferences: Representative and Resistant Sites for Higher Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Emily F.

    2015-01-01

    The overarching argument made in this article is twofold. Firstly, academic conferences are posited as sites for higher education research. Secondly, the well-recognised emotional and social processes of conferences are used to make space at the boundaries of higher education research for psychosocial analysis. The article theorises conferences in…

  4. Undergraduate Research and Academic Archives: Instruction, Learning and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Magia G.

    2010-01-01

    Colleges and universities are increasingly investing resources to promote undergraduate research. Undergraduate research can be broadly defined to incorporate scientific inquiry, creative expression, and scholarship with the result of producing original work. Academic archives and special collections can play a vital role in the undergraduate…

  5. Demystifying the IRB: Human Subjects Research in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smale, Maura A.

    2010-01-01

    Many academic librarians are interested in pursuing research studies that involve students, faculty, and other library patrons; these projects must be approved by an institutional review board (IRB). This article reviews federal requirements and regulations for human subjects research and explains the IRB application process. The author discusses…

  6. Constructing a Roadmap for Future Universal Screening Research beyond Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Clayton R.; Volpe, Robert J.; Livanis, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The majority of the literature on universal screening in education is devoted to academic screeners. However, research clearly indicates that other aspects of student functioning are closely associated with outcomes inside and outside of school. As a result, there are gaps in the current literature that call for additional research extending…

  7. No Academic Borders?: Transdisciplinarity in University Teaching and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, A. Wendy

    2005-01-01

    Transdisciplinarity has been a veritable mantra, especially in the humanities and social sciences, for twenty years or more. Yet academic structures and research application requirements still struggle to come to grips with cross-boundary research and teaching. Making universities more trans-discipline-friendly is a tricky task, however. As Wendy…

  8. Faculty Gender Effects on Academic Research and Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gander, James P.

    1999-01-01

    A study estimated the effects of college faculty gender differences on research and teaching productivity, using a sample of 523 four-year institutions for the academic year 1987-1988. Results indicate that female faculty have significant marginal productivity in research at liberal arts institutions but not in other institution categories.…

  9. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Academic Research Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomer, S. A.

    2004-12-01

    "Know the Earth.Show the Way." In fulfillment of its vision, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) provides geospatial intelligence in all its forms and from whatever source-imagery, imagery intelligence, and geospatial data and information-to ensure the knowledge foundation for planning, decision, and action. To achieve this, NGA conducts a multi-disciplinary program of basic research in geospatial intelligence topics through grants and fellowships to the leading investigators, research universities, and colleges of the nation. This research provides the fundamental science support to NGA's applied and advanced research programs. The major components of the NGA Academic Research Program (NARP) are: - NGA University Research Initiatives (NURI): Three-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators across the US academic community. Topics are selected to provide the scientific basis for advanced and applied research in NGA core disciplines. - Historically Black College and University - Minority Institution Research Initiatives (HBCU-MI): Two-year basic research grants awarded competitively to the best investigators at Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Minority Institutions across the US academic community. - Director of Central Intelligence Post-Doctoral Research Fellowships: Fellowships providing access to advanced research in science and technology applicable to the intelligence community's mission. The program provides a pool of researchers to support future intelligence community needs and develops long-term relationships with researchers as they move into career positions. This paper provides information about the NGA Academic Research Program, the projects it supports and how other researchers and institutions can apply for grants under the program.

  10. Academic Deans: An Analysis of Effective Academic Leadership at Research Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Judith L.

    This study sought to understand the roles and characteristics of individuals identified as effective academic deans at public research universities. The study used an inductive grounded theory approach guided by a broad conceptual framework and was guided by the broad constructs of quality/culture, teamwork/governance, and analysis/knowledge. In…

  11. Applied Research as Academic Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leichty, Greg

    Applied communication research should be used by communication professors, communication departments, and colleges as an important tool for strengthening their relationships with their communities, students, and communication practitioners. Professors spend a great deal of time doing research and teaching people about research. Public…

  12. Clinical research before informed consent.

    PubMed

    Miller, Franklin G

    2014-06-01

    Clinical research with patient-subjects was routinely conducted without informed consent for research participation prior to 1966. The aim of this article is to illuminate the moral climate of clinical research at this time, with particular attention to placebo-controlled trials in which patient-subjects often were not informed that they were participating in research or that they might receive a placebo intervention rather than standard medical treatment or an experimental treatment for their condition. An especially valuable window into the thinking of clinical investigators about their relationship with patient-subjects in the era before informed consent is afforded by reflection on two articles published by psychiatric researchers in 1966 and 1967, at the point of transition between clinical research conducted under the guise of medical care and clinical research based on consent following an invitation to participate and disclosure of material information about the study. Historical inquiry relating to the practice of clinical research without informed consent helps to put into perspective the moral progress associated with soliciting consent following disclosure of pertinent information; it also helps to shed light on an important issue in contemporary research ethics: the conditions under which it is ethical to conduct clinical research without informed consent.

  13. Clinical research: a globalized network.

    PubMed

    Richter, Trevor A

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research has become increasingly globalized, but the extent of globalization has not been assessed. To describe the globalization of clinical research, we used all (n = 13,208) multinational trials registered at ClinicalTrials.gov to analyzed geographic connections among individual countries. Our findings indicate that 95% (n = 185) of all countries worldwide have participated in multinational clinical research. Growth in the globalization of clinical research peaked in 2009, suggesting that the global infrastructure that supports clinical research might have reached its maximum capacity. Growth in the globalization of clinical research is attributable to increased involvement of non-traditional markets, particularly in South America and Asia. Nevertheless, Europe is the most highly interconnected geographic region (60.64% of global connections), and collectively, Europe, North America, and Asia comprise more than 85% of all global connections. Therefore, while the expansion of clinical trials into non-traditional markets has increased over the last 20 years and connects countries across the globe, traditional markets still dominate multinational clinical research, which appears to have reached a maximum global capacity.

  14. Academic-industry Collaborations in Translational Stroke Research.

    PubMed

    Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Barthel, Henryk; Gounis, Matthew J

    2016-08-01

    Academic-industry collaborations are an emerging format of translational stroke research. Next to classic contract research models, a multitude of collaboration models has been developed, some of which even allowing for multinational or intercontinental research programs. This development has recently been paralleled by first successful attempts to overcome the translational stroke research road block, such as the unprecedented success of novel endovascular approaches or the advent of the multicenter preclinical trial concept. While the first underlines the role of the industry as a major innovation driver in stroke research, the latter will require enrollment of industrial partners for optimal output. Moreover, academic-industry partnerships are invaluable to bridge the translational "valley of death" as well as funding gaps in times of dwindling public funding and declining high risk capital investments. However, these collaborations are also subject to relevant challenges because interests, values, and aims often significantly differ between cademia and industry. Here, we describe common academic-industry collaboration models as well as associated benefits and challenges in the stroke research arena. We also suggest strategies for improved planning, implementation, guidance, and utilization of academic-industry collaborations to the maximum mutual benefit.

  15. Academic Factors that Affect Undergraduate Research Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taraban, Roman; Logue, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences are considered an essential component in college curricula, and there is an ideological push to provide these experiences to all students. However, it is not clear whether engagement in research is better suited for higher ability undergraduates late in their programs or for all undergraduates and whether…

  16. Center Links Academic/Industry Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Discussed is the establishment of a Center University of MassachusettsIndustry Research on Polymers (CUMIRP) at the University's Amherst campus. CUMIRP involves the university, a group of 13 corporations, and the National Science Foundation working together to forge closer research ties between unversities and industry. (Author/DS)

  17. [ZHANG Tangfa's characteristics of acupuncture academic ideology and clinical treatment of syndrome differentiation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxing

    2015-10-01

    Through collecting and sorting of works, literature and medical cases regarding professor ZHANG Tangfa, it is found that his acupuncture academic ideology and clinical treatment of syndrome differentiation can be summarized as: tracing the source and paying attention to basic theory, especially the meridian theory and conception vessel and governor vessel; focusing on acupuncture manipulation and emphasizing acupuncture basic skills; highly valuing treating spirit, acquiring and maintaining needling sensation; underlining "three differentiations" that is consisted of syndrome differentiation, disease differentiation and meridian differentiation to guide the clinical prescriptions of acupoints; exploring and ingenious use of scalp acupuncture; being concerned on research of difficult and complicated diseases; advocating comparative studies to optimize the clinical treatment plan; proposing the combination of Chinese and western medicine, including diagnosis, treatment and basic theory, to improve the clinical therapeutic effects of acupuncture.

  18. Educational Research: The Challenge of Using an Academic Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Clifford

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: In 2010, I was invited to give the annual lecture that honors Lawrence Cremin, the historian of American education who became the seventh president of Teachers College, Columbia University. To pay tribute to the way in which Cremin used an academic discipline to bring rigor and depth to educational research, I described my own…

  19. Changes in Japanese Academics' Teaching and Research, 1992-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Futao

    2015-01-01

    By analyzing relevant findings from two national surveys which were carried out in 1992 and 2011 with dozens of similar questions, the study explores changes in Japanese academics' major teaching and research activities and their views of these activities from 1992 to 2011. The study begins with a brief introduction to context and main policies…

  20. Researching Academic Stress and Anxiety in Students: Some Methodological Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putwain, David

    2007-01-01

    Despite a long history of interest in North American and Western European literature, researchers in the UK are only now beginning to turn attention to the issue of academic stress in schoolchildren and how it may affect emotional well-being, health and performance on school assessments. Based on the author's experiences of designing an extensive…

  1. A Summer Academic Research Experience for Disadvantaged Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabacoff, Cathryn; Srivastava, Vasudha; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    Internships are an effective way of connecting high school students in a meaningful manner to the sciences. Disadvantaged minorities have fewer opportunities to participate in internships, and are underrepresented in both science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors and careers. We have developed a Summer Academic Research Experience…

  2. Management Competencies of Middle Managers in Large Academic Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Martha J.; Murphy, Marcy

    In order to validate the methodology used in the study by Jose-Marie Griffith and Donald W. King that is reported in "New Directions in Library and Information Science Education," this study examined the management competencies of middle managers in 11 large academic research libraries in the Midwest. The goals of the project were to provide a…

  3. Research on Academic Literacy Development in Sheltered Instruction Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Deborah J.; Echevarria, Jana; Richards-Tutor, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an extended program of research in sheltered instruction and the effects on the academic literacy development of English language learners. It also highlights the challenges of scaling up an instructional intervention. The intervention was the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) Model, an approach that teaches…

  4. Creating the Academic Commons: Guidelines for Learning, Teaching, and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Thomas H.P.

    2011-01-01

    Today's library is still at the heart of all university activities, helping students and faculty become better learners, teachers, and researchers. In recent years there has emerged the formalizing of one or more of these activities into an Academic Commons. These centers of information have been labeled variously but they all share a commonality:…

  5. Writing in the Ether: A Collaborative Approach to Academic Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winograd, David; Milton, Katherine

    The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the developmental stages of academic publication collaborations through both research on the collaborative process itself, as well as through analysis of the discovery process. Using the qualitative software package, NUD*IST, the teleconferencing system, FirstClass, and standard e-mail, the study…

  6. Researching Academic Identity: Using Discursive Psychology as an Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Current thinking on academic identities is heavily influenced by developments in other disciplines, notably sociology. This accords with Haggis's (2007) challenge for educational researchers to engage with current theory and methods from across the social sciences. However, the traditional sister discipline to education, psychology, seems…

  7. Academic Motherhood: Managing Complex Roles in Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Kelly; Wolf-Wendel, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    Given the prevalence of women faculty entering the profession, many of childbearing age, it is important to understand how women juggle the often-conflicting demands of children and tenure. Interviews with 29 faculty from research universities find them reporting joy in their professional and personal roles, the "greedy" nature of academic and…

  8. Online Data Collection in Academic Research: Advantages and Limitations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefever, Samuel; Dal, Michael; Matthiasdottir, Asrun

    2007-01-01

    Online data collection in academic research might be replacing paper-and-pencil surveys or questionnaires in the near future. This paper discusses the advantages and limitations of online data collection, with particular reference to the conduct of two qualitative studies involving upper secondary school teachers and students in Iceland in 2002.…

  9. Interlibrary Loan in Academic and Research Libraries: Workload and Staffing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver-Meyers, Pat; And Others

    A dramatic increase in interlibrary loan (ILL) in academic and research libraries in the last five years, combined with a changing office environment, is forcing reassessment of the relationship between the volume and cost of loans to service quality. In the spring of 1988, a survey was sent to 116 member libraries of the Association of Research…

  10. The Other Danger... Scholasticism in Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Lawrence M.

    2010-01-01

    Most members of the National Association of Scholars worry about the politicization of the university. Academia gives undue preference to racial minorities in student admissions and faculty appointments. Teaching and research is often slanted toward minority grievances and Third World claims against the United States. However, critics have largely…

  11. Financing Academic Research Facilities: A National Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Julie T.

    1990-01-01

    This article examines possible changes to provide increased federal funding for university-based research facilities. The difficulties of converting between depreciation and use allowances are discussed, as is the possibility of using current market value versus acquisition cost as a basis for costing calculations and splitting the indirect cost…

  12. International Research Students' Experiences in Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeoh, Joanne Sin Wei; Terry, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The flow of international students to study in Australia increases each year. It is a challenge for students to study abroad in a different sociocultural environment, especially for postgraduate research students, as they experience numerous difficulties in an unfamiliar and vastly different study environment. A study aimed to investigate the…

  13. Personal Computers in Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Neil; Andrews, David

    1984-01-01

    Personal computers have proved useful in several identifiable areas of clinical research support. However, they have limitations. Popular microcomputer systems typically fail to meet all of the traditional data processing requirements of serious clinical investigators — usually because of software restrictions. Objective evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of these small systems, and particularly of their software, ensures effective use of research budgets and personnel. An analysis of clinical research needs that personal computers serve well, and of those that they serve poorly, is therefore presented.

  14. Grant opportunities for academic research and training

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2016-08-30

    As an unbiased, multidisciplinary science organization, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is dedicated to the timely, relevant, and impartial study of the health of our ecosystems and environment, our natural resources, the impacts of climate and land-use change, and the natural hazards that affect our lives. Grant opportunities for researchers and faculty to participate in USGS science through the engagement of students are available in the selected programs described in this publication.

  15. Grant opportunities for academic research and training

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2016-01-01

    As an unbiased, multidisciplinary science organization, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is dedicated to the timely, relevant, and impartial study of the health of our ecosystems and environment, our natural resources, the impacts of climate and land-use change, and the natural hazards that affect our lives. Grant opportunities for researchers and faculty to participate in USGS science through the engagement of students are available in the selected programs described in this publication.

  16. Insurance in clinical research

    PubMed Central

    Ghooi, Ravindra B.; Divekar, Deepa

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Sponsors need to pay for management of all serious adverse events suffered by subjects in a clinical trial and to compensate for injuries or deaths related to the trial. This study examines if insurance policies of trials, cover all contingencies that require reimbursement or compensation. Materials and Methods: Insurance policies of trials submitted to Sahyadri Hospitals between January 2013 and December 2013 were studied, with respect to the policy period, the limit of liability, deductibles, and preconditions if any. Results: All the policies studied had some deficiencies, in one respect or the other and none had a provision to pay full compensation if required. Some insurers have put in preconditions that could jeopardize the payment of compensation to subjects. Conclusions: Insurances are complicated documents, and need to be critically examined by the ethics committee before approval of the study documents. PMID:25276622

  17. Mutual benefits of research collaborations between zoos and academic institutions.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Eduardo J; Timberlake, William

    2008-11-01

    Zoos focus on welfare, conservation, education, and research related to animals they keep. Academic institutions emphasize description, experimentation, modeling, and teaching of general and specific animal biology and behavior through work in both laboratory and field. The considerable overlap in concerns and methods has increased interest in collaborative projects, but there is ample room for closer and more extensive interactions. The purpose of this article is to increase awareness of potential research collaborations in three areas: (1) control and analysis of behavior, (2) conservation and propagation of species, and (3) education of students and the general public. In each area, we outline (a) research in zoos, (b) research in academics, and (c) potential collaborative efforts. Zoo Biol 27:470-487, 2008. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Yoga clinical research review.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2011-02-01

    In this paper recent research is reviewed on the effects of yoga poses on psychological conditions including anxiety and depression, on pain syndromes, cardiovascular, autoimmune and immune conditions and on pregnancy. Further, the physiological effects of yoga including decreased heartrate and blood pressure and the physical effects including weight loss and increased muscle strength are reviewed. Finally, potential underlying mechanisms are proposed including the stimulation of pressure receptors leading to enhanced vagal activity and reduced cortisol. The reduction in cortisol, in turn, may contribute to positive effects such as enhanced immune function and a lower prematurity rate.

  19. Selecting a commercial clinical information system: an academic medical center's experience.

    PubMed

    Wong, E T; Abendroth, T W

    1994-01-01

    Choosing a commercial clinical information system to meet the information needs of patient care, research, education, administration, finance, and ongoing changes of the healthcare system of an academic medical center is a challenging task. For the past six months, The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center undertook this task through (i) establishing a task force, (ii) assessing end-user information needs, (iii) understanding future institutional development and strategies, (iv) conceptualizing the ideal system, (v) identifying a short list of vendors, (vi) sending RFIs to vendors, (vii) visiting vendors' headquarters, (viii) technical review, (ix) reference calls, (x) using consultation services, (xi) on-site demonstration, and (xii) visiting the vendor's clients. PMID:7950008

  20. Selecting a commercial clinical information system: an academic medical center's experience.

    PubMed

    Wong, E T; Abendroth, T W

    1994-01-01

    Choosing a commercial clinical information system to meet the information needs of patient care, research, education, administration, finance, and ongoing changes of the healthcare system of an academic medical center is a challenging task. For the past six months, The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center undertook this task through (i) establishing a task force, (ii) assessing end-user information needs, (iii) understanding future institutional development and strategies, (iv) conceptualizing the ideal system, (v) identifying a short list of vendors, (vi) sending RFIs to vendors, (vii) visiting vendors' headquarters, (viii) technical review, (ix) reference calls, (x) using consultation services, (xi) on-site demonstration, and (xii) visiting the vendor's clients.

  1. From free to free market: cost recovery in federally funded clinical research.

    PubMed

    McCammon, Margaret G; Fogg, Thomas T; Jacobsen, Lynda; Roache, John; Sampson, Royce; Bower, Cynthia L

    2012-07-01

    In a climate of increased expectation for the translation of research, academic clinical research units are looking at new ways to streamline their operation and maintain effective translational support services. Clinical research, although undeniably expensive, is an essential step in the translation of any medical breakthrough, and as a result, many academic clinical research units are actively looking to expand their clinical services despite financial pressures. We examine some of the hybrid academic-business models in 19 clinical research centers within the Clinical and Translational Science Award consortium that are emerging to address the issue of cost recovery of clinical research that is supported by the United States federal government. We identify initiatives that have succeeded or failed, essential supporting and regulatory components, and lessons learned from experience to design an optimal cost recovery model and a timeline for its implementation. PMID:22764204

  2. From Free to Free Market: Cost Recovery in Federally Funded Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    McCammon, Margaret G.; Fogg, Thomas T.; Jacobsen, Lynda; Roache, John; Sampson, Royce; Bower, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    In a climate of increased expectation for the translation of research, academic clinical research units are looking at new ways to streamline their operation and maintain effective translational support services. Clinical research, although undeniably expensive, is an essential step in the translation of any medical breakthrough, and as a result, many academic clinical research units are actively looking to expand their clinical services despite financial pressures. We examine some of the hybrid academic-business models in 19 clinical research centers within the Clinical and Translational Science Award consortium that are emerging to address the issue of cost recovery of clinical research that is supported by the United States federal government. We identify initiatives that have succeeded or failed, essential supporting and regulatory components, and lessons learned from experience to design an optimal cost recovery model and a timeline for its implementation. PMID:22764204

  3. A research agenda for academic petroleum engineering programs

    SciTech Connect

    Calhoun, J.C. Jr.

    1990-03-31

    The development of a research agenda should be a direct way of portraying the scope of petroleum engineering, of identifying the critical technological issues faced by the profession,of elucidating the gaps between the existing research resources and the needs. and of outlining a program of research through which the petroleum engineering departments can be collectively of maximum service. Such an agenda would be of value to the profession of petroleum engineering, to industry and to government agencies, as well as to the faculty and students of the petroleum engineering departments. The purposes of the activity that led to this report, therefore, were to develop a statement to serve as a beginning research agenda for the petroleum engineering academic community; to bring together representatives of the petroleum engineering academic community to recognize the importance of developing a consensus posture with respect to research; and to provide a document that will assist in portraying to industry, government agencies and others the problems and needs of the petroleum engineering departments for conducting research. Contents of this report include; introduction; the background; the scope of petroleum engineering research; priority research topics and technological issues; non-technological research issues; and conclusions and recommendations.

  4. A research agenda for academic petroleum engineering programs. [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Calhoun, J.C. Jr.

    1990-03-31

    The development of a research agenda should be a direct way of portraying the scope of petroleum engineering, of identifying the critical technological issues faced by the profession,of elucidating the gaps between the existing research resources and the needs. and of outlining a program of research through which the petroleum engineering departments can be collectively of maximum service. Such an agenda would be of value to the profession of petroleum engineering, to industry and to government agencies, as well as to the faculty and students of the petroleum engineering departments. The purposes of the activity that led to this report, therefore, were to develop a statement to serve as a beginning research agenda for the petroleum engineering academic community; to bring together representatives of the petroleum engineering academic community to recognize the importance of developing a consensus posture with respect to research; and to provide a document that will assist in portraying to industry, government agencies and others the problems and needs of the petroleum engineering departments for conducting research. Contents of this report include; introduction; the background; the scope of petroleum engineering research; priority research topics and technological issues; non-technological research issues; and conclusions and recommendations.

  5. Latin American Cancer Research Coalition. Community primary care/academic partnership model for cancer control.

    PubMed

    Kreling, Barbara A; Cañar, Janet; Catipon, Ericson; Goodman, Michelle; Pallesen, Nancy; Pomeroy, Jyl; Rodriguez, Yosselyn; Romagoza, Juan; Sheppard, Vanessa B; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Huerta, Elmer E

    2006-10-15

    The Latin American Cancer Research Coalition (LACRC) was funded by NCI as a Special Populations Network to 1) provide training to clinic staff in cancer control and foster development of Latino faculty training, 2) conduct a needs assessment with the community clinics, 3) enhance the ability of the clinics to promote healthy lifestyles, 4) collaborate on research projects to improve use of early detection, and 5) explore partnerships to increase access to culturally competent cancer care. The LACRC developed a model for cancer control focused on community-based clinics as the focal point for in-reach and community outreach targeted to Latinos to reduce cancer disparities. This framework was designed to link the community to local hospitals and academic centers, build capacity, and promote diffusion of innovations directly into delivery systems. Eight research projects submitted by junior investigator/clinic teams have been funded by NCI. These research projects range from recruiting for clinical trials to prevention to survivorship. The LACRC has trained 6 cancer control coordinators from partner sites and educated 59 undergraduate minority student interns in aspects of cancer control research. Central to LACRC's success to date has been the creation and maintenance of an infrastructure of trusting relationships, especially those developed between clinician/investigators and individuals within the greater Latino community. Community clinics can be effective agents for cancer control among Latinos. Latinos are likely to participate in research conducted by culturally representative teams of researchers using culturally appropriate recruiting strategies. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society. PMID:16986105

  6. The Role of Entrepreneurial Activities in Academic Pharmaceutical Science Research

    PubMed Central

    Stinchcomb, Audra L.

    2010-01-01

    Academic pharmaceutical science research is expanding further and further from the University setting to encompass the for-profit private company setting. This parallels the National Institutes of Health momentum to include multiple funding opportunities for University and private company collaboration. It has been recognized that the non-profit and for-profit combination research model can accelerate the commercialization of pharmaceutical products, and therefore more efficiently improve human health. Entrepreneurial activities require unique considerations in the University environment, but can be modeled after the commercialization expansion of the academic healthcare enterprise. Challenges and barriers exist to starting a company as an entrepreneurial faculty member, but the rewards to one's personal and professional lives are incomparable. PMID:20017206

  7. The role of entrepreneurial activities in academic pharmaceutical science research.

    PubMed

    Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2010-06-01

    Academic pharmaceutical science research is expanding further and further from the University setting to encompass the for-profit private company setting. This parallels the National Institutes of Health momentum to include multiple funding opportunities for University and private company collaboration. It has been recognized that the nonprofit and for-profit combination research model can accelerate the commercialization of pharmaceutical products, and therefore more efficiently improve human health. Entrepreneurial activities require unique considerations in the University environment, but can be modeled after the commercialization expansion of the academic healthcare enterprise. Challenges and barriers exist to starting a company as an entrepreneurial faculty member, but the rewards to one's personal and professional lives are incomparable. PMID:20017206

  8. [AFNET. A translational research network develops into an academic research organization].

    PubMed

    Kirchhof, Paulus; Goette, Andreas; Näbauer, Michael; Schotten, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    "The whole is greater than the sum of its parts" (Aristotle).Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia and affects 1-2 % of the population in developed countries, especially the elderly. We expect that the prevalence of AF will double in the next few decades. The last decades have seen important improvements in the management of atrial fibrillation, but many questions remain regarding the optimal diagnosis and management of the condition. The German Atrial Fibrillation NETwork (AFNET) was one of three cardiovascular competence networks in medicine funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research between 2003-2014. AFNET has contributed to the understanding of atrial fibrillation, and AFNET-led studies have led to improved clinical practices and practice guidelines in Germany and in Europe. This work has been expanded and is continuing in the AFNET association (AFNET e. V.). The AFNET association, founded in 2010 and continuing to this day, has developed into a small but fully formed academic research organisation that conducts investigator-initiated clinical trials as the responsible sponsor in Germany, Europe, and beyond. The AFNET association currently cooperates with EHRA (The European Heart Rhythm Association), ESC (The European Society of Cardiology) and DZHK (The German Centre for Cardiovascular Research) and receives funding from the European Union to generate evidence that can in the future lead to better prevention and management of AF.

  9. A departmental initiative for clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Christopher J; Baer, Stephanie; Blake, Lindsay; Bollag, Wendy B; Colombo, Rhonda; Diamond, Matthew; George, Varghese; Huber, Lu; Merchen, Lee; Miles, Kathy; Yang, Frances; Nahman, N Stanley

    2016-06-01

    To encourage departmental research activities, the Department of Medicine of the Medical College of Georgia (MCG) introduced an internally funded Translational Research Program (TRP) in 2014. Patterned after the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research, the program offers research studios for project guidance, research mentoring and the availability of limited financial support through research vouchers. Additional academic services include abstract reviewing, conducting research conferences, organizing departmental research programs for students, and offering courses in biostatistics. During the first 15 months of its existence, the TRP working group addressed 132 distinct activities. Research mentoring, publications, and the conduct of research studios or voucher approvals encompassed 49% of working group activities. Other academic services constituted the remaining 51%. Twenty-four per cent of TRP committee activities involved research mentoring of 32 investigators (25% faculty and 75% trainees). Mentored projects generated 17 abstracts, 2 manuscripts and $87,000 in funds. The TRP conducted 13 research studios; trainees presented 54%. The TRP reviewed 36 abstracts for local and state organizations. Monthly research conferences and statistical courses were conducted and well attended. Our experience thus far indicates that a departmental TRP may serve to facilitate the growth of patient-oriented research with minimal financial support. It requires active engagement of volunteer faculty and departmental leadership willing to balance research with the other demands of the academic mission. PMID:27073213

  10. Mind the Gap: Promoting Careers in Academic Research to Psychiatry Residents

    PubMed Central

    Posporelis, Sotirios; Sawa, Akira; Smith, Gwenn S.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Chisolm, Margaret S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective With the shift of interest in psychiatry towards patient-oriented research with clinically relevant outcomes, there is a critical need for well-trained psychiatrist-scientists. The authors report on two developmentally-tailored, longitudinal research training curricula designed to use peer mentoring to bridge the gap between physicians and scientists, and to promote careers in academic research. Methods The authors instituted two independent research training curricula, one for first-year and one for second-to-fourth year psychiatry residents, spanning two campuses of one institutional residency training program. Each curriculum’s participants included psychiatry residents and peer scientific investigators, and both were attended by senior scientists and departmental leaders. The authors developed and administered an anonymous survey at the end of the first cycle of the first-year resident curriculum to assess participant attitudes. Results The first-year and second-to-fourth-year resident curricula have been implemented for 3and 2 years respectively. The authors observed overall participant satisfaction with the first-year curricula, independent of trainee status. Furthermore, first-year psychiatry residents reported increased interest in academic research careers after exposure to the curricula. Conclusions Results suggest it is possible to encourage academic research careers using peer mentoring, an innovative approach that requires minimal funding, little disruption to the residents’ schedule, and engages the gamut of individuals involved in psychiatry care and research: psychiatrists-in-training and young non-clinician scientists-in-training. PMID:24497181

  11. Methodology Rigor in Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lynda J-S.; Chang, Kate W-C.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Methodology rigor increases the quality of clinical research by encouraging freedom from the biases inherent in clinical studies. As randomized controlled studies (clinical trial design) are rarely applicable to surgical research, we address the commonly used observational study designs and methodologies by presenting guidelines for rigor. Methods Review of study designs including cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies and case series/reports, as well as biases and confounders of study design. Results Details about biases and confounders at each study stage, study characteristics, rigor checklists, and published literature examples for each study design are summarized and presented in this report. Conclusions For those surgeons interested in pursuing clinical research, mastery of the principles of methodology rigor is imperative in of the context of evidence-based medicine and widespread publication of clinical studies. Knowledge of the study designs, their appropriate application, and strictly adhering to study design methods can provide high-quality evidence to serve as the basis for rational clinical decision-making. PMID:22634695

  12. Socialization of Junior Researchers in New Academic Research Environments: Two Case Studies from Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakala, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    The article examines the modes of research training in two Finnish academic research centres, where research is project based, application oriented and externally funded. In particular, the article asks what duties, skills and qualities are considered appropriate for people in different positions (PhD student, post-doctoral researcher,…

  13. Consensus radiation protection practices for academic research institutions.

    PubMed

    Schiager, K J; McDougall, M M; Christman, E A; Party, E; Ring, J; Carlson, D E; Warfield, C A; Barkley, W E

    1996-12-01

    Under the auspices of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, a set of consensus guidelines for Radiation Protection Practices has been developed for biomedical research using radioactive materials. The purposes of the guidelines are (1) to promote good radiation protection practices consistent with the needs of biomedical research, the ALARA principle, and regulatory requirements; (2) to establish common goals and consistent practices within radiation safety programs; and (3) to build a meaningful partnership between radiation safety professionals and the biomedical research community. These practices are intended to enhance radiation protection and the efficiency of the research staff. The consensus guidelines will lessen the variability in radiation safety practices that is evident among many academic research institutions and will encourage better acceptance and regulatory compliance by users of radioactive materials in biomedical research. PMID:8919082

  14. Early Career Academic Perceptions, Attitudes and Professional Development Activities: Questioning the Teaching and Research Gap to Further Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Kelly E.; Lodge, Jason M.; Bosanquet, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Early career academia is a challenging time, particularly as academics are facing increasing pressures to excel across a range of areas. Boyer argued for the "true scholar" versed in the overlapping areas of scholarship in research, teaching, integration and engagement. Academic developers have an important role to play in assisting the…

  15. Review of carbon dioxide research staffing and academic support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, S. B.; Howard, L.; Stevenson, W.; Trice, J.

    1985-04-01

    More than 60 percent of the staff on Carbon Dioxide Research Division (CDRD) projects were university affiliated, and over one third of project scientists and engineers also had university teaching responsibilities. Almost 20 percent of project staff were students. CO2 research is unlikely to affect the general labor market for scientists and engineers because it uses such a small portion of the total pool. On the other hand, anticipated tight labor markets in some disciplines important to CO2 research may make it advantageous for CDRD to expand its support of university faculty, students, and staff to ensure that competent, knowledgeable researchers and managers are available for eventual policy decisions on CO2 issues. Options for academic support that lend themselves readily to the diffuse nature of CO2 research, while providing flexibility in the identification and accomplishment of specific programmatic objectives, include modifying procurement procedures for research contracts to enhance academic involvement, sponsoring summer institutes tailored to specific participants and focused on issues of interest to CDRD, and supporting traveling lecture programs designed to bring information of concern to CDRD to technical and nontechnical audiences.

  16. Academic Generations and Academic Work: Patterns of Attitudes, Behaviors, and Research Productivity of Polish Academics after 1989

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwiek, Marek

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on a generational change taking place in the Polish academic profession: a change in behaviors and attitudes between two groups of academics. One was socialized to academia under the communist regime (1945-1989) and the other entered the profession in the post-1989 transition period. Academics of all age groups are beginning to…

  17. The use of numerical programs in research and academic institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scupi, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    This paper is conceived on the idea that numerical programs using computer models of physical processes can be used both for scientific research and academic teaching to study different phenomena. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is used today on a large scale in research and academic institutions. CFD development is not limited to computer simulations of fluid flow phenomena. Analytical solutions for most fluid dynamics problems are already available for ideal or simplified situations for different situations. CFD is based on the Navier- Stokes (N-S) equations characterizing the flow of a single phase of any liquid. For multiphase flows the integrated N-S equations are complemented with equations of the Volume of Fluid Model (VOF) and with energy equations. Different turbulent models were used in the paper, each one of them with practical engineering applications: the flow around aerodynamic surfaces used as unconventional propulsion system, multiphase flows in a settling chamber and pneumatic transport systems, heat transfer in a heat exchanger etc. Some of them numerical results were validated by experimental results. Numerical programs are also used in academic institutions where certain aspects of various phenomena are presented to students (Bachelor, Master and PhD) for a better understanding of the phenomenon itself.

  18. Rural Community–Academic Partnership Model for Community Engagement and Partnered Research

    PubMed Central

    Baquet, Claudia R.; Bromwell, Jeanne L.; Hall, Margruetta B.; Frego, Jacob F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: A rural community–academic partnership was developed in 1997 between the Eastern Shore Area Health Education Center (ESAHEC) and the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s (UMSOM) Office of Policy and Planning (OPP). The model supports partnered research, bidirectional interactions, and community and health professional education. Objectives: The primary aim was to develop a sustainable community–academic partnership that addressed health and social issues on the rural Eastern Shore. Lessons Learned: Mutual respect and trust led to sustained, bidirectional interactions and communication. Community and academic partner empowerment were supported by shared grant funds. Continual refinement of the partnership and programs occurred in response to community input and qualitative and quantitative research. Results: The partnership led to community empowerment, increased willingness to participate in clinical trials and biospecimen donation, leveraged grant funds, partnered research, and policies to support health and social interventions. Conclusions: This partnership model has significant benefits and demonstrates its relevance for addressing complex rural health issues. Innovative aspects of the model include shared university grants, community inclusion on research protocols, bidirectional research planning and research ethics training of partners and communities. The model is replicable in other rural areas of the United States. PMID:24056510

  19. Advancing the research mission in an academic department: the creation of a center for translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Arthur M; Force, Thomas L; Whellan, David J; Bray, Paul F; Cheung, Joseph Y; Koch, Walter J

    2010-08-01

    Multidisciplinary research centers have multiplied in academic medical centers over the past decade and several recent reports have described their structure, strengths and limitations, and the difficulties that they may face. However, little attention has been paid to the role of a multidisciplinary center in the context of a single academic department. In 2003, the Department of Medicine at Jefferson Medical College launched the Center for Translational Medicine in order to facilitate multidisciplinary research, optimally utilize space and resources, enhance the educational experience for trainees, link basic investigation with clinical research programs, and develop a program of research excellence. Herein, we describe the structure of the Center and provide evidence of its success. The development of the Center has resulted in increased total funding, an increased number of students and residents pursuing translational research, a more effective utilization of space, the development of multidisciplinary research projects, and a significant increase in the number of individual and programmatic federally funded grants. Though the creation of the Center was not without challenges, the overall benefits for the department and the university have been substantial. The concept of a translational medicine center may be useful for many departments of academic medical centers.

  20. Can research influence clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan Pablo

    2007-06-01

    After briefly reviewing the unfavourable reception accorded empirical research by parts of the psychoanalytic community, as well as some of the benefits to clinical practice of analysts being involved in research activities, the author examines whether the findings of process and outcome research in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis can help identify the most appropriate forms of intervention for producing therapeutic change, given the specific condition of the patient and the relationship that the individual establishes with the analyst. He argues that research findings can influence clinical practice on various levels and in different areas, and goes on to examine a number of related issues: the specificity of therapeutic interventions versus the relevance of common curative factors; the dyadic conception of technique and ways of understanding the therapeutic action of the treatment alliance; and the strategic or heuristic conception in psychoanalytic therapy. Finally, the author presents clinical material with the aim of illustrating how the knowledge acquired through research can be applied to psychoanalytic treatment. PMID:17537698

  1. Predictors of job satisfaction among Academic Faculty: Do instructional and clinical faculty differ?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Song, Jae W.; Kim, H. Myra; Woolliscroft, James O.; Quint, Elisabeth H.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.; Gyetko, Margaret R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To identify and compare predictors of job satisfaction between the instructional and clinical faculty tracks. Method A 61-item faculty job satisfaction survey was distributed to 1,898 academic faculty at the University of Michigan Medical School. The anonymous survey was web-based. Questions covered topics on departmental organization, research, clinical and teaching support, compensation, mentorship, and promotion. Levels of satisfaction were contrasted between the two tracks, and predictors of job satisfaction were identified using linear regression models. Results The response rates for the instructional and clinical tracks were 43.1% and 41.3%, respectively. Clinical faculty reported being less satisfied with how they are mentored, and fewer reported understanding the process for promotion. There was no significant difference in overall job satisfaction between faculty tracks. Surprisingly, clinical faculty with mentors were significantly less satisfied with how they were being mentored, with career advancement and overall job satisfaction, compared to instructional faculty mentees. Additionally, senior-level clinical faculty were significantly less satisfied with their opportunities to mentor junior faculty compared to senior-level instructional faculty. Significant predictors of job satisfaction for both tracks included areas of autonomy, meeting career expectations, work-life balance, and departmental leadership. Unique to the clinical track, compensation and career advancement variables also emerged as significant predictors. Conclusion Greater effort must be placed in the continued attention to faculty well-being both at the institutional level and at the level of departmental leadership. Success in enhancing job satisfaction is more likely if directed by locally designed assessments involving department chairs, specifically in fostering more effective mentoring relationships focused on making available career advancement activities such as

  2. A summer academic research experience for disadvantaged youth.

    PubMed

    Kabacoff, Cathryn; Srivastava, Vasudha; Robinson, Douglas N

    2013-01-01

    Internships are an effective way of connecting high school students in a meaningful manner to the sciences. Disadvantaged minorities have fewer opportunities to participate in internships, and are underrepresented in both science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors and careers. We have developed a Summer Academic Research Experience (SARE) program that provides an enriching academic internship to underrepresented youth. Our program has shown that to have a successful internship for these disadvantaged youth, several issues need to be addressed in addition to scientific mentoring. We have found that it is necessary to remediate and/or fortify basic academic skills for students to be successful. In addition, students need to be actively coached in the development of professional skills, habits, and attitudes necessary for success in the workplace. With all these factors in place, these youths can become better students, compete on a more level playing field in their internships, and increase their potential of participating actively in the sciences in the future. PMID:24006390

  3. A Summer Academic Research Experience for Disadvantaged Youth

    PubMed Central

    Kabacoff, Cathryn; Srivastava, Vasudha; Robinson, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    Internships are an effective way of connecting high school students in a meaningful manner to the sciences. Disadvantaged minorities have fewer opportunities to participate in internships, and are underrepresented in both science, technology, engineering, and mathematics majors and careers. We have developed a Summer Academic Research Experience (SARE) program that provides an enriching academic internship to underrepresented youth. Our program has shown that to have a successful internship for these disadvantaged youth, several issues need to be addressed in addition to scientific mentoring. We have found that it is necessary to remediate and/or fortify basic academic skills for students to be successful. In addition, students need to be actively coached in the development of professional skills, habits, and attitudes necessary for success in the workplace. With all these factors in place, these youths can become better students, compete on a more level playing field in their internships, and increase their potential of participating actively in the sciences in the future. PMID:24006390

  4. Seeking Alternative Researcher Identities in Newcomer Academic Institutions in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallonsten, Olof

    2012-01-01

    Proliferating excellence gold standards in the global academic system tend to obscure the far-reaching diversification of academic missions, practices, ambitions and identities brought by massification. This article approaches this topic by a review of theory on academic scholarship and how it has changed in the wake of academic massification and…

  5. [Research code at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam: useful].

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, M

    2002-08-31

    At the Academic Medical Centre (AMC) of the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, it was decided to set up a research code committee. The first thing that was done was to define what were considered the most relevant types of scientific misconduct: falsification, plagiarism and invasion of privacy. The committee decided that prevention is better than cure and therefore developed a guideline for desirable behaviour, i.e. how to act scientifically with care and integrity, instead of a guideline on what not to do. The committee also proposed an ombudsman whose services are available to all participants in research in the AMC, and to whom misconduct can be reported. The research code is a loose-leaf system, since new issues will come to the fore and included issues will need to be changed. This committee has created a code that provides a firm basis for scientific integrity within the AMC.

  6. Intelligence and Academic Achievement in a Clinical Adolescent Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, David W.; Morris, Linda

    1977-01-01

    The present study was undertaken with two related goals: (a) to examine the relationships between the WRAT and CAT, and (b) to examine the relationships which may exist between these academic achievement tests -nd a standard intelligence battery such as the Wechsler Scale. (Author)

  7. Transforming the Academic Faculty Perspective in Graduate Medical Education to Better Align Educational and Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brian M; Holmboe, Eric S

    2016-04-01

    The current health care delivery model continues to fall short in achieving the desired patient safety and quality-of-care outcomes for patients. And, until recently, an explicit acknowledgment of the role and influence of the clinical learning environment on professional development had been missing from physician-based competency frameworks. In this Perspective, the authors explore the implications of the insufficient integration of education about patient safety and quality improvement by academic faculty into the clinical learning environment in many graduate medical education (GME) programs, and the important role that academic faculty need to play to better align the educational and clinical contexts to improve both learner and patient outcomes. The authors propose a framework that closely aligns the educational and clinical contexts, such that both educational and clinical outcomes are centered around the patient. This will require a reorganization of academic faculty perspective and educational design of GME training programs that recognizes that (1) the dynamic interplay between the faculty, learner, training program, and clinical microsystem ultimately influences the quality of physician that emerges from the training program and environment, and (2) patient outcomes relate to the quality of education and the success of clinical microsystems. To enable this evolution, there is a need to revisit the core competencies expected of academic faculty, implement innovative faculty development strategies, examine closely faculty's current clinical super vision practices, and establish a training environment that supports bridging from clinician to educator, training program to clinical microsystem, and educational outcomes to clinical outcomes that benefit patients.

  8. Academic Users' Information Searching on Research Topics: Characteristics of Research Tasks and Search Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Jia Tina; Evans, Nina

    2011-01-01

    This project investigated how academic users search for information on their real-life research tasks. This article presents the findings of the first of two studies. The study data were collected in the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia. Eleven PhD students' searching behaviors on personal research topics were…

  9. The Many Faces of Research Profiling: Academic Leaders' Conceptions of Research Steering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietilä, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The article examines academic leaders' conceptions of research profiling. Global science policies, including the Finnish governmental policy, promote the identification of areas of research excellence and recommend resource concentration on them. However, as active agents, leaders may have competing, even conflicting views on the pros and…

  10. NSF's Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Subsidizing Academic Research or State Budgets?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yonghong

    2009-01-01

    This cross-state empirical study focuses on the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) and examines its impact on the academic research and development (R&D) expenditures financed by state governments. Based on a panel of 50 states during 1979-2006, the empirical results indicate that…

  11. Moving comparative effectiveness research into practice: implementation science and the role of academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Ann C; Solomon, Mildred Z

    2010-10-01

    The success of the federal investment in comparative effectiveness research will hinge on using the power of science to guide reforms in health care delivery and improve patient-centered outcomes. Translating the results of comparative effectiveness research into practice calls for the rigors of implementation science to ensure the efficient and systematic uptake, dissemination, and endurance of these innovations. Academic medicine can help answer the call by thoroughly integrating its research and training missions with clinical care that is focused on patient-centered outcomes; building multidisciplinary teams that include a wide range of experts such as clinicians, clinical and implementation scientists, systems engineers, behavioral economists, and social scientists; and training future care providers, scientists, and educators to carry innovations forward. PMID:20921492

  12. Improving academic leadership and oversight in large industry-sponsored clinical trials: the ARO-CRO model.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Neil A; Spyropoulos, Alex C; Halperin, Jonathan L; Kessler, Craig M; Schulman, Sam; Turpie, Alexander G G; Skene, Allan M; Cutler, Neal R; Hiatt, William R

    2011-02-17

    Standards for clinical trial design, execution, and publication have increased in recent years. However, the current structure for interaction among the pharmaceutical sponsor funding a drug or device development program, the contract research organization (CRO) that typically assists in executing the trial, regulatory agencies, and academicians, provides inadequate leadership and oversight of the development process. Conventional academic steering committees are not provided with the independent infrastructure by which to verify statistical analyses and conclusions regarding safety and efficacy. We propose an alternative approach centered on partnerships between CROs and university-based academic research organizations (AROs). In this model, the ARO takes responsibility for processes that address journal requirements and regulatory expectations for independent academic oversight (including oversight of Steering Committee and Data and Safety Monitoring Board activities), whereas the CRO provides infrastructure for efficient trial execution, site monitoring, and data management. The ARO engages academic experts throughout the trial process and minimizes conflicts of interest in individual industry relationships via diversification of sponsors, agents, and therapeutic areas. Although numerous models can be entertained, the ARO-CRO model is uniquely structured to meet the demand for greater assurance of integrity in clinical trials and the needs of each stakeholder in the process. PMID:21068436

  13. Demographic characteristics of doctors who intend to follow clinical academic careers: UK national questionnaire surveys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fay; Lambert, Trevor W; Goldacre, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It is well recognised that women are underrepresented in clinical academic posts. Our aim was to determine which of a number of characteristics—notably gender, but also ethnicity, possession of an intercalated degree, medical school attended, choice of specialty—were predictive of doctors’ intentions to follow clinical academic careers. Design Questionnaires to all UK-trained medical graduates of 2005 sent in 2006 and again in 2010, graduates of 2009 in 2010 and graduates of 2012 in 2013. Results At the end of their first year of medical work, 13.5% (368/2732) of men and 7.3% (358/4891) of women specified that they intended to apply for a clinical academic training post; and 6.0% (172/2873) of men and 2.2% (111/5044) of women specified that they intended to pursue clinical academic medicine as their eventual career. A higher percentage of Asian (4.8%) than White doctors (3.3%) wanted a long-term career as a clinical academic, as did a higher percentage of doctors who did an intercalated degree (5.6%) than others (2.2%) and a higher percentage of Oxbridge graduates (8.1%) than others (2.8%). Of the graduates of 2005, only 30% of those who in 2006 intended a clinical medicine career also did so when re-surveyed in 2010 (men 44%, women 12%). Conclusions There are noteworthy differences by gender and other demographic factors in doctors’ intentions to pursue academic training and careers. The gap between men and women in aspirations for a clinical academic career is present as early as the first year after qualification. PMID:25136138

  14. Demographic and Academic Factors Affecting Research Productivity at the University of KwaZulu-Natal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, D.; Zewotir, T.; Murray, M.

    2011-01-01

    Research output affects both the strength and funding of universities. Accordingly university academic staff members are under pressure to be active and productive in research. Though all academics have research interest, all are not producing research output which is accredited by the Department of Education (DOE). We analyzed the demographic and…

  15. Clinical Epidemiology Unit - overview of research areas

    Cancer.gov

    Clinical Epidemiology Unit (CEU) conducts etiologic research with potential clinical and public health applications, and leads studies evaluating population-based early detection and cancer prevention strategies

  16. Public Presentations of Professional Change in Academic Research Library Strategic Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracke, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Academic librarianship is a profession in the midst of change. Embedded within multiple social spheres, academic librarians are adapting to changes in higher education, the sociotechnical environment of information, and the system of professions. This research investigates the ways in which academic librarians publicly present the ways in which…

  17. The Future of the Academic Calling? Junior Researchers in the Entrepreneurial University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakala, Johanna

    2009-01-01

    This article explores what motivates junior researchers to engage in academic work and what questions are central for their academic identities. The context of the study is the entrepreneurial orientation of today's university, which according to many leaves little space for the academic calling. The main argument is that the identity work of the…

  18. Evaluating various areas of process improvement in an effort to improve clinical research: discussions from the 2012 Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) Clinical Research Management workshop.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Jane E; Cola, Philip A; Rosenblum, Daniel

    2013-08-01

    Emphasis has been placed on assessing the efficiency of clinical and translational research as part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) goal to "improve human health." Improvements identified and implemented by individual organizations cannot address the research infrastructure needs of all clinical and translational research conducted. NIH's National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) has brought together 61 Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) sites creating a virtual national laboratory that reflects the diversity and breadth of academic medical centers to collectively improve clinical and translational science. The annual Clinical Research Management workshop is organized by the CTSA consortium with participation from CTSA awardees, NIH, and others with an interest in clinical research management. The primary objective of the workshop is to disseminate information that improves clinical research management although the specific objectives of each workshop evolve within the consortium. The fifth annual workshop entitled "Learning by doing; applying evidence-based tools to re-engineer clinical research management" took place in June 2012. The primary objective of the 2012 workshop was to utilize data to evaluate, modify, and improve clinical research management. This report provides a brief summary of the workshop proceedings and the major themes discussed among the participants. PMID:23919369

  19. Evaluating various areas of process improvement in an effort to improve clinical research: Discussions from the 2012 Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) Clinical Research Management Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Emphasis has been placed on assessing the efficiency of clinical and translational research as part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) goal to “improve human health”. Improvements identified and implemented by individual organizations cannot address the research infrastructure needs of all clinical and translational research conducted. NIH’s National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) has brought together 61 Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) sites creating a virtual national laboratory that reflects the diversity and breadth of academic medical centers to collectively improve clinical and translational science. The annual Clinical Research Management workshop is organized by the CTSA consortium with participation from CTSA awardees, NIH, and others with an interest in clinical research management. The primary objective of the workshop is to disseminate information that improves clinical research management although the specific objectives of each workshop evolve within the consortium. The fifth annual workshop entitled “Learning by doing; applying evidence-based tools to re-engineer clinical research management” took place in June 2012. The primary objective of the 2012 workshop was to utilize data to evaluate, modify, and improve clinical research management. This report provides a brief summary of the workshop proceedings and the major themes discussed among the participants. PMID:23919369

  20. Academic Cross-Pollination: The Role of Disciplinary Affiliation in Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Dhand, Amar; Luke, Douglas A; Carothers, Bobbi J; Evanoff, Bradley A

    2016-01-01

    Academic collaboration is critical to knowledge production, especially as teams dominate scientific endeavors. Typical predictors of collaboration include individual characteristics such as academic rank or institution, and network characteristics such as a central position in a publication network. The role of disciplinary affiliation in the initiation of an academic collaboration between two investigators deserves more attention. Here, we examine the influence of disciplinary patterns on collaboration formation with control of known predictors using an inferential network model. The study group included all researchers in the Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences (ICTS) at Washington University in St. Louis. Longitudinal data were collected on co-authorships in grants and publications before and after ICTS establishment. Exponential-family random graph models were used to build the network models. The results show that disciplinary affiliation independently predicted collaboration in grant and publication networks, particularly in the later years. Overall collaboration increased in the post-ICTS networks, with cross-discipline ties occurring more often than within-discipline ties in grants, but not publications. This research may inform better evaluation models of university-based collaboration, and offer a roadmap to improve cross-disciplinary collaboration with discipline-informed network interventions. PMID:26760302

  1. Academic Cross-Pollination: The Role of Disciplinary Affiliation in Research Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Dhand, Amar; Luke, Douglas A.; Carothers, Bobbi J.; Evanoff, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Academic collaboration is critical to knowledge production, especially as teams dominate scientific endeavors. Typical predictors of collaboration include individual characteristics such as academic rank or institution, and network characteristics such as a central position in a publication network. The role of disciplinary affiliation in the initiation of an academic collaboration between two investigators deserves more attention. Here, we examine the influence of disciplinary patterns on collaboration formation with control of known predictors using an inferential network model. The study group included all researchers in the Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences (ICTS) at Washington University in St. Louis. Longitudinal data were collected on co-authorships in grants and publications before and after ICTS establishment. Exponential-family random graph models were used to build the network models. The results show that disciplinary affiliation independently predicted collaboration in grant and publication networks, particularly in the later years. Overall collaboration increased in the post-ICTS networks, with cross-discipline ties occurring more often than within-discipline ties in grants, but not publications. This research may inform better evaluation models of university-based collaboration, and offer a roadmap to improve cross-disciplinary collaboration with discipline-informed network interventions. PMID:26760302

  2. Academic Cross-Pollination: The Role of Disciplinary Affiliation in Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Dhand, Amar; Luke, Douglas A; Carothers, Bobbi J; Evanoff, Bradley A

    2016-01-01

    Academic collaboration is critical to knowledge production, especially as teams dominate scientific endeavors. Typical predictors of collaboration include individual characteristics such as academic rank or institution, and network characteristics such as a central position in a publication network. The role of disciplinary affiliation in the initiation of an academic collaboration between two investigators deserves more attention. Here, we examine the influence of disciplinary patterns on collaboration formation with control of known predictors using an inferential network model. The study group included all researchers in the Institute of Clinical and Translational Sciences (ICTS) at Washington University in St. Louis. Longitudinal data were collected on co-authorships in grants and publications before and after ICTS establishment. Exponential-family random graph models were used to build the network models. The results show that disciplinary affiliation independently predicted collaboration in grant and publication networks, particularly in the later years. Overall collaboration increased in the post-ICTS networks, with cross-discipline ties occurring more often than within-discipline ties in grants, but not publications. This research may inform better evaluation models of university-based collaboration, and offer a roadmap to improve cross-disciplinary collaboration with discipline-informed network interventions.

  3. Academic and Research Programs in Exercise Science, South Korea

    PubMed Central

    PARK, KYUNG-SHIN; SONG, WOOK

    2009-01-01

    We appreciate the opportunity to review academic curriculum and current research focus of Exercise Science programs in South Korea. The information of this paper was collected by several different methods, including e-mail and phone interviews, and a discussion with Korean professors who attended the 2009 ACSM annual conference. It was agreed that exercise science programming in South Korea has improved over the last 60 years since being implemented. One of distinguishable achievement is that exercise science programs after the 1980’s has been expanded to several different directions. It does not only produce physical education teachers but also attributes more to research, sports medicine, sports, leisure and recreation. Therefore, it has produced various jobs in exercise-related fields. Some of exercise science departments do not require teacher preparation course work in their curriculum which allows students to focus more on their specialty. Secondly, we believe we South Korea has caught up with advanced countries in terms of research quality. Many Korean researchers have recently published and presented their investigations in international journals and conferences. The quality and quantity of these studies introduced to international societies indicate that Exercise Science programs in South Korea is continuing to develop and plays an important part in the world. PMID:27182314

  4. Usability of Academic Electronic Medical Record Application for Nursing Students' Clinical Practicum

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Suk; Park, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Nursing curricula for undergraduate nursing students need to reflect the information technology used in current nursing practice. A smart-device Academic Electronic Medical Record (AEMR) application can help nursing students access and document records for the clinical practicum. We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the usability of an AEMR application before applying it to the clinical nursing practicum. Methods A previously developed EMR application was modified as an AEMR to access patient information at bedside and to practice documentation. We added several features to the current EMR application to create an AEMR environment. We created a series of document forms and several useful scales on an external application, which included nursing admission notes, vital signs, and intake/output. The case scenarios and tasks were created by a research team to evaluate aspects of AEMRs, including their usability and functionality. Five nursing students completed 15 tasks using a think-aloud method with a tablet device. Results Minor usability issues were identified and rectified. All participants indicated that they became familiar with the application with little effort. They said that the application icons were intuitive, which helped them find patient information more quickly and accurately. Conclusions The application will improve timely access to patient data and documentation for nursing students. We are confident that this AEMR application will enhance nursing students' experience with their clinical practicum, and help them to better understand patient conditions and document them with ideal accessibility. PMID:26279956

  5. Clinical and Technical Phosphoproteomic Research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An encouraging approach for the diagnosis and effective therapy of immunological pathologies, which would include cancer, is the identification of proteins and phosphorylated proteins. Disease proteomics, in particular, is a potentially useful method for this purpose. A key role is played by protein phosphorylation in the regulation of normal immunology disorders and targets for several new cancer drugs and drug candidates are cancer cells and protein kinases. Protein phosphorylation is a highly dynamic process. The functioning of new drugs is of major importance as is the selection of those patients who would respond best to a specific treatment regime. In all major aspects of cellular life signalling networks are key elements which play a major role in inter- and intracellular communications. They are involved in diverse processes such as cell-cycle progression, cellular metabolism, cell-cell communication and appropriate response to the cellular environment. A whole range of networks that are involved in the regulation of cell development, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and immunologic responses is contained in the latter. It is so necessary to understand and monitor kinase signalling pathways in order to understand many immunology pathologies. Enrichment of phosphorylated proteins or peptides from tissue or bodily fluid samples is required. The application of technologies such as immunoproteomic techniques, phosphoenrichments and mass spectrometry (MS) is crucial for the identification and quantification of protein phosphorylation sites in order to advance in clinical research. Pharmacodynamic readouts of disease states and cellular drug responses in tumour samples will be provided as the field develops. We aim to detail the current and most useful techniques with research examples to isolate and carry out clinical phosphoproteomic studies which may be helpful for immunology and cancer research. Different phosphopeptide enrichment and quantitative

  6. Towards a Holistic Framework for Driving Performance in Externally-Funded Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagermann, Axel

    2009-01-01

    A gradual shift in United Kingdom research funding from blanket financing by government agencies towards more diversified income streams through activities funded by various customers is prompting academic research institutions to orient their research portfolios accordingly. Academic organisations such as university institutes are increasingly…

  7. Early career academic researchers and community-based participatory research: wrestling match or dancing partners?

    PubMed

    Lowry, Kelly Walker; Ford-Paz, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Early career faculty members at academic medical centers face unique obstacles when engaging in community-based participatory research (CBPR). Challenges and opportunities for solutions pertaining to mentorship, time demands, unfamiliarity of colleagues with CBPR approaches, ethical review regulations, funding, and publication and promotion are discussed. PMID:24330696

  8. Engaging Students in Aging Research through the Academic Research Enhancement Award Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Sandra S.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the R15, Academic Research Enhancement Award (AREA) mechanism available through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for institutions that do not typically receive substantial NIH funding. Equipped with training received at the St. Scholastica National Institute on Social Work and Aging, I was able to secure AREA funding…

  9. A novel program trains community-academic teams to build research and partnership capacity.

    PubMed

    Winckler, Eva; Brown, Jen; Lebailly, Susan; McGee, Richard; Bayldon, Barbara; Huber, Gail; Kaleba, Erin; Lowry, Kelly Walker; Martens, Joseph; Mason, Maryann; Nuñez, Abel

    2013-06-01

    The Community-Engaged Research Team Support (CERTS) program was developed and tested to build research and partnership capacity for community-engaged research (CEnR) teams. Led by the Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (NUCATS), the goals of CERTS were: (1) to help community-academic teams build capacity for conducting rigorous CEnR and (2) to support teams as they prepare federal grant proposal drafts. The program was guided by an advisory committee of community and clinical partners, and representatives from Chicago's Clinical and Translational Science Institutes. Monthly workshops guided teams to write elements of NIH-style research proposals. Draft reviewing fostered a collaborative learning environment and helped teams develop equal partnerships. The program culminated in a mock-proposal review. All teams clarified their research and acquired new knowledge about the preparation of NIH-style proposals. Trust, partnership collaboration, and a structured writing strategy were assets of the CERTS approach. CERTS also uncovered gaps in resources and preparedness for teams to be competitive for federally funded grants. Areas of need include experience as principal investigators, publications on study results, mentoring, institutional infrastructure, and dedicated time for research.

  10. What Influences the Utilisation of Educational Research by Policy-Makers and Practitioners?: The Perspectives of Academic Educational Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherney, Adrian; Povey, Jenny; Head, Brian; Boreham, Paul; Ferguson, Michele

    2012-01-01

    In the field of education much has been made of the need for academics to engage more closely with policy-makers and practitioners in the process of knowledge production and research uptake. This paper reports results from a survey of academic educational researchers in Australia on their experience of research uptake and engagement with…

  11. An Academic-Business Partnership for Advancing Clinical Informatics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Helen R.; Weaver, Charlotte; Warren, Judith; Miller, Karen L.

    2002-01-01

    A partnership between a university school of nursing and a health care information technology supplier resulted in the Simulated E-hEalth Delivery System (SEEDS). This program enables nursing students to learn clinical skills in a state-of-the-art environment using a live-production, clinical information system designed for care delivery. (JOW)

  12. Qualitative research in clinical epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Deborah M; Way, Christine Y

    2015-01-01

    This chapter has been written to specifically address the usefulness of qualitative research for the practice of clinical epidemiology. The methods of grounded theory to facilitate understanding of human behavior and construction of monitoring scales for use in quantitative studies are discussed. In end-stage renal disease patients receiving long-term hemodialysis, a qualitative study used grounded theory to generate a multilayered classification system, which culminated in a substantive theory on living with end-stage renal disease and hemodialysis. The qualitative data base was re-visited for the purpose of scale development and led to the Patient Perception of Hemodialysis Scale (PPHS). The quantitative study confirmed that the PPHS was psychometrically valid and reliable and supported the major premises of the substantive theory. PMID:25694318

  13. Qualitative research in clinical epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Deborah M; Way, Christine Y

    2015-01-01

    This chapter has been written to specifically address the usefulness of qualitative research for the practice of clinical epidemiology. The methods of grounded theory to facilitate understanding of human behavior and construction of monitoring scales for use in quantitative studies are discussed. In end-stage renal disease patients receiving long-term hemodialysis, a qualitative study used grounded theory to generate a multilayered classification system, which culminated in a substantive theory on living with end-stage renal disease and hemodialysis. The qualitative data base was re-visited for the purpose of scale development and led to the Patient Perception of Hemodialysis Scale (PPHS). The quantitative study confirmed that the PPHS was psychometrically valid and reliable and supported the major premises of the substantive theory.

  14. Developing Research-Ready Skills: Preparing Early Academic Students for Participation in Research Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Morris, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Engaging lower-division undergraduates in research experiences is a key but challenging aspect of guiding talented students into the geoscience research pipeline. UNAVCO conducted a summer internship program to prepare first and second year college students for participation in authentic, scientific research. Many students in their first two years of academic studies do not have the science content knowledge or sufficient math skills to conduct independent research. Students from groups historically underrepresented in the geosciences may face additional challenges in that they often have a less robust support structure to help them navigate the university environment and may be less aware of professional opportunities in the geosciences.UNAVCO, manager of NSF's geodetic facility, hosted four students during summer 2015 internship experience aimed to help them develop skills that will prepare them for research internships and skills that will help them advance professionally. Students spent eight weeks working with UNAVCO technical staff learning how to use equipment, prepare instrumentation for field campaigns, among other technical skills. Interns also participated in a suite of professional development activities including communications workshops, skills seminars, career circles, geology-focused field trips, and informal interactions with research interns and graduate student interns at UNAVCO. This presentation will outline the successes and challenges of engaging students early in their academic careers and outline the unique role such experiences can have in students' academic careers.

  15. Transforming the Academic Faculty Perspective in Graduate Medical Education to Better Align Educational and Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brian M; Holmboe, Eric S

    2016-04-01

    The current health care delivery model continues to fall short in achieving the desired patient safety and quality-of-care outcomes for patients. And, until recently, an explicit acknowledgment of the role and influence of the clinical learning environment on professional development had been missing from physician-based competency frameworks. In this Perspective, the authors explore the implications of the insufficient integration of education about patient safety and quality improvement by academic faculty into the clinical learning environment in many graduate medical education (GME) programs, and the important role that academic faculty need to play to better align the educational and clinical contexts to improve both learner and patient outcomes. The authors propose a framework that closely aligns the educational and clinical contexts, such that both educational and clinical outcomes are centered around the patient. This will require a reorganization of academic faculty perspective and educational design of GME training programs that recognizes that (1) the dynamic interplay between the faculty, learner, training program, and clinical microsystem ultimately influences the quality of physician that emerges from the training program and environment, and (2) patient outcomes relate to the quality of education and the success of clinical microsystems. To enable this evolution, there is a need to revisit the core competencies expected of academic faculty, implement innovative faculty development strategies, examine closely faculty's current clinical super vision practices, and establish a training environment that supports bridging from clinician to educator, training program to clinical microsystem, and educational outcomes to clinical outcomes that benefit patients. PMID:26703412

  16. Recruiting faculty with clinical responsibilities: factors that influence a decision to accept an academic position.

    PubMed

    Grauer, Gregory F

    2005-01-01

    The current opportunities for veterinary clinical specialists in private practice and industry have made recruiting and retaining faculty a major focus for most clinical academic departments. To gain a better understanding of the importance of the various factors considered in accepting an academic position, an electronic survey was distributed to newly hired veterinary faculty with clinical responsibilities. The results suggest that the perceived climate and collegiality within the prospective hiring department is the most important factor influencing the decision to accept an academic position. Salary is the second most important factor. Institutional support for the newly hired faculty member and the reputation and quality of the prospective institution rank as more important than the perceived quality of the local community and the geographic location of the institution. The search process and administrative support are the least important factors. There were no differences between the responses of faculty hired into tenure-track positions and those of faculty hired into clinical-track positions. Focusing on the advantages of a collegial environment, enhancing compensation packages, and using creative and flexible appointments may improve faculty recruitment and retention in clinical academic departments.

  17. Transforming Research Management Systems at Mayo Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Steven C.; Gronseth, Darren L.

    2011-01-01

    In order for research programs at academic medical centers and universities to survive and thrive in the increasingly challenging economic, political and regulatory environment, successful transformation is extremely important. Transformation and quality management techniques are increasingly well established in medical practice organizations. In…

  18. Patients' health or company profits? The commercialisation of academic research.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Nancy F

    2003-01-01

    This paper is a personal account of the events associated with the author's work at the University of Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children on a drug, deferiprone, for the treatment of thalassaemia. Trials of the drug were sponsored by the Canadian Medical Research Council and a drug company which would have been able, had the trials been successful, to seek regulatory approval to market the drug. When evidence emerged that deferiprone might be inadequately effective in a substantial proportion of patients, the drug company issued legal threats when the author proposed informing her patients and the scientific community. Until protests were made by international authorities in her field of research, the hospital and university did not adequately support the author's academic freedom and responsibilities as a medical practitioner. It is argued that underlying cause of this, and of other similar cases, is the political philosophy which is driving the commercialisation of universities and bringing about the deregulation of drug approval procedures. Together these changes constitute a serious threat to the public good. PMID:12645227

  19. Research issues in forensic pathology: a survey of academic institutions employing forensic pathologists.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Kurt B

    2004-05-01

    In an effort to characterize research efforts in forensic pathology, a questionnaire was sent to a representative of each of the 14 academic medical centers that employ full-time faculty forensic pathologists. Responses were received from all 14 (100%) of the institutions queried, representing a total of 39 forensic pathology faculty positions; 21 positions were tenure track and 18 positions were clinical or other tracks. Of the 39 positions, 25 positions (64%) at 10 institutions required some degree of research or scholarly output. Of the 25 forensic pathologists with a research imperative, only 3 (12%) were principal investigators or co-investigators on funded forensic pathology-based projects. The major limitation cited by respondents on the performance of forensic pathology research was the lack of protected time from service responsibilities. Fellowship training in forensic pathology was available at 6 of the 14 respondent institutions. Of these institutions, 4 (67%) had a research requirement for trainees, and 4 (67%) provided research training. In conclusion, very few US medical schools currently employ full-time faculty forensic pathologists. Of these, only a small number of institutions prioritize research by these faculty members. Scant federal funds are available to support research in forensic pathology. Few forensic pathology fellowship programs provide research training. To achieve a robust research agenda in forensic pathology that is sufficient to support the needs of the criminal justice and public health systems will require a paradigm shift in the medicolegal death investigative system and investment by federal agencies. PMID:15138925

  20. Academic nursing education guidelines: tool for bridging the gap between theory, research and practice.

    PubMed

    Jerlock, Margaretha; Falk, Kristin; Severinsson, Elisabeth

    2003-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop educational guidelines to be used as a tool for the integration of theory, research and practice to ensure that nursing knowledge and practical skills form the basis of academic nursing education. An additional aim was to describe the nursing competence expected of the students at four academic levels: introductory, intermediate and advanced levels I and II. Clinical nursing education plays a crucial role in assisting nursing students to integrate the theory and practice of nursing at the baccalaureate level, as well as in further specialization and in-depth nursing studies at the advanced level. A research group consisting of lecturers from the Institute of Nursing, Göteborg University, Sweden, was given the objective to formulate educational guidelines for clinical practice within nursing education. The study took the form of a literature search. In addition, the Delphi method, aimed at reaching a consensus of opinion among colleagues, was used. Based on the literature review and the collegial discussions, four core concepts emerged: professional stance, reflective processes, problem-solving processes, and practical skills, from which the educational guidelines were developed. Guidelines were formulated both in general and abstract form. They were not connected to a specific care context, specific patient group or specific nursing problems. The most important objective of academic education is that the student develops abilities and techniques necessary for life-long learning. Students will, in their professional life as nurses, continuously meet situations where they are challenged to take appropriate decisions and actions. This demands training in problem-solving, reflection, decision-making and the ability to use both deductive and inductive learning strategies. The guidelines describe what is expected of the students in terms of nursing competence and personal qualifications to ensure that they will be ready to

  1. Theory Development and Application in Higher Education Research: The Case of Academic Drift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tight, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the case of academic drift, as an example of a theory developed and applied within higher education research. It traces the origins and meaning of the term, reviews its application by higher education researchers, and discusses the issues it raises and the critiques it has attracted. It concludes that academic drift is at the…

  2. The Conflicts between Science Research and Teaching in Higher Education: An Academic's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karagiannis, Sophia N.

    2009-01-01

    Academics are now expected to manage increasingly demanding research, administrative, and teaching obligations. These demands in practice mean that the pressures to balance teaching and research duties render cultivating links between the two activities a less-than-intuitive process. The author describes the difficulties faced by academics in the…

  3. Academic/Research Librarians with Subject Doctorates: Data and Trends 1965-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindquist, Thea; Gilman, Todd

    2008-01-01

    The topic of academic/research librarians with subject doctorates is largely unexplored in the literature, despite recent efforts to recruit them. Based on survey data gathered from non-LIS doctorate holders currently working in U.S. and Canadian academic/research libraries, this article highlights data and trends relating to these librarians,…

  4. Implications of Academic Literacies Research for Knowledge Making and Curriculum Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paxton, Moragh; Frith, Vera

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the issue of what academic literacies research can bring to the study of knowledge and curriculum in higher education from a theoretical perspective and by means of illustrations from a work in progress academic literacies research project in the natural sciences. It argues that reading and writing are central to the process…

  5. The Effects of University-Industry Relationships and Academic Research on Scientific Performance: Synergy or Substitution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manjarres-Henriquez, Liney; Gutierrez-Gracia, Antonio; Carrion-Garcia, Andres; Vega-Jurado, Jaider

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates whether university-industry relationships (UIR) and academic research activities have complementary effects on the scientific production of university lecturers. The analysis is based on a case study of two Spanish universities. We find that the effects of R&D contracts with industry, and academic research activity on…

  6. Imagine! On the Future of Teaching and Learning and the Academic Research Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Kelly E.

    2014-01-01

    In the future, what role will the academic research library play in achieving the mission of higher education? This essay describes seven strategies that academic research libraries can adopt to become future-present libraries--libraries that foster what Douglas Thomas and John Seely Brown have called "a new culture of learning." Written…

  7. Understanding the Varying Investments in Researcher and Teacher Development and Enhancement: Implications for Academic Developers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrova, Petia; Hadjianastasis, Marios

    2015-01-01

    The increasing disparity between the research and teaching aspects of academic careers has been an area of concern in different national contexts over a number of decades. Anyone working with educational enhancement will have encountered the binary choice between research development and educational enhancement that academics are forced to make,…

  8. Academic Research Equipment and Equipment Needs in the Physical Sciences: 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This monograph is one in a series of analytical reports presenting findings from the National Science Foundation's 1989-90 National Survey of Academic Research Instruments and Instrumentation Needs. It describes recent national trends in academic research equipment and equipment needs in the physical sciences. It also documents equipment trends in…

  9. Academic Research Equipment in Computer Science, Central Computer Facilities and Engineering: 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This monograph is one in a series of analytical reports presenting findings from the National Science Foundation's 1989-90 National Survey of Academic Research Instruments and Instrumentation Needs. It describes recent national trends in academic research equipment and equipment needs in the fields of computer science and engineering. It also…

  10. Academic Research Equipment and Equipment Needs in Selected Science and Engineering Fields: 1989-90.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westat, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This monograph is one in a series of analytical reports presenting findings from the National Science Foundation's 1989-90 National Survey of Academic Research Instruments and Instrumentation Needs. This report documents current status and recent trends in the amounts, costs, and kinds of academic research equipment in seven major…

  11. The Experience of Academic Learning: Uneven Conceptions of Learning across Research and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Greg; Calkins, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    Research and teaching are often construed by academic staff as incongruous activities that have little overlap in practice. Many studies on the relationship of teaching and research assume an inherent competition or "rivalry" between these two practices. In this study, we draw on a framework that conceptualizes these academic practices…

  12. The Application of Job Redesign Concepts to the Management of Academic Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martell, Charles

    Although the academic research library is service oriented and exists in a diverse, dynamic environment, the jobs within the system tend to be highly structured and mechanistic, more suitable for a production oriented organization. This paper discusses the concept of job dimensions in general and in relation to the academic research library,…

  13. The Interface between Arts Practice and Research: Attitudes and Perceptions of Australian Artist-Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, David George; Bennett, Dawn; Blom, Diana

    2010-01-01

    Whilst an academic working in the arts may have been appointed as a consequence of artistic accomplishment and a capacity to teach, the research that underpins such work is an intrinsic part of its production and also needs to be recognised. In Australia, the ability of the artist-academic to translate research into a form that is respected and…

  14. ClinicalTrials.gov reporting: strategies for success at an academic health center.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Erin K; Hassell, Nancy J; Snyder, Denise C; Natoli, Susan; Liu, Irwin; Rimmler, Jackie; Amspacher, Valerie; Burnett, Bruce K; Parrish, Amanda B; Berglund, Jelena P; Stacy, Mark

    2015-02-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA 2007, US Public Law 110-98) mandated registration and reporting of results for applicable clinical trials. Meeting these registration and results reporting requirements has proven to be a challenge for the academic research community. Duke Medicine has made compliance with registration and results reporting a high priority. In order to create uniformity across a large institution, a written policy was created describing requirements for clinical trials disclosure. Furthermore, a centralized resource group was formed with three full time staff members. The group not only ensures compliance with FDAAA 2007, it also acts as a resource for study teams providing hands-on support, reporting, training, and ongoing education. Intensive resourcing for results reporting has been crucial for success. Due to implementation of the institutional policy and creation of centralized resources, compliance with FDAAA 2007 has increased dramatically at Duke Medicine for both registration and results reporting. A consistent centralized approach has enabled success in the face of changing agency rules and new legislation.

  15. The drug industry and clinical research in interwar America: three types of physician collaborator.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    This essay describes collaborations between American pharmaceutical companies and clinical investigators, mainly in academic medical centers and other research institutions, during the interwar period. I argue that efforts on the part of early twentieth-century "scientific medicine" reformers to impose higher standards on the testing and promotion of pharmaceuticals led both to the intended disciplining of the drug industry and also, as a reciprocal but unintended consequence, to a deep involvement with industry among medical scientists. Three basic patterns of collaboration between clinical trialists and sponsoring drugs firms are described. These patterns may help illuminate the mutual accommodation between ethical drug firms and academic clinical researchers (and institutions) that still prevails today.

  16. Clinical and Research Considerations for Patients With Hypertensive Acute Heart Failure: A Consensus Statement from the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine and the Heart Failure Society of America Acute Heart Failure Working Group.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean P; Levy, Phillip D; Martindale, Jennifer L; Dunlap, Mark E; Storrow, Alan B; Pang, Peter S; Albert, Nancy M; Felker, G Michael; Fermann, Gregory J; Fonarow, Gregg C; Givertz, Michael M; Hollander, Judd E; Lanfear, David J; Lenihan, Daniel J; Lindenfeld, JoAnn M; Peacock, W Frank; Sawyer, Douglas B; Teerlink, John R; Butler, Javed

    2016-08-01

    Management approaches for patients in the emergency department (ED) who present with acute heart failure (AHF) have largely focused on intravenous diuretics. Yet, the primary pathophysiologic derangement underlying AHF in many patients is not solely volume overload. Patients with hypertensive AHF (H-AHF) represent a clinical phenotype with distinct pathophysiologic mechanisms that result in elevated ventricular filling pressures. To optimize treatment response and minimize adverse events in this subgroup, we propose that clinical management be tailored to a conceptual model of disease based on these mechanisms. This consensus statement reviews the relevant pathophysiology, clinical characteristics, approach to therapy, and considerations for clinical trials in ED patients with H-AHF. PMID:27262665

  17. Planning Academic and Research Library Buildings. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leighton, Philip D.; Weber, David C.

    This book presents the processes involved in planning, programming, designing, and constructing academic library buildings. Chapters are arranged by topic in the general chronological order in which most projects proceed. Although this volume is concerned with the planning of academic libraries, there are many similarities with the planning of…

  18. Translational Bioinformatics and Clinical Research (Biomedical) Informatics.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, JianJiong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cheng, Donavan T

    2016-03-01

    Translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities that support translational research. Translational bioinformatics focuses on computational techniques in genetics, molecular biology, and systems biology. Clinical research (biomedical) informatics involves the use of informatics in discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. This article details 3 projects that are hybrid applications of translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics: The Cancer Genome Atlas, the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clinical variants and results database, all designed to facilitate insights into cancer biology and clinical/therapeutic correlations.

  19. Translational Bioinformatics and Clinical Research (Biomedical) Informatics.

    PubMed

    Sirintrapun, S Joseph; Zehir, Ahmet; Syed, Aijazuddin; Gao, JianJiong; Schultz, Nikolaus; Cheng, Donavan T

    2015-06-01

    Translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics are the primary domains related to informatics activities that support translational research. Translational bioinformatics focuses on computational techniques in genetics, molecular biology, and systems biology. Clinical research (biomedical) informatics involves the use of informatics in discovery and management of new knowledge relating to health and disease. This article details 3 projects that are hybrid applications of translational bioinformatics and clinical research (biomedical) informatics: The Cancer Genome Atlas, the cBioPortal for Cancer Genomics, and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center clinical variants and results database, all designed to facilitate insights into cancer biology and clinical/therapeutic correlations.

  20. Measuring Clinical Significance in Rehabilitation Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Erica K.; Dow, Christian; Lynch, Ruth T.; Hermann, Bruce P.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of clinically significant change is critical for rehabilitation research because it can enhance the credibility of rehabilitation efforts and guide evidence-based practices. The practical appeal of clinically significant change is that it can bridge research and clinical practice by focusing on individual rather than group differences.…

  1. Strategic outsourcing of clinical services: a model for volume-stressed academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Billi, John E; Pai, Chih-Wen; Spahlinger, David A

    2004-01-01

    Many academic medical centers have significant capacity constraints and limited ability to expand services to meet demand. Health care management should employ strategic thinking to deal with service demands. This article uses three organizational models to develop a theoretical framework to guide the selection of clinical services for outsourcing.

  2. An Evidence-Based Practice Model across the Academic and Clinical Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Julie A.; Corbin-Lewis, Kim; Self, Trisha; Elsweiler, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This tutorial is designed to provide academic communication sciences and disorders (CSD) programs, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, with a comprehensive instructional model on evidence-based practice (EBP). The model was designed to help students view EBP as an ongoing process needed in all clinical decision making. The three facets…

  3. The Correlation of Learning Styles with Student Performance In Academic and Clinical Course Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, M. Jo; Trickey, Becki A.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine any correlation between learning styles and performance in the academic and clinical course work of occupational therapy students at the Medical University of South Carolina. (Availability: RAM Associates LTD., P.O. Box N, Laurel, MD 20707) (SSH)

  4. An Academic Healthcare Twitter Account: The Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Widmer, R Jay; Engler, Nicole B; Geske, Jeffrey B; Klarich, Kyle W; Timimi, Farris K

    2016-06-01

    With more than 300 million monthly active users, Twitter is a powerful social media tool in healthcare, yet the characterization of an academic healthcare Twitter account remains poor to date. We assessed basic gender and geographic data on the account's "followers," as well as categorization of each tweet based on content type. We analyzed the impressions, engagements, retweets, favorites, replies, hashtag clicks, and detail expansions using both Sprinklr and Twitter Analytics. Over a period of 12 months, the account amassed 1,235 followers, with 54 percent being male and 68 percent residing in the United States. Of the 1,635 tweets sent out over the life of the account, we report more than 382,464 impressions, 6,023 engagements, 1,255 retweets, 776 favorites, and 1,654 embedded media clicks in this period. When broken down by tweet category, publication tweets garnered the highest engagement with an estimated mean number of clicks per tweet of 8.2 ± 81.9. Original content had higher total engagement per tweet than retweeted material (2.8 ± 9.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.9 engagements per tweet; p < 0.0001). Tweets regarding internal, national, and continuing medical education events had similar engagement. Herein is the first publication within the medical literature describing a "case series" of cardiovascular tweets over 12 months. We highlight a rapidly emerging group of interactive followers, a successful means by which to disseminate and engage in breaking topics throughout the cardiovascular field, and the importance of combining physician-led knowledge with intermittent marketing messages. PMID:27327062

  5. An Academic Healthcare Twitter Account: The Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Widmer, R Jay; Engler, Nicole B; Geske, Jeffrey B; Klarich, Kyle W; Timimi, Farris K

    2016-06-01

    With more than 300 million monthly active users, Twitter is a powerful social media tool in healthcare, yet the characterization of an academic healthcare Twitter account remains poor to date. We assessed basic gender and geographic data on the account's "followers," as well as categorization of each tweet based on content type. We analyzed the impressions, engagements, retweets, favorites, replies, hashtag clicks, and detail expansions using both Sprinklr and Twitter Analytics. Over a period of 12 months, the account amassed 1,235 followers, with 54 percent being male and 68 percent residing in the United States. Of the 1,635 tweets sent out over the life of the account, we report more than 382,464 impressions, 6,023 engagements, 1,255 retweets, 776 favorites, and 1,654 embedded media clicks in this period. When broken down by tweet category, publication tweets garnered the highest engagement with an estimated mean number of clicks per tweet of 8.2 ± 81.9. Original content had higher total engagement per tweet than retweeted material (2.8 ± 9.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.9 engagements per tweet; p < 0.0001). Tweets regarding internal, national, and continuing medical education events had similar engagement. Herein is the first publication within the medical literature describing a "case series" of cardiovascular tweets over 12 months. We highlight a rapidly emerging group of interactive followers, a successful means by which to disseminate and engage in breaking topics throughout the cardiovascular field, and the importance of combining physician-led knowledge with intermittent marketing messages.

  6. Re-thinking clinical research training in residency

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Jennifer; D’Eon, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Background There are good reasons to train clinician researchers, including a lack of translational and patient centered research, a decline in physicians choosing academic careers, the need for physicians who are able to critically appraise research, and accreditation requirements. However, why are we insisting that residents engage in original clinical research? Discussion This paper is structured around three questions: 1) Is mandating original research the answer? 2) What ought to be the central purpose of research training? And 3) What are the alternatives to original clinical research? The successful development of clinician-scientists involves many more factors than resident research training. While invoking social accountability and public welfare, we argue for considering the opportunity cost of resident research training. We question the focus on original resident research and challenge medical educators to encourage research training aimed steadfastly at public good in the local setting. Finally, we offer preliminary suggestions for how to move forward. Conclusions We conclude that medical educators should critically re-think our programs to develop resident researchers. If it is worthwhile to require original research projects during residency, then we must consider the priorities of local settings to best serve the public interest. PMID:26451223

  7. Going MAD: development of a "matrix academic division" to facilitate translating research to personalized medicine.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, David C

    2011-11-01

    Personalized medicine integrates an individual's genetic and other information for the prevention or treatment of complex disorders, and translational research seeks to identify those data most important to disease processes based on observations at the bench and the bedside. To understand complex disorders such as chronic pancreatitis, inflammatory bowel disease, liver cirrhosis, and other idiopathic chronic inflammatory diseases, physician-scientists must systematically collect data on relevant risks, clinical status, biomarkers, and outcomes. The author describes a "matrix academic division" (MAD), a highly effective academic program created at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center using translational research to rapidly develop personalized medicine for digestive diseases. MAD is designed to capture patient-specific data and biologic samples for analysis of steps in a complex process (reverse engineering), reconstructing the system conceptually and mathematically (disease modeling), and deciphering disease mechanism in individual patients to predict the effects of interventions (personalized medicine). MAD draws on the expertise of the medical school's and medical center's physician-scientists to translate essential disease information between the bed and the bench and to communicate with researchers from multiple domains, including epidemiology, genetics, cell biology, immunology, regenerative medicine, neuroscience, and oncology. The author illustrates this approach by describing its successful application to the reverse engineering of chronic pancreatitis.

  8. Establishing a new clinical informationist role in an academic health sciences center.

    PubMed

    Aldrich, Alison M; Schulte, Stephanie J

    2014-01-01

    The concept of clinical informationists is not new, but has recently been gaining more widespread acceptance across the United States. This article describes the lessons and challenges learned from starting a new clinical informationist service targeted to internal medicine residents in a large academic medical center. Lessons included the need for becoming immersed in evidence-based practice fundamentals; becoming comfortable with the pace, realities, and topics encountered during clinical rounds; and needing organizational commitment to both the evidence-based practice paradigm and clinical informationist role. Challenges included adapting to organizational culture, resident burnout, and perceptions of information overload.

  9. Culturally Diverse Undergraduate Researchers' Academic Outcomes and Perceptions of Their Research Mentoring Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byars-Winston, Angela M.; Branchaw, Janet; Pfund, Christine; Leverett, Patrice; Newton, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have empirically investigated the specific factors in mentoring relationships between undergraduate researchers (mentees) and their mentors in the biological and life sciences that account for mentees' positive academic and career outcomes. Using archival evaluation data from more than 400 mentees gathered over a multi-year period (2005-2011) from several undergraduate biology research programs at a large, Midwestern research university, we validated existing evaluation measures of the mentored research experience and the mentor-mentee relationship. We used a subset of data from mentees (77% underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities) to test a hypothesized social cognitive career theory model of associations between mentees' academic outcomes and perceptions of their research mentoring relationships. Results from path analysis indicate that perceived mentor effectiveness indirectly predicted post-baccalaureate outcomes via research self-efficacy beliefs. Findings are discussed with implications for developing new and refining existing tools to measure this impact, programmatic interventions to increase the success of culturally diverse research mentees and future directions for research.

  10. Clinical and Research Considerations for Patients With Hypertensive Acute Heart Failure: A Consensus Statement from the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine and the Heart Failure Society of America Acute Heart Failure Working Group.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean P; Levy, Phillip D; Martindale, Jennifer L; Dunlap, Mark E; Storrow, Alan B; Pang, Peter S; Albert, Nancy M; Felker, G Michael; Fermann, Gregory J; Fonarow, Gregg C; Givertz, Michael M; Hollander, Judd E; Lanfear, David E; Lenihan, Daniel J; Lindenfeld, JoAnn M; Peacock, W Frank; Sawyer, Douglas B; Teerlink, John R; Butler, Javed

    2016-08-01

    Management approaches for patients in the emergency department (ED) who present with acute heart failure (AHF) have largely focused on intravenous diuretics. Yet, the primary pathophysiologic derangement underlying AHF in many patients is not solely volume overload. Patients with hypertensive AHF (H-AHF) represent a clinical phenotype with distinct pathophysiologic mechanisms that result in elevated ventricular filling pressures. To optimize treatment response and minimize adverse events in this subgroup, we propose that clinical management be tailored to a conceptual model of disease that is based on these mechanisms. This consensus statement reviews the relevant pathophysiology, clinical characteristics, approach to therapy, and considerations for clinical trials in ED patients with H-AHF. PMID:27286136

  11. Implementation of a Research Participant Satisfaction Survey at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Smailes, Paula; Reider, Carson; Hallarn, Rose Kegler; Hafer, Lisa; Wallace, Lorraine; Miser, William F.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive case study covers the development of a survey to assess research subject satisfaction among those participating in clinical research studies at an academic medical center (AMC). The purpose was twofold: to gauge the effectiveness of the survey, as well as to determine the level of satisfaction of the research participants. The authors developed and implemented an electronic research participant satisfaction survey. It was created to provide research teams at the authors’ AMC with a common instrument to capture research participant experiences in order to improve upon the quality of research operations. The instrument captured participant responses in a standardized format. Ultimately, the results are to serve as a means to improve the research experience of participants for single studies, studies conducted within a division or department of the AMC, or across the entire research enterprise at the institution. For ease of use, the survey was created within an electronic data capture system known as REDCap, which is used by a consortium of more than 1,800 institutional partners as a tool from the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Participants in the survey described in this article were more than 18 years of age and participating in an institutional review board (IRB)-approved study. Results showed that the vast majority of participants surveyed had a positive experience engaging in research at the authors’ AMC. Further, the tool was found to be effective in making that determination. The authors hope to expand the use of the survey as a means to increase research satisfaction and quality at their university. PMID:27390769

  12. Do Quantitative Measures of Research Productivity Correlate with Academic Rank in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery?

    PubMed

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Dodson, Thomas B; Lopez, Joseph; Swanson, Edward W; Calotta, Nicholas; Peacock, Zachary S

    2015-08-01

    Academic promotion is linked to research productivity. The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between quantitative measures of academic productivity and academic rank among academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons. This was a cross-sectional study of full-time academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the United States. The predictor variables were categorized as demographic (gender, medical degree, research doctorate, other advanced degree) and quantitative measures of academic productivity (total number of publications, total number of citations, maximum number of citations for a single article, I-10 index [number of publications with ≥ 10 citations], and h-index [number of publications h with ≥ h citations each]). The outcome variable was current academic rank (instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, professor, or endowed professor). Descriptive, bivariate, and multiple regression statistics were computed to evaluate associations between the predictors and academic rank. Receiver-operator characteristic curves were computed to identify thresholds for academic promotion. The sample consisted of 324 academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons, of whom 11.7% were female, 40% had medical degrees, and 8% had research doctorates. The h-index was the most strongly correlated with academic rank (ρ = 0.62, p < 0.001). H-indexes of ≥ 4, ≥ 8, and ≥ 13 were identified as thresholds for promotion to associate professor, professor, and endowed professor, respectively (p < 0.001). This study found that the h-index was strongly correlated with academic rank among oral and maxillofacial surgery faculty members and thus suggests that promotions committees should consider using the h-index as an additional method to assess research activity.

  13. Psychobiology and psychopharmacology: issues in clinical research training.

    PubMed

    Janowsky, D S; Glick, I D; Lash, L; Mitnick, L; Klein, D F; Goodwin, F K; Hanin, I; Nemeroff, C; Robins, L

    1986-02-01

    Although the scope of basic studies in psychopharmacology and psychobiology has been expanding steadily for about 30 years, relatively few clinical psychiatrists, psychologists, and psychopharmacologists now choose to become researchers or teachers in these disciplines. Such training is crucial to the future vitality of both academic and private-practice psychiatry, and in view of increasing constraints on training funds, student researchers may well be an endangered species. With these concerns in mind, at its 1984 meeting, the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology's Education and Training Committee organized a symposium of investigators, administrators, and former trainees to explore aspects of effective clinical research training in psychobiology and psychopharmacology. Aspects discussed included mentoring, settings and content of training, depth versus breadth of curriculum, and the effect of a critical mass of colleagues at various stages of professional development. Following a brief overview, selected panelists addressed the issues from their individual perspectives.

  14. Clinical nursing research: you can do it!

    PubMed

    Zadinsky, J K; Broome, M E

    1989-01-01

    Nurses can use clinical nursing research to strengthen the knowledge base of their practice and to develop effective nursing interventions. When planning and implementing their studies, nurses must anticipate and deal with important issues concerning the realities of clinical nursing research. These issues include developing the research question, planning for an optimal sample size, passing the Institutional Review Committee, managing conflicts between clinical and research roles, selecting instruments to measure the variables, collecting data in a clinical setting, analyzing and interpreting the data, funding the proposed study, and ensuring administrative support.

  15. Developing a sustainable foot care clinic in a homeless shelter within an academic-community partnership.

    PubMed

    Schoon, Patricia M; Champlin, Barbara E; Hunt, Roberta J

    2012-12-01

    Nursing faculty are confronted with the need to design community learning activities with vulnerable populations to prepare students for nursing practice. The creation of sustainable academic-community partnerships with agencies providing care to underserved populations meets this challenge. This article describes the development and implementation of a foot care clinic in a homeless shelter, created through a model of curricular integration, faculty engagement, and a long-term academic-community partnership. A transformative pedagogical approach based on service-learning was used to facilitate student understanding of social justice through activities that promote citizenship, develop advocacy skills, and increase knowledge and skills related to the role of the public health nurse in the community. The process of designing and developing a community clinical learning activity and the essential components for sustainability are discussed. Student outcomes are addressed. Recommendations for implementing a foot care clinic within an academic–community partnership are outlined. PMID:23362514

  16. Translational science and the hidden research system in universities and academic hospitals: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lander, Bryn; Atkinson-Grosjean, Janet

    2011-02-01

    Innovation systems (IS) and science policy scholarship predominantly focus on linkages between universities and industry, and the commercial translation of academic discoveries. Overlooked in such analyses are important connections between universities and academic hospitals, and the non-commercial aspects of translational science. The two types of institutions tend to be collapsed into a single entity-'the university'-and relational flows are lost. Yet the distinctions and flows between the two are crucial elements of translational science and the biomedical innovation system. This paper explores what has been called the 'hidden research system' that connects hospitals, universities, and their resources, with the clinical and scientific actors who make the linkages possible. Then, using a novel conceptual model of translational science, we examine the individual interactions and dynamics involved in a particular example of the biomedical innovation system at work: the diagnosis of IRAK-4 deficiency, a rare immunological disorder, and the translational flows that result. Contra to conventional IS analyses, we are able to point to the strong role of public-sector institutions, and the weak role of the private-sector, in the translational processes described here. Our research was conducted within a Canadian network of scientists and clinician-scientists studying the pathogenomics of immunological disorders and innate immunity.

  17. Best practice & research in anaesthesiology issue on new approaches in clinical research ethics in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Schwenzer, Karen J

    2011-12-01

    The history of ethics in clinical research parallels the history of abuse of human beings. The Nuremberg Code, Declaration of Helsinki, and the Belmont Report laid the foundations for modern research ethics. In the United States, the OHRP and the FDA provide guidelines for the ethical conduct of research. Investigators should be familiar with regulations concerning informed consent, doing research in vulnerable populations, and protection of privacy.

  18. Clinical research: what do patients understand?

    PubMed

    Erlen, J A

    2000-01-01

    An increasing amount of clinical research is being conducted to test the efficacy and effectiveness of new medications, therapies, and medical procedures. These studies often require that patients be invited to be subjects. However, what do patients really understand whenever they are asked to participate in clinical research? Are patients aware that research is clearly different from treatment? Are they aware that their participation in research is to benefit future patients? Despite the desire of clinical agencies to support research, there is the concern about how they can best protect the rights of patients who are subjects in this research. The author briefly discusses clinical research, patients as vulnerable subjects, the therapeutic misconception, and informed consent. In addition, recommendations are provided to help assure that the rights of patients who are research subjects are protected.

  19. Cooperative Learning and the Academically Talented Student. Research-Based Decision Making Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Ann

    The research base on cooperative learning was examined for its applicability to academically talented students. Common types of cooperative learning are described with highlights of the model characteristics as they apply to academically talented students. The models include: Teams-Games-Tournament (TGT); Student Teams Achievement Divisions…

  20. Research and Mapping for MCEECDYA Project: Student Academic Engagement. Report 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ure, Christine; Gray, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Research and Mapping for MCEECDYA Project: Student Academic Engagement was to examine the characteristics of schools with a low Index of Community Socio-Educational Advantage (ICSEA) from all jurisdictions that were identified to be making a difference to student academic and to identify the key drivers and characteristics of…

  1. Women in Academic Leadership Roles at Research Intensive Universities: Examining the Recent Past Using NSOPF-93

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raveling, Joyce Susan

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates gender differences in personal and institutional factors that impact women's advancement to academic leadership roles at research intensive universities. It uses data from a 1993 national collection of information on post-secondary faculty. Academic leaders were defined as faculty who served as department chairs, deans,…

  2. Future of Academic/Research Librarians: A Period of Transition--To What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Larry L.

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes available data to determine the validity of explanations offered for the shortage of qualified academic librarians. Highlights include recruiting academic/ research librarians; library school enrollment trends; placement data; future possibilities; salary and working conditions; and professional issues. (Contains 50 references.)…

  3. How Are UK Academics Engaging the Public with Their Research? A Cross-Disciplinary Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chikoore, Lesley; Probets, Steve; Fry, Jenny; Creaser, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper takes a cross-disciplinary perspective in examining the views and practices of public engagement with research by UK academics. Using a mixed method approach consisting of a survey questionnaire and interviews, the paper identifies the range of audience groups that can potentially be engaged with by academics, and shows that some…

  4. The Council of Research and Academic Libraries: An Example of Interlibrary Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Mark E.

    This paper examines the history, organization, and activities of the Council of Research and Academic Libraries, a multitype library cooperative composed of academic, public and special libraries and located in San Antonio, Texas. The consortium's history is traced from the events preceding and leading to its founding in 1966 to the present time,…

  5. Ties That Do Not Bind: Musings on the Specious Relevance of Academic Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Michael J.; Stolcis, Gregory B.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the gap between academic research and practice in public administration and argues that it can be traced to conflicts such as theoretical vs. pragmatic knowledge, data-supported vs. logic-driven information, scientific method vs. case studies, academic vs. practitioner journals, and tenure vs. organizational effectiveness. Explores…

  6. Academic Remediation: Educational Applications of Research on Assignment Preference and Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Christopher H.; Wallace, Monica A.; Neddenriep, Christine E.

    2002-01-01

    Within educational settings students can choose to engage in assigned academic activities or other, sometimes disruptive behaviors. This paper reviews recent research on assignment preference, choice, and choosing. Results of these studies show how educators can enhance students' academic behaviors, decrease disruptive behaviors, and improve…

  7. Temperament, School Adjustment, and Academic Achievement: Existing Research and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Hendawi, Maha

    2013-01-01

    Since the 1980s, research has been examining the role of temperament in education. In particular, academic achievement and school adjustment were among the first variables to be examined. Subsequently, several studies have documented associations between temperament and either academic achievement or school adjustment. However, no review of this…

  8. Academic Listening in the 21st Century: Reviewing a Decade of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Tony

    2011-01-01

    This review article extends the conventional notion of academic listening to include reciprocal (two-way) listening events in academic settings, as well as (one-way) listening to lectures. The introductory section highlights the comparatively low profile of listening in EAP research, due in part to the inherent complexity of listening and its…

  9. The Efficacy of Using E-Mail When Researching Inclusive Teaching Practices Used by Male Academics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keamy, Ron

    The paper describes work-in-progress and reflects upon a small research project, "A Small Study of Male Academics and Their Inclusive Teaching Strategies," in which the author trialed the use of e-mail communication as a medium for having repeated conversations with a number of male academics about their inclusive teaching practices. This forms a…

  10. Providing semantic interoperability between clinical care and clinical research domains.

    PubMed

    Laleci, Gokce Banu; Yuksel, Mustafa; Dogac, Asuman

    2013-03-01

    Improving the efficiency with which clinical research studies are conducted can lead to faster medication innovation and decreased time to market for new drugs. To increase this efficiency, the parties involved in a regulated clinical research study, namely, the sponsor, the clinical investigator and the regulatory body, each with their own software applications, need to exchange data seamlessly. However, currently, the clinical research and the clinical care domains are quite disconnected because each use different standards and terminology systems. In this article, we describe an initial implementation of the Semantic Framework developed within the scope of SALUS project to achieve interoperability between the clinical research and the clinical care domains. In our Semantic Framework, the core ontology developed for semantic mediation is based on the shared conceptual model of both of these domains provided by the BRIDG initiative. The core ontology is then aligned with the extracted semantic models of the existing clinical care and research standards as well as with the ontological representations of the terminology systems to create a model of meaning for enabling semantic mediation. Although SALUS is a research and development effort rather than a product, the current SALUS knowledge base contains around 4.7 million triples representing BRIDG DAM, HL7 CDA model, CDISC standards and several terminology ontologies. In order to keep the reasoning process within acceptable limits without sacrificing the quality of mediation, we took an engineering approach by developing a number of heuristic mechanisms. The results indicate that it is possible to build a robust and scalable semantic framework with a solid theoretical foundation for achieving interoperability between the clinical research and clinical care domains.

  11. Providing semantic interoperability between clinical care and clinical research domains.

    PubMed

    Laleci, Gokce Banu; Yuksel, Mustafa; Dogac, Asuman

    2013-03-01

    Improving the efficiency with which clinical research studies are conducted can lead to faster medication innovation and decreased time to market for new drugs. To increase this efficiency, the parties involved in a regulated clinical research study, namely, the sponsor, the clinical investigator and the regulatory body, each with their own software applications, need to exchange data seamlessly. However, currently, the clinical research and the clinical care domains are quite disconnected because each use different standards and terminology systems. In this article, we describe an initial implementation of the Semantic Framework developed within the scope of SALUS project to achieve interoperability between the clinical research and the clinical care domains. In our Semantic Framework, the core ontology developed for semantic mediation is based on the shared conceptual model of both of these domains provided by the BRIDG initiative. The core ontology is then aligned with the extracted semantic models of the existing clinical care and research standards as well as with the ontological representations of the terminology systems to create a model of meaning for enabling semantic mediation. Although SALUS is a research and development effort rather than a product, the current SALUS knowledge base contains around 4.7 million triples representing BRIDG DAM, HL7 CDA model, CDISC standards and several terminology ontologies. In order to keep the reasoning process within acceptable limits without sacrificing the quality of mediation, we took an engineering approach by developing a number of heuristic mechanisms. The results indicate that it is possible to build a robust and scalable semantic framework with a solid theoretical foundation for achieving interoperability between the clinical research and clinical care domains. PMID:23008263

  12. The Contemporary Academic: Orientation towards Research Work and Researcher Identity of Higher Education Lecturers in the Health Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Pete; Smith, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Internationally, the increasing emphasis in universities on the quality of teaching, on student employability and on a corporate approach to entrepreneurial income generation has created a tension around the primacy afforded to published research outputs as a focus for academic work and status. In this study, a framework for academic socialisation…

  13. Perceptions of community-based participatory research in the delta nutrition intervention research initiative:an academic perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lower Mississippi Delta Nutrition Intervention Research Initiative (Delta NIRI) is an academic-community partnership between seven academic institutions and three communities in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. A range of community-based participatory methods have been employed to develop susta...

  14. Clinical Psychology: A Research and Development Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broskowski, Anthony

    The purpose of this paper is to present a clinical research and development (R and D) model along with the rationale for its implementation and a sample training program for clinical psychologists. Although it may be possible to correct some problems by a clearer restatement of the scientist-professional model, a new model of clinical R and D has…

  15. Career pathways in research: clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Foxcroft, K J

    This article, the first in a five-part series on career pathways, discusses the facility for nurses to develop their clinical expertise to consultant level, which is an exciting development on the career pathway for nurses in clinical practice. The introduction of consultant nurses has re-emphasised the need for experienced leadership in research and practice development in clinical settings.

  16. Methodology in clinical sleep research.

    PubMed

    Rosa, A; Poyares, D; Moraes, W; Cintra, F

    2007-05-01

    This review presents traditional and cutting-edge interventions in sleep research, including descriptions of the relationship of rapid eye movement-non-rapid eye movement sleep with the autonomous nervous system, and dream research methodology. Although sleep and dreaming are overlapping and non- separable phenomena, they are not typically addressed simultaneously in the scientific sleep research literature. Therefore, a more extensive overview of dream research has been included with a focus on objective dream content analysis and the theory of neurocognitive analysis. A bridge is made between dream content analysis and current sleep research methodologies.

  17. Selected Aspects of Assessment/Improvement of Academic Research Quality, Also of Industrial Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemala, Marek

    2016-06-01

    In terms of publishing and commercialisation of academic research results, there may be more preferred qualitative research in the long term. But, not every research can be focused only on the quality of its outputs, but each output of the research, however, should have an adequate quality and added value. The main research question of this article may be determined as follows - How can the quality of academic research be better evaluated and thus improved, also in the area of Industrial management? It is not the intention of this article to perform statistical research in the field yet, but this study is based on empirical data and results.

  18. The practice of clinical research in accredited marriage and family therapy programs.

    PubMed

    McWey, Lenore M; West, Stacy Hernandez; Ruble, Nikki M; Handy, Amy K; Handy, David G; Koshy, Mathen; Mills, Kathleen

    2002-01-01

    This study aims to explore the prevalence of clinic-based research among accredited marriage and family therapy (MFT) programs and reveal rationales explaining why academic settings may or may not be conducting clinical research. Findings of this project are the result of electronic-mail surveys completed by 26 accredited MFT programs. Approximately one-half of the respondents reported currently conducting clinic-based research. Open-ended responses reveal factors that lead to research success and failure, as well as reasons research was not being conducted at training programs.

  19. [Women, forgotten by clinical research].

    PubMed

    Potterat, M M; Monnin, Y; Pechère, A; Guessous, I

    2015-09-23

    For years, women were underrepresented in clinical studies. But the effect of many drugs differ among women and men, due to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences. As a result, there is a lack of information on therapeutic or adverse effets of drugs and, more generally, a lack of knowledge on diseases, leading more frequently to sub-optimal medical care in women. This underrepresentation is due to various factors, including the social role of women or ethical issues about pregnancy. The need for adequate representation of women in clinical studies is a social as well as medical concern, that implies political and legal changes. PMID:26591785

  20. Autism: Clinical and Research Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Accardo, Pasquale J., Ed.; Magnusen, Christy, Ed.; Capute, Arnold J., Ed.

    This text examines the characteristics that define autism: impairments in communication; abnormal social development; and clinically significant odd behaviors. Specific chapters include: (1) Neural Mechanisms in Autism (Andrew W. Zimmerman and Barry Gordon); (2) Epidemiology of Autism and Other Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Current…

  1. Public-Academic Partnerships: A Rapid Small-Grant Program for Policy-Relevant Research: Motivating Public-Academic Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carolyn I.; Arbuckle, Melissa R.; Simpson, Helen B.; Herman, Daniel B.; Stroup, T. Scott; Skrobala, Anne M.; Sederer, Lloyd I.; Appel, Anita; Essock, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    To help grow a cadre of researchers with the knowledge and skills to pursue topics of great utility to public mental health systems, the director of the Division of Mental Health Services and Policy Research at Columbia University used funding from the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) to create a rapid small-grant program called the OMH Policy Scholars Program. This column uses two case examples to describe how this public-academic partnership exposes early-career researchers to the needs and complexities of large public mental health systems while providing them with senior research and policy mentors to help ensure the success of the scholars' projects and oversee their introduction to and work within the public mental health system. This type of collaboration is one model of encouraging early-career psychiatric researchers to pursue policy-relevant research. PMID:23370621

  2. Information Technology Support for Clinical Genetic Testing within an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Samuel; Mahanta, Lisa; Ros, Lei Lei; Clark, Eugene; Babb, Lawrence; Oates, Michael; Rehm, Heidi; Lebo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Academic medical centers require many interconnected systems to fully support genetic testing processes. We provide an overview of the end-to-end support that has been established surrounding a genetic testing laboratory within our environment, including both laboratory and clinician facing infrastructure. We explain key functions that we have found useful in the supporting systems. We also consider ways that this infrastructure could be enhanced to enable deeper assessment of genetic test results in both the laboratory and clinic. PMID:26805890

  3. Validity of Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Indicators at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Leavell, Patricia; Stockslager, Gregory; Mays, Catherine; Harvey, Dale; Duane, Therese M

    2013-06-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality developed Patient Safety Indicators (PSI) to screen for in-hospital complications and patient safety events through International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification coding. The purpose of this study was to validate 10 common surgically related PSIs at our academic medical center and investigate the causes for inaccuracies. We reviewed patient records between October 2011 and September 2012 at our urban academic medical center for 10 common surgically related PSIs. The records were reviewed for incorrectly identified PSIs and a subset was further reviewed for the contributing factors. There were 93,169 charts analyzed for PSIs and 358 PSIs were identified (3.84 per 1000 cases). The overall positive predictive value (PPV) was 83 per cent (95% confidence interval 79 to -86%). The lowest PPVs were associated with catheter-related bloodstream infections (67%), postoperative respiratory failure (71%), and pressure ulcers (79%). The most common contributing factors for incorrect PSIs were coding errors (30%), documentation errors (19%), and insufficient criteria for PSI in the chart (16%). We conclude that the validity of PSIs is low and could be improved by increased education for clinicians and coders. In their current form, PSIs remain suboptimal for widespread use in public reporting and pay-for-performance evaluation. PMID:23711266

  4. Using Institutional Theory To Reframe Research on Academic Drift.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morphew, Christopher C.; Huisman, Jeroen

    2002-01-01

    Examines patterns of academic drift (a drift toward the structure and norms typical of more prestigious universities) in multiple higher education systems and tests the concept of "isomorphism in organizational fields" as discussed in institutional theory. Argues that the theoretical framework provided by institutional theory presents a useful…

  5. Academic Boot Camp for the Writing of Psychology Research Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skues, Jason L.; Wise, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we describe the implementation of, and responses to, a structured writing workshop in the form of an academic boot camp. Participants were 42 undergraduate psychology students from a medium-sized Australian university who were completing their major assignment for the semester. A majority of the students expressed satisfaction with the…

  6. General Academic Assessment. Institutional Research In-Brief #38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia Community Coll., PA. Office of Institutional Research.

    In spring 1986, the Community College of Philadelphia (CCP) participated in a study conducted by the Center for the Study of Community Colleges to test students' knowledge of the liberal arts. The General Academic Assessment (GAA), a 94-item test of student knowledge in the humanities, social sciences, mathematics, and English usage, was…

  7. On Commodification and the Governance of Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Merle

    2009-01-01

    The new prominence given to science for economic growth and industry comes with an increased policy focus on the promotion of commodification and commercialization of academic science. This paper posits that this increased interest in commodification is a new steering mechanism for governing science. This is achieved by first outlining what is…

  8. The Academic Ethics of Open Access to Research and Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willinsky, John; Alperin, Juan Pablo

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present the case for regarding the principles by which scholarly publications are disseminated and shared as a matter of academic ethics. The ethics of access have to do with recognizing people's right to know what is known, as well as the value to humanity of having one of its best forms of arriving at knowledge as widely…

  9. Research Publication as a Strategy to Improve International Academic Ranking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tie, Fatt Hee

    2012-01-01

    Many universities in Asia are now focused on enhancing their global academic competitiveness. Various strategies are implemented to restructure, reform and transform universities aimed at improving ranking in the global university league. One significant strategy is to encourage academicians to place priority on publishing in high-impact…

  10. The Causes and Consequences of Academic Procrastination: A Research Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orpen, Christopher

    1998-01-01

    Examines whether students who are intrinsically motivated about learning procrastinate less than those students who are externally motivated and also explores the consequences of procrastination. Indicates that students whose motivation is external are more likely to procrastinate while procrastination is associated with poor academic performance…

  11. Evaluation and treatment of patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease: consensus definitions from Peripheral Academic Research Consortium (PARC).

    PubMed

    Patel, Manesh R; Conte, Michael S; Cutlip, Donald E; Dib, Nabil; Geraghty, Patrick; Gray, William; Hiatt, William R; Ho, Mami; Ikeda, Koji; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Jaff, Michael R; Jones, W Schuyler; Kawahara, Masayuki; Lookstein, Robert A; Mehran, Roxana; Misra, Sanjay; Norgren, Lars; Olin, Jeffrey W; Povsic, Thomas J; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Rundback, John; Shamoun, Fadi; Tcheng, James; Tsai, Thomas T; Suzuki, Yuka; Vranckx, Pascal; Wiechmann, Bret N; White, Christopher J; Yokoi, Hiroyoshi; Krucoff, Mitchell W

    2015-03-10

    The lack of consistent definitions and nomenclature across clinical trials of novel devices, drugs, or biologics poses a significant barrier to accrual of knowledge in and across peripheral artery disease therapies and technologies. Recognizing this problem, the Peripheral Academic Research Consortium, together with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, has developed a series of pragmatic consensus definitions for patients being treated for peripheral artery disease affecting the lower extremities. These consensus definitions include the clinical presentation, anatomic depiction, interventional outcomes, surrogate imaging and physiological follow-up, and clinical outcomes of patients with lower-extremity peripheral artery disease. Consistent application of these definitions in clinical trials evaluating novel revascularization technologies should result in more efficient regulatory evaluation and best practice guidelines to inform clinical decisions in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease.

  12. Chinese Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) Academics' Perceptions about Research in a Transitional Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Li; Millwater, Jan; Hudson, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Research capacity building has become a prominent theme in higher education institutions in China and across the world. However, Chinese Teaching English as a Foreign Language academics' research output has been quite limited. In order to build their research capacity, it is necessary to understand their perceptions about research. This case study…

  13. Building academic health centers' capacity to shape and respond to comparative effectiveness research policy.

    PubMed

    VanLare, Jordan M; Conway, Patrick H; Rowe, John W

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, the focus on comparative effectiveness research (CER), the funding available to support it, and the range of possible effects of CER policy on academic health centers (AHCs) have increased substantially. CER has implications for the research, education, and clinical care components of AHCs' missions. The current funding and policy environment have created specific opportunities for AHCs to shape and respond to CER policies across the four dimensions of the CER enterprise: research, human and scientific capital, data infrastructure, and translation and dissemination. Characteristics such as the degree of physician-hospital integration, the status of a health information technology infrastructure, and the presence of a well-developed cross-functional health services research capacity linked to the care delivery enterprise could help AHCs respond to these opportunities and influence future policies. AHCs are also essential to the development of methodologies and the training of the next cadre of researchers. Further, a focus on understanding what works in health care and increasing adoption of evidence-based practice must become embedded in the fabric of AHCs. Those AHCs most successful in responding to the CER challenge may leverage it as a point of differentiation in the marketplace for health care and lead transformational improvements in health. PMID:21512371

  14. The impact of the Tulane-HCA joint venture on academic and clinical missions.

    PubMed

    Whitecloud, T S; Smathers, J E; Barrack, R L

    2001-10-01

    As with any joint venture in any given industry, positive and negative impacts are felt. Tulane University School of Medicine experienced impacts on its academic and clinical missions as a result of the joint venture between Tulane University and HCA, a for-profit public company. The laws of business had entered the halls of medicine. Although patients, personnel, and physicians experienced culture shock and inconveniences, Tulane University School of Medicine has been able to maintain viable training programs, and its faculty physicians have a hospital and corporately run clinics across the street. In addition, multidisciplinary centers of excellence, long spoken of in the academic realm, came to fruition through the corporate world. This may not have been the case, had Tulane University not entered into ajoint venture with HCA. Is it worth the effort? For Tulane University, whether one likes the entire package or not, the answer must be yes. The greatest impact is that the orthopaedic surgeons still are in a position to fulfill their academic and clinical missions.

  15. Clinical research in anthroposophic medicine.

    PubMed

    Hamre, Harald Johan; Kiene, Helmut; Kienle, Gunver Sophia

    2009-01-01

    Anthroposophic medicine includes special medications and special artistic and physical therapies. More than 200 clinical studies of varying design and quality have been conducted on anthroposophic treatment. Half of these studies concern anthroposophic mistletoe therapy for cancer. Clinical effects of mistletoe products include improvement of quality of life, reduction of side effects from chemotherapy and radiation, and possibly increased survival. Apart from cancer therapy, the largest studies of anthroposophic treatment have been 2 naturalistic system evaluations: In German outpatients with mental, musculoskeletal, respiratory, and other chronic conditions, anthroposophic treatment was followed by sustained improvements of symptoms and quality of life. In primary care patients from 4 European countries and the United States treated for acute respiratory and ear infections by anthroposophic or conventional physicians, anthroposophic treatment was associated with reduced use of antibiotics and antipyretics, quicker recovery, and fewer adverse reactions; these differences remained after adjustment for relevant baseline differences.

  16. Advice for a career in academic gastroenterology: from fellowship application through job selection and contract negotiations to research and promotion.

    PubMed

    Cappell, M S

    2009-03-01

    This study aims to describe a comprehensive strategy for success in academic gastroenterology by reporting common sense, but mostly previously unpublished, recommendations. The recommendation are based on expert opinion from personal experience mentoring 125 gastroenterology fellows and residents as a program director for nine years and from mentoring research while publishing more than 160 articles in peer-reviewed journals and editing 11 books during a 23-year academic career. Primary criteria for fellowship applicant selection include board scores, clinical performance, interview performance, clinical training, and research productivity. For optimal chances, select the subspecialty of gastroenterology early during residency, consult a mentor, and develop a well-planned strategy. Faculty advancement depends upon publications, grants, national recognition, interpersonal skills, and recommendations. Article categories from highest-to-lowest in prestige are original investigations, review articles, book chapters, case reports, and letters/abstracts. Articles are judged by the prestige of the journal of publication. Resubmit rejected articles to successively less prestigious journals until accepted for publication. Articles in journals without peer-review have negligible career impact. Grant support creates protected time. Institutional reputation is important in academics. Do not accept a job without a written contract. Have a lawyer review your contract. An outside offer strengthens a negotiating position. Be sociable and nonconfrontational at work. Network with colleagues. Seek a mentor. Meet your supervisor regularly for feedback. Never express anger at your boss or patients. Avoid litigation with employers. Sub-subspecialize to develop expertise in one area. Focus on this area in your research and clinical practice. In conclusion, a well-planned strategy can help you achieve a senior academic position early and efficiently. PMID:19212312

  17. Advice for a career in academic gastroenterology: from fellowship application through job selection and contract negotiations to research and promotion.

    PubMed

    Cappell, M S

    2009-03-01

    This study aims to describe a comprehensive strategy for success in academic gastroenterology by reporting common sense, but mostly previously unpublished, recommendations. The recommendation are based on expert opinion from personal experience mentoring 125 gastroenterology fellows and residents as a program director for nine years and from mentoring research while publishing more than 160 articles in peer-reviewed journals and editing 11 books during a 23-year academic career. Primary criteria for fellowship applicant selection include board scores, clinical performance, interview performance, clinical training, and research productivity. For optimal chances, select the subspecialty of gastroenterology early during residency, consult a mentor, and develop a well-planned strategy. Faculty advancement depends upon publications, grants, national recognition, interpersonal skills, and recommendations. Article categories from highest-to-lowest in prestige are original investigations, review articles, book chapters, case reports, and letters/abstracts. Articles are judged by the prestige of the journal of publication. Resubmit rejected articles to successively less prestigious journals until accepted for publication. Articles in journals without peer-review have negligible career impact. Grant support creates protected time. Institutional reputation is important in academics. Do not accept a job without a written contract. Have a lawyer review your contract. An outside offer strengthens a negotiating position. Be sociable and nonconfrontational at work. Network with colleagues. Seek a mentor. Meet your supervisor regularly for feedback. Never express anger at your boss or patients. Avoid litigation with employers. Sub-subspecialize to develop expertise in one area. Focus on this area in your research and clinical practice. In conclusion, a well-planned strategy can help you achieve a senior academic position early and efficiently.

  18. Training needs of clinical research associates.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Samyuktha; Bhatt, Arun

    2010-10-01

    Clinical research is a relatively new field in our country that has seen very rapid growth in the last few years. Availability of personnel appropriately trained to the specific requirements of the role they will perform in clinical research is critical for capacity expansion. Our study attempts to understand the specific areas of knowledge and skills that are important for the role of a clinical research associate. The survey was conducted among clinical research professionals from industry and academia who had more than five years of clinical research experience and held important decision making positions in clinical research (stakeholders). The survey questionnaire was designed as a matrix of various clinical research roles on the y-axis and six knowledge modules and eight skills on the x-axis. Respondents were asked to rate the importance of the knowledge /skills to the role of clinical research associates on a three point scale. In discussing results, a significant response was considered to be 50% or greater positive response from the total group. The significant findings were that general, ethics and clinical trial execution modules were rated as critical for the role of clinical research associate. Regulatory module was rated as important for the role. The other significant responses were that three of the sub-topics in the methodology module - framing a research proposal/protocol and experimental design, designing case report forms and EDCs and conducting PK studies - were rated as important and one sub topic in the data management and statistics module was rated as not important. All the skills except leadership skills were rated as critical for the role. The findings of our survey were in general on the lines of expectations of performance of the role. The general, ethics and clinical trial execution modules are critical knowledge areas for the role of a clinical research associate. No clear trends emerged for some of the other modules. Leadership

  19. Telling Tales: A Narrative Research Study of the Experiences of New International Academic Staff at an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Wendy; Myatt, Paula

    2011-01-01

    As the transnational movement of academics continues to increase, some are arguing it is time to look more closely at the challenges faced by new international academic staff. This article reports on a narrative research study exploring the experiences and perceptions of eight international academic staff at a large, research-intensive university…

  20. Mentor training within academic health centers with Clinical and Translational Science Awards.

    PubMed

    Abedin, Zainab; Rebello, Tahilia J; Richards, Boyd F; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-10-01

    Multiple studies highlight the benefits of effective mentoring in academic medicine. Thus, we sought to quantify and characterize the mentoring practices at academic health centers (AHCs) with Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA). Here we report findings pertaining specifically to mentor training at the level of the KL2 mentored award program, and at the broader institutional level. We found only four AHCs did not provide any form of training. One-time orientation was most prevalent at the KL2 level, whereas formal face-to-face training was most prevalent at the institutional level. Despite differences in format usage, there was general consensus at both the KL2 and institutional level about the topics of focus of face-to-face training sessions. Lower-resource training formats utilized at the KL2 level may reveal a preference for preselection of qualified mentors, while institutional selection of resource-heavy formats may be an attempt to raise the mentoring qualifications of the academic community as a whole. The present work fits into the expanding landscape of academic mentoring literature and sets the framework for future longitudinal, outcome studies focused on identifying the most efficient strategies to develop effective mentors.

  1. Academic Research Equipment in Selected Science/Engineering Fields, 1982-83. An Analysis of Findings from the Baseline National Survey of Academic Research Instruments and Instrumentation Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgdorf, Kenneth; Hausman, Howard J.

    The analysis of data from the baseline cycle of the National Science Foundation instrumentation survey has two principal objectives, namely, to construct and examine a variety of quantitative statistical indicators describing major characteristics of the current national stock of academic research equipment and to document differences among…

  2. Tremelimumab: research and clinical development

    PubMed Central

    Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Ibarrondo, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-01

    The immune checkpoint therapy is a relatively recent strategy that aims to tweak the immune system to effectively attack cancer cells. The understanding of the immune responses and their regulation at the intracellular level and the development of fully humanized monoclonal antibodies are the pillars of an approach that could elicit durable clinical responses and even remission in some patients with cancer. Most of the immune checkpoints that regulate the T-cell responses (activation and inhibition) operate through proteins present on the cytoplasmic membrane of the immune cells. Therefore, specific antibodies capable of blocking the inhibitory signals should lead to unrestrained immune responses that supersede the inhibitory mechanisms, which are naturally present in the tumor microenviroment. The best-known and most successful targets for immune checkpoint therapy are the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 and programmed cell death-1 coreceptors. Tremelimumab (CP-675,206) is a fully humanized monoclonal antibody specific for cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, which has been successfully used to treat patients with metastatic melanoma and some other cancers. Although still a work in progress, the use of tremelimumab as an immune checkpoint therapeutic agent is a promising approach alone or in combination with other anticancer drugs. Here, we review the use of this antibody in a number of clinical trials against solid tumors. PMID:27042127

  3. Using Publication Metrics to Highlight Academic Productivity and Research Impact

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Christopher R.; Cone, David C.; Sarli, Cathy C.

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of widely available measures of academic productivity and impact using publication data and highlights uses of these metrics for various purposes. Metrics based on publication data include measures such as number of publications, number of citations, the journal impact factor score, and the h-index, as well as emerging metrics based on document-level metrics. Publication metrics can be used for a variety of purposes for tenure and promotion, grant applications and renewal reports, benchmarking, recruiting efforts, and administrative purposes for departmental or university performance reports. The authors also highlight practical applications of measuring and reporting academic productivity and impact to emphasize and promote individual investigators, grant applications, or department output. PMID:25308141

  4. Perspective: The case for research justice: inclusion of patients with limited English proficiency in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Glickman, Seth W; Ndubuizu, Adanma; Weinfurt, Kevin P; Hamilton, Carol D; Glickman, Lawrence T; Schulman, Kevin A; Cairns, Charles B

    2011-03-01

    Persons with limited English proficiency (LEP) constitute a growing portion of the U.S. population, yet they are underrepresented in clinical research. This inherently limits the societal benefits of the research and its generalizability to ethnic populations living in the United States. To illustrate the complexity associated with including LEP participants in clinical research, the authors critically evaluated LEP consent requirements posted on the Web sites of 134 academic health centers in March 2008. They found wide variability with regard to consent policies and striking interinstitutional differences in posted IRB policies and attitudes toward consent of LEP patients in research. The authors argue this variation highlights competing concerns between autonomy and justice. Outcomes-based justice requires inclusion of LEP patients in the research, yet the consent process is often resource-intensive and complex. The authors suggest that more uniform and specific guidance from federal agencies for enrollment of LEP patients in clinical research be established and that this guidance explicitly recalibrate the current balance between autonomy and justice. Investigators and institutional review boards should also develop streamlined best practices to reduce unnecessary effort and expense associated with recruitment of LEP individuals. LEP individuals should have fair access to clinical research in order to fully realize individual and societal benefits of their participation and to ensure the generalizability of scientific discovery.

  5. CLARA: an integrated clinical research administration system.

    PubMed

    Bian, Jiang; Xie, Mengjun; Hogan, William; Hutchins, Laura; Topaloglu, Umit; Lane, Cheryl; Holland, Jennifer; Wells, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Administration of human subject research is complex, involving not only the institutional review board but also many other regulatory and compliance entities within a research enterprise. Its efficiency has a direct and substantial impact on the conduct and management of clinical research. In this paper, we report on the Clinical Research Administration (CLARA) platform developed at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. CLARA is a comprehensive web-based system that can streamline research administrative tasks such as submissions, reviews, and approval processes for both investigators and different review committees on a single integrated platform. CLARA not only helps investigators to meet regulatory requirements but also provides tools for managing other clinical research activities including budgeting, contracting, and participant schedule planning.

  6. CLARA: an integrated clinical research administration system

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Jiang; Xie, Mengjun; Hogan, William; Hutchins, Laura; Topaloglu, Umit; Lane, Cheryl; Holland, Jennifer; Wells, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Administration of human subject research is complex, involving not only the institutional review board but also many other regulatory and compliance entities within a research enterprise. Its efficiency has a direct and substantial impact on the conduct and management of clinical research. In this paper, we report on the Clinical Research Administration (CLARA) platform developed at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. CLARA is a comprehensive web-based system that can streamline research administrative tasks such as submissions, reviews, and approval processes for both investigators and different review committees on a single integrated platform. CLARA not only helps investigators to meet regulatory requirements but also provides tools for managing other clinical research activities including budgeting, contracting, and participant schedule planning. PMID:24778201

  7. Clinical Translational Research Hits the Road

    PubMed Central

    Bonuck, Karen A.; Lischewski, Jennifer; Brittner, Mindy

    2009-01-01

    Translating evidence-based research into practice requires data from clinical trials in real world settings. This paper presents “lessons learned” from the implementation of an RCT of breastfeeding promotion interventions at two busy, urban, prenatal care sites. Data were obtained via direct observations, qualitative interviews, and study statistics. Primary challenges include: time and space burdens, “research vs. service” mission conflict, and the provider learning curve for conducting interventions. Primary facilitators include: researcher presence for enhancing rapport with participants and staff, site staff labeling of both the research interview and intervention as “value added time,” and the ability of research staff to assist the clinic beyond the scope of the clinical trial. Specific suggestions are given for building collaborative bonds between the research team, clinicians, administrators, and staff in busy urban practices. PMID:19523539

  8. Ganetespib: research and clinical development

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Komal; Modi, Shanu

    2015-01-01

    Under stressful conditions, the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) molecular chaperone protects cellular proteins (client proteins) from degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. HSP90 expression is upregulated in cancers, and this contributes to the malignant phenotype of increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis and maintenance of metastatic potential via conservation of its client proteins, including human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, androgen receptor, estrogen receptor, Akt, Raf-1, cell cycle proteins, and B-cell lymphoma 2 among others. Hence, inhibition of HSP90 leads to the simultaneous degradation of its many clients, thereby disrupting multiple oncogenic signaling cascades. This has sparked tremendous interest in the development of HSP90 inhibitors as an innovative anticancer strategy. Based on the wealth of compelling data from preclinical studies, a number of HSP90 inhibitors have entered into clinical testing. However, despite enormous promise and anticancer activity reported to date, none of the HSP90 inhibitors in development has been approved for cancer therapy, and the full potential of this class of agents is yet to be realized. This article provides a review on ganetespib, a small molecule HSP90 inhibitor that is currently under evaluation in a broad range of cancer types in combination with other therapeutic agents with the hope of further enhancing its efficacy and overcoming drug resistance. Based on our current understanding of the complex HSP90 machinery combined with the emerging data from these key clinical trials, ganetespib has the potential to be the first-in-class HSP90 inhibitor to be approved as a new anticancer therapy. PMID:26244021

  9. [False innovations in clinical research].

    PubMed

    Garattini, Silvio; Bertele', Vittorio

    2006-11-01

    Pharmaceutical innovation is actually poorer than it seems, largely because of "false" innovations. Various factors help create an image of novelty in the pharmaceutical area. These factors act throughout the research and development process and in the post-marketing stages affecting the selection of study hypotheses, the adoption of the appropriate study methodology, and the interpretation and publication of results. Each of these steps may be diverted from the priority objective of patients' interest and shifted towards to the defence of the drugs companies' commercial interests. Regulators, NHS, physicians and patients must be vigilant to recognise and get rid of false innovations which can prevent the use of more effective and safer drugs and waste resources useful for effective treatments in other areas. Rewarding this lack of innovation discourages research for excellence and reduces the competitiveness of the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:17252717

  10. [False innovations in clinical research].

    PubMed

    Garattini, Silvio; Bertele', Vittorio

    2006-11-01

    Pharmaceutical innovation is actually poorer than it seems, largely because of "false" innovations. Various factors help create an image of novelty in the pharmaceutical area. These factors act throughout the research and development process and in the post-marketing stages affecting the selection of study hypotheses, the adoption of the appropriate study methodology, and the interpretation and publication of results. Each of these steps may be diverted from the priority objective of patients' interest and shifted towards to the defence of the drugs companies' commercial interests. Regulators, NHS, physicians and patients must be vigilant to recognise and get rid of false innovations which can prevent the use of more effective and safer drugs and waste resources useful for effective treatments in other areas. Rewarding this lack of innovation discourages research for excellence and reduces the competitiveness of the pharmaceutical industry.

  11. Clinical anatomy research in a research-driven anatomy department.

    PubMed

    Jones, D Gareth; Dias, G J; Mercer, S; Zhang, M; Nicholson, H D

    2002-05-01

    Clinical anatomy is too often viewed as a discipline that reiterates the wisdom of the past, characterized more by description of what is known than by active investigation and critical analysis of hypotheses and ideas. Various misconceptions follow from an acceptance of this premise: the teaching of clinical anatomists is textbook based, there is no clinical anatomy research worthy of the name, and any research that does exist fails to utilize modern technology and does not stand comparison with serious biomedical research as found in cell and molecular biology. The aim of this paper is to challenge each of these contentions by reference to ongoing clinical research studies within this department. It is argued that all teaching (including that of clinical anatomy) should be research-informed and that the discipline of clinical anatomy should have at its base a vigorous research ethos driven by clinically related problems. In interacting with physicians, the role of the clinical anatomist should be to promulgate a questioning scientific spirit, with its willingness to test and challenge accepted anatomic dicta. PMID:11948960

  12. Building a sustainable clinical academic workforce to meet the future healthcare needs of Australia and New Zealand: report from the first summit meeting.

    PubMed

    Windsor, J; Searle, J; Hanney, R; Chapman, A; Grigg, M; Choong, P; Mackay, A; Smithers, B M; Churchill, J A; Carney, S; Smith, J A; Wainer, Z; Talley, N J; Gladman, M A

    2015-09-01

    The delivery of healthcare that meets the requirements for quality, safety and cost-effectiveness relies on a well-trained medical workforce, including clinical academics whose career includes a specific commitment to research, education and/or leadership. In 2011, the Medical Deans of Australia and New Zealand published a review on the clinical academic workforce and recommended the development of an integrated training pathway for clinical academics. A bi-national Summit on Clinical Academic Training was recently convened to bring together all relevant stakeholders to determine how best to do this. An important part understood the lessons learnt from the UK experience after 10 years since the introduction of an integrated training pathway. The outcome of the summit was to endorse strongly the recommendations of the medical deans. A steering committee has been established to identify further stakeholders, solicit more information from stakeholder organisations, convene a follow-up summit meeting in late 2015, recruit pilot host institutions and engage the government and future funders.

  13. Building a sustainable clinical academic workforce to meet the future healthcare needs of Australia and New Zealand: report from the first summit meeting.

    PubMed

    Windsor, J; Searle, J; Hanney, R; Chapman, A; Grigg, M; Choong, P; Mackay, A; Smithers, B M; Churchill, J A; Carney, S; Smith, J A; Wainer, Z; Talley, N J; Gladman, M A

    2015-09-01

    The delivery of healthcare that meets the requirements for quality, safety and cost-effectiveness relies on a well-trained medical workforce, including clinical academics whose career includes a specific commitment to research, education and/or leadership. In 2011, the Medical Deans of Australia and New Zealand published a review on the clinical academic workforce and recommended the development of an integrated training pathway for clinical academics. A bi-national Summit on Clinical Academic Training was recently convened to bring together all relevant stakeholders to determine how best to do this. An important part understood the lessons learnt from the UK experience after 10 years since the introduction of an integrated training pathway. The outcome of the summit was to endorse strongly the recommendations of the medical deans. A steering committee has been established to identify further stakeholders, solicit more information from stakeholder organisations, convene a follow-up summit meeting in late 2015, recruit pilot host institutions and engage the government and future funders. PMID:26332622

  14. The Greater Plains Collaborative: a PCORnet Clinical Research Data Network.

    PubMed

    Waitman, Lemuel R; Aaronson, Lauren S; Nadkarni, Prakash M; Connolly, Daniel W; Campbell, James R

    2014-01-01

    The Greater Plains Collaborative (GPC) is composed of 10 leading medical centers repurposing the research programs and informatics infrastructures developed through Clinical and Translational Science Award initiatives. Partners are the University of Kansas Medical Center, Children's Mercy Hospital, University of Iowa Healthcare, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the Medical College of Wisconsin and Marshfield Clinic, the University of Minnesota Academic Health Center, the University of Nebraska Medical Center, the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, and the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The GPC network brings together a diverse population of 10 million people across 1300 miles covering seven states with a combined area of 679 159 square miles. Using input from community members, breast cancer was selected as a focus for cohort building activities. In addition to a high-prevalence disorder, we also selected a rare disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  15. Situated learning in translation research training: academic research as a reflection of practice

    PubMed Central

    Risku, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Situated learning has become a dominant goal in the translation classroom: translation didactics is being developed in a learner-, situation- and experience-based direction, following constructivist and participatory teaching philosophies. However, the explicit use of situated approaches has, so far, not been the centre of attention in translation theory teaching and research training. As a consequence, translation theory often remains unconnected to the skills learned and topics tackled in language-specific translation teaching and the challenges experienced in real-life translation practice. This article reports on the results of an exploratory action research project into the teaching of academic research skills in translation studies at Master’s level. The goal of the project is to develop and test possibilities for employing situated learning in translation research training. The situatedness perspective has a double relevance for the teaching project: the students are involved in an authentic, ongoing research project, and the object of the research project itself deals with authentic translation processes at the workplace. Thus, the project has the potential to improve the expertise of the students as both researchers and reflective practitioners. PMID:27499805

  16. Coping Strategies in Psychiatric Clinical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer, Helena Chmura

    1981-01-01

    A broad range of strategies in sampling, measurement, design, execution, implementation, and analysis are examined. Specific strategies are suggested that tend to be successful in the real world of psychiatric clinical research. (Author)

  17. Privacy and confidentiality in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Holder, A R

    1990-01-01

    The information contained in clinical research records is often highly sensitive and personal. This article describes some of the issues that can arise with respect to preserving the confidentiality of these records.

  18. Academic Research at a South African Higher Education Institution: Quality Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulze, S.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the research was to critically analyse how a university context influences the quality of academics' research output. Wenger's social theory of learning was used as theoretical framework. The investigation involved an ethnographic case study of the research culture at one college at the institution. Data collection was mainly by means…

  19. Breaking down Barriers: Academic Obstacles of First-Generation Students at Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebleton, Michael J.; Soria, Krista M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the perceived academic obstacles of first-generation students in comparison to non-first-generation students. Using the Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) completed by approximately 58,000 students from six research universities, the researchers used nonparametric bootstrapping to analyze…

  20. Rise of the Science and Engineering Postdoctorate and the Restructuring of Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, Brendan; Taylor, Barrett J.

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1980s the number of postdocs employed at U.S. research universities has increased dramatically as has the importance of postdocs to academic research. Growth in postdoc employment has coincided with increased dependence on external research funds. Using panel regression analysis, this article explores the organizational characteristics…

  1. Enhancing Quality Learning through Experiences of Research-Based Learning: Implications for Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela; Jewell, Evan

    2012-01-01

    Research into undergraduate research and inquiry in Australian universities was conducted during an Australian Learning and Teaching Council National Teaching Fellowship. In this paper we share experiences of this project as a student and an academic, reflecting on key challenges, including undergraduate research as an immersion experience for…

  2. Socio-Cultural Adaptation, Academic Adaptation and Satisfaction of International Higher Degree Research Students in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Baohua; Wright, Ewan

    2016-01-01

    The number of international higher degree research students has grown at a significant rate in recent years, with Australia becoming a hub for attracting such students from around the world. However, research has identified that international higher degree research students often encounter a wide range of academic and socio-cultural challenges in…

  3. Sources of Research Confidence for Early Career Academics: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, Brian

    2012-01-01

    There is a paucity of studies investigating how early career academics (ECAs) form attitudes towards aspects of their work and gain skills in research, teaching and service. This is especially the case with respect to research. A review of the pertinent literature revealed the prominence of a notion of research self-efficacy (or confidence) and…

  4. Connecting Higher Education Research in Japan with the International Academic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonezawa, Akiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the historical, current, and future challenges of higher education research in Japan within a global context. Japanese higher education research has been strongly influenced by the international academic community. At the same time, higher education researchers in Japan have participated in international projects, and Japan has…

  5. Facilitating Democratic Professional Development: Exploring the Double Role of Being an Academic Action Researcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olin, Anette; Karlberg-Granlund, Gunilla; Furu, Eli Moksnes

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the double role of the academic action researcher working as facilitator and researcher in democratic professional development projects. The inquiry is based on three partnership projects: "research circles" in Sweden, "dialogue conferences" in Norway and "tailored professional development" in…

  6. Buying-Out Teaching for Research: The Views of Academics and Their Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Erica; Smith, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the practice of buying-out teaching to create time for research. A study was carried out, at a regional university in Australia, with academics in receipt of research grant funds (and therefore with the means to buy out teaching), Heads of School, and the Deputy Vice Chancellors responsible respectively for research and for…

  7. How Europe Shapes Academic Research: Insights from Participation in European Union Framework Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primeri, Emilia; Reale, Emanuela

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the effects of participating in European Union Framework Programmes (EUFPs) at the level of research units and researchers. We consider EUFPs as policy instruments that contribute to the Europeanisation of academic research and study the changes they produce with respect to: 1) the organisation and activities of Departments,…

  8. Perceptions Community Residents Have about Partner Institutions and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Betty M.; Katzmarzyk, Peter T.; Johnson, William D.; Griffin, Willene P.; Kennedy, Kathleen B.; Cefalu, William T.; Ryan, Donna H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Engaging community residents to obtain their feedback in conducting clinical research, and including them as leaders in implementing applicable health advances is crucial for success and sustaining large center awards. Methods Forty-four adult men and women participated in one of four focus groups. Two groups each (one African American and one Caucasian) were conducted in Baton Rouge and in New Orleans. Results In an effort to determine the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs Louisiana residents have about the Louisiana Clinical and Translational Science (LA CaTS) Center concept, four main themes emerged from focus group participants concerning the state’s research institutions, and what it means to have these institutions operating under one umbrella to improve the quality of health of its people: 1) academic/research institutions of the State are uniformly widely recognized and held in high regard; 2) increasing awareness of clinical research is a necessity; 3) establishing the LA CaTS Center is an excellent idea; and 4) effective communication including delivery style is crucial to partnerships and especially to the community. Conclusion Focus group discussions can provide insight into community residents’ perceptions, beliefs, motivations and patterns of behavior for strategically planning for large center awards. PMID:24138681

  9. Experience in Strategic Networking to Promote Palliative Care in a Clinical Academic Setting in India

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Shoba; Tarey, SD; Barathi, B; Mary, Thiophin Regina; Mathew, Lovely; Daniel, Sudha Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Background: Palliative care in low and middle-income countries is a new discipline, responding to a greater patient need, than in high-income countries. By its very nature, palliative as a specialty has to network with other specialties to provide quality care to patients. For any medical discipline to grow as a specialty, it should be well established in the teaching medical institutions of that country. Data show that palliative care is more likely to establish and grow in an academic health care institution. It is a necessity that multiple networking strategies are adopted to reach this goal. Objectives: (1) To describe a strategic approach to palliative care service development and integration into clinical academic setting. (2) To present the change in metrics to evaluate progress. Design and Setting: This is a descriptive study wherein, the different strategies that are adopted by the Department of Palliative Medicine for networking in an academic health care institution and outside the institution are scrutinized. Measurement: The impact of this networking was assessed, one, at the level of academics and the other, at the level of service. The number of people who attended various training programs conducted by the department and the number of patients who availed palliative care service over the years were assessed. Results: Ten different strategies were identified that helped with networking of palliative care in the institution. During this time, the referrals to the department increased both for malignant diseases (52–395) and nonmalignant diseases (5–353) from 2000 to 2013. The academic sessions conducted by the department for undergraduates also saw an increase in the number of hours from 6 to 12, apart from the increase in a number of courses conducted by the department for doctors and nurses. Conclusion: Networking is an essential strategy for the establishment of a relatively new medical discipline like palliative care in a developing and

  10. A Community-Academic Partnered Grant Writing Series to Build Infrastructure for Partnered Research.

    PubMed

    King, Keyonna M; Pardo, Yvette-Janine; Norris, Keith C; Diaz-Romero, Maria; Morris, D'Ann; Vassar, Stefanie D; Brown, Arleen F

    2015-10-01

    Grant writing is an essential skill necessary to secure financial support for community programs and research projects. Increasingly, funding opportunities for translational biomedical research require studies to engage community partners, patients, or other stakeholders in the research process to address their concerns. However, there is little evidence on strategies to prepare teams of academic and community partners to collaborate on grants. This paper presents the description and formative evaluation of a two-part community-academic partnered grant writing series designed to help community organizations and academic institutions build infrastructure for collaborative research projects using a partnered approach. The first phase of the series was a half-day workshop on grant readiness, which was open to all interested community partners. The second phase, open only to community-academic teams that met eligibility criteria, was a 12-week session that covered partnered grant writing for foundation grants and National Institutes of Health grants. Participants in both phases reported an increase in knowledge and self-efficacy for writing partnered proposals. At 1-year follow-up, participants in Phase 2 had secured approximately $1.87 million in funding. This community-academic partnered grant writing series helped participants obtain proposal development skills and helped community-academic teams successfully compete for funding.

  11. Will the proposed compensation guidelines for research-related injury spell the death knell for clinical research in India?

    PubMed

    Pramesh, C S; Badwe, R A

    2012-01-01

    The Indian Council of Medical Research and the Central Drugs Standards Control Organization of the Directorate General of Health Services of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare' draft guidelines for compensation of research-related injury have evoked strong responses from the clinical research community. All stakeholders, including academic researchers, teachers in medical colleges, the pharmaceutical industry and even members of Institutional Review Boards and Ethics Committees have expressed grave reservations about several clauses in the guidelines. Moreover, these two guidelines differ from each other in important areas, reiterating that more thought and discussion is necessary to refine the guidelines. We present an academic researcher's perspective of the guidelines and our views on how they will affect clinical research in the country. The paper covers the types of research-related injury that are entitled for compensation, controversies on whether injury resulting from standard care should be entitled for compensation, whether causality needs to be established as a prerequisite for eligibility for compensation and whether all forms of research should have mandatory provision for compensation. We also put forward the potential dangers of such recommendations, which could potentially be inducement for patients to participate in clinical research. Finally, we raise the philosophical issue of infringement of an individual's fundamental rights regarding what research he/she wishes to participate in. While these points are based on several formal and informal discussions with stakeholders from various fields of clinical research, the views expressed are the authors' own personal thoughts.

  12. Strengthening Institutional Research Administration in Uganda: A Case Study on Developing Collaborations among Academic and Research Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kakande, Nelson; Namirembe, Regina; Kaye, Dan K.; Mugyenyi, Peter N.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the presence of several funded research projects at academic and research institutions in sub-Saharan Africa, the quality of the pre/post grant award process in these institutions is inadequate. There is a need to strengthen research administration through infrastructural, organizational, and human resource development to match the dynamic…

  13. Implementing a pragmatic framework for authentic patient-researcher partnerships in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Maureen B; Morrison, Constance Rc; Wong, Celene; Carnie, Martha B; Gabbai-Saldate, Paulette

    2016-05-01

    In response to the creation of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute in 2010, researchers have begun to incorporate patient and family stakeholders into the research process as equal partners, bringing their unique perspectives and experiences to the table. Nonetheless, there is a dearth of literature around how best to engage patients and families and many barriers to doing so effectively. This paper outlines a pragmatic framework of collaborative engagement and partnership between research investigators and patient and family advisors from existing patient and family advisory councils (PFACs) at an academic medical center. This framework includes the role for each party throughout the clinical research process (launch, hypothesis, specific aims, measures/methods, results, interpretations/recommendation and dissemination).

  14. Reengineering Academic Medical Centers: Reengineering Academic Values?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korn, David

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of academic medical centers (AMCs) looks at: change due to heavy federal funding in recent decades; adverse consequences, including deemphasis on education in favor of research and clinical service delivery, and discrepancies between AMC internal and external labor markets; and challenges to medical education in research, education, and…

  15. Ultrasound imaging in research and clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Schellpfeffer, Michael A

    2013-06-01

    The use of ultrasound imaging in clinical obstetrics continues to grow at an almost exponential rate. Ultrasound imaging in developmental biology has only begun to be used to enhance the traditional methodologies to study the developing embryo/fetus. The various modalities of ultrasound imaging are reviewed as they apply to current uses in clinical obstetrics and developmental biologic research. New modalities are also discussed in both clinical obstetrics and developmental biologic research as well as the current limitations of ultrasound imaging faced in both of these fields. PMID:23897593

  16. [Between bench and bedside: examples of clinically oriented basic surgery research].

    PubMed

    Hotz, H G; Foitzik, T; Runkel, N; Buhr, H J

    1997-01-01

    Animal experimental studies are an effective modality for testing new therapeutic strategies, provided that the animal model and the study protocol simulate the clinical situation. This is exemplified by various animal experimental studies on the therapy of infectious complications in acute necrotizing pancreatitis that were performed preliminary or supplementary to clinical studies. The results show that basic surgical research with close clinical orientation can be usefully and fruitfully combined with clinical studies and enables the academically active young surgeon to overcome the dualism between laboratory work and clinical practice.

  17. Encouraging primary care research: evaluation of a one-year, doctoral clinical epidemiology research course

    PubMed Central

    Liira, Helena; Koskela, Tuomas; Thulesius, Hans; Pitkälä, Kaisu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Research and PhDs are relatively rare in family medicine and primary care. To promote research, regular one-year research courses for primary care professionals with a focus on clinical epidemiology were started. This study explores the academic outcomes of the first four cohorts of research courses and surveys the participants’ perspectives on the research course. Design An electronic survey was sent to the research course participants. All peer-reviewed scientific papers published by these students were retrieved by literature searches in PubMed. Setting Primary care in Finland. Subjects A total of 46 research course participants who had finished the research courses between 2007 and 2012. Results Of the 46 participants 29 were physicians, eight nurses, three dentists, four physiotherapists, and two nutritionists. By the end of 2014, 28 of the 46 participants (61%) had published 79 papers indexed in PubMed and seven students (15%) had completed a PhD. The participants stated that the course taught them critical thinking, and provided basic research knowledge, inspiration, and fruitful networks for research. Conclusion A one-year, multi-professional, clinical epidemiology based research course appeared to be successful in encouraging primary care research as measured by research publications and networking. Activating teaching methods, encouraging focus on own research planning, and support from peers and tutors helped the participants to embark on research projects that resulted in PhDs for 15% of the participants. Key PointsClinical research and PhDs are rare in primary care in Finland, which has consequences for the development of the discipline and for the availability of clinical lecturers at the universities.A clinical epidemiology oriented, one-year research course increased the activity in primary care research. Focus on own research planning and learning the challenges of research with peers appeared to enhance the success of a doctoral

  18. Research misconduct among clinical trial staff.

    PubMed

    Redman, Barbara K; Templin, Thomas N; Merz, Jon F

    2006-07-01

    Between 1993 and 2002, 39 clinical trial staff were investigated for scientific misconduct by the Office of Research Integrity (ORI). Analysis of ORI case records reveals practices regarding workload, training and supervision that enable misconduct. Considering the potential effects on human subjects protection, quality and reliability of data, and the trustworthiness of the clinical research enterprise, regulations or guidance on use of clinical trial staff ought to be available. Current ORI regulations do not hold investigators or institutions responsible for supervision and training of clinical trial staff. Given the important issues at stake, the definition of research misconduct should encompass the intentional or negligent mismanagement of scientific projects. Individual institutions and professional associations not only can but should adopt stricter standards of conduct than those reflected in federal regulations. PMID:16909150

  19. Institutional Research and Academic Outcomes. Proceedings of the Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum. (8th, San Francisco, California, May 6-9, 1968.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron, Ed.

    The theme of the 8th Annual Forum on Institutional Research was "Institutional Research and Academic Outcomes" -- intended as a continuation of the 1966 Forum discussion dealing with academic inputs and the 1967 Forum on the instructional process. After an address by the Association's president in which he urged his academic colleagues to…

  20. Should academic medical centers conduct clinical trials of the efficacy of intercessory prayer?

    PubMed

    Halperin, E C

    2001-08-01

    Intercessory prayers for health or healing are requests to an object of worship for the preservation or restoration of health. There has been a recent proliferation of clinical trials that compare the health outcome of a group of prayed-for patients with that of controls, to test the efficacy of intercessory prayer. In this essay, the author defines the concept of intercessory prayer, contrasts it with other forms of prayer, and reviews the literature concerning clinical trials of its efficacy. The arguments put forward in favor of conducting such trials and those against are described and the reader is invited to consider their relative merits. The author concludes by discussing the potential power of faith in healing, reviewing the philosophical basis and pitfalls of clinical trials of intercessory prayer, and urging readers to weigh the arguments for and against such trials in academic medicine.

  1. Collaborations in Proteomics Research - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the sharing of proteomics reagents and protocols

  2. Executive summary of the CAEP 2014 Academic Symposium: How to make research succeed in your department.

    PubMed

    Stiell, Ian G; Artz, Jennifer D; Perry, Jeffrey; Vaillancourt, Christian; Calder, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    The vision of the recently created Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) Academic Section is to promote high-quality emergency patient care by conducting world-leading education and research in emergency medicine. The Academic Section plans to achieve this goal by enhancing academic emergency medicine primarily at Canadian medical schools and teaching hospitals. It seeks to foster and develop education, research, and academic leadership amongst Canadian emergency physicians, residents, and students. In this light, the Academic Section began in 2013 to hold the annual Academic Symposia to highlight best practices and recommendations for the three core domains of governance and leadership, education scholarship, and research. Each year, members of three panels are asked to review the literature, survey and interview experts, achieve consensus, and present their recommendations at the Symposium (2013, Education Scholarship; 2014, Research; and 2015, Governance and Funding). Research is essential to medical advancement. As a relatively young specialty, emergency medicine is rapidly evolving to adapt to new diagnostic tools, the challenges of crowding in emergency departments, and the growing needs of emergency patients. There is significant variability in the infrastructure, support, and productivity of emergency medicine research programs across Canada. All Canadians benefit from an investigation of the means to improve research infrastructure, training programs, and funding opportunities. Such an analysis is essential to identify areas for improvement, which will support the expansion of emergency medicine research. To this end, physician-scientist leaders were gathered from across Canada to develop pragmatic recommendations on the improvement of emergency medicine research through a comprehensive analysis of current best practices, systematic literature reviews, stakeholder surveys, and expert interviews.

  3. Key Elements of Clinical Physician Leadership at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dine, C. Jessica; Kahn, Jeremy M; Abella, Benjamin S; Asch, David A; Shea, Judy A

    2011-01-01

    Background A considerable body of literature in the management sciences has defined leadership and how leadership skills can be attained. There is considerably less literature about leadership within medical settings. Physicians-in-training are frequently placed in leadership positions ranging from running a clinical team or overseeing a resuscitation effort. However, physicians-in-training rarely receive such training. The objective of this study was to discover characteristics associated with effective physician leadership at an academic medical center for future development of such training. Methods We conducted focus groups with medical professionals (attending physicians, residents, and nurses) at an academic medical center. The focus group discussion script was designed to elicit participants' perceptions of qualities necessary for physician leadership. The lead question asked participants to imagine a scenario in which they either acted as or observed a physician leader. Two independent reviewers reviewed transcripts to identify key domains of physician leadership. Results Although the context was not specified, the focus group participants discussed leadership in the context of a clinical team. They identified 4 important themes: management of the team, establishing a vision, communication, and personal attributes. Conclusions Physician leadership exists in clinical settings. This study highlights the elements essential to that leadership. Understanding the physician attributes and behaviors that result in effective leadership and teamwork can lay the groundwork for more formal leadership education for physicians-in-training. PMID:22379520

  4. Women Academics and Research Productivity: An International Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiston, Sarah Jane; Jung, Jisun

    2015-01-01

    In the prestige economy of higher education, research productivity is highly prized. Previous research indicates, however, a gender gap with respect to research output. This gap is often explained by reference to familial status and responsibilities. In this article, we examine the research productivity gender gap from an international perspective…

  5. Remote sensing research activities related to academic institutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, V. I.

    1980-01-01

    The role of research in the educational setting is discussed. Curriculum developments for integrating teaching and research are described. Remote sensing technology is used as an example of bridging the gap between research and application. Recommendations are presented for strengthing research groups.

  6. [Social aspect of clinical research in Poland].

    PubMed

    Masełbas, Wojciech; Czarkowski, Marek

    2007-12-01

    Each year more than 400 new clinical studies are registered in Poland. They gather above 50.000 of study participants. Social opinion on clinical trials is an important factor. The paper presents the review of actual opinions on clinical research in Poland. It provides the description of standards of protection of study participants, benefits and risks related to the participation in clinical research and the role of media in creating and influencing of the social perception of clinical trials. Results of conducted questionnaire studies imply that Poles correctly identify and assess the risk of participation in clinical experiments. The primary reason for the participation seams to be the possibility to help other patients, contribution to the progress of science and standards of medical care and potential benefits for other sufferers. The need of testing the safety and efficacy of the new medication in man is generally well recognized. At the same time a substantial part of the society is concerned with the possible corruption of investigators and unethical behaviour of sponsors. The social perception of clinical research in Poland is in majority of analyzed parameters not substantially different from opinions in other member states of EU. However, the medical society should be more active in influencing and changing some negative impressions.

  7. An academic, clinical and industrial update on electrospun, additive manufactured and imprinted medical devices.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Christina N M; Fuller, Kieran P; Larrañaga, Aitor; Biggs, Manus; Bayon, Yves; Sarasua, Jose R; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I

    2015-01-01

    Electrospinning, additive manufacturing and imprint lithography scaffold fabrication technologies have attracted great attention in biomedicine, as they allow production of two- and three- dimensional constructs with tuneable topographical and geometrical features. In vitro data demonstrate that electrospun and imprinted substrates offer control over permanently differentiated and stem cell function. Advancements in functionalisation strategies have further enhanced the bioactivity and reparative capacity of electrospun and additive manufactured devices, as has been evidenced in several preclinical models. Despite this overwhelming success in academic setting, only a few technologies have reached the clinic and only a fraction of them have become commercially available products.

  8. Requirements on Clinical Trial Management Systems for Academic Site Management Organizations.

    PubMed

    Schöbel, Martin; Stäubert, Sebastian; Löbe, Matthias; Meinel, Kirsti; Winter, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    As a part of the introduction of a Clinical Trial Management System (CTMS) for an Academic Site Management Organization (SMO) we had to determine the requirements such a system has to meet. By performing extensive Requirements Engineering, we aimed at raising the success of the future system and the user satisfaction. Investigations revealed the existence of TORE (Task and Object-oriented Requirements Engineering), a task-driven approach for determining requirements on user interface- and information-intensive systems. In this paper, we present an adoption of this method for our purposes, resulting in a reasonable list of requirements for CTMS acquisition.

  9. Nursing Students' Satisfaction with Mobile Academic Electronic Medical Records for Undergraduate Clinical Practicum.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mona; Park, Joon Ho; Lee, Hyeong Suk

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of study was to evaluate satisfaction with and usability of mobile academic electronic medical records (AEMR) for undergraduate nursing students' clinical practicum. After an AEMR application on mobile devices was applied to the experimental group while a PC-based EMR system was used for the control group as usual in the fall semester, 2014. Two items of practicum satisfaction such as preparation of lab test and understanding of the results, and nursing intervention and documentation were significantly higher in the experiment group. The findings of usability survey showed that students in the experiment group consider the use of mobile AEMR in their job would increase their productivity. PMID:27332454

  10. Requirements on Clinical Trial Management Systems for Academic Site Management Organizations.

    PubMed

    Schöbel, Martin; Stäubert, Sebastian; Löbe, Matthias; Meinel, Kirsti; Winter, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    As a part of the introduction of a Clinical Trial Management System (CTMS) for an Academic Site Management Organization (SMO) we had to determine the requirements such a system has to meet. By performing extensive Requirements Engineering, we aimed at raising the success of the future system and the user satisfaction. Investigations revealed the existence of TORE (Task and Object-oriented Requirements Engineering), a task-driven approach for determining requirements on user interface- and information-intensive systems. In this paper, we present an adoption of this method for our purposes, resulting in a reasonable list of requirements for CTMS acquisition. PMID:27577390

  11. Academic nursing clinic: impact on health and cost outcomes for vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Badger, Terry A; McArthur, Donna Behler

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine selected health and cost outcomes of clients who used an academic nursing clinic (ANC) located in a high-rise public housing facility for low-income citizens. Service use, health promotion and screening, quality of care, satisfaction and costs were examined. Health outcomes were improved. Estimated cost savings were about $36,000 during the first year with reduced paramedic and police calls, hospitalizations, and emergency room visits. Findings show that advanced practice nurses can positively influence health outcomes by providing cost-effective quality health care. PMID:12624864

  12. Becoming and Being an Academic: The Perspectives of Chinese Staff in Two Research-Intensive UK Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Xiaoli; Di Napoli, Roberto; Borg, Michaela; Maunder, Rachel; Fry, Heather; Walsh, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an interview study investigating the experiences of academic acculturation (a process of mutual influence and enrichment with regard to academic practice) of a group of Chinese academic staff in two research-intensive UK universities. Following a systematic content-based analysis, three major themes emerged as salient,…

  13. The Development of an Index of Academic Rigor for College Readiness. Research Report No. 2011-11

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Jeffrey N.; Wiley, Andrew; Camara, Wayne J.; Proestler, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Academic intensity or academic rigor of students' high school curriculum is positively related to several college outcomes including the avoidance of remediation and graduation attainment. However, research on academic rigor has been limited possibly due to the difficulty in obtaining a quantitative measure applicable across schools and districts.…

  14. Ethics in clinical research: the Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Sanmukhani, J; Tripathi, C B

    2011-03-01

    Ethics in clinical research focuses largely on identifying and implementing the acceptable conditions for exposure of some individuals to risks and burdens for the benefit of society at large. Ethical guidelines for clinical research were formulated only after discovery of inhumane behaviour with participants during research experiments. The Nuremberg Code was the first international code laying ethical principles for clinical research. With increasing research all over, World Health Organization formulated guidelines in the form of Declaration of Helsinki in 1964. The US laid down its guidelines for ethical principles in the Belmont Report after discovery of the Tuskegee's Syphilis study. The Indian Council of Medical Research has laid down the 'Ethical Guidelines for Biomedical Research on Human Subjects' in the year 2000 which were revised in 2006. It gives twelve general principles to be followed by all biomedical researchers working in the country. The Ethics Committee stands as the bridge between the researcher and the ethical guidelines of the country. The basic responsibility of the Ethics Committee is to ensure an independent, competent and timely review of all ethical aspects of the project proposals received in order to safeguard the dignity, rights, safety and well-being of all actual or potential research participants. A well-documented informed consent process is the hallmark of any ethical research work. Informed consent respects individual's autonomy, to participate or not to participate in research. Concepts of vulnerable populations, therapeutic misconception and post trial access hold special importance in ethical conduct of research, especially in developing countries like India, where most of the research participants are uneducated and economically backward. PMID:22303053

  15. Economics and Health Reform: Academic Research and Public Policy.

    PubMed

    Glied, Sherry A; Miller, Erin A

    2015-08-01

    Two prior studies, conducted in 1966 and in 1979, examined the role of economic research in health policy development. Both concluded that health economics had not been an important contributor to policy. Passage of the Affordable Care Act offers an opportunity to reassess this question. We find that the evolution of health economics research has given it an increasingly important role in policy. Research in the field has followed three related paths over the past century-institutionalist research that described problems; theoretical research, which proposed relationships that might extend beyond existing institutions; and empirical assessments of structural parameters identified in the theoretical research. These three strands operating in concert allowed economic research to be used to predict the fiscal and coverage consequences of alternative policy paths. This ability made economic research a powerful policy force. Key conclusions of health economics research are clearly evident in the Affordable Care Act.

  16. Economics and Health Reform: Academic Research and Public Policy.

    PubMed

    Glied, Sherry A; Miller, Erin A

    2015-08-01

    Two prior studies, conducted in 1966 and in 1979, examined the role of economic research in health policy development. Both concluded that health economics had not been an important contributor to policy. Passage of the Affordable Care Act offers an opportunity to reassess this question. We find that the evolution of health economics research has given it an increasingly important role in policy. Research in the field has followed three related paths over the past century-institutionalist research that described problems; theoretical research, which proposed relationships that might extend beyond existing institutions; and empirical assessments of structural parameters identified in the theoretical research. These three strands operating in concert allowed economic research to be used to predict the fiscal and coverage consequences of alternative policy paths. This ability made economic research a powerful policy force. Key conclusions of health economics research are clearly evident in the Affordable Care Act. PMID:25854958

  17. Bridging the Gap between Academic Research and Regional Development in the Basque Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlsen, James; Larrea, Miren; Wilson, James R.; Aranguren, Mari Jose

    2012-01-01

    The discussion in this article focuses on how the gap between academic knowledge and regional development can be bridged, creating conditions for change processes between researchers and regional agents. Institutional entrepreneurs can create regional development organisations and research organisations, but in order to fulfil regional needs it is…

  18. Impact on Academic Medical Center of Reduction Reimbursement of Indirect Research Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutina, Kenneth L.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Using a system dynamics simulation model, the long-term economic impacts of federally funded research cutbacks on an academic medical center are analyzed. The significant negative multiplier effects, due to the required diversion of institutional funds, are indicative of those that any research-oriented university would experience. (Author/MLW)

  19. Building Sustainable Academic Research in a "Teaching and Learning" Intensive Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrams, Steve; Betts, Tony; Carton, Janet

    2008-01-01

    Academic research is increasingly interdisciplinary, inter-institutional and international. In this context, creating and maintaining the balance in the nexus between research, teaching and learning and industry interaction is central to the operation and reputation of a university-level institute. In seeking sustainability, the perennial…

  20. Academic Teamwork among Members of the National Researchers System in Tamaulipas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman-Acuña, Teresa; Guzman-Acuña, Josefina; Sánchez-Rodriguez, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the participation of Mexican researchers in the state of Tamaulipas who are members of Mexico's National Researchers System (SNI) and are working in academic groups. The paper also seeks to understand their perceptions in relation to the usefulness of this structured System to their individual research…

  1. A Self-Guided Tour on Audiocassette at a Large Academic Research Library: Development and Implementation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Charles; Gassmann, Mary

    1986-01-01

    This packet of materials includes an article, "Development of a Self-Guided Audiocassette Tour at a Large Academic Research Library: Preliminary Report," which originally appeared in the Summer 1986 issue of "Research Strategies," and the scripts for self-guided audiocassette tours of the main and undergraduate libraries at the University of…

  2. How Do Interaction Experiences Influence Doctoral Students' Academic Pursuits in Biomedical Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Xiaoqing; Chakraverty, Devasmita; Jeffe, Donna B.; Andriole, Dorothy A.; Wathington, Heather D.; Tai, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study investigated how doctoral students reported their personal and professional interaction experiences that they believed might facilitate or impede their academic pursuits in biomedical research. We collected 19 in-depth interviews with doctoral students in biomedical research from eight universities, and we based…

  3. Industrial and Academic Collaboration: Hybrid Models for Research and Innovation Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Freitas, Sara; Mayer, Igor; Arnab, Sylvester; Marshall, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how, in the light of global economic downturn and rising student populations, new academic-industrial models for research collaboration based upon specific technological expertise and knowledge can be developed as potential mechanisms for preserving and extending central university research infrastructure. The paper explores…

  4. Knowledge Sharing among Academics in Institutions of Higher Learning: A Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramayah, T.; Ignatius, Joshua; Leen, Jasmine Yeap Ai

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a research agenda for a funded research project on knowledge sharing among academics in Malaysia. One of the main objectives is to develop validate and measure of knowledge sharing which is suitable for academicians. Previous studies on knowledge sharing have used standard measurement items which do not cater for the multiple…

  5. Creative Research Ethics in the Enterprise University: What Price Academic Freedom?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, John

    2013-01-01

    Between 1990 and 2010, the New Zealand university adopted an enterprise form. The nature of academic work changed commensurate with changes in the external regulatory and funding environment, the internal performative research culture, the proliferation of trans-national researcher networks, and the growing managerial codification of acceptable…

  6. The Unacknowledged Value of Female Academic Labour Power for Male Research Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angervall, Petra; Beach, Dennis; Gustafsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Academic work in Sweden's higher education system is changing character. Distinctly different career pathways are emerging, as facilities for developing research careers and capital have become both more restricted and more dependent on external funding. These developments are in focus in the present article. Based on ethnographic research and a…

  7. School Engagement for Academically At-Risk Students: A Participatory Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Toole, Nadia; Due, Clemence

    2015-01-01

    While past literature has explored school engagement in older students, there is less research for younger children specifically, and very little which engages children themselves in the research process. This paper provides insight into school engagement for academically at-risk students in the second year of school through a participatory…

  8. Experiences of the Relation between Teaching and Research: What Do Academics Value?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Jane; Bond, Carol H.

    2001-01-01

    Interviews with a small number of academic staff who had previously expressed strong views on the teaching-research relationship revealed substantial variation in their experiences of the relationship. Five qualitatively different experiences of the teaching-research relationship were evident, ranging from incompatibility, to transmission of new…

  9. Developing a Sustainable Research Culture in an Independent Academic Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Jeffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Independent academic medical centers (IAMC) are challenged to develop and support a research enterprise and maintain primary goals of healthcare delivery and financial solvency. Strategies for promoting translational research have been shown to be effective at institutions in the top level of federal funding, but not for smaller IAMCs. The…

  10. Technology to Support Writing by Students with Learning and Academic Disabilities: Recent Research Trends and Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson-Karlan, George R.

    2011-01-01

    The trends and findings from a descriptive analysis of 25 years of research studies examining the effectiveness of technology to support the compositional writing of students with learning and academic disabilities are presented. A corpus of 85 applied research studies of writing technology effectiveness was identified from among 249 items in the…

  11. Inside the Triple Helix: An Integrative Conceptual Framework of the Academic Researcher's Activities, a Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halilem, Norrin

    2010-01-01

    In the Triple Helix of University-Industry-Government relations, the academic researcher plays a predominant role as he participates in research, which provides opportunities for innovation; in teaching, which develops highly qualified personnel; and in entrepreneurialism, which represents the transformation of knowledge in a more usable form, and…

  12. Statistics in clinical research: Important considerations

    PubMed Central

    Barkan, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Statistical analysis is one of the foundations of evidence-based clinical practice, a key in conducting new clinical research and in evaluating and applying prior research. In this paper, we review the choice of statistical procedures, analyses of the associations among variables and techniques used when the clinical processes being examined are still in process. We discuss methods for building predictive models in clinical situations, and ways to assess the stability of these models and other quantitative conclusions. Techniques for comparing independent events are distinguished from those used with events in a causal chain or otherwise linked. Attention then turns to study design, to the determination of the sample size needed to make a given comparison, and to statistically negative studies. PMID:25566715

  13. Configuring the patient as clinical research subject in the UK national health service.

    PubMed

    Adams, Mary; McKevitt, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines a central image in UK academic clinical research - the patient as altruistic research subject - by means of an interpretive review of social science, bioethical and bioscience research and development policy literatures. The review examines this image as it is indicted in discussions about the nature of clinical science; is consolidated in the ethical regulation of this science; and is articulated in recent bioscience research and development government initiatives. Drawing on Strathern's notion of the virtual (public-sector) subject, the review identifies the anticipation of NHS patients as alternatively 'available' or 'entitled' to the expanding translational medicine industry.

  14. Configuring the patient as clinical research subject in the UK national health service

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Mary; McKevitt, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines a central image in UK academic clinical research – the patient as altruistic research subject – by means of an interpretive review of social science, bioethical and bioscience research and development policy literatures. The review examines this image as it is indicted in discussions about the nature of clinical science; is consolidated in the ethical regulation of this science; and is articulated in recent bioscience research and development government initiatives. Drawing on Strathern's notion of the virtual (public-sector) subject, the review identifies the anticipation of NHS patients as alternatively ‘available’ or ‘entitled’ to the expanding translational medicine industry. PMID:25765178

  15. How do researchers decide early clinical trials?

    PubMed

    Grankvist, Hannah; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    Launch of clinical investigation represents a substantial escalation in commitment to a particular clinical translation trajectory; it also exposes human subjects to poorly understood interventions. Despite these high stakes, there is little to guide decision-makers on the scientific and ethical evaluation of early phase trials. In this article, we review policies and consensus statements on human protections, drug regulation, and research design surrounding trial launch, and conclude that decision-making is largely left to the discretion of research teams and sponsors. We then review what is currently understood about how research teams exercise this discretion, and close by laying out a research agenda for characterizing the way investigators, sponsors, and reviewers approach decision-making in early phase research.

  16. Analytic model for academic research productivity having factors, interactions and implications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Financial support is dear in academia and will tighten further. How can the research mission be accomplished within new restraints? A model is presented for evaluating source components of academic research productivity. It comprises six factors: funding; investigator quality; efficiency of the research institution; the research mix of novelty, incremental advancement, and confirmatory studies; analytic accuracy; and passion. Their interactions produce output and patterned influences between factors. Strategies for optimizing output are enabled. PMID:22130145

  17. Current clinical research environment: focus on psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Dainesi, Sonia Mansoldo; Elkis, Helio

    2007-09-01

    The introduction of international guidelines on Good Clinical Practices (GCP) in 1996, immediately followed by the publication of Resolution CNS 196/96 in Brazil, created a great opportunity for Brazilian research centers to participate in international trials. Such studies must be strictly monitored in order to assure compliance with the regulations, as well as with the standards of patient safety. Clear agreement among the investigator, the sponsor and the institution carrying out the study must be previously defined in order to avoid any conflicts of interest during or after the study. Operational aspects, such as the time needed to gain regulatory approval of the study design, strategies for patient recruitment/retention and appropriate logistics, are also important. In 2005, the Brazilian National Clinical Research Network was established, bringing together a number of research centers in teaching hospitals. The objective was to subsidize public clinical research with state-of-the-art practices and appropriate technical/scientific training programs. The development of research protocols that prioritize public health care needs in Brazil is other fundamental goal of this network. This article addresses general aspects of clinical research, as well as some specific issues in psychiatry. Improving the health and quality of life of the global population is certainly the major objective of all of the work done in this area.

  18. Expanding Research Capacity at United States Universities: A Study of Academic Research and Development Investment from 1990-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, Brendan; Mathies, Charles F.

    2012-01-01

    Growing emphasis has been placed on universities to contribute to the innovation process and as a result academic research and development expenditures have increased in recent years. Nevertheless, little is known about the specific ways in which universities have expanded their research capacity. This paper examines how universities in the United…

  19. How to Channel the Data Deluge in Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronicle of Higher Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    What are the best ways to organize the mass quantities of data that researchers generate, and to share those data to engender new research? Scott Carlson, a senior reporter at "The Chronicle", asked Michael C. Witt, an assistant professor of library science and an interdisciplinary research librarian at Purdue University Libraries and its…

  20. Feudalism and Academia: UK Academics' Accounts of Research Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge of research cultures in university education departments is still evolving, particularly in connection with the departments which have achieved a high ranking in the UK government's Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), and also the conditions under which "knowledge workers" operate are under-researched, although this is beginning to…

  1. Measuring Research "Impact" for Academic Promotion: Issues from the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kylie M.; Crookes, Ellie; Crookes, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    Around the world, governments and the higher education sector are being asked to become more accountable for the money they spend on research funding. Research quality measurement exercises, such as the Excellence in Research for Australia initiative, use a number of agreed indicators to measure, analyse and report on various institution and…

  2. "Ethics and Clinical Research" in Biographical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Henry K. Beecher (1904-1976) played an important role in the development of bioethics. His 1966 article "Ethics and Clinical Research" in the New England Journal of Medicine intensified concern about the welfare of patients participating in clinical research, and his leadership in the 1968 Harvard Ad Hoc Committee on Brain Death redefined the determination of death. Beecher deserves, and even demands, explanation and explication. This essay offers a biographical perspective on the Harvard professor. In addition to his early life and education in both Kansas and Boston, the essay explores how Beecher's experiences in World War II and in the new geopolitical realities of the Cold War shaped his views about the ethical dilemmas of clinical research. PMID:27499482

  3. Challenges and opportunities in establishing a Latino health research center in a majority academic institution.

    PubMed

    Giachello, A L

    1996-10-01

    This article provides a practical perspective of the issues, challenges and the opportunities involved in establishing a Latino Health Research Center in an academic institution. This article will use as an illustration the experiences related to the establishment of a Center on Latino Medical Treatment Effectiveness Program at a large public academic institution in Chicago. Some of the sociopolitical processes of establishing the Center's structure, and the recruitment and training of a multi-disciplinary core research staff are summarized, while simultaneously pursuing an ambitious research and training agenda. The article ends by suggesting a series of strategies in meeting the multiple and, at times, conflicting demands of the academic institution, the funding sources and the community, as well as the lessons learned.

  4. Academic Blogging: Academic Practice and Academic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkup, Gill

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale study which investigates the role of blogging in professional academic practice in higher education. It draws on interviews with a sample of academics (scholars, researchers and teachers) who have blogs and on the author's own reflections on blogging to investigate the function of blogging in academic practice…

  5. 78 FR 66992 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... specialties within the general areas of biomedical, behavioral, and clinical science research. The...

  6. 76 FR 66367 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... medical specialties within the general areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research....

  7. 76 FR 19188 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... medical specialties within the general areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research....

  8. 78 FR 22622 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services Scientific Merit... medical specialties within the general areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research....

  9. 77 FR 23810 - Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    ... AFFAIRS Joint Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development... Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development and Clinical Science Research and Development Services... areas of biomedical, behavioral and clinical science research. The panel meetings will be open to...

  10. Clinical integration and new options for academic medical institutions in network development.

    PubMed

    Taylor, P L

    1999-03-01

    The author outlines two options, made possible by developments in antitrust law, that can create a favored role for academic health science centers as well as for stand-alone medical schools and teaching hospitals, using the unique strengths of these institutions that are often considered weaknesses by the marketplace. The first option is the development of clinically integrated collaborations that need not be either system-wide or necessarily governed by total quality management processes, or involve the characteristics of ownership typical of the usual integrated delivery systems. The second option is the development of new clinical "products." Each option encourages creative financing, legal, medical, and governance approaches and makes it possible for centers, medical schools, and teaching hospitals to build multi-provider collaborations that are in harmony with their missions and different from the less-compatible integrated delivery systems that they often seek to build. The author provides an extensive background on antitrust law to explain the two options and the criteria for crafting them within antitrust law. He then describes how antitrust law applies to multi-provider networks and in particular to academic health science centers and free-standing medical schools and teaching hospitals, and gives examples of the kinds of fruitful collaborations these institutions could engage in. He urges those institutions to realize that if they keep faith with their best characteristics in creative new ways (such as those suggested by his article), they will thrive in the years ahead.

  11. Clinical nurse specialists driving research and practice through Research Roundtables.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Schafer, Deborah J

    2009-01-01

    Providing patient care based on the best evidence is a priority for healthcare institutions across the country to improve practice and patient outcomes. Creating a culture of evidence-based practice (EBP) within an organization can be a challenging task. Literature has identified numerous barriers to EBP including negative attitudes and perceptions among nurses and lack of organizational support, time, resources, and confidence with these skills. Creating programs that help nurses appreciate the value and importance of nursing research for practice can be an effective approach in changing the culture. Research Roundtable is a collaborative partnership between a healthcare system and a baccalaureate nursing program to promote EBP and research skills in nurses and nursing students. Initial goals of the program focused on increasing the nurses' knowledge base of the research process and applying research to actual clinical problems. Over the course of 3 years, Roundtable evolved from development and implementation of research projects to concentrating on the identification of clinical problems that could be analyzed and solved through the use of EBP processes. The program has resulted in the completion of research studies, implementation of practice changes based on evidence uncovered in group work, and the approval of research projects in data collection phases. The positive impacts of Roundtable have been identified at the level of the staff nurse and the organization as a whole. This article describes the role of the clinical nurse specialist in the development and implementation of the Research Roundtable. PMID:19858901

  12. Academics' Attitudes towards PhD Students' Teaching: Preparing Research Higher Degree Students for an Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jepsen, Denise M.; Varhegyi, Melinda M.; Edwards, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    An exploratory study of 473 academics in a metropolitan university investigated the attitudes of academic supervisors towards training for university teaching for doctoral students. The study investigated academic supervisors' levels of awareness and knowledge of teacher training opportunities, the relative importance of teaching--both lecturing…

  13. Innovation in clinical pharmacy practice and opportunities for academic--practice partnership.

    PubMed

    Gubbins, Paul O; Micek, Scott T; Badowski, Melissa; Cheng, Judy; Gallagher, Jason; Johnson, Samuel G; Karnes, Jason H; Lyons, Kayley; Moore, Katherine G; Strnad, Kyle

    2014-05-01

    Clinical pharmacy has a rich history of advancing practice through innovation. These innovations helped to mold clinical pharmacy into a patient-centered discipline recognized for its contributions to improving medication therapy outcomes. However, innovations in clinical pharmacy practice have now waned. In our view, the growth of academic–practice partnerships could reverse this trend and stimulate innovation among the next generation of pioneering clinical pharmacists. Although collaboration facilitates innovation,academic institutions and health care systems/organizations are not taking full advantage of this opportunity. The academic–practice partnership can be optimized by making both partners accountable for the desired outcomes of their collaboration, fostering symbiotic relationships that promote value-added clinical pharmacy services and emphasizing continuous quality improvement in the delivery of these services. Optimizing academic–practice collaboration on a broader scale requires both partners to adopt a culture that provides for dedicated time to pursue innovation, establishes mechanisms to incubate ideas, recognizes where motivation and vision align, and supports the purpose of the partnership. With appropriate leadership and support, a shift in current professional education and training practices, and a commitment to cultivate future innovators, the academic–practice partnership can develop new and innovative practice advancements that will improve patient outcomes.

  14. "It's an Amazing Learning Curve to Be Part of the Project": Exploring Academic Identity in Collaborative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibowitz, Brenda; Ndebele, Clever; Winberg, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation into the role of academic identity within collaborative research in higher education in South Africa. The study was informed by the literature on academic identities, collaborative research and communities of practice. It was located within a multi-site study, with involvement of researcher collaborators…

  15. Use of E-Books in an Academic and Research Environment: A Case Study from the Indian Institute of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anuradha, K. T.; Usha, H. S.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the use and usability of e-books from the perspectives of users in an academic and research environment. Design/methodology/approach: This study involved an e-mail questionnaire to survey researchers in the academic and research environment of the Indian Institute of Science regarding their use…

  16. Development of a Survey Instrument to Measure TEFL Academics' Perceptions about, Individual and Workplace Characteristics for Conducting Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Li; Hudson, Peter; Millwater, Jan; Tones, Megan

    2013-01-01

    A 30-item survey was devised to determine Chinese TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) academics' potential for conducting research. A five-part Likert scale was used to gather data from 182 academics on four factors: (1) perceptions on teaching-research nexus, (2) personal perspectives for conducting research, (3) predispositions for…

  17. Clinical Research Careers: Reports from a NHLBI Pediatric Heart Network Clinical Research Skills Development Conference

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Wyman W.; Richmond, Marc; Li, Jennifer S.; Saul, J. Philip; Mital, Seema; Colan, Steven D.; Newburger, Jane W.; Sleeper, Lynn A.; McCrindle, Brain W.; Minich, L. LuAnn; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Marino, Bradley S.; Williams, Ismee A.; Pearson, Gail D.; Evans, Frank; Scott, Jane D.; Cohen, Meryl S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Wyman W. Lai, MD, MPH, and Victoria L. Vetter, MD, MPH. The Pediatric Heart Network (PHN), funded under the U.S. National Institutes of Health-National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH–NHLBI), includes two Clinical Research Skills Development (CRSD) Cores, which were awarded to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and to the Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital of New York–Presbyterian. To provide information on how to develop a clinical research career to a larger number of potential young investigators in pediatric cardiology, the directors of these two CRSD Cores jointly organized a one-day seminar for fellows and junior faculty from all of the PHN Core sites. The participants included faculty members from the PHN and the NHLBI. The day-long seminar was held on April 29, 2009, at the NHLBI site, immediately preceding the PHN Steering Committee meeting in Bethesda, MD. Methods The goals of the seminar were 1) to provide fellows and early investigators with basic skills in clinical research 2) to provide a forum for discussion of important research career choices 3) to introduce attendees to each other and to established clinical researchers in pediatric cardiology, and 4) to publish a commentary on the future of clinical research in pediatric cardiology. Results The following chapters are compilations of the talks given at the 2009 PHN Clinical Research Skills Development Seminar, published to share the information provided with a broader audience of those interested in learning how to develop a clinical research career in pediatric cardiology. The discussions of types of clinical research, research skills, career development strategies, funding, and career management are applicable to research careers in other areas of clinical medicine as well. Conclusions The aim of this compilation is to stimulate those who might be interested in the research career options available to investigators. PMID:21167335

  18. Budgeting, funding, and managing clinical research projects.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Elizabeth; Dicks, Elizabeth; Parfrey, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Large, integrated multidisciplinary teams have become recognized as an efficient means by which to drive innovation and discovery in clinical research. This chapter describes how to budget and fund these large studies and effectively manage the large, often dispersed teams involved. Sources of funding are identified; budget development, justification, reporting, financial governance, and accountability are described; in addition to the creation and management of the multidisciplinary team that will implement the research plan. PMID:19160746

  19. African American Women Leaders in Academic Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epps, Sharon K.

    2008-01-01

    Effective leadership and increasing diversity are central concerns in the library profession. Using qualitative interviewing and research methods, this study identifies the attributes, knowledge, and skills that African American women need in order to be successful leaders in today's Association of Research Libraries (ARL). These findings indicate…

  20. Clinical research in pediatric organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Azeka, Estela; Saavedra, Laura Castillo; Fregni, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation has greatly improved survival in children with end-stage disease, becoming one of the main treatment options in this population. Nonetheless, there are significant challenges associated with validating and optimizing the effects of these interventions in clinical trials. Therefore, we reviewed the main issues related to conducting clinical transplantation research in children. We divided these challenges into three different categories: (i) challenges related to surgical techniques and anesthetic procedures, (ii) challenges related to post-transplant care and (iii) challenges specific to a particular population group and disease type. Some of the observed burdens for clinical research in this field are related to the limitations of conducting studies with a placebo or sham procedure, determining the standard of care for a control group, low prevalence of cases, ethical concerns related to use of a placebo control group and lack of generalizability from animal studies and clinical trials conducted in adult populations. To overcome some of these barriers, it is necessary to utilize alternative clinical trial designs, such as observational studies or non-inferiority trials, and to develop multicenter collaborations to increase the recruitment rate. In conclusion, the lack of robust data related to pediatric transplantation remains problematic, and further clinical trials are needed to develop more efficacious and safer treatments. PMID:24860862

  1. Modeling Flowsheet Data for Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Steven G.; Byrne, Matthew D.; Christie, Beverly; Delaney, Connie W.; LaFlamme, Anne; Park, Jung In; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Sherman, Suzan G.; Speedie, Stuart; Westra, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    Health care data included in clinical data repositories (CDRs) are increasingly used for quality reporting, business analytics and research; however, extended clinical data from interprofessional practice are seldom included. With the increasing emphasis on care coordination across settings, CDRs need to include data from all clinicians and be harmonized to understand the impact of their collaborative efforts on patient safety, effectiveness and efficiency. This study characterizes the extended clinical data derived from EHR flowsheet data that is available in the University of Minnesota’s CDR and describes a process for creating an ontology that organizes that data so that it is more useful and accessible to researchers. The process is illustrated using a pressure ulcer ontology and compares ease of finding concepts in i2b2 for different data organization approaches. The challenges of the manual process and difficulties combining similar concepts are discussed. PMID:26306244

  2. Modeling Flowsheet Data for Clinical Research.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven G; Byrne, Matthew D; Christie, Beverly; Delaney, Connie W; LaFlamme, Anne; Park, Jung In; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Sherman, Suzan G; Speedie, Stuart; Westra, Bonnie L

    2015-01-01

    Health care data included in clinical data repositories (CDRs) are increasingly used for quality reporting, business analytics and research; however, extended clinical data from interprofessional practice are seldom included. With the increasing emphasis on care coordination across settings, CDRs need to include data from all clinicians and be harmonized to understand the impact of their collaborative efforts on patient safety, effectiveness and efficiency. This study characterizes the extended clinical data derived from EHR flowsheet data that is available in the University of Minnesota's CDR and describes a process for creating an ontology that organizes that data so that it is more useful and accessible to researchers. The process is illustrated using a pressure ulcer ontology and compares ease of finding concepts in i2b2 for different data organization approaches. The challenges of the manual process and difficulties combining similar concepts are discussed.

  3. Clinical and Experimental Research Utilizing the DACL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Bonnie R.

    Since the development of the Lubin Depression Adjective Check Lists (DACL) in 1965, researchers have used this instrument in many empirical and clinical studies. Scores on the DACL have correlated with other measures of depression and have also been related to personal characteristics of depressed individuals. The DACL has been used in studies to…

  4. Single Case Research Results as Clinical Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Richard I.; Hagan-Burke, Shanna

    2007-01-01

    The movement toward evidence-based treatments, interventions, or practices pressures single case research (SCR) to use statistical summaries which have broad credibility. These summaries also need to be easily understood and useful in schools and clinics. To date the effect size families, "proportion of variance" ("R"[superscript 2],…

  5. Be a Partner in Clinical Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Latest Issue This Issue Features Be a Partner in Clinical Research Better Check Your Bowels Health Capsules Are You at Risk for Alcohol-Medication Interactions? Measles: Preventable with Vaccines Featured Website: National Center ...

  6. Diabetes research in jeopardy: the extinction of clinical diabetes researchers.

    PubMed

    Rossini, Aldo A; Greiner, Dale L

    2007-04-01

    Finding a cure for an autoimmune disease, such as diabetes, must be viewed as a marathon. Although there are occasional quick sprints forward on the road to discovery, the bulk of research is carried out steadily over time. Over the years, researchers have made progressive strides toward a cure, but our field is now facing a crisis. We need youthful researchers with fresh new perspectives to carry on the work started by forerunners in the field. In fact, many young people never get the opportunity to work in a scientific field. Of those who do choose to study science, after receiving a bachelor's degree in that field, only 4% eventually receive their doctorate. There are many reasons for the abrupt end of the academic path for these students. Perhaps they are stymied in their education, frustrated by the lack of grant support and mentorship provided to young scientists. On average, a scientist receives his or her first NIH R01 award at the age of 43 years. Moreover, many young researchers lack the mentorship they seek from more established scientists. This hurdle can be overcome by providing young scientists the ability to work unreservedly with other mature scientists. Ideally, a Diabetes Research Center needs to be geared toward facilitating collaboration and free exchange of ideas to promote the maturation of young scientists. Additionally, this environment, can offer young scientists the resources that would otherwise be unavailable to them. This concept is fundamental to creating more experienced and prolific scientists in the field of diabetes.

  7. Towards a portal and search engine to facilitate academic and research collaboration in engineering and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla Villarreal, Isaura Nathaly

    While international academic and research collaborations are of great importance at this time, it is not easy to find researchers in the engineering field that publish in languages other than English. Because of this disconnect, there exists a need for a portal to find Who's Who in Engineering Education in the Americas. The objective of this thesis is to built an object-oriented architecture for this proposed portal. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) model developed in this thesis incorporates the basic structure of a social network for academic purposes. Reverse engineering of three social networks portals yielded important aspects of their structures that have been incorporated in the proposed UML model. Furthermore, the present work includes a pattern for academic social networks..

  8. Community ACTION Boards: An Innovative Model for Effective Community–Academic Research Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    James, Sherline; Arniella, Guedy; Bickell, Nina A.; Walker, Willie; Robinson, Virginia; Taylor, Barbara; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Community-based participatory research (CBPR) requires equitable partnerships between community stakeholders and academics. Traditionally, researchers relied on community advisory boards, but these boards often play a reactive role on a project-by-project basis. The East and Central Harlem Health Outcomes (ECHHO) Community Action Board (CAB), however, is an effective, proactive group. Objectives The ECHHO board sought to identify key strategies and tools to build and employ a partnership model, and to disseminate lessons learned to other community–academic partnerships. Methods Current and former board members were interviewed and a wide range of related documents was reviewed. Lessons Learned The board became effective when it prioritized action and relationship-building, across seven key domains: Shared priorities, diversity, participation, transparency, mutual respect and recognition, and personal connections. The model is depicted graphically. Conclusion Community advisory boards may benefit from attention to taking action, and to building relationships between academics and community members. PMID:22616207

  9. [AGIKO (Clinical Research Fellow); a training model aimed at enhancement of clinical scientific research].

    PubMed

    van Rees-Wortelboer, M M; Lamberts, S W; Klasen, E C

    1997-06-21

    The enhancement of clinical scientific research in the Netherlands is being stimulated to a substantial extent by the introduction and stimulation of a training model aimed at the combined training of physicians to both a general practitioner or specialist and a clinical researcher, the AGIKO (Clinical Research Fellow). The model has been recognized by the Central College for Recognition and Registration of Medical Specialists. Extra stimulation by the section Medical Sciences of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (MW-NWO) makes it possible to appoint AGIKOs on second or third flows of funds but also within the first flow of funds. During the last two years, 25 AGIKO applications from ten medical specialisms have been approved. The AGIKO model may help to meet (expected) needs for future clinical-medical research workers in specific research areas.

  10. Georgia Teachers in Academic Laboratories: Research Experiences in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, D.

    2005-12-01

    The Georgia Intern-Fellowships for Teachers (GIFT) is a collaborative effort designed to enhance mathematics and science experiences of Georgia teachers and their students through summer research internships for teachers. By offering business, industry, public science institute and research summer fellowships to teachers, GIFT provides educators with first-hand exposure to the skills and knowledge necessary for the preparation of our future workforce. Since 1991, GIFT has placed middle and high school mathematics, science and technology teachers in over 1000 positions throughout the state. In these fellowships, teachers are involved in cutting edge scientific and engineering research, data analysis, curriculum development and real-world inquiry and problem solving, and create Action Plans to assist them in translating the experience into changed classroom practice. Since 2004, an increasing number of high school students have worked with their teachers in research laboratories. The GIFT program places an average of 75 teachers per summer into internship positions. In the summer of 2005, 83 teachers worked in corporate and research environments throughout the state of Georgia and six of these positions involved authentic research in geoscience related departments at the Georgia Institute of Technology, including aerospace engineering and the earth and atmospheric sciences laboratories. This presentation will review the history and the structure of the program including the support system for teachers and mentors as well as the emphasis on inquiry based learning strategies. The focus of the presentation will be a comparison of two placement models of the teachers placed in geoscience research laboratories: middle school earth science teachers placed in a 6 week research experience and high school teachers placed in 7 week internships with teams of 3 high school students. The presentation will include interviews with faculty to determine the value of these experiences

  11. The Brave New World of clinical cancer research: Adaptive biomarker-driven trials integrating clinical practice with clinical research.

    PubMed

    Berry, Donald A

    2015-05-01

    Clinical trials are the final links in the chains of knowledge and for determining the roles of therapeutic advances. Unfortunately, in an important sense they are the weakest links. This article describes two designs that are being explored today: platform trials and basket trials. Both are attempting to merge clinical research and clinical practice.

  12. Assessment of the Need to Integrate Academic Electronic Medical Records Into the Undergraduate Clinical Practicum: A Focus Group Interview.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mona; Park, Joon Ho; Lee, Hyeong Suk

    2016-06-01

    As healthcare systems demand that nurses be competent in using electronic medical records for patient care, the integration of electronic medical records into nursing curricula has become necessary. The purpose of this study was to explore how students, new nurses, clinical instructors, and faculty perceive the integration of academic electronic medical records into the undergraduate clinical practicum. From January to February 2014, four focus group interviews with 18 participants were conducted based on purposive sampling. Content analysis was used on the unabridged transcripts to extract themes and develop meaningful categories. Three major themes and eight subthemes were revealed from the focus group interviews. The major themes were "electronic medical record as a learning tool for clinical practicum," "essential functions of academic electronic medical records," and "expected outcomes of academic electronic medical record." Participants expected academic electronic medical records to enhance students' nursing informatics competencies. The findings of this study can inform the process of developing academic electronic medical records for clinical practicum, which will then augment students' informatics competencies. PMID:27081757

  13. [The research protocol II: study designs in clinical research].

    PubMed

    Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel; Miranda-Novales, María Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    In clinical research that takes place in health-care areas, most of the studies are performed with human beings as research subjects. The main objectives of these studies are to know the characteristics of one or more groups, the behavior of human diseases, the etiology or causes of diseases, to identify the best diagnostic tools, or to establish the best treatment for a condition or disease in particular. Additionally, some studies are classified as basic bio-medical research; in these investigations, the subjects of study are laboratory animals, tissues, cells, or molecules. In general terms, the objectives of these studies are to understand the physiology, pathogenesis, or biological mechanisms that could explain functions or alterations in one or more systems or body organs. This article will only address clinical research designs.

  14. Fetal cardiac interventions: clinical and experimental research

    PubMed Central

    Humuruola, Gulimila

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cardiac interventions for congenital heart diseases may alleviate heart dysfunction, prevent them evolving into hypoplastic left heart syndrome, achieve biventricular outcome and improve fetal survival. Candidates for clinical fetal cardiac interventions are now restricted to cases of critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The therapeutic options are advocated as prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of interatrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Experimental research on fetal cardiac intervention involves technical modifications of catheter-based cardiac clinical interventions and open fetal cardiac bypass that cannot be applied in human fetuses for the time being. Clinical fetal cardiac interventions are plausible for midgestation fetuses with the above-mentioned congenital heart defects. The technical success, biventricular outcome and fetal survival are continuously being improved in the conditions of the sophisticated multidisciplinary team, equipment, techniques and postnatal care. Experimental research is laying the foundations and may open new fields for catheter-based clinical techniques. In the present article, the clinical therapeutic options and experimental fetal cardiac interventions are described. PMID:27279868

  15. Fetal cardiac interventions: clinical and experimental research.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Humuruola, Gulimila

    2016-01-01

    Fetal cardiac interventions for congenital heart diseases may alleviate heart dysfunction, prevent them evolving into hypoplastic left heart syndrome, achieve biventricular outcome and improve fetal survival. Candidates for clinical fetal cardiac interventions are now restricted to cases of critical aortic valve stenosis with evolving hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia with an intact ventricular septum and evolving hypoplastic right heart syndrome, and hypoplastic left heart syndrome with an intact or highly restrictive atrial septum as well as fetal heart block. The therapeutic options are advocated as prenatal aortic valvuloplasty, pulmonary valvuloplasty, creation of interatrial communication and fetal cardiac pacing. Experimental research on fetal cardiac intervention involves technical modifications of catheter-based cardiac clinical interventions and open fetal cardiac bypass that cannot be applied in human fetuses for the time being. Clinical fetal cardiac interventions are plausible for midgestation fetuses with the above-mentioned congenital heart defects. The technical success, biventricular outcome and fetal survival are continuously being improved in the conditions of the sophisticated multidisciplinary team, equipment, techniques and postnatal care. Experimental research is laying the foundations and may open new fields for catheter-based clinical techniques. In the present article, the clinical therapeutic options and experimental fetal cardiac interventions are described. PMID:27279868

  16. Pathways to Advancing Aging Policy-Relevant Research in Academic Settings.

    PubMed

    Kietzman, Kathryn G; Troy, Lisa M; Green, Carmen R; Wallace, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Policy-level changes have a significant influence on the health and well-being of aging populations. Yet there is often a gap between scientific knowledge and policy action. Although previous research has identified barriers and facilitators to effective knowledge translation, little attention has been given to the role of academic institutions in knowledge generation. This exploratory focus group study examines barriers and pathways to developing and maintaining an aging policy-relevant research agenda in academic settings, and additional challenges associated with minority group membership in this pursuit. Participants were personally committed to conducting policy-relevant research despite institutional barriers such as fewer funding opportunities and less value attributed to their research, particularly in the context of tenure and promotion. Although many viewed their research as an opportunity to make a difference, especially for underserved older adult populations, a number of minority group participants expressed that their policy research interests were marginalized. Participants offer individual and institutional-level strategies for addressing barriers, including collaborating with community members and colleagues and engaging mentors within and outside of their academic institutions. Reframing the valuation of policy research through the diversification of funding and publishing opportunities can better support scholars engaged in aging policy-relevant research. PMID:26849290

  17. Pathways to Advancing Aging Policy-Relevant Research in Academic Settings

    PubMed Central

    KIETZMAN, KATHRYN G.; TROY, LISA M.; GREEN, CARMEN R.; WALLACE, STEVEN P.

    2016-01-01

    Policy-level changes have a significant influence on the health and well-being of aging populations. Yet there is often a gap between scientific knowledge and policy action. Although previous research has identified barriers and facilitators to effective knowledge translation, little attention has been given to the role of academic institutions in knowledge generation. This exploratory focus group study examines barriers and pathways to developing and maintaining an aging policy-relevant research agenda in academic settings, and additional challenges associated with minority group membership in this pursuit. Participants were personally committed to conducting policy-relevant research despite institutional barriers such as fewer funding opportunities and less value attributed to their research, particularly in the context of tenure and promotion. Although many viewed their research as an opportunity to make a difference, especially for underserved older adult populations, a number of minority group participants expressed that their policy research interests were marginalized. Participants offer individual and institutional-level strategies for addressing barriers, including collaborating with community members and colleagues and engaging mentors within and outside of their academic institutions. Reframing the valuation of policy research through the diversification of funding and publishing opportunities can better support scholars engaged in aging policy-relevant research. PMID:26849290

  18. Academic Research and Canadian Manufacturing Productivity since the Formation of NAFTA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brox, James

    2007-01-01

    Does academic research have a positive impact on productivity? To examine this question, the paper focuses on national Canadian manufacturing data, using a variable-cost CES-translog cost system. Changes in the elasticities calculated from the estimation results allow the study of the impact of the free-trade agreements on Canadian production and…

  19. Academic Research Equipment in Selected Science Engineering Fields: 1982-83 to 1985-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgdorf, Kenneth; Chaney, Bradford

    This report presents information for identification of the national trends in the amount, age, loss, condition, and perceived adequacy of academic research equipment in selected science and engineering fields. The data were obtained from a stratified probability sample of 55 colleges and universities and from a separately selected sample of 24…

  20. Teaching/Research Relations in Departments: The Perspectives of Built Environment Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durning, Bridget; Jenkins, Alan

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the perceptions of built environment academics in four post-1992 universities in the UK on teaching/research relations. Whilst set in particular departments, institutions and disciplines, it addresses issues that are of central concern worldwide. This study indicates that securing effective teaching/research…

  1. Academic Librarians and Research: A Study of Canadian Library Administrator Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Selinda Adelle; Jacobs, Heidi L. M.; Cornwall, Dayna

    2013-01-01

    Within the literature exploring the role of research in academic librarianship, very little attention has been paid to the perspectives of upper library administrators. This perspective is critical because library administrators play a key role in hiring, evaluating, supporting, promoting, and tenuring professional librarians. As a way of bringing…

  2. Productivity and Academic Assessment in Brazil: Challenges for Qualitative Health Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosi, Maria Lucia Magalhaes

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges to the qualitative health research approach, under the regime of productivity that rules current academic evaluation in many countries. The analysis considers aspects common to several contexts, illustrating the discussion with the Brazilian context and, more specifically, within the dynamics of the collective…

  3. Shanghai Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) and the "Big Five" South African Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boshoff, N.

    2009-01-01

    This article critically examines the methodology of the Shanghai Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) by generating raw scores for the "big five" South African research universities (Stellenbosch, Cape Town, Kwazulu-Natal, Pretoria and the Witwatersrand, henceforth referred to as SU, UCT, UKZN, UP and WITS) using the ARWU indicators. The…

  4. A Complex Systems Framework for Research on Leadership and Organizational Dynamics in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilstrap, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a historiographical analysis of major leadership and organizational development theories that have shaped our thinking about how we lead and administrate academic libraries. Drawing from behavioral, cognitive, systems, and complexity theories, this article discusses major theorists and research studies appearing over the past…

  5. Study of the Performance and Characteristics of U.S. Academic Research Institution Technology Commercialization (ARITC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jisun

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation aims to provide a better understanding of the technology licensing practices of academic research institutions. The study identifies time durations in licensing and incorporates these into a model to evaluate licensing performance. Performance is measured by the efficiency of an institution's technology licensing process and…

  6. Archimedes, Reading, and the Sustenance of Academic Research Culture in Library Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cain, Amanda

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the history of academic research, library instruction, and the role of leisure, reflection, and creativity. Suggests that these cultural elements should be introduced to undergraduates and contends that deep reading, rather than information literacy competency, cultivates these elements. Examines productivity and the faculty research…

  7. The Dislocation of Teaching and Research and the Reconfiguring of Academic Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locke, William

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between teaching and research is a touchstone in thinking about higher education. However, the last 40 years has seen the "dislocation" of these core academic activities as a result of policy and operational decisions to distinguish the way they are funded, managed, assessed and rewarded. The activities of "teaching" and…

  8. Spanning the HRD Academic-Practitioner Divide: Bridging the Gap through Mode 2 Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David E.; Iles, Paul; Watson, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to explore dimensions and tensions in the relationship between theory (usually produced by academics) and practice (the domain, normally of practitioners) in human resource development (HRD). Design/methodology/approach: The paper examines, from a conceptual perspective, the nature of mode 2 research, where knowledge is…

  9. Promoting Academic Achievement among English Learners: A Guide to the Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldenberg, Claude; Coleman, Rhoda

    2010-01-01

    A generation or two ago, the achievement of children who came to school knowing little or no English was not a prominent national issue. Today, with the increased focus on school accountability and educational equity, it is. This comprehensive resource explores the research on promoting academic success among language-minority students. The…

  10. Focus on Academic and Research Libraries: Librarians Speak Out to Journal Publishers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaser, Dick

    2009-01-01

    What is the economic situation in libraries these days? What are academic and research libraries doing with regard to making the resources in their collections more discoverable? Are they involved in institutional repository (IR) projects? And how do IRs and the availability of open access journals affect library purchasing decisions? Those were…

  11. Epistemological, Artefactual and Interactional-Institutional Foundations of Social Impact of Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miettinen, Reijo; Tuunainen, Juha; Esko, Terhi

    2015-01-01

    Because of the gross difficulties in measuring the societal impact of academic research, qualitative approaches have been developed in the last decade mostly based on forms of interaction between university and other societal stakeholders. In this paper, we suggest a framework for qualitative analysis based on the distinction between three…

  12. Academic Writing in a Second Language: Essays on Research and Pedagogy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belcher, Diane, Ed.; Braine, George, Ed.

    Essays on research and teaching of academic writing in English as a second language include:"When Practice Doesn't Make Perfect: The Case of a Graduate ESL Student" (Melanie Schneider, Naomi K. Fujishima); "Good Writing: I Know It When I See It" (Ilona Leki); "Redefining the Task: An Ethnographic Examination of Writing and Response in Graduate…

  13. Developing an Organizational Understanding of Faculty Mentoring Programs in Academic Medicine in Major American Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer Zellers, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and contextual factors associated with faculty mentoring programs in academic medicine within major research institutions in the United States, and explores the usefulness of organizational behavior theory in understanding these relationships. To date, many formal faculty mentoring programs are in operation…

  14. The Ideal Research-Teaching Nexus in the Eyes of Academics: Building Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser-Wijnveen, Gerda J.; Van Driel, Jan H.; Van der Rijst, Roeland M.; Verloop, Nico; Visser, Anthonya

    2010-01-01

    Research and teaching are supposed to be closely related in universities. Among academics the belief in a symbiotic relationship is strong. However, it is unclear what form this relationship can take. Several authors have presented categories and dimensions to clarify this relationship and the aim of this project was to contribute to this…

  15. Replication Research in Comparative Genre Analysis in English for Academic Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basturkmen, Helen

    2014-01-01

    In recent years a number of comparative studies based on an established approach to genre analysis have been published in the English for Academic Purposes (EAP) literature. Studies in this emerging strand of research typically aim to identify how the rhetorical structure of a particular genre (a text type) or part of a genre may vary across…

  16. Program Participation and Academic Progress of Second Language Learners: Texas Middle School Update. Policy Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Div. of Research and Evaluation.

    This study examined program participation and academic progress of second language learners, following a cohort of Texas public school students from the school years, 1992-93 to 1999-00 as they progressed through the elementary and middle grades. Researchers examined the following: changes in Texas policy related to students with limited English…

  17. Is the Relationship between AP® Participation and Academic Performance Really Meaningful? Research Brief 2015-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Maureen; Howell, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Strong academic performance in college, as measured by first-year grades, is important for a host of reasons, but perhaps the most critical reason is that students who perform well in their first year of college are more likely to earn a bachelor's degree (Adelman, 2006). Research shows that Advanced Placement Program® (AP®) students, particularly…

  18. What Research Says: About the Correlation between Athletic Participation and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantine, Robert J.

    Research has differing things to say about the effects of athletic participation on the academic achievement of athletes. Interest in this relationship has generated a number of studies at the high school and college levels, although little has been done at the junior high school level. A review, done in 1934, of 41 studies found that non-athletes…

  19. Promoting Doctoral Students' Research Self-Efficacy: Combining Academic Guidance with Autonomy Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overall, Nickola C.; Deane, Kelsey L.; Peterson, Elizabeth R.

    2011-01-01

    A diverse sample of doctoral students completed an on-line questionnaire assessing their supervisors' academic, personal and autonomy support and their research self-efficacy. The more task-related help and personal support students received, the more positively they evaluated their supervision. The degree to which supervisors encouraged students…

  20. What Research Says: The Effects of Reward Systems on Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Lucinda M.; Corpus, Deborah A.

    2001-01-01

    Examines educational research on the effects of rewards and punishments on students' academic performance. Discusses findings on the effects of extrinsic and intrinsic rewards, locus of control with students or teacher, the benefits of celebrations and rewards, and implications for the classroom. (JPB)

  1. Academic Procrastination and the Performance of Graduate-Level Cooperative Groups in Research Methods Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiao, Qun G.; DaRos-Voseles, Denise A.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which academic procrastination predicted the performance of cooperative groups in graduate-level research methods courses. A total of 28 groups was examined (n = 83 students), ranging in size from 2 to 5 (M = 2.96, SD = 1.10). Multiple regression analyses revealed that neither within-group mean nor within-group…

  2. Do academic knowledge brokers exist? Using social network analysis to explore academic research-to-policy networks from six schools of public health in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Jessani, Nasreen S; Boulay, Marc G; Bennett, Sara C

    2016-06-01

    The potential for academic research institutions to facilitate knowledge exchange and influence evidence-informed decision-making has been gaining ground. Schools of public health (SPHs) may play a key knowledge brokering role-serving as agencies of and for development. Understanding academic-policymaker networks can facilitate the enhancement of links between policymakers and academic faculty at SPHs, as well as assist in identifying academic knowledge brokers (KBs). Using a census approach, we administered a sociometric survey to academic faculty across six SPHs in Kenya to construct academic-policymaker networks. We identified academic KBs using social network analysis (SNA) in a two-step approach: First, we ranked individuals based on (1) number of policymakers in their network; (2) number of academic peers who report seeking them out for advice on knowledge translation and (3) their network position as 'inter-group connectors'. Second, we triangulated the three scores and re-ranked individuals. Academic faculty scoring within the top decile across all three measures were classified as KBs. Results indicate that each SPH commands a variety of unique as well as overlapping relationships with national ministries in Kenya. Of 124 full-time faculty, we identified 7 KBs in 4 of the 6 SPHs. Those scoring high on the first measure were not necessarily the same individuals scoring high on the second. KBs were also situated in a wide range along the 'connector/betweenness' measure. We propose that a composite score rather than traditional 'betweenness centrality', provides an alternative means of identifying KBs within these networks. In conclusion, SNA is a valuable tool for identifying academic-policymaker networks in Kenya. More efforts to conduct similar network studies would permit SPH leadership to identify existing linkages between faculty and policymakers, shared linkages with other SPHs and gaps so as to contribute to evidence-informed health policies. PMID

  3. Do academic knowledge brokers exist? Using social network analysis to explore academic research-to-policy networks from six schools of public health in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Jessani, Nasreen S; Boulay, Marc G; Bennett, Sara C

    2016-06-01

    The potential for academic research institutions to facilitate knowledge exchange and influence evidence-informed decision-making has been gaining ground. Schools of public health (SPHs) may play a key knowledge brokering role-serving as agencies of and for development. Understanding academic-policymaker networks can facilitate the enhancement of links between policymakers and academic faculty at SPHs, as well as assist in identifying academic knowledge brokers (KBs). Using a census approach, we administered a sociometric survey to academic faculty across six SPHs in Kenya to construct academic-policymaker networks. We identified academic KBs using social network analysis (SNA) in a two-step approach: First, we ranked individuals based on (1) number of policymakers in their network; (2) number of academic peers who report seeking them out for advice on knowledge translation and (3) their network position as 'inter-group connectors'. Second, we triangulated the three scores and re-ranked individuals. Academic faculty scoring within the top decile across all three measures were classified as KBs. Results indicate that each SPH commands a variety of unique as well as overlapping relationships with national ministries in Kenya. Of 124 full-time faculty, we identified 7 KBs in 4 of the 6 SPHs. Those scoring high on the first measure were not necessarily the same individuals scoring high on the second. KBs were also situated in a wide range along the 'connector/betweenness' measure. We propose that a composite score rather than traditional 'betweenness centrality', provides an alternative means of identifying KBs within these networks. In conclusion, SNA is a valuable tool for identifying academic-policymaker networks in Kenya. More efforts to conduct similar network studies would permit SPH leadership to identify existing linkages between faculty and policymakers, shared linkages with other SPHs and gaps so as to contribute to evidence-informed health policies.

  4. Do academic knowledge brokers exist? Using social network analysis to explore academic research-to-policy networks from six schools of public health in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Jessani, Nasreen S; Boulay, Marc G; Bennett, Sara C

    2016-01-01

    The potential for academic research institutions to facilitate knowledge exchange and influence evidence-informed decision-making has been gaining ground. Schools of public health (SPHs) may play a key knowledge brokering role—serving as agencies of and for development. Understanding academic-policymaker networks can facilitate the enhancement of links between policymakers and academic faculty at SPHs, as well as assist in identifying academic knowledge brokers (KBs). Using a census approach, we administered a sociometric survey to academic faculty across six SPHs in Kenya to construct academic-policymaker networks. We identified academic KBs using social network analysis (SNA) in a two-step approach: First, we ranked individuals based on (1) number of policymakers in their network; (2) number of academic peers who report seeking them out for advice on knowledge translation and (3) their network position as ‘inter-group connectors’. Second, we triangulated the three scores and re-ranked individuals. Academic faculty scoring within the top decile across all three measures were classified as KBs. Results indicate that each SPH commands a variety of unique as well as overlapping relationships with national ministries in Kenya. Of 124 full-time faculty, we identified 7 KBs in 4 of the 6 SPHs. Those scoring high on the first measure were not necessarily the same individuals scoring high on the second. KBs were also situated in a wide range along the ‘connector/betweenness’ measure. We propose that a composite score rather than traditional ‘betweenness centrality’, provides an alternative means of identifying KBs within these networks. In conclusion, SNA is a valuable tool for identifying academic-policymaker networks in Kenya. More efforts to conduct similar network studies would permit SPH leadership to identify existing linkages between faculty and policymakers, shared linkages with other SPHs and gaps so as to contribute to evidence-informed health

  5. Reengineering the national clinical and translational research enterprise: the strategic plan of the National Clinical and Translational Science Awards Consortium.

    PubMed

    Reis, Steven E; Berglund, Lars; Bernard, Gordon R; Califf, Robert M; Fitzgerald, Garret A; Johnson, Peter C

    2010-03-01

    Advances in human health require the efficient and rapid translation of scientific discoveries into effective clinical treatments; this process, in turn, depends on observational data gathered from patients, communities, and public health research that can be used to guide basic scientific investigation. Such bidirectional translational science, however, faces unprecedented challenges due to the rapid pace of scientific and technological development, as well as the difficulties of negotiating increasingly complex regulatory and commercial environments that overlap the research domain. Further, numerous barriers to translational science have emerged among the nation's academic research centers, including basic structural and cultural impediments to innovation and collaboration, shortages of trained investigators, and inadequate funding.To address these serious and systemic problems, in 2006 the National Institutes of Health created the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program, which aims to catalyze the transformation of biomedical research at a national level, speeding the discovery and development of therapies, fostering collaboration, engaging communities, and training succeeding generations of clinical and translational researchers. The authors report in detail on the planning process, begun in 2008, that was used to engage stakeholders and to identify, refine, and ultimately implement the CTSA program's overarching strategic goals. They also discuss the implications and likely impact of this strategic planning process as it is applied among the nation's academic health centers. PMID:20182119

  6. From Research to Practice: Promoting Academic Competence for Underserved Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Edward S.

    2008-01-01

    Over many decades, the efforts of researchers to understand key issues in the reading performance of those children most at risk for developing later reading problems has been relentless. This article presents the author's commentary to three studies: (1) Vanderwood, Linklater, and Healy (2008); (2) Edl, Jones, and Estell (2008); and (3) Baker et…

  7. Electronic Publishing: Research Issues for Academic Librarians and Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Addresses the need for further research into three important areas of electronic publishing: how the change to digital information sources is affecting the scholarly work of college and university students; when libraries select electronic journals, how products offered to them or the delivery models they choose influence scholarship and the way…

  8. In Russia, a Model Program Reunites Research and Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacWilliams, Bryon

    2007-01-01

    Scientific research has traditionally been left to professionals in Russia. Here, though, graduates and undergraduates work alongside established scientists from different fields, on modern equipment. Some even earn enough money to support themselves. The students have been given this chance under a joint program of the United States and Russia…

  9. Sustainability Accounting Courses, Talloires Declaration and Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Tehmina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to identify the offering and nature (scope) of sustainability accounting courses at universities that have signed the Talloires Declaration and also at universities with prominent sustainability accounting researchers' affiliations. For this purpose a university web sites content analysis for sustainability…

  10. Natives and Academics: Researching and Writing about American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihesuah, Devon A., Ed.

    This anthology provides Native perspectives on the ethics of researching, writing about, and teaching about American Indians, and may be used as a text for discussion in American Indian Studies classes. Leading Native scholars discuss the representativeness of Native informants, the merits of various data collection methods, the role and veracity…

  11. Student Engagement Research in Higher Education: Questioning an Academic Orthodoxy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zepke, Nick

    2014-01-01

    This article suggests that student engagement research is not often investigated critically. It attempts to change this. After briefly outlining a conceptual framework for student engagement, it explores three critical questions about it. First, it asks whether in trying to be all things in teaching and learning, student engagement focuses too…

  12. The Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe): An Informatics Foundation for the Science of Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Ida; Tu, Samson W.; Carini, Simona; Lehmann, Harold P.; Pollock, Brad H.; Peleg, Mor; Wittkowski, Knut M.

    2013-01-01

    To date, the scientific process for generating, interpreting, and applying knowledge has received less informatics attention than operational processes for conducting clinical studies. The activities of these scientific processes — the science of clinical research — are centered on the study protocol, which is the abstract representation of the scientific design of a clinical study. The Ontology of Clinical Research (OCRe) is an OWL 2 model of the entities and relationships of study design protocols for the purpose of computationally supporting the design and analysis of human studies. OCRe’s modeling is independent of any specific study design or clinical domain. It includes a study design typology and a specialized module called ERGO Annotation for capturing the meaning of eligibility criteria. In this paper, we describe the key informatics use cases of each phase of a study’s scientific lifecycle, present OCRe and the principles behind its modeling, and describe applications of OCRe and associated technologies to a range of clinical research use cases. OCRe captures the central semantics that underlies the scientific processes of clinical research and can serve as an informatics foundation for supporting the entire range of knowledge activities that constitute the science of clinical research. PMID:24239612

  13. Predictive power of individual factors and clinical learning experience on academic success: findings from a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Dante, Angelo; Fabris, Stefano; Palese, Alvisa

    2015-01-01

    Academic failure is the inability of a nursing student to graduate or to complete the nursing degree on time. This longitudinal cohort study, involving 2 Italian universities, documents the effects of selected individual variables and the quality of the clinical learning experience as perceived by students on academic success. Factors related to the clinical learning experience were the quality of the supervisory relationship, pedagogical atmosphere, and commitment of the ward related to the level of personalized nursing care delivered and clarity of nursing documentation. PMID:25643319

  14. Clinical Research Trials | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Clinical Research Trials Past Issues / Summer 2012 Table of Contents Let the Opportunities to Join A Clinical Study Find You How does clinical research work? Visit our website and click on New ...

  15. How can we improve clinical research in clinical practice with better research outcome?

    PubMed

    Woo, Keng Thye; Wong, Kok Seng; Lee, Evan J C; Chan, Choong Meng

    2011-11-01

    This paper explains some of the difficulties doctors face when taking up a career in research. It describes the efforts by the government and the Ministry of Health (MOH) to nurture the Clinician Scientist Programme. The nature of research and the mindset of clinicians who are passionate about research are explored and the reasons which drive some of them to pursue a research career. It discusses the need to have structured training for research and how continuing research education is necessary for the researcher. The paper discusses the goals for research and how we can achieve better research outcomes and the importance of good mentorship. It suggests ways to engage more doctors in research in the restructured hospitals by overcoming some of the problems they encounter. Finally, it relates the Biomedical Science initiative of the government through the National Research Foundation and the various programmes in Translational Clinical Research available for clinicians who are keen on a research career.

  16. Making the Connections across Institutional Types and Academic Programs: Recommendations for Institutional Research Practice and Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Beverly Rae

    2016-01-01

    This chapter sheds light on the ways in which institutional research (IR) professionals can be involved in the development and/or modification of high-quality academic programs. Suggestions from authors within this volume for how IR can assist in accomplishing these goals will be integrated and organized in alignment with Terenzini's (1993) three…

  17. Linking Clinical Research Data to Population Databases

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, Linda S.; Guo, Jia-Wen; Fraser, Alison; Beck, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Most clinical nursing research is limited to funded study periods. Researchers can study relationships between study measures and long-term outcomes if clinical research data can be linked to population databases. Objectives The objective was to describe feasibility of linking research participant data to data from population databases in order to study long-term poststudy outcomes. As an exemplar, participants were linked from a completed oncology nursing research trial to outcomes data in two state population databases. Methods Participant data from a previously completed symptom management study were linked to the Utah Population Database and the Utah Emergency Department Database. The final dataset contained demographic, cancer diagnosis and treatment, and baseline data from the oncology study linked to poststudy long-term outcomes from the population databases. Results One hundred twenty-nine of 144 (89.6%) study participants were linked to their individual data in the population databases. Of those, 73% were linked to hospitalization records, 60% to emergency department visit records, and 28% were identified as having died. Discussion Study participant data were successfully linked to population databases data to describe poststudy emergency department visit and hospitalization numbers and mortality. The results suggest that data linkage success can be improved if researchers include linkage and human subjects protection plans related to linkage in the initial study design. PMID:24165220

  18. Reengineering Clinical Research Science: A Focus on Translational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrell, Courtney B.

    2009-01-01

    The burden of disease in the United States is high. Mental illness is currently the leading cause of disease burden among 15- to 44-year-olds. This phenomenon is occurring despite the many advances that have been made in clinical research. Several efficacious interventions are available to treat many of these disorders; however, they are greatly…

  19. Researchers' views of the acceptability of restrictive provisions in clinical trial agreements with industry sponsors.

    PubMed

    Mello, Michelle M; Clarridge, Brian R; Studdert, David M

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a mail survey of 884 U.S. medical school faculty active in clinical research to elicit their views about the acceptability of provisions in contracts for industry-sponsored clinical trials that would restrict investigators' academic freedom and control over trials. We compared their responses to results from a similar survey of research administrators at 107 medical schools. There was substantial variation among clinical researchers in their acceptability judgments, with a relatively large proportion of clinical trial investigators willing to accept provisions that give industry sponsors considerable control over the dissemination of research results. There were significant differences in the perceptions of clinical trial investigators versus other recently published clinical researchers; investigators with a high versus low percentage of research support from industry; junior versus senior faculty; and investigators at institutions with high versus low National Institute of Health (NIH) funding ranks. There was also a significant divergence of views in a number of areas between clinical trialists and research administrators who negotiate clinical trial contracts on their behalf. Medical school faculty could benefit from additional guidance about what their institution views as acceptable parameters for industry-sponsored clinical trial agreements.

  20. Workplace Influences on Chinese TEFL Academics' Development as Researchers: A Study of Two Chinese Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bai, Li; Millwater, Jan; Hudson, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Workplace influences on Chinese Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) academics' development as researchers were examined in two Chinese higher education institutions in this qualitative collective case study. Data sources included research documentation and interviews with 12 Chinese TEFL academics. Both institutions were keen on…

  1. Extending VIVO ontology to represent research and educational resources in an academic biomedical informatics department.

    PubMed

    Nakikj, Drashko; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    The increasing need for interdisciplinary team sciences makes it vital for academic research departments to publicize their research and educational resources as part of "linked data" on the semantic web to facilitate research networking and recruitment. We extended an open-source ontology, VIVO, to represent the research and educational resources in an academic biomedical informatics department to enable ontology-based information storage and retrieval. Using participatory design methods, we surveyed representative types of visitors to the department web site to understand their information needs, and incorporated these needs into the ontology design. We added 114 classes and 186 properties to VIVO. Generalizability and scalability are the measures used in our theoretical evaluation.

  2. Implementation of Epic Beaker Clinical Pathology at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.; Wilford, Joseph D.; Howard, Wanita; Dane, Susan K.; Davis, Scott R.; Karandikar, Nitin J.; Blau, John L.; Ford, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epic Beaker Clinical Pathology (CP) is a relatively new laboratory information system (LIS) operating within the Epic suite of software applications. To date, there have not been any publications describing implementation of Beaker CP. In this report, we describe our experience in implementing Beaker CP version 2012 at a state academic medical center with a go-live of August 2014 and a subsequent upgrade to Beaker version 2014 in May 2015. The implementation of Beaker CP was concurrent with implementations of Epic modules for revenue cycle, patient scheduling, and patient registration. Methods: Our analysis covers approximately 3 years of time (2 years preimplementation of Beaker CP and roughly 1 year after) using data summarized from pre- and post-implementation meetings, debriefings, and the closure document for the project. Results: We summarize positive aspects of, and key factors leading to, a successful implementation of Beaker CP. The early inclusion of subject matter experts in the design and validation of Beaker workflows was very helpful. Since Beaker CP does not directly interface with laboratory instrumentation, the clinical laboratories spent extensive preimplementation effort establishing middleware interfaces. Immediate challenges postimplementation included bar code scanning and nursing adaptation to Beaker CP specimen collection. The most substantial changes in laboratory workflow occurred with microbiology orders. This posed a considerable challenge with microbiology orders from the operating rooms and required intensive interventions in the weeks following go-live. In postimplementation surveys, pathology staff, informatics staff, and end-users expressed satisfaction with the new LIS. Conclusions: Beaker CP can serve as an effective LIS for an academic medical center. Careful planning and preparation aid the transition to this LIS. PMID:26955505

  3. Academic Jibberish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krashen, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about academic jibberish. Alfie Kohn states that a great deal of academic writing is incomprehensible even to others in the same area of scholarship. Academic Jibberish may score points for the writer but does not help research or practice. The author discusses jibberish as a career strategy that impresses those…

  4. PSI: The Dutch Academic Infrastructure for shared biobanks for translational research

    PubMed Central

    Talmon, Jan L.; Ros', Maurits G.; Legemate, Dink A.

    2008-01-01

    Translational research requires large patient populations. A single research institute is not able to build up such a population in a short period of time. The String of Pearls Initiative (in Dutch “Parelsnoer Initiatief”, PSI) is a joint effort by the eight academic medical centers in the Netherlands to built an infrastructure for joint biobanking as to meet this challenge of establishing large collections of data and samples in relevant medical domains. PMID:21347130

  5. Standard operating procedures for clinical research departments.

    PubMed

    Kee, Ashley Nichole

    2011-01-01

    A set of standard operating procedures (SOPs) provides a clinical research department with clear roles, responsibilities, and processes to ensure compliance, accuracy, and timeliness of data. SOPs also serve as a standardized training program for new employees. A practice may have an employee that can assist in the development of SOPs. There are also consultants that specialize in working with a practice to develop and write practice-specific SOPs. Making SOPs a priority will save a practice time and money in the long run and make the research practice more attractive to corporate study sponsors.

  6. [Ear keloid and clinical research progress].

    PubMed

    Du, Guangyuan; Zhu, Jiang

    2014-04-01

    Keloid refers to the damaged skin due to excessive fibroblast proliferation. Ear is one predilection site. The pathogenesis of ear keloid is not very clear, and the treatment is also varied. Surgery, postoperative radiotherapy and laser treatment, steroid hormones, pressure therapy are the basic treatment methods. Integrated application of a variety of treatments, classification research and new materials using revealed the prospect for the treatment of the disease. This thesis reviews literature about ear keloid in recent 10 years, and introduces this disease and clinical research progress.

  7. Current clinical research in orthodontics: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, Sheldon

    2006-10-01

    This essay explores briefly the approach of the Craniofacial Research Instrumentation Laboratory to the systematic and rigorous investigation of the usual outcome of orthodontic treatment in the practices of experienced clinicians. CRIL's goal is to produce a shareable electronic database of reliable, valid, and representative data on clinical practice as an aid in the production of an improved environment for truly evidence-based orthodontic treatment.

  8. Negotiation skills for clinical research professionals

    PubMed Central

    Hake, Sanjay; Shah, Tapankumar

    2011-01-01

    Negotiation as a skill is a key requirement for each and every job profile where dealing with multiple parties is involved. The important focus while negotiating should be on the interest then position. Key to every successful negotiation is advance planning, preparation, and patience as the objective is to create value and establish the terms on which parties with differing and often conflicting aims will co-operate. While preparing one should collect facts, know priorities, principles, identify common ground, decide on walk-away position, and try and identify the next best alternative. Negotiation is a set of skills that can be learned and practiced so that your ability to utilize relationship, knowledge, money, power, time, and personality to negotiate improves with each negotiation. In a successful negotiation, all parties win. Important thing to note is that not every negotiation involves money. Anytime you want something from someone else and anytime someone wants something from you, you are negotiating. Everything is negotiable and every day you negotiate with customers, suppliers, colleagues, your wife, and even your children. Negotiation is a game, and like any game it has its rules and tactics. Clinical Research professionals deal with various parties for different purposes at the same time; hence, they require excellent negotiation skills. Project Mangers and Clinical Research Associates are the two most important roles in clinical research industry who require negotiation skills as they deal with various internal and external customers and vendors. PMID:21897886

  9. Negotiation skills for clinical research professionals.

    PubMed

    Hake, Sanjay; Shah, Tapankumar

    2011-07-01

    Negotiation as a skill is a key requirement for each and every job profile where dealing with multiple parties is involved. The important focus while negotiating should be on the interest then position. Key to every successful negotiation is advance planning, preparation, and patience as the objective is to create value and establish the terms on which parties with differing and often conflicting aims will co-operate. While preparing one should collect facts, know priorities, principles, identify common ground, decide on walk-away position, and try and identify the next best alternative. Negotiation is a set of skills that can be learned and practiced so that your ability to utilize relationship, knowledge, money, power, time, and personality to negotiate improves with each negotiation. In a successful negotiation, all parties win. Important thing to note is that not every negotiation involves money. Anytime you want something from someone else and anytime someone wants something from you, you are negotiating. Everything is negotiable and every day you negotiate with customers, suppliers, colleagues, your wife, and even your children. Negotiation is a game, and like any game it has its rules and tactics. Clinical Research professionals deal with various parties for different purposes at the same time; hence, they require excellent negotiation skills. Project Mangers and Clinical Research Associates are the two most important roles in clinical research industry who require negotiation skills as they deal with various internal and external customers and vendors. PMID:21897886

  10. Multi-institutional Collaboration to Promote Undergraduate Clinical Research Nursing.

    PubMed

    Garner, Shelby L; Spencer, Becky; Beal, Claudia C

    2016-01-01

    Clinical research nursing is distinct from nursing research and includes the coordination and delivery of care for patients enrolled in clinical research trials. An innovative elective in clinical research nursing was developed collaboratively by stakeholders at a university, research institute, and national organization to provide experiential learning for undergraduate nursing students. The multi-institutional collaborative process, course overview, and precepted experience are described.

  11. An Evaluation of a Community-Academic-Clinical Partnership to Reduce Prostate Cancer Disparities in the South

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Daniela B.; Owens, Otis L.; Jackson, Dawnyea D.; Johnson, Kim M.; Gansauer, Lucy; Dickey, Joe; Miller, Ron; Payne, Johnny; Bearden, James D.; Hebert, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Engaging partners in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of cancer education programs is critical for improving the health of our communities. A two-year pilot education intervention on prostate cancer decision making and participation in medical research was funded by the National Cancer Institute. The partnership involving community members and clinical staff at a cancer center was used to develop recruitment strategies and plan for the implementation of the intervention with African-American (AA) middle-age and older men and female family members. We assessed partners’ perceptions of this community-academic-clinical research collaboration. Methods In year 2, eight project advisory council members were selected among existing partners and year 1 participants to serve as a formal committee. Council members were required to participate in telephone and in-person meetings and actively support recruitment/implementation efforts. At the conclusion of the project, 20 individuals (all clinical and community partners, including the eight advisory council members) were invited to complete a survey to assess their perceived impact of the collaboration on the community and provide suggestions for future collaborations. Results Most partners agreed that their organization benefitted from the collaboration and that various aspects of the advisory council process (e.g., both formal and informal communication) worked well. The most noted accomplishment of the partnership related to leveraging the collaboration to make men more knowledgeable about prostate cancer decision making. Suggested improvements for future collaborations included distributing more frequent updates regarding project successes. Conclusions Evaluating partners’ perceptions of this collaboration provided important recommendations for future planning, implementation, and evaluation of community-based cancer education programs. PMID:24078315

  12. Policies of Academic Medical Centers for Disclosing Conflicts of Interest to Potential Research Participants

    PubMed Central

    Weinfurt, Kevin P.; Dinan, Michaela A.; Allsbrook, Jennifer S.; Friedman, Joëlle Y.; Hall, Mark A.; Schulman, Kevin A.; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Many professional organizations and governmental bodies recommend disclosing financial conflicts of interest to potential research participants. Three possible goals of such disclosures are to inform the decision making of potential research participants, to protect against liability, and to deter conflicts of interest. We reviewed US academic medical centers' policies regarding the disclosure of conflicts of interest in research. Forty-eight percent mentioned disclosing conflicts to potential research participants. Of those, 58% included verbatim language that could be used in informed consent documents. Considerable variability exists concerning the specific information that should be disclosed. Most of the institutions' policies are consistent with the goal of protection from legal liability. PMID:16436571

  13. Broadening Participation in Geosciences with Academic Year and Summer Research Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, S. A.; Howard, A.; Johnson, L. P.; Gutierrez, R.; Chow, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Medgar Evers College, City University of New York, has initiated a multi-tiered strategy aimed at increasing the number of under-represented minority and female students pursuing careers in the Geosciences, especially Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and related areas. The strategy incorporates research on the persistence of minority and female under-represented students in STEM disciplines. The initiatives include NASA and NSF-funded team-based undergraduate research activities during the summer and academic year as well as academic support (clustering, PTLT workshops for gatekeeper courses), curriculum integration modules, and independent study/special topics courses. In addition, high school students are integrated into summer research activities working with undergraduate and graduate students as well as faculty and other scientist mentors. An important initial component was the building of an infrastructure to support remote sensing, supported by NASA. A range of academic year and summer research experiences are provided to capture student interest in the geosciences. NYC-based research activities include urban impacts of global climate change, the urban heat island, ocean turbulence and general circulation models, and space weather: magnetic rope structure, solar flares and CMEs. Field-based investigations include atmospheric observations using BalloonSat sounding vehicles, observations of tropospheric ozone using ozonesondes, and investigations of the ionosphere using a CubeSat. This presentation provides a description of the programs, student impact, challenges and observations.

  14. Physician clinical alignment and integration: a community-academic hospital approach.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Weiss, Sandra Jarva; Nester, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    An overwhelming need for change in the U.S. healthcare delivery system, coupled with the need to improve clinical and financial outcomes, has prompted hospitals to direct renewed efforts toward achieving high quality and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, with the dawn of accountable care organizations and increasing focus on patient expectations, hospitals have begun to seek physician partners through clinical alignment. Contrary to the unsuccessful alignment strategies of the 1990s, today's efforts are more mutually beneficial, driven by the need to achieve better care coordination, increased access to infrastructure, improved quality, and lower costs. In this article, we describe a large, academic, tertiary care hospital's approach to developing and implementing alignment and integration models with its collaboration-ready physicians and physician groups. We developed four models--short of physicians' employment with the organization--tailored to meet the needs of both the physician group and the hospital: (1) medical directorship (group physicians are appointed to serve as medical directors of a clinical area), (2) professional services agreement (specific clinical services, such as overnight admissions help, are contracted), (3) co-management services agreement (one specialty group co-manages all services within the specialty service lines), and (4) lease arrangement (closest in scope to employment, in which the hospital pays all expenses and receives all revenue). Successful hospital-physician alignment requires careful planning and the early engagement of legal counsel to ensure compliance with federal statutes. Establishing an integrated system with mutually identified goals better positions hospitals to deliver cost-effective and high-quality care under the new paradigm of healthcare reform. PMID:24988674

  15. Physician clinical alignment and integration: a community-academic hospital approach.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Weiss, Sandra Jarva; Nester, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    An overwhelming need for change in the U.S. healthcare delivery system, coupled with the need to improve clinical and financial outcomes, has prompted hospitals to direct renewed efforts toward achieving high quality and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, with the dawn of accountable care organizations and increasing focus on patient expectations, hospitals have begun to seek physician partners through clinical alignment. Contrary to the unsuccessful alignment strategies of the 1990s, today's efforts are more mutually beneficial, driven by the need to achieve better care coordination, increased access to infrastructure, improved quality, and lower costs. In this article, we describe a large, academic, tertiary care hospital's approach to developing and implementing alignment and integration models with its collaboration-ready physicians and physician groups. We developed four models--short of physicians' employment with the organization--tailored to meet the needs of both the physician group and the hospital: (1) medical directorship (group physicians are appointed to serve as medical directors of a clinical area), (2) professional services agreement (specific clinical services, such as overnight admissions help, are contracted), (3) co-management services agreement (one specialty group co-manages all services within the specialty service lines), and (4) lease arrangement (closest in scope to employment, in which the hospital pays all expenses and receives all revenue). Successful hospital-physician alignment requires careful planning and the early engagement of legal counsel to ensure compliance with federal statutes. Establishing an integrated system with mutually identified goals better positions hospitals to deliver cost-effective and high-quality care under the new paradigm of healthcare reform.

  16. Randomized Trial of Prolonged Exposure for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder with and without Cognitive Restructuring: Outcome at Academic and Community Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foa, Edna B.; Hembree, Elizabeth A.; Cahill, Shawn P.; Rauch, Sheila A. M.; Riggs, David S.; Feeny, Norah C.; Yadin, Elna

    2005-01-01

    Female assault survivors (N = 171) with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were randomly assigned to prolonged exposure (PE) alone, PE plus cognitive restructuring (PE/CR), or wait-list (WL). Treatment, which consisted of 9-12 sessions, was conducted at an academic treatment center or at a community clinic for rape survivors. Evaluations…

  17. [Clinical research I. The importance of the research design].

    PubMed

    Talavera, Juan O

    2011-01-01

    The endeavor of clinical research to study a group of patients is to make a diagnosis, estimate the prognosis and prove a treatment. For this purpose is used the scientific method: 1) the architectural arrangement, which can be divided into cause-effect and the process of research; 2) the methodological approach, which includes controlled clinical trials, cohorts, case control, and cross-sectional designs; 3) the goal-oriented approach, in which studies on diagnostic tests, prognosis, treatment and risk or causal factors are grouped. The designs mentioned above are considered primary studies; it means that the information was obtained directly from the subjects studied. There is a second category of studies, which uses information obtained from the primary studies. This is the reason why they are considered as secondary or integrative studies.

  18. Clinically significant anaerobic bacteria isolated from patients in a South African academic hospital: antimicrobial susceptibility testing.

    PubMed

    Naidoo, S; Perovic, O; Richards, G A; Duse, A G

    2011-09-27

    BACKGROUND. Increasing resistance to some antimicrobial agents among anaerobic bacteria has made susceptibility patterns less predictable. METHOD. This was a prospective study of the susceptibility data of anaerobic organisms isolated from clinical specimens from patients with suspected anaerobic infections from June 2005 until February 2007. Specimens were submitted to the microbiology laboratory at Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, where microscopy, culture and susceptibility testing were performed the using E test® strip minimum inhibitory concentration method. Results were interpreted with reference to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines for amoxicillin-clavulanate, clindamycin, metronidazole, penicillin, ertapenem, cefoxitin, ceftriaxone, chloramphenicol and piperacillin-tazobactam. RESULTS. One hundred and eighty anaerobic isolates were submitted from 165 patients. The most active antimicrobial agents were chloramphenicol (100% susceptible), ertapenem (97.2%), piperacillin-tazobactam (99.4%) and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (96.7%). Less active were metronidazole (89.4%), cefoxitin (85%), clindamycin (81.7%), ceftriaxone (68.3%) and penicillin (33.3%). CONCLUSION. Susceptibility testing should be performed periodically to identify emerging trends in resistance and to modify empirical treatment of anaerobic infections.

  19. Research, policy and funding - academic treadmills and the squeeze on intellectual spaces.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a great deal of collective rumination about social scientists' role in society. In the post-1997 UK context, public policy commitments to 'evidence-based policy' and 'knowledge transfer' have further stimulated such reflections. More recently, Michael Burawoy's 2004 address to the American Sociological Association, which called for greater engagement with 'public sociology' has reverberated throughout the discipline, motivating a series of debates about the purpose of sociological research. To date, most such contributions have been based on personal experience and anecdotal evidence. In contrast, this paper responds directly to Burawoy's suggestion that we should 'apply sociology to ourselves,' in order that we 'become more conscious of the global forces' driving our research (Burawoy 2005: 285). Drawing on an empirical research project designed to explore of the relationship between health inequalities research and policy in Scotland and England, in the period from 1997 until 2007, this paper discusses data from interviews with academic researchers. The findings suggest that the growing pressure to produce 'policy relevant' research is diminishing the capacity of academia to provide a space in which innovative and transformative ideas can be developed, and is instead promoting the construction of institutionalized and vehicular (chameleon-like) ideas. Such a claim supports Edward Said's (1994) insistence that creative, intellectual spaces within the social sciences are increasingly being squeezed. More specifically, the paper argues we ought to pay far greater attention to how the process of seeking research funding shapes academic research and mediates the interplay between research and policy.

  20. Measuring informant discrepancies in clinical child research.

    PubMed

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Kazdin, Alan E

    2004-09-01

    Discrepancies among informants' ratings of child psychopathology have important implications for diagnosis, assessment, and treatment. Typically, parents and children complete measures (e.g., self-report checklists, diagnostic instruments) to assess child dysfunction. Ratings gathered from these sources reveal relatively little agreement on the nature and extent of the child's social, emotional, and behavioral problems. This article reviews and illustrates the most frequently used methods of measuring informant discrepancies in the clinical child literature (i.e., raw difference, standardized difference, and residual difference scores) and outlines key considerations to influence their selection. The authors conclude that frequently used methods of measuring informant discrepancies are not interchangeable and recommend that future investigations examining informant discrepancies in clinical child research use the standardized difference score as their measure of informant discrepancies.

  1. Applying Research on Family Violence to Clinical Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelles, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    Considers whether research on family violence can be applied to clinical practice. Suggests limitations of the knowledge base constrain the application of research on family violence to clinical work, and certain aspects of the research paradigm also limit the transfer of research knowledge to clinical practice. (Author)

  2. Clinical Research Strategies for Fructose Metabolism12

    PubMed Central

    Laughlin, Maren R.; Bantle, John P.; Havel, Peter J.; Parks, Elizabeth; Klurfeld, David M.; Teff, Karen; Maruvada, Padma

    2014-01-01

    Fructose and simple sugars are a substantial part of the western diet, and their influence on human health remains controversial. Clinical studies in fructose nutrition have proven very difficult to conduct and interpret. NIH and USDA sponsored a workshop on 13–14 November 2012, “Research Strategies for Fructose Metabolism,” to identify important scientific questions and parameters to be considered while designing clinical studies. Research is needed to ascertain whether there is an obesogenic role for fructose-containing sugars via effects on eating behavior and energy balance and whether there is a dose threshold beyond which these sugars promote progression toward diabetes and liver and cardiovascular disease, especially in susceptible populations. Studies tend to fall into 2 categories, and design criteria for each are described. Mechanistic studies are meant to validate observations made in animals or to elucidate the pathways of fructose metabolism in humans. These highly controlled studies often compare the pure monosaccharides glucose and fructose. Other studies are focused on clinically significant disease outcomes or health behaviors attributable to amounts of fructose-containing sugars typically found in the American diet. These are designed to test hypotheses generated from short-term mechanistic or epidemiologic studies and provide data for health policy. Discussion brought out the opinion that, although many mechanistic questions concerning the metabolism of monosaccharide sugars in humans remain to be addressed experimentally in small highly controlled studies, health outcomes research meant to inform health policy should use large, long-term studies using combinations of sugars found in the typical American diet rather than pure fructose or glucose. PMID:24829471

  3. Clinical research strategies for fructose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, Maren R; Bantle, John P; Havel, Peter J; Parks, Elizabeth; Klurfeld, David M; Teff, Karen; Maruvada, Padma

    2014-05-01

    Fructose and simple sugars are a substantial part of the western diet, and their influence on human health remains controversial. Clinical studies in fructose nutrition have proven very difficult to conduct and interpret. NIH and USDA sponsored a workshop on 13-14 November 2012, "Research Strategies for Fructose Metabolism," to identify important scientific questions and parameters to be considered while designing clinical studies. Research is needed to ascertain whether there is an obesogenic role for fructose-containing sugars via effects on eating behavior and energy balance and whether there is a dose threshold beyond which these sugars promote progression toward diabetes and liver and cardiovascular disease, especially in susceptible populations. Studies tend to fall into 2 categories, and design criteria for each are described. Mechanistic studies are meant to validate observations made in animals or to elucidate the pathways of fructose metabolism in humans. These highly controlled studies often compare the pure monosaccharides glucose and fructose. Other studies are focused on clinically significant disease outcomes or health behaviors attributable to amounts of fructose-containing sugars typically found in the American diet. These are designed to test hypotheses generated from short-term mechanistic or epidemiologic studies and provide data for health policy. Discussion brought out the opinion that, although many mechanistic questions concerning the metabolism of monosaccharide sugars in humans remain to be addressed experimentally in small highly controlled studies, health outcomes research meant to inform health policy should use large, long-term studies using combinations of sugars found in the typical American diet rather than pure fructose or glucose.

  4. Putting Research Findings into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Deepa; Al-Lawatia, Zainab; Al-Abri, Rashid; Bhargava, Kamlesh

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: A perception exists that clinicians in Oman are reluctant to adopt evidence-based practice (EBP). This pilot study was undertaken to study the feasibility of using EBP pathways at the point of care in otorhinolaryngology head and neck surgery. The ultimate aim was to facilitate EBP with the probability of developing a new system for implementing research findings/translational research at the clinical point of care. Methods: A cross-sectional prospective questionnaire pilot survey of clinicians at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Oman, a tertiary care medical centre, was undertaken. Respondents included 135 physicians and surgeons with between 3 months and 25 years of clinical experience and included personnel ranging from interns to senior consultants, in areas ranging from primary care to specialist care. Results: Of those polled, 90% (95% confidence interval (CI) 85–95%) either strongly agreed or agreed that evidence-based practice protocols (EBPP) could help in decision making. A total of 87.4% of participants (95% CI 81.8–93%) either strongly agreed or agreed that EBPPs can improve clinical outcomes; 91.8% of participants (95% CI 87.2–96.4%) would use and apply EBPP in day-to-day care if they were available at the point of care and embedded in the hospital information system. Conclusions: The perception that clinicians at SQUH are reluctant to adopt EBP is incorrect. The introduction of EBP pathways is very feasible at the primary care level. Institutional support for embedding EBP in hospital information systems is needed as well as further outcome research to assess the improvement in quality of care. PMID:22548137

  5. Culturally Diverse Undergraduate Researchers’ Academic Outcomes and Perceptions of Their Research Mentoring Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Branchaw, Janet; Pfund, Christine; Leverett, Patrice; Newton, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have empirically investigated the specific factors in mentoring relationships between undergraduate researchers (mentees) and their mentors in the biological and life sciences that account for mentees’ positive academic and career outcomes. Using archival evaluation data from more than 400 mentees gathered over a multi-year period (2005–11) from several undergraduate biology research programs at a large, Midwestern research university, we validated existing evaluation measures of the mentored research experience and the mentor-mentee relationship. We used a subset of data from mentees (77% underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities) to test a hypothesized social cognitive career theory model of associations between mentees’ academic outcomes and perceptions of their research mentoring relationships. Results from path analysis indicate that perceived mentor effectiveness indirectly predicted post-baccalaureate outcomes via research self-efficacy beliefs. Findings are discussed with implications for developing new and refining existing tools to measure this impact, programmatic interventions to increase the success of culturally diverse research mentees and future directions for research. PMID:27065568

  6. "Blogfolios" and Their Role in the Development of Research Projects in an Advanced Academic Literacy Class for ESL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ananyeva, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on "blogfolios", online interactive blog-based portfolios, developed by students for class projects in Electronic Literacy. Blogfolios may contain interactive images, podcasts, and web-log discussions on a variety of researched academic topics. The impact of academic blogfolios on the second language learner's…

  7. Big Questions, Small Works, Lots of Layers: Documentary Video Production and the Teaching of Academic Research and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halbritter, Bump; Blon, Noah; Creighton, Caron

    2011-01-01

    Documentary movie making is not academic writing. Nor is it traditional academic research. However, I have found it to be a remarkable vehicle for teaching both of these things...each semester I am amazed and humbled by the creativity and sincerity that my students bring to their work.

  8. The Quantitative Crunch: The Impact of Bibliometric Research Quality Assessment Exercises on Academic Development at Small Conferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Michael; Shurville, Simon; Fernstrom, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Small and specialist inter-disciplinary conferences, particularly those relating to technology enhanced learning such as International Conference on Information and Communications Technology in Education, provide valuable opportunities for academics and academic-related/professional staff to report upon their research and development…

  9. Adaptation of Chinese Graduate Students to the Academic Integrity Requirements of a U.S. University: A Mixed Methods Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jian, Hu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method study was to investigate how graduates originating from mainland China adapt to the U.S. academic integrity requirements. In the first, quantitative phase of the study, the research questions focused on understanding the state of academic integrity in China. This guiding question was divided into two sub-questions,…

  10. Connections, Productivity and Funding: An Examination of Factors Influencing Scientists' Perspectives on the Market Orientation of Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronning, Emily Anne

    2012-01-01

    This study examines scientists' perceptions of the environment in which they do their work. Specifically, this study examines how academic and professional factors such as research productivity, funding levels for science, connections to industry, type of academic appointment, and funding sources influence scientists' perceptions of the…

  11. Issues in the Articulation of "Impact": The Responses of UK Academics to "Impact" as a New Measure of Research Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watermeyer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This paper reflects on the emergence of an impact agenda and its incorporation as a feature of the academic contract in UK universities. It focuses on the depositions of senior academic managers across a range of social science research centres, as they critically reflect upon their organizational strategy for capturing and communicating the…

  12. Balancing entrepreneurship and business practices for e-collaboration: responsible information sharing in academic research.

    PubMed

    Porter, Mark W; Porter, Mark William; Milley, David; Oliveti, Kristyn; Ladd, Allen; O'Hara, Ryan J; Desai, Bimal R; White, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Flexible, highly accessible collaboration tools can inherently conflict with controls placed on information sharing by offices charged with privacy protection, compliance, and maintenance of the general business environment. Our implementation of a commercial enterprise wiki within the academic research environment addresses concerns of all involved through the development of a robust user training program, a suite of software customizations that enhance security elements, a robust auditing program, allowance for inter-institutional wiki collaboration, and wiki-specific governance. PMID:18998795

  13. Promise and Pragmatism in Clinical Microbiome Research.

    PubMed

    Ajami, Nadim J; Hutchinson, Diane S; Petrosino, Joseph F

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of human microbiome research has lead to a systems biology approach that encompasses multidisciplinary investigations. The implementation of next generation sequencing technologies has allowed researchers to study unculturable organisms, discover novel ones, and provide insights into the role of the human microbiome in health and disease. When these approaches are applied to large-scale longitudinal studies designed to interrogate the association of the microbiome with specific clinical outcomes, the development of new therapeutics and diagnostics intended to modulate or detect changes in microbiome composition to improve human health are born. We are just starting to unravel the role of the microbiome in a wide-variety of diseases, and while some of it appears to be related to causation and provide opportunities for intervention, a good dose of pragmatism is warranted as the field is still in its infancy.

  14. Neonatal networks: clinical research and quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Profit, Jochen; Soll, Roger F

    2015-12-01

    Worldwide, neonatal networks have been formed to address both the research and quality improvement agenda of neonatal-perinatal medicine. Neonatal research networks have led the way in conducting many of the most important clinical trials of the last 25 years, including studies of cooling for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, delivery room management with less invasive support, and oxygen saturation targeting. As we move into the future, increasing numbers of these networks are tackling quality improvement initiatives as a priority of their collaboration. Neonatal quality improvement networks have been in the forefront of the quality movement in medicine and, in the 21st century, have contributed to many of the reported improvements in care. In the coming years, building and maintaining this community of care is critical to the success of neonatal-perinatal medicine.

  15. Implementing a Clinical Research Management System: One Institution's Successful Approach Following Previous Failures.

    PubMed

    Campion, Thomas R; Blau, Vanessa L; Brown, Scott W; Izcovich, Daniel; Cole, Curtis L

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research management systems (CRMSs) can facilitate research billing compliance and clinician awareness of study activities when integrated with practice management and electronic health record systems. However, adoption of CRMSs remains low, and optimal approaches to implementation are unknown. This case report describes one institution's successful approach to organization, technology, and workflow for CRMS implementation following previous failures. Critical factors for CRMS success included organizational commitment to clinical research, a dedicated research information technology unit, integration of research data across disparate systems, and centralized system usage workflows. In contrast, previous failed approaches at the institution lacked a mandate and mechanism for change, received support as a business rather than research activity, maintained data in separate systems, and relied on inconsistent distributed system usage workflows. To our knowledge, this case report is the first to describe CRMS implementation success and failures, which can assist practitioners and academic evaluators.

  16. Optimizing Multibeam Data Across the U.S. Academic Research Fleet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrini, V.; Beaudoin, J.; Johnson, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    Multibeam sonars are fundamental mapping tools for a wide range of oceanographic studies throughout the global oceans. Initially installed on only a few academic research vessels, they have become standard sensors across global- and ocean-class ships in the U.S. academic research fleet. While ongoing efforts including the Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R, http://rvdata.us) and the Global Multi-Resolution Topography Synthesis (GMRT, http://www.marine-geo.org/portals/gmrt) are focused on data documentation, preservation, synthesis and dissemination, the Multibeam Advisory Committee (MAC, http://mac.unols.org) was recently established with the primary goal of optimizing multibeam data quality during acquisition. Our strategy is to engage operators, technical specialists and users to develop common protocols, guidelines and tools for use across the fleet. Technical teams are focused on specific aspects of multibeam sonar operation and maintenance, including Sea Acceptance, Acoustic Noise, and Quality Assurance. Key to our effort is working with the community of stakeholders to ensure that protocols and tools suit the needs of the community and can be easily implemented across the fleet. Although MAC efforts are initially focused on deep water systems in the US Academic Research Fleet, we recognize that our community of stakeholders is much broader and also includes operators and users of shallow water. All MAC-generated reports, guidelines and software tools, as well as links to related online resources are being made publicly available through the MAC website (http://mac.unols.org).

  17. How Much Academic Instruction Occurs outside Research Universities in BC? Research Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowin, Bob

    2009-01-01

    When British Columbia began establishing community colleges in the mid 1960s, the explicit decision to provide extensive university transfer opportunities for college students had the added benefit of making a wide array of academic courses available to students who were not university-bound. Some of these students had been in applied programs in…

  18. Research Partnerships between Academic Institutions and American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes and Organizations: Effective Strategies and Lessons Learned in a Multi-Site CTN Study

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Lisa Rey; Rosa, Carmen; Forcehimes, Alyssa; Donovan, Dennis M.

    2012-01-01

    Community Based and Tribally Based Participatory Research (CBPR/TPR) are approaches that can be successful for developing ethical and effective research partnerships between academic institutions and Tribes and Native organizations. The NIDA Clinical Trials Network funded a multi-site, exploratory study using CBPR/TPR to begin to better understand substance abuse issues of concern to some Tribes and Native organizations as well as strengths and resources that exist in these communities to address these concerns. Each of the five sites is briefly described and a summary of the common themes for developing these collaborative research efforts is provided. PMID:21854275

  19. The talent process of successful academic women scientists at elite research universities in New York state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaenzig, Lisa M.

    women scientists at elite research universities in New York. A criterion sample (n=94) was selected resulting in forty-one successful academic women scientists as the study participants, representing a response rate of 43.6%. Findings include the important roles of parents, teachers, mentors and collaborators on the talent development process of the participants. The perception of the study participants was that there were multiple facilitators to their talent development process, while few barriers were acknowledged. The most important barriers cited by participants were perceptions of institutional culture and sexism. Implications for practice in both gifted and higher education are suggested, based on the findings of the study. For gifted education, these suggestions include the need to provide parental education programs emphasizing the importance of intellectual engagement at home, providing dedicated time for science in primary education, and fostering science and mathematics opportunities, particularly for girls and young women. Stressing the importance of hard work, persistence and intelligent risk-taking are also important for encouraging girls in science. For higher education, the study provides models of success of academic women scientists, outlines the importance of mentors and collaborators, and emphasizes the critical role that institutions and departments play in facilitating or impeding women's career development as academics. The current study suggests several areas for further research to continue the exploration of the talent development influences on academic women scientists. Based on the findings of this study, recommended studies include examining the differences of generational cohorts; probing the roles of collaborators/mentor colleagues; exploring differences for women from various ethnic and racial backgrounds; replicating the current study with larger populations of women scientists; investigating the role of facilitative school environments

  20. Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Clinical Trials: A Crucial Key to Human Health Research Past ... the forefront of human health research today are clinical trials—studies that use human volunteers to help medical ...