Science.gov

Sample records for academic community participated

  1. Knowledge Acquisition or Participation in Communities of Practice? Academics' Metaphors of Teaching and Learning at the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegner, Elisabeth; Nückles, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Learning has been described by two conceptual metaphors: as individual acquisition of knowledge ("acquisition metaphor"), and as an enculturation into a subject community ("participation metaphor"). On the other hand, academics' conceptions of teaching are usually reported to vary between teacher and student orientation. In…

  2. The Role of Arts Participation in Students' Academic and Nonacademic Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study of School, Home, and Community Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.; Mansour, Marianne; Anderson, Michael; Gibson, Robyn; Liem, Gregory A. D.; Sudmalis, David

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study draws on positive youth development frameworks and ecological models to examine the role of school-, home- and community-based arts participation in students' academic (e.g., motivation, engagement) and nonacademic (e.g., self-esteem, life satisfaction) outcomes. The study is based on 643 elementary and high school students…

  3. High-Quality 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Academic Achievement among Frequent Participants and Non-Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstead, Jenell; King, Mindy Hightower

    2011-01-01

    This study examined academic differences between students who attended 21st Century Community Learning Center (CCLC) programs frequently (60 or more days) and matched nonattendees during the 2008-2009 school year. Schools included in the study represented only those centers found to be implementing high-quality programming, as measured by a…

  4. Examining Our Interdependence: Community Partners' Motivations to Participate in Academic Outreach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Although the literature on institutional civic engagement within higher education is quite extensive, the community perspective on such endeavors remains an underdeveloped area of study. This is particularly true of outreach programs emanating from the university intended to support college preparation of underrepresented students. The purpose of…

  5. Community- and School-Sponsored Program Participation and Academic Achievement in a Full-Service Community School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houser, John H. W.

    2016-01-01

    Community schools represent a school reform approach that purports to address the multifaceted and intertwined challenges faced by poor urban communities and schools. The community school approach includes partnering with community organizations, making the school a community hub where services are provided during and outside of the school day,…

  6. Academic Incentives for Faculty Participation in Community-based Participatory Research

    PubMed Central

    Nyden, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Recognizing the need to overcome the obstacles of traditional university- and discipline-oriented research approaches, a variety of incentives to promote community-based participatory research (CBPR) are presented. Experiences of existing CBPR researchers are used in outlining how this methodological approach can appeal to faculty: the common ground shared by faculty and community leaders in challenging the status quo; opportunities to have an impact on local, regional, and national policy; and opening doors for new research and funding opportunities. Strategies for promoting CBPR in universities are provided in getting CBPR started, changing institutional practices currently inhibiting CBPR, and institutionalizing CBPR. Among the specific strategies are: development of faculty research networks; team approaches to CBPR; mentoring faculty and students; using existing national CBPR networks; modifying tenure and promotion guidelines; development of appropriate measures of CBPR scholarship; earmarking university resources to support CBPR; using Institutional Review Boards to promote CBPR; making CBPR-oriented faculty appointments; and creating CBPR centers. PMID:12848841

  7. Academic incentives for faculty participation in community-based participatory research.

    PubMed

    Nyden, Philip

    2003-07-01

    Recognizing the need to overcome the obstacles of traditional university- and discipline-oriented research approaches, a variety of incentives to promote community-based participatory research (CBPR) are presented. Experiences of existing CBPR researchers are used in outlining how this methodological approach can appeal to faculty: the common ground shared by faculty and community leaders in challenging the status quo; opportunities to have an impact on local, regional, and national policy; and opening doors for new research and funding opportunities. Strategies for promoting CBPR in universities are provided in getting CBPR started, changing institutional practices currently inhibiting CBPR, and institutionalizing CBPR. Among the specific strategies are: development of faculty research networks; team approaches to CBPR; mentoring faculty and students; using existing national CBPR networks; modifying tenure and promotion guidelines; development of appropriate measures of CBPR scholarship; earmarking university resources to support CBPR; using Institutional Review Boards to promote CBPR; making CBPR-oriented faculty appointments; and creating CBPR centers. PMID:12848841

  8. On Measuring Community Participation in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khodyakov, Dmitry; Stockdale, Susan; Jones, Andrea; Mango, Joseph; Jones, Felica; Lizaola, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Active participation of community partners in research aspects of community-academic partnered projects is often assumed to have a positive impact on the outcomes of such projects. The value of community engagement in research, however, cannot be empirically determined without good measures of the level of community participation in research…

  9. Professional Learning Communities: An Analysis of Teacher Participation in a PLC and the Relationship with Student Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aylsworth, Anthony James

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to compare teacher participation in a Professional Learning Community with the performance of their students. Student achievement data from multiple subject-alike groups were compared in a pre-and post-PLC format, using an independent, two-sample t-test. Overall, 10 PLCs from one high school in a suburban, Iowa setting were…

  10. Women's Participation in Academic Conferences in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eden, Devorah

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the participation of women in academic conferences in Israel, a country in which women are under-represented in academia vertically and horizontally. Data were retrieved from announcements of academic conferences in Israel, for one academic year, covering 56 conferences that attracted 997 participants. Participation was…

  11. Community College Students' Perceptions of Academic Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millar, Bradbury Stewart

    2010-01-01

    This study compares community college students' perceptions of their academic readiness before and after they participated in community college coursework. Students enroll in community colleges for many reasons but many drop-out before reaching their goals. High rates of attrition suggest that students may not accurately assess their levels of…

  12. International Project Participation by Women Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Nancy; Patton, Wendy; Giancarlo, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The internationalization of higher education has led to changing roles for academics, including opportunities to participate in international projects. The extent to which academics feel prepared to enter this arena has received little attention. This study examines women academics' perceptions of barriers to, facilitators of, and career benefits…

  13. The Impact of Freshman Year Learning Community Participation on Students' Self-Reported Sense of Meaning in Life, Academic Self-Efficacy and Commitment to Academic Major at the Beginning of the Second Academic Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruett, Karen Ann

    2011-01-01

    Student retention is one of the most studied areas in higher education. Much of the focus has been on providing services to aid in retention efforts from the first to the second academic year. Freshman seminar classes as well as learning community programs have become common on college campuses to provide students with the resources and support to…

  14. The Future Academic Community: Continuity and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    This collection of papers was compiled as background information for participants in the 1968 Annual Meeting of the American Council on Education. The 10 papers focus on the academic community of the future, and ways of being responsive to change while preserving valuable continuities. John Caffrey relates the present community to the future…

  15. Transformative Connections: Community-Based K-12 Computing Program Strives to Strengthen Academic and Career Aspirations of Its Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2005-01-01

    The Joint Educational Facilities Inc. (JEF) computer science program has as its goal to acquaint minority and socially disadvantaged K-12 students with computer science basics and the innovative subdisciplines within the field, and to reinforce the college ambitions of participants or help them consider college as an option. A non-profit…

  16. Determining the Relationship between Participation in the Arts and the Academic, Personal, and Social Growth of Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rayfield, William W., III

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to answer the call of the National Endowment for the Arts (2011), and various other arts-related organizations, for extensive research on the ability of the fine and performing arts to improve the quality of life for those who participate in them. Guided by C. Robert Pace's theory of quality of student effort,…

  17. An Investigation of Participation in Weekly Music Workshops and Its Relationship to Academic Self-Concept and Self-Esteem of Middle School Students in Low-Income Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Jihae

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how I Am A Dreamer Musician Program (IDMP) affected academic self-concept and self-esteem of middle school students in low-income communities. During the seven weeks of the weekly music workshops, students participated in different musical activities including playing percussion instruments, singing,…

  18. "I Don't Know Where We'd Be without Them": Understanding Community Partners' Motivations to Participate in Academic Outreach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Douglas Stuart

    2012-01-01

    While the literature on institutional civic engagement is quite extensive, the community perspective on such endeavors remains an under-developed area of study. This is particularly true of academic outreach programs meant to support the college preparation of underrepresented students. The purpose of this study was to explore the motivations of…

  19. Keeping Kids Smokefree: Lessons Learned on Community Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlier, N.; Glover, M.; Robertson, J.

    2009-01-01

    Community participation in program decision-making and implementation is an ideal that community and academic stakeholders aspire to in participatory research. This ideal, however, can be difficult to achieve. We describe lessons learned about community participation from a quasi-experimental trial aimed at reducing the uptake of smoking among…

  20. Enhancing Academic Success by Creating a Community of Learners

    PubMed Central

    Berlie, Helen; Salinitri, Francine; McCuistion, Micah; Slaughter, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To enhance academic performance and student progression by creating a community of learners. Design. Academic performance and student progression of students participating in the first 3 years of a second-year pharmacy learning community were compared with those of students in the 3 previous classes. Students participating in the learning community completed surveys at the end of each semester and at the end of the academic year. Peer mentors were surveyed at the end of the academic year. Assessment. After implementing the learning community, failures during the second year of the pharmacy program decreased. Students had increasingly positive perceptions of the experience over the 3 years. Peer mentors rated their overall experience highly. Conclusion. Implementation of a learning community resulted in improved progression through the program and was well received by students. PMID:26396279

  1. Underserved populations in science education: Enhancement through learning community participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jennifer Emily

    A positive relationship between college anatomy students' achievement and academic language proficiency in the context of a learning community was established. For many students the barrier to learning science is language. A relationship exists between low academic language proficiency and lack of success among students, in particular failure among at-risk minority and language-minority students. The sample consisted of Anatomy classes during the Fall semesters of the academic years, 2000, 2001, and 2002 at a community college in Central California having a high percentage of culturally and linguistically diverse students. Students from each semester participated in the academic language proficiency and science achievement studies. Twenty-two of the Fall 2002 students (n = 65) enrolled in the Learning Community (LC) that included instruction in academic language in the context of the anatomy course content. Fall 2002 students (n = 19) also participated in Peer-led Support (PLS) sessions. Fall 2001 students participated in a textbook use study (n = 44) and in a Cooperative-Learning (CL) (n = 35) study. Students in the LC and Non-LC groups took the academic language assessment; their results were correlated with course grades and attendance. Fall 2002 students were compared for: (1) differences regarding self-expectations, (2) program impressions, and (3) demographics. Fall 2001 student reading habits and CL participation were analyzed. Results identified: (1) selected academic language tasks as good predictors of science success, (2) a significant positive relationship between science success and participation in support interventions, (3) no differences in self expectations or demographic characteristics of participants and non-participants in the LC group, and (4) poor textbook reading habits. Results showed a significant positive relationship between academic language proficiency and science achievement in participatory instruction.

  2. Student Participation and Parental Involvement in Relation to Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niia, Anna; Almqvist, Lena; Brunnberg, Elinor; Granlund, Mats

    2015-01-01

    This study shows that students, teachers, and parents in Swedish schools ascribe differing meanings and significance to students' participation in school in relation to academic achievement. Students see participation as mainly related to social interaction and not academic achievement, whilst teachers view students' participation as more closely…

  3. Community Violence Exposure and Children's Academic Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, David; Gorman, Andrea Hopmeyer

    2003-01-01

    Reports a cross-sectional investigation of the link between community violence exposure and academic difficulties for 237 urban elementary school children. Analyses indicated that community violence exposure was associated with poor academic performance. These relations appear to be mediated by symptoms of depression and disruptive behavior.…

  4. Academic Library Resource Sharing through Bibliographic Utility Program Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trochim, Mary Kane

    Information on the growth of bibliographic utilities and academic library networking is presented in this report, as well as profiles of interlibrary loan activity at six academic libraries who are members of a major bibliographic utility. Applications of computer technology and network participation in academic libraries, and the major events in…

  5. Academic Planning in Response to Community Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, G. Ronald; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The changing role of the academic institution in relation to its environment is reviewed in terms of student constituents, white collar employees, geographic neighborhood, and professionals. An "androgogical" rather than "pedagogical" approach to community knowledge development and transfer, and ways for university planners to make academe more…

  6. Community Participation in Tribal Diabetes Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    In the past five years, there has been a surge in the attention shown to community and community-based health programs among Native Americans, particularly for chronic health problems such as diabetes. Community participation in health programming--from the efforts of community health workers (CHWs), to participatory research, to the impact of…

  7. Academic Capitalism and the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Ilene

    2010-01-01

    Profit-generating entrepreneurial initiatives have become increasingly important as community colleges look for alternative revenue to support escalating costs in an environment characterized by funding constraints. Academic capitalism was used as the conceptual framework to determine whether community colleges have become increasingly market…

  8. Academic Community: Discourse or Discord? Higher Education Policy Series 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Ronald, Ed.

    This collection of 12 author-contributed papers examines the notion of "academic community" within and among institutions of higher education. Papers are grouped into four sections which examine the idea of academic community, community through academic inquiry, community through curriculum, and community through organization, respectively. Papers…

  9. Participative Leadership: Perspectives of Community College Presidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grasmick, Lauren; Davies, Timothy Gray; Harbour, Clifford P.

    2012-01-01

    This grounded theory study addressed the issue of how community college presidents foster active, broad-based participation in campus decision-making processes. This study was based on in-depth interviews with nationally recognized community college presidents selected on the basis of their work in implementing participative governance within…

  10. Participation in Social Media as Academic Service (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, D. J.

    2013-12-01

    We are all familiar with the three-legged stool of standard academic practice -- research, teaching, and service -- especially as it pertains to promotion and tenure. For example, many studies are emerging on the various ways that social media can be effectively used in teaching at all levels. Researchers are using analytical tools to turn social media feeds into useful indicators of human pattern and process. Darling et al. (2013) investigate the usefulness of Twitter for the development and distribution of scientific knowledge, including within the life cycle of scientific publication. However, the author focuses here on the use of social media as related to the traditional forms of academic "service:" i.e., participation on a committee or a board, in strategic planning or development of programs, in coordination of a seminar series or workshop, in professional reviews of books, papers, proposals, delivery of a public lectures to a civic group, giving an interview to a journalist on one's research or practice, even providing testimony to a group of policymakers. The author shares personal and institutional/organizational perspectives on how appropriate social media interaction in this context, can be viewed as a necessary (even daily) part of professional practice, and thus yet another moniker of good scientific behavior (especially as a model for students and early-career faculty), and of the "gift culture" of scholarship. For example, the "live tweeting" of ideas and summary points from paper sessions at scholarly meetings is gaining popularity, especially to inform those who could not attend. Other modes of contribution to intellectual communities range from advertising calls for special issues, proposals, participation in specialists meetings, to showcasing the real-time effects of natural disasters via social media feeds embedded in maps. Indeed, there is much discussion of "innovation" in research and in teaching, but can the speed and structure of social

  11. Becoming Academics: Experiencing Legitimate Peripheral Participation in Part-Time Doctoral Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teeuwsen, Phil; Ratkovic, Snežana; Tilley, Susan A.

    2014-01-01

    An important element of doctoral studies is identification with the academic community. Such identification is often complicated by part-time student status. In this paper, two part-time doctoral students and their supervisor employ Lave and Wenger's concept of legitimate peripheral participation to explore, through a critical socio-cultural…

  12. Linking Academic and Community Guidelines for Community-Engaged Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLugan, Robin Maria; Roussos, Stergios; Skram, Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Research universities seeking to promote community-engaged scholarship (CES), defined here as research of mutual benefit to community and academic interests, will discover that it requires capacity building and institutional support. At the University of California at Merced, our 7-year experience in building a new public research university that…

  13. Academic Crossover Study: Community Colleges, Fall 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.

    In fall 1981, a study was conducted in Hawaii's community colleges to determine the course-taking patterns of different groups of student majors (e.g., the proportion of the liberal arts major's academic load that is taken in the humanities, natural sciences, etc.), and the client-serving patterns of different subject disciplines (e.g., the…

  14. Applications in the Academic and Scientific Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perspectives in Computing, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The six articles in this journal reflect the role of computers in the academic and scientific communities, discussing the relationship between universities and industry, communication networks, light-scattering, data processing during seismic exploration, and computer applications in publishing and archaeological site management. It is available…

  15. Leadership Styles of Community College Academic Deans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sypawka, William; Mallett, William; McFadden, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The future of the community college system will depend on sound leadership, and its success will rely on how well academic deans effectively direct their units. The study investigated the dean's leadership styles using Bolman and Deal's Leadership Orientation Instrument to discover their primary leadership frame with a focus on how data may be…

  16. Recruiting Research Participants at Community Education Sites

    PubMed Central

    SADLER, GEORGIA ROBINS; PETERSON, MELANIE; WASSERMAN, LINDA; MILLS, PAUL L.; MALCARNE, VANESSA L.; ROCK, CHERYL; ANCOLI-ISRAEL, SONIA; MOORE, AMANDA; WELDON, RAI-NESHA; GARCIA, TENISHA; KOLODNER, RICHARD D.

    2006-01-01

    Background Minority groups are underrepresented in research, making it difficult to apply medical advances with confidence. In this study, we explored whether community-based cancer education sites and educators serving the African American community could be used to recruit minority participants to research. Methods We invited Individuals at community education sites to provide buccal scrapings, saliva samples, psychometric data, and personal information anonymously. Results Culturally aligned community sites (100%) collaborated in the research recruitment, as did 83% of the individuals at those sites. Conclusion Community-based education sites offer exceptional promise for teaching about research benefits and recruiting members of minority groups to research studies. PMID:16497136

  17. Community-Based Prevention Specialist. Participant Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Research Corp., Bethesda, MD.

    This participant manual is designed to assist substance abuse prevention specialists in the development of knowledge and skills in implementing community-based programs through an entry-level course. The manual initially concentrates on a basic, generic approach to community work, and reviews course goals and objectives. The nine training modules…

  18. Bolivian Currents: Popular Participation and Indigenous Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Mary Jo

    1997-01-01

    Describes the effects on indigenous communities of Bolivia's recent Popular Participation Laws, which relocated political and financial decision making to the municipal level; community efforts toward cultural maintenance and nonformal agricultural education; the activism of indigenous university students; and the dual discrimination suffered by…

  19. Site participation in the small community experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holbeck, H. J.; Fellows, M.

    1981-01-01

    The Small Community Solar Thermal Experiment, planned to test a small, developmental solar thermal power plant in a small community application, is assessed. The baseline plan is to install a field of parabolic dishes with distributed generation to provide 1 MWe of experimental power. Participation by the site proposer is an integral element of the experiment; the proposer will provide a ten-acre site, a connection to the electrical distributional system serving the small community, and various services. In addition to the primary participant, site study efforts may be pursued at as many as five alternative sites.

  20. Recreation Center Participation and Its Relationship to Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knepp, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    Many colleges and universities are engaged in developing enrollment strategies in higher education that focus on student retention. Using concepts based on Astin's (1993) theory of involvement and Tinto's (1975) theory of social interaction, this study focused on how participation in recreation center activities is related to the academic success…

  1. A Community-Academic Partnered Grant Writing Series to Build Infrastructure for Partnered Research.

    PubMed

    King, Keyonna M; Pardo, Yvette-Janine; Norris, Keith C; Diaz-Romero, Maria; Morris, D'Ann; Vassar, Stefanie D; Brown, Arleen F

    2015-10-01

    Grant writing is an essential skill necessary to secure financial support for community programs and research projects. Increasingly, funding opportunities for translational biomedical research require studies to engage community partners, patients, or other stakeholders in the research process to address their concerns. However, there is little evidence on strategies to prepare teams of academic and community partners to collaborate on grants. This paper presents the description and formative evaluation of a two-part community-academic partnered grant writing series designed to help community organizations and academic institutions build infrastructure for collaborative research projects using a partnered approach. The first phase of the series was a half-day workshop on grant readiness, which was open to all interested community partners. The second phase, open only to community-academic teams that met eligibility criteria, was a 12-week session that covered partnered grant writing for foundation grants and National Institutes of Health grants. Participants in both phases reported an increase in knowledge and self-efficacy for writing partnered proposals. At 1-year follow-up, participants in Phase 2 had secured approximately $1.87 million in funding. This community-academic partnered grant writing series helped participants obtain proposal development skills and helped community-academic teams successfully compete for funding. PMID:26365589

  2. SIRTF - Key Projects and Community Participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicay, M.; Gehrz, R.; Caroff, L.; Jura, M.; Pipher, J. L.; Werner, M.; Young, E.

    1994-05-01

    SIRTF - the Space Infrared Telescope Facility - will be an observatory for the entire scientific community, but the modes of community participation may be somewhat different from those used on previous astrophysics missions. The limited lifetime of the mission demands the development of a highly efficient observing program that will maximize the scientific return. To achieve this goal, the SIRTF scientific program will probably consist largely of Key Projects - large scale targeted and unbiased spectroscopic and imaging surveys - supplemented by General Observer and Archival Research opportunities. Possible forms of community participation in the SIRTF program include: 1. Planning and preparation through collaboration in the definition of community roles and in the definition of the structure of the Key Projects Program. 2. Collaboration in SIRTF's Key Projects. Key Project investigations and investigators will be chosen by peer review several years before launch. Investigators will work with the instrument and operations teams in defining and preparing for their observations. 3. Participation in the General Observer Program. Selected General Observers will bear much of the responsibility for planning their observational programs and reducing the data. 4. Archival Research. We anticipate starting the archival research program during the mission while the spacecraft is still operating and adding data to the archive. The poster will describe these modes of participation in greater detail and serve as a focal point for discussion of the community's role in SIRTF.

  3. Community Participation in Jamaican Conservation Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundy, Patricia

    1999-01-01

    In Jamaica, people most likely to be affected by environmental degradation are less likely to be involved in environmental nongovernmental organizations and community-based conservation projects. Funders, practitioners, and policy makers should work to remove barriers to participation and ensure equitable allocation of funding. (SK)

  4. Are All Student Organizations Created Equal? The Differences and Implications of Student Participation in Academic versus Non-Academic Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzweiss, Peggy; Rahn, Rhonda; Wickline, John

    2007-01-01

    This study examined differences between participation in academic and non-academic student organizations at a large, predominantly White, public research institution. A survey of 354 undergraduates revealed that students joined academic organizations to prepare for their futures while students joined non-academic organizations for immediate…

  5. Beyond Academics: Challenging Issues Facing Community College Non-Academic Support Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Judith Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This research focused on identifying and exploring the significant current and emerging community college non-academic support service issues. These auxiliary services, not unlike academic or student affairs, support the community college mission and vision as well as students' academic success. Since December 2007, Americans have been…

  6. The Impact of Curricular Learning Communities on Furthering the Engagement and Persistence of Academically Underprepared Students at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Joshua Grant

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the impact of basic skills curricular learning communities on academically underprepared community college students to determine if participation in such programs significantly contributed to student persistence from year one to year two. The conceptual framework that informed this study was Tinto's (1993) longitudinal…

  7. Students' Perceptions of Their Academics, Relationships, and Sense of Belonging: Comparisons across Residential Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schussler, Deborah L.; Fierros, Edward G.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how participation in one of four learning community models influenced first-year college students' perceptions of their academic environment, relationships with other members of the college community, and sense of belonging at the institution. The research was conducted at a private, mid-sized university and employed a…

  8. The Healthy Children, Strong Families intervention: design and community participation.

    PubMed

    Adams, Alexandra K; LaRowe, Tara L; Cronin, Kate A; Prince, Ronald J; Wubben, Deborah P; Parker, Tassy; Jobe, Jared B

    2012-08-01

    Healthy Children, Strong Families (HCSF) is a 2-year, community-driven, family-based randomized controlled trial of a healthy lifestyles intervention conducted in partnership with four Wisconsin American Indian tribes. HCSF is composed of 1 year of targeted home visits to deliver nutritional and physical activity curricula. During Year 1, trained community mentors work with 2-5-year-old American Indian children and their primary caregivers to promote goal-based behavior change. During Year 2, intervention families receive monthly newsletters and attend monthly group meetings to participate in activities designed to reinforce and sustain changes made in Year 1. Control families receive only curricula materials during Year 1 and monthly newsletters during Year 2. Each of the two arms of the study comprises 60 families. Primary outcomes are decreased child body mass index (BMI) z-score and decreased primary caregiver BMI. Secondary outcomes include: increased fruit/vegetable consumption, decreased TV viewing, increased physical activity, decreased soda/sweetened drink consumption, improved primary caregiver biochemical indices, and increased primary caregiver self-efficacy to adopt healthy behaviors. Using community-based participatory research and our history of university-tribal partnerships, the community and academic researchers jointly designed this randomized trial. This article describes the study design and data collection strategies, including outcome measures, with emphasis on the communities' input in all aspects of the research. PMID:22956296

  9. Community ACTION Boards: An Innovative Model for Effective Community–Academic Research Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    James, Sherline; Arniella, Guedy; Bickell, Nina A.; Walker, Willie; Robinson, Virginia; Taylor, Barbara; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Community-based participatory research (CBPR) requires equitable partnerships between community stakeholders and academics. Traditionally, researchers relied on community advisory boards, but these boards often play a reactive role on a project-by-project basis. The East and Central Harlem Health Outcomes (ECHHO) Community Action Board (CAB), however, is an effective, proactive group. Objectives The ECHHO board sought to identify key strategies and tools to build and employ a partnership model, and to disseminate lessons learned to other community–academic partnerships. Methods Current and former board members were interviewed and a wide range of related documents was reviewed. Lessons Learned The board became effective when it prioritized action and relationship-building, across seven key domains: Shared priorities, diversity, participation, transparency, mutual respect and recognition, and personal connections. The model is depicted graphically. Conclusion Community advisory boards may benefit from attention to taking action, and to building relationships between academics and community members. PMID:22616207

  10. Higher Education, Academic Communities, and the Intellectual Virtues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ward E.

    2012-01-01

    Because higher education brings members of academic communities in direct contact with students, the reflective higher education student is in an excellent position for developing two important intellectual virtues: confidence and humility. However, academic communities differ as to whether their members reach consensus, and their teaching…

  11. Supplemental Instruction: The Effect of Demographic and Academic Preparation Variables on Community College Student Academic Achievement in STEM-Related Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabitoy, Eric R.; Hoffman, John L.; Person, Dawn R.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated variables associated with academic preparation and student demographics as predictors of academic achievement through participation in supplemental instruction (SI) programs for community college students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) fields. The findings suggest a differential impact of SI outcome for…

  12. Perceptions of Campus Climate, Academic Efficacy and Academic Success among Community College Students: An Ethnic Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edman, Jeanne L.; Brazil, Brad

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined whether there are ethnic differences in perceptions of campus climate, social support, and academic efficacy among community college students, and whether student perceptions were associated with academic success. A total of 475 community college students completed a questionnaire that measured students' perceptions of…

  13. From Subject to Participant: Ethics and the Evolving Role of Community in Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Mikesell, Lisa; Jones, Felica; Khodyakov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    Belmont Report principles focus on the well-being of the research subject, yet community-engaged investigators often eschew the role of subject for that of participant. We conducted semistructured interviews with 29 community and academic investigators working on 10 community-engaged studies. Interviews elicited perspectives on ethical priorities and ethical challenges. Interviewees drew on the Belmont Report to describe 4 key principles of ethical community-engaged research (embodying ethical action, respecting participants, generalizing beneficence, and negotiating justice). However, novel aspects of the participant role were the source of most ethical challenges. We theorize that the shift in ethical focus from subject to participant will pose new ethical dilemmas for community-engaged investigators and for other constituents interested in increasing community involvement in health research. PMID:25790380

  14. From subject to participant: ethics and the evolving role of community in health research.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Elizabeth; Mikesell, Lisa; Jones, Felica; Khodyakov, Dmitry

    2015-05-01

    Belmont Report principles focus on the well-being of the research subject, yet community-engaged investigators often eschew the role of subject for that of participant. We conducted semistructured interviews with 29 community and academic investigators working on 10 community-engaged studies. Interviews elicited perspectives on ethical priorities and ethical challenges. Interviewees drew on the Belmont Report to describe 4 key principles of ethical community-engaged research (embodying ethical action, respecting participants, generalizing beneficence, and negotiating justice). However, novel aspects of the participant role were the source of most ethical challenges. We theorize that the shift in ethical focus from subject to participant will pose new ethical dilemmas for community-engaged investigators and for other constituents interested in increasing community involvement in health research. PMID:25790380

  15. The Healthy Children, Strong Families Intervention: Design and Community Participation

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Alexandra K.; LaRowe, Tara L.; Cronin, Kate A.; Prince, Ronald J.; Wubben, Deborah P.; Parker, Tassy; Jobe, Jared B.

    2012-01-01

    Healthy Children, Strong Families (HCSF) is a 2-year, community-driven, family-based randomized controlled trial of a healthy lifestyles intervention conducted in partnership with four Wisconsin American Indian tribes. HCSF is composed of 1 year of targeted home visits to deliver nutritional and physical activity curricula. During Year 1, trained community mentors work with 2–5-year-old American Indian children and their primary caregivers to promote goal-based behavior change. During Year 2, intervention families receive monthly newsletters and attend monthly group meetings to participate in activities designed to reinforce and sustain changes made in Year 1. Control families receive only curricula materials during Year 1 and monthly newsletters during Year 2. Each of the two arms of the study comprises 60 families. Primary outcomes are decreased child BMI z-score and decreased primary caregiver BMI. Secondary outcomes include: increased fruit/vegetable consumption, decreased TV viewing, increased physical activity, decreased soda/sweetened drink consumption, improved primary caregiver biochemical indices, and increased primary caregiver self-efficacy to adopt healthy behaviors. Using community-based participatory research and our history of university–tribal partnerships, the community and academic researchers jointly designed this randomized trial. This article describes the study design and data collection strategies, including outcome measures, with emphasis on the communities’ input in all aspects of the research. PMID:22956296

  16. Community (in) Colleges: The Relationship Between Online Network Involvement and Academic Outcomes at a Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Eliza D.; McFarland, Daniel A.; Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Deil-Amen, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study explores the relationship between online social network involvement and academic outcomes among community college students. Prior theory hypothesizes that socio-academic moments are especially important for the integration of students into community colleges and that integration is related to academic outcomes. Online social…

  17. Collaborative academic-practice transition program for new graduate RNs in community settings: lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Jones-Bell, Jessie; Karshmer, Judith; Berman, Audrey; Prion, Susan; Van, Paulina; Wallace, Jonalyn; West, Nikki

    2014-06-01

    In 2010-2011, leaders from California academic and practice settings and additional community partners collaboratively developed four 12- to 16-week transition programs for 345 new registered nurse (RN) graduates who had not yet found employment as nurses. Program goals were to increase participants' confidence, competence, and employability and expand the employment landscape to nontraditional new graduate settings. One program focused exclusively on community-based settings and was completed by 40 participants at clinics and school sites; all participants secured RN jobs. Key lessons learned go beyond the impact for participants and relate to changing the nursing culture about career path models for new graduates, troubleshooting regulatory issues, the potential for new graduates to help transform nursing, and advancing academic-practice partnerships and supporting practice sites. The community-based transition program continues to provide opportunities for new RN graduates and model an approach for transforming nursing practice. PMID:24693972

  18. Early childhood WIC participation, cognitive development and academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Margot I

    2015-02-01

    For the 22% of American children who live below the federal poverty line, and the additional 23% who live below twice that level, nutritional policy is part of the safety net against hunger and its negative effects on children's development. The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) provides steadily available food from the food groups essential for physical and cognitive development. The effects of WIC on dietary quality among participating women and children are strong and positive. Furthermore, there is a strong influence of nutrition on cognitive development and socioeconomic inequality. Yet, research on the non-health effects of U.S. child nutritional policy is scarce, despite the ultimate goal of health policies directed at children-to enable productive functioning across multiple social institutions over the life course. Using two nationally representative, longitudinal surveys of children-the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) and the Child Development Supplement (CDS) of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics-I examine how prenatal and early childhood exposure to WIC is associated in the short-term with cognitive development, and in the longer-term with reading and math learning. Results show that early WIC participation is associated with both cognitive and academic benefits. These findings suggest that WIC meaningfully contributes to children's educational prospects. PMID:25555255

  19. Bringing Community and Academic Scholars Together to Facilitate and Conduct Authentic Community Based Participatory Research: Project UNITED.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Dwight; Yerby, Lea; Tucker, Melanie; Foster, Pamela Payne; Hamilton, Kara C; Fifolt, Matthew M; Hites, Lisle; Shreves, Mary Katherine; Page, Susan B; Bissell, Kimberly L; Lucky, Felecia L; Higginbotham, John C

    2016-01-01

    Cultural competency, trust, and research literacy can affect the planning and implementation of sustainable community-based participatory research (CBPR). The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight: (1) the development of a CBPR pilot grant request for application; and (2) a comprehensive program supporting CBPR obesity-related grant proposals facilitated by activities designed to promote scholarly collaborations between academic researchers and the community. After a competitive application process, academic researchers and non-academic community leaders were selected to participate in activities where the final culminating project was the submission of a collaborative obesity-related CBPR grant application. Teams were comprised of a mix of academic researchers and non-academic community leaders, and each team submitted an application addressing obesity-disparities among rural predominantly African American communities in the US Deep South. Among four collaborative teams, three (75%) successfully submitted a grant application to fund an intervention addressing rural and minority obesity disparities. Among the three submitted grant applications, one was successfully funded by an internal CBPR grant, and another was funded by an institutional seed funding grant. Preliminary findings suggest that the collaborative activities were successful in developing productive scholarly relationships between researchers and community leaders. Future research will seek to understand the full-context of our findings. PMID:26703675

  20. Bringing Community and Academic Scholars Together to Facilitate and Conduct Authentic Community Based Participatory Research: Project UNITED

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Dwight; Yerby, Lea; Tucker, Melanie; Foster, Pamela Payne; Hamilton, Kara C.; Fifolt, Matthew M.; Hites, Lisle; Shreves, Mary Katherine; Page, Susan B.; Bissell, Kimberly L.; Lucky, Felecia L.; Higginbotham, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Cultural competency, trust, and research literacy can affect the planning and implementation of sustainable community-based participatory research (CBPR). The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight: (1) the development of a CBPR pilot grant request for application; and (2) a comprehensive program supporting CBPR obesity-related grant proposals facilitated by activities designed to promote scholarly collaborations between academic researchers and the community. After a competitive application process, academic researchers and non-academic community leaders were selected to participate in activities where the final culminating project was the submission of a collaborative obesity-related CBPR grant application. Teams were comprised of a mix of academic researchers and non-academic community leaders, and each team submitted an application addressing obesity-disparities among rural predominantly African American communities in the US Deep South. Among four collaborative teams, three (75%) successfully submitted a grant application to fund an intervention addressing rural and minority obesity disparities. Among the three submitted grant applications, one was successfully funded by an internal CBPR grant, and another was funded by an institutional seed funding grant. Preliminary findings suggest that the collaborative activities were successful in developing productive scholarly relationships between researchers and community leaders. Future research will seek to understand the full-context of our findings. PMID:26703675

  1. Sustaining Academic Community in the Aftermath of Tragedy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Terry M.

    2008-01-01

    The author's charge in this article is to focus particularly on the question of how an academic community can sustain itself and work productively and positively to achieve normally high aspirations for its students and all members of the community. Writing from the perspective of a longtime member of the Virginia Tech community, he begins with a…

  2. Academic Divisions Connections to the Community: Essential for Effective Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Lea Gabbert

    This commentary focuses on the need to develop collaborative efforts between academic divisions and the community. While the role of the public school in the community has not changed, there is growing concern that the personal interactions between schools and the community have been lost, thereby dismissing students' need to understand their…

  3. Emeritus Colleges: Enriching Academic Communities by Extending Academic Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Roger G.; Zeig, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The emeritus college, a recent higher education innovation, provides retired professors with a means to stay intellectually engaged and continue to contribute professionally in retirement. The emeritus college can also help institutions maintain a steady flow of professional talent by making retirement more attractive for senior academics. This…

  4. Early-Career Academics' Learning in Academic Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmik, Marvi; Karm, Mari; Haamer, Anu; Lepp, Liina

    2011-01-01

    Communities of practice are generally known as places of engagement, learning and development. The current research aims to develop understanding of Estonian early-career university teachers' learning and developing possibilities as teachers in the community of practice (in the university). This paper is based on narrative interviews of 25…

  5. Connecting Higher Education Research in Japan with the International Academic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonezawa, Akiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the historical, current, and future challenges of higher education research in Japan within a global context. Japanese higher education research has been strongly influenced by the international academic community. At the same time, higher education researchers in Japan have participated in international projects, and Japan has…

  6. Academic-community partnerships for sustainable preparedness and response systems.

    PubMed

    Isakov, Alexander; O'Neal, Patrick; Prescott, John; Stanley, Joan; Herrmann, Jack; Dunlop, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Academic institutions possess tremendous resources that could be important for community disaster response and preparedness activities. In-depth exploration of the role of academic institutions in community disaster response has elicited information about particular academic resources leveraged for and essential to community preparedness and response; factors that contribute to the decision-making process for partner engagement; and facilitators of and barriers to sustainable collaborations from the perspectives of academic institutions, public health and emergency management agencies, and national association and agency leaders. The Academic-Community Partnership Project of the Emory University Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center in collaboration with the Association of Schools of Public Health convened an invitational summit which included leadership from the National Association of County and City Health Officials, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Directors of Public Health Preparedness, Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, CDC Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Association of Schools of Public Health, Association of American Medical Colleges, Association of Academic Health Centers, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and American Association of Poison Control Centers. From this convention, emerged recommendations for building and sustaining academic-public health-community collaborations for preparedness locally and regionally. PMID:25068939

  7. Framing the Curriculum for Participation: A Bernsteinian Perspective on Academic Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapp, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Academic writing is challenging, particularly for new undergraduates who can struggle to know what is expected of them. Research into Academic Literacies often presents academic literacy practices as a barrier to the academy, excluding those not familiar with and those not able to participate in those practices and positioning them permanently on…

  8. Developmental Brain Research with Participants from Underprivileged Communities: Strategies for Recruitment, Participation, and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habibi, Assal; Sarkissian, Alissa Der; Gomez, Martha; Ilari, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Challenges associated with recruitment and retention of participants from underprivileged social communities, in addition to neuroscience researchers' unfamiliarity with these communities, possibly explain the limited number of individuals from these communities who participate in neuroscience research studies. The consequence is a scarcity of…

  9. Participation of Academic Scientists in Relationships with Industry

    PubMed Central

    Zinner, Darren E.; Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana; Clarridge, Brian; Blumenthal, David; Campbell, Eric G.

    2013-01-01

    Relationships between academic researchers and industry have received considerable attention in the last 20 years, but current data on the prevalence, magnitude, and trends in such relationships are rare. In a mailed survey of 3080 academic life science researchers conducted in 2007, we found the majority (52.8%) of academic life scientists have some form of relationship with industry. Compared to our previous studies in 1995 and 1985, we found a significant decrease in industry support of university research, which could have major consequences for the academic life science research sector. PMID:19887423

  10. Participating in International Academic Publishing: A Taiwan Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Min, Hui-Tzu

    2014-01-01

    There has been growing concern among researchers and scholars about how nonnative-English-speaking academics in the "expanding circle" (Kachru, 2001, p. 520) cope with challenges while publishing in English in international refereed journals in the center. Most found that academics from peripheral countries where English is a foreign…

  11. Personal and Social Support Factors Involved in Students' Decision to Participate in Formal Academic Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larose, Simon; Cyrenne, Diane; Garceau, Odette; Harvey, Marylou; Guay, Frederic; Deschenes, Claire

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examined the role of personal and social support factors involved in students' decision to participate in formal academic mentoring. Three hundred and eighteen students completing Grade 11 and planning to study sciences in college filled out a questionnaire and were then asked to participate in an academic mentoring program…

  12. Irreparable Cleavages in the Academic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Roosevelt

    1972-01-01

    The author concludes that the ideological are inherent and desirable in the academic process. Racial problems have been a social reality in the American society and will therefore continue on the campuses which are in fact microcosms of society. (Author)

  13. Community participation to design rural primary healthcare services

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This paper explores how community participation can be used in designing rural primary healthcare services by describing a study of Scottish communities. Community participation is extolled in healthcare policy as useful in planning services and is understood as particularly relevant in rural settings, partly due to high social capital. Literature describes many community participation methods, but lacks discussion of outcomes relevant to health system reconfiguration. There is a spectrum of ideas in the literature on how to design services, from top-down standard models to contextual plans arising from population health planning that incorporates community participation. This paper addresses an evidence gap about the outcomes of using community participation in (re)designing rural community health services. Methods Community-based participatory action research was applied in four Scottish case study communities in 2008–10. Data were collected from four workshops held in each community (total 16) and attended by community members. Workshops were intended to produce hypothetical designs for future service provision. Themes, rankings and selections from workshops are presented. Results Community members identified consistent health priorities, including local practitioners, emergency triage, anticipatory care, wellbeing improvement and health volunteering. Communities designed different service models to address health priorities. One community did not design a service model and another replicated the current model despite initial enthusiasm for innovation. Conclusions Communities differ in their receptiveness to engaging in innovative service design, but some will create new models that fit in a given budget. Design diversity indicates that context influences local healthcare planning, suggesting community participation impacts on design outcomes, but standard service models maybe useful as part of the evidence in community participation discussions

  14. Profiling Chief Academic Officers in Public Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Cynthia B.; Cejda, Brent D.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 369 chief academic officers (CAOs) at public community colleges belonging to the American Association of Community Colleges was conducted in 1998-99. Reports on the personal and professional characteristics of respondents. Indicates that female CAOs differ from male CAOs in four ways. Notes the continued low representation of ethnic…

  15. Academic Standards in the American Community College: Trends and Controversies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Howard B.

    Reasons for slipping academic standards in U.S. community colleges and a specific program combating this problem are discussed. Two reasons are offered for this slippage; the first has to do with the ambiguous state of the community college faculty. These teachers are said to have difficulty defining their roles because they feel a powerlessness…

  16. Attending Community College, Parenting Satisfaction, and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilfert, Christy M.

    2010-01-01

    This research was a quantitative study designed to evaluate parenting satisfaction, academic performance, and students' perceptions of pursuing higher education in students attending community college. One purpose of this research was to determine if pursuing higher education at the community college level impacted the parenting satisfaction of…

  17. Measurement of balance function and community participation in stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sinae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the relationship between balance function and community participation in stroke survivors. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty-three patients diagnosed with hemiparetic stroke participated in this study (36 males, 27 females, aged 58.6 ± 15.2 years). The participants were assessed for balance function and their level of participation in the community, using activity card sorting and the Berg Balance Scale. A regression analysis was used to identify the influence of balance function on instrumental activities of daily living and leisure and social activities. [Results] The results of the regression analysis indicated that balance function measured by using the Berg Balance Scale affected community participation of patients with hemiparetic stroke. Participation in instrumental activities of daily living and leisure and social activities was affected by balance function. [Conclusion] This study provides useful information for designing efficient programs and identifying their effectiveness for enhancement of community participation in stroke survivors.

  18. Profiling Participative Residents in Western Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matarrita-Cascante, David; Luloff, A. E.

    2008-01-01

    Differences between old-timers and newcomers and their effects on community social dimensions have been the object of much research. These studies have shown how extensive in-migration of people with different socioeconomic backgrounds, values, and perspectives contribute to heightened social conflict in some communities. Popular media accounts…

  19. The academic health center and the healthy community.

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, J; Vana, J E

    1994-01-01

    US medical care reflects the priorities and influence of academic health centers. This paper describes the leadership role assumed by one academic health center, the State University at Buffalo's School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and its eight affiliated hospitals, to serve its region by promoting shared governance in educating graduate physicians and in influencing the cost and quality of patient care. Cooperation among hospitals, health insurance payers, the business community, state government, and physicians helped establish priorities to meet community needs and reduce duplication of resources and services; to train more primary care physicians; to introduce shared governance into rural health care delivery; to develop a regional management information system; and to implement health policy. This approach, spearheaded by an academic health center without walls, may serve as a model for other academic health centers as they adapt to health care reform. PMID:8017527

  20. Adult Attitudes about Youth Participation in Community Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasmussen, Marilyn F.

    2003-01-01

    Survey responses from 68 civic and community organizations in South Dakota indicated that one-fourth currently had some level of youth participation. Service/community, religious, 4-H/scout leaders, and youth center/after-school programs, but none of the government or business organizations, indicated that youth participated in decision making.…

  1. What Community Participation in Schooling Means: Insights from Southern Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift-Morgan, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    Community participation is a term frequently used and often cited in international educational development. In this article, Jennifer Swift-Morgan investigates the definition and impact of community participation in schooling in rural Ethiopia. Although national governments, development agencies, and nongovernmental organizations across the…

  2. Community Participation and Strengthening in a Reconstruction Context After a Natural Disaster.

    PubMed

    Cueto, Rosa María; Fernández, María Zoila; Moll, Sarah; Rivera, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    During the first academic term of 2010, participatory action investigation processes were conducted in three communities affected by the 2007 high magnitude earthquake that occurred in the province of Chincha (Ica, Peru). In the process, members of the communities identified, as core problems, aspects related to the community coexistence, emphasizing the attention of the most vulnerable segments (children and adolescents) in the context of economic constraints and problems aggravated by the earthquake. Results include an analysis of the needs and reactions following the earthquake, the leadership and the power relations visible in the post disaster context and, finally, the community participation throughout the reconstruction process. This article also proposes some topics resulting from the analysis, aiming to contribute to interventions focused on community participation and strengthening of local resources in contexts of great vulnerability to natural disasters. PMID:26472239

  3. Youth Patrols: An Experiment in Community Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knopf, Terry Ann

    1970-01-01

    The Lemberg Center studied youth patrols in twelve cities during 1967 to discuss why and how they were formed, their part in restoring or maintaining order, and their effect on community relations. (JM)

  4. [Community participation in health: the challenge in Chile].

    PubMed

    Méndez, Claudio A; López, Jairo J Vanegas

    2010-02-01

    Health care reforms implemented in Latin America and the Caribbean over the last 20 years have viewed community participation as a system-wide component. Nonetheless, these reform efforts have yet to break through the conceptual and operational barriers holding back the development and expansion of community participation. In Chile, changes introduced to the health care system are far from achieving any real participation from the community. Therefore, the consumer's role needs to be redefined from merely controlling the parts, to reaching across the whole system in a way that consumer input might identify and quickly correct any possible shortcomings in the health system's design, as well as its operations. With this in mind, the main challenges are to strengthen coordination among the various promotion and participation commitments, as well as community control, and to generate data and other evidence to assess the impact of community participation in health strategies. PMID:20339619

  5. Legitimate Peripheral Participation in Communities of Practice: Participation Support Structures for Newcomers in Faculty Student Councils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Julia; Stegmann, Karsten; Fischer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Participating in communities of practice (CoPs) is an important way of learning. For newcomers in such communities, the learning process can be described as legitimate peripheral participation (LPP). Although a body of knowledge on LPP has been accumulated from qualitative case studies, mostly focusing on the use of practices, the concrete…

  6. Community-Academic Partnerships: Developing a Service-Learning Framework.

    PubMed

    Voss, Heather C; Mathews, Launa Rae; Fossen, Traci; Scott, Ginger; Schaefer, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Academic partnerships with hospitals and health care agencies for authentic clinical learning have become a major focus of schools of nursing and professional nursing organizations. Formal academic partnerships in community settings are less common despite evolving models of care delivery outside of inpatient settings. Community-Academic partnerships are commonly developed as a means to engage nursing students in service-learning experiences with an emphasis on student outcomes. The benefit of service-learning projects on community partners and populations receiving the service is largely unknown primarily due to the lack of structure for identifying and measuring outcomes specific to service-learning. Nursing students and their faculty engaged in service-learning have a unique opportunity to collaborate with community partners to evaluate benefits of service-learning projects on those receiving the service. This article describes the development of a service-learning framework as a first step toward successful measurement of the benefits of undergraduate nursing students' service-learning projects on community agencies and the people they serve through a collaborative community-academic partnership. PMID:26428344

  7. Community participation in rural health: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major health inequities between urban and rural populations have resulted in rural health as a reform priority across a number of countries. However, while there is some commonality between rural areas, there is increasing recognition that a one size fits all approach to rural health is ineffective as it fails to align healthcare with local population need. Community participation is proposed as a strategy to engage communities in developing locally responsive healthcare. Current policy in several countries reflects a desire for meaningful, high level community participation, similar to Arnstein’s definition of citizen power. There is a significant gap in understanding how higher level community participation is best enacted in the rural context. The aim of our study was to identify examples, in the international literature, of higher level community participation in rural healthcare. Methods A scoping review was designed to map the existing evidence base on higher level community participation in rural healthcare planning, design, management and evaluation. Key search terms were developed and mapped. Selected databases and internet search engines were used that identified 99 relevant studies. Results We identified six articles that most closely demonstrated higher level community participation; Arnstein’s notion of citizen power. While the identified studies reflected key elements for effective higher level participation, little detail was provided about how groups were established and how the community was represented. The need for strong partnerships was reiterated, with some studies identifying the impact of relational interactions and social ties. In all studies, outcomes from community participation were not rigorously measured. Conclusions In an environment characterised by increasing interest in community participation in healthcare, greater understanding of the purpose, process and outcomes is a priority for research, policy and practice

  8. Peer Observation of Teaching: Enhancing Academic Engagement for New Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Conor; O'Loughlin, Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to uncover key motivations, barriers and outcomes associated with first-time users of peer observation of teaching within an Irish higher level academic context. Following preliminary research, a peer observation process was piloted on five self-selected peer observation faculty pairs involving peer observation training and…

  9. Arresting Decline in Shared Governance: Towards a Flexible Model for Academic Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapworth, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers tensions between corporate models of governance focused on the governing body and more traditional, consensual academic approaches. It argues that despite these tensions, a decline in the role of the academic community in matters of institutional governance (shared governance) is neither desirable nor inevitable, and that…

  10. Establishing the SouthWestern Academic Health Network (SWAHN): A Survey Exploring the Needs of Academic and Community Networks in SouthWestern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Kathryn; Randhawa, Jasmine; Steele, Margaret

    2015-10-01

    With the evolving fields of health research, health professional education and advanced clinical care comes a need to bring researchers, educators and health care providers together to enhance communication, knowledge-sharing and interdisciplinary collaboration. There is also a need for active collaboration between academic institutions and community organizations to improve health care delivery and health outcomes in the community setting. In Canada, an Academic Health Sciences Network model has been proposed to achieve such activities. The SouthWestern Academic Health Network (SWAHN) has been established among three universities, three community colleges, community hospitals, community-based organizations and health care providers and two Local Health Integrated Networks (LHINs) in Southwestern Ontario. A survey was conducted to understand the characteristics, activities, existing partnerships, short- and long-term goals of the academic and community health networks in SouthWestern Ontario to inform the development of SWAHN moving forward. A total of 114 health networks were identified from the two participating LHINs, 103 community health networks and 11 academic health networks. A mailed survey was sent to all networks and responses were analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. The short- and long-term goals of these networks were categorized into five main themes: Public Health, Education, Research, System Delivery and Special Populations. Overall, this study helped to elicit important information from the academic and community based networks, which will inform the future work of SWAHN. This research has also demonstrated the significance of collecting information from both academic and community partners during the formation of other interdisciplinary health networks. PMID:25795223

  11. Academic Library Resource Sharing through Bibliographic Utility Program Participation. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trochim, Mary Kane

    This summary briefly outlines a separate report containing information on the growth of bibliographic utilities and academic library networking, as well as profiles of interlibrary loan activity at six academic libraries who are members or users of a major bibliographic utility. Applications of computer technology and network participation in…

  12. Health care philanthropies: how communities can participate.

    PubMed

    1996-09-01

    When a nonprofit hospital or health plan converts to for-profit status, the value of its assets endows a charitable foundation. As a result, billions of health care dollars are being shifted into new philanthropic institutions with an explicit mission to "improve the health of the community." But this issue of States of Health argues that mission can only be accomplished if consumers are involved significantly in the conversion process. PMID:11503873

  13. Community participation in health activities in an Amazon community of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Tauil, M C; de Azevedo, A C

    1978-01-01

    This article describes community participation in a comprehensive eight-year health program at Porto Nacional, a town in Brazils Amazon region. The authors discuss various techniques employed to encourage community participation, indicate methods used to resolve low-key conflicts in a positive manner, describe the major contributions made by community participation in this program, and present a number of conclusions considered applicable to other communities in this part of Brazil. PMID:698459

  14. Community size and sport participation across 22 countries.

    PubMed

    Balish, S M; Rainham, D; Blanchard, C

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine, across 22 countries, the association between community size and individual sport, team sport, and exercise participation. Hierarchal non-linear Bernoulli modeling is used to examine the association between community size (100,000-10,000; <10,000) and (a) individual sport, (b) team sport, and (c) exercise participation. After controlling for country-level clustering and demographic variables, those residing a community with between 100,000 and 10,000 residents are more likely to participate in individual sport [odds ratio (OR) = 1.14; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-1.23] while residing in a community with less than 10,000 residents is unrelated (OR = 1.06; 95% CI = 0.96-1.19). Those residing in communities with between 100,000 and 10,000 residents were more likely to participate in team sport (OR = 1.21; 95% CI = 1.01-1.45) while residing in a community with less than 10,000 residents is unrelated (OR = 1.02; 95% CI = 0.88-1.18). Residing in a community with between 100,000 and 10,000 residents is unrelated to exercise participation (OR = 0.97; 95% CI = 0.89-1.7), while residing in a community with less than 10,000 residents is negatively related to exercise participation (OR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.79-0.93). These findings provide novel evidence that communities between 100,000 and 10,000 residents are related to increased sport participation, particularly team sport participation. PMID:25487738

  15. Senate Rostrum: Academic Senate for California Community Colleges Newsletter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Rostrum is a quarterly publication of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges. The following articles are included in this issue: (1) The Need for full Time faculty (again) by Jane Patton; (2) Reading May Be the Key to Unlocking Basic Skills Success by Janet Fulks; (3) Diversity Institute on the Right Track by Beth Smith; (4)…

  16. Freshmen and Sophomores Abroad: Community Colleges and Overseas Academic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Gerhard

    The mechanics of establishing and maintaining overseas academic programs are examined in this monograph with respect to the community college level. Chapter 1 provides a history of internationalism in institutions of higher learning from ancient times in India, China, Persia, Greece, Rome, and Western Europe. Chapter 2 presents a rationale for the…

  17. The Managerial Roles of Community College Chief Academic Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Philip Wayne

    This study utilized Mintzberg's taxonomy of managerial roles to examine the roles performed by community college chief academic officers (CAOs). Mintzberg's taxonomy defines managerial roles as a set of behaviors and identifies 10 distinct roles: (1) figurehead; (2) leader; (3) liaison; (4) monitor; (5) disseminator; (6) spokesperson; (7)…

  18. The Managerial Roles of Public Community College Chief Academic Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Philip; Murray, John P.; Olivarez, Arturo, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the managerial roles of the community college Chief Academic Officer (CAO). Findings indicated that (1) CAOs placed the most importance on the roles of leader, liaison, and disseminator; (2) managers with more years of experience tended to emphasize the liaison role most; and (3) CAOs over 40 placed the most importance on…

  19. Exploring Students' Perceptions of Academically Based Living-Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawrzynski, Matthew R.; Jessup-Anger, Jody Elizabeth; Stolz, Katherine; Helman, Cynthia; Beaulieu, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study employed focus group interviews to explore students' perceptions of three well established academically based living-learning communities at a large, land-grant university in the Midwest. Three themes merged that illustrated students' perceptions of a culture that promoted seamless learning, a scholarly environment, and an…

  20. Academic Optimism and Community Engagement in Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Misty M.; DiPaola, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among academic optimism, community engagement, and student achievement in urban elementary schools across one district. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from all 35 urban elementary schools across one district in Virginia, USA. Correlation, multiple regression, and…

  1. Digital Documents and the Future of the Academic Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Peter

    This paper examines the dynamics of change in scholarly publishing and the impact of technological innovation upon the academic community for which the system of scholarly communication serves as an infrastructure. For the purposes of this discussion, what is of immediate interest is the way the productivity issue frames the possible dimensions of…

  2. Increasing the Academic Momentum of Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attewell, Paul; Douglas, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the credits-attempted perspective--in the context of how many credits a student attempts in their first year of college--and reports on several related projects all intended to evaluate potential interventions to raise academic momentum among first-year community college students. The presentation contrasts non-experimental…

  3. Academic Predictors of Online Course Success in the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Christy D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify academic factors that might predict online course success for community college students. Online course success was a focus of national research and debate as studies consistently indicated lower success rates in online courses as compared to traditional courses; however, research that identified academic…

  4. Evaluating Academic Programs in California's Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Andrew M.; Leigh, Duane E.

    2004-01-01

    Community colleges have traditionally received funding based on student enrollment, which is usually considered an input in the educational process. Recently, however, legislation enacted at the federal and state levels specifies that funding is to hinge, as least in part, on student performance--an output measure. Performance standards improve…

  5. Academic Crossover Report, Community Colleges, Fall 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Community Coll. System.

    Patterns of course distribution by subject areas and of courses taken by various majors are described in this report on Hawaii community colleges. Distribution of courses by major indicates: (1) liberal arts majors are the largest consumers of general education--66% of all Student Semester Hours (SSH) generated in general education are taken by…

  6. Academic Community and Post-Tenure Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, William G.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the need for post-tenure faculty review to root out "dead wood" faculty and increase faculty accountability, focusing on the time frame for such reviews, who gets reviewed, and the intensity and ramifications of the review. Also notes criticisms of post-tenure reviews and the need to build community through self-regulation. (MDM)

  7. Older Women Participating in the Community: Pathways and Barriers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setterlund, Deborah; Abbott, Joan

    1995-01-01

    Fifteen older women involved as volunteers faced several barriers to participation: pain, disability, family obligations, assumptions about age, transportation, and different patterns and pace of life. Structural changes that would enhance older people's contributions to community life were suggested. (SK)

  8. Remediation at the Community College: Student Participation and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettinger, Eric P.; Long, Bridget Terry

    2005-01-01

    This chapter explores the characteristics and features of remedial education at community colleges, examines participation in these courses, and reviews findings on the effects of remediation on student decisions and outcomes. (Contains 2 tables.)

  9. Gender differences on osteoporosis health beliefs and related behaviors in non-academic community Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin-Ping; Xia, Ru-Yi; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Xin-Shuang; Zhang, Lu-Lu; Li, Hao

    2014-06-01

    Osteoporosis represents the major public health concern worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess osteoporosis beliefs and actual performance of osteoporosis preventive behaviors in non-academic community Chinese population and to explore whether the differences exist in community females and males. A cross sectional study including 137 females and 122 males was conducted in four non-academic communities of Xi'an city during November 2012, selected by multi-stage sampling method. Self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. The respondents' mean age was 56.06 ± 5.81 years. 35.5% of the participants had a bone mineral density test. The participants exhibit relatively low osteoporosis health beliefs. The total health belief score was 63.30 ± 8.55 and 64.13 ± 6.47 in females and males respectively. There was significant gender differences in the subscales of Perceived seriousness (p = 0.03), Perceived barriers to exercise (p = 0.004) and Perceived motivation (p = 0.01). Participants had low frequencies of preventive practices. Gender differences were revealed in current smoking and alcohol intake, soybean food intake, smoking history (p < 0.001), alcohol intake history (p = 0.001), meat or egg intake (p = 0.019). The findings from the study suggest an increased awareness of this major public health problem in non-academic Chinese and the scope for enhancing osteoporosis intervention considering the gender difference. PMID:24399160

  10. Conflict, Development and Community Participation in Education: Pakistan and Yemen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Adele

    2005-01-01

    In development policy, community participation has increasingly come to be seen as a way to encourage community interest, involvement, ownership and ultimately, sustainability of projects. Education has also been affected by this discourse. The following paper examines two countries affected by conflict (Pakistan and Yemen), asking what type of…

  11. An Inclusive ACE. Broadening Participation in Adult and Community Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alt, Merilyn; Beatty, Dianne

    A project identified strategies to increase participation by community members who traditionally have not used adult and community education (ACE) in Australia. Methodology included a focus group, literature research, and interviews with 70 people. Government-supported ACE was seen as having a broad role in supporting lifelong learning. ACE…

  12. Participation in Community Arts: Lessons from the Inner-City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clennon, Ornette D.; Kagan, Carolyn; Lawthom, Rebecca; Swindells, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we critically reflect, through the lens of liberation psychology, on our experiences of using participative community arts in work with young people and intergenerational groups in inner-city Manchester, UK. We used mixed methods to examine the impact of and engagement with community arts in two projects. One study was quasi…

  13. Church Musicians' Participation Perceptions: Applications to Community Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohwer, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe the participation perceptions of church choir musicians. Twenty-two choral musicians in 3 churches were interviewed. The results align with past research on community music ensembles in terms of musical and social perceptions of the participants, including concepts of recruitment, attendance, and diverse…

  14. Online Students: Relationships between Participation, Demographics and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldwell, J.; Craig, A.; Paterson, T.; Mustard, J.

    2008-01-01

    Using information technology to support teaching and learning is becoming ubiquitous in tertiary education. However, how students participate and perform when a major component of the learning experience is conducted via an online learning environment is still an open question. The objective of this study was to investigate any relationships…

  15. Brief report: The impact of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms on academic performance in an adolescent community sample.

    PubMed

    Birchwood, James; Daley, Dave

    2012-02-01

    Less is understood about the relationship between ADHD symptoms and academic performance in adolescents than the relationship in younger children. As such, the aim of the present study was to investigate the prospective relationship between ADHD symptoms and academic performance in a community adolescent sample. Three hundred and twenty-four participants, aged 15 and 16, in their final year of compulsory education, completed measures of ADHD, anxiety, depression, and motivation, and a test of general cognitive ability. Participants were also asked for permission for their academic grades to be viewed on a later occasion (approximately 6 months later). In regression analyses, ADHD symptoms were the most significant independent psychopathological predictor of academic performance, and were almost as significant as motivation and cognitive ability. The results suggest that adolescents with more ADHD symptoms are likely to encounter greater academic difficulties. PMID:20880572

  16. Sports Participation and Academic Performance: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Daniel I.; Sabia, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been argued that high school sports participation increases motivation and teaches teamwork and self-discipline. While several studies have shown that students who participate in athletic activities perform better in school than those who do not, it is not clear whether this association is a result of positive academic spillovers, or due to…

  17. The Impact of Participating in a Peer Assessment Activity on Subsequent Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jhangiani, Rajiv S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the impact of participation in a peer assessment activity on subsequent academic performance. Students in two sections of an introductory psychology course completed a practice quiz 1 week prior to each of three course exams. Students in the experimental group participated in a five-step double-blind peer assessment…

  18. Characteristics of and Implications for Students Participating in Alternate Assessments Based on Alternate Academic Achievement Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Jacqueline Farmer; Towles-Reeves, Elizabeth; Kleinert, Harold L.; Kleinert, Jane O'Regan; Thomas, Megan Kleine-Kracht

    2011-01-01

    Little research has precisely defined the population of students participating in alternate assessments based on alternate academic achievement standards (AA-AAAS). Therefore, the purpose of this article is twofold: (a) explicate the findings of a multistate study examining the characteristics of the population of students participating in…

  19. The Effects of Participation in School Instrumental Music Programs on Student Academic Achievement and School Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Kevin O.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether or not students that participated in a school sponsored instrumental music program had higher academic achievement and attendance than students that did not participate in a school sponsor instrumental music program. Units of measurement included standardized test scores and attendance, without taking into consideration…

  20. Sustaining Community Participation: What Remains After the Money Ends?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nkansa, Grace Akukwe; Chapman, David W.

    2006-12-01

    SUSTAINING COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION: WHAT REMAINS AFTER THE MONEY ENDS? - A major concern confronting development specialists in the education sector is the sustainability of project activities and outcomes, that is, their ability to persist once external funding ends. The increased attention of international development-assistance organizations to sustainability reflects the greater recent focus on outcome-based funding. The present study investigates differences between six communities in Ghana that varied in their ability to sustain externally initiated community-participation activities beyond the life of the external development-assistance project that promoted those activities. It was hypothesized that high- and low-sustaining communities differ in eight managerial and socio-cultural dimensions suggested by earlier research to be important for sustainability of community-level activities: planning, transparency, leadership, and participation, on one hand, and, on the other, social cohesion, resources, community skills, and valuing of education. Findings indicate that leadership and social cohesion are the two most vital elements in the sustainability of organizational structures intended to promote community participation in the oversight of local schools. Other factors suggested by the model are largely subsumed under leadership, so that the model can be simplified.

  1. Exploring the Influence of Individual and Academic Differences on the Placement Participation Rate among International Students: A UK Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Ian; Wang, Zhiqi; Andrews, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the low placement participation rate among international students compared with UK students, by examining the impact of individual factors such as gender and domicile and academic achievement such as prior academic qualification, prior academic results and subsequent academic results on…

  2. Learning through community participation: immunization program at an elementary school.

    PubMed

    Velezis, M J; Endeshaw, Y

    2001-02-01

    Many universities are establishing programs to bring health professions students, faculty, and communities together to address the communities' needs using public health models and tools. Such partnerships provide students with the opportunity to put into practice what they learn in the classroom, work together in interdisciplinary teams, and provide communities with access to preventive care and health education. The authors describe the experience of the partnership developed between a Washington, D.C., elementary school and a group of students from the schools of medicine, nursing, and public health and health services of the George Washington University and George Mason University. Working with both an academic preceptor and a community preceptor, the students assessed the schoolchildren's immunization status; prepared informational packets for parents; and organized and conducted an immunization fair at the elementary school. The authors describe how the program was implemented, the results of the program, and lessons learned. PMID:11158846

  3. Effectiveness of Community College Success Courses on Academic Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houchen-Clagett, Denise A.

    2013-01-01

    Retention rates at a southeastern community college declined to approximately 26% between 2009 and 2012. This decline in student success may indicate a problem with programs intended to help retain students. To promote student retention, the participating community college has recommended that students complete a college success course as part of…

  4. Increasing participation in genomic research and biobanking through community-based capacity building.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Elizabeth Gross; Husamudeen, Maryam; Larson, Elaine L; Williams, Janet K

    2015-06-01

    Achieving equitable minority representation in genomic biobanking is one of the most difficult challenges faced by researchers today. Capacity building--a framework for research that includes collaborations and on-going engagement--can be used to help researchers, clinicians and communities better understand the process, utility, and clinical application of genomic science. The purpose of this exploratory descriptive study was to examine factors that influence the decision to participate in genomic research, and identify essential components of capacity building with a community at risk of being under-represented in biobanks. Results of focus groups conducted in Central Harlem with 46 participants were analyzed by a collaborative team of community and academic investigators using content analysis and AtlisTi. Key themes identified were: (1) the potential contribution of biobanking to individual and community health, for example the effect of the environment on health, (2) the societal context of the science, such as DNA criminal databases and paternity testing, that may affect the decision to participate, and (3) the researchers' commitment to community health as an outcome of capacity building. These key factors can contribute to achieving equity in biobank participation, and guide genetic specialists in biobank planning and implementation. PMID:25228357

  5. Increasing Participation in Genomic Research and Biobanking Through Community-Based Capacity Building

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Elizabeth Gross; Husamudeen, Maryam; Larson, Elaine L.; Williams, Janet K.

    2016-01-01

    Achieving equitable minority representation in genomic biobanking is one of the most difficult challenges faced by researchers today. Capacity building—a framework for research that includes collaborations and on-going engagement—can be used to help researchers, clinicians and communities better understand the process, utility, and clinical application of genomic science. The purpose of this exploratory descriptive study was to examine factors that influence the decision to participate in genomic research, and identify essential components of capacity building with a community at risk of being under-represented in biobanks. Results of focus groups conducted in Central Harlem with 46 participants were analyzed by a collaborative team of community and academic investigators using content analysis and AtlisTi. Key themes identified were: (1) the potential contribution of biobanking to individual and community health, for example the effect of the environment on health, (2) the societal context of the science, such as DNA criminal databases and paternity testing, that may affect the decision to participate, and (3) the researchers’ commitment to community health as an outcome of capacity building. These key factors can contribute to achieving equity in biobank participation, and guide genetic specialists in biobank planning and implementation. PMID:25228357

  6. Does sustained participation in an online health community affect sentiment?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaodian; Bantum, Erin; Owen, Jason; Elhadad, Noémie

    2014-01-01

    A large number of patients rely on online health communities to exchange information and psychosocial support with their peers. Examining participation in a community and its impact on members' behaviors and attitudes is one of the key open research questions in the field of study of online health communities. In this paper, we focus on a large public breast cancer community and conduct sentiment analysis on all its posts. We investigate the impact of different factors on post sentiment, such as time since joining the community, posting activity, age of members, and cancer stage of members. We find that there is a significant increase in sentiment of posts through time, with different patterns of sentiment trends for initial posts in threads and reply posts. Factors each play a role; for instance stage-IV members form a particular sub-community with patterns of sentiment and usage distinct from others members. PMID:25954470

  7. Prediction of Children’s Academic Competence From Their Effortful Control, Relationships, and Classroom Participation

    PubMed Central

    Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Swanson, Jodi; Reiser, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the relations among children’s effortful control, school relationships, classroom participation, and academic competence with a sample of 7- to 12-year-old children (N = 264). Parents and children reported on children’s effortful control, and teachers and children reported on children’s school relationships and classroom participation. Children’s grade point averages (GPAs) and absences were obtained from school-issued report cards. Significant positive correlations existed between effortful control, school relationships, classroom participation, and academic competence. Consistent with expectations, the teacher–child relationship, social competence, and classroom participation partially mediated the relation between effortful control and change in GPA from the beginning to the end of the school year. The teacher–child relationship and classroom participation also partially mediated the relation between effortful control and change in school absences across the year. PMID:21212831

  8. The implementation of Mask-Ed: reflections of academic participants.

    PubMed

    Reid-Searl, Kerry; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Cooper, Simon; Happell, Brenda

    2014-09-01

    This paper profiles the findings from a study that explored the perspectives and experiences of nurse educators who implemented a novel simulation approach termed Mask-Ed. The technique involves the educator wearing a silicone mask and or body parts and transforming into a character. The premise of this approach is that the masked educator has domain specific knowledge related to the simulation scenario and can transmit this to learners in a way that is engaging, realistic, spontaneous and humanistic. Nurse educators charged with the responsibility of implementing Mask-Ed in three universities were invited to participate in the study by attending an introductory workshop, implementing the technique and then journaling their experiences, insights and perspectives over a 12 month period. The journal entries were then thematically analysed. Key themes were categorised under the headings of Preparation, Implementation and Impact; Reflexivity and Responsiveness; Student Engagement and Ownership; and Teaching and Learning. Mask-Ed is a simulation approach which allows students to interact with the 'characters' in humanistic ways that promote person-centred care and therapeutic communication. This simulation approach holds previously untapped potential for a range of learning experiences, however, to be effective, adequate resourcing, training, preparation and practice is required. PMID:24906681

  9. A Comparison of Career Technical Education--16 Career Pathway High School Participants with Non-Participants on Academic Achievement, School Engagement, and Development of Technical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orozco, Edith Aimee

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research was to compare Career Technical Education--16 Career Pathway high school participants with non-participants on academic achievement, development of technical skills and school engagement. Academic achievement was measured by Exit Level Math and English Language Arts Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS)…

  10. [The political context for community participation in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Briceño-León, R

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the overall significance of the concept of community participation in health with respect to endemic diseases. It also observes how changes in Latin American society during the past forty years have forced radical changes in the notion of participation. The article describes changes in society and analyzes participation in the Cold War context, with four modalities of participation: as ideological manipulation, as cheap labor, as medical care facilitation, and as subversion. It then reviews participation in the context of the crisis of ideologies and describes two modalities: participation as a grassroots movement and as popular promotion. Finally, it interprets the forms participation takes in the context of economic adjustment programs, and from there it describes participation as both a complement to the State and a form of privatization. The article concludes with a proposal for participation as a mechanism to expand and extend democracy; in this sense, it highlights participation as a means of criticism of power, a fomenter of democratic organization, and a mechanism of transformation for the health sector. PMID:9700233

  11. Community Eagerness and Participation for Supporting Eliminate Malaria

    PubMed Central

    SHAHANDEH, Khandan; BASSERI, Hamid Reza; MAJDZADEH, Reza; SADEGHI, Roya; SHAHANDEH, Maryam; SHOJAEIZADEH, Davoud

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was undertaken to identify key elements for obtaining community interest and motivate them to support eliminate malaria in the places that malaria is no longer a perceived threat. Methods: Sequential explanatory mixed methods research design used to provide more comprehensive evidence research. A questionnaire was developed after reviewing the literature relating to community participation for malaria elimination and used to collect data from three native people, Iranian migrant and foreign immigrant groups. The variables included access to educational facilities, services, social support, social supporters, trust, and supportive norms were assessed. We also employed an ethnographic design involving: observation participant (PO), Key informant interviews (KIIs), and focus group discussions (FGDs). Results: The results revealed that predisposing, enabling and reinforcing factors had association with community involvement. Less than 50% of total respondents reported have access to educational sessions, most of them were unaware of available and affordable services. Differences views regarding to social support influence have been found among respondents. Although patterns of social interactions were almost similar in all residents, frequencies of interactions were varied. Three thematic areas emerged including perceptions on involvement, potential barriers, and focus areas for the training community members. Conclusion: These findings indicate needs for greater understanding about how to strengthen community involvement with emphasize for community capacity building. This research has benefit to national and regional efforts to increase community involvement as a source for effective actions on malaria elimination. PMID:26284207

  12. Academic Standards in the California Community Colleges: A Study of Faculty Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piland, William E.; Villanueva, Xavier

    A study was conducted to measure faculty perceptions of academic standards and the level of academic intensity in transfer courses. Questionnaires were sent to chief academic officers (CAO's) at 30 community colleges, asking them to distribute five instruments to members of the academic senate and five to instructors who were not members of the…

  13. An Overlooked Population in Community College: International Students' (In)Validation Experiences With Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Guided by validation theory, this study aims to better understand the role that academic advising plays in international community college students' adjustment. More specifically, this study investigated how academic advising validates or invalidates their academic and social experiences in a community college context. Method: This…

  14. Children's effortful control and academic achievement: do relational peer victimization and classroom participation operate as mediators?

    PubMed

    Valiente, Carlos; Swanson, Jodi; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Berger, Rebecca H

    2014-08-01

    Given that early academic achievement is related to numerous developmental outcomes, understanding processes that promote early success in school is important. This study was designed to clarify how students' (N=291; M age in fall of kindergarten=5.66 years, SD=0.39 year) effortful control, relational peer victimization, and classroom participation relate to achievement, as students progress from kindergarten to first grade. Effortful control and achievement were assessed in kindergarten, classroom participation and relational peer victimization were assessed in the fall of first grade, and achievement was reassessed in the spring of first grade. Classroom participation, but not relational peer victimization, mediated relations between effortful control and first grade standardized and teacher-rated achievement, controlling for kindergarten achievement. Findings suggest that aspects of classroom participation, such as the ability to work independently, may be useful targets of intervention for enhancing academic achievement in young children. PMID:25107413

  15. Community participation in health: perpetual allure, persistent challenge.

    PubMed

    Morgan, L M

    2001-09-01

    The concept of community participation continues to capture the attention of international health policymakers and analysts nearly a quarter of a century after it was formally introduced at the Alma Ata Conference. This paper reviews trends in the participation literature of the 1990s, drawing examples primarily from Latin America. The following topics are discussed: sustainability, new methods for operationalizing and evaluating participation, the significance of local and cultural variability in determining outcomes, participatory self-determination as raised in the social movements literature, the increasing importance of intersectoral linkages, and continuing impediments posed by biomedical ideologies and systems. While the rhetoric and practice of participation have become fully integrated into mainstream health and development discourses, the paper concludes that ideological and political disagreements continue to divide pragmatists, who favour utilitarian models of participation, from activists, who prefer empowerment models. PMID:11527862

  16. Children's Intent Participation in a Pediatric Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rindstedt, Camilla; Aronsson, Karin

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes informal learning, drawing on video recordings of staff-child interaction in a pediatric unit. It is shown that even very young patients engage in intent community participation, carefully noting fine variations in examination and treatment practices. They orient to everyday routines in successively more complex ways, gradually…

  17. Democratizing Indonesia through Education? Community Participation in Islamic Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Lyn; Raihani, R.

    2011-01-01

    In 1998, Indonesia embarked on a journey to democracy. This journey involved the decentralization of education from 2002. The new school-based management (SBM) system required greater community and parental participation in schools--thereby, it was hoped, contributing to a deepening of democracy. Islamic schools ("madrasah") also adopted this…

  18. Science education as/for participation in the community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Lee, Stuart

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we take up and advance the project of rethinking scientific literacy by Eisenhart, Finkel, and Marion (American Educational Research Journal, 1996, 33, 261-295). As part of a project of rethinking science education, we advance three propositions. First, because society is built on division of labor, not everybody needs to know the same basic sets of concepts; it is more important to allow the emergence of scientific literacy as a collective property. Second, scientific knowledge ought not to be privileged in democratic collective decision making but ought to be one of many resources. Third, rethinking science education as and for participation in community life sets up the potential for lifelong participation in and learning of science-related issues. To show the viability of these propositions, we provide a case study based on a 3-year, multisite ethnographic research project as part of which we investigated science in the community. Framing our work in terms of activity theory, we provide descriptions of science in a local middle school, where students learn science while participating in a community effort to contribute to the knowledge base about a local creek. The children's activities are continuous with those of adults concerned about environmental health. In this way, rather than preparing for life after school, science education allows students to participate in legitimate ways in community life and therefore provides a starting point for uninterrupted lifelong learning across the presently existing boundary separating formal schooling from everyday life outside schools.

  19. Social Capital and Community Participation among Migrant Workers in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Neal A.; Perkins, Douglas D.; Xu, Qingwen

    2011-01-01

    In China, rapid development has prompted massive migration from rural to urban areas. Migrants' participation in Urban Residents Committees (URCs) and other community organizations offers opportunities for the development of social capital and democracy in contemporary China. We use 2006 survey data from a stratified convenience sample of 3,024…

  20. Major lessons learned from a nationally-based community-academic partnership: addressing sibling adjustment to childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Long, Kristin A; Goldish, Melanie; Lown, E Anne; Ostrowski, Nancy L; Alderfer, Melissa A; Marsland, Anna L; Ring, Sandra; Skala, Suzanne; Ewing, Linda J

    2015-03-01

    Prolonged, intensive treatment protocols for childhood cancer disrupt family routines and daily functioning, with effects extending to all family members. Despite their unique needs, siblings of children with cancer receive limited attention from community organizations and researchers. Community-academic partnerships may foster research that effectively assesses and addresses siblings' unmet needs. In this article, "community" refers to siblings of children with cancer who participate in SuperSibs!, a national nonprofit organization for siblings of children with cancer. This article (a) describes a replicable model for successful community-academic partnerships: the Sibling Research Advisory Board (SRAB) and (b) articulates "lessons learned" from this partnership, including documenting the ability to recruit a representative sample through a community organization. Lessons emerged from an iterative process of discussion and revision that involved all SRAB members. This case study describes approaches to overcoming practical obstacles in community-partnered research planning and implementation. To meet the common goals of identifying and addressing unmet sibling needs, SRAB partners learned to establish a common language, identify each team member's unique expertise, and acknowledge differences in approach (e.g., methodology, pace of accomplishment) between research and community service. SRAB's ability to recruit a representative sample was achieved through close collaboration with SuperSibs! and implementation of active recruitment strategies to overcome barriers to research participation. Protection of community member privacy was emphasized alongside methodological rigor. Community-academic partnerships enable research with high-need, hard-to-access populations. Proactively identifying and addressing common pitfalls of community-academic partnerships promotes community engagement and acceptability and facilitates high-quality research. PMID:25581558

  1. The Impact of Student Motivation on Participation and Academic Performance in Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pittman, Candice Nicole

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of motivation on students' participation and academic performance in distance learning. Distance learning continues to grow in popularity as more and more students enroll in distance education courses. These courses require more responsibility on the part of the student. Some students are unaware of the…

  2. Holistic Growth of College Peer Study Group Participants: Prompting Academic and Personal Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arendale, David R.; Hane, Amanda R.

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on observed and perceived changes in academic and personal attitudes and behaviors by student participants in the Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) program at the University of Minnesota (UMN). The PAL model employs best practices from national peer learning models including Supplemental Instruction, Peer-led Team…

  3. Repositioning the Subject Discipline for an "Academic-Enhancement" Model of Widening Participation: A Philosophical Sketch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This article addresses a question for those seeking to deepen engagement with nontraditional students for strategies of widening participation in the higher education setting. The question is as follows: how can the academic subject be made more "open" to what the student (and therefore also the nontraditional student) can bring to it?…

  4. The Impact of Music Education and Athletic Participation on Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Timothy W.; Klotz, Jack

    This study sought to determine if participation as a musician or an athlete had an effect on academic achievement as measured by standardized test scores. It was hypothesized that students who received training as musicians would score higher on the core battery composite of reading, language, and mathematics sections of the California Achievement…

  5. How Europe Shapes Academic Research: Insights from Participation in European Union Framework Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primeri, Emilia; Reale, Emanuela

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the effects of participating in European Union Framework Programmes (EUFPs) at the level of research units and researchers. We consider EUFPs as policy instruments that contribute to the Europeanisation of academic research and study the changes they produce with respect to: 1) the organisation and activities of Departments,…

  6. Enrollees' Perceptions of Participating in the Education of Medical Students at an Academically Affiliated HMO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Sarah; Plasso, Ann; Finkelstein, Jonathan A.; Fletcher, Robert H.; Christiansen, Cindy L.; Inui, Thomas S.

    2000-01-01

    Studied the views of enrollees in an academically affiliated health maintenance organization (HMO) about participating in the education of medical students. Responses from 210 adults and 125 parents or guardians replying about children show that enrollees thought the HMO should be involved in teaching but they had specific concerns about the…

  7. Something for everyone? A community and academic partnership to address farmworker pesticide exposure in North Carolina.

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, S A; Arcury, T A; Pell, A I

    2001-01-01

    Partnerships between academic researchers and community organizations are frequently formed to address environmental health concerns in underserved communities. Although such participatory approaches to research combine valuable assets of both partners, they are often difficult to maintain. We describe a partnership formed to investigate migrant and seasonal farmworker exposure to pesticides in North Carolina and to develop effective interventions to reduce exposure. North Carolina ranks fifth in the United States in the number of farmworkers; most are from Mexico, and a significant minority come to the United States on work contracts. Several barriers to establishing effective collaboration were recognized in this partnership, including stereotypes, cultural differences, competing demands for time and attention, and differences in orientation to power structures. To overcome these barriers, members of the partnership took actions in three domains: clarifying the different goals of each partner, operationalizing a model of participation that could involve many different community segments developing cultural sensitivity. By taking these actions, the work of the partnership was accomplished in ways that met the criteria for success of both academic researchers and community members. This approach can be used by others to develop collaborative relationships to investigate environmental health issues within a community-based participatory framework. PMID:11427393

  8. Academic Innovation and Autonomy: An Exploration of Entrepreneurship Education within American Community Colleges and the Academic Capitalist Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mars, Matthew M.; Ginter, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Employing interviews with individuals from 16 community colleges across the country, as well as an independent consultant engaged in activities of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), this study considers the organizational structures and academic practices associated with community college entrepreneurship…

  9. Community participation: the keynote of integrated population programmes.

    PubMed

    1984-01-01

    The regional Intergovernmental Meeting on Health and Development, convened by the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) and the UN International Childrens Emergency Fund (UNICEF) in 1983, discussed in detail the rationale for community participation in multidimensional health care programs. In reporting on the discussions that occurred, focus is on some experiences in which the community approach is used in selected countries of the ESCAP region. Program implementation is divided into 2 distinct forms of effort to involve the individual, the family, and the community. The first of these is health education which forms an integral part of the activities of all health workers. On their visits to homes and communities, health workers educate the individual and the family to enable them to take voluntary action to prevent disease and maintain health. Health workers also educate individuals and families when the latter visit health centers and outpatient departments or are admitted as impatients. This kind of education is the 1st item in the package of primary health care services prescribed by the Alma Ata Declaration. The 2nd form of effort is organized educational effort to ensure the participation of the larger community in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of health care services. Bangladesh has recognized the need for a strong community organization and has launched a movement for integrated rural development. Here, the responsibility for education concerning prevailing health problems and for community participation is vested in the hands of village level health workers. Other health professionals supervise, guide, and support them. In Maldives the education mechanism is community self development. The responsibility for education concerning prevailing health problems in Mongolia is shared equally by all health personnel at every level of its health organization. Nepal

  10. Academic bridge to the community: the ABCs of a service-learning model.

    PubMed

    Querry, Ross G; Smith, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to outline the process, obstacles, and outcomes for the development and successful implementation of a service-learning experience between the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and the Muscular Dystrophy Association of Dallas. The rationale for initiation of the partnership is outlined, and curriculum planning concerns and integration are presented. These include development of community partnerships, identification of curricular placement, and development of academic and community roles, including didactic and clinical objectives for the participants. The importance of understanding the service-learning philosophy and evaluation of the student and community impact is emphasized. Outcomes report students' assessments encompassing issues of both prior and future didactic education, development of clinical skills and problem solving, and evaluation of professional and personal issues. It is suggested that this model of service learning project has the ability to be implemented across a wide spectrum of allied health care curricula. PMID:19759960

  11. Broadening Participation: Mentoring Community College Students in a Geoscience REU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Osborn, J.

    2015-12-01

    Increasingly, REUs are recruiting from community colleges as a means of broadening participation of underrepresented minorities, women, and low-income students in STEM. As inclusion of community college students becomes normalized, defining the role of science faculty and preparing them to serve as mentors to community college students is a key component of well-designed programs. This session will present empirical research regarding faculty mentoring in the first two years of an NSF-REU grant to support community college students in a university's earth and environmental science labs. Given the documented benefits of undergraduate research on students' integration into the scientific community and their career trajectory in STEM, the focus of the investigation has been on the processes and impact of mentoring community college STEM researchers at a university serving a more traditionally privileged population; the degree to which the mentoring relationships have addressed community college students needs including their emotional, cultural and resource needs; and gaps in mentor training and the mentoring relationship identified by mentors and students.

  12. Self-Efficacy, Intrinsic Motivation, and Academic Outcomes among Latino Middle School Students Participating in an After-School Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niehaus, Kate; Rudasill, Kathleen Moritz; Adelson, Jill L.

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined how academic self-efficacy, intrinsic motivation, and participation in an after-school program contributed to the academic achievement of Latino middle school students over the course of one school year. Participants were 47 Latino students in sixth through eighth grades who attended two public middle schools in…

  13. Engage/Trojan Neighbors: A community service partnership between an academic division and residential community.

    PubMed

    Pyatak, Elizabeth A; Díaz, Jesús; Delgado, Celso

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the case of an after-school program, focused on providing enrichment opportunities for neighborhood youth, jointly administered through an academic division and residential community within a large urban research university. The program, originally conceived as an activity-based after-school program for middle school youth, expanded in scope in response to both community and student needs. The resident faculty fellow in this community served as a liaison between the academic division and office of residential education, helping maintain continuity and facilitating effective student leadership of the program. In this case, we detail the origins and evolution of the program, including strategies used to resolve challenges that arose over several years of program implementation. PMID:26545031

  14. [Experiences in community participation to promote nutritional education].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Salgado, H; Martínez-Andrade, G O; Contreras-Pérez, J; Saucedo-Arteaga, G; Huerta-Pérez, L; Ramos, R I; Ramírez-Centeno, J; Meneses-Díaz, L M; Chávez-Villasana, A

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents several experiences obtained in the Rural Research Center of the Solís Valley in relation to community participation programs. The main objective of these projects was to improve the nutritional practices of children in the rural areas of highland Mexico. As first experience, small groups were formed with mothers, fathers, married couples and teenagers. Each of these groups started a project oriented to promote nutritional self-sufficiency. One group of mothers was successful in assuring the provision of government subsidized milk in their community. A second group of mothers started a chicken-raising farm, but the project failed because all the chicken died in an epidemic. The group of fathers started a sheep-raising project as the first step to get a milk-producing cow. The sheep-raising was successful, but when the sheep were sold each man in the group kept the revenue to himself and the group disappeared. The married couples were successful both in a home-gardening project and in a chicken-raising farm. The teenagers were also successful with their home-gardening project and acted as "injection groups" to spread the project in other communities. As a second experience in community participation, community health workers taught mothers how to use locally available food to improve their diets, preparing culturally acceptable food recipes. This intervention was successful in increasing mother's awareness of a balanced diet. A second intervention combined the presentation of a drama ("peasant's theater") in order to increase mother's participation in these projects.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8128308

  15. Developing a transcultural academic-community partnership to arrest obesity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rebecca E; Soltero, Erica G; Mama, Scherezade K; Saavedra, Fiorella; Ledoux, Tracey A; McNeill, Lorna

    2013-01-01

    Innovative and empirically tested strategies are needed to define and understand obesity prevention and reduction in a transcultural society. This manuscript describes the development of Science & Community, a partnership developed over a 3-year period with the end goal of implementing a community-based participatory research (CBPR) trial to reduce and prevent obesity. Outreach strategies focused on promoting the project via existing and new channels and identifying and contacting potential partners using established strategies. Science & Community developed and fostered partnerships by hosting a series of interactive meetings, including three Opportunity Receptions, four Community Open Forum Symposia, and quarterly Community Advisory Board (CAB) meetings. Opportunity Reception (N = 62) and Symposia attendees (N = 103) represented the diversity of the community, and participants reported high satisfaction with content and programming. From these events, the CAB was formed and was comprised of 13 community representatives. From these meetings, a Partnership representing 34 organizations and 614 individuals emerged that has helped to guide the development of future proposals and strategies to reduce obesity in Houston/Harris County. PMID:25030103

  16. DEVELOPING A TRANSCULTURAL ACADEMIC-COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP TO ARREST OBESITY

    PubMed Central

    LEE, REBECCA E.; SOLTERO, ERICA G.; MAMA, SCHEREZADE K.; SAAVEDRA, FIORELLA; LEDOUX, TRACEY A.; McNEILL, LORNA

    2015-01-01

    Innovative and empirically tested strategies are needed to define and understand obesity prevention and reduction in a transcultural society. This manuscript describes the development of Science & Community, a partnership developed over a 3-year period with the end goal of implementing a community-based participatory research (CBPR) trial to reduce and prevent obesity. Outreach strategies focused on promoting the project via existing and new channels and identifying and contacting potential partners using established strategies. Science & Community developed and fostered partnerships by hosting a series of interactive meetings, including three Opportunity Receptions, four Community Open Forum Symposia, and quarterly Community Advisory Board (CAB) meetings. Opportunity Reception (N = 62) and Symposia attendees (N = 103) represented the diversity of the community, and participants reported high satisfaction with content and programming. From these events, the CAB was formed and was comprised of 13 community representatives. From these meetings, a Partnership representing 34 organizations and 614 individuals emerged that has helped to guide the development of future proposals and strategies to reduce obesity in Houston/Harris County. PMID:25030103

  17. Weak State, Strong Community? Promoting Community Participation in Post-Conflict Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burde, Dana

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the effects of community participation in school governance, as an element of development and humanitarian assistance programs, on social capital and civil society building. The first section describes different types of participation in education, its institutional forms, and the paradigms that support…

  18. Increasing College-Going Rate, Parent Involvement, and Community Participation in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Stephanie B.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of leaders of grant-supported projects aimed at increasing the college-going rate of high school students in rural Appalachian counties in Mississippi to determine which factors they felt most influenced the college-going rate, parental participation in school activities, and community participation. Analysis of…

  19. Community Participation in the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrz, R. D.; Beichman, C. A.; Bicay, M. D.; Christian, C. A.; Clemens, D. P.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Cutri, R. M.; Greenhouse, M. A.; Hanner, M. S.; Jones, T. J.; Miller, R. B.; Rieke, M. J.; Thronson, H. A., Jr.; Weiler, E. J.; Werner, M. W.; Woodward, C. E.

    1997-12-01

    Eighty percent of the observing time on SIRTF will be available to the general astronomical community through Legacy Project (LP), Guest Observer (GO), Target of Opportunity (ToO), and Director's Discretionary Observations (DDO) programs. We describe the organization of the community of potential SIRTF observers under the auspices of the SIRTF Community Task Force (CTF) and summarize the recent activities of the CTF and its Working Groups (WGs). The WGs enable the SIRTF Project to draw on broad community representation to explore issues related to the definition of the LP, GO, and ToO Programs. Additional WGs are studying SIRTF Solar System Science and Data Archiving and Analysis. Working documents of the CTF and white papers delineating the major issues currently before the WGs can be read on the SIRTF homepage at http://www.ipac.caltech.edu/SIRTF. An interactive forum on the homepage will enable the community to participate actively during the mission definition phase. Community members can use the time-estimator tool on the homepage to assist with planning for SIRTF observations. A current version of the SIRTF Science Activities Timeline (SSAT) is presented. The SSAT defines the schedule for community activities that are necessary to conduct the SIRTF mission through its design, development, construction, preflight testing, and flight phases. Major milestones to be described include a series of workshops to define the LP program, NASA Research Announcement (NRA) releases for the LP and GO Programs, and NRA releases for flight-phase data archiving and analysis activities. An estimate of the fractional distribution of SIRTF observing time among Guaranteed Time Observations (GTOs), LPS, GOs, ToOs, and DDOs during the flight phase is presented. Further information regarding community activities in support of this NASA mission can be found on the SIRTF-homepage.

  20. Citizen participation in the governance of community mental health centers.

    PubMed

    Cibulka, J G

    1981-01-01

    The article reviews theory undergoing citizen participation in governance and presents several models of governance. A mail survey of 220 community mental health centers revealed that most centers did not meet the participant requirements of Public Law 94-63 for broad representation of the catchment area in governance or the functional requirements for decision-making, nor did boards incorporate other typical approaches to participation. This breakdown in implementation of the law can be interpreted as a twofold problem of organizational adaptation an power redistribution. Policy solutions would need to take both these cases into account. Incremental strategies alone are unlikely to create sufficient impact. Organizational development focused on building new models of governance and direct efforts to mobilize and empower citizens are suggested. PMID:7226739

  1. Community participation in a rural community health trust: the case of Lawrence, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Rachel; Gauld, Robin

    2003-09-01

    Since the mid-1980s, the New Zealand health sector has been in a state of continual change. The most radical changes were in the early-1990s, with the creation of an internal market system for public health care delivery. Rural health services, seen to be unviable, were given the option of establishing themselves as 'community trusts', owning and running their own services. Community trusts have since become a feature of rural health care in New Zealand. An expectation was that community trusts would facilitate community participation. This article reports on a study of participation in a rural community health trust. The 'pentagram model' of Rifkin and coworkers, with its five dimensions of participation-needs assessment, leadership, resource mobilization, management and organization-was applied. High levels of participation were found across each of these dimensions. The research revealed additional dimensions that could be added to the framework, including 'sustainability of participation', 'equity in participation' and 'the dynamic socio-political context'. In this regard, it supports recent theoretical work by Laverack (2001) and Laverack and Wallerstein (2001). Finally, the article comments on the future of rural health trusts in the current round of health sector restructuring. PMID:12920139

  2. Sense of Community in Academic Communities of Practice: Predictors and Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nistor, Nicolae; Daxecker, Irene; Stanciu, Dorin; Diekamp, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Sense of community (SoC) in communities of practice (CoP) seems to play a similar role to that of group cohesion in small groups: Both sustain participants' knowledge sharing, which in turn substantiates the socio-cognitive structures that make up the CoP such as scholar identities, practical repertoires in research and teaching or…

  3. The Attitudes and Behaviors of Generational Students towards Academic Integrity at the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Jeannine M.

    2011-01-01

    Academic dishonesty is a problem that educators face at all levels of education. Many studies have focused on researching academic dishonesty at four year colleges and universities, ignoring the community college. The purpose of this study was to examine the self-reported attitudes and behaviors of generational students towards academic integrity…

  4. A Qualitative Inquiry into the Training and Development Provided to Community College Academic Advisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikluscak, George Steven, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The qualitative study explored the training and development provided to Community College academic advisors who are members of the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA). The purpose was to investigate the factors academic advisors believe are crucial for the support of their roles as advisors. Professional, faculty, and self-identified…

  5. Academic Advising: Organizing and Delivering Services for Student Success. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Margaret C., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    Offering new perspectives on academic advising in community colleges, this book defines developmental academic advising, describes the organization and delivery of advising services, and discusses key components of effective programs. The following 10 chapters are included: (1) "Developmental Academic Advising," by Thaddeus M. Raushi, defining…

  6. Where Is the Learning in Smaller Learning Communities? Academic Press, Social Support for Learning, and Academic Engagement in Smaller Learning Community Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Christopher; Bol, Linda; Pribesh, Shana; Nunnery, John

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which smaller learning communities' (SLCs) focus on academic press and strong social relationships affects academic engagement among 9th graders in urban high schools was investigated. Data were collected through classroom observations, student questionnaires, and focus groups with teachers. Data were analyzed using descriptive…

  7. 45 CFR 2553.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... community participation? 2553.24 Section 2553.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE THE RETIRED AND SENIOR VOLUNTEER PROGRAM... community participation? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation...

  8. 45 CFR 2553.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... community participation? 2553.24 Section 2553.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... community participation? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by...: (1) Knowledgeable about human and social needs of the community; (2) Competent in the field...

  9. 45 CFR 2553.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... community participation? 2553.24 Section 2553.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... community participation? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by...: (1) Knowledgeable about human and social needs of the community; (2) Competent in the field...

  10. 45 CFR 2553.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... community participation? 2553.24 Section 2553.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... community participation? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by...: (1) Knowledgeable about human and social needs of the community; (2) Competent in the field...

  11. Teacher Participation in Online Communities: Why Do Teachers Want to Participate in Self-Generated Online Communities of K-12 Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hur, Jung Won; Brush, Thomas A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine reasons for teacher participation in online communities of K-12 teachers. The authors interviewed 23 teachers from three self-generated online communities and analyzed more than 2,000 postings in those communities. The findings indicated five reasons for participation: (a) sharing emotions, (b) utilizing…

  12. Community Participation in New Mexico's Behavioral Health Care Reform

    PubMed Central

    Kano, Miria; Willging, Cathleen E.; Rylko-Bauer, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, New Mexico implemented a unique reform in managed behavioral health services that seeks to ensure delivery of consumer-driven, recovery-oriented care to low-income individuals. Distinguishing features of the reform are the Local Collaboratives (LCs), regionally based community organizations designed by state government to represent behavioral health concerns of New Mexico's diverse cultural populations. We examine community response to the LCs, focusing on two broad sets of themes derived from 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork. The first set—structure and function—encompasses several issues: predominance of provider versus consumer voice; insufficient resources to support internal operations; imposition of state administrative demands; and perceived lack of state response to LC efforts. The second set—participation and collaboration—reveals how problems of information flow and other logistical factors impact involvement in LCs and how the construction of “community” introduced under this initiative exacerbates tensions across localities with varied histories and populations. PMID:19764315

  13. African American Males in the Community College: Towards a Model of Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jonathan Luke

    2010-01-01

    Many scholars have noted the dismal persistence rates of Black male students in community colleges, as well as their poor academic success outcomes. This study sought to further the literature on academic success by exploring student perspectives in one southwestern community college. The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of…

  14. Magnets and Seekers: A Network Perspective on Academic Integration inside Two Residential Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    Residential learning communities aim to foster increased academic and social integration, ideally leading to greater student success. However, the concept of academic integration is often conceptualized and measured at the individual level, rather than the theoretically more consistent community level. Network analysis provides a paradigm and…

  15. Understanding the Effects of Student Engagement on Persistence and Academic Performance for Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Aretha L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the spring 2008 Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) results from a community college located in Southeast Texas to determine what relationship student engagement had to student persistence and academic performance and if that relationship differed by race, ethnicity, or academic program.…

  16. Rethinking the "Apprenticeship of Liberty": The Case for Academic Programs in Community Engagement in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan W.

    2012-01-01

    This article articulates a model for the "engaged campus" through academic programs focused on community engagement, broadly construed. Such academic programs--usually coalesced in certificate programs, minors, and majors--provide a complementary vision for the deep institutionalization of civic and community engagement in the academy that can…

  17. Academic Service Learning in PETE: Service for the Community in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konukman, Ferman; Schneider, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Academic Service Learning (ASL) is a non-traditional experiential learning model where students gain experience through community involvement and reflection, and ultimately are able to link community service to academic study. Students understand related course content and civic responsibility via a period of highly structured reflection. This…

  18. Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, January 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Rostrum is a quarterly publication of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges. The following articles are included in this issue: (1) The Master Plan for Higher Education and the Missions of the California Community Colleges (Jane Patton); (2) Academic Dishonesty and the Faculty's Right to Assign a Grade: A Test of the Academic…

  19. Transitions to College: Academic Pathways from High School to the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the emergence of high school-to-college transition models, referred to as academic pathways, that regard community colleges as a primary partner for higher learning. It explores three academic pathways that deliberately partner secondary schools with community colleges. They are dual credit and dual enrollment, tech prep and…

  20. The Twentieth Annual Report of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 1995-1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, Sacramento.

    The Academic Senate for California Community Colleges was established to promote the best interests of higher education in the state and to represent community college faculty at the state level. This 20th annual report summarizes the activities of the Academic Senate for 1995-96. The first part presents a report from the Senate President, a…

  1. Coming down from the Ivory Tower? Academics' Civic and Economic Engagement with the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Ross; Paterson, Lindsay

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the degree and nature of universities' interaction with their communities from the perspectives of individual academics. It considers whether academic values and practice tend toward a "detached" or "universalist" perspective in which location is largely redundant and any perceived "community" has a global character, or whether…

  2. Socioemotional Adjustment as a Mediator of the Association between Exposure to Community Violence and Academic Performance in Low-Income Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hardaway, Cecily R.; Larkby, Cynthia A.; Cornelius, Marie D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examines whether exposure to community violence is indirectly related to academic performance through anxious/depressed symptoms and delinquent behaviors. Methods Three hundred eighteen mothers and adolescents who participated in a longitudinal investigation were interviewed when adolescents were age 10, 14, and 16. Results Community violence exposure at age 14 was significantly related to anxious/depressed symptoms and delinquent behaviors. Delinquent behaviors (but not anxious/depressed symptoms) were significantly associated with academic performance at age 16. Exposure to community violence was indirectly related to academic performance through delinquent behaviors. There was no significant indirect effect of exposure to community violence on academic performance through anxious/depressed symptoms. Covariates included sociodemographics and exposure to child abuse. Age 10 anxious/depressed symptoms, age 10 delinquent behaviors, and age 14 academic performance were also included in the model to control for preexisting differences in socioemotional adjustment and academic performance. Conclusions Results suggest that exposure to community violence may initiate a cascade of problems that spread from behavior problems to declines in academic performance. Our results highlight the need for schools to consider exposure to community violence as one form of trauma and to transform in ways that make them more trauma-sensitive. The use of trauma-sensitive practices that address the effects of violence exposure on youth may help limit the progression of adverse effects from delinquent behavior to other domains of functioning. PMID:25485167

  3. Using an academic-community partnership model and blended learning to advance community health nursing pedagogy.

    PubMed

    Ezeonwu, Mabel; Berkowitz, Bobbie; Vlasses, Frances R

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a model of teaching community health nursing that evolved from a long-term partnership with a community with limited existing health programs. The partnership supported RN-BSN students' integration in the community and resulted in reciprocal gains for faculty, students and community members. Community clients accessed public health services as a result of the partnership. A blended learning approach that combines face-to-face interactions, service learning and online activities was utilized to enhance students' learning. Following classroom sessions, students actively participated in community-based educational process through comprehensive health needs assessments, planning and implementation of disease prevention and health promotion activities for community clients. Such active involvement in an underserved community deepened students' awareness of the fundamentals of community health practice. Students were challenged to view public health from a broader perspective while analyzing the impacts of social determinants of health on underserved populations. Through asynchronous online interactions, students synthesized classroom and community activities through critical thinking. This paper describes a model for teaching community health nursing that informs students' learning through blended learning, and meets the demands for community health nursing services delivery. PMID:24720659

  4. Developing Research-Ready Skills: Preparing Early Academic Students for Participation in Research Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlevoix, D. J.; Morris, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    Engaging lower-division undergraduates in research experiences is a key but challenging aspect of guiding talented students into the geoscience research pipeline. UNAVCO conducted a summer internship program to prepare first and second year college students for participation in authentic, scientific research. Many students in their first two years of academic studies do not have the science content knowledge or sufficient math skills to conduct independent research. Students from groups historically underrepresented in the geosciences may face additional challenges in that they often have a less robust support structure to help them navigate the university environment and may be less aware of professional opportunities in the geosciences.UNAVCO, manager of NSF's geodetic facility, hosted four students during summer 2015 internship experience aimed to help them develop skills that will prepare them for research internships and skills that will help them advance professionally. Students spent eight weeks working with UNAVCO technical staff learning how to use equipment, prepare instrumentation for field campaigns, among other technical skills. Interns also participated in a suite of professional development activities including communications workshops, skills seminars, career circles, geology-focused field trips, and informal interactions with research interns and graduate student interns at UNAVCO. This presentation will outline the successes and challenges of engaging students early in their academic careers and outline the unique role such experiences can have in students' academic careers.

  5. Participatory Action Research in Public Mental Health and a School of Nursing: Qualitative Findings from an Academic-Community Partnership.

    PubMed

    Mahone, Irma H; Farrell, Sarah P; Hinton, Ivora; Johnson, Robert; Moody, David; Rifkin, Karen; Moore, Kenneth; Becker, Marcia; Barker, Margaret

    2011-02-23

    An academic-community partnership between a school of nursing (SON) at a public university (the University of Virginia, or UVA) and a public mental health clinic developed around a shared goal of finding an acceptable shared decision making (SDM) intervention targeting medication use by persons with serious mental illness. The planning meetings of the academic-community partnership were recorded and analyzed. Issues under the partnership process included 1) clinic values and priorities, 2) research agenda, 3) ground rules, and 4) communication. Issues under the SDM content included: 1) barriers, 2) information exchange, 3) positive aspects of shared decision making, and 4) technology. Using participatory-action research (PAR), the community clinic was able to raise questions and concerns throughout the process, be actively involved in research activities (such as identifying stakeholders and co-leading focus groups), participate in the reflective activities on the impact of SDM on practice and policy, and feel ownership of the SDM intervention. PMID:22163075

  6. PUBLISHING SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOLARSHIP IN THE GLOBAL ACADEMIC COMMUNITY.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Elizabeth

    2015-09-20

    South Africa's academic publishing history has been profoundly influenced by its colonial heritage. This is reflected in the publication of Transactions of the South African Philosophical Society (later, the Royal Society of South Africa) from 1878. Although the Society and journal sought to promote original research about South Africa, it was modelled after the Royal Society in London and formed part of an imperial scientific community. As the local higher education institutions grew more independent and research-focused, local scholarly publishing developed as well, with university presses playing an increasingly important role. The University of South Africa (Unisa) Press started publishing departmental journals in the 1950s, with a focus on journals that 'speak to the student', and it is today the only South African university press with an active journals publishing programme. As external funding declined and the country became intellectually isolated in the high apartheid period, the Press managed to attract journals that could no longer be subsidized by learned societies and other universities. More recently, new co-publishing arrangements have brought South African journals back into an international intellectual community. Although some argue that this constitutes a re-colonization of South African knowledge production, it is also an innovative strategy for positioning local research in a global context. PMID:26495579

  7. [Social participation and community orientation in health services].

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Manuel; Ponte-Mittelbrun, Carlos; Sánchez-Bayle, Marciano

    2006-03-01

    The community participation in the health systems is a concept that develops from the health policy proposals that have led the World Health Organization and that they highlight the fundamental role of health promotion and of primary care to answer to the health challenges from the middle of the XXth century. Its development has encountered big obstacles that have become major from the increasing trend of introduction of healthcare marketing. This explains partly its scanty advance in the developed countries, though there exist very interesting experiences that are based especially on the effort of professionals and social organizations. The fundamental dilemma is one in the option among the assumption of the role like consumers or clients that it supports a relation subordinated of the patients with a major dependence of the consumption, or on the contrary to give voice and vote for the citizens incorporating them into the productive process and turning them into producers of health. There are analyzed also the existing practices of community participation in Spain and offers are realized for its impulse and development. PMID:16539982

  8. Sampling and Recruiting Community-Based Programs Using Community-Partnered Participation Research.

    PubMed

    Stockdale, Susan E; Tang, Lingqi; Pudilo, Esmeralda; Lucas-Wright, Anna; Chung, Bowen; Horta, Mariana; Masongsong, Zoe; Jones, Felica; Belin, Thomas R; Sherbourne, Cathy; Wells, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    The inclusion of community partners in participatory leadership roles around statistical design issues like sampling and randomization has raised concerns about scientific integrity. This article presents a case study of a community-partnered, participatory research (CPPR) cluster-randomized, comparative effectiveness trial to examine implications for study validity and community relevance. Using study administrative data, we describe a CPPR-based design and implementation process for agency/program sampling, recruitment, and randomization for depression interventions. We calculated participation rates and used cross-tabulation to examine balance by intervention status on service sector, location, and program size and assessed differences in potential populations served. We achieved 51.5% agency and 89.6% program participation rates. Programs in different intervention arms were not significantly different on service sector, location, or program size. Participating programs were not significantly different from eligible, nonparticipating programs on community characteristics. We reject claims that including community members in research design decisions compromises scientific integrity. This case study suggests that a CPPR process can improve implementation of a community-grounded, rigorous randomized comparative effectiveness trial. PMID:26384926

  9. The Predictive Relationship between Achievement and Participation in Music and Achievement in Core Grade 12 Academic Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouzouasis, Peter; Guhn, Martin; Kishor, Nand

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between musical training and general intellectual capacity as well as academic achievement has been discussed in numerous contexts. In our study, we examined the relationship between participation and achievement in music and achievement in academic courses, based on data from three consecutive British Columbia student cohorts.…

  10. Perceptions of University Academic Department Chairmen as Related to the Degree of Participation of University Departments in Continuing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Larry Avon

    This study examined perceptions and opinions of academic departmental chairmen in the University of Missouri regarding the participation of academic departments in continuing education (defined to include all off campus programs and all on campus noncredit programs). Major differences were sought, and found, between chairmen of high participation…

  11. Factors associated with participation in a community senior health promotion program: a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Buchner, D M; Pearson, D C

    1989-01-01

    Factors associated with participation in a community senior health promotion program were studied in 103 participants and a population-based control group of 531 non-participants. Compared to controls, participants had similar physical health status, but lower mental and social health status. Both men and women participants reported more depressive symptoms, lower positive affect, and lower social participation. Mental and social health may be important yet under-studied factors influencing participation in community health promotion programs. PMID:2729475

  12. Implementation of a Research Participant Satisfaction Survey at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Smailes, Paula; Reider, Carson; Hallarn, Rose Kegler; Hafer, Lisa; Wallace, Lorraine; Miser, William F.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive case study covers the development of a survey to assess research subject satisfaction among those participating in clinical research studies at an academic medical center (AMC). The purpose was twofold: to gauge the effectiveness of the survey, as well as to determine the level of satisfaction of the research participants. The authors developed and implemented an electronic research participant satisfaction survey. It was created to provide research teams at the authors’ AMC with a common instrument to capture research participant experiences in order to improve upon the quality of research operations. The instrument captured participant responses in a standardized format. Ultimately, the results are to serve as a means to improve the research experience of participants for single studies, studies conducted within a division or department of the AMC, or across the entire research enterprise at the institution. For ease of use, the survey was created within an electronic data capture system known as REDCap, which is used by a consortium of more than 1,800 institutional partners as a tool from the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Participants in the survey described in this article were more than 18 years of age and participating in an institutional review board (IRB)-approved study. Results showed that the vast majority of participants surveyed had a positive experience engaging in research at the authors’ AMC. Further, the tool was found to be effective in making that determination. The authors hope to expand the use of the survey as a means to increase research satisfaction and quality at their university. PMID:27390769

  13. Community Participation in Schools in Developing Countries: Characteristics, Methods and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Kenneth A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines how communities participate in schools across diverse contexts in developing countries and the results attributed to community participation. It reviews evaluations of participatory approaches to education in developing countries to answer two basic questions: 1) How do communities participate in school in developing countries?…

  14. Whose Voices Are Being Heard? Mechanisms for Community Participation in Education in Northern Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mfum-Mensah, Obed; Friedson-Ridenour, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study of community participation in School "for" Life, a complementary education programme operating in northern Ghana. The researchers investigated three components of community participation: the nature of the mechanisms used to engage community members as participants in the education process; the actors who…

  15. 45 CFR 2551.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... community participation? 2551.24 Section 2551.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Responsibilities of a Sponsor § 2551.24 What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by establishing...

  16. 45 CFR 2552.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... community participation? 2552.24 Section 2552.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Responsibilities of a Sponsor § 2552.24 What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by establishing...

  17. 45 CFR 2552.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... community participation? 2552.24 Section 2552.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Responsibilities of a Sponsor § 2552.24 What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by establishing...

  18. 45 CFR 2551.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... community participation? 2551.24 Section 2551.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Responsibilities of a Sponsor § 2551.24 What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by establishing...

  19. 45 CFR 2552.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... community participation? 2552.24 Section 2552.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Responsibilities of a Sponsor § 2552.24 What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by establishing...

  20. 45 CFR 2551.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... community participation? 2551.24 Section 2551.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare... Responsibilities of a Sponsor § 2551.24 What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation? (a) A sponsor shall secure community participation in local project operation by establishing...

  1. A Study of Community College Participation in the JOBS Program: A Report to America's Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katsinas, Stephen G.; And Others

    This two-part report presents quantitative and qualitative data from a 1994 national study of community college participation in the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) program, a transitional welfare-to-work program. Following a preface, an executive summary reviews the study methodology, indicating that 277 colleges out of 1,170 surveyed…

  2. Academic Crossover Study, University of Hawaii Community Colleges, Fall 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Office of the Chancellor for Community Colleges.

    The academic crossover study was developed to answer two questions: (1) What is the course-taking pattern of the different groups of academic majors? (e.g. what is proportion of academic load taken outside the major); and (2) What is the client-serving pattern of the different subject disciplines? (e.g. what are the groups of students served by…

  3. Coordinated Vocational Academic Education. Home and Community Services Instructor's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baca, Patricia

    This instructor's handbook contains information on the Coordinated Vocational Academic Education program (CVAE) designed for special learning needs students (in-school youth possessing academic, socio-economic, or other handicaps). Academic instruction is provided for the areas of math, science, English, and social studies. Home economics skills…

  4. Preparing new nurse graduates for practice in multiple settings: a community-based academic-practice partnership model.

    PubMed

    West, Nikki; Berman, Audrey; Karshmer, Judith; Prion, Susan; Van, Paulina; Wallace, Jonalyn

    2014-06-01

    Responding to local and national concerns about the nursing workforce, the California Institute for Nursing and Health Care worked with private and public funders and community health care partners to establish community-based transition-to-practice programs for new RN graduates unable to secure nursing positions in the San Francisco Bay Area. The goals were to retain new RN graduates in nursing and further develop their skills and competencies to increase their employability. Leaders from academic and inpatient, ambulatory, and community-based practice settings, as well as additional community partners, collaboratively provided four 12- to 16-week pilot transition programs in 2010-2011. A total of 345 unemployed new nurse graduates enrolled. Eighty-four percent of 188 respondents to a post-program survey were employed in inpatient and community settings 3 months after completion. Participants and clinical preceptors also reported increases in confidence and competence. PMID:24779715

  5. Implementing community participation through legislative reform: a study of the policy framework for community participation in the Western Cape province of South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Amidst an evolving post-apartheid policy framework for health, policymakers have sought to institutionalize community participation in Primary Health Care, recognizing participation as integral to realizing South Africa’s constitutional commitment to the right to health. With evolving South African legislation supporting community involvement in the health system, early policy developments focused on Community Health Committees (HCs) as the principal institutions of community participation. Formally recognized in the National Health Act of 2003, the National Health Act deferred to provincial governments in establishing the specific roles and functions of HCs. As a result, stakeholders developed a Draft Policy Framework for Community Participation in Health (Draft Policy) to formalize participatory institutions in the Western Cape province. Methods With the Draft Policy as a frame of analysis, the researchers conducted documentary policy analysis and semi-structured interviews on the evolution of South African community participation policy. Moving beyond the specific and unique circumstances of the Western Cape, this study analyzes generalizable themes for rights-based community participation in the health system. Results Framing institutions for the establishment, appointment, and functioning of community participation, the Draft Policy proposed a formal network of communication – from local HCs to the health system. However, this participation structure has struggled to establish itself and function effectively as a result of limitations in community representation, administrative support, capacity building, and policy commitment. Without legislative support for community participation, the enactment of superseding legislation is likely to bring an end to HC structures in the Western Cape. Conclusions Attempts to realize community participation have not adequately addressed the underlying factors crucial to promoting effective participation, with

  6. Factors impacting the decision to participate in and satisfaction with public/community psychiatry fellowship training.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Michael; LeMelle, Stephanie; Ranz, Jules

    2014-10-01

    During yearly meetings of the recently developed network of 15 public/community psychiatry fellowships, it has been noted that programs are having varying degrees of success with regard to recruitment. To understand factors that impact recruitment, a quality improvement survey of fellows and alumni was conducted. Respondents were asked to rate overall satisfaction with their fellowship training as well as perceived benefits and obstacles to participating in a fellowship program, and impact on their careers. A total of 155 (57%) fellows and alumni responded. Factor analysis was used to condense the variables, and a multiple regression explored factors predicting overall fellowship program satisfaction. Factors that represented perceived benefits had higher means than did factors that represent obstacles. Respondents highly valued the extent to which these fellowships enhanced their careers, with regard to job opportunities, academics, networking and leadership. PMID:24477510

  7. Community-academic partnerships in HIV-related research: a systematic literature review of theory and practice

    PubMed Central

    Brizay, Ulrike; Golob, Lina; Globerman, Jason; Gogolishvili, David; Bird, Mara; Rios-Ellis, Britt; Rourke, Sean B; Heidari, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Community involvement in HIV research has increased over recent years, enhancing community-academic partnerships. Several terms have been used to describe community participation in research. Clarification is needed to determine whether these terms are synonymous or actually describe different research processes. In addition, it remains unclear if the role that communities play in the actual research process follows the recommendations given in theoretical frameworks of community-academia research. Objectives The objective of this study is to review the existing terms and definitions regarding community-academic partnerships and assess how studies are implementing these in relation to conceptual definitions. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed. Two reviewers independently assessed each article, applying the following inclusion criteria: the article must be published in English before 2013; it must provide an explicit definition and/or defining methodology for a term describing research with a community component; and it has to refer to HIV or AIDS, reproductive health and/or STDs. When disagreements about the relevance of an article emerged, a third reviewer was involved until concordance was reached. Data were extracted by one reviewer and independently verified by a second. Qualitative data were analyzed using MaxQDA for content and thematic analyses while quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Community feedback on data analysis and presentation of results was also incorporated. Results In total, 246 articles were retrieved, 159 of which fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The number of studies that included community participation in the field of HIV research increased between 1991 and 2012, and the terms used to describe these activities have changed, moving away from action research (AR) to participatory action research (PAR), community-based research (CBR) and community-based participatory research

  8. Changing the culture of academic medicine: the C-Change learning action network and its impact at participating medical schools.

    PubMed

    Krupat, Edward; Pololi, Linda; Schnell, Eugene R; Kern, David E

    2013-09-01

    The culture of academic medicine has been described as hierarchical, competitive, and not highly supportive of female or minority faculty. In response to this, the authors designed the Learning Action Network (LAN), which was part of the National Initiative on Gender, Culture and Leadership in Medicine (C-Change). The LAN is a five-school consortium aimed at changing the organizational culture of its constituent institutions. The authors selected LAN schools to be geographically diverse and representative of U.S. medical schools. Institutional leaders and faculty representatives from constituent schools met twice yearly for four years (2006-2010), forming a cross-institutional learning community. Through their quarterly listing of institutional activities, schools reported a wide array of actions. Most common were increased faculty development and/or mentoring, new approaches to communication, and adoption of new policies and procedures. Other categories included data collection/management, engagement of key stakeholders, education regarding gender/diversity, and new/expanded leadership positions. Through exit interviews, most participants reported feeling optimistic about maintaining the momentum of change. However, some, especially in schools with leadership changes, expressed uncertainty. Participants reported that they felt that the LAN enabled, empowered, facilitated, and/or caused the reported actions.For others who might want to work toward changing the culture of academic medicine, the authors offer several lessons learned from their experiences with C-Change. Most notably, people, structures, policies, and reward systems must be put into place to support cultural values, and broad-based support should be created in order for changes to persist when inevitable transitions in leadership occur. PMID:23887002

  9. Integrating Academics into Agriculture Programs: A Delphi Study to Determine Perceptions of the National Agriscience Teacher Ambassador Academy Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Brian E.; Thompson, Gregory W.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of participants in the National Agriscience Teacher Ambassador Academy as to the next steps the agricultural education profession should take to move forward in the area of integrating academic subject matter into agricultural education courses. All members of the 2007 Academy participated in the study.…

  10. Factors Promoting Academic Success among African American and White Male Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrakis, Athena I.

    2008-01-01

    This study seeks to isolate factors associated with academic success, operationalized as grade point average (GPA) and course completion, among two male student populations within the Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD): African American and white men. In order to determine the factors that are associated with academic success, two…

  11. A Discourse Analysis of Collaboration between Academic and Student Affairs in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulley, Needham Yancey

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the nature of collaboration between academic affairs and student affairs units in the community college context from a qualitative perspective. A discourse analysis study was conducted to explore the ways in which collaborative practice was discussed and understood by chief and midlevel academic and…

  12. Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, May 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Rostrum is a quarterly publication of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges. The following articles are included in this issue: (1) An SLO Terminology Glossary: A Draft in Progress by Lesley Kawaguchi; (2) A Tale of Two Data Elements by Mark Wade Lieu; (3) Sustainability and the Academic Senate by David Beaulieu and Don…

  13. Exploring the Effect of a Non-Residential Learning Community on Academic Achievement and Institutional Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Patrick Michael

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine what effect the Freshmen Interest Group (FIG) program, a variation of a non-residential learning community had on academic achievement scores and institutional rates of persistence. Study variables included: gender; race; pre-collegiate academic achievement (GPA scores); educational preferences (major…

  14. Academic In/Civility: Co-Constructing the Foundation for a Civil Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Zopito; Polihronis, Christine; Blackwell, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    While it has important implications for the success of students as well as for institutions, academic in/civility is not an issue that is readily engaged by many professors. However, the creation of a civil learning community should be a high priority for everyone in the academe for it has the potential to benefit both individuals and…

  15. State of Washington. State Board for Community and Technical Colleges. Academic Year Report: 2005-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Academic Year Report 2005-06 provides a snapshot of funding, facilities, staffing, and enrollments in community and technical colleges in the past academic year. The report also describes key measures of student outcomes and addresses the most frequently asked questions related to expenditures, personnel and students. Additional demographic…

  16. 60 Milestones in the History of Senates and the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, Edith, Ed.

    A historical overview is provided of 60 significant events in the development of the Academic Senate movement in California's community colleges. Beginning in 1963, when the State Assembly passed a resolution giving legal recognition and specific jurisdiction to Academic Senates, the paper offers brief descriptions of legislative enactments…

  17. A Study To Identify Academic Personnel Replacement Needs in SUNY Community Colleges and Technical Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Gene M.; And Others

    In 1990, a study was conducted of full-time faculty, deans, chairpersons, and academic administrators at the State University of New York (SUNY) community and technical colleges. The purpose of the study was to profile these groups and to identify future academic personnel replacement needs. A survey questionnaire mailed to SUNY's 30 community…

  18. Psychological Factors in the Academic Achievement of Remedial-Level English Students in Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Heather M.

    2012-01-01

    Rates of in-coming college students in need of academic remediation are on the rise, for both community college and four-year colleges. Consequently, many of these students will be required to enroll in some level of academic remediation in reading, writing and/or math to develop the basic skills necessary for student success in college-level…

  19. The Academic Senate for California Community Colleges Resolutions, 23rd Fall Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, Sacramento.

    Documenting the 1991 fall session, this report provides resolutions adopted by the Academic Senate for the California Community Colleges. The resolutions are divided into the following 13 categories and topics: (1) the Academic Senate, including research, rules and procedures, and attendance at meetings; (2) accreditation, including self-study…

  20. Financial Aid Tipping Points: An Analysis of Aid and Academic Achievement at a California Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coria, Elizabeth; Hoffman, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between financial aid awards and measures of student academic achievement. Financial aid and academic records for 11,956 students attending an urban California community college were examined and analyzed using simultaneous linear regression and two-way factorial ANOVAs. Findings revealed a…

  1. Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges Academic Year Report, 2012-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This "Academic Year Report 2012-13" provides a snapshot of funding, facilities, staffing, and enrollments in community and technical colleges in Washington state for the past academic year. The report also describes key measures of student outcomes and addresses the most frequently asked questions related to expenditures, personnel and…

  2. Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Academic Year Report 2013-2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The "Academic Year Report 2013-14" provides a snapshot of funding, facilities, staffing, and enrollments in Washington's community and technical colleges for the past academic year. The report also describes key measures of student outcomes and addresses the most frequently asked questions related to expenditures, personnel, and…

  3. Qualifications Handbook for Faculty and Academic Support Personnel at Illinois Valley Community College. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Hans A.

    This handbook presents the minimum qualifications required for full- and part-time faculty and academic support personnel at Illinois Valley Community College (IVCC). Section A presents board of trustee policies regarding: (1) hiring of professional staff; (2) hiring of full-time faculty; (3) hiring of full-time academic support personnel; (4)…

  4. IQ, Academic Achievement and Community Adjustment After Discharge from the Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Marvin; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Fifty previously institutionalized educable retarded adults were retested approximately 3 years after discharge to ascertain if community living produced a change in IQ or academic achievement, measured by the WAIS and Metropolitan Achievement Battery. (Author)

  5. Assessment of Factors Influencing Community Pharmacy Residents' Pursuit of Academic Positions

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Colleen A.; Rodis, Jennifer L.; Pruchnicki, Maria C.; Pedersen, Craig A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To determine the percentage of residents accepting faculty positions following completion of a community pharmacy residency program (CPRP) and identify influences to pursue/not pursue an academic career. Methods CPRP directors and preceptors across the United States were contacted and 53 community pharmacy residents were identified. The residents were invited to participate in surveys at the beginning and end of the 2005-2006 residency year. Results Forty-five residents (85%) completed the preliminary survey instrument and 40 (75%) completed the follow-up survey instrument. Of these, 36 completed both survey instruments. Initially, 28 (62%) respondents indicated a faculty position as one of their potential job preferences. After completing their residency program, 3 (8%) residents accepted faculty positions; and 3 (8%) others were awaiting offers at follow-up. Reasons for accepting a faculty position were positive teaching experiences and the influence of a mentor or preceptor. Reasons for not pursuing a faculty position included lack of interest, geographic location, disliked teaching experiences, lack of preparedness, and non-competitive salary. Conclusion Many community pharmacy residents consider faculty positions early in their residency but few pursue faculty positions. CPRPs and colleges of pharmacy should work together to enhance residents' experiences to foster interest in academia. PMID:18322566

  6. Academic Dishonesty and the Community College. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdeman, R. Dean

    This digest cites studies of academic dishonesty in two- and four-year institutions, examining variables such as frequency of dishonest behavior, individual and environmental factors associated with dishonest student behavior, and responses of faculty. Academic dishonesty appears related to: (1) individual characteristics such as student academic…

  7. Assessing the Academic Medical Center as a Supportive Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Sam C.

    2011-01-01

    Academic medical centers are well-known for their emphasis on teaching, research and public service; however, like most large, bureaucratic organizations, they oftentimes suffer from an inability to learn as an organization. The role of the research administrator in the academic medical center has grown over time as the profession itself has…

  8. Academic Success Strategy Use among Community-Active Urban Hispanic Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Rebecca M.; Packard, Becky Wai-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Although much has been written about the "risky" behaviors in which some Hispanic adolescents participate, the predictors of academic success are less understood. Toward this end, predictors of academic self-regulation were investigated in Hispanic adolescents. Specifically, a predictive model incorporating self-efficacy, instrumentality, salience…

  9. A Different Result of Community Participation in Education: An Indonesian Case Study of Parental Participation in Public Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitriah, Amaliah; Sumintono, Bambang; Subekti, Nanang Bagus; Hassan, Zainudin

    2013-01-01

    Parental participation in school management is regarded as a good thing according to the rationale that local people know better and are able to be more responsive to their own needs. However, little is understood about the implications of the School Operational Support policy for community participation in education. This study investigated…

  10. Building a Community-Academic Partnership: Implementing a Community-Based Trial of Telephone Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Rural Latinos

    PubMed Central

    Aisenberg, Eugene; Dwight-Johnson, Meagan; O'Brien, Mary; Ludman, Evette J.; Golinelli, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about the appropriate use of EBP with ethnic minority clients and the ability of community agencies to implement and sustain EBP persist and emphasize the need for community-academic research partnerships that can be used to develop, adapt, and test culturally responsive EBP in community settings. In this paper, we describe the processes of developing a community-academic partnership that implemented and pilot tested an evidence-based telephone cognitive behavioral therapy program. Originally demonstrated to be effective for urban, middle-income, English-speaking primary care patients with major depression, the program was adapted and pilot tested for use with rural, uninsured, low-income, Latino (primarily Spanish-speaking) primary care patients with major depressive disorder in a primary care site in a community health center in rural Eastern Washington. The values of community-based participatory research and community-partnered participatory research informed each phase of this randomized clinical trial and the development of a community-academic partnership. Information regarding this partnership may guide future community practice, research, implementation, and workforce development efforts to address mental health disparities by implementing culturally tailored EBP in underserved communities. PMID:23050133

  11. Building a community-academic partnership: implementing a community-based trial of telephone cognitive behavioral therapy for rural latinos.

    PubMed

    Aisenberg, Eugene; Dwight-Johnson, Meagan; O'Brien, Mary; Ludman, Evette J; Golinelli, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about the appropriate use of EBP with ethnic minority clients and the ability of community agencies to implement and sustain EBP persist and emphasize the need for community-academic research partnerships that can be used to develop, adapt, and test culturally responsive EBP in community settings. In this paper, we describe the processes of developing a community-academic partnership that implemented and pilot tested an evidence-based telephone cognitive behavioral therapy program. Originally demonstrated to be effective for urban, middle-income, English-speaking primary care patients with major depression, the program was adapted and pilot tested for use with rural, uninsured, low-income, Latino (primarily Spanish-speaking) primary care patients with major depressive disorder in a primary care site in a community health center in rural Eastern Washington. The values of community-based participatory research and community-partnered participatory research informed each phase of this randomized clinical trial and the development of a community-academic partnership. Information regarding this partnership may guide future community practice, research, implementation, and workforce development efforts to address mental health disparities by implementing culturally tailored EBP in underserved communities. PMID:23050133

  12. Assessing participation in a community-based health planning and services programme in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Community participation is increasingly seen as a pre-requisite for successful health service uptake. It is notoriously difficult to assess participation and little has been done to advance tools for the assessment of community participation. In this paper we illustrate an approach that combines a ‘social psychology of participation’ (theory) with ‘spider-grams’ (method) to assess participation and apply it to a Community-based Health Planning and Services (CHPS) programme in rural Ghana. Methods We draw on data from 17 individual in-depth interviews, two focus group discussions and a community conversation with a mix of service users, providers and community health committee members. It was during the community conversation that stakeholders collectively evaluated community participation in the CHPS programme and drew up a spider-gram. Results Thematic analysis of our data shows that participation was sustained through the recognition and use of community resources, CHPS integration with pre-existing community structures, and alignment of CHPS services with community interests. However, male dominance and didactic community leadership and management styles undermined real opportunities for broad-based community empowerment, particularly of women, young people and marginalised men. Conclusion We conclude that combining the ‘spider-gram’ tool and the ‘social psychology of participation’ framework provide health professionals with a useful starting point for assessing community participation and developing recommendations for more participatory and empowering health care programmes. PMID:23803140

  13. Learning in the context of community: The academic experiences of first-year arts and science students in a learning community program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Nancy

    2000-10-01

    This study explored the academic experiences of two groups of first-year students in university, one in the arts and one in the science, who participated in a residential-based learning community program. Using qualitative and critical analysis of in-depth student interviews conducted over a fall and winter semester, I constructed their world as implied from their stories and narratives. From this vantage point, I investigated how students as novice learners negotiated their role as learners; the belief systems they brought with them to minimize academic risk; their coping strategies in a 12 week semestered system; and the tacit theories they acquired within their day-to-day educational experiences. A number of themes emerged from the research: students intentionally minimizing faculty contact until they developed 'worthiness'; learning as 'teacher pleasing'; disciplinary learning differences between the arts and sciences students; and a grade orientation that influenced what and how students learned. Within the broader political, ideological, and cultural framework of the university, I identified student patterns of accommodation, resistance, silence and submission in negotiating their roles as learners. By critiquing the academic side of university life as students experienced it and lived it as a community of learners, I exposed the tensions, contradictions, and paradoxes that emerged. I revealed the points of disjuncture that came from competing discourses within the university for these students: the discourse of community, the discourse of collective harmony, and the discourse of the market place.

  14. Community Participation or Control? From New York to Chicago.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, G. Alfred, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the history of community control of public education, examining: sub-regional communities (New York City's community school boards and Detroit's regional decentralization); school-based decentralization (preserving professional privilege in Salt Lake City and local school councils in Chicago); balancing bottom-up and top-down; whether…

  15. Factors Influencing Teachers' Level of Participation in Online Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalid, Fariza; Joyes, Gordon; Ellison, Linda; Daud, Md Yusoff

    2014-01-01

    The use of an online learning community is one possible approach to teachers' professional development that can enhance the opportunity for collaboration. Discussions in online learning communities not only allow community members to share resources, ideas and expertise, but also contribute to the fulfilment of teachers' needs in terms of…

  16. Place Identity, Participation, and Emotional Climate in a Rural Community From the Northern Coast of Peru.

    PubMed

    Freire, Silvana; Espinosa, Agustín; Rottenbacher, Jan Marc

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in rural communities from the Peruvian northern coast, it is common to find a climate of distrust and pessimism that accompanies the lack of coordinated social action and community participation among residents. This study analyzes the relationships that people develop with regard to the place where they live in, how it associates to the ways they participate in their community and the relationship that these two variables have with the perceived emotional climate, in a rural community from the northern coast of Peru (n = 81). Results indicate that place identity is significantly associated with a high community participation and a climate of trust in the community. Finally, a Path Analysis is performed to analyze comprehensively the relationship between these variables. The results suggest that place identity does have an influence on perceived positive climate in the community, being mediated by the dimensions of community participation. PMID:26472235

  17. Community Participation in Chagas Disease Vector Surveillance: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Abad-Franch, Fernando; Vega, M. Celeste; Rolón, Miriam S.; Santos, Walter S.; Rojas de Arias, Antonieta

    2011-01-01

    Background Vector control has substantially reduced Chagas disease (ChD) incidence. However, transmission by household-reinfesting triatomines persists, suggesting that entomological surveillance should play a crucial role in the long-term interruption of transmission. Yet, infestation foci become smaller and harder to detect as vector control proceeds, and highly sensitive surveillance methods are needed. Community participation (CP) and vector-detection devices (VDDs) are both thought to enhance surveillance, but this remains to be thoroughly assessed. Methodology/Principal Findings We searched Medline, Web of Knowledge, Scopus, LILACS, SciELO, the bibliographies of retrieved studies, and our own records. Data from studies describing vector control and/or surveillance interventions were extracted by two reviewers. Outcomes of primary interest included changes in infestation rates and the detection of infestation/reinfestation foci. Most results likely depended on study- and site-specific conditions, precluding meta-analysis, but we re-analysed data from studies comparing vector control and detection methods whenever possible. Results confirm that professional, insecticide-based vector control is highly effective, but also show that reinfestation by native triatomines is common and widespread across Latin America. Bug notification by householders (the simplest CP-based strategy) significantly boosts vector detection probabilities; in comparison, both active searches and VDDs perform poorly, although they might in some cases complement each other. Conclusions/Significance CP should become a strategic component of ChD surveillance, but only professional insecticide spraying seems consistently effective at eliminating infestation foci. Involvement of stakeholders at all process stages, from planning to evaluation, would probably enhance such CP-based strategies. PMID:21713022

  18. Factors Influencing Latino Participation in Community-Based Diabetes Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Sarah L.; Noterman, Amber; Litchfield, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    An Extension diabetes program (DP) was revised for Latinos; however, participation was limited. Factors influencing low participation rates were examined. Five Latinos interested in the DP participated in a focus group discussion. Transcripts were analyzed for themes. Preferred education programs were multi-session, local, group classes led by an…

  19. Implementing community-based provider participation in research: an empirical study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since 2003, the United States National Institutes of Health (NIH) has sought to restructure the clinical research enterprise in the United States by promoting collaborative research partnerships between academically-based investigators and community-based physicians. By increasing community-based provider participation in research (CBPPR), the NIH seeks to advance the science of discovery by conducting research in clinical settings where most people get their care, and accelerate the translation of research results into everyday clinical practice. Although CBPPR is seen as a promising strategy for promoting the use of evidence-based clinical services in community practice settings, few empirical studies have examined the organizational factors that facilitate or hinder the implementation of CBPPR. The purpose of this study is to explore the organizational start-up and early implementation of CBPPR in community-based practice. Methods We used longitudinal, case study research methods and an organizational model of innovation implementation to theoretically guide our study. Our sample consisted of three community practice settings that recently joined the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) in the United States. Data were gathered through site visits, telephone interviews, and archival documents from January 2008 to May 2011. Results The organizational model for innovation implementation was useful in identifying and investigating the organizational factors influencing start-up and early implementation of CBPPR in CCOP organizations. In general, the three CCOP organizations varied in the extent to which they achieved consistency in CBPPR over time and across physicians. All three CCOP organizations demonstrated mixed levels of organizational readiness for change. Hospital management support and resource availability were limited across CCOP organizations early on, although they improved in one CCOP organization

  20. The Academic Consequences of Employment for Students Enrolled in Community College. CCRC Working Paper No. 46

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadgar, Mina

    2012-01-01

    College students are increasingly combining studying with paid employment, and community college students tend to work even longer hours compared with students at four-year colleges. Yet, there is little evidence on the academic consequences of community college students' term-time employment. Using a rare administrative dataset from Washington…

  1. Wyoming Community College System Annual Enrollment Report. Academic Year 2005-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This report provides annualized enrollment information for the Wyoming community college system for the 2005-2006 academic year. During this year, credit headcount at Wyoming's community colleges increased by 6.1%, the largest annual enrollment increase during the last decade. The report also indicates that the difference between enrollments of…

  2. The Propensity of Community College Chief Academic Officers To Leave an Institution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, John P.; Murray, Judy I.; Summar, Cliff.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the findings of a national survey measuring the propensity of community college chief academic officers (CAOs) to leave their current position, the levels of satisfaction they feel with their jobs, and their perceptions of role conflict and ambiguity. Finds that although community college CAOs do experience some role conflict, they are…

  3. Improving the Academic Performance of Hispanic Youth: A Community Education Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspiazu, Gary G.; Bauer, Scott C.; Spillett, MaryDee

    1998-01-01

    A community education center based on liberation theology principles was created by the Hispanic immigrant community to address educational needs of Hispanic youth. Interviews with 16 parents revealed that parent leadership was activated at the center and that children had benefitted academically from after-school homework assistance in a…

  4. Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, March 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Rostrum is a quarterly publication of the academic senate for California community colleges. The following articles are included in this issue: (1) Establishing a Systemwide California Community College General Education Advanced Placement (CCC GE AP) List by Dave Degroot; (2) Explaining the ASCCC Position on "Transfer Degrees" by Jane Patton;…

  5. Academic Advisers: Perceptions of Training and Professional Development at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study utilizing in-depth interviews examined academic advisers' perceptions of training and professional development resources at a Midwestern U.S. community college. In addition, the study examined the availability and accessibility of training and professional development resources at the community college. The study…

  6. O'Farrell Community School: Center for Advanced Academic Studies. A Charter School Prototype.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Bob

    1996-01-01

    O'Farrell Community School, in San Diego, California, was built on the principles of restructuring, teacher and community empowerment, interagency collaboration, and interdisciplinary teaching. Supported by the Panasonic and Stuart Foundations, the school offers an enriched, untracked three-year academic program for grades six through eight. All…

  7. School-Community Partnerships: Using Authentic Contexts to Academically Motivate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willems, Patricia P.; Gonzalez-DeHass, Alyssa R.

    2012-01-01

    The opportunities school-community partnerships pose for students' learning continue to generate the attention of educational stakeholders. Children learn through a variety of social and educational contexts, and the goals for student academic success are best achieved through the cooperation and support of schools, families, and communities. The…

  8. Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of four issues (a year's worth: Nov 1995; Jan,Mar,Oct 1996) of a newsletter devoted to issues of importance regarding community college education and provides updates on activities and policies of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges. The November 1995 issue highlights affirmative action and offers a…

  9. Urban communities in analysis of the causes of low participation for example X in Wuhan City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Keyong; Xu, Wenli

    2011-12-01

    Community governance is not only a global social development of the core issues, but also the essential requirement of social development, At present, there are still exist poor sense of involved in community awareness and participation insufficient. These constraints have become the bottleneck of China's urban community development. This paper attempts to the community perspective of participation, and the District of Wuhan, for example X, from a historical, psychological, institutional and other elements to discussed the causes of low participation, Hope benefit to the domestic community development.

  10. Inside a school-university partnership: Participation in a community of practice as a professional growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottoms, Sueann I.

    Research suggests that long-term participation in professional development is critical in helping teachers meet the increasing demands of reform efforts and changing practice (Gallucci, 2003; Darling-Hammond, 1995; Little, 1993). Understanding the influence that participation in a community of teachers as a community of practice may have on teachers professional growth requires a deeper understanding of those aspects of teacher community that encourage or discourage participation. This research examines teachers perceptions as to why they participate in a community of practice. It also addresses what these perceptions suggest about the potential resources that participation in a community of practice provide in support of professional growth. This study utilizes community of practice as theoretical framework because it encourages thought about learning as participation rather than simply the acquisition of knowledge or skills (Wenger, 1999). This mid-level analysis focuses on the actions, artifacts, tools, stories, events, and discourse of the participants in a given context. It is a critical case study using a phenomenological perspective (Patton, 2005) to understand the essence of the experience of participation from the perspective of the participants themselves. Analysis of participants responses indicates that from their perspective, participation in a community of teachers as community of practice through a school-university partnership constitutes a resource for professional growth. Teachers in this study describe their participation in terms of leadership, disengagement, student-centeredness, pedagogy and pedagogical content knowledge, financial and material resources, professional development, collegial interactions and relationships, and shared personal practice. Analysis of participation is characterized by reason(s) for initial participation, for continuing or discontinuing participation, in terms of collegial interactions and relationships, and by

  11. The Relationship between Wheelchair Mobility Patterns and Community Participation among Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Rory A.; Ferretti, Eliana; Oyster, Michelle; Kelleher, Annmarie; Cooper, Rosemarie

    2011-01-01

    Participation is considered the most meaningful outcome of rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there were correlations between wheelchair activity recorded with a data logger and community participation as measured by the Participation Survey/Mobility. Data from 16 participants were included in this study. Data…

  12. Retaining Participants in Outpatient and Community-Based Health Studies: Researchers and Participants in Their Own Words

    PubMed Central

    Odierna, Donna H.; Bero, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Loss to follow-up can introduce bias into research, making it difficult to develop inclusive evidence-based health policies and practice guidelines. We aimed to deepen understanding of reasons why participants leave or remain in longitudinal health studies. We interviewed 59 researchers and current and former research participants in six focus groups (n = 55) or interviews (n = 4) at three study centers in a large academic research institution. We used minimally structured interview guides and inductive thematic analysis to explore participant-level, study-level, and contextual participation barriers and facilitators. Four main themes emerged: transportation, incentives and motivation, caregiver concerns, and the social and physical environment. Themes shared crosscutting issues involving funding, flexibility, and relationships between researchers and research participants. Study-level and contextual factors appear to interact with participant characteristics, particularly socioeconomic status and disease severity to affect participant retention. Participants’ characteristics do not seem to be the main cause of study dropout. Researchers and funders might be able to address contextual and study factors in ways that reduce barriers to participation. PMID:25599003

  13. Press Participation as a Civil Liberty: The Model of Academic Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Beverly

    1991-01-01

    Compares and contrasts the principles of press freedom and academic freedom in both origin and practice to explore the potential of the model of academic freedom for enhancing the autonomy of journalists. (SR)

  14. 50 CFR Table 7 to Part 679 - Community Development Quota Groups and Communities Eligible To Participate in the CDQ Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Community Development Quota Groups and... Development Quota Groups and Communities Eligible To Participate in the CDQ Program Aleutian Pribilof Island Community Development Association: Akutan Atka False Pass Nelson Lagoon Nikolski Saint George Bristol...

  15. 50 CFR Table 7 to Part 679 - Community Development Quota Groups and Communities Eligible To Participate in the CDQ Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Community Development Quota Groups and... Development Quota Groups and Communities Eligible To Participate in the CDQ Program Aleutian Pribilof Island Community Development Association: Akutan Atka False Pass Nelson Lagoon Nikolski Saint George Bristol...

  16. 50 CFR Table 7 to Part 679 - Community Development Quota Groups and Communities Eligible To Participate in the CDQ Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Community Development Quota Groups and... Development Quota Groups and Communities Eligible To Participate in the CDQ Program Aleutian Pribilof Island Community Development Association: Akutan Atka False Pass Nelson Lagoon Nikolski Saint George Bristol...

  17. Community participation and attitudes of decision-makers towards community involvement in health development in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed Central

    al-Mazroa, Y.; al-Shammari, S.

    1991-01-01

    National policies and government strategies in Saudi Arabia are adequate for the promotion of community involvement in health development (CIH). The system of government is decentralized and has ample scope for intersectorial cooperation. In Ha'il and Qasim regions active efforts are being made to realize intersectorial coordination through regional committees in which community leaders are involved; unfortunately, however, such mechanisms are lacking at the central level. Decision-makers and community leaders adequately recognized and interpreted the importance of CIH. Most of the respondents advocated community participation in planning and evaluation, while less than 50% thought that communities could participate in the implementation of health services. A survey in Ha'il and Qasim regions of 2417 residents indicated that community participation in health activities was in its infancy and that considerable effort is still needed at the central, regional, and peripheral levels to achieve meaningful community involvement in health. PMID:2054919

  18. Perceptions of community-based participatory research in the delta nutrition intervention research initiative:an academic perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lower Mississippi Delta Nutrition Intervention Research Initiative (Delta NIRI) is an academic-community partnership between seven academic institutions and three communities in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. A range of community-based participatory methods have been employed to develop susta...

  19. Institutionalization of Community Partnerships: The Challenge for Academic Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Magwood, Gayenell S.; Andrews, Jeannette O.; Zapka, Jane; Cox, Melissa J.; Newman, Susan; Stuart, Gail W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Current public health priorities emphasize the elimination of health disparities, translational research, and transdisciplinary and community alliances. The Center for Community Health Partnerships is a proactive initiative to address new paradigms and priorities in health care through institutionalization of community-university partnerships. This report highlights innovative strategies and lessons learned. PMID:23698666

  20. Developing a sustainable foot care clinic in a homeless shelter within an academic-community partnership.

    PubMed

    Schoon, Patricia M; Champlin, Barbara E; Hunt, Roberta J

    2012-12-01

    Nursing faculty are confronted with the need to design community learning activities with vulnerable populations to prepare students for nursing practice. The creation of sustainable academic-community partnerships with agencies providing care to underserved populations meets this challenge. This article describes the development and implementation of a foot care clinic in a homeless shelter, created through a model of curricular integration, faculty engagement, and a long-term academic-community partnership. A transformative pedagogical approach based on service-learning was used to facilitate student understanding of social justice through activities that promote citizenship, develop advocacy skills, and increase knowledge and skills related to the role of the public health nurse in the community. The process of designing and developing a community clinical learning activity and the essential components for sustainability are discussed. Student outcomes are addressed. Recommendations for implementing a foot care clinic within an academic–community partnership are outlined. PMID:23362514

  1. Analyzing Members' Motivations to Participate in Role-Playing and Self-Expression Based Virtual Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Eun; Saharia, Aditya

    With the rapid growth of computer mediated communication technologies in the last two decades, various types of virtual communities have emerged. Some communities provide a role playing arena, enabled by avatars, while others provide an arena for expressing and promoting detailed personal profiles to enhance their offline social networks. Due to different focus of these virtual communities, different factors motivate members to participate in these communities. In this study, we examine differences in members’ motivations to participate in role-playing versus self-expression based virtual communities. To achieve this goal, we apply the Wang and Fesenmaier (2004) framework, which explains members’ participation in terms of their functional, social, psychological, and hedonic needs. The primary contributions of this study are two folds: First, it demonstrates differences between role-playing and self-expression based communities. Second, it provides a comprehensive framework describing members’ motivation to participate in virtual communities.

  2. Community participation for rural healthcare design: description and critique of a method.

    PubMed

    Nimegeer, Amy; Farmer, Jane; Munoz, Sarah Anne; Currie, Mags

    2016-03-01

    This paper outlines a community participation process that was developed to engage rural community stakeholders in designing new health services. The paper explains what led up to the process and provides critique around applying the process for other health services and in other communities. Internationally, community participation is widely invoked, but it is only broadly explained in the literature, other than reviews of outcomes or descriptions of problems. This paper provides an actual process, derived from iterative research, that others could use, but explains caveats in the method and its application. From developing this method of community participation for service design, we conclude that rather than being a benign and inherently 'good thing', community participation is a process into which health services managers and communities should enter cautiously. Stronger parameters around desirable outcomes and awareness of potential pitfalls in the process are important to address. PMID:25684597

  3. Family Background, School-Age Trajectories of Activity Participation, and Academic Achievement at the Start of High School

    PubMed Central

    Crosnoe, Robert; Smith, Chelsea; Leventhal, Tama

    2014-01-01

    Applying latent class and regression techniques to data from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (n = 997), this study explored the potential academic advantages of time spent in out-of-school activities. Of particular interest was how these potential advantages played out in relation to the timing and duration of activity participation and the family contexts in which it occurred. Participation closer to the start of high school—including consistent participants and latecomers—was associated with higher grades at the transition into high school, especially for youth from low-income families. Sensitivity analyses indicated that this link between school-age activity participation and adolescent academic progress was unlikely to be solely a function of selection. It also tended to be more pronounced among youth from lower-income families, although without varying by other aspects of family status or process. PMID:26279615

  4. Factors Associated with Community Participation among Individuals Who Have Experienced Homelessness

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng-Hang; Helfrich, Christine A.; Coster, Wendy J.; Rogers, E. Sally

    2015-01-01

    Community participation is an important goal for people who have experienced homelessness. The aim of this study was to use the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a framework to examine factors associated with community participation among people who are homeless or recently housed through housing programs. Participants (n = 120) recruited from six housing placement and search programs completed measures of community participation (including productivity, social and leisure, and community-services-use domains), psychiatric and physical symptoms, functional limitations, and a demographic form. Multiple regression analyses were used to identify predictors of overall community participation and subdomain scores. Results suggested that cognitive and mobility limitations, relationship status, and housing status significantly predicted both overall participation and participation in productivity and social and leisure subdomains. Participants who were housed through housing programs, who had cognitive and mobility limitations, and who were single showed less community participation. The findings suggest that activity limitations and environmental and personal factors may need to be addressed in efforts to enhance community participation in this population. PMID:26378558

  5. The value of frameworks as knowledge translation mechanisms to guide community participation practice in Ontario CHCs.

    PubMed

    Montesanti, Stephanie Rose; Abelson, Julia; Lavis, John N; Dunn, James R

    2015-10-01

    The community participation literature has produced numerous frameworks to guide practice and evaluation of community participation strategies in the health sector. These frameworks are useful starting points for differentiating the approaches for involving people in planning and decision-making for health services, but have been critiqued for being too generic and ignoring that community participation is highly contextual and situational. Health service organizations across Canada and internationally have begun to respond to address this limitation by developing more context-specific community participation frameworks; however, such frameworks do not exist for Ontario Community Health Centres (CHCs)-local primary health care organizations with a mandate to engage marginalized groups in planning and decision-making for health services. We conducted a series of focus groups with staff members from four Ontario CHCs to: (1) examine the factors that would influence their use of a generic framework for community participation with marginalized populations; and (2) improve the "context-specificity" of this framework, to enhance its relevance to CHCs. Participants described the difficulty of organizing the contextual, multi-faceted and situational process of community participation that they experienced with marginalized populations into a single framework, which led them to question the value of using frameworks as a resource for guiding the design, implementation and evaluation of their community participation initiatives. Instead, participants revealed that tacit knowledge, in the form of professional and personal experience and local knowledge of a marginalized population, had a greater influence on guiding participation activities in Ontario CHCs. Our findings suggest that tacit knowledge is an essential feature of community participation practice and requires further exploration regarding its role in the community participation field. PMID:26318211

  6. Exploring Winter Community Participation Among Wheelchair Users: An Online Focus Group

    PubMed Central

    Ripat, Jacquie; Colatruglio, Angela

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this qualitative study was to gain an understanding of what people who use wheeled mobility devices (WMDs; e.g., manual and power wheelchairs, and scooters) identify as environmental barriers to community participation in cold weather climates, and to explore recommendations to overcome environmental barriers to community participation. Researchers conducted an online asynchronous focus group that spanned seven days, with eight individuals who use WMDs. Each day, participants were asked to respond to a moderator-provided question, and to engage with one another around the topic area. The researchers analyzed the verbatim data using an inductive content-analysis approach. Four categories emerged from the data: (1) winter barriers to community participation; (2) life resumes in spring and summer; (3) change requires awareness, education, and advocacy; and (4) winter participation is a right. Participants confirmed that it is a collective responsibility to ensure that WMD users are able to participate in the community throughout the seasons. PMID:26295488

  7. Community College Transfer and University Native Students' Participation in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Stephanie B.; Minchew, Sue S.

    2010-01-01

    Students who graduated from a teacher education program at a large public university were contacted to determine if they were teaching. Those who were teaching were also asked if they were teaching in the communities where they lived prior to attending college. A comparison of the graduates who were community college transfer students and…

  8. Community Programs and Women's Participation: The Chinese Experience. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coady, David; Dai, Xinyi; Wang, Limin

    A community development program in rural China aimed to enhance women's economic and social opportunities as a means of lowering fertility rates. The program involved agricultural seminars and extension services, organized cultural and entertainment activities, and political meetings. Village leaders took part in seminars on community development,…

  9. Women's Participation in a Postconflict Community in Peru.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Elba Custodio; Rivera-Holguín, Miryam; Pacheco, Manuel Seminario; Sotelo, Eric Arenas; Béjar, Paola Urruchi

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the internal armed conflict in Peru (1980-2000) was felt in many regions in this South American country, and especially in rural regions such as the Southern Andean province of Cotabambas in the Apurímac department. This article describes and analyzes the actions and results of a community mental health project in this area that aimed to address the conflict's aftermath. The intervention used participatory strategies to identify the communities' prioritized problems, established actions appropriate to the cultural characteristics of the population, and implemented creative and recreational initiatives that responded to communities' needs. Based on democratic dialogue, horizontal relations, and reciprocity, the targeted communities became protagonists in the process of psychosocial transformation that fostered individual and collective exercise of rights, individual human development, and democratic community building. PMID:26472238

  10. To Be Honest: Championing Academic Integrity in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleeker, Karen Clos

    2008-01-01

    Academic dishonesty is not new, but recent research reviews and the media indicate that its prevalence is on the rise and that it erodes public confidence in academia. Such loss can be ill afforded at at time when the costs of education are increasing, and both federal and public funding are decreasing. The author discusses: (1) What is academic…

  11. "Academicus Interculturalis"? Negotiating Interculturality in Academic Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otten, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Structure and agency of cultural diversity in (international) higher education have to be addressed with a critical perspective on international mobility and practices of international academic teaching. In order to overcome naive assumptions about intercultural developments on the individual and the organizational level, sociological analysis…

  12. Blogging as Community of Practice: Lessons for Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Cally; Carter, Susan; Aitchison, Claire

    2015-01-01

    As practices and expectations around doctoral writing continue to change, so too do the demands on academic developers and learning advisors. Social media is increasingly playing a role in doctoral education, just as it is in higher education more generally. This paper explores a blog initiated in 2012 to inform and support doctoral writing; since…

  13. Improving Academic Advising at the Community College. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Railsback, Gary; Colby, Anita

    While there is general consensus on the importance of good academic advising to student success and support for the American College Testing Program's developmental concept of advising, there is less agreement on the most effective model for delivery. Research suggests that both faculty-oriented advising and professional counselor-oriented systems…

  14. The new reality: academic medical centers partner with the community.

    PubMed

    Scott, K

    1996-11-01

    As academic medical centers face a price-sensitive market dominated by managed care, their survival, says Association of American Medical Colleges' Robert Dickler, will depend on the combination of strategies they use in response. HSL looks at three centers' solution--building alliances to secure patient bases, focusing on expanding primary care capabilities, and downsizing and reorganizing for greater cost savings. PMID:10162189

  15. Physical Activity and Sports Team Participation: Associations with Academic Outcomes in Middle School and High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Claudia K.; Barr-Anderson, Daheia; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Wall, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have found that higher physical activity levels are associated with greater academic achievement among students. However, it remains unclear whether associations are due to the physical activity itself or sports team participation, which may involve requirements for maintaining certain grades, for example. The purpose…

  16. The Effect of Participation in the Neighborhood Academic Program on the Autophotographic Self-Concepts of Inner-City Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    The current research investigates the effect of participation in the Neighborhood Academic Initiative Scholars Program (NAI) on the students' sense of self as viewed through autophotography. The NAI is designed to prepare inner-city middle school students, composed mainly of African-Americans and Hispanics, for entry into a four year university.…

  17. Academic and Social Status of Hearing, Deaf, and Hard of Hearing Students Participating in a Co-Enrolled Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCain, Kathleen G.; Antia, Shirin D.

    2005-01-01

    The researchers examined the communication participation, academic achievement, and social behavior of five Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing (DHH) students, five DHH students with additional disabilities (DHH-D), and 18 nondisabled, hearing peers in a co-enrolled, Grade 3-4-5 combination classroom. DHH students were not significantly different from their…

  18. The Effects of Intercollegiate Athletic Participation on Student Academic Achievement and Leadership Performance in a Selective Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunker, Craig Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of various intensity levels of athletic participation on academic and leadership performance in a selective institution. For the purpose of this study a retrospective analysis of existing admissions and student performance data was conducted. The continuous dependent variables were academic…

  19. The Perception of Belonging: Latino Undergraduate Students Participation in the Social and Academic Life at a Predominantly White Private University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdes Ingelmo, Jose Joaquin, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the perception of belonging by Latino undergraduate students attending a predominantly White private university by documenting, in their "own voices," the extent of their participation in the social and academic life of the campus. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of…

  20. Civic Culture, Community and Citizen Participation in Contrasting Neighbourhoods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docherty, Iain; Goodlad, Robina; Paddison, Ronan

    2001-01-01

    Collected data from four urban neighborhoods to explore whether citizen participation in urban governance was fostered by civic culture and local political institutions. Although citizen participation was least likely to occur in poor neighborhoods demonstrating lower educational attainment levels, such factors could be mitigated by political…

  1. Learning (and Researching) as Participation in Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dos Santos, Madalena Pinto

    2004-01-01

    In my contribution to this panel I will bring elements from recent research I conducted (Santos, 2004) in Cape Verde aiming to clarify the meaning of learning as participation in social practices--"learning as participation in the social world" (Lave and Wenger, 1991, p. 42). But as my main interest is learning in compulsory education (in…

  2. Community Environmental Policing: Assessing New Strategies of Public Participation in Environmental Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Rourke, Dara; Macey, Gregg P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper evaluates a new form of public participation in environmental monitoring and regulation advanced through local "bucket brigades," which allow community members to sample air emissions near industrial facilities. These brigades represent a new form of community environmental policing, in which residents participate in collecting,…

  3. An Investigation of the Contingent Relationships between Learning Community Participation and Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Gary R.; Kuh, George D.; McCormick, Alexander C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the contingent relationships between learning community participation and student engagement in educational activities inside and outside the classroom using data from the 2004 administration of the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). Results indicated that learning community participation was positively and…

  4. Community and Social Participation among Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder Transitioning to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Emily; Davis, Beth Ellen; Stobbe, Gary; Bjornson, Kristie

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are at increased risk for poor psychosocial outcomes as adults. We described community and social participation in adolescents with ASDs as they transitioned from adolescence to adulthood, and identified adolescent factors associated with community and social participation outcomes in adulthood. We…

  5. The Effect of Participating in a First-Year Learning Community on Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaPierre, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover whether participation in a first-year learning community is linked with increased levels of self-reported student engagement. The study compares the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) scores of students who participated in a first-year learning community with their peers who did not participate…

  6. Gender, Academics and Interscholastic Sports Participation at the School Level: A Gender-specific Analysis of the Relationship between Interscholastic Sports Participation and AP Enrollment.

    PubMed

    Veliz, Philip; Shakib, Sohaila

    2014-01-01

    While literature demonstrates that interscholastic sports participation is associated with positive academic outcomes, this relationship is rarely analyzed at a macro-level (the school-level). To date, there is no research examining whether increases in schools' female and male interscholastic sports participation rates is associated with increases in female and male AP enrollment rates. Using a national sample of 4,644 public high schools during the 2009-2010 school year, we test several gender-specific hypotheses linked with the association between schools' sport participation rates and advanced placement enrollment rates (AP math, AP science, AP foreign language, and overall AP enrollment). The findings reveal that schools' female and male sports participation rates have a positive association with schools' female and male AP math, AP science, AP foreign language, and overall AP enrollment rates. Moreover, the findings suggest that females benefit more than males in regard to the positive relationship between interscholastic sports and AP enrollment. PMID:24910475

  7. Gender, Academics and Interscholastic Sports Participation at the School Level: A Gender-specific Analysis of the Relationship between Interscholastic Sports Participation and AP Enrollment

    PubMed Central

    Veliz, Philip; Shakib, Sohaila

    2014-01-01

    While literature demonstrates that interscholastic sports participation is associated with positive academic outcomes, this relationship is rarely analyzed at a macro-level (the school-level). To date, there is no research examining whether increases in schools’ female and male interscholastic sports participation rates is associated with increases in female and male AP enrollment rates. Using a national sample of 4,644 public high schools during the 2009-2010 school year, we test several gender-specific hypotheses linked with the association between schools’ sport participation rates and advanced placement enrollment rates (AP math, AP science, AP foreign language, and overall AP enrollment). The findings reveal that schools’ female and male sports participation rates have a positive association with schools’ female and male AP math, AP science, AP foreign language, and overall AP enrollment rates. Moreover, the findings suggest that females benefit more than males in regard to the positive relationship between interscholastic sports and AP enrollment. PMID:24910475

  8. The challenges of collaboration for academic and community partners in a research partnership: points to consider.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lainie Friedman; Loup, Allan; Nelson, Robert M; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Kost, Rhonda; Smith, George R; Gehlert, Sarah

    2010-03-01

    The philosophical underpinning of Community-Engaged Research (CEnR) entails a collaborative partnership between academic researchers and the community. The Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) model is the partnership model most widely discussed in the CEnR literature and is the primary model we draw upon in this discussion of the collaboration between academic researchers and the community. In CPBR, the goal is for community partners to have equal authority and responsibility with the academic research team, and that the partners engage in respectful negotiation both before the research begins and throughout the research process to ensure that the concerns, interests, and needs of each party are addressed. The negotiation of a fair, successful, and enduring partnership requires transparency and understanding of the different assets, skills and expertise that each party brings to the project. Delineating the expectations of both parties and documenting the terms of agreement in a memorandum of understanding or similar document may be very useful. This document is structured to provide a "points- to-consider" roadmap for academic and community research partners to establish and maintain a research partnership at each stage of the research process. PMID:20235861

  9. Strengthening Community Capacity to Participate in Making Decisions to Reduce Disproportionate Environmental Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Manuel; Israel, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Environmental exposures impose a disproportionate health burden on low-income populations and communities of color. One contributing factor may be the obstacles such communities face to full participation in making policy decisions about environmental health. This study described and analyzed the characteristics that contributed to communities' capacity to participate in making environmental decisions and suggested steps public agencies could take to achieve more meaningful participation. By strengthening community capacity, advancing authentic participation, and building democratic power, it might be possible to alter current patterns of health inequities. Strengthening participation by working with communities to develop the capacities needed to be effective in such processes is a key role for local, state, and national environmental agencies. PMID:22021323

  10. Predicting Community College Transfer Student Success: The Role of Community College Academic Experiences on Post-Transfer Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Kristin LeAnne

    2013-01-01

    Community college students who transfer to four-year universities face a variety of academic, social, and psychological challenges as they adjust to new postsecondary institutions (Laanan, 2001; Townsend, 2008). Student success through the transfer process is positively influenced by accumulated knowledge, skills, and experiences from the…

  11. A qualitative study using traditional community assemblies to investigate community perspectives on informed consent and research participation in western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background International collaborators face challenges in the design and implementation of ethical biomedical research. Evaluating community understanding of research and processes like informed consent may enable researchers to better protect research participants in a particular setting; however, there exist few studies examining community perspectives in health research, particularly in resource-limited settings, or strategies for engaging the community in research processes. Our goal was to inform ethical research practice in a biomedical research setting in western Kenya and similar resource-limited settings. Methods We sought to use mabaraza, traditional East African community assemblies, in a qualitative study to understand community perspectives on biomedical research and informed consent within a collaborative, multinational research network in western Kenya. Analyses included manual, progressive coding of transcripts from mabaraza to identify emerging central concepts. Results Our findings from two mabaraza with 108 community members revealed that, while participants understood some principles of biomedical research, they emphasized perceived benefits from participation in research over potential risks. Many community members equated health research with HIV testing or care, which may be explained in part by the setting of this particular study. In addition to valuing informed consent as understanding and accepting a role in research activities, participants endorsed an increased role for the community in making decisions about research participation, especially in the case of children, through a process of community consent. Conclusions Our study suggests that international biomedical research must account for community understanding of research and informed consent, particularly when involving children. Moreover, traditional community forums, such as mabaraza in East Africa, can be used effectively to gather these data and may serve as a forum to

  12. Community Violence and Youth: Affect, Behavior, Substance Use, and Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooley-Strickland, Michele; Quille, Tanya J.; Griffin, Robert S.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Furr-Holden, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Community violence is recognized as a major public health problem (WHO, "World Report on Violence and Health," 2002) that Americans increasingly understand has adverse implications beyond inner-cities. However, the majority of research on chronic community violence exposure focuses on ethnic minority, impoverished, and/or crime-ridden communities…

  13. 45 CFR 2552.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... community participation? 2552.24 Section 2552.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE FOSTER GRANDPARENT PROGRAM Eligibility and Responsibilities of a Sponsor § 2552.24 What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community...

  14. 45 CFR 2551.24 - What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community participation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... community participation? 2551.24 Section 2551.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SENIOR COMPANION PROGRAM Eligibility and Responsibilities of a Sponsor § 2551.24 What are a sponsor's responsibilities for securing community...

  15. Homophily of Vocabulary Usage: Beneficial Effects of Vocabulary Similarity on Online Health Communities Participation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Albert; Hartzler, Andrea L.; Huh, Jina; McDonald, David W.; Pratt, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    Online health communities provide popular platforms for individuals to exchange psychosocial support and form ties. Although regular active participation (i.e., posting to interact with other members) in online health communities can provide important benefits, sustained active participation remains challenging for these communities. Leveraging previous literature on homophily (i.e., “love of those who are like themselves”), we examined the relationship between vocabulary similarity (i.e., homophily of word usage) of thread posts and members’ future interaction in online health communities. We quantitatively measured vocabulary similarity by calculating, in a vector space model, cosine similarity between the original post and the first reply in 20,499 threads. Our findings across five online health communities suggest that vocabulary similarity is a significant predictor of members’ future interaction in online health communities. These findings carry practical implications for facilitating and sustaining online community participation through beneficial effects of homophily in the vocabulary of essential peer support. PMID:26958240

  16. Indicators of Citizen Participation: Lessons from Learning Teams in Rural EZ/EC Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrissey, Janice

    2000-01-01

    A study of participatory evaluation by learning teams at 10 rural sites of the Empowerment Zones/Enterprise Communities program showed the importance of separating indicators of participation from project impacts. Evaluation of three categories was recommended: citizen participation (process indicators), impact of participation on individuals and…

  17. Participation in Community and Political Life of Persons with Severe Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puumalainen, Jouni

    2011-01-01

    Participation as a citizen, that is, engaging in social, political, and governmental life, has been rarely seen as an important domain when studying social participation of disabled persons. The purpose of this study was to depict the participation in community and political life of persons with severe or multiple disabilities and to determine…

  18. The Role of Information and Communication Technology in Community Outreach, Academic and Research Collaboration, and Education and Support Services (IT-CARES)

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ashish; Meza, Jane; Costa, Sergio; Puricelli Perin, Douglas Marcel; Trout, Kate; Rayamajih, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study is to examine the role of information and communication technology (ICT) in enhancing community outreach, academic and research collaboration, and education and support services (IT-CARES) in an academic setting. Methods A survey was deployed to assess the ICT needs in an academic setting. The survey was developed using the Delphi methodology. Questionnaire development was initiated by asking key stakeholders involved in community outreach, academic, research, education, and support to provide feedback on current ICT issues and future recommendations for relevant ICT tools that would be beneficial to them in their job, and to capture current ICT issues. Participants were asked to rate the level of importance of each ICT question on five-point Likert scales. Results The survey was sent to 359 participants, including faculty, staff, and students. The total number of respondents was 96, for a 27 percent response rate. The majority of the participants (54.1 percent, n = 46) placed a high importance on learning the available research capabilities of the college. The majority of the participants placed moderate (43.5 percent, n = 37) to high importance (40 percent, n = 34) on having an intranet that could support collaborative grant writing. A majority of the participants attributed high importance to learning to interact with the online learning management system Blackboard. A majority of the participants agreed that social media should being more actively utilized for diverse activities for academic and research purposes. Conclusion The study helped to identify the current needs and challenges faced by professionals and students when interacting with ICT. More research is needed in order to effectively integrate the use of ICT in the field of higher education, especially related to the modern global public health context. PMID:24159275

  19. Exploring the Academic and Social Experiences of Latino Engineering Community College Transfer Students at a 4-Year Institution: A Qualitative Research Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagler, LaTesha R.

    As the number of historically underrepresented populations transfer from community college to university to pursue baccalaureate degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), little research exists about the challenges and successes Latino students experience as they transition from 2-year colleges to 4-year universities. Thus, institutions of higher education have limited insight to inform their policies, practices, and strategic planning in developing effective sources of support, services, and programs for underrepresented students in STEM disciplines. This qualitative research study explored the academic and social experiences of 14 Latino engineering community college transfer students at one university. Specifically, this study examined the lived experiences of minority community college transfer students' transition into and persistence at a 4-year institution. The conceptual framework applied to this study was Schlossberg's Transition Theory, which analyzed the participant's social and academic experiences that led to their successful transition from community college to university. Three themes emerged from the narrative data analysis: (a) Academic Experiences, (b) Social Experiences, and (c) Sources of Support. The findings indicate that engineering community college transfer students experience many challenges in their transition into and persistence at 4-year institutions. Some of the challenges include lack of academic preparedness, environmental challenges, lack of time management skills and faculty serving the role as institutional agents.

  20. Ethical Issues Affecting Human Participants in Community College Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtz, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The increasing demand of constituents to conduct analyses in order to help inform the decision-making process has led to the need for Institutional Research (IR) guidelines for community college educators. One method of maintaining the quality of research conducted by IR staff is to include professional development about ethics. This article…

  1. Evaluating the Struggles with International Students and Local Community Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusek, Weronika A.

    2015-01-01

    International students are not only important for universities, but even more so to the host communities, towns and regions where higher education institutions are located. This pilot study looked at a public university located in a small college town in Ohio. The study explored the relationship between international students and the local…

  2. Developing Technological Initiatives for Youth Participation and Local Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burd, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in technology are transforming our lives, but in many cases they are also limiting the way children are exposed to local communities and physical spaces. Technology can help young people actively connect with their neighborhoods, but doing that requires different methods and tools from the ones typically available in schools,…

  3. Student Development among Community College Participants in Study Abroad Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drexler, Devi S.; Campbell, Dale F.

    2011-01-01

    For decades, institutions of higher education have provided study abroad opportunities for college students wishing to increase and expand their intellectual and social skills. While many universities around the country have supported successful international exchange and study abroad programs, there is little research on community college study…

  4. The Healthy Children, Strong Families Intervention: Design and Community Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Alexandra K.; LaRowe, Tara L.; Cronin, Kate A.; Prince, Ronald J.; Wubben, Deborah P.; Parker, Tassy; Jobe, Jared B.

    2012-01-01

    Healthy Children, Strong Families (HCSF) is a 2-year, community-driven, family-based randomized controlled trial of a healthy lifestyles intervention conducted in partnership with four Wisconsin American Indian tribes. HCSF is composed of 1 year of targeted home visits to deliver nutritional and physical activity curricula. During Year 1, trained…

  5. Context Matters: The Importance of Local Culture in Community Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokopy, Linda Stalker; Aldrich, Daniel; Ayres, Janet; Amberg, Shannon M.; Molloy, Alicia; Saylor, Amber; Thompson, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Encouraging members of the public to get engaged in local decision-making is a key role of Extension educators. The study reported here explores whether local context influences which individuals choose to attend public meetings about the community and the environment. The study surveyed meeting attendees and non-meeting attendees in three…

  6. CITIZEN PARTICIPATION IN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT, PART 2. WORKSHOP MANUAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FESSLER, DONALD R.

    THE TRAINING MATERIALS IN THIS MANUAL ARE INTENDED FOR USE IN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT, AN APPROACH TO REGIONAL, COUNTY, OR COMMUNITY NEEDS PRIMARILY CONCERNED WITH MOTIVATING PEOPLE TO HELP THEMSELVES. THE PURPOSES ARE (1) TO TRAIN CITIZENS TO ANALYZE THEIR NEEDS AND SOLVE THEIR PROBLEMS AND (2) TO TRAIN PROFESSIONALS TO MAKE MORE EFFECTIVE…

  7. Community Participation in the Cultural Adaptation of a Prevention Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clinton, Amanda; Amesty, Elvia

    2010-01-01

    The present project analysed the use of participatory models during the process of application of a prevention program with preschool-aged children in Maracaibo, Venezuela. Relevant phases in achieving community collaboration are delineated and challenges are discussed. Results indicate that participatory models provided an effective means of…

  8. Institutional Factors Affecting Student Participation in Community College Science Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arthur M.

    Drawing upon the responses of 268 instructors of randomly selected class sections offered at the Los Angeles Community College District during Fall 1980, this paper assesses the role of the faculty in remedying the underrepresentation of women, minorities, and the handicapped in science education. The paper first summarizes probable causes of this…

  9. An Evaluation of a Community-Academic-Clinical Partnership to Reduce Prostate Cancer Disparities in the South

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Daniela B.; Owens, Otis L.; Jackson, Dawnyea D.; Johnson, Kim M.; Gansauer, Lucy; Dickey, Joe; Miller, Ron; Payne, Johnny; Bearden, James D.; Hebert, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Engaging partners in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of cancer education programs is critical for improving the health of our communities. A two-year pilot education intervention on prostate cancer decision making and participation in medical research was funded by the National Cancer Institute. The partnership involving community members and clinical staff at a cancer center was used to develop recruitment strategies and plan for the implementation of the intervention with African-American (AA) middle-age and older men and female family members. We assessed partners’ perceptions of this community-academic-clinical research collaboration. Methods In year 2, eight project advisory council members were selected among existing partners and year 1 participants to serve as a formal committee. Council members were required to participate in telephone and in-person meetings and actively support recruitment/implementation efforts. At the conclusion of the project, 20 individuals (all clinical and community partners, including the eight advisory council members) were invited to complete a survey to assess their perceived impact of the collaboration on the community and provide suggestions for future collaborations. Results Most partners agreed that their organization benefitted from the collaboration and that various aspects of the advisory council process (e.g., both formal and informal communication) worked well. The most noted accomplishment of the partnership related to leveraging the collaboration to make men more knowledgeable about prostate cancer decision making. Suggested improvements for future collaborations included distributing more frequent updates regarding project successes. Conclusions Evaluating partners’ perceptions of this collaboration provided important recommendations for future planning, implementation, and evaluation of community-based cancer education programs. PMID:24078315

  10. 45 CFR 2517.300 - Who may participate in a community-based service-learning program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Who may participate in a community-based service... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Eligibility To Participate § 2517.300 Who may participate in a community-based service-learning...

  11. 45 CFR 2517.300 - Who may participate in a community-based service-learning program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Who may participate in a community-based service... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Eligibility To Participate § 2517.300 Who may participate in a community-based service-learning...

  12. Academic Incentives for Students Can Increase Participation in and Effectiveness of a Physical Activity Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVahl, Julie; King, Richard; Williamson, Jon W.

    2005-01-01

    The authors sought to determine whether a greater academic incentive would improve the effectiveness and student adherence to a 12-week voluntary exercise program designed to decrease students' percentage of body fat. They randomly assigned 210 students to 1 of 2 groups with different academic reward structures. The group with the greater reward…

  13. Factors contributing to participation of a rural community in health education: a case study from ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Adamu, Abebaw Yirga

    This study investigated factors that contributed to the participation of a rural community in health education. It was conducted in the Awi zone of the Amhara region in Ethiopia. The participants were rural community members and health extension workers. Purposive and snowball sampling techniques were used to recruit rural community members, whereas convenient sampling was used to recruit health extension workers. Data was collected through in-depth individual interviews, and focus group discussions. The study revealed various factors contributing to the participation of a rural community in health education, including attainability of the objectives of health education, profiles of the health extension workers, peer influence, organization of the health education program in terms of place and time, and meaningfulness of the health education in terms of rural community lives. Although the ultimate goal of participation in health education is similar for all rural community members, they were attracted to the program by one or more than one different factor. Efforts aimed at enhancing participation of a rural community in health education program should address each factor that contributes to the participation of community members. PMID:23000462

  14. Community participation in malaria control strategy of intersect oral collaboration in Ghana: Myth or reality?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background For many years, malaria has been one of the main health concerns of the government of Ghana. The government has recently implemented a control strategy which will ensure the inclusion of the community members who were previously excluded from the process. Until now, however, scientific study on this strategy has been scanty. Objectives The objectives were to investigate the level at which communities have been allowed to participate and to understand whether the idea of community participation in malaria control strategy is a myth or a reality. Methods Data were collected in the rural district of Ahafo-Ano South in the Ashanti region of Ghana. An exploratory qualitative approach was employed in order to ascertain the opinions of the local health officials and community members. The level of participation was measured using the framework of Arnstein's ‘ladder’ of participation, as developed in 1969. Results Evidence showed that the level of community participation was only tokenistic. Communities were only informed and/or consulted after decisions had been made, but the real engagement and negotiations were absent. Communities thus had limited opportunities to air their views in the planning process. Conclusion This article has revealed that the government's vision of ensuring community participation in the malaria control policy-making process can be said to be a myth rather than a reality. PMID:26245403

  15. How Participants Envision Community Music in Welsh Men's Choirs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohwer, Debbie; Rohwer, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe choristers' perceptions of Welsh men's choir participation. Four choirs were observed in concert and rehearsal settings across Wales. Focus group interviews were conducted with between 4 and 10 members in each of the 4 choral settings for a total of 24 total interview respondents. The interviewees had a…

  16. Weekly Community Interviews With High-Risk Participants: Operational Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Carol A.; Mulvey, Edward P.; Lidz, Charles W.; Gardner, William P.; Skeem, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    To address several key questions in social science research, repeated interviews of individuals drawn from difficult populations are required. This article describes an approach for addressing the challenges associated with longitudinal interview studies, including locating research participants, obtaining reliable and valid interview data over…

  17. Toward community engagement: Can the built environment help? Grassroots participation and communal space in Chinese urban communities

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yushu

    2015-01-01

    The scholarship in building community capacity by way of cultivating community social capital and community spirit through neighborhood design has spawned heated debates in urban and community studies. This paper contributes to this scholarship by examining the neighborhood contexts of grassroots participation in Chinese contemporary urban communities. In particular, it explores the relationship between neighborhood communal space and community participation, using a city-wide survey of 1,809 households in 39 commodity housing estates in the city of Guangzhou. It is found that local residents’ participation in community affairs is conditioned by both the social milieu (measured by the overall level of social cohesion) and the physical environment (indicated by effects of communal space) of a neighborhood. Notably, communal space exerts positive indirect effects on grassroots participation by facilitating the development of place-based social capital and neighborhood attachment. These findings point to a civic virtue of communal space and provide nascent evidence regarding neighborhood contexts of grassroots participation in urban China. PMID:26640314

  18. An exploration of the longer-term impacts of community participation in rural health services design.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Jane; Currie, Margaret; Kenny, Amanda; Munoz, Sarah-Anne

    2015-09-01

    This article explores what happened, over the longer term, after a community participation exercise to design future rural service delivery models, and considers perceptions of why more follow-up actions did or did not happen. The study, which took place in 2014, revisits three Scottish communities that engaged in a community participation research method (2008-2010) intended to design rural health services. Interviews were conducted with 22 citizens, healthcare practitioners, managers and policymakers all of whom were involved in, or knew about, the original project. Only one direct sustained service change was found - introduction of a volunteer first responder scheme in one community. Sustained changes in knowledge were found. The Health Authority that part-funded development of the community participation method, through the original project, had not adopted the new method. Community members tended to attribute lack of further impact to low participation and methods insufficiently attuned to the social nuances of very small rural communities. Managers tended to blame insufficient embedding in the healthcare system and issues around power over service change and budgets. In the absence of convincing formal community governance mechanisms for health issues, rural health practitioners tended to act as conduits between citizens and the Health Authority. The study provides new knowledge about what happens after community participation and highlights a need for more exploration. PMID:26248306

  19. Developing professional identity in nursing academics: the role of communities of practice.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Nicola; Ferguson, Dorothy; Wilkie, George; Corcoran, Terry; Simpson, Liz

    2009-08-01

    This paper analyses the current standing of nursing within the wider United Kingdom (UK) higher education (HE) environment and considers the development of academic identity within the sector, introducing a technology mediated approach to professional learning and development. A community of practice (CoP) is a way of learning based on collaboration among peers. Individuals come together virtually or physically, with a common purpose, defined by knowledge rather than task [Wenger, E., 1998. Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning and Identity, sixth ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge]. In 2008, a small team of academics at Glasgow Caledonian University, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Community Health created and implemented iCoP, a project undertaken to pilot an international CoP, where novices and expert academics collaborated to debate and discuss the complex transition from clinician to academic. Although not intended as a conventional research project, the developmental journey and emerging online discussion provide an insight into the collective thoughts and opinions of a multi-national group of novice academics. The article also highlights the key challenges, problems and limitations of working in an international online arena with professionals who traditionally work and thrive in a face to face, real time environment. PMID:19250718

  20. Association between community garden participation and fruit and vegetable consumption in rural Missouri

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fruit and vegetable consumption reduces chronic disease risk, yet the majority of Americans consume fewer than recommended. Inadequate access to fruits and vegetables is increasingly recognized as a significant contributor to low consumption of healthy foods. Emerging evidence shows the effectiveness of community gardens in increasing access to, and consumption of, fruits and vegetables. Methods Two complementary studies explored the association of community garden participation and fruit and vegetable consumption in rural communities in Missouri. The first was with a convenience sample of participants in a rural community garden intervention who completed self-administered surveys. The second was a population-based survey conducted with a random sample of 1,000 residents in the intervention catchment area. Results Participation in a community garden was associated with higher fruit and vegetable consumption. The first study found that individuals who worked in a community garden at least once a week were more likely to report eating fruits and vegetables because of their community garden work (X2 (125) = 7.78, p = .0088). Population-based survey results show that 5% of rural residents reported participating in a community garden. Those who reported community garden participation were more likely to report eating fruits 2 or more times per day and vegetables 3 or more times per day than those who did not report community garden participation, even after adjusting for covariates (Odds Ratio [OR] = 2.76, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 1.35 to 5.65). Conclusion These complementary studies provide evidence that community gardens are a promising strategy for promoting fruit and vegetable consumption in rural communities. PMID:24252563

  1. Use of an Activity Monitor and GPS Device to Assess Community Activity and Participation in Transtibial Amputees

    PubMed Central

    Hordacre, Brenton; Barr, Christopher; Crotty, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This study characterized measures of community activity and participation of transtibial amputees based on combined data from separate accelerometer and GPS devices. The relationship between community activity and participation and standard clinical measures was assessed. Forty-seven participants were recruited (78% male, mean age 60.5 years). Participants wore the accelerometer and GPS devices for seven consecutive days. Data were linked to assess community activity (community based step counts) and community participation (number of community visits). Community activity and participation were compared across amputee K-level groups. Forty-six participants completed the study. On average each participant completed 16,645 (standard deviation (SD) 13,274) community steps and 16 (SD 10.9) community visits over seven days. There were differences between K-level groups for measures of community activity (F(2,45) = 9.4, p < 0.001) and participation (F(2,45) = 6.9, p = 0.002) with lower functioning K1/2 amputees demonstrating lower levels of community activity and participation than K3 and K4 amputees. There was no significant difference between K3 and K4 for community activity (p = 0.28) or participation (p = 0.43). This study demonstrated methodology to link accelerometer and GPS data to assess community activity and participation in a group of transtibial amputees. Differences in K-levels do not appear to accurately reflect actual community activity or participation in higher functioning transtibial amputees. PMID:24670721

  2. A community-academic partnership to address racial/ethnic health disparities through grant-making.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Michelle A; Fox, Ashley; Simon, Ellen P; Horowitz, Carol R

    2013-11-01

    Because they focus on culturally and contextually specific health determinants, participatory approaches are well-recognized strategies to reduce health disparities. Yet, few models exist that use academic and community members equally in the grant funding process for programs aimed at reducing and eliminating these disparities. In 2008, the Communities IMPACT Diabetes Center in East Harlem, New York, developed a partnered process to award grants to community groups that target the social determinants of diabetes-related disparities. Community and academic representatives developed a novel strategy to solicit and review grants. This approach fostered equality in decision-making and sparked innovative mechanisms to award $500,000 in small grants. An evaluation of this process revealed that most reviewers perceived the review process to be fair; were able to voice their perspectives (and those perspectives were both listened to and respected); and felt that being reviewers made them better grant writers. Community-academic partnerships can capitalize on each group's strengths and knowledge base to increase the community's capacity to write and review grants for programs that reduce health disparities, providing a local context for addressing the social determinants of health. PMID:24179281

  3. Promoting community participation in priority setting in district health systems: experiences from Mbarali district, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kamuzora, Peter; Maluka, Stephen; Ndawi, Benedict; Byskov, Jens; Hurtig, Anna-Karin

    2013-01-01

    Background Community participation in priority setting in health systems has gained importance all over the world, particularly in resource-poor settings where governments have often failed to provide adequate public-sector services for their citizens. Incorporation of public views into priority setting is perceived as a means to restore trust, improve accountability, and secure cost-effective priorities within healthcare. However, few studies have reported empirical experiences of involving communities in priority setting in developing countries. The aim of this article is to provide the experience of implementing community participation and the challenges of promoting it in the context of resource-poor settings, weak organizations, and fragile democratic institutions. Design Key informant interviews were conducted with the Council Health Management Team (CHMT), community representatives, namely women, youth, elderly, disabled, and people living with HIV/AIDS, and other stakeholders who participated in the preparation of the district annual budget and health plans. Additionally, minutes from the Action Research Team and planning and priority-setting meeting reports were analyzed. Results A number of benefits were reported: better identification of community needs and priorities, increased knowledge of the community representatives about priority setting, increased transparency and accountability, promoted trust among health systems and communities, and perceived improved quality and accessibility of health services. However, lack of funds to support the work of the selected community representatives, limited time for deliberations, short notice for the meetings, and lack of feedback on the approved priorities constrained the performance of the community representatives. Furthermore, the findings show the importance of external facilitation and support in enabling health professionals and community representatives to arrive at effective working arrangement

  4. Understanding Community College Students' Learning Styles and the Link to Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Learning styles have been an area of interest in educational psychology for many decades. However, community college students have been overlooked in learning styles research. To enhance teacher efficacy and student success, it is important to continue to evaluate the relationship between learning styles and academic achievement. The purpose of…

  5. Black Males and the Community College: Student Perspectives on Faculty and Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, J. Luke; Turner, Caroline S.

    2011-01-01

    This article highlights findings from a qualitative study of factors affecting the academic success of African American male students in the community college. Data was collected through interviews with 28 Black male students in a midsized institution in the southwestern United States. Findings illuminated four key faculty-initiated elements that…

  6. Putting a Face on Hunger: A Community-Academic Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Nancy; Canales, Mary K.; Moore, Emily; Gullickson, Melissa; Kaczmarski, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Food insecurity is a growing concern for Eau Claire County residents in Western Wisconsin. A community-academic partnership studied food insecurity through the voices of families struggling to access food and institutions that assist with hunger related problems. Data were collected through focus groups held in urban and rural parts of the county.…

  7. Washington Community Colleges Factbook. Addendum A: Student Enrollments, Academic Year 1977-78.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Terre; Story, Sherie

    In order to reveal trends in community college enrollments in Washington, student demographic and enrollment data for academic year 1977-78 were compiled and compared with figures for previous years. The report provides annualized averages for full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollments for the system for the years 1967 to 1977, and for FTE students by…

  8. Washington Community College Factbook Addendum A: Student Enrollments, Academic Year 1978-79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Terre

    In order to reveal trends in community college enrollments in Washington, student demographic and enrollment data for academic year 1978-79 were compiled and compared with figures for previous years. The study report provides annualized averages for full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollments for the years 1968-69 to 1978-79 and quarterly and…

  9. Academic Performance of Community College Transfers: Psychological, Sociodemographic, and Educational Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xueli

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the academic performance of community college transfer students at four-year institutions. It uses a nationally representative sample from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS: 88/2000) and the Postsecondary Education Transcript Study (PETS). Results from an Ordinary Least Squares regression model suggest…

  10. Reconstructing Notions of Community in Academe: The Subversive Nature of WAC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meagher, Eileen M.

    This paper sees existing academic communities the following way: faculty centered, discipline centered, competitive in nature, static in structure, lecture based "teaching," banking concept of learning, one dominant discourse--"Standard English," narrow in research interests, and focus on individual achievement of faculty and students. The paper…

  11. Exposure to Violence in the Community Predicts Friendships with Academically Disengaged Peers During Middle Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, David; Kelly, Brynn M; Mali, Luiza V; Duong, Mylien T

    2016-09-01

    Adolescents who have been exposed to violence in the community often experience subsequent difficulties with academic achievement. Because competence in the classroom is a salient developmental task during the adolescent years, outcomes in this critical context can then have broader implications for social and psychological functioning. In the current study, we tested a hypothesized progression in which the association between violence exposure and deficient achievement is presumed to potentiate friendships with academically disengaged peers. We followed 415 urban adolescents (53 % girls; average age of 14.6 years) for a one-year period, with two annual assessment of psychosocial functioning. Exposure to violence in the community and academic engagement were assessed with a self-report inventory; reciprocated friendships were assessed with a peer interview; and achievement was indexed based on a review of school records. Consistent with our hypotheses, neighborhood violence was associated with deficient classroom achievement. Poor achievement, in turn, mediated associations between community violence exposure and low academic engagement among friends. Our findings highlight pathways though which exposure to community violence potentially predicts later dysfunction. PMID:27138174

  12. Factors Affecting Academic Outcomes of Underprepared Community College Students. AIR 1999 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, J. Charles

    This study examined the factors affecting the four-year academic performance and outcomes of 1,249 underprepared students at Prince George's Community College (Maryland). The fall 1994 freshmen required remediation in reading, writing, or mathematics. Subjects were defined as achievers if, by summer 1998, they had earned a degree or certificate…

  13. Improving Teaching and Learning in Community Colleges: Guidelines for Academic Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawthorne, Elizabeth M.; Smith, Albert B.

    This report presents findings of a 1991 survey of chief academic officers (CAO's) of community, technical, and junior colleges to measure the level of commitment to instructional effectiveness and illuminate those areas which deserve attention. The study replicated a 1987 survey of CAO's at four-year institutions and utilized the five areas of…

  14. Women Chief Academic Officers of Public Community Colleges: Career Paths and Mobility Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Cynthia B.

    This study investigates the career paths and mobility factors of female chief academic officers (CAOs) in public community colleges. Analysis revealed the most significant predictors for the career paths to be entry port, number of higher education positions held, and the first prior position held. Gender did not significantly influence mobility…

  15. Community-Engaged Courses in a Conflict Zone: A Case Study of the Israeli Academic Corpus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golan, Daphna; Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Nadera

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on an action-oriented study of 13 community-engaged courses at 11 institutions of higher education in Israel. These courses were not part of peace education programs but rather accredited academic courses in various disciplines, all of which included practice and theory. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how these…

  16. Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, September 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Rostrum is a quarterly publication of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges. The following articles are included in this issue: (1) A Modest Proposal: Simplifying Articulation, Respecting Local Autonomy, and Responding to "Common Course Numbering" Mandates by Michelle Pilati; (2) Resolving the TBA Dilemma: A Tale of Three Memos…

  17. Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Julie, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 newsletter of Senate Rostrum contains the February and October issues. The February issue covers the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges' January 2002 hearing on Draft A of the proposed new accreditation standards. Members of the Academic Senate attended the meeting in order to voice their concerns regarding the new…

  18. Balancing Open Access with Academic Standards: Implications for Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabbard, Anita; Mupinga, Davison M.

    2013-01-01

    Community colleges act as the gateway for students to higher education. Many of these colleges realize this mission through open-door policies where students lacking in basic reading, writing, and mathematics skills can enroll. But, this open-access policy often creates challenges when meeting academic standards. Based on data collected from…

  19. Building Community in Academic Settings: The Importance of Flexibility in a Structured Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Robyn; Freeman, Mark; Barrie, Simon; Bell, Amani; O'Connor, Donna; Waugh, Fran; Sykes, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Academic mentoring is increasingly being used by many universities as a tool to enhance the quality of research-led teaching, promote cross-faculty collaboration and encourage a mentoring culture and community. This article reports on a pilot project established to investigate the benefits of building flexibility into a structured academic…

  20. Effectiveness of Blended Cooperative Learning Environment in Biology Teaching: Classroom Community Sense, Academic Achievement and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yapici, I. Ümit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Blended Cooperative Learning Environment (BCLE) in biology teaching on students' classroom community sense, their academic achievement and on their levels of satisfaction. In the study, quantitative and qualitative research methods were used together. The study was carried out with 30 students in…

  1. Learning Community Transitions in the First Year: A Case Study of Academic and Social Network Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel A.

    2011-01-01

    Residential learning communities often focus on easing first-year students' transitions to college by emphasizing the creation of peer social and academic relationships. However, this relational process is most often examined through analyzing individual student characteristics, behaviors, and attitudes. This study used network analysis to…

  2. Psychological Symptoms Linking Exposure to Community Violence and Academic Functioning in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, Danielle R.; Lambert, Sharon F.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    African American adolescents are exposed disproportionately to community violence, increasing their risk for emotional and behavioral symptoms that can detract from learning and undermine academic outcomes. The present study examined whether aggressive behavior and depressive and anxious symptoms mediated the association between exposure to…

  3. Academic Progress of Community College Nursing Aspirants: An Institutional Research Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perin, Dolores

    2006-01-01

    The community college is a major site preparing students for nursing careers, an important role at a time of a national shortage. However, many of the low socioeconomic status (SES), minority students who aspire to associates degrees in nursing display low levels of academic preparedness. An analysis of 3-year institutional data from a single…

  4. Academic Computing at the Community College of Baltimore: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Beverly; Kearsley, Greg

    Part of a series of case studies on successful academic computing programs at minority institutions, this monograph focuses on the Community College of Baltimore (CCB). Sections I and II outline the purpose and background of the case study project, focusing on the 11 computing activities the case studies are designed to facilitate, the need for…

  5. The Northwest Indiana Center for Data and Analysis: A Case Study of Academic Library Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Scott; Morris, Cele; Sutherland, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    This paper details community engagement activity of an academic library coordinated within a broader university strategic plan. The Anderson Library at Indiana University Northwest (IU-Northwest) supports a service called the Northwest Indiana Center for Data and Analysis. Created in 1996 with funding made available from the Indiana University…

  6. The Impact of Video Game Playing on Academic Performance at a Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, Lynn E.; Campbell, Janice D.

    1986-01-01

    Studies the relationship between video game playing and academic achievement. Compares matched groups of community college psychology students, differing in the amount of their game playing. There were no differences between frequent and infrequent players on measures of psychology class attendance, locus of control, or grade point average.…

  7. Knowledge Sharing and Educational Technology Acceptance in Online Academic Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nistor, Nicolae; Baltes, Beate; Schustek, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Online programs rely on the use of educational technology for knowledge sharing in academic virtual communities of practice (vCoPs). This poses the question as to which factors influence technology acceptance. Previous research has investigated the inter-relationship between educational technology acceptance (ETA) and the vCoP context…

  8. Women Chief Academic Officers of Public Community Colleges: Significant Predictors for Their Career Paths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Cynthia B.; Cejda, Brent D.

    As women now comprise 39% of the chief academic officer (CAO) positions, the focus of this investigation was the career paths and mobility factors of women CAOs in public comprehensive community colleges. This survey of 142 women resulted in eight distinct, common pathways by which women attain this rank. The typical profile of a female CAO is a…

  9. The Internal Conflict Experienced by Public Community College Academic Department Chairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Raymonda T.

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this research is the conflicted nature of the lived experience of public community college academic department chairs. In many colleges, department chairs are faculty chosen by colleagues and/or administration. Once selected, chairs assume supervisory responsibilities. The duality of this colleague-supervisor role has the potential…

  10. Conference Recommendations on Child Abuse. Report of Representatives from Government, Media and the Academic Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Catherine J.; And Others

    The report presents recommendations from a November, 1978 national conference on child abuse. It is explained that groups of invited representatives from government, social service and public interest groups, the media, and the academic community discussed policies for treatment and prevention of child abuse. Summarized are recommendations on the…

  11. Latinas/os in Community College Developmental Education: Increasing Moments of Academic and Interpersonal Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acevedo-Gil, Nancy; Santos, Ryan E.; Alonso, LLuliana; Solorzano, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the experiences of Latinas/os in community college English and math developmental education courses. Critical race theory in education and the theory of validation serve as guiding frameworks. The authors find that institutional agents provide academic validation by emphasizing high expectations, focusing on social…

  12. A Study of the Relationship between Selected Variables and Academic Achievement in a Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preas, Nancy Bush

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the validity of selected predictor variables for estimating academic performance and to assess which of them were best predictors of achievement among selected community college students in North Carolina. A secondary purpose was to develop a model from the findings whereby a student could be…

  13. University of Hawai'I Kapi'olani Community College Academic Development Plan, 1997-2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Kapiolani Community Coll.

    This report presents the University of Hawaii Kapiolani Community College's (KCC's) 1997-2002 Academic Development Plan. The report contains seven sections. Section 1 describes the college, enrollment numbers, and faculty and staff numbers. A total of 16,400 students are enrolled, and 330 faculty members and 126 staff members are employed. Section…

  14. Community Awareness Planning in Academic Libraries: The Bowling Green State University Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabol, Laurie; Parrish, Marilyn

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the diversity of academic library users and the need for community awareness planning, and describes a program developed at Bowling Green State University libraries that evolved around a celebration of National Library Week. Topics discussed include free computer searches, displays and exhibits, publicity, read-a-thons, fundraising, and…

  15. Gendered Academic Adjustment among Asian American Adolescents in an Emerging Immigrant Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiang, Lisa; Supple, Andrew J.; Stein, Gabriela L.; Gonzalez, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Research on the academic adjustment of immigrant adolescents has been predominately conducted in large cities among established migration areas. To broaden the field's restricted focus, data from 172 (58% female) Asian American adolescents who reside within a non-traditional or emerging immigrant community in the Southeastern US were used to…

  16. Generational Differences among Community College Students in Their Evaluation of Academic Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wotring, Kathleen E.; Bol, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This study examined how community college students (n = 650) vary by generation and other characteristics in their evaluation of academic activities as cheating. A Likert-type instrument was developed based on the literature, pilot tested, and subjected to factor analysis. Results of MANOVA found no difference by generation in the evaluation of…

  17. The Tenth Annual Report of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petit, Susan, Ed.; Estes, Susan, Ed.

    An overview is provided of the 1985-86 activities of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges (ASCCC). After citing the section of the California Administrative Code establishing the ASCCC and listing the officers and members of the organization, the annual report presents a statement by the ASCCC president, Mark Edelstein, regarding…

  18. Early career academic researchers and community-based participatory research: wrestling match or dancing partners?

    PubMed

    Lowry, Kelly Walker; Ford-Paz, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Early career faculty members at academic medical centers face unique obstacles when engaging in community-based participatory research (CBPR). Challenges and opportunities for solutions pertaining to mentorship, time demands, unfamiliarity of colleagues with CBPR approaches, ethical review regulations, funding, and publication and promotion are discussed. PMID:24330696

  19. Evaluating the Effects of Basic Skills Mathematics Placement on Academic Outcomes of Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melguizo, Tatiana; Bo, Hans; Prather, George; Kim, Bo

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the authors' proposed study is to evaluate the effectiveness of math placement policies for entering community college students on these students' academic success in math, and their transfer and graduation rates. The main research question that guides the proposed study is: What are the effects of various basic skills…

  20. The Use of Computer Data Systems in Academic Counseling: Outcomes for Community College Students. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, Kristen

    This Digest discusses computer assisted advisory practices currently in use in community colleges, outlining the types of data collected and how they are used, including the use of tracking to plan interventions for at-risk students. Enhanced computer technology has improved the effectiveness of academic advising by enabling more thorough and…

  1. Academic/Instructional Computing in the Community and Junior College: Its Role and Its Institutional Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creutz, Alan

    With the dramatic growth in the use of computers in recent years, questions have been raised concerning the role of computer education in community colleges. Four principal reasons can be advanced for implementing an academic/instructional computing program: (1) to increase computer awareness among students to prepare them for the growing number…

  2. Academic Leadership--Journal for Community and Technical College Leaders, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Jennifer, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    Volume 9.1.1 [v9 n1 Winter 2002, Commemorative Anniversary issue] of "Academic Leadership" includes the following articles: (1) "Growing our Own Leaders" by Gary Filan; (2) "Facilitating Change: Leadership's Major Challenge" by Paul Elsner and Larry Christiansen; (3) "Servant Leadership: Robert K. Greenleaf's Legacy and the Community College" by…

  3. Partnership for Health Care: An Academic Nursing Center in a Rural Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMone, Priscilla; McDaniel, Roxanne W.; Sullivan, Toni J.

    1998-01-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia Sinclair School of Nursing collaborates with Moberly Area Community College in providing holistic health care services to rural college students. This academic nursing center is based on nursing models rather than medical models of health. (JOW)

  4. Differences in academic performance and self-regulated learning based on level of student participation in supplemental instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Ana C.

    This study examined differences in academic performance and self-regulated learning based on levels of student participation in Supplemental Instruction (SI) sessions in two introductory undergraduate biology and chemistry courses offered at University of Central Florida in the Spring 2006 semester. The sample consisted of 282 students enrolled in the biology class and 451 students enrolled in chemistry. Academic performance was measured using students' final course grades and rates of withdrawal from the courses. The self-regulated learning constructs of motivation, cognition, metacognition, and resource management were measured using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Relationships between students' gender and ethnic background and levels of SI participation were also analyzed in this research. Findings in both biology and chemistry courses revealed a statistically significant decrease in student motivation from beginning to end of semester. In chemistry, frequent SI participants also showed statistically significantly higher levels of motivation at the end of the semester than occasional and non-SI participants. There were no statistically significant gains in cognitive, metacognitive, and resource management strategies from beginning to end of semester. However, statistically significant differences in resource management were observed at the end of the semester among SI attendance groups in both courses. Students in the high SI attendance group were more likely to use learning resources than those who did not participate regularly or did not participate at all. Statistically significant differences in academic performance based on students' SI participation were found in both biology and chemistry courses. Frequent SI participants had significantly higher final percentage grades and were more likely to receive grades of A, B, or C, than those who either did not attend SI regularly of did not participate at all. They were also less

  5. Building an Online Academic Learning Community among Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Adele

    2015-01-01

    Online learning communities are frequently created for higher education students; however, these are most often designed to cater to a particular unit or subject. In an effort to strengthen the Bachelor of Arts course at the University of New England, the author sought to create an online space that would promote an interdisciplinary and collegial…

  6. Service-Learning: Some Academic and Community Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronick, Robert F.; Cunningham, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Civic engagement, service-learning, and university-assisted community schools are strong forces in making universities, as anchor institutions, engaged and responsible within their spheres of influence. By helping solve social problems, universities engage in the highest form of learning, come to understand social issues and problems, and escape…

  7. Academic Year Report, 1984-85. Washington Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community Coll. Education, Olympia.

    Information on enrollments, personnel, finances, and facilities in Washington's community colleges is provided in this report for the four quarters of 1984-85 and for previous years. First, general information is presented on the colleges' role, mission, and history, and on the organization of the state system. Section I contains definitions…

  8. Exemplary Academic Programs at the Community College. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazer, Gerald, Ed.

    Brief descriptions are provided of 54 community college programs identified as outstanding by the National Council of Instructional Administrators. Organized alphabetically by program title, the descriptions include the name of the college president, the name of a contact person, and the name, address, and telephone number of the college. The…

  9. The Productive High School: Creating Personalized Academic Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph; Beck, Lynn G.; Crawford, Marilyn; Hodges, Amy; McGaughy, Charis L.

    This book is designed to inform the educational community about the empirical foundations of productive high schools. Part 1 focuses on the core technology (learning and teaching), the organizational systems in which the core function are nested (the ecology of the institution), and the institutional linkages between the school and its…

  10. "Why Fly That Way?" Linking Community and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greely, Kathy

    This book tells the story of a year in one middle school teacher's class full of lively young adolescents, highlighting exemplary ways of learning and types of schooling. This alternative model of education shows how a strong, supportive community is essential in helping students reach their highest potential. The book includes: specific projects…

  11. A Learning Community's Potential Academic Impact: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael W.; Warner, Susan C.; Rose, Stephanie Firebaugh; Johnson, Courtney B.; Firmin, Ruth L.

    2012-01-01

    Learning Communities (LC) in higher education can serve as powerful connectors among individuals, particularly when integrating minority and White students. We conducted 24 in-depth interviews, using qualitative research methodology, with the 2004 cohort of LC students from a private, selective, Midwest university. Seniors at the time of…

  12. Disease Surveillance and the Academic, Clinical, and Public Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Rebmann, Catherine A.; Schuchat, Anne; Hughes, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The Emerging Infections Programs (EIPs), a population-based network involving 10 state health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, complement and support local, regional, and national surveillance and research efforts. EIPs depend on collaboration between public health agencies and clinical and academic institutions to perform active, population-based surveillance for infectious diseases; conduct applied epidemiologic and laboratory research; implement and evaluate pilot prevention and intervention projects; and provide capacity for flexible public health response. Recent EIP work has included monitoring the impact of a new conjugate vaccine on the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease, providing the evidence base used to derive new recommendations to prevent neonatal group B streptococcal disease, measuring the impact of foodborne diseases in the United States, and developing a systematic, integrated laboratory and epidemiologic method for syndrome-based surveillance. PMID:12890317

  13. Citizen participation in community mental health center service delivery.

    PubMed

    Riley, W

    1981-01-01

    Citizen involvement in CMHC service delivery has two bases: (a) volunteerism and (b) identification with clients and citizens who may need services. This identification is expressed two ways, as cultural similarity to clients or social activism in their behalf. Paraprofessionals have been portrayed as a major mechanism. Current practice shows some discrepancy from the theoretical program goals. While CMHCs include an appreciable number of volunteers and mental health workers with less than a BA degree, the extent to which they augment services with community or social activism values is doubtful. PMID:7226740

  14. Social and community participation following spinal cord injury: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Linda; McDonald, Rachael; Lentin, Primrose

    2015-03-01

    Evaluation of rehabilitation outcomes following acquired disability should include participation in social and community life. Evidence is needed to guide clinical practice to ensure that it is client-centered; therefore, findings from studies that report on social and community participation following spinal cord injury (SCI) need to be reviewed and synthesized. The objectives of this critical literature review are to examine the available evidence on social and community participation following SCI and to examine the factors that influence that participation. The barriers and facilitators will be identified and described in terms of the contextual factors - personal or environmental, as outlined by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. An additional objective is to appraise the quality of the evidence examined. A systematic literature search was completed in the databases OVID MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL PLUS, PSYCHINFO, and hand searches were carried out. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods studies were included. Twenty-three studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria: 17 quantitative, five qualitative, and one mixed methods. In general, studies were of low methodological quality, and no intervention studies were identified. The terms participation, social participation, and community participation were used interchangeably often without clarification of meaning. Adequate personal care assistance, appropriate social support, having adequate specialized equipment, and appropriate occupational therapy input were found to facilitate social and community participation, whereas problems with transport, inaccessibility of the natural and built environment, issues with healthcare services and rehabilitation providers, and pain were identified as barriers. In-depth investigation into what aspects of social and community participation are important to those living with SCI is needed so that client-focused solutions and interventions can

  15. Community participation of patients 12 months post-stroke in Johannesburg, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Aimee; Musenge, Eustasius

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Improvement in health-related quality of life (HRQL) is the main goal of rehabilitation. The ability of the stroke-patient to participate in various situations signifies successful rehabilitation. The aim of the study was to establish the extent of community participation and the barriers and facilitators to the participation for stroke patients after their discharge. Method This study formed part of a larger study focusing on the impact of caregiver education on stroke survivors and their careers. This was a longitudinal study comprising 200 patients with first-time ischaemic stroke. Although the patients were followed up at home at 3 months, 6 months and 12 months post-stroke, this paper focuses on the 12-months follow-up participation results. Patient functional ability was measured by using the Barthel Index (BI) and the Rivermead Mobility Index (RMI), whereas participation was measured by using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) checklist. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Results Patients experienced severe to complete difficulty when undertaking single and multiple tasks without help 12-months post-discharge. They struggled with the preparation of meals, household work and interpersonal interactions, and they had difficulties with community life and partaking in recreation and leisure activities. Immediate family and societal attitudes were viewed as facilitators to community participation whereas friends, transportation services and social security services were viewed as barriers to community participation. Conclusion The patient-ability to socialise and participate in community issues is currently poor. The identified barriers to community participation need to be addressed in order to improve patient-participation in the community post-stroke.

  16. [Community participation. Some perspectives on professional involvement in health programs].

    PubMed

    Pérez Mendoza, S; Ascanio, S V

    1990-01-01

    Action Community regarding health is but part of a long-term project started out back in the 1960. As far as Latin America was concerned the so-called experience did not work out; notwithstanding, it has become an Attention-Getter among the countries of the area once again. How so? Because of the Primary-Approach. Understood as an approach based on the global development of society, self-involvement lies at the cornerstone of the whole process. The health section gives full measure of the primary-approach theoretical framework and propose alternatives to get it of the ground. Professionals from the health section aim at "self-involvement" as activity performed willingly. Besides as it were, it should be supervised by experts. Nowadays the venezuelan government promotes action community claiming it will endorse the Primary-Approach on health granted the national health system bill is approved. Amid such context dentistry most meet the challenge of upcoming changes, so must fellow-dentists who, in the end, will dominate center stage. The process must narrow down to actions with will stem from its own dynamics along the way. Needless to say, these actions can not be easily foreseen, let alone do they guarantee success. PMID:2131730

  17. Enhancing voluntary participation in community collaborative forest management: a case of Central Java, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Lestari, Sri; Kotani, Koji; Kakinaka, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    This paper examines voluntary participation in community forest management, and characterizes how more participation may be induced. We implemented a survey of 571 respondents and conducted a case study in Central Java, Indonesia. The study's novelty lies in categorizing the degrees of participation into three levels and in identifying how socio-economic factors affect people's participation at each level. The analysis finds that voluntary participation responds to key determinants, such as education and income, in a different direction, depending on each of the three levels. However, the publicly organized programs, such as information provision of benefit sharing, are effective, irrespective of the levels of participation. Overall, the results suggest a possibility of further success and corrective measures to enhance the participation in community forest management. PMID:25527989

  18. The ADVANCE Program: Targeting the Increase in the Participation and Advancement of Women in Academic Science and Engineering Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esperanca, S.

    2003-12-01

    The goal of NSF's ADVANCE Program is to help increase the participation of women in the scientific and engineering workforce through the increased representation and advancement of women in academic science and engineering careers. The Program tries to address this under representation by focusing on support for men and women with three approaches: institutional (Institutional Transformation), grass-root (Leadership), and individual (Fellows) support. The ADVANCE Program alternates with a round of Institutional and Leadership awards in one year and a Fellows competition the next. Since its inception in 2001, NSF has had two competitive rounds for each of the three award types and will have spent approximately 75 M\\ by the end of the next fiscal year (2004). The first and second ADVANCE Institutional Transformation competitions (FY 2001 and 2003) received over 70 proposals each. These awards are for multi-year support in the amount of 3-4M\\ each. Details and access to the websites for the ADVANCE programs of each institution can be found in NSF's ADVANCE webpage at http://nsf.gov/home/crssprgm/advance/itwebsites.htm. The number of proposals submitted for the Leadership awards competition dropped from 35 in 2001 to 26 in 2003, despite an increase in the allowed award size for the second round. In terms of projected goals, this part of ADVANCE is perhaps the most eclectic. Some Leadership awards were made to professional societies to work specifically with their respective scientific communities in identifying needs that might be peculiar to a field of science. In the first round of the Leadership awards, PI Mary-Anne Holmes of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and collaborators received a grant to work with the Association of Women Geoscientists to determine the current status of women geoscientists in the US. These grantees hope to disseminate the information gathered under this award broadly in order to educate women students and faculty on strategies to

  19. Community capacity-building in disaster mental health resilience: a pilot study of an academic/faith partnership model.

    PubMed

    McCabe, O Lee; Marum, Felicity; Mosley, Adrian; Gwon, Howard S; Langlieb, Alan; Everly, George S; Kaminsky, Michael J; Links, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    We describe an academic/faith partnership approach for enhancing the capacity of communities to resist or rebound from the impact of terrorism and other mass casualty events. Representatives of several academic health centers (AHCs) collaborated with leaders of urban Christian-, Jewish-, and Muslim faith-based organizations (FBOs) to design, deliver, and preliminarily evaluate a train-the-trainer approach to enhancing individual competencies in the provision of psychological first aid and in disaster planning for their respective communities. Evidence of partner commitment to, and full participation in, project implementation responsibilities confirmed the feasibility of the overall AHC/FBO collaborative model, and individual post-training, self-report data on perceived effectiveness of the program indicated that the majority of community trainees evaluated the interventions as having significantly increased their: (a) knowledge of disaster mental health concepts; (b) skills (self-efficacy) as providers of psychological first aid and bereavement support services, and (c) (with somewhat less confidence because of module brevity) capabilities of leading disaster preparedness planning efforts within their communities. Notwithstanding the limitations of such early-phase research in ensuring internal and external validity of the interventions, the findings, particularly when combined with those of earlier and subsequent work, support the rationale for continuing to refine this participatory approach to fostering community disaster mental health resilience, and to promoting the translational impact of the model. An especially important (recent) example of the latter is the formal recognition by local and state health departments of program-trained lay volunteers as a vital resource in the continuum of government assets for public health emergency preparedness planning and response. PMID:23350227

  20. Reconfiguring Academic Priorities: Through the Eyes of Michigan Community College Chief Academic Officers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergh, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Strategic planning decisions and determinations in higher education present significant challenges even during relatively uneventful economic periods. In times of economic turbulence, the only predictable factor is a constantly diminishing funding base. Community colleges in particular are affected most directly and immediately by downturns in the…

  1. Situated Motives of Lay Participants in Community Collaboratives for Children's Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Potter, Deborah Anne

    2016-02-01

    Publicly funded programs in many industrialized countries increasingly require the participation of citizens. In this article, I explore the "situated motives" of family members who participated alongside professionals in implementing children's mental health programs in two communities in the United States. I conducted in-depth interviews with family members and observed monthly meetings of Community Collaboratives to assess how family members understood their participation. The inductive data analysis demonstrates that family members participated (a) as a therapeutic outlet, (b) to pay it forward, (c) to gain new skills, (d) to have a voice, and/or (e) to empower the community. I then use Giddens' concepts of "life politics" and "emancipatory politics" to explore how these accounts variously reflected lay members' orientations as consumers, empowered individuals, and/or citizen advocates. In the absence of articulated and specific objectives for family participation, these "situated motives" were salient and had implications for how policy was implemented. PMID:25646002

  2. Capacity building for long-term community-academic health partnership outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, M Kathryn; Felix, Holly C; Cottoms, Naomi; Olson, Mary; Shelby, Beatrice; Huff, Anna; Colley, Dianne; Sparks, Carla; McKindra, Freeman

    2014-01-01

    Too often, populations experiencing the greatest burden of disease and disparities in health outcomes are left out of or ineffectively involved in academic-led efforts to address issues that impact them the most. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is an approach increasingly being used to address these issues, but the science of CBPR is still viewed by many as a nascent field. Important to the development of the science of CBPR is documentation of the partnership process, particularly capacity building activities important to establishing the CBPR research infrastructure. This paper uses a CBPR Logic Model as a structure for documenting partnership capacity building activities of a long-term community-academic partnership addressing public health issues in Arkansas, U.S. Illustrative activities, programs, and experiences are described for each of the model’s four constructs: context, group dynamics, interventions, and outcomes. Lessons learned through this process were: capacity building is required by both academic and community partners; shared activities provide a common base of experiences and expectations; and creating a common language facilitates dialogue about difficult issues. Development of community partnerships with one institutional unit promoted community engagement institution-wide, enhanced individual and partnership capacity, and increased opportunity to address priority issues. PMID:25750694

  3. Introduction of Sap ERP System Into a Heterogeneous Academic Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mornar, Vedran; Fertalj, Krešimir; Kalpić, Damir

    2010-06-01

    Introduction of a complex ERP system like SAP into a heterogeneous academic environment like the University of Zagreb is far from being a trivial task. The University comprises more than 30 constituents, called faculties or academies, geographically dispersed, with long and specific traditions. Financing according to the lump sum principle, enforced in Croatia as a side effect of the in Europe obligatory and omnipresent Bologna process, requires a unified view on the educational institutions in order to provide a more just and appropriate financing scheme than the current one. After the experience with own development to support educational tasks and student administration, for standard financial and administration tasks SAP has been chosen as the most appropriate platform. The developer was selected after public bidding and the authors' institution was chosen for the pilot project. The authors were playing principal roles in the process of successful deployment and still expect to offer their expertise for implementation in the rest of the University. However, serious risks stemming from lack of motivation by some constituents are present.

  4. Organizational Responsibility for Age-Friendly Social Participation: Views of Australian Rural Community Stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Winterton, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study critically explores the barriers experienced by diverse rural community stakeholders in facilitating environments that enable age-friendly social participation. Twenty-six semi-structured interviews were conducted across two rural Australian communities with stakeholders from local government, health, social care, and community organizations. Findings identify that rural community stakeholders face significant difficulties in securing resources for groups and activities catering to older adults, which subsequently impacts their capacity to undertake outreach to older adults. However, in discussing these issues, questions were raised in relation to whose responsibility it is to provide resources for community groups and organizations providing social initiatives and whose responsibility it is to engage isolated seniors. These findings provide a much-needed critical perspective on current age-friendly research by acknowledging the responsibilities of various macro-level social structures-different community-level organizations, local government, and policy in fostering environments to enable participation of diverse rural older adults. PMID:26881483

  5. Community participation and nutrition. The Kasa project in India.

    PubMed

    Shah, P M

    1976-01-01

    The Kasa project in India was organized to improve the nutritional level and health of women and children in rural communities, giving special attention to those identified as being at risk of suffering from malnutrition. The project operates out of a government Primary Health Centre and provides health, nutrition, immunization, family planning and nutrition education services at the doorsteps of all under-6s and married women. Primary Health Centres are the source of medical care for approximately 81% of India's population. They are generally understaffed and there are not enough of them. The Kasa center serves an area inhabited mostly by tribal groups, the overwhelming majority of which are socioculturally and economically underprivileged. The normal staff structure was maintained, but the 8 auxiliary nurse midwives and the 4 smallpox vaccinators were converted into multipurpose health workers. To bridge the gap between the health workers and the community, 28 part-time social workers (PTWs) were locally recruited. The PTSWs cover about 2000 inhabitants each working 4-5 hours/day providing health and nutrition care to under-6s and married women, weighing children, taking censuses, chlorinating wells, collecting vital statistics, motivating parents to accept family planning, distributing food supplements, assisting with immunization programs, and identifying at risk children and pregnant women. The last group is attended to by the multipurpose health workers, while the medical officers (usually 2/center) concentrate on those referred for immediate care. The preferred PTSW was a middleaged female with 7 years of school, but they were difficult to find. In the end, mean age of worker was 22 and over half were male. The dropout rate was heavy though workers were paid relatively well. Initial training lasted 4 weeks and included child growth and development, nutritional disorders, common childhood diseases, and medical problems of pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum

  6. Teachers' Perceptions of a Community Participation Programme for Preschoolers with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mak, Candice; Zhang, Kaili Chen

    2013-01-01

    Preschoolers with autism face a number of challenges in integrating into different community activities owing to behavioural, communication and emotional concerns. Since the year 2009, the Hong Kong Heep Hong Society has developed a training programme for enhancing community participation among individuals with autism. The current project reports…

  7. Central Practitioners' Developing Legitimate Peripheral Participation in a Community of Practice for Changing Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, David James

    2015-01-01

    As new technologies continue to shape society, there has been a greater need for communities of practice to facilitate changing teaching and learning practices through technology in schools. Legitimate peripheral participation through these communities of practice has become an essential means to spread and support this technology integration…

  8. Perceived Effects of Community Gardening in Lower Mississippi Delta Gardening Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Alicia S.; Chittendon, Nikki; Coker, Christine E. H.; Weiss, Caitlin

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the perceived physical and psychological health impacts of community gardening on participants in the Mississippi Delta. Themes identified include the use of gardening as an educational tool and as a means to increase self-efficacy and responsibility for personal and community health. Additional benefits of gardening as…

  9. Leadership for Social Justice: Authentic Participation in the Case of a Community Center in Caracas, Venezuela.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, Katia Paz; Grinberg, Jaime

    2002-01-01

    Describes the leadership conditions that encouraged authentic participation of community members in a Venezuelan community center to advance social justice. Argues that urban educational transformation might succeed in terms of practicing social justice, if leadership facilitates and creates urban sanctuaries and creates a trusting environment…

  10. Social Service Community Education as an Area of Training and Participation for Social Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    García, Amelia Molina

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the conditions and characteristics of a rural community education program in the Mexican context. The scheme of operation and participation of young people called Community Instructors (Instructores Comunitarios or IC) is innovative and worthy of recognition as a learning area, not only for school purposes but as one which…

  11. A Group Psychotherapeutic Perspective on Transforming Participation in a Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hod, Yotam; Ben-Zvi, Dani

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate learners' transforming participation as they enter and engage in a learning community. To do this, we investigated the micro-development of two students' learning and collaborative practices in the context of a unique learning community that was fostered within a graduate level course.…

  12. Understanding Community Development. A Guide for Native American Community Leaders and Professionals. Participant's Manual. A Training Packet Developed for and in Cooperation with Native American Tribal Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnabel, Rudolph K.; Parmee, Edward A.

    The participant's manual for workshops to train Native American community leaders and professionals in community development skills defines community development terms, shows how to help community members solve their own problems, helps clarify the role of community leaders/professionals, gives examples of good community development/action…

  13. Filling the Implementation Gap: A Community-Academic Partnership Approach to Early Intervention in Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Kate V.; Moore, Melissa; Rose, Demian; Bennett, Robert; Jackson-Lane, Carletta; Gause, Michael; Jackson, Alma; Loewy, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Aim To describe the development of a sustainable community early psychosis program created through an academic–community partnership in the USA to other parties interested in implementing early psychosis services founded upon evidence based practices within community settings. Method The service was developed around a sustainable core of key components, founded upon evidence based practice, with additional flexible elements that could be adapted to the needs of the individual commissioning county. This article describes the ways in which funding was sourced and secured as well as the partnerships developed through this process. Results Successful development of the Prevention and Recovery from Early Psychosis (PREP) program in San Francisco County, California. PREP clinicians have received extensive training in the evidence-based approaches that are available through the program and treated 30 clients and their families in the first year of operation. Conclusions Development of a sustainable community program of this type in a non-universal health care setting which is historically seen as non-integrated required extensive partnering with agencies familiar with local resources. Implementation of the community-academic partnership bridged the gap between research and practice with successful integration of fidelity practice at the community level. The community partners were effective in sourcing funding and allocating resources while the academic side of the partnership provided training in evidence-based models and oversight of clinical implementation of the model. Stringent evaluation of the impact of the service is our next focus PMID:22032550

  14. *A participant-based approach to indoor/outdoor air monitoring in Community Health Studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Community health studies of traffic-related air pollution have been hampered by the cost and participant burden associated with collecting household-level exposure data. The current study utilized a participant-based approach to collect indoor and outdoor air monitoring data from...

  15. Community Participation in Schooling in Nepal: A Disjunction between Policy Intention and Policy Implementation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khanal, Peshal

    2013-01-01

    Community participation in the governance of school systems is a recurrent theme of educational reform in developed and developing countries alike. This article analyses the effort of one developing country -- Nepal -- to promote broader participation in educational decision-making through local school governance structure. It looks at how the…

  16. Community participation and environmental decision-making in the Niger Delta

    SciTech Connect

    Adomokai, Rosemary; Sheate, William R

    2004-07-01

    The participation of communities in the process of environmental decision-making in Nigeria and the Niger Delta region in particular is a relatively new process. There are many practical problems ranging from financial support, methods used and the willingness of identified stakeholders to participate. This paper seeks to highlight recent developments in community participation and environmental decision-making in the Niger Delta, using the EIA Decree of 1992 as a reference point. The EIA Decree of 1992 is the only legislation that refers to participation of the communities when environmental decisions are being made. The study reported here aimed to examine differences and similarities between the identified stakeholders interviewed in the research, in order to highlight areas of improvement that will encourage positive changes to the process and foster better relations between the stakeholders. The paper provides a brief background to community participation in the Niger Delta region and reports on the research approach adopted. Interviews with stakeholders in the EIA process were undertaken to provide a better understanding of public participation in practice under the EIA Decree. While participation was found to be now firmly on the agenda, there is still much to do to engender greater awareness of EIA and the potential benefits participation can hold.

  17. The Effects of Leadership and Governance Processes on Member Participation in Community Health Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metzger, Maureen E.; Alexander, Jeffrey A.; Weiner, Bryan J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the effects of coalition leadership and governance on member participation in voluntary community health coalitions. Path modeling was used to explore how leadership and governance processes in coalitions affect existing member costs, benefits, and levels of participation. It was hypothesized that the effects of coalition…

  18. Participation is possible: A case report of integration into a community performing arts program.

    PubMed

    Becker, Emily; Dusing, Stacey

    2010-05-01

    Typically developing children frequently participate in community recreation activities that enhance their social/emotional and physical development. The inclusion of children with developmental disabilities in these activities continues to be a challenge. This case report investigated the feasibility of including a child with Down syndrome in a community performing arts program. The participant is an 11-year-old female with Down syndrome and mild cognitive impairment. The participant was enrolled in a 14-week performing arts session that included a combination of acting, voice, and dance instruction. She participated in the program with the support of a one-on-one assistant who was a physical therapy student. The assistant facilitated learning the choreography, appropriate socialization, and positioning on the stage. Peer helpers were used to allow for greater independence toward the end of the session and for the final performance. The participant completed the final performance without the one-on-one assistant. The participant's mother completed the PedsQL before and after the performance, and the participant's scaled scores increased in all subsets except for emotional function and the total scales score increased from 51 to 57. With appropriate modifications and the right child/program fit, children with developmental disabilities such as Down syndrome can successfully be included in community programs. Physical therapists can assist families and community programs to make developmentally appropriate modifications to enhance participation. PMID:20397862

  19. Are Homeowners Better Citizens? Homeownership and Community Participation in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Proponents of homeownership policies often argue that homeowners participate more actively in community life and civic affairs than renters. Although research suggests higher rates of participation among homeowners, the underlying mechanisms driving this relationship are unclear. On one hand, the locally dependent financial investments homeowners…

  20. Shifting Selves: Constructing and Negotiating Academic Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandeyar, S.

    2010-01-01

    This study set out to explore how academics construct and negotiate their identities within the world of the academe. Identity construction involves different forms of community participation and identification. Utilising the research methodology of narrative inquiry, this article explores how academics came to see themselves across those…

  1. Community Willingness to Participate in a Dengue Study in Aceh Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Samsul; Bustaman, Aslam; Radiansyah, Arsil; Angraini, Pradiba; Fasli, Riny; Salwiyadi, Salwiyadi; Bastian, Reza Akbar; Oktiviyari, Ade; Akmal, Imaduddin; Iqbalamin, Muhammad; Adil, Jamalul; Henrizal, Fenni; Darmayanti, Darmayanti; Pratama, Rovy; Fajar, Jonny Karunia; Setiawan, Abdul Malik; Imrie, Allison; Kuch, Ulrich; Groneberg, David Alexander; Sasmono, R. Tedjo; Dhimal, Meghnath; Müller, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Background Dengue virus infection is the most rapidly spreading vector-borne disease in the world. Essential research on dengue virus transmission and its prevention requires community participation. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the factors that are associated with the willingness of communities in high prevalence areas to participate in dengue research. The aim of this study was to explore factors associated with the willingness of healthy community members in Aceh province, Indonesia, to participate in dengue research that would require phlebotomy. Methodology/Principal Findings A community-based cross-sectional study was carried out in nine regencies and municipalities of Aceh from November 2014 to March 2015. Interviews using a set of validated questionnaires were conducted to collect data on demography, history of dengue infection, socioeconomic status, and knowledge, attitude and practice regarding dengue fever. Two-step logistic regression and Spearman’s rank correlation (rs) analysis were used to assess the influence of independent variables on dependent variables. Among 535 participants, less than 20% had a good willingness to participate in the dengue study. The factors associated with good willingness to participate were being female, working as a civil servant, private employee or entrepreneur, having a high socioeconomic status and good knowledge, attitude and practice regarding dengue. Good knowledge and attitude regarding dengue were positive independent predictors of willingness to participate (OR: 2.30 [95% CI: 1.36–3.90] and 3.73 [95% CI: 2.24–6.21], respectively). Conclusion/Significance The willingness to participate in dengue research is very low among community members in Aceh, and the two most important associated factors are knowledge and attitude regarding dengue. To increase participation rate, efforts to improve the knowledge and attitude of community members regarding dengue fever and dengue-related research is required

  2. Community and Contribution: Factors Motivating Students to Participate in an Extra-Curricular Online Activity and Implications for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Tony; Gomm, Phil

    2015-01-01

    The human desire to join and participate in communities can be seen as an attempt to satisfy some of our universal human needs. The theory of communities of practice has been widely used to explain how and why humans participate in multiple communities, and a key requirement of a community of practice (CoP) is that members engage in "joint…

  3. An academic health center-community partnership: the Morgantown Health Right free clinic.

    PubMed

    Smego, R A; Costante, J

    1996-06-01

    This article reports the main findings of a descriptive study of the origin, structure, and evolution of the Morgantown Health Right (MHR) free clinic in Morgantown, West Virginia. The study was conducted between 1984 and 1995 to examine the organizational and operational features of this rural academic health center-community partnership. The MHR's longevity and provision of primary care without charge to low-income, uninsured, and underinsured residents of north central West Virginia are a function of its intimate relationship with the Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center of West Virginia University. Essential elements of this rural academic health center-community partnership include social commitment and voluntarism, shared community and faculty leadership, joint problem-oriented long-term planning, and interdisciplinary practice and training opportunities for faculty, residents, and students. Financial support for the MHR comes from a variety of public and private sources, and the clinic serves as a prototypic rural free health care provider by virtue of its social and fiscal sustainability. The MHR experience shows that, like inner-city counterparts, academic health center-community partnerships can enhance access to health care for rural underserved populations. PMID:9125917

  4. Narrowing the gap between academic professional wisdom and community lay knowledge: perceptions from partnerships.

    PubMed

    El Ansari, W; Phillips, C J; Zwi, A B

    2002-05-01

    Community involvement in health through community partnerships (CPs) has been widely advocated. Putting CPs into practice is complex and represents a challenge for all the stakeholders involved in the change process. Employing data from five CPs aiming to bring together communities, academics and health service providers in South Africa, this paper aims to examine and compare the views of the health care professionals with those of the community members with respect to each other's skills and abilities. Five domains of expertise in partnership working are examined: educational competencies; partnership fostering skills; community involvement expertise; change agents proficiencies; and strategic and management capacities. The findings suggest that the community recognizes the expertise and abilities brought by the professional staff to the CPs. Community members have a positive view of the capabilities of the professionals, in particular their abilities as resource persons in the areas of budget management, policy formulation and the introduction and management of change. The professionals, on the other hand, are cautious regarding the level of skill and capability in communities. The limited appreciation of community skills by the professionals covered all the five domains of expertise examined. The findings suggest that if joint working is to survive, the professionals will need to increase their valuation of the indigenous proficiencies inherent in their community partners. We conclude that programme models need to consciously incorporate in their design and implementation, capacity building, skills transfer and empowerment strategies. PMID:12082597

  5. Partnering for Environmental Sustainability: A Case Study of a University's Participation in the Community Action for a Renewed Environment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szarleta, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This article examines an important policy initiative that creates self-sustaining partnerships among community stakeholders, including academic institutions. The Community Action for a Renewed Environment (CARE) model of collaborative problem-solving (CPS) builds community capacity and knowledge while addressing the challenges of toxic pollution…

  6. Increasing participation in cancer research: insights from Native Hawaiian women in medically underserved communities.

    PubMed

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue; Mitschke, Diane; Lono, Joelene

    2004-09-01

    The cancer burden falls heavily on Native Hawaiian women, and of particular concern are those living in medically underserved communities where participation in potentially helpful clinical studies may be limited. Difficulty in accrual of Native Hawaiian women to a culturally-grounded intervention led researchers to conduct focus groups aimed at exploring attitudes towards research, use of a traditional Hawaiian practice for family discussion, and study promotion. Social marketing theory guided the development of discussion questions and a survey. Through purposive sampling, 30 women from medically underserved communities were recruited. Content analysis was used to identify major discussion themes. Findings indicate that lack of informational access may be a major barrier to participation. Study information disseminated through community channels with targeted outreach to social and religious organizations, promotion through face-to-face contact with researchers, and culturally tailored messages directed to families were preferred. Community oriented strategies based on linkages with organizational networks may increase participation. PMID:16281696

  7. The Impact of a Psychology Learning Community on Academic Success, Retention, and Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buch, Kim; Spaulding, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Learning communities have become an integral part of the educational reform movement of the past two decades and have been heralded as a promising strategy for restructuring undergraduate education. This study used a matched control group design to examine the impact of participation in a psychology learning community (PLC) on a range of student…

  8. Open to Influence: What Counts as Academic Influence in Scholarly Networked "Twitter" Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    Within the academy, signals of a scholar's academic influence are made manifest in indices like the "h"-index, which rank output. In open scholarly networks, however, signals of influence are less codified, and the ways in which they are enacted and understood have yet to be articulated. Yet the influence scholars cultivate in open…

  9. Participant Leadership in Adult Basic Education: Negotiating Academic Progress and Leadership Responsibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drayton, Brendaly; Prins, Esther

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the conflicts and challenges that student leaders in adult basic education and literacy programs experience in balancing their leadership responsibilities with academic endeavours. Based upon a case study of an adult basic education student leadership council in New York City, the article shows that leadership activities can…

  10. Is the Relationship between AP® Participation and Academic Performance Really Meaningful? Research Brief 2015-1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Maureen; Howell, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Strong academic performance in college, as measured by first-year grades, is important for a host of reasons, but perhaps the most critical reason is that students who perform well in their first year of college are more likely to earn a bachelor's degree (Adelman, 2006). Research shows that Advanced Placement Program® (AP®) students, particularly…

  11. Predicting Academics' Willingness to Participate in Peer Review of Teaching: A Quantitative Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kiri; Boehm, Emilia; Chester, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Peer review of teaching is a collegial process designed to help academics reflect on and improve their teaching practice. Considerable research supports the value of peer review of teaching. However, uptake of voluntary programs is typically low. Few studies have examined the predictors of engagement in voluntary peer review. This study surveyed…

  12. College Athletic Participation and Academic Success: How Student-Athletes Compete for Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmour, Heather B.

    2013-01-01

    NCAA data indicates that Division III student-athletes are graduating at higher rates than their non-athlete peers. Graduation rate data alone do not provide a full understanding of student-athletes' academic success. The data thus far simply show empirically that student-athletes have a higher federal six-year graduation rate, but…

  13. Predicting General Academic Performance and Identifying the Differential Contribution of Participating Variables Using Artificial Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musso, Mariel F.; Kyndt, Eva; Cascallar, Eduardo C.; Dochy, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have explored the contribution of different factors from diverse theoretical perspectives to the explanation of academic performance. These factors have been identified as having important implications not only for the study of learning processes, but also as tools for improving curriculum designs, tutorial systems, and students'…

  14. Social Positioning, Participation, and Second Language Learning: Talkative Students in an Academic ESL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayi-Aydar, Hayriye

    2014-01-01

    Guided by positioning theory and poststructural views of second language learning, the two descriptive case studies presented in this article explored the links between social positioning and the language learning experiences of two talkative students in an academic ESL classroom. Focusing on the macro- and micro-level contexts of communication,…

  15. Preliminary Results for the PAR-PRO: A Measure of Home and Community Participation

    PubMed Central

    Ostir, Glenn V.; Granger, Carl V.; Black, Terrie; Roberts, Pamela; Burgos, Laura; Martinkewiz, Paula; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develop a measure of home and community participation related to the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Design Cross-sectional analysis of survey data. Setting Nine medical inpatient rehabilitation facilities from 6 states. Participants A total of 594 patients of mixed impairment type admitted for inpatient rehabilitation in 2002. Mean age was 74.0 years and 61.4% were women. Interventions Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures Reliability and validity of the participation instrument. Results A 20-item instrument of home and community participation was developed (PAR-PRO). The instrument showed good internal consistency and good Rasch person and item fit statistics. Four subfactors were identified beyond the unidimensional construct of participation including domestic management, socialization, physical vigor, and generative activities. The PAR-PRO total participation score correlated inversely with age (r=−.31, P<.001) but did not differ by sex. Conclusions The 20-item PAR-PRO instrument of home and community participation displayed good psychometric characteristics. The instrument shows promise as a broad measure of home and community involvement for persons with disabilities. Further work is needed to support its application for people without disability. PMID:16876548

  16. Framework for effective community participation in water quality management in Luvuvhu Catchment of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nare, L.; Odiyo, J. O.; Francis, J.; Potgieter, N.

    A study has been done in Luvuvhu Catchment to develop a framework for effective community participation in water quality monitoring and management. Community participation and involvement in development has since the 1970s gathered momentum among the non-governmental organisations (NGOs) fraternity but has never gained clear status with Governments world over. In South Africa the policy and legal frameworks for community consultation, involvement and participation are clearly spelt out on paper starting with the country’s constitution. The division of the country into Water Management Areas (WMA) and the formation of Catchment Management Agencies (CMA), Water User Associations (WUAs) for example, was meant to increase participation of stakeholders including communities in the management of water resources. These efforts have not translated into effective participation by local communities in the management of water resources because there is no link between the national water quality management frameworks and community based development structures. An extensive review of development frameworks including community based structures has been undertaken. The most critical frameworks identified were the national water quality management framework (Directorate of Water Quality Monitoring and Catchment Management Agencies), community based structures and local government structures and systems (municipalities, provincial and national structures). There was no flow of information between the national water quality framework and community based development structures and therefore linkages were created between the lower tiers of the catchment management system (sub catchment fora and WUAs) to allow for information from the Directorate of Quality Monitoring to reach communities and vice versa. The lower tiers of the catchment management system should serve as specialised committees under the community development structures. The municipalities who control and fund

  17. A Study of the Academic Performance of Student Athletes in California's Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanter, Martha; Lewis, Merillee

    In the California Community Colleges (CCC), students who participate in athletics must be enrolled in a minimum of 12 credit units during the season of participation and must maintain a grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0. In 1989, a study was conducted to determine whether there were differences in the educational goal achievement of…

  18. Community-Engaged Strategies to Increase Diversity of Participants in Health Education Research.

    PubMed

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Balls-Berry, Joyce; Price, James H; Webb, Fern J

    2016-05-01

    Minorities have historically been underrepresented in health-related research. Several strategies have been recommended to increase the participation of minorities in health-related research. However, most of the recommendations and guidelines apply to research in clinical or laboratory contexts. One of the more prominent methods to enhance minority participation in health-related research that has recently come to the fore is the use of community-engaged strategies. The purpose of this article is to summarize community-engaged outreach efforts that can be translated into useable strategies for health education research teams seeking to diversify the pool of research participants. Also, we provide a succinct overview of the various components of a research endeavor that may influence minority participation in health-related research. Finally, we analyze how health education specialists and SOPHE (Society of Public Health Education) can play a leading role in helping enhance minority participation in health-related research. PMID:27091602

  19. The Relationship between Intensity and Breadth of After-School Program Participation and Academic Achievement: Evidence from a Short-Term Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Ken; Diffily, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    We explored the extent to which intensity and breadth of participation in an after-school program (ASP) predicted academic achievement, as measured by changes in grades and attendance. The sample comprised 719 2nd-grade through 8th-grade Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Dallas members during the 2009-2010 academic year. With respect to intensity,…

  20. Do risk perceptions explain sex differences in community integration and participation after spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Lysack, Cathy; Neufeld, Stewart; Dillaway, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe how men and women with spinal cord injury (SCI) rate the risks posed by a set of everyday activities measured using the Risk Inventory for persons with Spinal Cord Injury (RISCI), and to examine whether sex differences are related to community integration and participation. Design Cohort study. Setting Metropolitan Detroit. Participants One hundred and forty community-dwelling white and African-American men and women with SCI. Outcome measures RISCI scores, community integration, and level of and satisfaction with community participation. Results Study participants were just over age 40 years, and had been living with SCI for 10.8 years. One-third were women and 40% were African-American. Results showed women with SCI had higher RISCI scores (perceived more dangers) on every item on the RISCI Scale (P < 0.001). The items perceived to hold greatest risk were revealing personal information to others, going on a blind date, and going for a roll (“walk”) alone after dark. Women with higher RISCI scores reported lower community integration (P < 0.05) and lower levels of and lower satisfaction with community participation (P < 0.01). For men, however, RISCI scores were mainly unrelated (except for community integration) to participation measures. Conclusion More research is needed to determine whether the levels of risk perceived by women are warranted and whether a sense of vulnerability for women with SCI is unnecessarily limiting their chances at “a good life” after injury. PMID:24090195

  1. Broadening Participation in Geosciences with Academic Year and Summer Research Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, S. A.; Howard, A.; Johnson, L. P.; Gutierrez, R.; Chow, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Medgar Evers College, City University of New York, has initiated a multi-tiered strategy aimed at increasing the number of under-represented minority and female students pursuing careers in the Geosciences, especially Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and related areas. The strategy incorporates research on the persistence of minority and female under-represented students in STEM disciplines. The initiatives include NASA and NSF-funded team-based undergraduate research activities during the summer and academic year as well as academic support (clustering, PTLT workshops for gatekeeper courses), curriculum integration modules, and independent study/special topics courses. In addition, high school students are integrated into summer research activities working with undergraduate and graduate students as well as faculty and other scientist mentors. An important initial component was the building of an infrastructure to support remote sensing, supported by NASA. A range of academic year and summer research experiences are provided to capture student interest in the geosciences. NYC-based research activities include urban impacts of global climate change, the urban heat island, ocean turbulence and general circulation models, and space weather: magnetic rope structure, solar flares and CMEs. Field-based investigations include atmospheric observations using BalloonSat sounding vehicles, observations of tropospheric ozone using ozonesondes, and investigations of the ionosphere using a CubeSat. This presentation provides a description of the programs, student impact, challenges and observations.

  2. The impact of a virtual community on student engagement and academic performance among baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Giddens, Jean; Hrabe, David; Carlson-Sabelli, Linnea; Fogg, Louis; North, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present findings from a study which evaluated the effectiveness of a virtual community (an emerging pedagogical application) on student engagement and academic performance. Virtual communities mirror real-life through unfolding patient histories and relationship development over time. Students also become more engaged in learning by creating personally meaningful knowledge of a concept (Rogers & Stone, 2007). Virtual communities offer one teaching strategy to assist students in learning complex, health-related content in a contextualized manner. This quasi-experimental study involved first-semester baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a course at two campuses of a nursing program at a large university in the Southwest. Three key strategies assessed the impact of the virtual community on student engagement and learning: third-party observational measurement, end-of-class student/faculty surveys, and use of knowledge items in student exams for the class. Significant differences between the control and experimental group were found regarding learning engagement and communication exchanges; the groups appeared similar in ratings of quality of instruction and academic performance. Use of virtual communities can help nursing educators address the recent Carnegie Foundation study's (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard & Day, 2010) counsel to implement "pedagogies of contextualization" in which theoretical and factual information about diseases and conditions are placed in the context of a patient's experience. PMID:23006650

  3. Decentralisation Policy and Practice in Ghana: The Promise and Reality of Community Participation in Education in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essuman, Ato; Akyeampong, Kwame

    2011-01-01

    In 1987, the government of Ghana embarked on a process to decentralise education management to districts as part of wider social and democratic governance reforms. A central part of this reform was the prescription of active community participation in the affairs of schools within their locality. This paper explores the different meanings…

  4. A Study of the Music, Academic, Leadership, and Extracurricular Achievements of Massachusetts All-State Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, R. Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Researchers have noted that the personal attributes of high school all-state participants have not been probed and have expressed surprise at this void in the music education literature (Cole, 1986; Fuller, 1989; Welker, 1997). The purpose of this study was to ascertain, through participant self-report data, the activities and accomplishments of…

  5. The Effect of Interscholastic Sports Participation on Academic Achievement of Middle Level School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Larry J.; Schaben, Laura A.

    2002-01-01

    Eighth graders (N = 136) were divided into two groups: students who had participated in at least one interscholastic sport and were classified as athletes (n = 73), and students who had not participated in interscholastic sports and were classified as nonathletes (n = 63). The mean grade point average (GPA) for each group and subgroup was computed…

  6. Communities of practice: Participation patterns and professional impact for high school mathematics and science teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Printy, Susan M.

    Improving the quality of teachers in schools is a keystone to educational improvement. New and veteran teachers alike need to enhance their content knowledge and pedagogical skills, but they must also examine, and often change, their underlying attitudes, beliefs, and values about the nature of knowledge and the abilities of students. Best accomplished collectively rather than individually, the interactions between teachers as they undertake the process of collaborative inquiry create "communities of practice." This dissertation investigates the importance of science and mathematics teachers' participation in communities of practice to their professional capabilities. The study tests the hypothesis that the social learning inherent in community of practice participation encourages teachers to learn from others with expertise, enhances teachers' sense of competence, and increases the likelihood that teachers' will use student-centered, problem-based instructional techniques aligned with national disciplinary standards. The researcher conceptualizes communities of practice along two dimensions that affect social learning: legitimate participation in activities and span of engagement with school members. Differences in teachers' subject area and the curricular track of their teaching assignment contribute to variation in teachers' participation in communities of practice along those dimensions. Using data from the National Educational Longitudinal Study, first and second follow-up, the study has two stages of multi-level analysis. The first stage examines factors that contribute to teachers' participation in communities of practice, including teachers' social and professional characteristics and school demographic and organizational characteristics. The second stage investigates the professional impact of such participation on the three outcome variables: teacher learning, teacher competence, and use of standards-based pedagogy. Hierarchical linear models provide

  7. Brief Report: The Impact of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Symptoms on Academic Performance in an Adolescent Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birchwood, James; Daley, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Less is understood about the relationship between ADHD symptoms and academic performance in adolescents than the relationship in younger children. As such, the aim of the present study was to investigate the prospective relationship between ADHD symptoms and academic performance in a community adolescent sample. Three hundred and twenty-four…

  8. The Impact of Employment on the Academic Achievement of Full-Time Community College Students. AIR 1989 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks; And Others

    Is college student academic performance harmed by competing employment obligations? At what point do the hours spent on the job begin to interfere with the predicted academic achievement of full-time students? This study addresses these questions by analyzing data collected from students at two non-residential community colleges. Using an outcomes…

  9. The Relationship between Professional Learning Community Implementation and Academic Achievement and Graduation Rates in Georgia High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardinger, Regina Gail

    2013-01-01

    Many educational administrators in Georgia continue to struggle with low student academic achievement and low high school graduation rates. DuFour's professional learning community (PLC) theory suggests a positive relationship between levels of PLC implementation and academic achievement and between levels of PLC implementation and graduation…

  10. The Difference in the Academic Achievement of Hispanic High School Students Based on the Theme of the Small Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Beate M. Winter

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the difference in the academic achievement of urban Hispanic high school students based on the small learning community theme. The study used a quantitative method of ex post facto research to examine how the academic achievement of Hispanic high school students differs across the themes of small…

  11. Iowa Lakes Community College: Partnerships for Academic and Economic Success in a Rapidly Evolving Wind-Energy Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohni, Mary; Rogers, Jolene; Zeitz, Al

    2007-01-01

    Iowa Lakes Community College responded to a national need for wind-energy technicians. The Wind-Energy and Turbine Program aligned industry and academic competencies with experiential learning components to foster exploration of additional renewable energy applications. Completers understand both the physical and academic rigor a career in wind…

  12. Adding an online community to an internet-mediated walking program. Part 2: strategies for encouraging community participation.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Paul J; Janney, Adrienne W; Buis, Lorraine R; Richardson, Caroline R

    2010-01-01

    Starting a new online community with a limited number of members who have not self-selected for participation in the community is challenging. The space must appear active to lure visitors to return; when the pool of participants is small, a large fraction must be converted from lurkers to contributors, and contributors must receive responses quickly to encourage continued participation. We report on strategies for overcoming these challenges and our experience implementing them within an online community add-on to an existing Internet-mediated walking program. Concentrated study recruitment increased the effective membership size. Having few conversation spaces rather than many specialized ones, staff seeding of the forums before members were invited to visit, and staff posting of new topics when there were conversation lulls, all helped to make the forums appear active. In retrospect, using even fewer separate spaces and displaying a flat rather than nested reply structure would have made the forums appear even more active. Contests with small prizes around participation in the forums and around meeting walking goals generated a lot of discussion; a contest for first-time posters was especially effective at moving lurkers to post. Staff efforts to elicit participation by asking questions had mixed success. Staff replies to posts that had not received member replies created a feeling of responsiveness despite limited membership. PMID:21169161

  13. Predicting Student Persistence in Adult Basic Education Using Interaction Effects among Academic Self-Efficacy and Students Participation and Academic Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bujack, Lynette K.

    2012-01-01

    Academic self-efficacy is associated with academic success; the more positive or stronger the individual's academic self-efficacy, the more likely the individual will be successful in an academic environment. Prior research by Bandura (1989, 1993, 1997) suggested that self-efficacy influences not only activity choice but also the degrees to…

  14. Cultural patterns in children's learning through keen observation and participation in their communities.

    PubMed

    Correa-Chávez, Maricela; Roberts, Amy L D; Pérez, Margarita Martínez

    2011-01-01

    This chapter examines children's learning through careful attention and participation in the ongoing activities of their community. This form of learning, which has been called learning through Intent Community Participation, seems to be especially common in Mesoamerican Indigenous communities. In these communities, children are integrated into the everyday work and lives of adults and their learning may not be the central focus. We contrast this pattern with that of middle-class European American communities where children are segregated from the primary adult functions of the community. In middle-class communities and schools, children are often encouraged to engage in abstract lessons where their attention is explicitly directed to specific events. In contrast, learning through keen attention and observation may rely on learning through attention to instructions not specifically directed to the learner. Studies demonstrate Mesoamerican Indigenous children's ability to learn through simultaneous and open attention to overheard or observed activities. This form of learning is supported through multiple modalities of communication and interaction. Motivation to learn stems from the learner's inclusion into the major activities and goals of the community. Implications of research and future directions for the study of learning through keen observation are discussed. PMID:21887963

  15. Community participation in primary care in Ireland: the need for implementation research.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, Rachel; MacFarlane, Anne

    2013-04-01

    There are now several decades of history of community participation in health, with significant international evidence to suggest that there is much to be gained by primary health services and disadvantaged communities working in partnership. In this paper we provide an overview of community participation in primary care, establishing the policy context in which a recent 'Joint Initiative on Community Participation in Primary Health Care' was developed in Ireland. This Initiative was designed to support the involvement of disadvantaged communities and groups in the development of primary health care services at local level. An independent formative evaluation of the Joint Initiative took place between September 2009 and April 2010. We present a summary of key findings from this evaluation. We pay particular attention to the issue of sustaining community participation in newly developed Primary Care Teams (PCTs) in the current and changing economic climate, an issue considered crucial if the documented positive impacts of the Joint Initiative are to be maintained and the potential for health gains in the longer term are to be realised. We then argue that the Joint Initiative referred to in this paper clearly provides a strong prototype for community participation in PCTs in Ireland. We also ask whether it can be replicated across all PCTs in the country and embedded as a core part of thinking and everyday health care. We highlight the need for research to build knowledge about the ways in which innovations such as this can be embedded into ongoing, routine healthcare practice. This research agenda will have relevance for policy makers, practitioners and evaluators in Ireland and other healthcare jurisdictions. PMID:22717410

  16. Evaluating public participation in environmental decision-making: EPA's superfund community involvement program.

    PubMed

    Charnley, Susan; Engelbert, Bruce

    2005-11-01

    This article discusses an 8-year, ongoing project that evaluates the Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund community involvement program. The project originated as a response to the Government Performance and Results Act, which requires federal agencies to articulate program goals, and evaluate and report their progress in meeting those goals. The evaluation project assesses how effective the Superfund community involvement program is in promoting public participation in decisions about how to clean up hazardous wastes at Superfund sites. We do three things in the article: (1) share our experience with evaluating an Agency public participation program, including lessons learned about methods of evaluation; (2) report evaluation results; and (3) address a number of issues pertaining to the evaluation of public participation in environmental decision-making. Our goal is to encourage more environmental managers to incorporate evaluation into their public participation programs as a tool for improving them. We found that written mail surveys were an effective and economical tool for obtaining feedback on EPA's community involvement program at Superfund sites. The evaluation focused on four criteria: citizen satisfaction with EPA information about the Superfund site, citizen understanding of environmental and human health risks associated with the site, citizen satisfaction with opportunities provided by EPA for community input, and citizen satisfaction with EPA's response to community input. While the evaluation results were mixed, in general, community members who were most informed about and involved in the cleanup process at Superfund sites generally were also the most satisfied with the community involvement process, and the job that EPA was doing cleaning up the site. We conclude that systematic evaluation provides meaningful and useful information that agencies can use to improve their public participation programs. However, there need to be

  17. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda, Sheila F.; Giacinto, Rebeca E.; Medeiros, Elizabeth A.; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women’s health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program’s acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p<0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients. PMID:27271058

  18. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women's health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program's acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p < 0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients. PMID:27271058

  19. Explainers' development of science-learner identities through participation in a community of practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Anne E.

    The urgent environmental issues of today require science-literate adults to engage in business and political decisions to create solutions. Despite the need, few adults have the knowledge and skills of science literacy. This doctoral dissertation is an analytical case study examining the science-learner identity development of Exploratorium Field Trip Explainers. Located in San Francisco, CA, the Exploratorium is a museum of science, art, and human perception dedicated to nurturing curiosity and exploration. Data collected included semi-structured interviews with sixteen former Field Trip Explainers, participant observation of the current Field Trip Explainer Program, and review of relevant documentation. Data analysis employed constant comparative analysis, guided by the communities of practice theoretical framework (Wenger, 1998) and the National Research Council's (2009) Six Strands of Science Learning. Findings of this research indicate that Exploratorium Field Trip Explainers participate in a community of practice made up of a diverse group of people that values curiosity and openness to multiple ways of learning. Many participants entered the Field Trip Explainer Program with an understanding of science learning as a rigid process reserved for a select group of people; through participation in the Field Trip Explainer community of practice, participants developed an understanding of science learning as accessible and a part of everyday life. The findings of this case study have implications for research, theory, and practice in informal adult science learning, access of non-dominant groups to science learning, and adult workplace learning in communities of practice.

  20. Participant experiences of a community-based maintenance program post-pulmonary rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Desveaux, Laura; Rolfe, Debbie; Beauchamp, Marla; Goldstein, Roger; Brooks, Dina

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the perspectives of individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who participated in a minimally supervised maintenance exercise intervention and identify the barriers and facilitators associated with participation. The intervention was delivered in a community center and was designed to maintain exercise capacity and quality of life following discharge from pulmonary rehabilitation. This study utilized qualitative focus groups (FGs) involving individuals with COPD (n = 12) who had been attending the maintenance community program for at least 6 months. All individuals who met the inclusion criteria for the FGs consented to participate. Four themes were identified: (1) issues around attendance; (2) perceived benefits of the program; (3) perceived burdens of the program; and (4) recommendations for program improvement. Participants expressed more benefits than barriers, stating that their experience of improved function and quality of life facilitated their attendance. Barriers included exacerbations, fatigue, access to transportation, and weather. Participants endorsed the benefits of a community-based maintenance exercise program after pulmonary rehabilitation. Minimally supervised community-based programs with access to a case manager may provide a useful approach to enhancing adherence to exercise. PMID:24431408

  1. Community participation and sustainability – evidence over 25 years in the Västerbotten Intervention Programme

    PubMed Central

    Norberg, Margareta; Blomstedt, Yulia; Lönnberg, Göran; Nyström, Lennarth; Stenlund, Hans; Wall, Stig; Weinehall, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Background Selection bias and declining participation rates are of concern in many long-term epidemiological studies. The Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) was launched in 1985 as a response to alarming reports on elevated cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in Västerbotten County in Northern Sweden. The VIP invites women and men to a health examination and health counselling during the year of their 40th, 50th, and 60th birthdays. Objective To evaluate trends in participation rates and determinants of participation in the VIP from 1990 to 2006. Design Registry data on socio-economic status from Statistics Sweden, and mortality and hospitalisation data from the National Board of Health and Welfare, both covering the whole Swedish population, were linked to the VIP and analysed for participants and non-participants. Results During 1990–2006, 117,710 individuals were eligible to participate in the VIP, and 40,472 of them were eligible to participate twice. There were 96,560 observations for participants and 61,622 for non-participants. The overall participation rate increased from 56 to 65%. Participants and non-participants had minimal differences in education and age. Initial small differences by sex and degree of urban residence decreased over time. Despite an increasing participation rate in all groups, those with low income or who were single had an approximately 10% lower participation rate than those with high or medium-income or who were married or cohabitating. Conclusion Sustainability of the VIP is based on organisational integration into primary health care services and targeting of the entire middle-aged population. This enables the programme to meet population expectations of health promotion and to identify high-risk individuals who are then entered into routine preventive health care services. This has the potential to increase participation rates, to minimise social selection bias, and to reinforce other community-based interventions

  2. Identifying barriers to mental health system improvements: an examination of community participation in assertive community treatment programs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Integrating the best available evidence into program standards is essential if system-wide improvements in the delivery of community-based mental health services are to be achieved. Since the beginning of the Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) program movement, program standards have included a role for the community. In particular, ACT program standards have sought to ensure that members of the local community are involved in governance and that former clients participate in service delivery as "Peer Support Specialists". This paper reports on the extent to which ACT program standards related to community participation have been implemented and identifies barriers to full compliance. Methods Qualitative and quantitative data were collected through a telephone survey of ACT Program Coordinators in Ontario, Canada, using a census sample of the existing 66 ACT programs. A thematic approach to content analysis was used to analyze respondents' qualitative comments. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 and included means, frequencies, independent t-tests and Pearson Correlations. Results An 85% response rate was achieved. Of the 33 program standards, the two that received the lowest perceived compliance ratings were the two standards directly concerning community participation. Specifically, the standard to have a functioning Community Advisory Body and the standard requiring the inclusion of a Peer Support Specialist. The three major themes that emerged from the survey data with respect to the barriers to fully implementing the Community Advisory Body were: external issues; standard related issues; and, organizational/structural related issues. The three major themes concerning barriers to implementing the Peer Support Specialist role were: human resource related issues; organizational/structural related issues; and, standard related issues. Conclusions The reasons for low compliance of ACT programs with community participation standards are

  3. 45 CFR 2517.300 - Who may participate in a community-based service-learning program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-learning program? 2517.300 Section 2517.300 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Eligibility To Participate § 2517.300 Who may participate in a community-based service-learning...

  4. 45 CFR 2517.300 - Who may participate in a community-based service-learning program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-learning program? 2517.300 Section 2517.300 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Eligibility To Participate § 2517.300 Who may participate in a community-based service-learning...

  5. 45 CFR 2517.300 - Who may participate in a community-based service-learning program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-learning program? 2517.300 Section 2517.300 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Eligibility To Participate § 2517.300 Who may participate in a community-based service-learning...

  6. Dynamics of Community Participation, Student Achievement and School Management: The Case of Primary Schools in a Rural Area of Malawi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taniguchi, Kyoko; Hirakawa, Yukiko

    2016-01-01

    School management in many sub-Saharan African countries has been enhanced through community participation in an attempt to improve education quality. This study uses field research in a rural district of Malawi to assess how community and parent participation differs between schools, the intentions of communities and parents when carrying out…

  7. Forging successful academic-community partnerships with community health centers: the California statewide Area Health Education Center (AHEC) experience.

    PubMed

    Fowkes, Virginia; Blossom, H John; Mitchell, Brenda; Herrera-Mata, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    Increased access to insurance under the Affordable Care Act will increase demands for clinical services in community health centers (CHCs). CHCs also have an increasingly important educational role to train clinicians who will remain to practice in community clinics. CHCs and Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) are logical partners to prepare the health workforce for the future. Both are sponsored by the Health Resources and Services Administration, and they share a mission to improve quality of care in medically underserved communities. AHECs emphasize the educational side of the mission, and CHCs the service side. Building stronger partnerships between them can facilitate a balance between education and service needs.From 2004 to 2011, the California Statewide AHEC program and its 12 community AHECs (centers) reorganized to align training with CHC workforce priorities. Eight centers merged into CHC consortia; others established close partnerships with CHCs in their respective regions. The authors discuss issues considered and approaches taken to make these changes. Collaborative innovative processes with program leadership, staff, and center directors revised the program mission, developed common training objectives with an evaluation plan, and defined organizational, functional, and impact characteristics for successful AHECs in California. During this planning, centers gained confidence as educational arms for the safety net and began collaborations with statewide programs as well as among themselves. The AHEC reorganization and the processes used to develop, strengthen, and identify standards for centers forged the development of new partnerships and established academic-community trust in planning and implementing programs with CHCs. PMID:24280858

  8. Supporting People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to Participate in Their Communities through Support Staff Pilot Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakrajsek, Andrea Gossett; Hammel, Joy; Scazzero, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasingly, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) are supported to participate in least-restricted settings in the community. However, little is known about desired community participation choice and control of people with I/DD, nor effective strategies to support full participation. Furthermore, service…

  9. Community Participation in School Policy and Practice in Malawi: Balancing Local Knowledge, National Policies and International Agency Priorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Pauline

    2003-01-01

    Explores the extent to which public policy commitments toward community participation are realized in Malawi. Finds that the main motivation for participation is extractive rather than genuine attempts to encourage local ownership and accountability. Argues that marketization of community participation signifies the entrenchment of individual…

  10. Lessons Learned From a Community–Academic Initiative: The Development of a Core Competency–Based Training for Community–Academic Initiative Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Sergio; Kapadia, Smiti; Islam, Nadia; Cusack, Arthur; Kwong, Sylvia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Despite the importance of community health workers (CHWs) in strategies to reduce health disparities and the call to enhance their roles in research, little information exists on how to prepare CHWs involved in community–academic initiatives (CAIs). Therefore, the New York University Prevention Research Center piloted a CAI–CHW training program. Methods. We applied a core competency framework to an existing CHW curriculum and bolstered the curriculum to include research-specific sessions. We employed diverse training methods, guided by adult learning principles and popular education philosophy. Evaluation instruments assessed changes related to confidence, intention to use learned skills, usefulness of sessions, and satisfaction with the training. Results. Results demonstrated that a core competency–based training can successfully affect CHWs’ perceived confidence and intentions to apply learned content, and can provide a larger social justice context of their role and work. Conclusions. This program demonstrates that a core competency–based framework coupled with CAI-research–specific skill sessions (1) provides skills that CAI–CHWs intend to use, (2) builds confidence, and (3) provides participants with a more contextualized view of client needs and CHW roles. PMID:22594730

  11. Community participation in the development and validation of a school violence observation instrument

    PubMed Central

    Medina, N.; Fernández, G.; Cruz, T.; Jordán, N.; Trenche, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background School violence is a worldwide public health issue with negative effects on education. Official statistics and reports do not include daily occurrences of violent behavior that may precede severe incidents. Objectives This project aimed to engage school community members in the development, validation and implementation of an observation instrument to identify characteristics of school violence. Methods The role of members of each participating school community in all phases of the research is described. Results (or Lessons Learned) The input of community members contributed to enrich the process by providing insight into the problem studied and a more informed framework for interpreting results. Conclusions Taking into account distinctive features of each particular school made results meaningful to the school community and fostered a sense of empowerment of community members as they recognized their knowledge is essential to the solution of their problems. PMID:27346771

  12. Attitudes Toward Participation in Breast Cancer Randomized Clinical Trials in the African American Community

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Hannah M.; Reisch, Lisa M.; Hart, Alton; Harrington, Margaret A.; Nakano, Connie; Jackson, J. Carey; Elmore, Joann G.

    2013-01-01

    Participation of African Americans in research trials is low. Understanding the perspectives of African American patients toward participation in clinical trials is essential to understanding the disparities in participation rates compared with whites. A qualitative study was conducted to discover attitudes of the African American community regarding willingness to participate in breast cancer screening and randomized clinical trials. Six focus groups consisting of 8 to 11 African American women (N = 58), aged 30 to 65, were recruited from local churches. Focus group sessions involved a 2-hour audiotaped discussion facilitated by 2 moderators. A breast cancer randomized clinical trial involving an experimental breast cancer treatment was discussed to identify the issues related to willingness to participate in such research studies. Six themes surrounding willingness to participate in randomized clinical trials were identified: (1) Significance of the research topic to the individual and/or community; (2) level of trust in the system; (3) understanding of the elements of the trial; (4) preference for “natural treatments” or “religious intervention” over medical care; (5) cost-benefit analysis of incentives and barriers; and (6) openness to risk versus a preference for proven treatments. The majority (80%) expressed willingness or open-mindedness to the idea of participating in the hypothetical trial. Lessons learned from this study support the selection of a culturally diverse research staff and can guide the development of research protocols, recruitment efforts, and clinical procedures that are culturally sensitive and relevant. PMID:17666974

  13. A Qualitative Ethnographic Study of How Teachers Who Participate in Professional Learning Communities Construct Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ikhwan, Susana Nunez

    2011-01-01

    A recent study conducted by the National Staff Development Council (NSDC) has found that teachers who participate in high quality professional learning communities (PLC) are provided with on-going professional development that elicit focus on learning, a collaborative culture, collective inquiry, action orientation, commitment to continuous…

  14. An Intervention Designed to Increase Participation and Completion Rates of Community College Students in Nontraditional Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straight, Carli A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the missions of California Community Colleges (CCCs) is to provide career and technical education (CTE) to students that will prepare them for the workforce. Major funding for CTE programs comes from grant monies that are tied to the condition that institutions must demonstrate an effort to increase the participation and completion rates of…

  15. The North Carolina Community College Leadership Program: Impact on Career Achievement as Perceived by Women Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorham, Laura S.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of women participants in the North Carolina Community College Leadership Program (NCCCLP) to determine what effect, if any, those experiences may have had on subsequent career achievement. The NCCCLP is a one-year leadership-training program designed to give women and minorities the skills…

  16. "Heavy Sledding": Barriers to Community Participation in Beaufort Sea Hydrocarbon Developments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durst, Douglas

    1994-01-01

    This description of the Canadian government's assessment of the social impact of hydrocarbon exploration in the Arctic demonstrates barriers to citizen involvement: ad hoc nature, travel and child care problems, and lack of enough volunteers. Recommendations for community participation in impact assessment are given. (SK)

  17. Effects of Student Participation in an Online Learning Community on Environmental Education: A Greek Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papastergiou, Marina; Antoniou, Panagiotis; Apostolou, Marianna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was: (a) the creation of an Online Learning Community (OLC) for the implementation of an environmental education (EE) project in secondary education, and (b) the investigation of the potential impact of student participation in the OLC on students' knowledge and attitudes regarding the natural environment, on students'…

  18. Enhancing Choice and Participation for Adults with Severe Disabilities in Community-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Karena J.; Browder, Diane M.

    1998-01-01

    Three adults with severe disabilities received instructional support to make purchases in fast food restaurants. During intervention, participants were prompted to make five distinct choices during the community routine. This prompting resulted not only in increased choice making, but also in collateral increases in the performance of the…

  19. Participation of Elderly Women in Community Welfare Activities in Akinyele Local Government, Oyo State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odebode, Stella O.

    2009-01-01

    This paper assessed the participation of elderly women in community welfare activities in Oyo State, Nigeria. Simple random sampling technique was used to select 120 elderly women from six out of the twelve political wards in the study area. Both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection were used to elicit information from the…

  20. Active Citizenship and the Secondary School Experience: Community Participation Rates of Australian Youth. Research Report Number.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kevin; Lipsig-Mumme, Carla; Zajdow, Grazyna

    Volunteering is often seen as an essential element in active citizenship and community participation, and existing literature suggests that those who volunteer young are more likely to volunteer through later stages of life. Analysis of Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY), which identified factors that contribute to volunteering for…

  1. Getting Personal about Values: Scaffolding Student Participation towards an Inclusive Classroom Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morcom, Veronica Elizabeth; MacCallum, Judith Anne

    2012-01-01

    The development of an inclusive community is underpinned by values that support an appreciation of diversity. This paper is based on a larger research project, "student leadership in a primary classroom", which developed different ways for students to interact with each other. The focus not only promoted full student participation in classroom…

  2. Participant Association and Emergent Curriculum in a MOOC: Can the Community Be the Curriculum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Frances; Mackness, Jenny; Funes, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how participants associated with each other and developed community in a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) about Rhizomatic Learning (Rhizo14).We compared learner experiences in two social networking sites (SNSs), Facebook and Twitter. Our combination of thematic analysis of qualitative survey data with analysis of participant…

  3. Impact of Environmental Factors on Community Participation of Persons with an Intellectual Disability: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verdonschot, Manon M. L.; de Witte, L. P.; Reichrath, E.; Buntinx, W. H. E.; Curfs, L. M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Study Design: A systematic review of the literature. Objectives: To describe which environmental factors have an impact on community participation of persons with an intellectual disability. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted for the period of 1996-2006 in Pubmed, CINAHL and PSYCINFO. Search terms were derived from the…

  4. Outcome Data for MICA Clients after Participation in an Institutional Therapeutic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Stelle, Kit R.; Moberg, D. Paul

    2004-01-01

    The current study assessed the effectiveness of a prison-based substance abuse treatment therapeutic community (TC) providing treatment to male inmates dually diagnosed with both substance abuse and mental health disorders. The findings show a short-term impact of the program on arrest after release, with program participants significantly less…

  5. Participation As Relational Process: Unpacking Involvement in Social Action and Community Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jeffrey N.; Bench, Joshua H.; Warnaar, Bethany L.; Stroup, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Educators, policymakers, and other concerned adults share an interest in promoting lifelong patterns of community service in youth. Practitioners and researchers alike highlight the importance of youth participation in afterschool service activities so the author's focus in this paper is on youth involved in PeaceJam, an innovative service…

  6. State Gender Equity Law & Athletic Participation among Community Colleges in Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Horton, David, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of partial tuition waivers for athletic participation among community colleges in Washington State and its implications for state and federal gender equity policy and legislation. Using a mixed-methods approach, this article presents findings from Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act data, document analysis, and…

  7. Programs to Enhance Participation, Retention, and Success of Minority Students at Florida Community Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Louis W.; Blanco, Cheryl D.

    This five-part report describes the methods and findings of a study of programs implemented at Florida's 9 public universities and 28 community colleges to enhance the participation of minority and disadvantaged students in postsecondary education. Following introductory material on the project, study design, and methods, an inventory of…

  8. Improved Physical Fitness among Older Female Participants in a Nationally Disseminated, Community-Based Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seguin, Rebecca A.; Heidkamp-Young, Eleanor; Kuder, Julia; Nelson, Miriam E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Strength training (ST) is an important health behavior for aging women; it helps maintain strength and function and reduces risk for chronic diseases. This study assessed change in physical fitness following participation in a ST program implemented and evaluated by community leaders. Method: The StrongWomen Program is a nationally…

  9. Contributing to the Community: The Economic Significance of Academic Health Centers and Their Role in Neighborhood Development. Report IV. Report of the Task Force on Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commonwealth Fund, New York, NY.

    This report is a selective analysis and assessment of quantitative data and field studies that reflect the economic role of the Academic Health Center (AHC) in the urban economy and in neighborhood revitalization. It describes the effect of a variety of cooperative efforts between local community organizations and AHCs, which usually include a…

  10. Community participation in the prevention and control of dengue: the patio limpio strategy in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Méndez-Galván, Jorge; Burciaga-Zúñiga, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Community participation is vital to prevent and control the spread of dengue in Latin America. Initiatives such as the integrated management strategy for dengue prevention and control (IMS-Dengue) and integrated vector management (IVM) incorporate social mobilisation and behavioural change at the community level as part of a wider strategy to control dengue. These strategies aim to improve the efficacy, cost-effectiveness, environmental impact and sustainability of vector control strategies. Community empowerment is a key aspect of the strategy as it allows the local population to drive eradication of the disease in their environment. Through the patio limpio campaign, the concept of community participation has been employed in Mexico to raise awareness of the consequences of dengue. Patio limpio consists of training local people to identify, eliminate, monitor and evaluate vector breeding sites systematically in households under their supervision. A community participation programme in Guerrero State found that approximately 54% were clean and free of breeding sites. Households that were not visited and assessed had a 2·4-times higher risk of developing dengue than those that were. However, after a year, only 30% of trained households had a clean backyard. This emphasises the need for a sustainable process to encourage individuals to maintain efforts in keeping their environment free of dengue. PMID:22668443

  11. Exploring the Hidden Barriers in Knowledge Translation: A Case Study Within an Academic Community.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Gill; Marshall, Rhianon J; Jordan, Zoe; Kitson, Alison L

    2015-11-01

    Debates about knowledge translation (KT) typically focus on the research-practice gap, which appears to be premised on the assumption that academics are a homogeneous collective, sharing a common view. We argue that a number of hidden barriers need to be addressed related to the understanding, interpretation, ability, and commitment to translate knowledge within academic communities. We explore this by presenting a qualitative case study in a health sciences faculty. Applying organizational and management theory, we discuss different types of boundaries and the resultant barriers generated, ranging from diversity in understanding and perceptions of KT to varying motivations and incentives to engage in translational activity. We illustrate how we are using the empirical findings to inform the development of a KT strategy that targets the identified barriers. Investing in this internal KT-focused activity is an important step to maximize the potential of future collaborations between producers and users of research in health care. PMID:25847856

  12. A Literature Review of the Impact of Extracurricular Activities Participation on Students' Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seow, Poh-Sun; Pan, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Extracurricular activities (ECA) have become an important component of students' school life and many schools have invested significant resources on extracurricular activities. The authors suggest three major theoretical frameworks (zero-sum, developmental, and threshold) to explain the impact of ECA participation on students' academic…

  13. Students' High School Organizational Leadership Opportunities and Their Influences on Academic Achievement and Civic Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elemen, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to analyze high school leadership praxis for its inclusion of students in organizational leadership dialogue and decision-making and the influences of these factors on student achievement and civic participation. Survey questionnaire data were provided by 215 full-time enrolled undergraduate students from…

  14. An Ecological Analysis of After-School Program Participation and the Development of Academic Performance and Motivational Attributes for Disadvantaged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahoney, Joseph L.; Lord, Heather; Carryl, Erica

    2005-01-01

    This longitudinal study evaluated after-school program (ASP) participation and the development of academic performance (school grades, reading achievement) and teacher-rated motivational attributes (expectancy of success, effectance motivation) over a school year. Participants were 599 boys and girls (6.3 to 10.6 years) from an urban,…

  15. Challenges and Facilitators of Community Clinical Oncology Program Participation: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Reiter, Kristin L.; Weiner, Bryan J.; Minasian, Lori; Song, Paula H.

    2013-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Successful participation in the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI) Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) can expand access to clinical trials and promote cancer treatment innovations for patients and communities otherwise removed from major cancer centers. Yet CCOP participation involves administrative, financial, and organizational challenges that can impact hospital and provider participants. This study was designed to improve our understanding of challenges associated with CCOP participation from the perspectives of involved providers, and to learn about opportunities to overcome these challenges. We conducted five case studies of hospitals and providers engaged with the CCOP. Across organizations we interviewed forty-one administrative, physician, and nurse key informants. We asked about CCOP participation, focusing on issues related to implementation, operations, and organizational support. We analyzed interview transcripts both deductively and inductively, exploring themes that emerged. Interviewees noted seven challenges associated with CCOP participation: 1) lack of appreciation for the value of participation; 2) poor understanding about CCOP operations; 3) cost; 4) need to meet CCOP requirements; 5) required workflow changes; 6) managing patient recruitment and physician involvement; and 7) sustaining hospital leadership support. Informants also suggested three major opportunities to facilitate participation: 1) increase awareness of the CCOP; 2) enhance commitment to the CCOP; and 3) promote and support champions of the CCOP. Improving our understanding of the challenges and facilitators of CCOP participation may help hospitals and providers in efforts to increase and sustain participation in the CCOP, thus helping to helping to preserve access to innovative medical treatment options for patients in need. PMID:23424817

  16. Beyond the horizon: the role of academic health centers in improving the health of rural communities.

    PubMed

    Gazewood, John D; Rollins, Lisa K; Galazka, Sim S

    2006-09-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) face increasing pressures from federal, state, and community stakeholders to fulfill their social missions to the communities they serve. Yet, in the 21st century, rural communities in the United States face an array of health care problems, including a shortage of physicians, health problems that disproportionately affect rural populations, a need to improve quality of care, and health disparities related to disproportionate levels of poverty and shifting demographics. AHCs have a key role to play in addressing these issues. AHCs can increase physician supply by targeting their admissions policies and educational programs. Specific health concerns of rural populations can be further addressed through increased use of telemedicine consultations. By partnering with providers in rural areas and through the use of innovative technologies, AHCs can help rural providers increase the quality of care. Partnerships with rural communities provide opportunities for participatory research to address health disparities. In addition, collaboration between AHCs, regional planning agencies, and rural communities can lead to mutually beneficial outcomes. At a time when many AHCs are operating in an environment with dwindling resources, it is even more critical for AHCs to build creative partnerships to help meet the needs of their regional communities. PMID:16936482

  17. Too much of a good thing? How breadth of extracurricular participation relates to school-related affect and academic outcomes during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Knifsend, Casey A; Graham, Sandra

    2012-03-01

    Although adolescents often participate in multiple extracurricular activities, little research has examined how the breadth of activities in which an adolescent is involved relates to school-related affect and academic performance. Relying on a large, multi-ethnic sample (N = 864; 55.9% female), the current study investigated linear and non-linear relationships of 11th grade activity participation in four activity domains (academic/leadership groups, arts activities, clubs, and sports) to adolescents' sense of belonging at school, academic engagement, and grade point average, contemporarily and in 12th grade. Results of multiple regression models revealed curvilinear relationships for sense of belonging at school in 11th and 12th grade, grade point average in 11th grade, and academic engagement in 12th grade. Adolescents who were moderately involved (i.e., in two domains) reported a greater sense of belonging at school in 11th and 12th grade, a higher grade point average in 11th grade, and greater academic engagement in 12th grade, relative to those who were more or less involved. Furthermore, adolescents' sense of belonging at school in 11th grade mediated the relationship of domain participation in 11th grade to academic engagement in 12th grade. This study suggests that involvement in a moderate number of activity domains promotes positive school-related affect and greater academic performance. School policy implications and recommendations are discussed. PMID:22160442

  18. Multicultural social policy and community participation in health: new opportunities and challenges for indigenous people.

    PubMed

    Torri, Maria Costanza

    2012-01-01

    Community participation in local health has assumed a central role in the reforms of public healthcare, being increasingly associated with the issue of decentralization of the health system. The aim of this paper is to raise questions regarding the structural approaches to multicultural social policy in Chile and to analyze the results of its implementation. The article analyzes the case study of Makewe Hospital, one of the pioneering experiences of intercultural health initiative in Chile. The Makewe Hospital, which involves the indigenous community of the Mapuche, provides interesting insights to understand the dynamics of multicultural social policy and presents an example of a successful initiative that has succeeded in involving local communities in multicultural health policy. This case study discusses the effectiveness of grassroots participation in multicultural healthcare provision and presents the main strengths and challenges for the replicability of this experience in other settings. PMID:21837643

  19. Social Participation, Community Attachment, and Quality of Life in the Rapidly Industrializing Rural Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albrecht, Stan L.

    Data on the social effects of boomtown growth and industrialization were collected from residents of three western communities (Craig, Colorado; Price, Utah; and Gunnison, Colorado) via a fairly detailed mail questionnaire sent to a random sample of 900. Completed questionnaires were received from 443 (a return rate of 65%). A number of different…

  20. Evaluation of a Community-Based Participatory Research Consortium from the Perspective of Academics and Community Service Providers Focused on Child Health and Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pivik, Jayne R.; Goelman, Hillel

    2011-01-01

    A process evaluation of a consortium of academic researchers and community-based service providers focused on the health and well-being of children and families provides empirical and practice-based evidence of those factors important for community-based participatory research (CBPR). This study draws on quantitative ratings of 33 factors…

  1. Agreement between the Williamsport Area Community College and Williamsport Area Community College Education Association for the 1972-1973 Academic Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamsport Area Community Coll., PA.

    This agreement between Williamsport Area Community College and the Williamsport Area Community College Education Association covers the academic year 1972-1973. Articles of the agreement include recognition, check-off, association prerogatives, employer prerogatives, employees' rights, grievance procedure, no strikes or lockouts, access to…

  2. Maryland's Plan for Family, School, and Community Involvement: Recommendations for Reaching Academic Success for All Students through Family, School, and Community Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2003

    2003-01-01

    The Maryland Plan for Family, School, and Community Involvement addresses the importance of families, schools, and communities working together to reach academic success for all students. To continuously improve public education in Maryland so that each learner from birth through the completion of high school acquires the skills and knowledge…

  3. Effect of community participation on household environment to mitigate dengue transmission in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Suwannapong, N; Tipayamongkholgul, M; Bhumiratana, A; Boonshuyar, C; Howteerakul, N; Poolthin, S

    2014-03-01

    Due to the absence of dengue vaccination, vector control is the only measure to prevent dengue outbreaks. The key element of dengue prevention is to eliminate vector habitats. Clean household environment, preventive behaviors of household members and community participation in dengue prevention and control are key successful elements. This study aimed to investigate the associations between environmental factors, dengue knowledge, perception and preventive behaviors of household and collaboration of community members and household risk of dengue by using mixed methods. One dengue epidemic province was selected from each region of Thailand including Bangkok. Two districts, one from the highest and another from the lowest dengue incidence areas, were selected from those provinces. The household leaders, community members, and local authorities in highest dengue incidence areas were interviewed by using questionnaire and through group interviews. The environment of each selected household was observed. Of 4,561 households, 194 were reported having dengue case(s) in the past year and that outdoor solid waste disposal significantly influenced household risk of dengue (OR=1.62; 95% CI=1.16-2.29). In contrast, having gardening areas reduced dengue risk at household level by 32%. High level of community participation in dengue prevention and control in uninfected areas and the information from local authorities and community members reconfirmed that community participation was the key factor against dengue outbreaks. Sustainable process of encouraging community members to eliminate vector breeding sites such as outdoor solid waste disposal is likely to lead to an achievement in dengue prevention and control. PMID:24862055

  4. Small Learning Communities versus Small Schools: Describing the Difference in the Academic Achievement of African American High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    In 1999, the United States Department of Education began its Small Learning Community Program in an effort to support the breakup of large schools into smaller learning communities. In an effort to improve the academic success rate of students, President George W. Bush signed into law the "No Child Left Behind Act of 2001" (NCLB). NCLB had as its…

  5. A Predictive Study of Community College Faculty Perceptions of Student Academic Preparation, Work Ethics, and Institutional Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibezim-Uche, Scholar

    2013-01-01

    Examined in this study were faculty perceptions of students who do not continue their college education. Also examined was how urban and rural community colleges faculty perceived academic preparation, work ethics, and institutional support as predictors of student success. In this predictive study of community college faculty, 36 faculty members…

  6. Designing New Academic Pathways: Reimaging the Community College Experience with Students' Needs and Best Interests at Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClenney, Kay; Dare, Donna

    2013-01-01

    This is the second article in a three-part series on reimagining the community college student experience, describing a new model for academic pathways, key design principles, examples from colleges leading the way, and implementation challenges. Community colleges are beginning to embrace the task of reimagining students' educational experiences.…

  7. The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) Leadership Competencies as Gauged through the Voices of Female Academic Senators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferri-Milligan, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore faculty perceptions about effective leadership skills, knowledge, and qualities as identified by female community college academic senators and to examine the relationship of those perceptions to the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) leadership competencies. Examining the…

  8. An Analysis of Clause Usage in Academic Texts Produced by African American, Haitian, and Hispanic Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge for the increasing multicultural and multilingual community college student population has been the difficulty in accessing the register features which define academic writing. In this study, an analysis of clause structures using writing samples collected from 45 community-college students, 15 from African-American, Haitian and…

  9. The Potential of Research-Based Learning for the Creation of Truly Inclusive Academic Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Pete; Rust, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The academic community in higher education is becoming increasingly fragmented, with arguably the greatest fault line between research and teaching. This paper argues that, through the reinvention of the undergraduate curriculum to focus on student engagement in research and research-type activities, a truly inclusive community of academic…

  10. Opencast Matterhorn: A Community-Driven Open Source Software Project for Producing, Managing, and Distributing Academic Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketterl, Markus; Schulte, Olaf A.; Hochman, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Opencast Community, a global community of individuals, institutions, and commercial stakeholders exchanging knowledge about all matters relevant in the context of academic video and promoting projects in this context. It also gives an overview of the most prominent of these projects, Opencast…

  11. Pre-participation cardiovascular screening: is community screening using hand-held cardiac ultrasound feasible?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, A R J; Hurry, R; Le Page, P; MacLachlan, H

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and costs of utilising hand-held cardiac ultrasound (HHCU) as part of a community-based pre-participation cardiovascular screening programme. Ninety-seven school children were screened using a personal history, a physical examination, a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and a HHCU. A consultant cardiologist independently reviewed and reported the data. Previously undiagnosed cardiovascular abnormalities were identified in nine participants (9%). An additional three participants (3%) were diagnosed with hypertension. The nine abnormalities were identified at a cost of £460 per finding, with a cost of £43 per participant screened. The marginal cost of adding a HHCU to the personal history, physical examination and ECG was £16 per participant. Pre-participation screening in the community using hand-held echocardiography is practical and inexpensive. The additional sensitivity and specificity provided by the ultrasound may enhance screening programmes, thereby reducing false positives and the need for expensive follow-up testing. PMID:26693333

  12. Pre-participation cardiovascular screening: is community screening using hand-held cardiac ultrasound feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Hurry, R; Le Page, P; MacLachlan, H

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and costs of utilising hand-held cardiac ultrasound (HHCU) as part of a community-based pre-participation cardiovascular screening programme. Ninety-seven school children were screened using a personal history, a physical examination, a resting 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and a HHCU. A consultant cardiologist independently reviewed and reported the data. Previously undiagnosed cardiovascular abnormalities were identified in nine participants (9%). An additional three participants (3%) were diagnosed with hypertension. The nine abnormalities were identified at a cost of £460 per finding, with a cost of £43 per participant screened. The marginal cost of adding a HHCU to the personal history, physical examination and ECG was £16 per participant. Pre-participation screening in the community using hand-held echocardiography is practical and inexpensive. The additional sensitivity and specificity provided by the ultrasound may enhance screening programmes, thereby reducing false positives and the need for expensive follow-up testing. PMID:26693333

  13. Social contract of academic medical centres to the community: Dr Howard Atwood Kelly (1858-1943), a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Allen, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Academic medical centres have traditionally been bastions of teaching and research. Outreach to the community at large and involvement in community affairs have sometimes been lacking in the overall mission and activities of academic medical centres. This paper provides an historical perspective first on the numerous achievements of a physician and surgeon and then on the topic of involvement in community affairs by reviewing the many contributions of America's pioneer gynaecological surgeon and one of the four physician founders of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine in 1889 - Dr Howard Atwood Kelly. PMID:24906403

  14. Outcomes of an Academic Service-Learning Project on Four Urban Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Debra Abston

    2015-01-01

    Service-learning has a rich history in higher education, with a multitude of studies indicating positive learning, community engagement, and moral development outcomes of student participants. The majority of the research findings, however, have represented four-year colleges. And while there are limited outcome studies of service-learning in…

  15. Impact of VANA academic-practice partnership participation on educational mobility decisions and teaching aspirations of nurses.

    PubMed

    Wyte-Lake, Tamar; Bowman, Candice; Needleman, Jack; Dougherty, Mary; Scarrott, Diana N; Dobalian, Aram

    2014-01-01

    This study reports findings assessing the influence of the Department of Veterans Affairs Nursing Academy (VANA) academic-practice partnership program on nurse decision making regarding educational mobility and teaching aspirations. We conducted national surveys with nursing faculty from VANA partnership sites in 2011 (N = 133) and 2012 (N = 74). Faculty who spent more hours per week in the VANA role and who reported an increase in satisfaction with their participation in VANA were more likely to have been influenced by their VANA experience in choosing to pursue a higher degree (p < .05). Sixty-nine percent of VANA faculty reported that they would be very interested in staying on as a VANA faculty member if the program should continue. Six measures were positively associated with VANA's influence on the desire to continue as faculty beyond the VANA pilot; support from VANA colleagues, quality of VANA students, amount of guidance with curriculum development, availability of administrative support, support for improving teaching methods, and overall satisfaction with VANA experience (p < .05). As the popularity of academic-practice partnerships grows and their list of benefits is further enumerated, motivating nurses to pursue both higher degrees and faculty roles should be listed among them based on results reported here. PMID:25223286

  16. Governing board and management staff attitudes toward community mental health center citizen participation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, R; Fiester, A

    1979-01-01

    The present study investigated the attitudes and values of community and mental health center board and management staff of four Community Mental Health Centers and one mental health clinic toward the recent federal mandate calling for increased citizen involvement in center evaluation activities. Three related areas were address: (a) general attitudes toward citizen participation, (b) types of program-evaluation activities in which citizen input would be most useful; and (c) types of individuals who would best serve on citizen review groups. The results indicated that although board members are somewhat more optimistic about benefits received from citizen involvement, overall there was close agreement between the board and staff respondents in the three areas studied. These results were interpreted as substantiating the view that community mental health center boards typically reflect a provider orientation in their approach to mental health governance. A missing evaluation component in most centers is citizen participation as it reflects the values of its service consumers. It is advocated that only by developing consumer participation mechanisms will centers more readily achieve the goal of responsiveness to community needs. PMID:535338

  17. Participatory evaluation of a community-academic partnership to inform capacity-building and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Vani Nath; Klasko, Lynne B; Fleming, Khaliah; Koskan, Alexis M; Jackson, Nia T; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Luque, John S; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Britt, Lounell; Waddell, Rhondda; Meade, Cathy D; Gwede, Clement K

    2015-10-01

    The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) was formed as a partnership comprised of committed community based organizations (grassroots, service, health care organizations) and a National Cancer Institute designated cancer center working together to reduce cancer health disparities. Adhering to principles of community-based participatory research, TBCCN's primary aims are to develop and sustain outreach, training, and research programs that aim to reach medically underserved, multicultural and multilingual populations within the Tampa Bay tri-county area. Using a participatory evaluation approach, we recently evaluated the partnerships' priorities for cancer education and outreach; perspectives on the partnerships' adherence to CBPR principles; and suggestions for sustaining TBCCN and its efforts. The purpose of this paper is to describe implementation and outcomes of this participatory evaluation of a community/academic partnership, and to illustrate the application of evaluation findings for partnership capacity-building and sustainability. Our evaluation provides evidence for partners' perceived benefits and realized expectations of the partnership and illustrates the value of ongoing and continued partnership assessment to directly inform program activities and build community capacity and sustainability. PMID:25863014

  18. Perceptions of Participants in a Group, Community, Exercise Programme for People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Rosemary; Coote, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of people with multiple sclerosis of a community based, group exercise programme. Method. A pragmatic programme evaluation approach using qualitative research design was adopted. Focus groups were used to gather data from 14 participants who had taken part in a RCT of community based exercise interventions for PwMS who used at most a stick to walk outdoors. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was used to first identify categories and then to group them into themes. Results. Three themes emerged, psychological benefits, physical benefits, and knowledge gained. The psychological benefits included the role of the group as a social and motivational factor, empowerment, confidence, hope, sense of achievement, and pride. Physical benefits were improved energy and reduced fatigue and improved ability and participation. Knowledge gained caused a shift from thoughts that exercise might do harm, to sufficient knowledge that would give participants confidence to exercise themselves. The role of the group was a key element in the positive outcomes. Conclusions. The qualitative analysis supports the findings of the main trial confirming positive effects of community exercise interventions by reducing the impact of MS and fatigue and improving participation. PMID:26491567

  19. Scoping review of the exclusion and inclusion of rural newcomers in community participation.

    PubMed

    Patten, Emma; O'Meara, Peter; Dickson-Swift, Virginia

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have considered the impact of rural migration on rural community engagement. The objective of this research was to undertake a scoping review about the inclusion and exclusion of newcomers in rural community participation to inform design of inclusive participation processes. The scoping review used the six stages of Arksey and O'Malley's methodological framework. Narrative analysis of the articles was structured using three themes of inclusion and exclusion derived from the literature: interpersonal, socio-cultural norms, and structural and organisational processes. Inclusion and exclusion at the interpersonal level is intricate and often represents broader social rules and tensions that newcomers must navigate in order to become involved. Social norms, such as fear of outsiders and difference, can exclude newcomers from participating in a rural community. Newcomer's awareness of these issues means they are mindful of how they contribute and give respect to the social position of existing residents. Despite this, resistance to change is experienced by newcomers when contributing in organisational contexts. Formal participation processes can harness the practice and value of rural hospitality that newcomers experience as inclusionary. Deliberately designing group processes and operational norms for inclusion can reduce tensions when change occurs and prevent group loss due to exclusionary practices. PMID:25945785

  20. Community participation for transformative action on women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health

    PubMed Central

    Marston, Cicely; Hinton, Rachael; Kean, Stuart; Baral, Sushil; Ahuja, Arti; Costello, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Global strategy for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health (2016–2030) recognizes that people have a central role in improving their own health. We propose that community participation, particularly communities working together with health services (co-production in health care), will be central for achieving the objectives of the global strategy. Community participation specifically addresses the third of the key objectives: to transform societies so that women, children and adolescents can realize their rights to the highest attainable standards of health and well-being. In this paper, we examine what this implies in practice. We discuss three interdependent areas for action towards greater participation of the public in health: improving capabilities for individual and group participation; developing and sustaining people-centred health services; and social accountability. We outline challenges for implementation, and provide policy-makers, programme managers and practitioners with illustrative examples of the types of participatory approaches needed in each area to help achieve the health and development goals. PMID:27152056