Science.gov

Sample records for academic content areas

  1. Who's Using the Language? Supporting Middle School Students with Content Area Academic Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Dianna

    2015-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examines middle school students' academic language development in the context of a year-long professional development project titled, Developing Content Area Academic Language (DCAAL). The purpose of DCAAL was to partner middle school teachers (n = 8) with a team of university researchers to explore how to integrate…

  2. Developing Academic and Content Area Literacy: The Thai EFL Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charubusp, Sasima; Chinwonno, Apasara

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of Academic Literacy-Based Intervention (ALI) on 30 undergraduate Thai university students' English reading proficiency. Based on the English reading proficiency test, these students were sub-classified into 2 groups, 15 in the high English reading proficiency group and 15 in the low English reading…

  3. Longitudinal associations between executive functioning and academic skills across content areas.

    PubMed

    Fuhs, Mary Wagner; Nesbitt, Kimberly Turner; Farran, Dale Clark; Dong, Nianbo

    2014-06-01

    This study assessed 562 four-year-old children at the beginning and end of their prekindergarten (pre-k) year and followed them to the end of kindergarten. At each time point children were assessed on 6 measures of executive function (EF) and 5 subtests of the Woodcock-Johnson III academic achievement battery. Exploratory factor analyses yielded EF and achievement factor scores. We examined the longitudinal bidirectional associations between these domains as well as the bidirectional associations among the separate content areas and the EF factor. In the pre-k year, strong bidirectional associations were found for EF skills and mathematics and oral comprehension skills but not for literacy skills. After controlling for pre-k gains in both EF and achievement, EF skills continued to be strong predictors of gains in mathematics in kindergarten and a more moderate predictor of kindergarten language gains. These results provide important information on the interrelationship of the developmental domains of EF and achievement as well as support for efforts to determine effective pre-k activities and/or curricula that can improve children's EF skills. They also suggest that mathematics activities may be a possible avenue for improving EF skills in young children. PMID:24749550

  4. Literacy Coaching: Middle School Academic Achievement and Teacher Perceptions Regarding Content Area Literacy Strategy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Anjell H.; Neill, Patricia; Faust, Phyllis B.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined differences in perceptions of content area teachers receiving literacy coaching and teachers receiving no literacy coaching regarding implementation of literacy instruction. It also examined student achievement on standardized tests relative to literacy coaching. A survey measured teachers' perceptions regarding their…

  5. CREATE: A Comprehensive Model for Instruction of Academic Language and Literacy in the Content Areas. CREATE Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duguay, Annie

    2012-01-01

    This brief outlines a systematic school-wide intervention that consistently integrates content knowledge and language and literacy development in content area curricula. The brief first describes the elements of the intervention, including implementation, professional development and coaching support, in critical content areas. It then explains…

  6. Developing Content-Area Academic Literacy: A Randomized Control Trial of the Reading Apprenticeship Improving Secondary Education (RAISE) Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fancsali, Cheri; Abe, Yasuyo; Pyatigorsky, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Nationally, two-thirds of high school students are unable to read and comprehend complex academic materials, think critically about texts, and synthesize information from multiple sources, or communicate what they have learned. Without a substantial change in their academic literacy, U.S. high school students face continued academic problems in…

  7. CTE Teachers as Content Area Reading Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    Career and technical education (CTE) is emerging as a reading content area similar to other academic areas such as social studies, math and science. The primary reason for this is that CTE is more integrated with academic subjects. This trend is prompting CTE teachers to become more active in supporting their students' reading through their CTE…

  8. Content Area Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Students' vocabulary knowledge is a significant predictor of their overall comprehension. The Common Core State Standards are raising the expectations for word learning and there are now 4 distinct standards related to vocabulary as well as expectations in other standards, including content areas. To address these expectations, teachers need…

  9. Academic Proficiency (Language and Content) and the Role of Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krashen, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This report continues the work of Krashen and Brown (2007), developing and evaluating a set of hypotheses for the development of academic proficiency. That article defined academic proficiency as having two components: academic language proficiency and knowledge of academic content.

  10. Adolescent Health Behavior, Contentment in School, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristjansson, Alfgeir Logi; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Allegrante, John P.; Helgason, Asgeir R.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the association between health behavior indicators, school contentment, and academic achievement. Methods: Structural equation modeling with 5810 adolescents. Results: Our model explained 36% of the variance in academic achievement and 24% in school contentment. BMI and sedentary lifestyle were negatively related to school…

  11. Genre-Based Curricula: Multilingual Academic Literacy in Content and Language Integrated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses academic literacy in content and language integrated learning (CLIL) secondary education. More precisely, this paper focuses on attempts to meet modern standards for language competences set in areas like Europe, where the notion involves multilingual academic competence. The study centres on new proposals for language…

  12. Developing a Content Strategy for an Academic Library Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakiston, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Academic library websites contain a vast amount of complex content and, all too often, there is a lack of established process for creating, updating, and deleting that content. There is no clear vision or purpose to the content, and numerous staff members are expected to maintain content with little guidance. Because of this, many library websites…

  13. Academic Content, Student Learning, and the Persistence of Preschool Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claessens, Amy; Engel, Mimi; Curran, F. Chris

    2014-01-01

    Little research has examined the relationship between academic content coverage in kindergarten and student achievement. Using nationally representative data, we examine the association between reading and mathematics content coverage in kindergarten and student learning, both overall and for students who attended preschool, Head Start, or…

  14. Content Management and the Future of Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Yuhfen Diana; Liu, Mengxiong

    2001-01-01

    Discusses Internet-based electronic content management in digital libraries and considers the future of academic libraries. Topics include digital technologies; content management systems; standards; bandwidth; security and privacy concerns; legal matters, including copyrights and ownership; lifecycle; and multilingual access and interface. (LRW)

  15. Learning Academic Content the Adventure Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Hector

    1997-01-01

    Describes and gives examples of integrating adventure activities into existing classroom curricula at three levels: review or metaphors, interwoven activities for content delivery, and total integration into classroom design. Example activities include "Speed Rabbit,""Have You Ever,""Stepping Stones,""Whale Watch," and "Mine Field." (SAS)

  16. Content Area Reading and Learning: Instructional Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapp, Diane; And Others

    This book offers strategies to help educators become increasingly effective in teaching various areas in content area reading and learning. The book includes the following chapters: "Content Area Reading: A Historical Perspective" (E. Dishner and M. Olson); "Content Area Reading: Current State of the Art" (T. Bean and J. Readence); "The Role of…

  17. Academic Achievement, Academic Self-Concept, and Academic Motivation of Immigrant Adolescents in the Greater Toronto Area Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Areepattamannil, Shaljan; Freeman, John G.

    2008-01-01

    The study examined the self-reported academic achievement, academic self-concept, and academic motivation of 573 immigrant and nonimmigrant adolescents in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) secondary schools. Descriptive Discriminant Analyses indicated that the immigrant adolescents had higher performance in mathematics, higher math and school…

  18. Academic Deans' Views on Curriculum Content in Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graber, David R.; Bellack, Janis P.; Musham, Catherine; O'Neil, Edward H.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of academic deans (n=100) in universities associated with medical and osteopathy schools found that administrators' attitudes about curriculum content are being influenced by changes in health care delivery and an increasingly generalist orientation. There appears to be support for medical school curricula fostering a broader, more…

  19. What RTI Means for Content Area Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenski, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RTI) has the potential to have a positive impact on adolescent literacy by requiring content-area teachers to provide Tier 1 literacy instruction. This commentary suggests that content-area teachers can help their students improve their content knowledge and literacy skills by providing discipline-specific strategy…

  20. Exploring Academic Entrepreneurship in the Milan Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colapinto, Cinzia

    2011-01-01

    Academic entrepreneurship has become an increasingly important means by which universities can contribute to the economic development of a country. In Italy, universities have produced more than 700 academic spin-off companies in the last ten years. This paper uses case studies to develop an understanding of the key factors that underpin the…

  1. Writing in the Content Areas. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Amy

    2005-01-01

    Do you spend entirely too much time correcting your students' papers? Do your students' essays and term papers take side trips to nowhere? Is their writing riddled with mechanical errors? Do their lab reports and essays lack specificity and clarity? Writing in the Content Areas, Second Edition is for middle and high school content area teachers…

  2. Reading and Writing in the Content Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorp, Christy

    2002-01-01

    Describes several websites containing content-area reading and writing resources and research, including the ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading, English, and Communication (www.indiana.edu/~eric rec). (PKP)

  3. Doctors currently in jobs with academic content and their future intentions to pursue clinical academic careers: questionnaire surveys

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Fay; Goldacre, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objectives Our aim was to report on doctors’ descriptions of their current post at about 12 years after qualification, in respect of academic content, and to compare this with their long-term intentions. By academic content, we mean posts that are designated as clinical academic posts or clinical service posts that include research and/or teaching commitments. Design Questionnaire survey. Participants All UK medical graduates of 1996 contacted in 2007, graduates of 1999 in 2012, and graduates of 2000 in 2012. Setting UK. Main outcome measures Responses about current posts and future intentions. Method Postal and email questionnaires. Results The response rate was 61.9% (6713/10844). Twenty eight per cent were working in posts with academic content (3.3% as clinical academics, 25% in clinical posts with some academic content). Seventeen per cent of women were working in clinical posts with some teaching and research, compared with 29% of men. A higher percentage of men than women intended to be clinical academics as their eventual career choice (3.9% overall, 5.4% of men, 2.7% of women). More doctors wished to move to a job with an academic component than away from one (N = 824 compared with 236). This was true for both men (433 compared with 118) and women (391 compared with 118). Conclusions Women are under-represented both in holding posts with academic content and in aspirations to do so. It is noteworthy that many more doctors hoped to move into an academic role than to move out of one. Policy should facilitate this wish in order to address current shortfalls in clinical academic medicine. PMID:25780595

  4. A Bernsteinian Analysis of Content Area Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin, Ross

    2014-01-01

    This article examines two approaches to teaching content area literacy: a strategies approach focused on general practices of reading and writing and a disciplinary approach attuned to the particular discourses of particular domains. Basil Bernstein's theory of the pedagogic device is used to critique both approaches' assumptions about…

  5. Improving Reading Comprehension in the Content Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durley, Jill; Emlen, Rita; Knox, Kimberly; Meeker, Marcia; Rhea, Peggy

    This report describes a program implemented to improve reading comprehension in the content areas. The targeted population will consist of students in grades two, three, four, and five, in five midwestern schools, four public and one private. The problem of poor comprehension will be documented through test scores, parent and student surveys, and…

  6. Integrating Literature in Content Areas: Professional's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walley, Carl W.; Walley, Kate

    Based on the premise that viewing the curriculum holistically enriches the instructional practices of teachers and adds depth and meaning to children's school experiences, this guide is intended to: (1) encourage teachers who have doubts about using literature in their content area classes; (2) support those presently using literature to teach;…

  7. Teaching Writing in the Content Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urquhart, Vicki

    2005-01-01

    Most educators intuitively understand the critical relationship between thinking and writing: writing allows us to express what we think, but the very act of writing spurs a process of exploration that changes our thinking and helps us learn. "Teaching Writing in the Content Areas" examines nearly 30 years of research to identify how teachers can…

  8. Job Satisfaction of Secondary Content Area Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Christine K.

    2012-01-01

    Educational researchers have examined both observed and perceived influences of the job satisfaction levels of secondary teachers and post-secondary department chairs. However, researchers have largely ignored a third group of educators: secondary Content Area Leaders (CALs). The overall satisfaction levels and the potentially influencing factors…

  9. 34 CFR Appendix to Part 648 - Academic Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Academic Areas Appendix to Part 648 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION....04Information Sciences and Systems 11.05Computer Systems Analysis 11.07Computer Science 13.Education...

  10. 34 CFR Appendix to Part 648 - Academic Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Academic Areas Appendix to Part 648 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION....04Information Sciences and Systems 11.05Computer Systems Analysis 11.07Computer Science 13.Education...

  11. Using YouTube Videos as a Primer to Affect Academic Content Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duverger, Philippe; Steffes, Erin M.

    2012-01-01

    College students today watch more content, academic or not, on the Internet than on any other media. Consequently, the authors argue that using any of these media, especially YouTube.com in particular, is an effective way to not only reach students, but also capture their attention and interest while increasing retention of academic content. Using…

  12. Content Generation and Social Network Interaction within Academic Library Facebook Pages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Ginna Gauntner

    2014-01-01

    The use of Facebook to share resources and engage patrons continues to gain acceptance within academic libraries. While many studies have analyzed the types of content academic libraries share on Facebook, there has not yet been a full examination of how this content is generated. This article examined the posting methods, the user responses, and…

  13. Investigating Correspondence between Language Proficiency Standards and Academic Content Standards: A Generalizability Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chih-Kai; Zhang, Jinming

    2014-01-01

    Research on the relationship between English language proficiency standards and academic content standards serves to provide information about the extent to which English language learners (ELLs) are expected to encounter academic language use that facilitates their content learning, such as in mathematics and science. Standards-to-standards…

  14. Policy Route Map for Academic Libraries' Digital Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koulouris, Alexandros; Kapidakis, Sarantos

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a policy decision tree for digital information management in academic libraries. The decision tree is a policy guide, which offers alternative access and reproduction policy solutions according to the prevailing circumstances (for example acquisition method, copyright ownership). It refers to the digital information life cycle,…

  15. Academic Library Web Sites and Distance Education: A Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurkowski, Odin L.

    2004-01-01

    This study focuses on college and university library services provided to distance education students and a content analysis of library Web sites. The Web sites chosen were categorized by the amount of distance education the institution offered to students. Results indicated that the size of the institution had the strongest correlation to library…

  16. Bird Boxes Build Content Area Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cianca, Sherri Ann

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a preservice teacher training in line with meeting the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) using geometric reasoning, spatial sense, measurement, representation, communication, and problem solving. The author infers that when preservice teachers lack pedagogical content knowledge they cannot successfully…

  17. Rationale and Content for English-Language Arts. Survey of Academic Skills: Grade 12. Preliminary Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    As a preliminary version of the rationale and content for the English-language arts portion of the "Survey of Academic Skills: Grade 12," this booklet describes elements of the new reading and editing tests to be used to complement a direct writing assessment in this part of the 1987-88 California Assessment Program (CAP). After a brief…

  18. Sustained Content Teaching in Academic ESL/EFL: A Practical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pally, Marcia, Ed.

    This edited volume provides a rationale for and classroom examples of the effective use of content-based instruction in English-as-Second/English-as-a-Foreign-Language (ESL/EFL), in which the study of an academic subject is sustained over time. Each chapter provides the following: detailed course descriptions; practical suggestions for developing…

  19. Navigating Uncharted Waters: An Accelerated Content-Based English for Academic Purposes Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Kelly; Thomas, Michelle; Schuemann, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, Miami Dade College received a $1.9 million Title V grant from the US Department of Education to develop an Accelerated Content-Based English for Academic Purposes (EAP) track called Project ACE for ESL students. The ACE curriculum is anchored by the principles of flexibility, contextualization, and faculty buy-in--critical matters given…

  20. Content Area Literacy: Relationship between Lesson Design and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens-Kristenson, Jodi

    2013-01-01

    Despite Minnesota's investment in professional development in content area literacy, secondary students are not showing expected literacy gains. A lack of literacy proficiency limits future options for students. The purpose of this study was to examine content-area literacy strategy inclusion and its relationship to professional development…

  1. Basic Literacy through the Content Areas in the Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, David L.

    One of the necessities of basic literacy--basic knowledge--is divided into specific content area disciplines for instructional purposes; but the other need--competence in language skills--can and should be taught by teachers in all disciplines. High school content area teachers can promote the tenets of basic literacy by emphasizing the effective…

  2. Past and Future Directions in Content Area Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Tom; O'Brien, David

    2013-01-01

    In this column, content area literacy scholars Tom Bean and David O'Brien challenge the older "infusion" model of content area literacy with its emphasis on generic strategies. Rather, they argue for and provide examples of projects that draw on the unique dimensions of various disciplines like history, science, and English, particularly in light…

  3. Content Area Reading and Writing: Practices and Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulusoy, Mustafa; Dedeoglu, Hakan

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate science, social studies, and classroom teachers' reading and writing practices, and to investigate their beliefs about content area reading and writing. One hundred and forty-three teachers filled out the survey developed to learn their content area reading and writing practices and beliefs. In the…

  4. Supporting Adolescent English Language Learners' Reading in the Content Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Janette K.; Boardman, Alison G.; Eppolito, Amy M.; Schonewise, Estella Almanza

    2012-01-01

    Adolescent English language learners (ELLs) with learning difficulties face many challenges when reading in the content areas. In this article, we review what research tells us about how best to support ELLs' reading comprehension and content learning. We draw from recent research syntheses as well as individual studies. We highlight one…

  5. Collaborative Strategic Reading as a Means To Enhance Peer-Mediated Instruction for Reading Comprehension and Content-Area Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Sharon; Klingner, Janette K.; Bryant, Diane P.

    2001-01-01

    This article summarizes studies conducted with Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR), a program designed to enhance reading comprehension and content-area reading for diverse learners. It describes the stages of CSR development and discusses the role of peer-mediated learning in improving the social and academic outcomes of participating students.…

  6. Pre- and In-Service Teachers' Beliefs about ELLs in Content Area Classes: A Case for Inclusion, Responsibility, and Instructional Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polat, Nihat; Mahalingappa, Laura

    2013-01-01

    This study documents differences between pre- and in-service content area teachers' beliefs about: whether English language learners (ELLs) should be included in content area classes, the kind of instructional support (IS) they should receive, and responsibility for ELLs' language and academic achievement. Questionnaire data were collected from 94…

  7. The presence of academic health sciences libraries on Facebook: the relationship between content and library popularity.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Milian, Rolando; Norton, Hannah F; Tennant, Michele R

    2012-01-01

    Social networks such as Facebook allow libraries to be proactive in reaching their users. While some libraries have popular Facebook pages, it remains unclear what attracts users to these pages. This study evaluates relationships between libraries' Facebook page content and popularity. An analysis of 72 academic health sciences libraries' Facebook pages showed positive correlations between number of library fans and number of tabs, photos, events, and wall posts on Facebook. Libraries posting videos had significantly more fans than libraries without them. This study contributes to an understanding of correlations between content and popularity on Facebook, with implications for library outreach.

  8. What's in a Word? Using Content Vocabulary to "Generate" Growth in General Academic Vocabulary Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanigan, Kevin; Templeton, Shane; Hayes, Latisha

    2012-01-01

    The role of vocabulary knowledge in supporting students' comprehension and understanding of their content-area reading is critical. This article explores how content-area teachers can help students become aware of, understand, and apply generative knowledge about English words to grow and develop their vocabularies. Generative vocabulary…

  9. Using (Re)Valuing Methodology to Understand Content Area Literacy Immersion (CALI): A Journey with Preservice Secondary Content Area Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Veronica M.

    2010-01-01

    The author explored secondary content literacy in four ways: 1) to create and pilot (Re)valuing Methodology; 2) to explore the various contextual issues in secondary content area literacy through (Re)valuing Methodology; 3) to explore the beliefs and perspectives of secondary preservice teachers; and 4) to explore teachers' contextual experiences…

  10. L2 Learning Opportunities in Different Academic Subjects in Content-Based Instruction -- Evidence in Favour of "Conventional Wisdom"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Yuen Yi

    2014-01-01

    Content-based instruction (CBI) adopts a second language (L2) as the medium of instruction for some or all academic subjects to facilitate L2 learning. There seem however, no uniform policies concerning which academic subjects should be taught in L2, in case only some subjects are involved. Conventional wisdom tends to favour Humanities subjects…

  11. Teaching Academic Content and Literacy to English Learners in Elementary and Middle School. IES Practice Guide. NCEE 2014-4012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Scott; Lesaux, Nonie; Jayanthi, Madhavi; Dimino, Joseph; Proctor, C. Patrick; Morris, Joan; Gersten, Russell; Haymond, Kelly; Kieffer, Michael J.; Linan-Thompson, Sylvia; Newman-Gonchar, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    As English learners face the double demands of building knowledge of a second language while learning complex grade-level content, teachers must find effective ways to make challenging content comprehensible for students. This updated English learner practice guide, "Teaching Academic Content and Literacy to English Learners in Elementary and…

  12. Reading Skills Development in Content Areas. Handbook I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton City School Board, VA.

    This handbook, designed as part of the Right to Read Program in Hampton, Virginia, focuses on the development of reading skills within the content area classroom. Sections discussing the instructional and organizational strategies are followed by specific units of study. These individual units include learning objectives or concepts, materials,…

  13. Agriscience Teachers' Concern Profiles for Content Area Reading Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Anna J.; Myers, Brian E.

    2011-01-01

    Although students today will need to rely on text more than in the past, American students are struggling to read and comprehend text. Research has supported the ability of content area reading strategies (CARS) to increase students' ability to read and comprehend text. The purpose of this research was to assess agriscience educators'…

  14. Increasing Secondary Reading Comprehension and Reading Proficiency across Content Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Marty

    2011-01-01

    This action research developed as a response to the researcher's experience with struggling and alliterate readers across all content areas in secondary schools. The researcher witnessed the negative impact of a depressed economy and depressed reading proficiency pervasive among students based on classroom experience and standardized testing. The…

  15. Teaching Content Area Literacy in Informal Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, visits to informal learning environments [ILEs] such as zoos, have historically been considered to be important educational experiences that promote increased student achievement in content-area subjects. Recently, however, funds are more likely to be diverted away from field trip experiences, depriving less-privileged…

  16. Culturally Responsive Instruction: Promoting Literacy in Secondary Content Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Patricia Ruggiano

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how secondary teachers implement culturally responsive literacy instruction in their content areas. Culturally responsive instruction makes connections with students' backgrounds, interests, and experiences to teach the standards-based curriculum. Learning becomes more meaningful and relevant as teachers…

  17. Teaching Disciplinary Literacy to Adolescents: Rethinking Content-Area Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shanahan, Timothy; Shanahan, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    In this article, Timothy and Cynthia Shanahan argue that "disciplinary literacy"--advanced literacy instruction embedded within content-area classes such as math, science, and social studies--should be a focus of middle and secondary school settings. Moving beyond the oft-cited "every teacher a teacher of reading" philosophy…

  18. Mathematics in Content Areas. MICA. A Teacher Training Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Bessie C.

    Although skill in mathematics will be a crucial human resource in the future, there is a national disaffection with and fear of mathematics. To reverse this situation, all teachers should be required to have inservice instruction in mathematics, focusing on how mathematics supports and relates to specific content areas. Teachers' avoidance of and…

  19. What Content-Area Teachers Should Know about Adolescent Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institute for Literacy, 2007

    2007-01-01

    A growing research base on adolescent literacy supports an emphasis on direct instruction in the reading and writing skills needed to perform these more complex literacy tasks. However, many middle and high school teachers have little or no preparation for teaching these skills within their content-area disciplines and have few resources upon…

  20. An Evaluation of the Air Force Logistics Career Area Advanced Academic Degree Position Validation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biehl, Aleck L.; Sonnier, Ronald J.

    Reduced funding for educational programs indicated that a thorough review should be made of the Advanced Academic Degree (AAD) validation process. This reduction in funding necessitates more effective management of the AAD program in the logistics career areas to insure that officers in these career areas require those skills learned through these…

  1. Library Applications of a Wide Area Network: Promoting JANET to UK Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacColl, John A.

    1990-01-01

    Describes Project Jupiter, which was developed to promote the United Kingdom's Joint Academic Network (JANET) to its member libraries. Library uses of JANET are described, including online catalogs, commercial services, and electronic mail; the convergence of local area networks (LANs) and wide area networks (WANs) is discussed; and future…

  2. Selecting a Local Area Network for an Academic Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aman, Mohammed M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes the process used to select a local area network (LAN) for the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Library and Information Science. The use of computers at the library school by staff, faculty, and students is described, technical aspects of a LAN are explained, and the future of LANs is discussed. (LRW)

  3. Inquiring into Pre-Service Content Area Teachers' Development of Literacy Practices and Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitton Kukner, Jennifer; Murray Orr, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this qualitative multi-year case study is on preservice teachers' experiences related to the development of their literacy practices in teaching high school science, math, social studies and other content area courses during their final field placement in a teacher education program. Results indicate tangible indicators of overall…

  4. Inequality in Academic Performance and Juvenile Convictions: An Area-Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabates, Ricardo; Feinstein, Leon; Shingal, Anirudh

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the links between inequality in academic performance and juvenile conviction rates for violent crime, stealing from another person, burglary in a dwelling and racially motivated offences. We use area-based aggregate data to model this relationship. Our results show that, above and beyond impacts of absolute access to…

  5. Challenges Facing Women Academic Leadership in Secondary Schools of Irbid Educational Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Jaradat, Mahmoud Khaled Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the challenges facing women academic leadership in secondary schools of Irbid Educational Area. A random sample of 187 female leaders were chosen. They responded to a 49-item questionnaire prepared by the researcher. The items were distributed into four domains: organizational, personal, social and physical…

  6. Insert Student Here: Why Content Area Constructions of Literacy Matter for Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gritter, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    This article explores content area pre-service teacher beliefs about disciplinary knowledge, perceptions of effective content area teaching, and existing beliefs about how to integrate literacy into the content areas. Ten pre-service teachers across ten secondary content areas were asked to describe three important variables in secondary teaching:…

  7. Identifying and Exploring Future Trends Impacting on Academic Libraries: A Mixed Methodology Using Journal Content Analysis, Focus Groups, and Trend Reports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwyer, Roisin

    2015-01-01

    This article compares three sources of information about academic libraries to consider what the future could hold and the skills needed to deliver effective services within that future. The starting point is the contents of "New Review of Academic Librarianship" (formerly "British Journal of Academic Librarianship") from 1986,…

  8. Academic Majors and Subject-Area Certifications of Health Education Teachers in the United States, 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardina, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify academic preparation and subject-area certifications of K-12 public school staff teaching at least one health education class during 2011-2012 academic year. In general, teachers who are well qualified to teach a subject area are more likely to positively affect student achievement. Methods: Data…

  9. Making Standards Work! A Teacher's Guide to Contextual Learning: Integrating Academic Content Standards with Career Development and Workplace Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado School to Career Partnership, Denver.

    This publication is a tool to help educators weave academic content standards, assessments, and school-to-career methods into an integrated and comprehensive educational strategy that prepares all students to meet their future goals. Examples included in the publication were created by Colorado educators to provide a vision of how teachers can…

  10. 10 Content-Area Literacy Strategies for Art, Mathematics, Music, and Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ming, Kavin

    2012-01-01

    Content-area literacy involves the use of research-based learning strategies that help students effectively and efficiently gain content knowledge. Its use is fundamental to all content areas, not just to those that rely heavily on printed materials. One of the major goals of content-area instruction is to produce critical thinkers and problem…

  11. Mercury content in mushroom species in the Cordoba area

    SciTech Connect

    Zurera, G.; Rincon, F.; Arcos, F.; Pozo-Lora, R.

    1986-05-01

    Numerous investigations have established that fish is the food which shows the highest levels of mercury, thus being the most hazardous for humans. Recently much research has been carried out in several places of Europe on the high capacity of mushrooms to accumulate heavy metals. It has been noticed that the various species differ in their tendency to accumulate heavy metals. Two genera in which mercury accumulation was very marked are Agaricus and Lycoperdon. It is suggested that members of the genus Agaricus could be used as indicator organisms in the study of mercury pollution. The object of the present paper is to provide data on the levels of mercury contents in mushroom species collected in the Cordoba area (Spain).

  12. Academic Conversations: Classroom Talk That Fosters Critical Thinking and Content Understandings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwiers, Jeff; Crawford, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Where would we be without conversation? Throughout history, conversations have allowed us to see different perspectives, build ideas, and solve problems. Conversations, particularly those referred to in this book as academic conversations, push students to think and learn in lasting ways. Academic conversations are back-and-forth dialogues in…

  13. Contemporary Development of Academic Reference Librarianship in the United States: A 44-Year Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hanrong; Tang, Yingqi; Knight, Carley

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzes job advertisements to identify the contemporary development of academic reference librarianship in the United States. Results show that more job openings, higher educational backgrounds, more duties & responsibilities, and variety of titles were assigned to academic reference librarian positions from 1966 through 2009.…

  14. Language, Content and Skills in the Testing of English for Academic Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamaroff, R.

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated the consistency of criteria for academic English skills as applied by teachers of academic English and science lecturers in a South African historically black university. Both groups were asked to evaluate first-year students' essays on the greenhouse effect. Results indicated a wide variation in scores and judgments within…

  15. The Relationship between Bible Literacy and Behavioral and Academic Outcomes in Urban Areas: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeynes, William

    2010-01-01

    A meta-analysis is undertaken, including 11 studies, to determine whether there is a relationship between Bible knowledge on one hand and academic and behavioral outcomes on the other among those living in urban areas. The results indicate that increased Bible knowledge is associated with higher levels of student academic achievement and positive…

  16. Beyond Bells and Whistles: Content Area Teachers' Understanding of and Engagement with Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huysman, Mary

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative action research study was to explore content area teachers' understanding of literacy, the strategies they use in working with content materials to support their students' learning of content, and how collaboration with a literacy expert informs literacy instruction. In my work with content area teachers,…

  17. The Third Language of Academic English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwiers, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Academic language is the linguistic glue that holds the tasks, texts, and tests of school together. If students can't use this glue well, their academic work is likely to fall apart. According to the author of this article, "academic language" is defined as the set of words and phrases that (1) describe content-area knowledge and procedures; (2)…

  18. Contributions of Study Skills to Academic Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettinger, Maribeth; Seibert, Jill K.

    2002-01-01

    Study skills are fundamental to academic competence. Effective study skills are associated with positive outcomes across multiple academic content areas and for diverse learners. The purpose of this article is to describe an information-processing perspective on the contribution of study skills to academic competence, and to identify…

  19. Place-Based Essay Writing and Content Area Literacy Instruction for Preservice Secondary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesley, Mellinee; Matthews, Marian

    2009-01-01

    As teacher educators, we discuss the ways place-based inquiry can be incorporated into content area literacy instruction with preservice secondary teachers to strengthen an understanding of discipline-specific applications for content area literacy. We begin with a discussion of content area literacy as a situated experience and examine the ways…

  20. New Mexico Language Arts Content Area Standards and Benchmarks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Paul

    This guide states that New Mexico's Language Arts Content Standards and Benchmarks are built upon the Competency Frameworks adopted by the State Board of Education in 1992. The guide further states that the first two content standards are comprised of Unifying Concepts that represent universal language skills that apply not only to language arts,…

  1. Cooperative Learning: Integrating Language and Content-Area Instruction. Teacher Resource Guide Series, Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, Lorraine Valdez, Comp.

    Insights gained from experience and research on language minority students' academic success are reviewed as background for presentation of a curriculum that is bilingual and content-based and uses cooperative learning techniques. First, findings on three elements of success (interest and motivation, intelligence and development, and psychosocial…

  2. Supporting Adolescent Literacy across the Content Areas. Perspectives on Policy and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meltzer, Julie

    Literacy--the ability to read, write, speak, listen, and think effectively--enables adolescents to learn and to communicate clearly in and out of school. Adolescents need to have strong literacy skills so that they can understand academic content, communicate in a credible way, participate in cultural communities, and negotiate the world. The…

  3. Expository Content Area Texts, Cognitive Style and Gender: Their Effects on Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hite, Clare E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if cognitive style (field dependence/independence [FD/I]) and gender interact with passage content to affect reading comprehension. Research on FD/I and its relationship to reading-related and other academic tasks served as the theoretical and empirical basis for the study. While most of the…

  4. Academic Commentary Faculty Development: Some Thoughts About the Process and Content

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, M. W.

    1979-01-01

    Faculty development, particularly that aspect of it concerned with increasing the educational and teaching skills of faculty members, is currently a major issue for medicine in general—and family medicine in particular. This article presents the author's views about what might be aspects of the guiding philosophy and content of such a program of faculty development, where it is concerned with increasing teaching skills. These views have been distilled over several years of personal growth and development, whilst working in this area as an educator within the RACGP's family medicine program, as a participant and facilitator in international workshops examining related topics, and most recently as a visiting professor within the McGill Department of Family Medicine at Jewish General Hospital, Montreal. PMID:21297745

  5. Using Collaboration, Co-Teaching, and Question Answer Relationships to Enhance Content Area Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenty, Nicole S.; McDuffie-Landrum, Kim; Fisher, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents who struggle in the area of literacy tend to experience difficulty accessing texts across many different content areas. These students could benefit from increased collaborative interactions between general education content area teachers, special education teachers, and other school personnel with expertise in the area of literacy…

  6. Modularization and Structured Markup for Learning Content in an Academic Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schluep, Samuel; Bettoni, Marco; Schar, Sissel Guttormsen

    2006-01-01

    This article aims to present a flexible component model for modular, web-based learning content, and a simple structured markup schema for the separation of content and presentation. The article will also contain an overview of the dynamic Learning Content Management System (dLCMS) project, which implements these concepts. Content authors are a…

  7. Balance Between Merit and Equity in Academic Hiring Decisions: Judgemental Content Analysis Applied to the Phraseology of Australian Tenure-Stream Advertisements in Comparison with Canadian Advertisements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Gregory J.; Furedy, John J.; Neumann, David L.; Westbury, H. Rae; Reiestad, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    The wording of university academic job advertisements can reflect a commitment to equity (affirmative action) as opposed to academic merit in hiring decisions. The method of judgemental content analysis was applied by having three judges rate 810 Australian tenure-stream advertisements on seven-point magnitude scales of equity and merit. The…

  8. Making Sense of Principal Leadership in Content Areas: The Case of Secondary Math and Science Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochmiller, Chad R.; Acker-Hocevar, Michele

    2016-01-01

    We drew upon sense making and leadership content knowledge to explore how high school administrators' understanding of content areas informed their leadership. We used math and science to illustrate our interpretations, noting that other content areas may pose different challenges. We found that principals' limited understanding of these content…

  9. Integrating the Language Arts and Content Areas: Effective Research-Based Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapp, Diane; Fisher, Douglas; Flood, James

    1999-01-01

    Teachers can confront issues of students' infrequent reading and infrequent choice of content area texts by using specific instructional strategies that are highly motivating. Five research-based language arts strategies that many teachers use to successfully teach content area information are: (1) previewing vocabulary and content; (2) developing…

  10. Characteristics of Literacy Instruction That Support Reform in Content Area Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siebert, Daniel K.; Draper, Roni Jo; Barney, Daniel; Broomhead, Paul; Grierson, Sirpa; Jensen, Amy P.; Nielson, Jennifer; Nokes, Jeffery D.; Shumway, Steven; Wimmer, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Current reforms in content area education present new challenges for literacy educators. These reforms promote engaging students in the practices of the disciplines--teaching students how to participate in an activity in which disciplinary content is produced. Content area literacy (CAL) instruction that supports only the learning of general…

  11. Telecommuting Academics within an Open Distance Education Environment of South Africa: More Content, Productive, and Healthy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tustin, Deon Harold

    2014-01-01

    Outside an academic setting, telecommuting has become fairly popular in recent years. However, research on telecommuting practices within a higher education environment is fairly sparse, especially within the higher distance education sphere. Drawing on existing literature on telecommuting and the outcome of a valuation study on the success of an…

  12. The Effects of Arts Integration on Long-Term Retention of Academic Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardiman, Mariale; Rinne, Luke; Yarmolinskaya, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Previous correlational and quasi-experimental studies of arts integration--the pedagogical practice of "teaching through the arts"--suggest its value for enhancing cognitive, academic, and social skills. This study reports the results of a small, preliminary classroom-based experiment that tested effects of arts integration on long-term…

  13. Integrating Academic Content into Business Education: Results from Research in Illinois.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Thomas S.; And Others

    Illinois State University and University of Illinois faculty collaborated to pilot test and evaluate Applied Academics curricula in Illinois. Three sets of pilot sites included the following: (1) 14 local education agencies that pilot tested Applied Communications and/or Mathematics; (2) 10 sites at which vocational teachers collaborated with…

  14. Developing Reading Comprehension and Academic Vocabulary for English Language Learners through Science Content: A Formative Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taboada, Ana; Rutherford, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    This formative experiment explored the extent to which two instructional frameworks that varied in the explicitness of academic vocabulary instruction, comprehension strategy instruction, and supports for student autonomy influenced reading comprehension, vocabulary acquisition, perceptions of autonomy supports, and reading engagement in…

  15. Using Video Modeling and Video Prompting to Teach Core Academic Content to Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellems, Ryan O.; Edwards, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Practitioners are constantly searching for evidence-based practices that are effective in teaching academic skills to students with learning disabilities (LD). Video modeling (VM) and video prompting have become popular instructional interventions for many students across a wide range of different disability classifications, including those with…

  16. Embedding Reading Comprehension Training in Content-Area Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joanna P.; Stafford, K. Brooke; Lauer, Kristen D.; Hall, Kendra M.; Pollini, Simonne

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of comprehension training embedded in a program that taught science content to 2nd graders. The program included instruction about the structure of compare-contrast expository text, emphasizing clue words, generic questions, graphic organizers, and the close analysis of well-structured text exemplars. This…

  17. Racial-ethnic identity in mid-adolescence: content and change as predictors of academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Altschul, Inna; Oyserman, Daphna; Bybee, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    Three aspects of racial-ethnic identity (REI)-feeling connected to one's racial-ethnic group (Connectedness), being aware that others may not value the in-group (Awareness of Racism), and feeling that one's in-group is characterized by academic attainment (Embedded Achievement)-were hypothesized to promote academic achievement. Youth randomly selected from 3 low-income, urban schools (n=98 African American, n=41 Latino) reported on their REI 4 times over 2 school years. Hierarchical linear modeling shows a small increase in REI and the predicted REI-grades relationship. Youth high in both REI Connectedness and Embedded Achievement attained better grade point average (GPA) at each point in time; youth high in REI Connectedness and Awareness of Racism at the beginning of 8th grade attained better GPA through 9th grade. Effects are not moderated by race-ethnicity.

  18. Hydroponics: Content and Rationale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Busby, Joe R.

    2009-01-01

    Technology education has the means of becoming the catalyst for integrated content and curricula, especially in core academic areas, such as science and mathematics, where it has been found difficult to incorporate other subject matter. Technology is diverse enough in nature that it can be addressed by a variety of content areas, serving as a true…

  19. Writing in the Content Areas: A Norwegian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzberg, Frøydis; Roe, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Since 2006, literacy skills have been mandated as an integral part of all subject areas at all levels (grades 1-13) in Norwegian schools. With the exception of reading, evaluation reports show that teaching in general seems to be little affected by this reform. During the last few years, however, there has been a noticeable growth in interest in…

  20. Effects of Genre and Content Knowledge on Historical Thinking with Academically Diverse High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De La Paz, Susan; Wissinger, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Historians use a range of genres in presenting their subjects, yet educators have increasingly privileged argumentation to help novices to reason with historical content. However, the influence genre and content knowledge are relatively unmeasured in this discipline. To learn more, the authors asked 101 eleventh-grade students to compose an…

  1. Technical Communications in OSS Content Management Systems: An Academic Institutional Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cripps, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Single sourcing through a content management system (CMS) is altering technical communication practices in many organizations, including institutions of higher education. Open source software (OSS) solutions are currently among the most popular content management platforms adopted by colleges and universities in the United States and abroad. The…

  2. A Project for Everyone: English Language Learners and Technology in Content-Area Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egbert, Joy

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of student participation in classroom projects when learning English as a second language highlights conditions that support language and content learning; approaches that can facilitate language and content learning; and what technology and other resources support English language learners in content-area classrooms. Uses a project on…

  3. "Why Are There so Many Words in Math?": Planning for Content-Area Vocabulary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Antony T.; Angotti, Robin L.

    2012-01-01

    Vocabulary presents a challenge to students in content area classes, making it difficult to understand new concepts and make connections to background knowledge. This article describes the 5 Cs, a tool developed to help content area teachers consider vocabulary as part of lesson planning. By selecting a set of key words for instruction, teachers…

  4. Applying a Cohesive Set of Comprehension Strategies to Content-Area Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Elizabeth; Edmonds, Meaghan S.; Hairrell, Angela; Vaughn, Sharon; Simmons, Deborah C.

    2011-01-01

    Upper elementary content-area teachers often face the challenge of how to make content-area text more accessible and learnable for their students. Whereas there exists a range of comprehension strategies that can be applied to informational text, the premium on instructional time leaves teachers in search of a cohesive, efficient, and effective…

  5. The Synergy of Poetry and Content Areas: Reading Poetry across the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salas, Laura Purdie; Wong, Janet; Bentley-Flannery, Paige; Hahn, Mary Lee; Jules, Jacqueline; Mordhorst, Heidi; Vardell, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Poetry can enhance all content areas. This article shares highlights from the 2014 CLA Master Class focused on using poetry in math, science, social studies, the arts, and physical education/movement. Presenters and participants read poems, asked questions, and engaged in lively discussions about using poetry to enhance all content areas. Chair…

  6. The Identification of Reading Skills Essential for Learning in Seven Content Areas at Postelementary Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Beverly

    A questionnaire was designed to give content area teachers an opportunity to review 35 reading/learning skills that are necessary for vocabulary development, the comprehension of written materials, and the efficient use of study time. Over 400 secondary school teachers in seven content areas (English/language arts, social studies, science,…

  7. Writing to Learn across the Curriculum: Tools for Comprehension in Content Area Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knipper, Kathy J.; Duggan, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Mastery of content area reading in science and social studies is demonstrated through writing as well as reading. Integrating writing with reading enhances comprehension because the two are reciprocal processes. Therefore, teachers who implement a variety of writing strategies help students better understand content area texts. This article offers…

  8. Students' Attitudes, Academic Performance and Preferences for Content Delivery in a Very Large Self-Care Course Redesign.

    PubMed

    Camiel, Lana Dvorkin; Mistry, Amee; Schnee, David; Tataronis, Gary; Taglieri, Catherine; Zaiken, Kathy; Patel, Dhiren; Nigro, Stefanie; Jacobson, Susan; Goldman, Jennifer

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To evaluate students' performance/attitudes toward a flipped team-based learning (TBL) format in a "very large" self-care course based on student content delivery preference. Design. Third-year students enrolled in the course were surveyed regarding elements of redesign and homework completion. Additionally, their performance and incoming grade point average were evaluated. Assessment. A survey was completed by 286 of 305 students. Nineteen percent of respondents preferred traditional content delivery, whereas 30% preferred flipped TBL, 48% preferred a mixed format, and 3% had no preference. The grades achieved in the course were: A (49%), B (48%), C (3%) and D (0%). The majority completed "all" or "most" of the homework, appreciated attributes of course redesign, felt home preparation and in-class activities engaged them, and reported improved communication/evaluation skills. Content delivery preference significantly affected attitudes. Conclusion. Students positively received a flipped team-based learning classroom format, especially those who preferred flipped TBL or mixed content delivery. A minority with preference for traditional teaching style did not enjoy the new format; however, their academic performance did not differ significantly from those who did. PMID:27293234

  9. Students' Attitudes, Academic Performance and Preferences for Content Delivery in a Very Large Self-Care Course Redesign.

    PubMed

    Camiel, Lana Dvorkin; Mistry, Amee; Schnee, David; Tataronis, Gary; Taglieri, Catherine; Zaiken, Kathy; Patel, Dhiren; Nigro, Stefanie; Jacobson, Susan; Goldman, Jennifer

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To evaluate students' performance/attitudes toward a flipped team-based learning (TBL) format in a "very large" self-care course based on student content delivery preference. Design. Third-year students enrolled in the course were surveyed regarding elements of redesign and homework completion. Additionally, their performance and incoming grade point average were evaluated. Assessment. A survey was completed by 286 of 305 students. Nineteen percent of respondents preferred traditional content delivery, whereas 30% preferred flipped TBL, 48% preferred a mixed format, and 3% had no preference. The grades achieved in the course were: A (49%), B (48%), C (3%) and D (0%). The majority completed "all" or "most" of the homework, appreciated attributes of course redesign, felt home preparation and in-class activities engaged them, and reported improved communication/evaluation skills. Content delivery preference significantly affected attitudes. Conclusion. Students positively received a flipped team-based learning classroom format, especially those who preferred flipped TBL or mixed content delivery. A minority with preference for traditional teaching style did not enjoy the new format; however, their academic performance did not differ significantly from those who did.

  10. Students’ Attitudes, Academic Performance and Preferences for Content Delivery in a Very Large Self-Care Course Redesign

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Amee; Schnee, David; Tataronis, Gary; Taglieri, Catherine; Zaiken, Kathy; Patel, Dhiren; Nigro, Stefanie; Jacobson, Susan; Goldman, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate students’ performance/attitudes toward a flipped team-based learning (TBL) format in a “very large” self-care course based on student content delivery preference. Design. Third-year students enrolled in the course were surveyed regarding elements of redesign and homework completion. Additionally, their performance and incoming grade point average were evaluated. Assessment. A survey was completed by 286 of 305 students. Nineteen percent of respondents preferred traditional content delivery, whereas 30% preferred flipped TBL, 48% preferred a mixed format, and 3% had no preference. The grades achieved in the course were: A (49%), B (48%), C (3%) and D (0%). The majority completed “all” or “most” of the homework, appreciated attributes of course redesign, felt home preparation and in-class activities engaged them, and reported improved communication/evaluation skills. Content delivery preference significantly affected attitudes. Conclusion. Students positively received a flipped team-based learning classroom format, especially those who preferred flipped TBL or mixed content delivery. A minority with preference for traditional teaching style did not enjoy the new format; however, their academic performance did not differ significantly from those who did. PMID:27293234

  11. Academic Productivity and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Kenneth C.; Gilbert, Steven W.

    1995-01-01

    This article suggests that, although advances in information technology have been interpreted as leading directly to increased college faculty research productivity, the real benefits will be found in the areas of improved content, curriculum, and pedagogy. The existing academic infrastructure and perceived role of faculty are seen as major…

  12. Academic Jibberish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krashen, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about academic jibberish. Alfie Kohn states that a great deal of academic writing is incomprehensible even to others in the same area of scholarship. Academic Jibberish may score points for the writer but does not help research or practice. The author discusses jibberish as a career strategy that impresses those…

  13. Visualisations as a Means for Exploring Academics' Teacher Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevgi, Anne; Löfström, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Academics' teacher identities is a relatively little explored area. This paper explores this through an analysis of drawings by academics. The data consist of 90 drawings. The participants are academics who have attended basic courses in university pedagogy. The drawings were content analysed. In the drawings, the academics expressed…

  14. Performance Gaps between Online and Face-to-Face Courses: Differences across Types of Students and Academic Subject Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Di; Jaggars, Shanna S.

    2014-01-01

    Using a dataset containing nearly 500,000 courses taken by over 40,000 community and technical college students in Washington State, this study examines the performance gap between online and face-to-face courses and how the size of that gap differs across student subgroups and academic subject areas. While all types of students in the study…

  15. Salvaging "Academic Disaster Areas": The Black College Response to Christopher Jencks and David Riesman's 1967 Harvard Educational Review Article

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasman, Marybeth

    2006-01-01

    In 1967, the "Harvard Educational Review" published an article entitled "The American Negro College" by Christopher Jencks and David Riesman. The article dealt a stinging blow to Black colleges--labeling them "academic disaster areas." Using a historical methodology, I show the strategic ways in which Black college leaders and the United Negro…

  16. The Academic Performance and Persistence Pattern of a Select Group of Developmental Students at Harrisburg Area Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basonic, N. Lorraine Yovanovich

    In 1981, a study was conducted to investigate the academic performance and persistence patterns of developmental students who matriculated at Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC) between 1977 and 1979. Specifically, the study sought to determine the proportion of developmental students who successfully completed developmental and subsequent…

  17. Home Influences on the Academic Performance of Agricultural Science Students in Ikwuano Local Government Area of Abia State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndirika, Maryann C.; Njoku, U. J.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the home influences on the academic performance of agricultural science secondary school students in Ikwuano Local Government Area of Abia State. The instrument used in data collection was a validated questionnaire structured on a two point rating scale. Simple random sampling technique was used to select…

  18. Content Analysis of International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education: 18 Years of Academic Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidman, Gillian; Papadimitriou, Fivos

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the history of the "International Research in Geographical and Environmental Education" (IRGEE) journal in terms of its sustainable future. The development of geographical and environmental education is evaluated, as reflected from the papers published in the journal "IRGEE". A content analysis of all papers and forum sections…

  19. Misplaced Multiculturalism: Representations of American Indians in U.S. History Academic Content Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Carl B.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative textual analysis investigates the ideological lenses through which U.S. History content standards for grades 5-12 for Arizona and Washington frame interactions between American Indians and European Americans during U.S. national development. The study's multiperspective critical conceptual framework interrogates the standards not…

  20. Content Area Reading Instruction for Secondary Teacher Candidates: A Case Study of a State-Required Online Content Area Reading Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, Brad

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation examined in a state-required, online preservice teacher course in content area reading instruction (CARI) at a large land-grant university in Minnesota. Few studies have been published to date on revitalized literacy teacher preparation efforts in CARI (See Vagle, Dillon, Davison-Jenkins, & LaDuca, 2005; Dillon, O'Brien,…

  1. Learning from Our Mistakes: What Matters When Incorporating Blogging in the Content Area Literacy Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hungerford-Kresser, Holly; Wiggins, Joy; Amaro-Jimenez, Carla

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript explores the inclusion of blogging as a pedagogical tool with preservice secondary teachers from a variety of content areas. The authors focus on data collected over two and a half years with preservice teachers in the content literacy classroom setting, specifically highlighting the qualitative data collected to determine…

  2. Literacy Mash-Up: Discipline-Specific Practices Empower Content-Area Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dostal, Hannah; Gabriel, Rachael

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a process for building teachers' capacity to identify, develop, and engage in discipline-specific literacy instruction that supports both content and literacy aims. This process uses three questions to frame inquiry and guide discussions. Addressing these three questions can empower content-area teachers to incorporate…

  3. Making Standards Work! A Teacher's Guide to Integrating Academic Content Standards and Assessments with Workplace Competencies and School-to-Career Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    This handbook, which is intended for K-12 teachers in Colorado, explains how to integrate academic content standards and assessments with workplace competencies and school-to-career activities. The handbook is divided into four sections. The first presents the Colorado General Workplace Competencies, which describe the skills and knowledge…

  4. A Study of Problem-Based Learning Content Acquisition and Academic Achievement in Career and Technical Education Courses at the Middle-School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation study was to determine if a relationship existed between problem-based learning (PBL) content acquisition and academic achievement on teacher-made tests in Career and Technical Education (CTE) courses at the middle school level. The study sample consisted of 20 seventh-grade students enrolled in a CTE keyboarding…

  5. [Difference of P content in different area substrate of constructed wetland].

    PubMed

    Cao, Xue-Ying; Chong, Yun-Xiao; Yu, Guang-Wei; Zhong, Hai-Tao

    2012-11-01

    Adsorption of substrate is the main removal mechanisms of phosphorus in constructed wetland. It is easily impacted by various environmental factors existing in the wetland bed. The contents of substrate TP and the main inorganic P in different areas of both horizontal sub-surface flow constructed wetland with plant and one without plant were measured after treating wastewater five months. Different areas of the wetland with plant differed greatly in the substrate TP. Rhizosphere substrate in front area had the highest TP content and achieved 0.75 g x kg(-1), and the TP content of non-rhizosphere substrate in back area was only 0.21 g x kg(-1). The TP content of substrate in different areas of the wetland without plant had a little variety and ranged only between 0.21 and 0.27 g x kg(-1). Averagely, the substrate TP content in the wetland with plant was higher than the one in the wetland without plant. The phosphorous with Fe-bound (Fe-P), Al-bound (Al-P), and Ca-bound (Ca-P) were main inorganic phosphorous existing in the substrate in both wetlands, their contents in different areas substrate all increased, compared with the one before experiment. Fe-P and Al-P in different substrates in both wetlands had a similar variety. Their content between rhizosphere and intermediate substrate of front area in the wetland with plant and other area substrate in both wetlands differed greatly because the former increased greatly. Compared with Fe-P and Al-P, the variety of Ca-P in different substrates in both wetlands was low. But the content of Ca-P in rhizosphere substrate in wetland with plant was higher than other two parts respectively in front and back areas. Obviously, the plant root had an impact on the phosphorous content of substrate in constructed wetland. For TP, Fe-P, Al-P, Ca-P and loosely sorbed phosphorous in substrate, it increased with distance of the root.

  6. National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988: Second Follow-up Questionnaire Content Areas and Research Issues. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingels, Steven; Dowd, Katy

    The National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS:88) provides a wealth of information about factors that influence academic performance and social development of students. The focus of this content overview is the research issues addressed by the NELS:88 second followup in 1992. In 1988, by surveying nearly 25,000 eighth graders, their…

  7. Building a Third Space: How Academic Language Knowledge Helps Pre-Service Teachers Develop Content Literacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sussbauer, Erik J.

    2013-01-01

    Though attention to academic language is a key component of the Teacher Performance Assessment and the new Common Core Standards, little has been researched regarding how pre-service teachers build academic language knowledge and integrate it into their practice teaching experience. This study focuses on the construction and delivery of academic…

  8. Reading in the Social Studies and Natural Science Content Area: A Phenomenological Study of the Beliefs, Attitudes, and Strategies Sixth and Seventh Grade Content Area Teachers Use to Teach below Grade Level Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the attitudes and beliefs content teachers have concerning teaching reading in the content area to below level readers and to identify specific instructional strategies that are used to teach students who are below grade level the content area material. Twelve participants were selected, using maximum…

  9. Middle-School Science Students' Scientific Modelling Performances Across Content Areas and Within a Learning Progression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberger, Yael M.; Davis, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on students' ability to transfer modelling performances across content areas, taking into consideration their improvement of content knowledge as a result of a model-based instruction. Sixty-five sixth grade students of one science teacher in an urban public school in the Midwestern USA engaged in scientific modelling practices that were incorporated into a curriculum focused on the nature of matter. Concept-process models were embedded in the curriculum, as well as emphasis on meta-modelling knowledge and modelling practices. Pre-post test items that required drawing scientific models of smell, evaporation, and friction were analysed. The level of content understanding was coded and scored, as were the following elements of modelling performance: explanation, comparativeness, abstraction, and labelling. Paired t-tests were conducted to analyse differences in students' pre-post tests scores on content knowledge and on each element of the modelling performances. These are described in terms of the amount of transfer. Students significantly improved in their content knowledge for the smell and the evaporation models, but not for the friction model, which was expected as that topic was not taught during the instruction. However, students significantly improved in some of their modelling performances for all the three models. This improvement serves as evidence that the model-based instruction can help students acquire modelling practices that they can apply in a new content area.

  10. Quantification of surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy: the concept of effective amorphous surface area.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jeffrey; Burnett, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the use of dispersive surface energy in quantifying surface amorphous content, and the concept of effective amorphous surface area is introduced. An equation is introduced employing the linear combination of surface area normalized square root dispersive surface energy terms. This equation is effective in generating calibration curves when crystalline and amorphous references are used. Inverse gas chromatography is used to generate dispersive surface energy values. Two systems are investigated, and in both cases surface energy data collected for physical mixture samples comprised of amorphous and crystalline references fits the predicted response with good accuracy. Surface amorphous content of processed lactose samples is quantified using the calibration curve, and interpreted within the context of effective amorphous surface area. Data for bulk amorphous content is also utilized to generate a thorough picture of how disorder is distributed throughout the particle. An approach to quantifying surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy is presented. Quantification is achieved by equating results to an effective amorphous surface area based on reference crystalline, and amorphous materials. PMID:21725707

  11. Teaching a Graduate Content Area Reading Course Via the Internet: Confessions of an Experienced Neophyte.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, H. Jon; Wolf, Page J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a course that was designed to provide instruction in the methods and procedures that can be utilized to enhance student comprehension of textbooks and other printed materials that are encountered in a content area. Discusses instructor concerns, the support system, planning, course assignments, students, instructor workload, and course…

  12. A Different Kind of Diversity: Collaboration across Content Areas Intensifies Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Ryan R.; Sousanis, Nick

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of DNA is a classic example of the importance of working across content areas. Conceptually, interdisciplinarity can be fuzzy. Thankfully, scholars like Allen Repko and Julie Thompson Klein offer definitions one can build on. Klein (1990) sees interdisciplinarity as a bridge that links different disciplines while restructuring and…

  13. Sustaining Collaboration: English-as-a-Second-Language, and Content-Area Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawan, Faridah; Ortloff, Jeremy H.

    2011-01-01

    This research is an investigation into English as a Second Language (ESL) and content area teachers' perceptions of collaboration after they completed a joint professional development program called the Collaborative Teaching Institute (CTI). The overall objective of the study was to identify how CTI and other joint professional development…

  14. Athletic Trainers' Perceptions of the Importance, Preparation and Time Spent in the Athletic Training Content Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Context: Graduates of professional programs accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education are expected to be competent and proficient in the athletic training content areas. Objective: The unique skills and knowledge that an athletic trainer (AT) must possess may have more importance in one clinical setting than in…

  15. Content Area Bilingual Education: Project CABE 1988-89. OREA Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berney, Tomi D.; Lista, Carlos A.

    Project CABE (Content Area Bilingual Education) offered instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL) and Native Language Arts (NLA) to 823 limited English proficient Spanish-Speaking students in grades 1 through 9 in 34 schools in Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens (New York). All students were two or more years below level in mathematics and…

  16. Content Area Reading and Disciplinary Literacy: A Case for The Radical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brozo, William G.; Moorman, Gary; Meyer, Carla; Stewart, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Within the past few years literacy scholars have begun voicing serious doubts on theoretical and practical grounds about the efficacy of the longstanding notion that every teacher is a teacher of reading. In this commentary, we add our voices to the conversation around content area literacy as well as offer our perspectives on the recent calls for…

  17. Reading in the Content Areas for Junior High and High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Judith A.

    Reflecting concern for the myriad problems resulting from the presence of poor readers in secondary schools today, this book shows content area teachers why they must and how they can improve students' reading deficiencies. The book provides an explanation of reading skills and learning difficulties in a quick and easy format; activities to…

  18. Previewing Pictures: A Means of Activating Prior Knowledge in Content Area Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchholz, Tom

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the importance prior knowledge plays in learning in the content areas. Discusses previewing pictures as a prereading activity and presents a picture analysis activity which can be used to activate prior knowledge to use as a foundation for good bridge building. (MG)

  19. A Tale of Two Rubrics: Improving Teaching and Learning across the Content Areas through Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kenneth; Connelly, Mary; Komara, Ann

    2008-01-01

    This is a story of two different assessment rubrics, similar in design but different in content area and pedagogical context. One rubric is from a course in the College of Arts and Media in an advanced painting class; the other is from the College of Architecture and Planning in a landscape architecture studio design class. Each rubric is…

  20. Redefining Content-Area Literacy Teacher Education: Finding My Voice through Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Roni Jo

    2008-01-01

    In this essay, Roni Jo Draper reflects upon her professional journey as a content-area literacy teacher educator, describing how she first became a literacy teacher educator and how she later came to collaborate with a group of teacher educators who specialize in disciplines such as music, theater, and mathematics. Drawing upon naturalistic data…

  1. Literature-Based Teaching in the Content Areas: 40 Strategies for K-8 Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Carole

    2011-01-01

    Grounded in theory and best-practices research, this practical text provides teachers with 40 strategies for using fiction and non-fiction trade books to teach in five key content areas: language arts and reading, social studies, mathematics, science, and the arts. Each strategy provides everything a teacher needs to get started: a classroom…

  2. (Re)Imagining Content-Area Literacy Instruction. Language & Literacy Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Roni Jo, Ed.; Broomhead, Paul, Ed.; Jensen, Amy Petersen, Ed.; Nokes, Jeffery D., Ed.; Siebert, Daniel, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Today's teachers need to prepare students for a world that places increasingly higher literacy demands on its citizens. In this timely book, the authors explore content-area literacy and instruction in English, music, science, mathematics, social studies, visual arts, technology, and theatre. Each of the chapters has been written by teacher…

  3. A Reading-Writing Connection in the Content Areas (Secondary Perspectives).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Reading, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Discusses instructional activities designed to foster the reading-writing connection in the content area classroom. Describes the use of "possible sentences," learning logs, freewriting, dialogue journals, the RAFT technique (role, audience, format, and topic), and the "opinion-proof" organization strategy. (RS)

  4. Teaching Communication in Content Area Courses: Another Functional Use of the Liberal Arts Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Charles V.; Cannon, Walter

    This paper describes a unified effort at Central College (Pella, Iowa) to insure that graduates in all content areas achieve competency in the communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking. The discussion focuses on how the program was set up, what its components are, how all the faculty contribute, the positive impact of the…

  5. Resources and instructional strategies effective middle school science teachers use to improve content area reading skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaver, Melanie S.

    This study examined the resources and instructional strategies effective middle school science teachers use to improve content area reading skills. Reading instruction in the middle school years should follow the natural cognitive progression that occurs in the adolescent brain from learning to read to reading to learn. Scientific reading is a different type of reading than most middle school students are accustomed to. It is important to understand that students will continue to be expected to read non-fiction critically for success in the 21st century. Effective teachers know this, and they perceive themselves as teachers of reading regardless of the content area in which their expertise lies. This qualitative research study was conducted at a rural middle school with three science teachers who employ before, during, and after literacy strategies when reading the textbook content with their students. The methodologies used in this study were interviews, observations, and document collection. The results of this study revealed the students' reading difficulties perceived by the teacher participants, the literacy strategies used by the teacher participants, the instructional resources the teacher participants used to improve comprehension, and the need for professional development in content area literacy.

  6. Indiana Academic Standards for Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis.

    This publication presents Indiana's Academic Standards for K-8 social studies grade-by-grade and organized into five content areas: (1) history; (2) civics and government; (3) geography; (4) economics; and (5) individuals, society, and culture (psychology, sociology, and anthropology). For instructional purposes, the content knowledge should be…

  7. Determination of the content of hazardous heavy metals on Larrea tridentata grown around a contaminated area

    SciTech Connect

    Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Polette, L.; Arteaga, S.; Tiemann, K.J.; Bibb, J.; Gonzalez, J.H.

    1996-12-31

    The content of copper, lead, cadmium, and nickel on tissues of Larrea tridentata grown around a contaminated area was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The area was divided into six sections, and each section was studied. Analyses were performed on sample roots, stems, leaves, as well as the soil where the plant grew. Roots showed a high content of the metals, followed by the leaves, and finally the stems, which has the lowest content of the metals. Lead concentrations in roots, leaves, and stems were 650 mg/Kg, 150 mg/Kg, and 110 mg/Kg, respectively, while copper concentrations were 953 mg/Kg, 493 mg/Kg, and 370 mg/Kg, respectively. In contrast, cadmium and nickel concentrations were lower and varied from 30 mg/Kg on roots, 37 mg/Kg on leaves, and 10 mg/Kg on stems for cadmium, and the content of nickel found ranged from 27 mg/Kg on roots, 23 mg/Kg on leaves, and 10 mg/Kg on stems. Soil concentrations were high in site 4 for lead and copper, 5,067 mg/Kg and 4,933 mg/Kg, respectively; lower concentrations were found for cadmium and nickel, 117 mg/Kg and 17 mg/Kg, respectively. The heavy metal content of the soils indicates the degree of pollution in the area. As expected, those sections which contained higher levels of heavy metals in the soil also showed to have higher heavy metal uptake by various parts of Larrea tridentata. These data demonstrate Larrea tridentata`s ability to uptake copper and lead, and to some extent cadmium and nickel, from heavy metal contaminated soils. Analyses of other heavy metals will also be examined.

  8. Preschool Children's Cognitive Style and Their Selection of Academic Areas in Their Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saracho, Olivia N.

    1995-01-01

    Examined children's cognitive style and their play in different play areas according to sex and age. Found that females played most in the physical, block, manipulative, and dramatic play areas, while males played most in block play. Four-year olds played most in physical, block, and dramatic play, while five-year olds most often chose…

  9. Students' and Teachers' Perceptions: An Inquiry into Academic Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolsey, Thomas DeVere; Lapp, Diane; Fisher, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Academic writing is a mainstay of expression in secondary schools. However, many students think of academic writing in terms of local operations that include spelling, punctuation, use of third person, and so on. Teachers may expect mastery of local operations, but often they want students to navigate the terrain of the content area or discipline…

  10. Academic Content and Students with Significant Cognitive Disabilities: How Teacher Interpretation and Choice Impact Access to the General Education Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timberlake, Maria T.

    2013-01-01

    Federal special education policy stipulates that students with disabilities receive access to the general education curriculum but does not prescribe what meaningful access entails. There is little research on how educators interpret their responsibility to create academic access. Street level bureaucracy theory was utilized to explore the…

  11. Using Physical Activity to Teach Academic Content: A Study of the Effects on Literacy in Head Start Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Stacie M.; Vizcarra, Coleman R.; Looney, Erin C.; Kirk, Erik P.

    2014-01-01

    The potential impact of increased physical activity on early literacy skills in preschool children has not been sufficiently explored. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a 6 month, low cost, teacher-directed, academic program that delivered existing literacy lessons using physical activity in Head Start…

  12. Identifying Liaison Opportunities through Content Analysis: Academic Library Trends in the Ecological Society of America's Conference Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Jamie L.

    2013-01-01

    Science and technology librarians need to continually invest time into professional development activities to gain new skills relevant to the faculty and students they serve. Many academic libraries face diminishing budgets and have few travel dollars available for attendance at library and subject-specific conferences. This study determined that…

  13. Integrating Academic Language into Content Methodology: Supporting Math and Science Teacher Candidates to Meet Students' Language Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freking, Frederick; Park, Jaime; Francois, Annamarie

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how a teacher-education program (TEP), whose mission is to improve schooling for linguistically diverse students, develops its' teacher candidate's critical dispositions and pedagogy related to academic-language (AL) development and how candidate performance on PACT can help TEPs better assess and improve how AL…

  14. Early Local Activity in Temporal Areas Reflects Graded Content of Visual Perception.

    PubMed

    Tagliabue, Chiara F; Mazzi, Chiara; Bagattini, Chiara; Savazzi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    In visual cognitive neuroscience the debate on consciousness is focused on two major topics: the search for the neural correlates of the different properties of visual awareness and the controversy on the graded versus dichotomous nature of visual conscious experience. The aim of this study is to search for the possible neural correlates of different grades of visual awareness investigating the Event Related Potentials to reduced contrast visual stimuli whose perceptual clarity was rated on the four-point Perceptual Awareness Scale. Results revealed a left centro-parietal negative deflection (Visual Awareness Negativity; VAN) peaking at 280-320 ms from stimulus onset, related to the perceptual content of the stimulus, followed by a bilateral positive deflection (Late Positivity; LP) peaking at 510-550 ms over almost all electrodes, reflecting post-perceptual processes performed on such content. Interestingly, the amplitude of both deflections gradually increased as a function of visual awareness. Moreover, the intracranial generators of the phenomenal content (VAN) were found to be located in the left temporal lobe. The present data thus seem to suggest (1) that visual conscious experience is characterized by a gradual increase of perceived clarity at both behavioral and neural level and (2) that the actual content of perceptual experiences emerges from early local activation in temporal areas, without the need of later widespread frontal engagement. PMID:27199809

  15. Early Local Activity in Temporal Areas Reflects Graded Content of Visual Perception

    PubMed Central

    Tagliabue, Chiara F.; Mazzi, Chiara; Bagattini, Chiara; Savazzi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    In visual cognitive neuroscience the debate on consciousness is focused on two major topics: the search for the neural correlates of the different properties of visual awareness and the controversy on the graded versus dichotomous nature of visual conscious experience. The aim of this study is to search for the possible neural correlates of different grades of visual awareness investigating the Event Related Potentials to reduced contrast visual stimuli whose perceptual clarity was rated on the four-point Perceptual Awareness Scale. Results revealed a left centro-parietal negative deflection (Visual Awareness Negativity; VAN) peaking at 280–320 ms from stimulus onset, related to the perceptual content of the stimulus, followed by a bilateral positive deflection (Late Positivity; LP) peaking at 510–550 ms over almost all electrodes, reflecting post-perceptual processes performed on such content. Interestingly, the amplitude of both deflections gradually increased as a function of visual awareness. Moreover, the intracranial generators of the phenomenal content (VAN) were found to be located in the left temporal lobe. The present data thus seem to suggest (1) that visual conscious experience is characterized by a gradual increase of perceived clarity at both behavioral and neural level and (2) that the actual content of perceptual experiences emerges from early local activation in temporal areas, without the need of later widespread frontal engagement. PMID:27199809

  16. How Expert Secondary Special Education Teachers Conceptualize Teaching Literacy in Their Content Area to Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauterbach, Alexandra A.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides insight into the cognition of expert content area teachers with specialized knowledge in teaching literacy to students with learning disabilities (LD), with the purpose of developing an understanding of expertise in teaching literacy in the content areas to secondary students with LD. This study used hermeneutic phenomenology…

  17. Under the Big Top: Using the Hartford Circus Fire of 1944 to Teach Literacy Strategies to Connecticut's Content Area Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morse, M. Lynn

    2008-01-01

    This article concerns the use of an historical event to teach interdisciplinary design and reading strategies to content area preservice teachers at a Connecticut state university. The course, a requirement for state certification, seeks to give secondary content area teachers strategies to help struggling readers. Teachers from all subject areas…

  18. Powerful Voices and Pens: Developing Critical Stance with Adolescent Literacy in Content-Area Pre-Service Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Lina B.

    2012-01-01

    This practitioner-research study investigated the effect critical literacy has on content area preservice teachers' abilities (N = 14) to perceive the sociocultural influences in text. The study further investigated how content area pre-service teachers engage in critical stance during situated reading practices that centered on discussions of…

  19. Historical Tank Content Estimate for the Northwest Quandrant of the Hanford 200 East Area

    SciTech Connect

    Brevick, C.H.; Gaddis, L.A.; Pickett, W.W.

    1994-06-01

    Historical Tank Content Estimate of the Northeast Quadrant provides historical evaluations on a tank by tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground single-shell tanks of the Hanford 200 East area. This report summaries historical information such at waste history, temperature, tank integrity, inventory estimates and tank level history on a tank by tank basis. Tank Farm aerial photos and in-tank photos of each tank are provided. A brief description of instrumentation methods used for waste tank surveillance, along with the components of the data management effort, such as waste status and Transaction Record Summary, Tank Layering Model, Defined Waste Types, and Inventory Estimates to generate these tank content estimates are also given in this report.

  20. Wisconsin's Model Academic Standards for Business. Bulletin No. 9004.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This document contains standards for the academic content of the Wisconsin K-12 curriculum in the area of business. Developed by task forces of educators, parents, board of education members, and employers and employees, the standards cover content, performance, and proficiency areas. They are cross-referenced to the state standards for English…

  1. Content-Area Framework for Conducting Family Meetings for Acutely Ill Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Pon, Natalie C; Gordon, Mollie R; Coverdale, John; Nguyen, Phuong T

    2016-09-01

    Family meetings are a critically important component of managing acutely psychiatrically ill patients, and learning how to conduct such a meeting is critically important in the training of psychiatrists. Because we found no published comprehensive tools that dealt with the biopsychosocial content areas to be covered in family meetings in acute psychiatric settings, we developed and present such a comprehensive tool that is based in part on a review of existing tools utilized by other disciplines. This article describes the specific steps involved in premeeting planning, the formal topic areas that might be canvassed during the meeting, and postmeeting documentation and debriefing. The general content areas for discussion during the meeting include the setting of goals and expectations, relevant history-gathering, assessment of the family's understanding of the issues at stake, formal psychoeducation, and review of specific treatment strategies and clinical progress. The meeting may also include a discussion of resources available to the patient and family members and a review of issues related to the safety of the patient and others, management of early warning signs, and sensitive topics such as trauma, abuse, or violence that may play a role in the presentation or treatment of the patient to best translate established goals into a longer term plan of care. Implementation of this comprehensive and necessarily structured model should enhance the patient's and family's understanding of the issues at stake and should improve satisfaction, promote trust and an effective working alliance, and enhance the quality of the biopsychosocial care plan. PMID:27648507

  2. Homeless Students and Academic Achievement: Evidence from a Large Urban Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Kerri J.

    2016-01-01

    Child homelessness has recently reached levels unprecedented in the United States since the Great Depression. Contemporary research has attempted to isolate the effects of homelessness on education, with mixed results. This study reports results from a study in one large urban area and finds that there is no meaningful difference in achievement…

  3. Validity of Academic Work Indicators in the Projected European Higher Education Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Rafael J.; Moreno, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The competencies achieved, the quantity and distribution of the time employed, and the activities carried out by the student are fundamental elements of the future European Higher Education Area. The present study explores, in a specific course, the current level of some indicators of such elements and their validity. The results highlight the…

  4. Sediment Surface Areas, Organic Content, and Metal Fractionation of Point Mugu Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerra, C. A.; Wong, N.; Khachikian, C. S.

    2002-12-01

    Point Mugu contains one of the largest coastal wetlands ecosystems in California, which includes a Naval Air station, several sewage oxidation ponds and a partly dredged lagoon. Remediation efforts include investigating the feasibility of using the present sewage pond sludge to restore a dredged area in the lagoon. A problem with this approach is the potential release and subsequent environmental impact of the toxic substances from the sludge. Contaminants may become unavailable once sorbed onto particles. In general, this process is a direct function of surface area and organic carbon sorbed onto the sediment. The goal of the current investigation is to provide insight into the biological availability of a suite of metal contaminants in Pt. Mugu marsh sediments by studying changes in the physical and chemical properties of the sediments at horizontal and vertical spatial scales. The surface area and organic carbon for eight cores were measured as well as the first three sequential extraction of a host of metals. We have found that a direct correlation exists between surface area and the organic content of sediments as a function of depth. Surface area and the amount of organic carbon decreases with depth, which could result in higher availability of metals with increasing depth into the sediments.

  5. Leaf Area and Water Content Changes after Permanent and Temporary Storage

    PubMed Central

    Juneau, Kevyn J.; Tarasoff, Catherine S.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate measurements of leaf morphology must be taken to develop models of ecosystem productivity and climate change projections. Once leaves are removed from a plant they begin to lose water and degrade. If specimens cannot be measured immediately after harvest, it is important to store the leaves in a manner that reduces morphological changes. If preserved specimens are used, estimates that closely match fresh measurements need to be calculated. This study examined the change in leaf area after storage treatments and developed models that can be used to more accurately estimate initial leaf area. Fresh leaf area was measured from ten plant species then stored in one of two common storage treatments. After storage, leaf area was re-measured and comparisons were made between species and growth forms. Leaf area decreased the most after permanent storage treatments and the least after temporary storage. Pressed leaves shrunk over 18% while cold storage leaves shrunk under 4%. The woody dicot growth form shrunk the least in all treatments. Shrinkage was positively correlated with initial water content and dissection index, a measure of leaf shape and complexity. PMID:22880051

  6. Historical tank content estimate for the southeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 area

    SciTech Connect

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-14

    The Historical Tank Content Estimate for the Quadrant provides historical information on a tank-by-tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground single-shell tanks for the Hanford 200 Areas. This report summarized historical information such as waste history, level history, temperature history, riser configuration, tank integrity, and inventory estimates on a tank- by-tank basis. Tank farm aerial photographs and interior tank montages are also provided for each tank. A description of the development of data for the document of the inventory estimates provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory are also given in this report.

  7. Historical tank content estimate for the northwest quadrant ofthe Hanford 200 west area

    SciTech Connect

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    The Historical Tank Content Estimate for the Quadrant provides historical information on a tank-by-tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground single-shell tanks for the Hanford 200 West Area. This report summarized historical information such as waste history, level history, temperature history, riser configuration, tank integrity, and inventory estimates on a tank-by-tank basis. Tank farm aerial photographs and interior tank montages are also provided for each tank. A description of the development of data for the document of the inventory estimates provided by Los Alamos National Labo1368ratory are also given in this report.

  8. Historical tank content estimate for the southwest quadrant of the Hanford 200 west area

    SciTech Connect

    Brevick, C.H.; Stroup, J.L.; Funk, J.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-06

    The Historical Tank Content Estimate for the Quadrant provides historical information on a tank-by-tank basis of the radioactive mixed wastes stored in the underground single-shell tanks for the Hanford 200 West Area. This report summarized historical information such as waste history, level history, temperature history, riser configuration, tank integrity, and inventory estimates on a tank- by-tank basis. Tank farm aerial photographs and interior tank montages are also provided for each tank. A description of the development of data for the document of the inventory estimates provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory are also given in this report.

  9. Trace metal content of fish and shellfishes of the Niger delta area of Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Kakulu, S.E.; Osibanjo, O.; Ajayi, S.O.

    1987-01-01

    The trace metal contents of various fish and shellfishes from the Niger delta area of Nigeria were determined. The levels in the shellfishes were higher than those in the fish, which could be due to their being bottom feeders. The levels of fish varied from <0.01-0.10 ..mu..g/g for Cd, < 0.05-3.69 ..mu..g/g for Cu, 0.49-16.52 ..mu..g/g for Fe, and 0.08-6.90 ..mu..g/g for Zn. 15 references, 1 figures, 2 tables.

  10. [Contrast study on natural radioactive nuclides contents of rice between Xiangshan uranium deposit area, Jiangxi and non-uranium depsoit area].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping-Hui; Ye, Chang-Sheng; Xie, Shu-Rong; Rui, Yu-Kui

    2009-07-01

    The contents of natural radioactive nuclides such as uranium and thorium in paddies were analyzed and compared by means of ICP-MS. Totally 14 paddy samples were distinguished into two groups and collected from two rice planting area. One group (12 paddy samples) was collected from the Xiangshan uranium deposit area, Jiangxi province; while the other group (2 samples) collected from non-uranium deposit suburban area of Fuzhou city, Jiangxi, as comparison samples. The distance between the two sampling areas is about 80 kilometers. Before analysis, those paddy samples were continuously carbonized by two hours first, then continuously incinerated for 8 hours at the temperature of 600 degrees centigrade. The results show that the uranium contents in the paddy ash of samples gotten from Xiangshan uranium deposit area range from 0.053 to 1.482 microg x g(-1). The uranium contents of two comparison paddy samples ash are 0.059 and 0.061 microg x g(-1), respectiovely. The average uranium content of paddy ash of uranium deposit area is 0.323 microg x g(-1). Compared with the comparison samples, the uranium contents of paddy ash of uranium deposit area are considerably high, 5.30 times that of non-uranium deposit area. The thorium contents in paddy ash of the uranium deposit area, however, are relatively low and less than that of samples collected from non-uranium deposit area, which range from 0.029 to 0.311 microg x g(-1); The average level is 0.104 microg x g(-1), only about 50% of that of paddy ash sampled from non-urnaium deposit area. Moreover, there is significant linearity correlation between uranium and thorium contents of paddy sampled from Xiangshan uranium deposit area. The positive effects show that the thorium contents of paddy increase as uranium contents of paddy in uranium deposit area increase. The causes for the remarkable difference in uranium contents in paddy between urianium deposit area and non-uranium deposit area are not clear yet. The research on

  11. [Arsenic contents in soil, water, and crops in an e-waste disposal area].

    PubMed

    Yao, Chun-xia; Yin, Xue-bin; Song, Jing; Li, Chen-xi; Qian, Wei; Zhao, Qi-guo; Luo, Yong-ming

    2008-06-01

    In order to study whether disposing electronic wastes and secondary metal smelting could cause an arsenic pollution in the environment or not, Luqiao town, Taizhou City, Zhejiang Province was selected as a study area. The main purpose of this paper was to characterize arsenic contents in the local environment, including waters, sediments, soils and rice, and to assess the potential risk to humans. Additionally, the arsenic spatial distribution property and arsenic uptake-translocation rule in soil-rice system were also studied. The results showed that the average arsenic levels in the surface water and the groundwater were 8.26 microg/L and 18.52 microg/L, respectively, which did not exceed the limiting value of Chinese Environment Standards class III . Whereas,some groundwater exceeded the recommended standard by the WHO for drinking water (10 microg/L). The arsenic (on average 7.11 mg/kg) in paddy soils and arsenic (on average 6.17 mg/kg) in the vegetable garden soils were lower than the value recommended by the National Standard (level I). The average arsenic contents in brown rice and husks were 165.1 microg/kg and 144.2 microg/kg, which was also lower than the Chinese Foods Quality Standard. The arsenic contents between the corresponding soils-rice and husks-brown rice showed significantly positive correlations. By comparison, the arsenic contents of soils and husks collected around electroplating were relatively higher than most of other pollutant sources, indicating the electroplating may lead accumulation of arsenic in the paddy soil-rice system. PMID:18763528

  12. [Arsenic contents in soil, water, and crops in an e-waste disposal area].

    PubMed

    Yao, Chun-xia; Yin, Xue-bin; Song, Jing; Li, Chen-xi; Qian, Wei; Zhao, Qi-guo; Luo, Yong-ming

    2008-06-01

    In order to study whether disposing electronic wastes and secondary metal smelting could cause an arsenic pollution in the environment or not, Luqiao town, Taizhou City, Zhejiang Province was selected as a study area. The main purpose of this paper was to characterize arsenic contents in the local environment, including waters, sediments, soils and rice, and to assess the potential risk to humans. Additionally, the arsenic spatial distribution property and arsenic uptake-translocation rule in soil-rice system were also studied. The results showed that the average arsenic levels in the surface water and the groundwater were 8.26 microg/L and 18.52 microg/L, respectively, which did not exceed the limiting value of Chinese Environment Standards class III . Whereas,some groundwater exceeded the recommended standard by the WHO for drinking water (10 microg/L). The arsenic (on average 7.11 mg/kg) in paddy soils and arsenic (on average 6.17 mg/kg) in the vegetable garden soils were lower than the value recommended by the National Standard (level I). The average arsenic contents in brown rice and husks were 165.1 microg/kg and 144.2 microg/kg, which was also lower than the Chinese Foods Quality Standard. The arsenic contents between the corresponding soils-rice and husks-brown rice showed significantly positive correlations. By comparison, the arsenic contents of soils and husks collected around electroplating were relatively higher than most of other pollutant sources, indicating the electroplating may lead accumulation of arsenic in the paddy soil-rice system.

  13. Success of Academic Failures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meskill, Victor P.

    1971-01-01

    The process of readmission of academically troubled students should be subjected to extensive critical analysis. The human resources represented by the college academic dropout, often overlooked in the past should be reclaimed and channeled into productive areas. (Author)

  14. Field Dependence-Field Independence Cognitive Style, Gender, Career Choice and Academic Achievement of Secondary School Students in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyekuru, Bruno Uchenna

    2015-01-01

    This is a descriptive study that investigated the relationships among field dependence-field independence cognitive style and gender, career choice and academic achievement of secondary school students in Emohua Local Government Area of Rivers State, Nigeria. From the initial sample of 320 senior secondary school one (SS1) students drawn from the…

  15. Alu elements in primates are preferentially lost from areas of high GC content

    PubMed Central

    Brookfield, John FY

    2013-01-01

    The currently-accepted dogma when analysing human Alu transposable elements is that ‘young’ Alu elements are found in low GC regions and ‘old’ Alus in high GC regions. The correlation between high GC regions and high gene frequency regions make this observation particularly difficult to explain. Although a number of studies have tackled the problem, no analysis has definitively explained the reason for this trend. These observations have been made by relying on the subfamily as a proxy for age of an element. In this study, we suggest that this is a misleading assumption and instead analyse the relationship between the taxonomic distribution of an individual element and its surrounding GC environment. An analysis of 103906 Alu elements across 6 human chromosomes was carried out, using the presence of orthologous Alu elements in other primate species as a proxy for age. We show that the previously-reported effect of GC content correlating with subfamily age is not reflected by the ages of the individual elements. Instead, elements are preferentially lost from areas of high GC content over time. The correlation between GC content and subfamily may be due to a change in insertion bias in the young subfamilies. The link between Alu subfamily age and GC region was made due to an over-simplification of the data and is incorrect. We suggest that use of subfamilies as a proxy for age is inappropriate and that the analysis of ortholog presence in other primate species provides a deeper insight into the data. PMID:23717800

  16. How Are We Using What We Know about Literacy Processes in the Content Areas? (When the Principal Asks).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harp, Bill

    1989-01-01

    Examines the application of reading process and writing process research in content area instruction. Provides a chart of characteristics and purposes for various writing formats, including outlining, notetaking, captions, news reports, scripts, and books of facts. (MM)

  17. Carbon content of atmospheric aerosols in a residential area during the wood combustion season in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krecl, Patricia; Ström, Johan; Johansson, Christer

    Carbonaceous aerosol particles were observed in a residential area with wood combustion during wintertime in Northern Sweden. Filter samples were analyzed for elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) content by using a thermo-optical transmittance method. The light-absorbing carbon (LAC) content was determined by employing a commercial Aethalometer and a custom-built particle soot absorption photometer. Filter samples were used to convert the optical signals to LAC mass concentrations. Additional total PM 10 mass concentrations and meteorological parameters were measured. The mean and standard deviation mass concentrations were 4.4±3.6 μg m -3 for OC, and 1.4±1.2 μg m -3 for EC. On average, EC accounted for 10.7% of the total PM 10 and the contribution of OC to the total PM 10 was 35.4%. Aethalometer and custom-built PSAP measurements were highly correlated ( R2=0.92). The hourly mean value of LAC mass concentration was 1.76 μg m -3 (median 0.88 μg m -3) for the winter 2005-2006. This study shows that the custom-built PSAP is a reliable alternative for the commercial Aethalometer with the advantage of being a low-cost instrument.

  18. The Effectiveness of Using Vocal Music as the Content Area of English Immersion Classes for Japanese Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Steven Gene

    2012-01-01

    This study set out to determine if English can be taught effectively to Japanese children through a content-based instruction program that uses vocal music as the content area. A total of 240 children participated in the study. The treatment group at a private elementary school in Tokyo received weekly vocal music lessons taught in English for one…

  19. From Literacy Strategies to Disciplined Inquiry: My Journey with Pre-Service Teachers in a Content Area Reading Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsener, Anne A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent calls have been made for content area literacy instruction to extend beyond the teaching of general literacy strategies as tools to use with any content text to a more disciplinary literacy approach that would support students in learning literacy practices specific to a discipline. This practitioner inquiry is my investigation into what…

  20. Vision-specific health-related quality of life: content areas for nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Scilley, Kay; Owsley, Cynthia

    2002-08-01

    Nursing home residents have a high prevalence of remediable visual impairment and blindness. Future research on the effectiveness of providing eye care to nursing home residents will need to include a vision-targeted health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instrument appropriate for this population. The purpose of this study was to identify the core content areas for such an instrument. In-depth interviews on vision-related issues were conducted with 40 residents. Interviews were audio-taped, transcribed, and coded using a standardized protocol. Binocular distance and near visual acuity were assessed using the resident's 'walking around' correction to examine whether one vision-specific HRQOL measure could address the needs of residents with 'good' and 'poor' vision. Overall 1070 vision-related comments were identified. Residents mentioned 315 problem comments that were grouped into 13 categories, including ocular symptoms (18% of comments), reading (15%), general vision (13%), psychological distress (12%), and activities of daily living (ADLs) (7%). Compared to published data on vision-specific content areas most relevant to community based persons, nursing home residents focused more on ocular symptoms and basic ADLs, with no mention of issues related to driving, home care, and finances. The majority of categories mentioned did not differ on the proportion of comments made- by those with 'good' and 'poor' visual acuity, suggesting that one vision-specific HRQOL instrument would be appropriate for residents with varying levels of visual acuity. Future work will focus on developing a vision-specific HRQOL instrument for nursing home residents.

  1. Relationship between Broken Homes and Academic Achievement of Secondary School Students in Oredo Local Government Area of Edo State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alika, Henrietta Ijeoma; Edosa, Ogboro Samson

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the relationship between broken homes and academic achievement of students. Three research hypotheses were formulated to guide the study. The study was correlational because the study sought to establish the extent of relationship between broken homes and academic achievement. The statistical method used in analyzing the…

  2. Regional mapping of forest canopy water content and biomass using AIRSAR images over BOREAS study area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan; Rignot, Eric; Vanzyl, Jakob

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, monitoring vegetation biomass over various climate zones has become the primary focus of several studies interested in assessing the role of the ecosystem responses to climate change and human activities. Airborne and spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems provide a useful tool to directly estimate biomass due to its sensitivity to structural and moisture characteristics of vegetation canopies. Even though the sensitivity of SAR data to total aboveground biomass has been successfully demonstrated in many controlled experiments over boreal forests and forest plantations, so far, no biomass estimation algorithm has been developed. This is mainly due to the fact that the SAR data, even at lowest frequency (P-band) saturates at biomass levels of about 200 tons/ha, and the structure and moisture information in the SAR signal forces the estimation algorithm to be forest type dependent. In this paper, we discuss the development of a hybrid forest biomass algorithm which uses a SAR derived land cover map in conjunction with a forest backscatter model and an inversion algorithm to estimate forest canopy water content. It is shown that unlike the direct biomass estimation from SAR data, the estimation of water content does not depend on the seasonal and/or environmental conditions. The total aboveground biomass can then be derived from canopy water content for each type of forest by incorporating other ecological information. Preliminary results from this technique over several boreal forest stands indicate that (1) the forest biomass can be estimated with reasonable accuracy, and (2) the saturation level of the SAR signal can be enhanced by separating the crown and trunk biomass in the inversion algorithm. We have used the JPL AIRSAR data over BOREAS southern study area to test the algorithm and to generate regional scale water content and biomass maps. The results are compared with ground data and the sources of errors are discussed. Several SAR

  3. Forging successful academic-community partnerships with community health centers: the California statewide Area Health Education Center (AHEC) experience.

    PubMed

    Fowkes, Virginia; Blossom, H John; Mitchell, Brenda; Herrera-Mata, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    Increased access to insurance under the Affordable Care Act will increase demands for clinical services in community health centers (CHCs). CHCs also have an increasingly important educational role to train clinicians who will remain to practice in community clinics. CHCs and Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) are logical partners to prepare the health workforce for the future. Both are sponsored by the Health Resources and Services Administration, and they share a mission to improve quality of care in medically underserved communities. AHECs emphasize the educational side of the mission, and CHCs the service side. Building stronger partnerships between them can facilitate a balance between education and service needs.From 2004 to 2011, the California Statewide AHEC program and its 12 community AHECs (centers) reorganized to align training with CHC workforce priorities. Eight centers merged into CHC consortia; others established close partnerships with CHCs in their respective regions. The authors discuss issues considered and approaches taken to make these changes. Collaborative innovative processes with program leadership, staff, and center directors revised the program mission, developed common training objectives with an evaluation plan, and defined organizational, functional, and impact characteristics for successful AHECs in California. During this planning, centers gained confidence as educational arms for the safety net and began collaborations with statewide programs as well as among themselves. The AHEC reorganization and the processes used to develop, strengthen, and identify standards for centers forged the development of new partnerships and established academic-community trust in planning and implementing programs with CHCs. PMID:24280858

  4. Using Picturebooks to Promote Academic Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranck-Buhr, Wendy, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The development of academic literacy requires students to think critically about multiple text types. Picturebooks can be rich and varied resources on which to base well-designed instruction that will facilitate thinking, discussions, connections, and problem solving in multiple content areas. From the Holocaust to ecology to grammar, picturebooks…

  5. Framework Fuels the Need to Read: Strategies Boost Literacy of Students in Content-Area Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenbach, Ruth; Greenleaf, Cynthia L.; Hale, Gina

    2010-01-01

    Middle and high school teachers across academic disciplines face increased pressure to address the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for English language arts and for literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects. This means that the responsibility of preparing students to read, write, talk, and think critically about…

  6. Content-Area Conversations: How to Plan Discussion-Based Lessons for Diverse Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Frey, Nancy; Rothenberg, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Time pressures, standards-driven curricula, and rising populations of students who are struggling with English can make it hard to include discussions in your teaching, yet there are more good reasons than ever to use academic discourse to promote learning. Read this book to find out why and how discussion-based lessons help students--especially…

  7. Content of toxic and essential metals in medicinal herbs growing in polluted and unpolluted areas of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Gjorgieva, Darinka; Kadifkova-Panovska, Tatjana; Baceva, Katerina; Stafilov, Trajce

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine and compare Ba, Cr, Cd, Fe, Sr, Pb, and Zn content in medicinal herbs Urtica dioica L., Taraxacum officinale, and Matricaria recutita growing in polluted and unpolluted areas of the Republic of Macedonia. The metal content was determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). In the unpolluted area of Mt. Plackovica the metal content in Taraxacum officinale was in the descending order: Fe>Sr>Zn>Ba>Cr, while Pb and Cd were below the limit of detection. In the polluted area of Veles, the order was as follows: Fe>Zn>Sr>Pb>Ba>Cd>Cr. Our results suggest that quality assurance and monitoring of toxic metals is needed for plants intended for human use and consumption. Medicinal plants should be picked in areas free of any contamination sources. PMID:20860970

  8. Prospect inversion for indirect estimation of leaf dry matter content and specific leaf area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Darvishzadeh, R.; Skidmore, A.-K.; Duren, I.-V.; Heiden, U.; Heurich, M.

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of vegetation properties plays an indispensable role in assessments of ecosystem function with leaf dry mater content (LDMC) and specific leaf area (SLA) being two important vegetation properties. Methods for fast, reliable and accurate measurement of LDMC and SLA are still lacking. In this study, the inversion of the PROSPECT radiative transfer model was used to estimate these two leaf parameters. Inversion of PROSPECT traditionally aims at quantifying its direct input parameters rather than identifying the parameters which can be derived indirectly from the input parameters. The technique has been tested here to indirectly model these parameters for the first time. Biophysical parameters such as leaf area, as well as fresh and dry weights of 137 leaf samples were measured during a field campaign in July 2013 in the mixed mountain forests of the Bavarian Forest National Park, Germany. Reflectance and transmittance of the leaf samples were measured using an ASD field spec III equipped with an integrating sphere. The PROSPECT model was inverted using a look-up table (LUT) approach for the NIR/SWIR region of the spectrum. The retrieved parameters were evaluated using their calculated R2 and normalized root mean square error (nRMSE) values with the field measurements. Among the retrieved variables the lowest nRMSE (0.0899) was observed for LDMC. For both traits higher R2 values (0.83 for LDMC and 0.89 for SLA) were discovered. The results indicate that the leaf traits studied can be quantified as accurately as the direct input parameters of PROSPECT. The strong correlation between the estimated traits and the NIR/SWIR region of the electromagnetic spectrum suggests that these leaf traits could be assessed at canopy and in the landscape by using hyperspectral remote sensing data.

  9. Stalagmite water content as a proxy for drip water supply in tropical and subtropical areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Scheidegger, Y.; Brennwald, M. S.; Fleitmann, D.; Figura, S.; Wieler, R.; Kipfer, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this pilot study water was extracted from samples of two Holocene stalagmites from Socotra Island, Yemen, and one Eemian stalagmite from southern continental Yemen. The amount of water extracted per unit mass of stalagmite rock, termed "water yield" hereafter, serves as a measure of its total water content. Based on direct correlation plots of water yields and δ18Ocalcite and on regime shift analyses, we demonstrate that for the studied stalagmites the water yield records vary systematically with the corresponding oxygen isotopic compositions of the calcite (δ18Ocalcite). Within each stalagmite lower δ18Ocalcite values are accompanied by lower water yields and vice versa. The δ18Ocalcite records of the studied stalagmites have previously been interpreted to predominantly reflect the amount of rainfall in the area; thus, water yields can be linked to drip water supply. Higher, and therefore more continuous drip water supply caused by higher rainfall rates, supports homogeneous deposition of calcite with low porosity and therefore a small fraction of water-filled inclusions, resulting in low water yields of the respective samples. A reduction of drip water supply fosters irregular growth of calcite with higher porosity, leading to an increase of the fraction of water-filled inclusions and thus higher water yields. The results are consistent with the literature on stalagmite growth and supported by optical inspection of thin sections of our samples. We propose that for a stalagmite from a dry tropical or subtropical area, its water yield record represents a novel paleo-climate proxy recording changes in drip water supply, which can in turn be interpreted in terms of associated rainfall rates.

  10. Stalagmite water content as a proxy for drip water supply in tropical and subtropical areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, N.; Scheidegger, Y.; Brennwald, M. S.; Fleitmann, D.; Figura, S.; Wieler, R.; Kipfer, R.

    2012-07-01

    In this pilot study water was extracted from samples of two Holocene stalagmites from Socotra Island, Yemen, and one Eemian stalagmite from southern continental Yemen. The amount of water extracted per unit mass of stalagmite rock, termed "water yield" hereafter, serves as a measure for its total water content. The stalagmites' water yield records vary systematically with the corresponding oxygen isotopic compositions of the calcite (δ18Ocalcite). Low δ18Ocalcite values are thereby accompanied by low water yields and vice versa. Based on the paleoclimatic interpretation of the δ18Ocalcite records, water yields can be linked to drip water supply. High drip water supply caused by high precipitation rates supports homogeneous deposition of calcite with low porosity and therefore a small fraction of water-filled inclusions, resulting in low water yields of the respective samples. A reduction of drip water supply fosters irregular growth of calcite with higher porosity, leading to an increase of the fraction of water-filled inclusions and thus higher water yields. The results are consistent with the literature on stalagmite growth and supported by optical inspection of thin sections of our samples. We propose that for a stalagmite from a tropical or subtropical area, its water yield record represents a novel paleoclimate proxy recording changes in drip water supply, which can in turn be interpreted in terms of associated precipitation rates.

  11. Secondary content area teachers speak about literacy and technology: Tensions, complexities, conceptualizations, and practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolle, Elizabeth Joy Petroelje

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to share the details, complexities, contradictions, parallels, conceptualizations, and practices of secondary content area teachers' use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to enhance literacy practices and learning. Specifically, the research questions were: How do English, Science, and Social Studies teachers conceptualize the impacts ICTs have on literacy practices and learning? What is the relationship between English, Science, and Social Studies teachers' conceptualizations and their use of ICTs in their everyday pedagogical practices to enhance literacy practices and learning? I used the notions of literacy as a social practice to frame the study and writing as a method of inquiry to analyze the teachers' conceptualizations and practices. Through observations and interviews, I learned the teachers' stories. Within these stories, four tensions emerged in regard to how the teachers negotiate between their conceptualizations and classroom practices: (1) access to ICTs adequate for the task; (2) sufficient levels of ICT knowledge for the task; (3) fear of the unknown; and (4) identification of who benefits form the ICTs and how these benefits can be determined. The conclusions, or major themes highlighted in the teachers' stories, are that: (a) technology seems to be an add-on to support well-established practices, (b) teachers cling to traditional literacy practices, (c) teachers take up and use ICTs and literacy for unique purposes based on their individual classroom contexts, and (d) teachers' tensions limit their ability to envision beyond what they currently see and do in regards to ICTs and literacy.

  12. Using aliphatic alcohols as gaseous tracers in determination of water contents and air-water interfacial areas in unsaturated sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Menghau; Chen, Bi-Hsiang

    2011-11-01

    A new type of gaseous tracer utilizing nontoxic aliphatic alcohols for the determination of water content and air-water interfacial area is tested on unsaturated sands of low water content. Alcohol vapors are generated at room temperature and passed through the experimental sand column. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of these vapors are obtained by monitoring their effluent concentrations using GC-FID. The retardation factor with respect to each vapor transport process is obtained by optimizing BTCs data using the CXTFIT program in the reverse problem mode. The water content and the interfacial area are subsequently calculated from their retardation factors by both equilibrium and nonequilibrium transport models. Experimental results indicate that the pentanol tracer is feasible in the determination of water content at conditions when the degree of water saturation is low. In the determination of air-water interfacial area, decanol is selected due to its interfacial adsorption characteristics. By comparing to interfacial areas from theoretical predictions as well as other conventional tarcer methods, the ones determined from the decanol tracer tests are found to be close to the true interfacial areas when the water content is low.

  13. Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: Summary and Assessment of Project Intervention at Springfield High School. Teacher Corps Program '79. The University of Toledo/Springfield Local Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toledo Univ., OH. Coll. of Education.

    In fall 1981, three Teacher Corps interns worked with high school students to improve their abilities in content area reading. The interns worked directly with content area teachers and their students on a tutorial basis, each intern assuming responsibility for an identified content area--social studies, mathematics, and English. The interns made…

  14. Norepinephrine content in discrete brain areas and neurohypophysial vasopressin in rats after a 9-d spaceflight (SLS-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fareh, Jeannette; Cottet-Emard, Jean-Marie; Pequignot, Jean-Marc; Jahns, Gary; Meylor, John; Viso, Michel; Vassaux, Didier; Gauquelin, Guillemette; Gharib, Claude

    1993-01-01

    The norepinephrine (NE) content in discrete brain areas and the vasopressin content in the neurohypophysial system were assessed in rats after a 9-d spaceflight and after a recovery period. The NE content in the locus coeruleus decreased significantly in spaceflight rats, but showed no difference between control and flight animals after a 9-d recovery. These findings were probably due to an acute stress undergone during landing. The NE content was unchanged in the A2 and A5 cell groups. In rats flown aboard SLS-1, the vasopressin content was increased in the posterior pituitary, and was significantly decreased in the hypothalamus. We conclude that the NE depletion in the locus coeruleus and the alteration in vasopressin release were consistent with an acute stress, likely occurring during and/or after landing. These changes tend to mask the actual neuroendocrine modifications caused by microgravity.

  15. [A spatial heterogeneity of surface soil moisture content in dry season in Mulun National Natural Reserve in Karst area].

    PubMed

    Song, Tong-qing; Peng, Wan-xia; Zeng, Fu-ping; Ouyang, Zi-wen; Wu, Hai-yong

    2009-01-01

    By the methods of classical statistics and geostatistics, the spatial heterogeneity of surface soil (0-5 cm and 5-10 cm layers) moisture content in dry season in the typical sloping fields and depressions in Mulun National Natural Reserve in Karst area were studied. The results indicated that in study area, the surface soil moisture content in dry season was still higher, and showed a fine semivariogram structure as a whole. The spatial distribution of moisture content in 0-5 cm and 5-10 cm soil layers, both for sloping fields and for depressions, fitted exponential model well. Under the same stand conditions, the moisture content in the two soil layers had the similar spatial structure and distribution pattern; while under different stand conditions, there existed obvious difference in the same soil layer. The spatial pattern of surface soil moisture content in sloping fields was characterized by medium spatial autocorrelation, clear patches with well continuum, relatively slow variation of Moran's I index, while that in depressions was characterized by strong spatial autocorrelation, larger variation of Moran' s I index, and more fragmented patches. Therefore, topography, micro-physiognomy, precipitation, human disturbance, and especially vegetation were the most important factors affecting the spatial pattern of soil moisture content in the Mulun National Natural Reserve, and to preserve primary forest should have favorable effect on the regulation of the spatial heterogeneity of soil moisture content in the Reserve.

  16. Heavy metals content in acid mine drainage at abandoned and active mining area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatar, Hazirah; Rahim, Sahibin Abd; Razi, Wan Mohd; Sahrani, Fathul Karim

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted at former Barite Mine, Tasik Chini and former iron mine Sungai Lembing in Pahang, and also active gold mine at Lubuk Mandi, Terengganu. This study was conducted to determine heavy metals content in acid mine drainage (AMD) at the study areas. Fourteen water sampling stations within the study area were chosen for this purpose. In situ water characteristic determinations were carried out for pH, electrical conductivity (EC), redox potential (ORP) and total dissolved solid (TDS) using multi parameter YSI 556. Water samples were collected and analysed in the laboratory for sulfate, total acidity and heavy metals which follow the standard methods of APHA (1999) and HACH (2003). Heavy metals in the water samples were determined directly using Inductive Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Data obtained showed a highly acidic mean of pH values with pH ranged from 2.6 ± 0.3 to 3.2 ± 0.2. Mean of electrical conductivity ranged from 0.57 ± 0.25 to 1.01 ± 0.70 mS/cm. Redox potential mean ranged from 487.40 ± 13.68 to 579.9 ± 80.46 mV. Mean of total dissolved solids (TDS) in AMD ranged from 306.50 ± 125.16 to 608.14 ± 411.64 mg/L. Mean of sulfate concentration in AMD ranged from 32.33 ± 1.41 to 207.08 ± 85.06 mg/L, whereas the mean of total acidity ranged from 69.17 ± 5.89 to 205.12 ± 170.83 mgCaCO3/L. Heavy metals content in AMD is dominated by Fe, Cu, Mn and Zn with mean concentrations range from 2.16 ± 1.61 to 36.31 ± 41.02 mg/L, 0.17 ± 0.13 to 11.06 ± 2.85 mg/L, 1.12 ± 0.65 to 7.17 ± 6.05 mg/L and 0.62 ± 0.21 to 6.56 ± 4.11 mg/L, respectively. Mean concentrations of Ni, Co, As, Cd and Pb were less than 0.21, 0.51, 0.24, 0.05 and 0.45 mg/L, respectively. Significant correlation occurred between Fe and Mn, Cu, Zn, Co and Cd. Water pH correlated negatively with all the heavy metals, whereas total acidity, sulfate, total dissolved solid, and redox potential correlated positively. The concentration of heavy metals in the AMD

  17. Academic Performance and Interest in Physical Sciences of Female Learners in the Mafikeng, South Africa, Municipal Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kgabi, Nnenesi A.

    2005-10-01

    There are notably fewer women than men, worldwide, in the physical sciences and engineering. Numbers also decrease markedly with each step up the career ladder, in both the academic and research (industrial and government laboratories) environments. In this study, academic performance of secondary-school and university females in the mathematical and physical sciences was analyzed. The choice of careers for a group of secondary-school females was also studied. A positive correlation between the choice of career and academic performance among the secondary-school females was observed. The correlation was, however, not obvious for the female university students. This study presents possible reasons for poor performance and lack of interest in physics, and suggests ways of attracting and keeping females in the field of physics and its related sciences.

  18. Modelling the Demand for Higher Education by Local Authority Area in England Using Academic, Economic and Social Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Managing the demand for higher education has been a major concern of successive UK governments over the last 30 years. While initially they sought to increase demand, latterly the emphasis has been on widening participation to include demographic groups among which it has traditionally been low. There had long been an academic and policy interest…

  19. Improving Content Area Reading Comprehension with 4-6th Grade Spanish ELLs Using Web-Based Structure Strategy Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wijekumar, Kausalai; Meyer, Bonnie J. F.; Lei, Puiwa

    2014-01-01

    Reading in the content areas of science, social studies, and current events is a difficult task that is even more elusive to Spanish speaking English language learners. There is a huge increase in children transitioning from their L1 (e.g., Spanish) to L2 (e.g., English) in classrooms across the US. These ELs face challenges due to a lack of…

  20. Using Content-Area-of-the-Day Contributions To Help Preservice Teachers Make Connections across the Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Sharon

    A content-area reading course for preservice teachers challenges them to engage in the kinds of activities that "real" teachers do or should be doing, demonstrating how teachers can work across disciplines and foster collaborative relationships, while at the same time assisting their students in making connections from one classroom to the next.…

  1. Word Games: Content Area Teachers' Use of Vocabulary Strategies to Build Diverse Students' Reading Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk-Ross, Francine; Evans, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Five content area teachers participated in this year-long qualitative research study focused on developing a language-building approach to support literacy activities for marginalized students. A mixed methods design evaluated the impact of the professional development program with the teachers. Data included structured interviews with the…

  2. The Use of Theatre as an Instructional Strategy in the Content Areas for Students with Reading and Learning Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyda, Sandra D.

    2003-01-01

    This article provides a foundation for using theatre as a learning strategy in the content areas for students with learning disabilities, with metacognition as an important factor. Research is described supporting using theatre-based learning as a way to strengthen perceptual skills and improve retention. A social studies example is provided.…

  3. Every Teacher an English Teacher? Literacy Strategy Teaching and Research in the Content Area of Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Recent statements from teachers of English and literacy (NCTE, 2007) have voiced the failure of schools to help minority students and ELLs close the literacy achievement gap and the responsibility of all teachers to help with this endeavor. Central to this effort in secondary schools are the content area teachers, as their subjects constitute the…

  4. DIY Media in the Classroom: New Literacies Across Content Areas (Middle Through High School). Language & Literacy Series (Practitioner's Bookshelf)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzzetti, Barbara; Elliot, Kate; Welsch, Diana

    2010-01-01

    This book shows teachers how to bring students' Do-It-Yourself media practices into the classroom (Grades 6-12). In one accessible resource, the authors explain DIY media, identify their appealing features for content area instruction, and describe the literacy skills and strategies they promote. Chapters address: Adolescents' DIY Media as New…

  5. Introduction to Computers & Introduction to Word Processing: Integrating Content Area Coursework into College Reading/Study Skills Curricula Using Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balajthy, Ernest; And Others

    A study examined the planning, implementation, and evaluation of a curriculum designed to teach 60 college level developmental reading students to use microcomputers (Apple) as learning tools and to improve their content area reading ability. The textbook from a biology course in which all but three of the subjects were enrolled was the source for…

  6. Examination of Illinois Superintendents' Perceptions of the Illinois School Superintendent Content-Area Standards and Performance Indicators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demory, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines Illinois school superintendents' perceived importance of the Illinois school superintendent content area standards and performance indicators. This study is significant because it provides an opportunity for rigorous reflection in identifying Illinois school superintendents' perceived importance of superintendent…

  7. Working Toward Third Space in Content Area Literacy: An Examination of Everyday Funds of Knowledge and Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moje, Elizabeth Birr; Ciechanowski, Kathryn McIntosh; Kramer, Katherine; Ellis, Lindsay; Carrillo, Rosario; Collazo, Tehani

    2004-01-01

    In this article we analyze the intersections and disjunctures between everyday (home, community, peer group) and school funds of knowledge and discourse (Gee, 1996) that frame the school-based, content area literacy practices of middle school-aged youth in a predominantly Latino/a, urban community of Detroit, Michigan, in the United States. Using…

  8. Definitions and Strategies of Critical Reading as Presented in Textbooks on Reading and Learning in the Content Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherney, Elaine E.

    Noting that a major issue in education today is the concern about students' ability to read critically and to solve problems, this paper describes an analysis of five texts focusing on reading and learning in the content areas to determine what they had to say about critical reading and strategies for teaching critical reading--specifically,…

  9. Lipid sac area as a proxy for individual lipid content of arctic calanoid copepods

    PubMed Central

    Vogedes, Daniel; Varpe, Øystein; Søreide, Janne E.; Graeve, Martin; Berge, Jørgen; Falk-Petersen, Stig

    2010-01-01

    We present an accurate, fast, simple and non-destructive photographic method to estimate wax ester and lipid content in single individuals of the calanoid copepod genus Calanus and test this method against gas-chromatographic lipid measurements. PMID:20824043

  10. Assessment of the soil water content temporal variations in an agricultural area of Galicia (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas-Valero, Roger Manuel; Miras-Avalos, Jose Manuel; Paz-González, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    The direct and continuous assessment of the temporal variation on soil water content is of paramount importance for agricultural practices and, in particular, for the management of water resources. Soil water content is affected by many factors such as topography, particle size, clay and organic matter contents, and tillage systems. There are several techniques to measure or estimate soil water content. Among them, Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) stands out. It is based on measuring the dielectrical constant of the soil environment. This technique allows to describe water dynamics in time and space, to determine the main patterns of soil moisture, the water uptake by roots, the evapotranspiration and the drainage. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the daily variation of soil water content in the root-influenced zone in plots devoted to maize and grassland as a function of the soil water volumetric content. The studied site is located in an experimental field of the Centre for Agricultural Research (CIAM) in Mabegondo located in the province of A Coruña, Spain (43°14'N, 8°15'W; 91 masl). The study was carried out from June 2008 to September 2009 in a field devoted to maize (Zea mays, L.) and another field devoted to grassland. The soil of these sites is silt-clay textured. Long-term mean annual temperature and rainfall figures are 13.3 °C and 1288 mm, respectively. During the study period, maize crop was subjected to conventional agricultural practices. A weekly evaluation of the phenological stage of the crop was performed. An EnviroSCAN FDR equipment, comprising six capacitance sensors, was installed in the studied sites following the manufacturer's recommendations, thus assuring a proper contact between the probe and the soil. Soil water content in the root-influenced zone (40 cm depth in grassland and 60 cm depth in maize were considered) was hourly monitored in 20 cm ranges (0-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and 40-60 cm) using FDR. Evaluations were

  11. Comparison of elemental contents in earthworm cast and soil from a mercury-contaminated site (Idrija area, Slovenia).

    PubMed

    Teršič, Tamara; Gosar, Mateja

    2012-07-15

    The aim of this paper was to test the new sampling media-earthworm casts in a highly contaminated area. The investigation was carried out at the ancient Hg ore roasting site Pšenk in the surroundings of Idrija, where extremely high Hg contents in soils and SOM were determined in previous investigations. 32 earthworm cast samples were collected in the research grid 30 × 30 m in order to compare the Hg contents and spatial distribution in earthworm casts to the values and distributions in SOM and soil (0-15 cm). Extremely elevated Hg concentrations were determined in earthworm casts from the studied area ranging from 5.4 to 4330 mg/kg with the median of 31 mg/kg. The Hg values in casts are somewhat lower than in soil (6.3-8600 mg/kg) and slightly higher compared to soil organic matter (SOM) (1.5-4200 mg/kg). Strong correlation (r²=0.75) between Hg contents in casts and soil was found, while correlation between casts and SOM was positive but weaker (r²=0.35). Spatial distribution of Hg in earthworm casts show the highest concentrations in the central part of investigated area, similar to the distribution in soil. Hg contents rapidly decrease from the center toward the margins of the studied area, where they reach values of less than 50mg/kg. It was shown that Hg contents and dispersion in casts are comparable to those in soil, which indicates that at investigated area soil contamination is strongly reflected in contamination of earthworm casts.

  12. Using Reading Strategies To Reduce the Failure Rate in the Content Area. Subject: Social Studies. Grade Level: 6-7-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, Olivett

    Content area reading instruction includes two elements: the information presented in subject matter text, and the plan that teachers use to help students understand the content. According to research and interviews with social studies teachers, there is a high failure rate in the social studies content area because children have problems…

  13. Decoding the content of visual short-term memory under distraction in occipital and parietal areas.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Katherine C; Xu, Yaoda

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have provided conflicting accounts regarding where in the human brain visual short-term memory (VSTM) content is stored, with strong univariate fMRI responses being reported in superior intraparietal sulcus (IPS), but robust multivariate decoding being reported in occipital cortex. Given the continuous influx of information in everyday vision, VSTM storage under distraction is often required. We found that neither distractor presence nor predictability during the memory delay affected behavioral performance. Similarly, superior IPS exhibited consistent decoding of VSTM content across all distractor manipulations and had multivariate responses that closely tracked behavioral VSTM performance. However, occipital decoding of VSTM content was substantially modulated by distractor presence and predictability. Furthermore, we found no effect of target-distractor similarity on VSTM behavioral performance, further challenging the role of sensory regions in VSTM storage. Overall, consistent with previous univariate findings, our results indicate that superior IPS, but not occipital cortex, has a central role in VSTM storage. PMID:26595654

  14. Decoding the content of visual short-term memory under distraction in occipital and parietal areas.

    PubMed

    Bettencourt, Katherine C; Xu, Yaoda

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have provided conflicting accounts regarding where in the human brain visual short-term memory (VSTM) content is stored, with strong univariate fMRI responses being reported in superior intraparietal sulcus (IPS), but robust multivariate decoding being reported in occipital cortex. Given the continuous influx of information in everyday vision, VSTM storage under distraction is often required. We found that neither distractor presence nor predictability during the memory delay affected behavioral performance. Similarly, superior IPS exhibited consistent decoding of VSTM content across all distractor manipulations and had multivariate responses that closely tracked behavioral VSTM performance. However, occipital decoding of VSTM content was substantially modulated by distractor presence and predictability. Furthermore, we found no effect of target-distractor similarity on VSTM behavioral performance, further challenging the role of sensory regions in VSTM storage. Overall, consistent with previous univariate findings, our results indicate that superior IPS, but not occipital cortex, has a central role in VSTM storage.

  15. High-Ability Students' Participation in Specialized Instructional Delivery Models: Variations by Aptitude, Grade, Gender, and Content Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assouline, Susan G.; Colangelo, Nicholas; Heo, Nanseol; Dockery, Lori

    2013-01-01

    Established in the early 1970s, the talent search model has garnered strong theoretical and programming support for addressing the academic needs of highly able students. The two main components of the talent search model are discovery (identification) and development (programming) of academic talent. Discovery of academically talented elementary…

  16. Perceptions of Co-Teaching by Content Area and Special Education Teachers with and without Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrigues, Ashley Blanca

    2014-01-01

    Schools are required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA) to include students with disabilities in the general education classroom. Recently there has been emphasis on co-teaching as a method to comply with this mandate. Co-teaching is a technique geared at utilizing a special education teacher and a content area…

  17. An Interdisciplinary Inservice Model for Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: Grades 7-9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granite School District, Salt Lake City, UT.

    The model outlined in this document describes the development of an integrated approach to teaching content reading skills to teachers. Methods and materials applicable to texts and media currently used in classrooms were produced by inservice teachers of science, math, and social studies at a Salt Lake City junior high school. This document…

  18. Daily dietary selenium intake and hair selenium content in a high selenium area of Enshi, China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selenium is essential to humans and is widely distributed within the human body. Its content in blood, urine, hair and nails are important indicators to evaluate Se level in the human body. In China (Shadi, Enschi city), human selenosis of residents is reported to occur in high numbers. In this stud...

  19. Faith without Works? Twenty-five Years of Undervaluing Content Area Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Gregory Kent

    2001-01-01

    Cites anecdotal and research examples indicating that content knowledge, especially in history, is undervalued in schools of education, teacher selection and assignment, and staff development. States that as long as theory is valued over subject matter, the situation will not change. (SK)

  20. The Influence of Teacher Development on Secondary Content Area Supervision among Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burbank, Mary D.; Bates, Alisa; Gupta, Udita

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses the issues and challenges faced by university supervisors when providing content-specific and general pedagogical feedback to preservice teachers. Study data highlight the perspectives of six preservice teachers as they reflect on their supervisory experiences over the course of a licensure year. Survey, interview, and written…

  1. Using Literature to Enhance Content Area Instruction: A Guide for K-5 Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olness, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    RAuthor Rebecca Olness combines her love of children's literature and her experience as a classroom teacher and literacy specialist to show teachers that it is possible to teach both content and literacy concepts simultaneously. Chapters cover social studies, science, mathematics, and the arts. In these pages readers will find rationale and…

  2. Relationship between Maximum Leaf Photosynthesis, Nitrogen Content and Specific Leaf Area in Balearic Endemic and Non‐endemic Mediterranean Species

    PubMed Central

    GULÍAS, JAVIER; FLEXAS, JAUME; MUS, MAURICI; CIFRE, JOSEP; LEFI, ELKADRI; MEDRANO, HIPÓLITO

    2003-01-01

    Gas exchange parameters, leaf nitrogen content and specific leaf area (SLA) were measured in situ on 73 C3 and five C4 plant species in Mallorca, west Mediterranean, to test whether species endemic to the Balearic Islands differed from widespread, non‐endemic Mediterranean species and crops in their leaf traits and trait inter‐relationships. Endemic species differed significantly from widespread species and crops in several parameters; in particular, photosynthetic capacity, on an area basis (A), was 20 % less in endemics than in non‐endemics. Similar differences between endemics and non‐endemics were found in parameters such as SLA and leaf nitrogen content per area (Na). Nevertheless, most of the observed differences were found only within the herbaceous deciduous species. These could be due to the fact that most of the non‐endemic species within this group have adapted to ruderal areas, while none of the endemics occupies this kind of habitat. All the species—including the crops—showed a positive, highly significant correlation between photosynthetic capacity on a mass basis (Am), leaf nitrogen content on a mass basis (Nm) and SLA. However, endemic species had a lower Am for any given SLA and Nm. Hypotheses are presented to explain these differences, and their possible role in reducing the distribution of many endemic Balearic species is discussed. PMID:12805082

  3. Cognitive Content Engagement in Content-Based Language Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Stella; Hoare, Philip

    2011-01-01

    This article reports a study of aspects of pedagogy that can bring about students' cognitive engagement with academic content and, thus, use of the academic language in content-based language lessons in three middle schools in Xi'an, China. Two criteria--academic content level and depth of processing--were used to determine cognitive content…

  4. Soil nutrient bioavailability and nutrient content of pine trees (Pinus thunbergii) in areas impacted by acid deposition in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae E; Lee, Wi-Young; Ok, Yong Sik; Skousen, Jeffrey

    2009-10-01

    Acid deposition has caused detrimental effects on tree growth near industrial areas of the world. Preliminary work has indicated that concentrations of NO(3-), SO(4)(2-), F( - ) and Al in soil solutions were 2 to 33 times higher in industrial areas compared to non-industrial areas in Korea. This study evaluated soil nutrient bioavailability and nutrient contents of red pine (Pinus thunbergii) needles in forest soils of industrial and non-industrial areas of Korea. Results confirm that forest soils of industrial areas have been acidified mainly by deposition of sulfate, resulting in increases of Al, Fe and Mn and decreases of Ca, Mg and K concentrations in soils and soil solutions. In soils of industrial areas, the molar ratios of Ca/Al and Mg/Al in forest soils were <2, which can lead to lower levels and availability of nutrients for tree growth. The Ca/Al molar ratio of Pinus thunbergii needles on non-industrial sites was 15, while that of industrial areas was 10. Magnesium concentrations in needles of Pinus thunbergii were lower in soils of industrial areas and the high levels of acid cations such as Al and Mn in these soils may have antagonized the uptake of base cations like Mg. Continued acidification can further reduce uptake of base cations by trees. Results show that Mg deficiency and high concentrations of Al and Mn in soil solution can be limiting factors for Pinus thunbergii growth in industrial areas of Korea.

  5. Soil nutrient bioavailability and nutrient content of pine trees (Pinus thunbergii) in areas impacted by acid deposition in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jae E; Lee, Wi-Young; Ok, Yong Sik; Skousen, Jeffrey

    2009-10-01

    Acid deposition has caused detrimental effects on tree growth near industrial areas of the world. Preliminary work has indicated that concentrations of NO(3-), SO(4)(2-), F( - ) and Al in soil solutions were 2 to 33 times higher in industrial areas compared to non-industrial areas in Korea. This study evaluated soil nutrient bioavailability and nutrient contents of red pine (Pinus thunbergii) needles in forest soils of industrial and non-industrial areas of Korea. Results confirm that forest soils of industrial areas have been acidified mainly by deposition of sulfate, resulting in increases of Al, Fe and Mn and decreases of Ca, Mg and K concentrations in soils and soil solutions. In soils of industrial areas, the molar ratios of Ca/Al and Mg/Al in forest soils were <2, which can lead to lower levels and availability of nutrients for tree growth. The Ca/Al molar ratio of Pinus thunbergii needles on non-industrial sites was 15, while that of industrial areas was 10. Magnesium concentrations in needles of Pinus thunbergii were lower in soils of industrial areas and the high levels of acid cations such as Al and Mn in these soils may have antagonized the uptake of base cations like Mg. Continued acidification can further reduce uptake of base cations by trees. Results show that Mg deficiency and high concentrations of Al and Mn in soil solution can be limiting factors for Pinus thunbergii growth in industrial areas of Korea. PMID:18758977

  6. The effects of an interactive instructional strategy for enhancing reading comprehension and content area learning for students with learning disabilities.

    PubMed

    Bos, C S; Anders, P L; Filip, D; Jaffe, L E

    1989-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of an interactive vocabulary instructional strategy, semantic-feature analysis (SFA), on the content area text comprehension of adolescents with learning disabilities. Prior to reading a social studies text, students in resource classes either completed a relationship chart as part of the SFA condition or used the dictionary to write definitions and sentences as part of the contrast condition. Passage comprehension was measured on a multiple-choice test consisting of two types of items, vocabulary and conceptual. Comprehension was measured immediately following teaching and again 6 months after teaching. Prior knowledge for the content of the passage served as a covariate. Results indicated that students in the SFA instructional condition had significantly greater measured comprehension immediately following and 6 months after initial teaching. These results are discussed in relation to concept-driven, interactive strategies for teaching content and facilitating text comprehension.

  7. California Hass avocado: profiling of carotenoids, tocopherol, fatty acid, and fat content during maturation and from different growing areas.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Yanjun; Wang, Yue; Wang, David; Lee, Ru-po; Gao, Kun; Byrns, Russell; Heber, David

    2009-11-11

    The California Hass avocado ( Persea americana ) is an example of a domesticated berry fruit that matures on the tree during its growing season but ripens only after being harvested. Avocados are typically harvested multiple times during the growing season in California. Previous research has demonstrated potential health benefits of avocados and extracts of avocado against inflammation and cancer cell growth, but seasonal variations in the phytochemical profile of the fruits being studied may affect the results obtained in future research. Therefore, in the present study, avocados were harvested in January, April, July, and September, 2008, from four different growing locations in California (San Luis Obispo, Ventura, Riverside, and San Diego) and analyzed for total fat content, fatty acid profile, carotenoids, and vitamin E. A significant increase in total carotenoid and fat content of avocados from all regions was noted as the season progressed from January to September. Four carotenoids not previously described in the avocado were quantified. The total content of carotenoids was highly correlated with the total fat content (r = 0.99, p < 0.001) demonstrating a remarkable degree of constancy of carotenoid intake per gram of fat content in the California Hass avocado. Future clinical research on the health benefits of the avocado should specify the time of harvest, degree of ripening, growing area, and the total phytochemical profile of the fruit or extract being studied. These steps will enable researchers to account for potential nutrient-nutrient interactions that might affect the research outcomes.

  8. California Hass Avocado: Profiling of Carotenoids, tocopherol, fatty acid, and fat content during maturation and from different growing areas

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing-Yi; Zhang, Yanjun; Wang, Yue; Wang, David; Lee, Ru-po; Gao, Kun; Byrns, Russell; Heber, David

    2009-01-01

    The California Hass avocado (Persea Americana) is an example of a domesticated berry fruit that matures on the tree during its growing season but ripens only after being harvested. Avocados are typically harvested multiple times during the growing season in California. Previous research has demonstrated potential health benefits of avocados and extracts of avocado against inflammation and cancer cell growth, but seasonal variations in the phytochemical profile of the fruits being studied may affect the results obtained in future research. Therefore in the present study, avocados were harvested in January, April, July and September 2008 from four different growing locations in California (San Luis Obispo, Ventura, Riverside and San Diego), and analyzed fortotal fat content, fatty acid profile, carotenoids and vitamin E. A significant increase in total carotenoid and fat content of avocados from all regions was noted as the season progressed from January to September. Four carotenoids not previously described in the avocado were quantified. The total content of carotenoids was highly correlated with total fat content (r=0.99, p<0.001) demonstrating a remarkable degree of constancy of carotenoid intake per gram of fat content in the California Hass avocado.. Future clinical research on the health benefits of the avocado should specify the time of harvest, degree of ripening, growing area and the total phytochemical profile of the fruit or extract being studied. These steps will enable researchers to account for potential nutrient-nutrient interactions that might affect the research outcomes. PMID:19813713

  9. Equine sperm nuclei with different ploidy levels: relationship between the nuclear DNA content and the nuclear area.

    PubMed

    Spirito, S; Campi, S; Boquet, M; Fernández, H; Ferrari, M

    2011-08-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate the ability of the Feulgen reaction to identify equine sperm nuclei with different ploidy levels, to determine the frequency of haploid, diploid and polyploid sperm nuclei in the semen of fertile equines and to evaluate the relationship between the nuclear DNA content and the nuclear area. Determination of the ploidy level of Feulgen-stained spermatozoa using a scanning microspectrophotometer was very similar to the subjective estimations made with a light microscope. This indicates that the Feulgen reaction is a simple, inexpensive and reliable technique to recognise the ploidy level of equine spermatozoa. The incidence of diploid and polyploid spermatozoa, determined with a light microscope in 11 fertile equines, was 0.17 ± 0.08% and 0.027 ± 0.027% respectively. DNA content values obtained by microspectrophotometry in the only equine that presented polyploid spermatozoa allowed us to discriminate between haploid, diploid and polyploid subpopulations. Measurement of the nuclear area discriminated only two subpopulations: one including the haploid and diploid subpopulations and the other including the polyploid one. The similarity between the area of the haploid and diploid sperm nuclei suggests that the increase in DNA content is anisotropic, with a privileged direction of growth perpendicular to the nuclear flattening plane.

  10. Every teacher an English teacher? Literacy strategy teaching and research in the content area of science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckingham, Thomas

    Recent statements from teachers of English and literacy (NCTE, 2007) have voiced the failure of schools to help minority students and ELLs close the literacy achievement gap and the responsibility of all teachers to help with this endeavor. Central to this effort in secondary schools are the content area teachers, as their subjects constitute the bulk of school day instruction. While there have been small studies and field reports of what content teachers are or are not teaching in the way of literacy instruction (Fisher and Ivey, 2005; Verplaste, 1996, 1998; Vacca and Vacca 1989), researchers have not had success measuring the literacy practices of content area teachers in a broad-based study. This study focuses specifically on what many researchers in both the content literacy and ESL fields have emphasized for promoting literacy in the classroom---teaching metacognitive strategies. Twelve metacognitive functions derived from a literacy strategies handbook are employed as a means to ascertain strategy usage within the lessons whether specifically known content strategies are named or not. The initial analysis is performed on over 100 lesson plans hosted at four prominent university science education sites, all within a five year period (2003-7). In addition to the lesson plan analysis, a review of 100 articles taken from five on-line science education journals reveal what the science education field addresses this issue. Findings suggest that while 80% of science teachers include some type of strategic teaching and learning in their lessons, only about 20% of science teachers explicitly utilize strategies as listed in content literacy manuals and promoted by literacy and ESL experts. Rather, most science teachers implicitly include these strategies within their lessons and/or promote their own subject-specific strategies in content teaching. Analysis of science education research and publications shows that there is a focus on literacy and specifically strategic

  11. Historical tank content estimate for the southeast quadrant of the Hanford 200 Areas

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This document provides historical evaluations of the radioactive and mixed waste stored in the Hanford site underground double-shell tanks. A Historical Tank Content Estimate has been developed by reviewing the process histories, waste transfer data, and available physical and chemical characterization data from various Department of Energy and Department of Defense contractors. The historical data will supplement information that is currently being gathered from core sampling. Historical waste transfer and level data, tank physical information, temperature data, and sampling data have been compiled for this report and supporting documents.

  12. Secondary Preservice Teachers Remember Their Favorite Reading Experiences: Insights and Implications for Content Area Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daisey, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Teacher educators need to identify course pedagogy to improve instructional use of reading. Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe the favorite reading experiences of 82 secondary preservice teachers of diverse subject areas through their drawings and words. Another purpose was to report their reflections regarding the implications of…

  13. Academic Blogging: Academic Practice and Academic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkup, Gill

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale study which investigates the role of blogging in professional academic practice in higher education. It draws on interviews with a sample of academics (scholars, researchers and teachers) who have blogs and on the author's own reflections on blogging to investigate the function of blogging in academic practice…

  14. Academic predictors of success in a nursing program.

    PubMed

    Wolkowitz, Amanda A; Kelley, Jeffrey A

    2010-09-01

    The academic content areas that best predict success early in a nursing program affect admission and placement decisions in nursing programs nationwide. The purpose of this research was to apply a multiple regression model to student test scores to determine the relative strength of science, mathematics, reading, and English content areas in predicting early nursing school success. Using a standardized nursing entrance examination, the subtest scores of these four academic areas for 4,105 registered nurse students were used as the predictors in the regression model. Performance on a standardized Fundamentals of Nursing assessment was the criterion variable. Results confirmed those found in the majority of the literature indicating that science is both a statistically significant predictor and the strongest of the four content areas in the prediction of early nursing program success.

  15. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  16. The Content Area Reading Project: An Inservice Education Program for Junior High School Teachers and Teachers of Adults. Appendix C, Model Teaching Materials. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Mary M.; Askov, Eunice N.

    Materials developed by teacher participants in the Content Area Reading Project are presented in this appendix to the Project report. The first section provides group informal reading inventories developed for use in adult education, teaching English as a second language, and nine content areas; it then presents cloze tests developed for use in…

  17. Child Characteristics by Science Instruction Interactions in Second and Third Grade and Their Relation to Students' Content-Area Knowledge, Vocabulary, and Reading Skill Gains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Rice, Diana C.; Canto, Angela I.; Southerland, Sherry A.; Underwood, Phyllis; Kaya, Sibel; Fishman, Barry; Morrison, Frederick J.

    2012-01-01

    The associations among second- and third-grade students' content-area knowledge, vocabulary, and reading gains and the science instruction they received were examined in this exploratory longitudinal study. We also asked whether there were child characteristics x instruction interaction effects on students' content-area literacy. Second graders (n…

  18. Nevada Pre-Kindergarten Content Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada State Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation focuses on the need for accountability in supporting student achievement for all children. The standards movement in the U.S. has articulated key benchmarks for student achievement at each grade level K-12 in academic content areas. Through the "No Child Left Behind" legislation and the "Good Start, Grow Smart"…

  19. Andragogical Content Knowledge as a Key Component in the Training of the Instructors of Nonformal Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nurhayati, Sri

    2015-01-01

    Currently, professionals and academics of non-formal education in Indonesia have began to question the competences of the non-formal education instructors. Non-formal education is a profession that requires knowledge (subject-content area), skill (ability to deliver content in regard to the needs of society) and programme content (the content…

  20. Academic Self-Concept: Its Structure, Mechanism, and Relation to Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xiaodong

    1997-01-01

    Reviews research findings on academic self-concept, including the multidimensional character of academic self-concept, the role of frame of reference in academic self-concept formation, and the relationship between academic achievement and academic self-concept. Explores implications of this research for educational practice and suggests areas for…

  1. Heavy metals and hydrocarbons contents in soils of urban areas of Yamal autonomous region (Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, Ivan; Abakumov, Evgeny; Shamilishvili, George

    2016-04-01

    This investigation is devoted to evaluation of heavy metals and hydrocarbons contents in soils of different functional localities within the Yamalo-Nenets autonomous region (YaNAR, North-Western Siberia, Russia). Geo-accumulation indices Igeo (Müller 1988) were calculated in order to assess soil contamination levels with heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, Ni, As, Hg) in the studied settlements: Harsaim, Aksarka, Labytnangy, Harp and Salekhard. The degree of soil pollution was assessed according to seven contamination classes (Förstner et al. 1990) in order of increasing numerical value of the index. Cd's regional soil background concentrations of the Yamal peninsula (Moskovchenko 2010), Hg's Earth crust clarke (Greenwood & Earnshaw 2008) and concentrations of the rest trace elements in natural sandy soil from the Beliy island, YaNAR (Tomashunas & Abakumov, 2014) were used in calculations. In general terms, obtained Igeo values in all samples were under or slightly above the 0 level, indicating low to moderate pollution of the studied soils. However, considerable Igeo values of Zn, Pb and Ni were revealed in several samples, suggesting different soil pollution levels, namely: Zn Igeo in Harsaim soil sample of 2.22 - moderate polluted to highly polluted soil; Pb Igeo in Aksarka soil sample of 4.04 - highly polluted to extremely polluted soil; Ni Igeo in Harp soil sample of 4.34 - highly polluted to extremely polluted soil. Soil contamination level was additionally evaluated, comparing with the maximal permissible concentrations (MPCs) of the trace elements in soil (SANPIN 4266-87), established by the national legislation. Almost all samples exceeded the MPC for As in soils (2 mg•kg-1). Concentrations of Ni in several soil samples taken in Harp were 19 times higher than recommended level (20 mg•kg-1). Moderate excess of Zn, Pb and Cu MPCs was also noted. Data obtained will be used in further environmental researches and environmental management purposes in this key

  2. Pesticide content in drinking water samples collected from orchard areas in central Poland.

    PubMed

    Badach, Hanna; Nazimek, Teresa; Kamińska, Iwona A

    2007-01-01

    Samples of drinking water collected in Warka-Grójec region of central Poland were tested for the presence of pesticides. Data obtained from analysis of water samples will be used for future epidemiological and environmental studies in the region. Samples were collected during spring and autumn of 2002-2003 from dug wells, deep wells and water mains in 81 randomly-selected rural households scattered throughout this region of extensive agriculture. The concentration of pesticides from four main chemical groups was determined by gas chromatography: organochlorines (lindane, DDT, methoxychlor), triazines (atrazine, simazine), organophosphates (acephate, diazinon, fenitrothion) and pyrethroids (alpha-cypermethrin, deltamethrin). Two-year monitoring of drinking water samples indicated the presence of DDT and methoxychlor contamination. Pyrethroids were generally not detected, with the exception of alpha-cypermethrin found in only a few samples. Triazines were also found in water samples collected in the course of the study with higher incidence during spring period. Organophosphates were by far the most common contaminants of drinking water in this region. Almost all samples were contaminated by significant amounts of fenitrothion. The present study reveals an urgent need for systematic monitoring of drinking water quality in regions of intensive agriculture, since they are highly vulnerable to pesticide contamination. Consumption of pesticide-contaminated water may have a negative impact on the population living in this area, which also requires scientific assessment.

  3. Temporal disparity in leaf chlorophyll content and leaf area index across a growing season in a temperate deciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, H.; Chen, J. M.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Spatial and temporal variations in canopy structure and leaf biochemistry have considerable influence on fluxes of CO2, water and energy and nutrient cycling in vegetation. Two vegetation indices (VI), NDVI and Macc01, were used to model the spatio-temporal variability of broadleaf chlorophyll content and leaf area index (LAI) across a growing season. Ground data including LAI, hyperspectral leaf reflectance factors (400-2500 nm) and leaf chlorophyll content were measured across the growing season and satellite-derived canopy reflectance data was acquired for 33 dates at 1200 m spatial resolution. Key phenological information was extracted using the TIMESAT software. Results showed that LAI and chlorophyll start of season (SOS) dates were at day of year (DOY) 130 and 157 respectively, and total season duration varied by 57 days. The spatial variability of chlorophyll and LAI phenology was also analyzed at the landscape scale to investigate phenological patterns over a larger spatial extent. Whilst a degree of spatial variability existed, results showed that chlorophyll SOS lagged approximately 20-35 days behind LAI SOS, and the end of season (EOS) LAI dates were predominantly between 20 and 30 days later than chlorophyll EOS. The large temporal differences between VI-derived chlorophyll content and LAI has important implications for biogeochemical models using NDVI or LAI to represent the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by a canopy, in neglecting to account for delays in chlorophyll production and thus photosynthetic capacity.

  4. CoR-MAC: Contention over Reservation MAC Protocol for Time-Critical Services in Wireless Body Area Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jeongseok; Park, Laihyuk; Park, Junho; Cho, Sungrae; Keum, Changsup

    2016-05-09

    Reserving time slots for urgent data, such as life-critical information, seems to be very attractive to guarantee their deadline requirements in wireless body area sensor networks (WBASNs). On the other hand, this reservation imposes a negative impact on performance for the utilization of a channel. This paper proposes a new channel access scheme referred to as the contention over reservation MAC (CoR-MAC) protocol for time-critical services in wireless body area sensor networks. CoR-MAC uses the dual reservation; if the reserved time slots are known to be vacant, other nodes can access the time slots by contention-based reservation to maximize the utilization of a channel and decrease the delay of the data. To measure the effectiveness of the proposed scheme against IEEE 802.15.4 and IEEE 802.15.6, we evaluated their performances with various performance indexes. The CoR-MAC showed 50% to 850% performance improvement in terms of the delay of urgent and time-critical data according to the number of nodes.

  5. CoR-MAC: Contention over Reservation MAC Protocol for Time-Critical Services in Wireless Body Area Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jeongseok; Park, Laihyuk; Park, Junho; Cho, Sungrae; Keum, Changsup

    2016-01-01

    Reserving time slots for urgent data, such as life-critical information, seems to be very attractive to guarantee their deadline requirements in wireless body area sensor networks (WBASNs). On the other hand, this reservation imposes a negative impact on performance for the utilization of a channel. This paper proposes a new channel access scheme referred to as the contention over reservation MAC (CoR-MAC) protocol for time-critical services in wireless body area sensor networks. CoR-MAC uses the dual reservation; if the reserved time slots are known to be vacant, other nodes can access the time slots by contention-based reservation to maximize the utilization of a channel and decrease the delay of the data. To measure the effectiveness of the proposed scheme against IEEE 802.15.4 and IEEE 802.15.6, we evaluated their performances with various performance indexes. The CoR-MAC showed 50% to 850% performance improvement in terms of the delay of urgent and time-critical data according to the number of nodes. PMID:27171085

  6. CoR-MAC: Contention over Reservation MAC Protocol for Time-Critical Services in Wireless Body Area Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeongseok; Park, Laihyuk; Park, Junho; Cho, Sungrae; Keum, Changsup

    2016-01-01

    Reserving time slots for urgent data, such as life-critical information, seems to be very attractive to guarantee their deadline requirements in wireless body area sensor networks (WBASNs). On the other hand, this reservation imposes a negative impact on performance for the utilization of a channel. This paper proposes a new channel access scheme referred to as the contention over reservation MAC (CoR-MAC) protocol for time-critical services in wireless body area sensor networks. CoR-MAC uses the dual reservation; if the reserved time slots are known to be vacant, other nodes can access the time slots by contention-based reservation to maximize the utilization of a channel and decrease the delay of the data. To measure the effectiveness of the proposed scheme against IEEE 802.15.4 and IEEE 802.15.6, we evaluated their performances with various performance indexes. The CoR-MAC showed 50% to 850% performance improvement in terms of the delay of urgent and time-critical data according to the number of nodes. PMID:27171085

  7. A Method for Calculating the Area of Zostera marina Leaves from Digital Images with Noise Induced by Humidity Content

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Ramirez, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ecological importance of eelgrass, nowadays anthropogenic influences have produced deleterious effects in many meadows worldwide. Transplantation plots are commonly used as a feasible remediation scheme. The characterization of eelgrass biomass and its dynamics is an important input for the assessment of the overall status of both natural and transplanted populations. Particularly, in restoration plots it is desirable to obtain nondestructive assessments of these variables. Allometric models allow the expression of above ground biomass and productivity of eelgrass in terms of leaf area, which provides cost effective and nondestructive assessments. Leaf area in eelgrass can be conveniently obtained by the product of associated length and width. Although these variables can be directly measured on most sampled leaves, digital image methods could be adapted in order to simplify measurements. Nonetheless, since width to length ratios in eelgrass leaves could be even negligible, noise induced by leaf humidity content could produce misidentification of pixels along the peripheral contour of leaves images. In this paper, we present a procedure aimed to produce consistent estimations of eelgrass leaf area in the presence of the aforementioned noise effects. Our results show that digital image procedures can provide reliable, nondestructive estimations of eelgrass leaf area. PMID:24892089

  8. A method for calculating the area of Zostera marina leaves from digital images with noise induced by humidity content.

    PubMed

    Leal-Ramirez, Cecilia; Echavarria-Heras, Hector

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ecological importance of eelgrass, nowadays anthropogenic influences have produced deleterious effects in many meadows worldwide. Transplantation plots are commonly used as a feasible remediation scheme. The characterization of eelgrass biomass and its dynamics is an important input for the assessment of the overall status of both natural and transplanted populations. Particularly, in restoration plots it is desirable to obtain nondestructive assessments of these variables. Allometric models allow the expression of above ground biomass and productivity of eelgrass in terms of leaf area, which provides cost effective and nondestructive assessments. Leaf area in eelgrass can be conveniently obtained by the product of associated length and width. Although these variables can be directly measured on most sampled leaves, digital image methods could be adapted in order to simplify measurements. Nonetheless, since width to length ratios in eelgrass leaves could be even negligible, noise induced by leaf humidity content could produce misidentification of pixels along the peripheral contour of leaves images. In this paper, we present a procedure aimed to produce consistent estimations of eelgrass leaf area in the presence of the aforementioned noise effects. Our results show that digital image procedures can provide reliable, nondestructive estimations of eelgrass leaf area.

  9. Frequency Analysis of the Words in the Academic Word List (AWL) and Non-AWL Content Words in Applied Linguistics Research Papers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vongpumivitch, Viphavee; Huang, Ju-yu; Chang, Yu-Chia

    2009-01-01

    This study is a corpus-based lexical study that aims to explore the use of words in Coxhead's (2000) Academic Word List (AWL) in journal articles in the field of applied linguistics. A 1.5 million-word corpus called the Applied Linguistics Research Articles Corpus (ALC) was created for this study. The corpus consists of 200 research articles that…

  10. Using Academic Journals to Help Students Learn Subject Matter Content, Develop and Practice Critical Reasoning Skills, and Reflect on Personal Values in Food Science and Human Nutrition Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwaoka, Wayne T.; Crosetti, Lea M.

    2008-01-01

    It has been reported that students learn best when they use a wide variety of techniques to understand the information of the discipline, be it visual, auditory, discussion with others, metacognition, hands-on activities, or writing about the subject. We report in this article the use of academic journals not only as an aid for students to learn…

  11. Academic writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  12. High contents of rare earth elements (REEs) in stream waters of a Cu-Pb-Zn mining area.

    PubMed

    Protano, G; Riccobono, F

    2002-01-01

    Stream waters draining an old mining area present very high rare earth element (REE) contents, reaching 928 microg/l as the maximum total value (sigmaREE). The middle rare earth elements (MREEs) are usually enriched with respect to both the light (LREEs) and heavy (HREEs) elements of this group, producing a characteristic "roof-shaped" pattern of the shale Post-Archean Australian Shales-normalized concentrations. At the Fenice Capanne Mine (FCM), the most important base metal mine of the study area, the REE source coincides with the mine tailings, mostly the oldest ones composed of iron-rich materials. The geochemical history of the REEs released into Noni stream from wastes in the FCM area is strictly determined by the pH, which controls the REE speciation and in-stream processes. The formation of Al-rich and mainly Fe-rich flocs effectively scavenges the REEs, which are readily and drastically removed from the solution when the pH approaches neutrality. Leaching experiments performed on flocs and waste materials demonstrate that Fe-oxides/oxyhydroxides play a key role in the release of lanthanide elements into stream waters. The origin of the "roof-shaped" REE distribution pattern as well as the peculiar geochemical behavior of some lanthanide elements in the aqueous system are discussed. PMID:11911532

  13. Soil temperature and water content drive microbial carbon fixation in grassland of permafrost area on the Tibetan plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, W.; Guo, G.; Liu, J.

    2014-12-01

    Soil microbial communities underpin terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and are greatly influenced by global warming and global-warming-induced dryness. However, the response of soil microbial community function to global change remains largely uncertain, particularly in the ecologically vulnerable Tibetan plateau permafrost area with large carbon storage. With the concept of space for time substitution, we investigated the responses of soil CO2-fixing microbial community and its enzyme activity to climate change along an elevation gradient (4400-5100 m) of alpine grassland on the central Tibetan plateau. The elevation gradient in a south-facing hill slope leads to variation in climate and soil physicochemical parameters. The autotrophic microbial communities were characterized by quantitative PCR (qPCR), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) and cloning/sequencing targeting the CO2-fixing gene (RubisCO). The results demonstrated that the autotrophic microbial community abundance, structure and its enzyme activity were mainly driven by soil temperature and water content. Soil temperature increase and water decrease dramatically reduced the abundance of the outnumbered form IC RubisCO-containing microbes, and significantly changed the structure of form IC, IAB and ID RubisCO-containing microbial community. Structural equation model revealed that the RubisCO enzyme was directly derived from RubisCO-containing microbes and its activity was significantly reduced by soil temperature increase and water content decrease. Thus our results provide a novel positive feedback loop of climate warming and warming-induced dryness by that soil microbial carbon fixing potential will reduce by 3.77%-8.86% with the soil temperature increase of 1.94oC and water content decrease of 60%-70%. This positive feedback could be capable of amplifying the climate change given the significant contribution of soil microbial CO2-fixing up to 4.9% of total soil organic

  14. Motor imagery of hand actions: Decoding the content of motor imagery from brain activity in frontal and parietal motor areas.

    PubMed

    Pilgramm, Sebastian; de Haas, Benjamin; Helm, Fabian; Zentgraf, Karen; Stark, Rudolf; Munzert, Jörn; Krüger, Britta

    2016-01-01

    How motor maps are organized while imagining actions is an intensely debated issue. It is particularly unclear whether motor imagery relies on action-specific representations in premotor and posterior parietal cortices. This study tackled this issue by attempting to decode the content of motor imagery from spatial patterns of Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signals recorded in the frontoparietal motor imagery network. During fMRI-scanning, 20 right-handed volunteers worked on three experimental conditions and one baseline condition. In the experimental conditions, they had to imagine three different types of right-hand actions: an aiming movement, an extension-flexion movement, and a squeezing movement. The identity of imagined actions was decoded from the spatial patterns of BOLD signals they evoked in premotor and posterior parietal cortices using multivoxel pattern analysis. Results showed that the content of motor imagery (i.e., the action type) could be decoded significantly above chance level from the spatial patterns of BOLD signals in both frontal (PMC, M1) and parietal areas (SPL, IPL, IPS). An exploratory searchlight analysis revealed significant clusters motor- and motor-associated cortices, as well as in visual cortices. Hence, the data provide evidence that patterns of activity within premotor and posterior parietal cortex vary systematically with the specific type of hand action being imagined. PMID:26452176

  15. Motor imagery of hand actions: Decoding the content of motor imagery from brain activity in frontal and parietal motor areas

    PubMed Central

    Pilgramm, Sebastian; de Haas, Benjamin; Helm, Fabian; Zentgraf, Karen; Stark, Rudolf; Munzert, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Abstract How motor maps are organized while imagining actions is an intensely debated issue. It is particularly unclear whether motor imagery relies on action‐specific representations in premotor and posterior parietal cortices. This study tackled this issue by attempting to decode the content of motor imagery from spatial patterns of Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) signals recorded in the frontoparietal motor imagery network. During fMRI‐scanning, 20 right‐handed volunteers worked on three experimental conditions and one baseline condition. In the experimental conditions, they had to imagine three different types of right‐hand actions: an aiming movement, an extension–flexion movement, and a squeezing movement. The identity of imagined actions was decoded from the spatial patterns of BOLD signals they evoked in premotor and posterior parietal cortices using multivoxel pattern analysis. Results showed that the content of motor imagery (i.e., the action type) could be decoded significantly above chance level from the spatial patterns of BOLD signals in both frontal (PMC, M1) and parietal areas (SPL, IPL, IPS). An exploratory searchlight analysis revealed significant clusters motor‐ and motor‐associated cortices, as well as in visual cortices. Hence, the data provide evidence that patterns of activity within premotor and posterior parietal cortex vary systematically with the specific type of hand action being imagined. Hum Brain Mapp 37:81–93, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26452176

  16. How Academic Is Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    University provision for academic development is well established in the USA, UK and many other countries. However, arrangements for its provision and staffing vary. In Australia, there has been a trend towards professional rather than academic staff appointments. Is this appropriate? In this paper, the domains of academic development work are…

  17. Annual variations in the surface radiation budget and soil water and heat content in the Upper Yellow River area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suosuo; Lü, Shihua; Ao, Yinhuan; Shang, Lunyu

    2009-03-01

    Measurements taken between July 2006 to May 2007 at the Maqu station in the Upper Yellow River area were used to study the surface radiation budget and soil water and heat content in this area. These data revealed distinct seasonal variations in downward shortwave radiation, downward longwave radiation, upward longwave radiation and net radiation, with larger values in the summer than in winter because of solar altitudinal angle. The upward shortwave radiation factor is not obvious because of albedo (or snow). Surface albedo in the summer was lower than in the winter and was directly associated with soil moisture and solar altitudinal angle. The annual averaged albedo was 0.26. Soil heat flux, soil temperature and soil water content changed substantially with time and depth. The soil temperature gradient was positive from August to February and was related to the surface net radiation and the heat condition of the soil itself. There was a negative correlation between soil temperature gradient and net radiation, and the correlation coefficient achieved a significance level of 0.01. Because of frozen state of the soil, the maximum soil thermal conductivity value was 1.21 W m-1°C-1 in January 2007. In May 2007, soil thermal conductivity was 0.23 W m-1°C-1, which is the lowest value measured in the study, likely due to the fact that the soil was drier then than in other months. The soil thermal conductivity values for the four seasons were 0.27, 0.38, 0.55 and 0.83 W m-1°C-1, respectively.

  18. Relationships between area-specific measures of self-concept, self-esteem and academic achievement for junior high school students.

    PubMed

    Muller, D; Chambliss, J; Wood, M

    1977-12-01

    Physical maturity, peer relations, academic success and school adaptiveness self-concept and self-esteem measures were correlated with reading, language, mathematics, and composite achievement scores for 26 male and 48 female junior high school students. Academic success self-concept was significantly correlated with each of the achievement measures. Peer relations self-concept and self-esteem correlated with language, math, and composite achievement. Academic success self-esteem measures did not correlate with any of the measures of achievement.

  19. Does Academic Work Make Australian Academics Happy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Roderick; Tilbrook, Kerry; Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka

    2015-01-01

    Happiness research is a rapidly-growing area in social psychology and has emphasised the link between happiness and workplace productivity and creativity for knowledge workers. Recent articles in this journal have raised concerns about the level of happiness and engagement of Australian academics with their work, however there is little research…

  20. Action-related semantic content and negation polarity modulate motor areas during sentence reading: an event-related desynchronization study.

    PubMed

    Alemanno, F; Houdayer, E; Cursi, M; Velikova, S; Tettamanti, M; Comi, G; Cappa, S F; Leocani, L

    2012-11-12

    Our study evaluated motor cortex involvement during silent reading of sentences referring to hand actions. We aimed at defining whether sentential polarity (affirmative vs. negative) would modulate motor cortex activation using the event-related desynchronization (ERD) analysis of the mu rhythm. Eleven healthy volunteers performed a reading task involving 160 sentences (80 affirmative: 40 hand-related, 40 abstract; 80 negative: 40 hand-related, 40 abstract). After reading each sentence, subjects had to decide whether the verb was high or low frequency in Italian. Electroencephalographic (EEG) activity was recorded with 32 surface electrodes and mu ERD analyses were performed for each subject. Hand-action related sentences induced a greater mu ERD over the left premotor and motor hand areas compared to abstract sentences. Mu ERD was greater and temporally delayed when the hand-related verbs were presented in the negative versus affirmative form. As predicted by the "embodied semantic" theory of language understanding, motor areas were activated during sentences referring to hand actions. In addition, motor cortex activation was larger for negative than affirmative motor sentences, a finding compatible with the hypothesis that comprehension is more demanding in the specific case of motor content negation.

  1. Estimation of mercury content in tailings of the gold mine area of Poconé, Mato Grosso, Brazil.

    PubMed

    von Tümpling, W; Zeilhofer, P; Ammer, U; Einax, J; Wilken, R D

    1995-07-01

    As in many other parts of the world, gold is produced in the surface mining region of Poconé, Mato Grosso, Brazil, using mercury. The goal of this investigation was to estimate the amount of mercury in certain tailings and to determine the area of the land that has been contaminated by the gold mining operations. Mercury concentrations from 2 to 495 ng/g (dw) were determined in the tailing materials. It was observed that only isolated sites were acting as central points of contamination. Using digital Landsat satellite data (The-matic Mapper) and aerial photos, the sites degraded by the mining were classified, and their total area was estimated to be 12.3 km(2) in the region of Poconé. It was estimated, that 4.9 km(2) were occupied by the contaminated tailings. The mean height of the pile slags was determined to be 4.5 m. From the experimentally calculated average density of the material in the tailings, 2.01 g/cm(3), the total mercury content in the piles of tailings was estimated to be 1600 ± 350 kg.

  2. Action-related semantic content and negation polarity modulate motor areas during sentence reading: an event-related desynchronization study.

    PubMed

    Alemanno, F; Houdayer, E; Cursi, M; Velikova, S; Tettamanti, M; Comi, G; Cappa, S F; Leocani, L

    2012-11-12

    Our study evaluated motor cortex involvement during silent reading of sentences referring to hand actions. We aimed at defining whether sentential polarity (affirmative vs. negative) would modulate motor cortex activation using the event-related desynchronization (ERD) analysis of the mu rhythm. Eleven healthy volunteers performed a reading task involving 160 sentences (80 affirmative: 40 hand-related, 40 abstract; 80 negative: 40 hand-related, 40 abstract). After reading each sentence, subjects had to decide whether the verb was high or low frequency in Italian. Electroencephalographic (EEG) activity was recorded with 32 surface electrodes and mu ERD analyses were performed for each subject. Hand-action related sentences induced a greater mu ERD over the left premotor and motor hand areas compared to abstract sentences. Mu ERD was greater and temporally delayed when the hand-related verbs were presented in the negative versus affirmative form. As predicted by the "embodied semantic" theory of language understanding, motor areas were activated during sentences referring to hand actions. In addition, motor cortex activation was larger for negative than affirmative motor sentences, a finding compatible with the hypothesis that comprehension is more demanding in the specific case of motor content negation. PMID:23010314

  3. Changes in element contents of four lichens over 11 years in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, northern Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bennett, J.P.; Wetmore, C.M.

    1999-01-01

    Four species of lichen (Cladina rangiferina, Evernia mesomorpha, Hypogymnia physodes, and Parmelia sulcata) were sampled at six locations in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness three times over a span of 11 years and analyzed for concentrations of 16 chemical elements to test the hypotheses that corticolous species would accumulate higher amounts of chemical elements than terricolous species, and that 11 years were sufficient to detect spatial patterns and temporal trends in element contents. Multivariate analyses of over 2770 data points revealed two principal components that accounted for 68% of the total variance in the data. These two components, the first highly loaded with Al, B, Cr, Fe, Ni and S, and the second loaded with Ca, Cd, Mg and Mn, were inversely related to each other over time and space. The first component was interpreted as consisting of an anthropogenic and a dust component, while the second, primarily a nutritional component. Cu, K, Na, P, Pb and Zn were not highly loaded on either component. Component 1 decreased significantly over the 11 years and from west to east, while component 2 increased. The corticolous species were more enriched in heavy metals than the terricolous species. All four elements in component 2 in H. physodes were above enrichment thresholds for this species. Species differences on the two components were greater than the effects of time and space, suggesting that biomonitoring with lichens is strongly species dependent. Some localities in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness appear enriched in some anthropogenic elements for no obvious reasons.

  4. Academic buoyancy: Towards an understanding of students' everyday academic resilience.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andrew J; Marsh, Herbert W

    2008-02-01

    Academic buoyancy is developed as a construct reflecting everyday academic resilience within a positive psychology context and is defined as students' ability to successfully deal with academic setbacks and challenges that are typical of the ordinary course of school life (e.g., poor grades, competing deadlines, exam pressure, difficult schoolwork). Data were collected from 598 students in Years 8 and 10 at five Australian high schools. Half-way through the school year and then again at the end of the year, students were asked to rate their academic buoyancy as well as a set of hypothesized predictors (self-efficacy, control, academic engagement, anxiety, teacher-student relationship) in the area of mathematics. Multilevel modeling found that the bulk of variance in academic buoyancy was explained at the student level. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling showed that (a) Time 1 anxiety (negatively), self-efficacy, and academic engagement significantly predict Time 1 academic buoyancy; (b) Time 2 anxiety (negatively), self-efficacy, academic engagement, and teacher-student relationships explain variance in Time 2 academic buoyancy over and above that explained by academic buoyancy at Time 1; and (c) of the significant predictors, anxiety explains the bulk of variance in academic buoyancy. PMID:19083351

  5. Academic buoyancy: Towards an understanding of students' everyday academic resilience.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andrew J; Marsh, Herbert W

    2008-02-01

    Academic buoyancy is developed as a construct reflecting everyday academic resilience within a positive psychology context and is defined as students' ability to successfully deal with academic setbacks and challenges that are typical of the ordinary course of school life (e.g., poor grades, competing deadlines, exam pressure, difficult schoolwork). Data were collected from 598 students in Years 8 and 10 at five Australian high schools. Half-way through the school year and then again at the end of the year, students were asked to rate their academic buoyancy as well as a set of hypothesized predictors (self-efficacy, control, academic engagement, anxiety, teacher-student relationship) in the area of mathematics. Multilevel modeling found that the bulk of variance in academic buoyancy was explained at the student level. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling showed that (a) Time 1 anxiety (negatively), self-efficacy, and academic engagement significantly predict Time 1 academic buoyancy; (b) Time 2 anxiety (negatively), self-efficacy, academic engagement, and teacher-student relationships explain variance in Time 2 academic buoyancy over and above that explained by academic buoyancy at Time 1; and (c) of the significant predictors, anxiety explains the bulk of variance in academic buoyancy.

  6. Arizona Academic Standards: Kindergarten

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for kindergarten. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Kindergarten; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Readiness (Kindergarten); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Readiness…

  7. Adolescent drinking, academic achievement and leisure time use by secondary education students in a rural area of Crete.

    PubMed

    Koutra, Kleio; Papadovassilaki, Kyriaki; Kalpoutzaki, Pelagia; Kargatzi, Maria; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Koukouli, Sofia

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the alcohol consumption of secondary education students and their relationship to school life and leisure time use with peers. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in March 2007, and the study population consisted of 14- to 19-year-old students living in an agricultural area of Crete. The final sample consisted of 117 individuals (response rate 90.0%). A short previously validated self-completion questionnaire was used collecting information on: personal and family characteristics; school progress; leisure time activities and relations with other adolescents; and alcohol consumption. Alcohol consumption differed significantly between male (75.5%) and female (25.8%) students (P < 0.001). Almost half of the participants (48.3%) reported alcohol consumption during nights out with friends. The mean grade for the previous year for students consuming alcohol was lower compared with those who did not, but the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.066). Statistical evidence supported the hypothesis that students who consumed alcohol had more absences and this association was stronger for male students. The frequency of alcohol consumption was found to relate to the number of absences for both sexes. Male students who had been suspended from school were more likely to drink alcohol than those who had not been suspended. Statistical evidence also supported the hypotheses that students who spent their free time in cafeterias, bars or billiard halls were more likely to drink alcohol and also consume alcohol at higher frequencies than those that did not spend their free time this way (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively). More health education programmes and actions are needed at the national and local level to help students, families, schools, communities and the state better understand the real dimensions of the problem. PMID:21883608

  8. [Annual Reports for the Academic Year 1980-81 from 49 States, the District of Columbia and 3 Canadian Provinces Focusing on Problems, Issues, Achievements and Other Areas of Interest to the Postsecondary Education Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berve, Nancy M., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Annual reports are presented for the academic year 1980-1981 from 49 states (except Maine), the District of Columbia, and three Canadian provinces focusing on problems, issues, achievements, and other areas of interest to the postsecondary education community. Specific topics include the following: long-range plans for higher education,…

  9. [Study of spatial interpolation of soil Cd contents in sewage irrigated area based on soil spectral information assistance].

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; Chang, Qing-Rui; Liu, Jing

    2013-08-01

    To acquire the accuracy distribution information of soil heavy metal, improving interpolation precision is very important for agricultural safety production and soil environment protection. In the present study, the spatial variation and Cokriging interpolation of soil Cd was studied in a sewage irrigation area. Fifty two soil samples were collected to measure the contents of soil total Cd (TCd), available Cd (ACd), pH, organic matter (OM), iron oxide (Fe2 O3) and soil reflection spectrum. Through correlation analysis, it was found that TCd and ACd had a significant correlation with soil first-order differential spectrum (-0.585** at 759 nm and -0.551** at 719 nm, respectively), which were much higher than the correlation coefficients between soil Cd contents and other environmental variables (pH, OM and Fe2O3). The spatial patterns of soil Cd were predicted by Cokriging which used soil first-order differential spectrum as covariate. Compared with the Kriging, the root-mean-square error decreased by 8.22% for TCd and 20.09% for ACd, respectively; the correlation coefficients between the predicted values and measured values increased by 27.45% for TCd and by 53.13% for ACd, respectively. Meanwhile, the prediction accuracy improved by Cokriging with soil spectrum as covariate was still higher than by Cokriging with soil environment variables (OM and Fe2O3). Therefore, it was found that Cokriging was a more accurate interpolation method which could provide more precise distribution information of soil heavy metal. At the same time, soil reflection spectrum was shown to be more economic, time-saving and easier to acquire than these usual environment variables, which indicated that soil spectrum information is more suited as a covariate used in Cokriging.

  10. Monitoring of equine health in Denmark: the importance, purpose, research areas and content of a future database.

    PubMed

    Hartig, Wendy; Houe, Hans; Andersen, Pia Haubro

    2013-04-01

    The plentiful data on Danish horses are currently neither organized nor easily accessible, impeding register-based epidemiological studies on Danish horses. A common database could be beneficial. In principle, databases can contain a wealth of information, but no single database can serve every purpose. Hence the establishment of a Danish equine health database should be preceded by careful consideration of its purpose and content, and stakeholder attitudes should be investigated. The objectives of the present study were to identify stakeholder attitudes to the importance, purpose, research areas and content of a health database for horses in Denmark. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 13 horse-related stakeholder groups in Denmark. The groups surveyed included equine veterinarians, researchers, veterinary students, representatives from animal welfare organizations, horse owners, trainers, farriers, authority representatives, ordinary citizens, and representatives from laboratories, insurance companies, medical equipment companies and pharmaceutical companies. Supplementary attitudes were inferred from qualitative responses. The overall response rate for all stakeholder groups was 45%. Stakeholder group-specific response rates were 27-80%. Sixty-eight percent of questionnaire respondents thought a national equine health database was important. Most respondents wanted the database to contribute to improved horse health and welfare, to be used for research into durability and disease heritability, and to serve as a basis for health declarations for individual horses. The generally preferred purpose of the database was thus that it should focus on horse health and welfare rather than on performance or food safety, and that it should be able to function both at a population and an individual horse level. In conclusion, there is a positive attitude to the establishment of a health database for Danish horses. These results could enrich further reflection on the

  11. Delicate Balance: ELL Students Struggle to Balance Language and Content, while Educators Need Partnerships and Specific Professional Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmeyer, Jon

    2008-01-01

    All teachers face challenges in helping English language learners (ELLs) reach proficiency in content areas while learning English. ESL teachers are essential in helping ELLs to face the twin challenges of achieving in content areas and developing academic English proficiency. This article discusses how ESL teachers can continue to help students…

  12. Spatial patterns and stability of soil water content in forested slope and terraced area on the Loess Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guoce; Li, Zhanbin; Li, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Soil water content (SWC) plays a vital role in hydrological and vegetation restoration processes. It is the principal limiting factor for vegetation restoration on the Loess Plateau of China. This study aimed to analyze the spatial patterns and stability of SWC in a terraced area containing jujube trees (Ziziphus jujuba Mill.) and a forested slope with Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.) following rainfall. The SWCs in nine soil layers at intervals of 0.2 m down to a depth of 1.8 m were measured at 21 locations both in the terraces and in the forested slope from July 19 to September 3 in 2014. The results showed that the SWCs at different soil depths were normally distributed. The SWC in terraces and forestland at each soil depth all had strong temporal stability. The temporal stability of SWC was lower in the 0-0.4 m soil layer than at the deeper soil depths. The representative locations for SWC were depth-dependent and the number of representative locations was not constant. The mean SWC was largest in the lower terrace slopes. The lowest mean SWC in the forested slope was at the mid-slope point due to the highest root distribution. The 0.4-0.6 m soil depth was generally the wettest in both terraces and forestland. The driest soil depth in terraces was 1.0-1.2 m while the driest soil depth in forestland was 0.8-1.0 m. The SWC had a significant positive correlation with clay and silt content. Moerover, the SWC had a significant positive correlation with SOC and did not have a significant correlation with root conten in the terraced area. But in the forested slope, the SWC had a significant negative correlation with roots and did not have a significant correlation with SOC. Although it is feasible to use the representative locations of SWC to represent the mean SWC of a hillslope over a period of time, the cumulative absolute error increases with the cumulative number of days. In conclusion, the SWC at different soil depths and locations showed strong spatial

  13. Moraine Area Career System (MACS). Technology Preparation Final Report for 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraine Valley Community Coll., Palos Hills, IL.

    The Moraine Area Career System (MACS) Tech Prep Applied Academics Core project was undertaken to develop a written replicable model core of applied academics for selected vocational-technical programs that would emphasize Illinois goals for learning and technical content (including critical and computer literacy). A tech prep advisory council…

  14. Changes in leaf area, nitrogen content and canopy photosynthesis in soybean exposed to an ozone concentration gradient.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Shimpei; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A

    2016-08-01

    Influences of ozone (O3) on light-saturated rates of photosynthesis in crop leaves have been well documented. To increase our understanding of O3 effects on individual- or stand level productivity, a mechanistic understanding of factors determining canopy photosynthesis is necessary. We used a canopy model to scale photosynthesis from leaf to canopy, and analyzed the importance of canopy structural and leaf ecophysiological characteristics in determining canopy photosynthesis in soybean stands exposed to 9 concentrations of [O3] (37-116 ppb; 9-h mean). Light intensity and N content peaked in upper canopy layers, and sharply decreased through the lower canopy. Plant leaf area decreased with increasing [O3] allowing for greater light intensity to reach lower canopy levels. At the leaf level, light-saturated photosynthesis decreased and dark respiration increased with increasing [O3]. These data were used to calculate daily net canopy photosynthesis (Pc). Pc decreased with increasing [O3] with an average decrease of 10% for an increase in [O3] of 10 ppb, and which was similar to changes in above-ground dry mass production of the stands. Absolute daily net photosynthesis of lower layers was very low and thus the decrease in photosynthesis in the lower canopy caused by elevated [O3] had only minor significance for total canopy photosynthesis. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the decrease in Pc was associated with changes in leaf ecophysiology but not with decrease in leaf area. The soybean stands were very crowded, the leaves were highly mutually shaded, and sufficient light for positive carbon balance did not penetrate to lower canopy leaves, even under elevated [O3].

  15. Changes in leaf area, nitrogen content and canopy photosynthesis in soybean exposed to an ozone concentration gradient.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Shimpei; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A

    2016-08-01

    Influences of ozone (O3) on light-saturated rates of photosynthesis in crop leaves have been well documented. To increase our understanding of O3 effects on individual- or stand level productivity, a mechanistic understanding of factors determining canopy photosynthesis is necessary. We used a canopy model to scale photosynthesis from leaf to canopy, and analyzed the importance of canopy structural and leaf ecophysiological characteristics in determining canopy photosynthesis in soybean stands exposed to 9 concentrations of [O3] (37-116 ppb; 9-h mean). Light intensity and N content peaked in upper canopy layers, and sharply decreased through the lower canopy. Plant leaf area decreased with increasing [O3] allowing for greater light intensity to reach lower canopy levels. At the leaf level, light-saturated photosynthesis decreased and dark respiration increased with increasing [O3]. These data were used to calculate daily net canopy photosynthesis (Pc). Pc decreased with increasing [O3] with an average decrease of 10% for an increase in [O3] of 10 ppb, and which was similar to changes in above-ground dry mass production of the stands. Absolute daily net photosynthesis of lower layers was very low and thus the decrease in photosynthesis in the lower canopy caused by elevated [O3] had only minor significance for total canopy photosynthesis. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the decrease in Pc was associated with changes in leaf ecophysiology but not with decrease in leaf area. The soybean stands were very crowded, the leaves were highly mutually shaded, and sufficient light for positive carbon balance did not penetrate to lower canopy leaves, even under elevated [O3]. PMID:27261884

  16. Women in Academic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Thibault, George E

    2016-08-01

    More than a decade ago, women achieved parity with men in the number of matriculants to medical school, nearly one-third of the faculty of medical schools were women, and there were some women deans and department chairs. These trends were promising, but today there are still significant differences in pay, academic rank, and leadership positions for women compared with men in academic medicine. Though there has been progress in many areas, the progress is too slow to achieve previously recommended goals, such as 50% women department chairs by 2025 and 50% women deans by 2030.The author points to the findings presented in the articles from the Research Partnership on Women in Biomedical Careers in this issue, as well as research being published elsewhere, as an evidence base for the ongoing discussion of gender equity in academic medicine. More attention to culture and the working environment will be needed to achieve true parity for women in academic medical careers.

  17. Academic Bullies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    Many professors have been traumatized by academic bullies. Unlike bullies at school, the academic bully plays a more subtle game. Bullies may spread rumors to undermine a colleague's credibility or shut their target out of social conversations. The more aggressive of the species cuss out co-workers, even threatening to get physical. There is…

  18. Academic Decathlon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of California School Administrators.

    This position paper from the Research, Evaluation, and Accreditation Committee of the Association of California School Administrators (ACSA) presents a description of the Academic Decathlon program and offers recommendations for improving the program and ways that ACSA can assist the program. The description of the Academic Decathlon, a ten-event…

  19. The Symbolic Role of Academic Boards in University Academic Quality Assurance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowlands, Julie

    2013-01-01

    While much research on quality assurance in higher education has centred on issues related to the impact on teaching and learning and academic staff, there is a significant gap in the area of quality assurance and academic governance. Within Australia the roles of university academic boards (also known as academic senates or faculty senates) have…

  20. Academic detailing.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations. PMID:21209521

  1. Impact of the Design of U.S. History Textbooks on Content Acquisition and Academic Engagement of Special Education Students: An Experimental Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harniss, Mark K.; Caros, Jennifer; Gersten, Russell

    2007-01-01

    We used randomized controlled trials to compare the impact of the designs of 2 United States history textbooks on the content acquisition and behavior of 8th-grade students identified for special education services or identified as low achieving. We also investigated whether teachers differed in their use of instructional activities and…

  2. Evaluating an academic writing program for nursing students who have English as a second language.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Roslyn; Jackson, Debra

    2011-01-01

    Academic writing skills are essential to the successful completion of preregistration nursing programs, yet the development of such skills is a challenge for many nursing students, particularly those who speak English as a second language (ESL). It is vital to develop and evaluate strategies that can support academic writing skills for ESL nursing students. This qualitative study evaluated a four-day academic writing intervention strategy designed to support ESL first-year nursing students. Data from the program showed two major areas of difficulty for participants relating to academic writing: problems understanding course content in English, and problems expressing their understanding of that content in English. The participants noted a key benefit of this program was the provision of individual feedback. Programs such as this intervention successfully meet the demands of ESL nursing students, although ongoing support is also needed.

  3. Quantitative radioimmunohistochemical method using (/sup 125/I)-protein A to measure the content of methionine enkephalin in discrete rat brain areas

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, F.M.; Guilhaume, S.G.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1988-11-01

    We report a quantitative radioimmunohistochemical method, using (125I)-protein A in combination with a specific antibody to methionine enkephalin (Met-enk), for determination of the content of this peptide in discrete areas of rat brain. After paraformaldehyde fixation, rat brain sections were incubated with a Met-enk polyclonal antibody, followed by incubation with (125I)-protein A. After autoradiography with 3H-sensitive Ultrofilm, optical densities (OD) were quantified by computerized microdensitometry. The OD obtained were compared to a standard curve, constructed after determination by radioimmunoassay of the Met-enk content in corresponding brain areas from adjacent tissue sections. After comparing 15 different brain areas over a ninetyfold range of concentrations, we found a linear relationship between the content of Met-enk, as determined by radioimmunoassay, and the OD generated by autoradiography. The content of Met-enk in other discrete brain areas can be quantified by interpolation of the OD determined by autoradiography in the standard curve. The method allows, for the first time, precise quantification of peptide concentrations in discrete areas and nuclei from thin sections of rat brain. This technique has a more than 100-fold higher sensitivity than classical radioimmunoassays, with the additional advantage of neuroanatomical localization. It also has the potential for application to the quantification of many other antigens present in brain and other tissues.

  4. Nursing Faculty and Academic Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Cecilia E.

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient information exists regarding the process influencing faculty decisions, specifically in the area of maintaining academic integrity in an online environment. The purpose of the study was to explore the experiences and decision-making process of nursing faculty related to maintaining academic integrity in an online environment. The…

  5. Academic Village.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Renner Middle School (Plano, Texas) where the sprawling suburbs have been kept at bay while creating the atmosphere of an academic village. Photos and a floor plan are provided. (GR)

  6. Possible relationships between literacy-based instructional coaching and effects on high school teachers' self-efficacy and attitudes toward teaching reading in the content areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Jessica Lynn

    Grounded in the Theory of Self-Efficacy and the Theory of Reasoned Action, this quantitative, correlational study examined if participation in literacy-based instructional coaching (one-on-one, small group) predicted both high school teachers' self-efficacy as measured by the Teachers' Sense of Efficacy Scale and teachers' attitudes toward teaching reading in the content areas measured by the Scale to Measure Attitudes Toward Teaching Reading in Content Classrooms. This study utilized a convenience sample of content teachers from three high schools in Northeastern Pennsylvania participating in a literacy coaching initiative. The volunteer sample of teachers completed the Likert-type questionnaires. The study used hierarchical regression analysis to determine values for each block of the regression models. The study correlated instances of literacy-based instructional coaching (one-on-one, small group) with the scores on the SMATTRCC and the TSES to examine predictive validity. Gender, years of experience, and content area were control variables in this study. The results of the first model indicated that there was a significant relationship between the number of coaching instances and attitudes toward teaching reading in the content area with participation in instructional coaching accounting for 9.6% of the variance in scores on the SMATTRCC. The results of the second model indicated that there was a significant relationship between the number of coaching instances and teachers' self-efficacy with participation in instructional coaching accounting for 6.1% of the variance in scores on the TSES.

  7. Kinesics in Academic Listening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Susan Lewis

    Although nonverbal behaviors have been shown to be learned, meaningful, systematic, and sometimes culture bound, kinesics, the science of body behavioral communication, has been a neglected factor in second language instruction and research, particularly in the area of academic listening. This paper describes steps taken to develop materials,…

  8. Turn On Units: English as a Second Language Content Area Curriculum in Math, Science, and Computer Science for Grades K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Mary Lou, Ed.

    Thematic units, the basis of organization for this guide, work in many ways toward the dual goals of language and content area instruction. The thematic units presented here address topics of high interest to limited English-proficient (LEP) students, including: robots; using a computer data base; activities with plants; building terrariums;…

  9. The Many Facets and Applications of Text Structure in Supporting Educational Trajectories of Elementary and Middle Grade Children in Content Area Reading Comprehension and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albro, Elizabeth; Williams, Joanna P.; Wijekumar, Kausalai; Meyer, Bonnie J. F.; Harris, Karen R.

    2015-01-01

    Content area reading comprehension and writing have been a challenge for children in the U.S. schools for many years as evidenced by state and national assessments. One promising solution to the problem is text structure based instruction that promotes strategic selection, encoding, retrieval, and use of information for myriads of activities…

  10. A Content Area Reading Course Re-Imagined: A Situated Case Study of Disciplinary Literacies Pedagogy in Secondary English Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Terri L.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the experiences of one secondary preservice English teacher facilitating an out-of-school e-book club with urban youth while enrolled in a required course entitled Content Area Reading. Data were generated through field notes, interviews, course assignments, and book club artifacts and narratively analyzed using holistic…

  11. Explicit Vocabulary Instruction in an English Content-Area Course with University Student Teachers: When Comprehensible Input Needs to Be Comprehended

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimas, Héctor Manuel Serna

    2011-01-01

    This action research study explores explicit vocabulary instruction in an L2 (English) content-area course with a group of university student teachers. The study reviews several positions on the treatment of vocabulary in L2 contexts. The researcher takes up the teaching of explicit vocabulary through class activities and the students' completion…

  12. Reading in the Content Areas: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," March through December 1977 (Vol. 37 No. 9 through Vol. 38 No. 6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 26 titles are concerned with a variety of topics related to reading skills and reading achievement in content-area courses or life situations, including the language of commonly used forms; the readability of a state driver's…

  13. Examining Differentiation and Utilization of iPads across Content Areas in an Independent, PreK-4th Grade Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milman, Natalie B.; Carlson-Bancroft, Angela; Vanden Boogart, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This mixed methods case study examined the implementation of a 1:1 iPad initiative in a suburban, co-educational, independent, preK-4th grade elementary school in the United States. This article focuses on how teachers used iPads to differentiate instruction and across multiple content areas. Findings show the processes by which teachers employed…

  14. Toward a Grounded Theory of Trust: Collaboration, Trust and Cooperation between ESL and Content-Area Teachers in a Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortloff, Jeremy H.

    2011-01-01

    In the field of secondary-level English as a Second Language (ESL), the ESL teacher (ESLT) works together with the Content-area teacher (CAT), building-level administrator and ESL coordinator to meet the learning needs of English Language Learners (ELLs). This ESL network depends on the collegial relationships of those comprising it. With this in…

  15. Can Students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disabilities Improve on Planning and Writing in the Content Areas of Civics and Mathematics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauth, Clara; Mastropieri, Margo; Scruggs, Tom; Regan, Kelley

    2013-01-01

    Eight eighth-grade students identified as having emotional and/or behavioral disabilities participated in a multiple-baseline design study to assess the effects of teaching persuasive writing and applying writing in the civics content area. After baseline data were collected, two intervention phases were implemented. An instructional phase on…

  16. "I Write It in a Way that People Can Read It": How Teachers and Adolescent L2 Writers Describe Content Area Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibler, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Adolescent writers in second language settings often spend the majority of their school days in content area courses, such as math, science, and social studies, where they must negotiate challenging literacy tasks in their second languages with little explicit writing instruction. While genre scholars have built an extensive body of knowledge…

  17. Reading English for Academic Purposes--What Situational Factors May Motivate Learners to Read?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Shu-Chen

    2006-01-01

    This study, situated in an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) context where non-English major college learners are usually required to read content-area textbooks in English, tried to determine what motivates students to engage in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) reading activities. Three student informants were invited to reflect on their own…

  18. Using Technology to Increase Student Engagement in Academic Work in Special Education Graduate Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Yaoying

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effects of using Tablet PC to increase student engagement in their academic work, especially nontraditional students in the field of special education, through technology in hybrid graduate courses. Student achievements were compared through pre- and post-tests on course content areas, pre- and post-surveys…

  19. Academic Internship Program: Curriculum Guide. The Great Exchange. Grades 10-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Schools, Charlotte, NC.

    This curriculum guide provides the framework for the Academic Internship Program (AIP) that is available to Charlotte-Mecklenburg (North Carolina) Public Schools' high school students. In each career area, information is provided to describe the purpose of the internship, the qualifications for the intern, the content/scope and competency goals…

  20. Adolescent Literacy in the Academic Disciplines: General Principles and Practical Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jetton, Tamara L., Ed.; Shanahan, Cynthia, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    From leading authorities in both adolescent literacy and content-area teaching, this book addresses the particular challenges of literacy learning in each of the major academic disciplines. Chapters focus on how to help students successfully engage with texts and ideas in English/literature, science, math, history, and arts classrooms. The book…

  1. Word Generation Randomized Trial: Discussion Mediates the Impact of Program Treatment on Academic Word Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Joshua F.; Crosson, Amy C.; Paré-Blagoev, E. Juliana; Snow, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Classroom discussion, despite its association with good academic outcomes, is exceedingly rare in U.S. schools. The Word Generation intervention involves the provision of texts and activities to be implemented across content area class, organized around engaging and discussable dilemmas. The program was evaluated with 1,554 middle grade students…

  2. Academic Motivation: Concepts, Strategies, and Counseling Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, Lonnie; Hong, Eunsook

    2013-01-01

    Motivation is an important foundation of academic development in students. This article discusses academic motivation; its various component concepts in areas such as beliefs, goals, and values; and intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. It also presents major, widely studied theoretical perspectives of academic motivation and briefly illustrates…

  3. Teaching Academic Vocabulary to Foreign Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Anne V.

    1976-01-01

    A method of teaching academic vocabulary to the intermediate to advanced EFL graduate students is discussed. Academic vocabulary includes non-technical vocabulary used in the research process, analysis and evaluation. Criteria for selecting academic vocabulary items are explained. Selected items and sample exercises for each area are given. (SCC)

  4. Academic Integrity: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macfarlane, Bruce; Zhang, Jingjing; Pun, Annie

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a literature review on academic integrity, which encompasses the values, behaviour and conduct of academics in all aspects of their practice. This is a growing area of academic research as a result of the expansion of higher education on a global basis and concerns about standards of professional conduct. The article maps the…

  5. Relationship between Instructional Leadership of Headmaster and Work Discipline and Work Motivation and Academic Achievement in Primary School at Special Areas of Central Jakarta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supriadi, Eddi; Yusof, Hj. Abdul Raheem Bin Mohamad

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the relationship between the instructional leadership of the headmaster and the work discipline of teachers and the work motivation and the academic achievement of primary school students from Special Province of Central Jakarta. The research method will be done with quantitative research methods. The study uses data…

  6. Long-term changes of metal contents in two metallophyte species (Olkusz area of Zn-Pb ores, Poland).

    PubMed

    Kicińska, Alicja; Gruszecka-Kosowska, Agnieszka

    2016-06-01

    The authors present the changes of the As, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb and Zn contents in two plant-considered metallophytes: common bent Agrostis capillaris (blades) and birch Betula pendula (leaves and seeds), recorded in a Zn-Pb industrial region of Olkusz (Poland) in 1994 and 2014. The highest amounts of Cd (12 ppm) and Zn (2524 ppm) in the common bent occur in the vicinity of the mining and metallurgical works 'Bolesław' in Bukowno. However, these values are significantly lower than those in 1994: Cd by 87 % and Zn by 52 %. The highest contents of Fe (2674 ppm), Mn (130 ppm) and Pb (334 ppm) in this grass species are in the vicinity of the closed Olkusz mine. These contents have increased in comparison with the 1994 figures: Fe by 56 %, Mn by 120 % and Pb by 6 %. In the birch leaves, the metal contents averaged for four sites are the following: As 2.1, Cd 6.5, Fe 261, Mn 110, Pb 70 and Zn 1657 ppm, being lower from the figures in 1994. The highest As, Fe and Pb contents of birch leaves occur in the habitat closest to the former Olkusz mine, while those of Cd, Mn and Zn in the habitat distant at 100 m from the active plant in Bukowno. The common bent grass generates better resistance mechanisms against the metals than does the birch. In the birch leaves, the contents of the metals are significantly lower than those of the grass blades, but higher from those of the birch seeds collected from the same tree individuals. It is a proof of good functioning of the mechanisms preventing excessive metal amounts from the cell metabolism and of the presence of physiological barriers protecting birch seeds as the generative organs. PMID:27165603

  7. Library and Information Science Research Areas: A Content Analysis of Articles from the Top 10 Journals 2007-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aharony, Noa

    2012-01-01

    The current study seeks to describe and analyze journal research publications in the top 10 Library and Information Science journals from 2007-8. The paper presents a statistical descriptive analysis of authorship patterns (geographical distribution and affiliation) and keywords. Furthermore, it displays a thorough content analysis of keywords and…

  8. Effects of decreasing resolution on spectral and spatial information content in an agricultural area. [Pottawatmie study site, Iowa and Nebraska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The effects of decreasing spatial resolution from 6 1/4 miles square to 50 miles square are described. The effects of increases in cell size is studied on; the mean and variance of spectral data; spatial trends; and vegetative index numbers. Information content changes on cadastral, vegetal, soil, water and physiographic information are summarized.

  9. How Can the Classroom Teacher Match Content Area Reading Materials with the Needs and Abilities of Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aukerman, Robert

    Teachers can match content reading materials with student needs and abilities in a number of ways. If textbooks are the main or only source, teachers can group students according to textbook difficulty, conduct student surveys of specific topics in the textbook, and use the textbook as a sampler or starting point for more in-depth studies of…

  10. A Content and Sample Analysis of Quantitative Articles Published in the "Journal of Counseling & Development" between 1991 and 2000

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilsson, Johanna E.; Love, Keisha M.; Taylor, Kathryn J.; Slusher, Anita L.

    2007-01-01

    This study reviewed the content of articles and characteristics of samples in all quantitative articles published in the "Journal of Counseling & Development" between 1991 and 2000. The content analysis revealed that the areas that received the most attention were academic/career, multicultural issues, symptoms/disorders, and counseling process.…

  11. Academic Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durant, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As colleges and universities become even more complex organizations, advancement professionals need to have the skills, experience, and academic credentials to succeed in this ever-changing environment. Advancement leaders need competencies that extend beyond fundraising, alumni relations, and communications and marketing. The author encourages…

  12. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally negative practice.…

  13. Academic Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Burton R.

    With fragmentation the dominant trend in academic settings around the world, the larger wholes of profession, enterprise, and system are less held together by integrative ideology. Strong ideological bonding is characteristic of the parts, primarily the disciplines. The larger aggregations are made whole mainly by formal superstructure, many…

  14. Academic Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, William R.

    The internal politics of colleges and the influence of a current emphasis on efficiency on the traditional independence of the academician are analyzed. It is suggested that the academician does not work in the same differentiated, and therefore interdependent, way as someone in industry or a bureaucracy. Academic activity is segmented, which…

  15. Academic Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Brian G.

    The strength of academic freedom has always depended upon historical circumstances. In the United States, higher education began with institutions founded and controlled by religious sects. The notion of who gets educated and to what ends expanded as American democracy expanded. By the 1980's, legitimate calls for equality became a general…

  16. Semi-Blind Source Separation for Estimation of Clay Content Over Semi-Vegetated Areas, from Vnir/swir Hyperspectral Airborne Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouerghemmi, W.; Gomez, C.; Nacer, S.; Lagacherie, P.

    2015-08-01

    The applicability of Visible, Near-Infrared and Short Wave Infrared (VNIR/SWIR) hyperspectral imagery for soil property mapping decreases when surfaces are partially covered by vegetation. The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate a methodology based on the "double-extraction" technique, for clay content estimation over semi-vegetated surfaces using VNIR/SWIR hyperspectral airborne data. The "double-extraction" technique initially proposed by Ouerghemmi et al. (2011) consists of 1) an extraction of a soil reflectance spectrum ssoil from semi-vegetated spectra using a Blind Source Separation technique, and 2) an extraction of clay content from the soil reflectance spectrum ssoil, using a multivariate regression method. In this paper, the Source Separation approach is Semi-Blind thanks to the integration of field knowledge in Source Separation model. And the multivariate regression method is a partial least squares regression (PLSR) model. This study employed VNIR/SWIR HyMap airborne data acquired in a French Mediterranean region over an area of 24 km2. Our results showed that our methodology based on the "double-extraction" technique is accurate for clay content estimation when applied to pixels under a specific Cellulose Absorption Index threshold. Finally the clay content can be estimated over around 70% of the semi-vegetated pixels of our study area, which may offer an extension of soil properties mapping, at the moment restricted to bare soils.

  17. Monitoring of Heavy Metals Content in Soil Collected from City Centre and Industrial Areas of Misurata, Libya

    PubMed Central

    Elbagermi, M. A.; Edwards, H. G. M.; Alajtal, A. I.

    2013-01-01

    The present paper deals with the assessment of heavy metals in soil and roadside dust around Misurata City Centre and industrial areas/roads in the period of October 2011–May 2012. The levels of Pb, Fe, Zn, Ni, Cd, Cr, and Cu in settled dust samples collected near small streets, playgrounds, gas stations and main streets in the Misurata Area have been determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Also, the levels of same heavy metals in industrial areas have been determined. Metal concentration trend variation was also discussed in relation with traffic density and other sources of fugitive emission around different sites on each road/area. The overall mean concentration for main streets was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than for other small streets, where Misurata has been the centre of fierce fighting and is located in a frontline battle zone in the Libyan war; therefore most of metal concentrations in surface soil in the fighting area Tripoli Street and Benghazi Street were higher than those from the other sites (outside fighting area). PMID:23762061

  18. Monitoring of heavy metals content in soil collected from city centre and industrial areas of misurata, libya.

    PubMed

    Elbagermi, M A; Edwards, H G M; Alajtal, A I

    2013-01-01

    The present paper deals with the assessment of heavy metals in soil and roadside dust around Misurata City Centre and industrial areas/roads in the period of October 2011-May 2012. The levels of Pb, Fe, Zn, Ni, Cd, Cr, and Cu in settled dust samples collected near small streets, playgrounds, gas stations and main streets in the Misurata Area have been determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Also, the levels of same heavy metals in industrial areas have been determined. Metal concentration trend variation was also discussed in relation with traffic density and other sources of fugitive emission around different sites on each road/area. The overall mean concentration for main streets was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than for other small streets, where Misurata has been the centre of fierce fighting and is located in a frontline battle zone in the Libyan war; therefore most of metal concentrations in surface soil in the fighting area Tripoli Street and Benghazi Street were higher than those from the other sites (outside fighting area).

  19. Critique in Academic Disciplines and Active Learning of Academic Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    This article argues for increased theoretical specificity in the active learning process. Whereas constructivist learning emphasizes construction of meaning, the process articulated here complements meaning construction with disciplinary critique. This process is an implication of how disciplinary communities generate new knowledge claims, which…

  20. Fostering the Intellectual and Tribal Spirit: The Role of the Chief Academic Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    His Horse Is Thunder, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces and describes the academic leadership role of the chief academic officer (CAO), also referred to as the academic vice-president, academic dean, or the provost. The CAO is responsible for the development and implementation of all academic programs, including the curriculum content, assessment, instruction quality,…

  1. Hg contents in soils and olive-tree (Olea Europea, L.) leaves from an area affected by elemental mercury pollution (Jódar, SE Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Berdonces, Miguel Angel; María Esbrí, José; Amorós, José Angel; Lorenzo, Saturnino; Fernández-Calderón, Sergio; Higueras, Pablo; Perez-de-los-Reyes, Caridad

    2014-05-01

    Data from soil and olive tree leaves around a decommissioned chlor-alkali plant are presented in this communication. The factory was active in the period 1977-1991, producing during these years a heavily pollution of Guadalquivir River and hydrargyrism in more than local 45 workers. It is located at 7 km South of Jódar, a locality with some 12,120 inhabitants. Mercury usage was general in this type of plants, but at present it is being replaced by other types of technologies, due to the risks of mercury usage in personal and environment. A soil geochemistry survey was carried out in the area, along with the analysis of olive-tree leaves (in the plots with this culture) from the same area. 73 soil samples were taken at two different depths (0-15 cm and 15-30 cm), together with 41 olive tree samples. Mercury content of geologic and biologic samples was determined by means of Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with Zeeman Effect, using a Lumex RA-915+ device with the RP-91C pyrolysis attachment. Air surveys were carried our using a RA-915M Lumex portable analytical device. Soil mercury contents were higher in topsoil than in the deeper soil samples, indicating that incorporation of mercury was due to dry and wet deposition of mercury vapors emitted from the plant. Average content in topsoil is 564.5 ng g-1. Hg contents in olive-tree leaves were in the range 46 - 453 ng g-1, with an average of 160.6 ng g-1. This level is slightly lower than tolerable level for agronomic crops established by Kabata-Pendias (2001) in 200 ng g-1. We have also compared soil and leaf contents for each sampling site, finding a positive and significant correlation (R=0.49), indicating that Hg contents in the leaves are linked to Hg contents in the soils. BAC (Bioaccumulation Absorption Coefficient, calculated as ratio between soil and leaf concentration) is 0.28 (consistent with world references, BAC = 0.7), considered "medium" in comparison with other mineral elements. Main conclusions of this

  2. Fluorine in the rocks and sediments of volcanic areas in central Italy: total content, enrichment and leaching processes and a hypothesis on the vulnerability of the related aquifers.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Donatella; Cremisini, Carlo; Cinnirella, Alessandro; Spaziani, Fabio

    2012-09-01

    Rock, sediment and water samples from areas characterised by hydrothermal alterations in the Sabatini and Vico Volcanic Districts, near Rome and the large city of Viterbo, respectively, were collected and analysed to determine the total fluorine (F) content and to understand the F geochemical background level in the volcanic districts of central Italy. Leaching and alteration processes controlling the high concentration of F in water were also investigated. Fluorine concentrations were directly determined (potentiometrically) by an F selective electrode in water samples, while the procedure for rock samples included preliminary F dissolution through alkaline fusion. F concentrations higher than 800 mg kg(-1) were commonly found in the analysed rocks and sediments; the concentration depended on the lithology and on the distance from the alteration areas. A specific successive sampling campaign was conducted in three areas where the F content in sediments was particularly high; in the same areas, measurements of CO(2) flux were also performed to investigate the possible deep origin of F. To verify the relationships among the high F contents in rocks and sediments, the leaching processes involved and the presence of F in the aquifer, we also collected water samples in the western sector of the Sabatini Volcanic District, where hydrothermal manifestations and mineral springs are common. The data were processed using a GIS system in which the F distribution was combined with morphological and geological observations. The main results of our study are that (1) F concentrations are higher in volcanic and recently formed travertine (especially in hydrothermally altered sediments) than in sedimentary rocks and decrease with distance from hydrothermal alteration areas, (2) F is more easily leached from hydrothermally altered rocks and from travertine and (3) sediments enriched with F may indicate the presence of deep regional fractures that represent direct pathways of

  3. Fluorine in the rocks and sediments of volcanic areas in central Italy: total content, enrichment and leaching processes and a hypothesis on the vulnerability of the related aquifers.

    PubMed

    De Rita, Donatella; Cremisini, Carlo; Cinnirella, Alessandro; Spaziani, Fabio

    2012-09-01

    Rock, sediment and water samples from areas characterised by hydrothermal alterations in the Sabatini and Vico Volcanic Districts, near Rome and the large city of Viterbo, respectively, were collected and analysed to determine the total fluorine (F) content and to understand the F geochemical background level in the volcanic districts of central Italy. Leaching and alteration processes controlling the high concentration of F in water were also investigated. Fluorine concentrations were directly determined (potentiometrically) by an F selective electrode in water samples, while the procedure for rock samples included preliminary F dissolution through alkaline fusion. F concentrations higher than 800 mg kg(-1) were commonly found in the analysed rocks and sediments; the concentration depended on the lithology and on the distance from the alteration areas. A specific successive sampling campaign was conducted in three areas where the F content in sediments was particularly high; in the same areas, measurements of CO(2) flux were also performed to investigate the possible deep origin of F. To verify the relationships among the high F contents in rocks and sediments, the leaching processes involved and the presence of F in the aquifer, we also collected water samples in the western sector of the Sabatini Volcanic District, where hydrothermal manifestations and mineral springs are common. The data were processed using a GIS system in which the F distribution was combined with morphological and geological observations. The main results of our study are that (1) F concentrations are higher in volcanic and recently formed travertine (especially in hydrothermally altered sediments) than in sedimentary rocks and decrease with distance from hydrothermal alteration areas, (2) F is more easily leached from hydrothermally altered rocks and from travertine and (3) sediments enriched with F may indicate the presence of deep regional fractures that represent direct pathways of

  4. The Effects of Self-Regulated Strategy Development with Content Area Prompts for Persuasive Essays on the Planning and Written Language Performance of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauth, Clara

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the use of self-regulating strategies (SRSD) to support students with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD) in the academic area of writing. Eight, eighth grade students identified as having emotional disabilities participated in a multiple baseline multiple probe designed to assess the effects of teaching persuasive…

  5. Correlation between bone mineral density and serum trace element contents of elderly males in Beijing urban area

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Yu, Haotian; Yang, Guohua; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Wenjiao; Su, Tianjiao; Ma, Weifeng; Yang, Fan; Chen, Liying; He, Li; Ma, Yuanzheng; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Trace element levels are associated with the incidence of osteoporotic fractures, but related mechanisms remain unknown. Trace elements may interfere with growth, development and maintenance of bones. Therefore, we investigated whether plasma trace element levels are associated with bone mineral density in elderly males in Beijing. After epidemiologically investigating 91 elderly males with age ranging from 50 years to 80 years, we obtained a total of 30 healthy (group 1), 31 osteopoenic (group 2) and 30 osteoporotic (group 3) subjects. Blood was collected, and serum concentrations of trace elements were detected. Elderly males in the three groups were carefully matched in terms of body mass index. Iron, manganese, zinc, copper, selenium, cadmium and lead were analysed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by QDR-2000 dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Correlation between BMD and serum element contents was analysed using SPSS16.0. The plasma levels of manganese, zinc, copper, selenium and lead were similar in all of the groups (P>0.05). Cadmium was significantly and negatively correlated with BMD of the lumbar vertebrae (P<0.05). Moreover, cadmium and iron contents significantly differed in osteoporotic and healthy groups. These elements may directly and correlatively affect BMD in elderly males. Many trace elements may directly and correlatively influence BMD. Future studies should be conducted to evaluate serum and bone levels of these trace elements to determine the relationship of these trace elements with osteoporosis. PMID:26770561

  6. Lead contents in the surface enamel of deciduous teeth sampled in vivo from children in uncontaminated and in lead-contaminated areas

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Glauce Regina Costa de . E-mail: rfgerlach@forp.usp.br

    2007-07-15

    This study aimed to: (1) measure lead contents in the surface enamel of two populations consisting of 4-6-year-old children, one from an apparently uncontaminated area (Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo State, SP, Brazil, n=247) and the other from an area notoriously contaminated with lead (Bauru, Sao Paulo State, Brazil, n=26); (2) compare biopsy depths between the two populations; (3) correlate biopsy depth with lead content; (4) stratify samples according to biopsy depth to compare lead contents in samples from similar biopsy depths. A surface enamel acid-etch microbiopsy was performed in vivo on a single upper deciduous incisor for each sample. Lead was measured by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) while phosphorus was measured colorimetrically to establish biopsy depth. Samples from both populations were classified into categories of similar biopsy depths based on biopsy depth quartiles. Median lead contents were statistically different between the Ribeirao Preto population (206 {mu}g/g, range: 5-1399 {mu}g/g) and the Bauru population (786 {mu}g/g, range: 320-4711 {mu}g/g) (p<0.001); however, biopsy depth did not differ between the Ribeirao Preto (3.9 {mu}m, Standard Deviation, SD=0.9) and Bauru (3.8 {mu}m, SD=0.9) populations (p=0.7940). Pearson's correlation coefficient for biopsy depths versus log{sub 10} lead values was -0.29 for Ribeirao Preto and -0.18 for Bauru. Lead contents were statistically different between the two populations for all quartiles of biopsy depth. These findings suggest that lead accumulated in the surface enamel of deciduous teeth is linked to the environment in which people reside, indicating that this tissue should be further explored as an accessible biomarker of lead exposure.

  7. Particle Size, Surface Area, and Amorphous Content as Predictors of Solubility and Bioavailability for Five Commercial Sources of Ferric Orthophosphate in Ready-To-Eat Cereal

    PubMed Central

    Dickmann, Robin S.; Strasburg, Gale M.; Romsos, Dale R.; Wilson, Lori A.; Lai, Grace H.; Huang, Hsimin

    2016-01-01

    Ferric orthophosphate (FePO4) has had limited use as an iron fortificant in ready-to-eat (RTE) cereal because of its variable bioavailability, the mechanism of which is poorly understood. Even though FePO4 has desirable sensory properties as compared to other affordable iron fortificants, few published studies have well-characterized its physicochemical properties. Semi-crystalline materials such as FePO4 have varying degrees of molecular disorder, referred to as amorphous content, which is hypothesized to be an important factor in bioavailability. The objective of this study was to systematically measure the physicochemical factors of particle size, surface area, amorphous content, and solubility underlying the variation in FePO4 bioavailability. Five commercial FePO4 sources and ferrous sulfate were added to individual batches of RTE cereal. The relative bioavailability value (RBV) of each iron source, determined using the AOAC Rat Hemoglobin Repletion Bioassay, ranged from 51% to 99% (p < 0.05), which is higher than typically reported. Solubility in dilute HCl accurately predicted RBV (R2 = 0.93, p = 0.008). Amorphous content measured by Dynamic Vapor Sorption ranged from 1.7% to 23.8% and was a better determinant of solubility (R2 = 0.91; p = 0.0002) than surface area (R2 = 0.83; p = 0.002) and median particle size (R2 = 0.59; p = 0.12). The results indicate that while solubility of FePO4 is highly predictive of RBV, solubility, in turn, is strongly linked to amorphous content and surface area. This information may prove useful for the production of FePO4 with the desired RBV. PMID:26938556

  8. Particle Size, Surface Area, and Amorphous Content as Predictors of Solubility and Bioavailability for Five Commercial Sources of Ferric Orthophosphate in Ready-To-Eat Cereal.

    PubMed

    Dickmann, Robin S; Strasburg, Gale M; Romsos, Dale R; Wilson, Lori A; Lai, Grace H; Huang, Hsimin

    2016-03-01

    Ferric orthophosphate (FePO₄) has had limited use as an iron fortificant in ready-to-eat (RTE) cereal because of its variable bioavailability, the mechanism of which is poorly understood. Even though FePO₄ has desirable sensory properties as compared to other affordable iron fortificants, few published studies have well-characterized its physicochemical properties. Semi-crystalline materials such as FePO₄ have varying degrees of molecular disorder, referred to as amorphous content, which is hypothesized to be an important factor in bioavailability. The objective of this study was to systematically measure the physicochemical factors of particle size, surface area, amorphous content, and solubility underlying the variation in FePO₄ bioavailability. Five commercial FePO₄ sources and ferrous sulfate were added to individual batches of RTE cereal. The relative bioavailability value (RBV) of each iron source, determined using the AOAC Rat Hemoglobin Repletion Bioassay, ranged from 51% to 99% (p < 0.05), which is higher than typically reported. Solubility in dilute HCl accurately predicted RBV (R² = 0.93, p = 0.008). Amorphous content measured by Dynamic Vapor Sorption ranged from 1.7% to 23.8% and was a better determinant of solubility (R² = 0.91; p = 0.0002) than surface area (R² = 0.83; p = 0.002) and median particle size (R² = 0.59; p = 0.12). The results indicate that while solubility of FePO₄ is highly predictive of RBV, solubility, in turn, is strongly linked to amorphous content and surface area. This information may prove useful for the production of FePO₄ with the desired RBV.

  9. Academics' Teacher Identities, Authenticity and Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreber, Carolin

    2010-01-01

    Nine academics participated in semi-structured interviews to explore possible linkages between their teacher identities and the pedagogies they employ. A content analysis of the interviews was performed to gain insight into the factors playing a role in how academics define themselves as teachers, the larger educational goals they espouse and the…

  10. Legal Bases for Dealing with Academic Dishonesty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bricault, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Academic dishonesty poses a threat to the goals of every educational institution. This article draws heavily from current literature and case law to provide an overview of academic dishonesty, paying particular attention to associated legal aspects, such as due process, the content and communication of policies, sanctions, prevention, and…

  11. First data on the uranium content in water of the Yenisei River basin in the area affected by the operation of Rosatom plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolsunovskii, A. Ya.; Zhizhaev, A. M.; Saprykin, A. I.; Degermendzhi, A. G.; Rubailo, A. I.

    2011-07-01

    This study is devoted to investigating the content of uranium isotopes in water of the Yenisei River and its tributaries within the territories affected by the operation of Rosatom plants (mining chemical combine, and electrochemical plant). Long-term monitoring of the 238U content by mass spectrometry carried out in two institutes of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences first revealed the multiple excess of 238U over the background content in different areas of the Yenisei River basin, such as the region of the Yenisei River near the effluents of the mining and chemical combine (MCC), and the territories of the Bol'shaya Tel' and Kan rivers. In these regions, the 238U content in water reaches 2.1-4.0 μg/l, which exceeds its content upstream from the MCC (0.3-0.6 μg/l) by almost an order of magnitude. The studies of the isotopic composition of uranium in water samples, which were carried out at the Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, showed the presence of a technogenic isotope of uranium 236U in the samples from the Bolshaya Tel' River and revealed the deviation of the isotope ratio 238U/235U (167 ± 3 and 177 ± 3) from the equilibrium natural ratio (238U/235U = 138). These facts attest to the technogenic origin of part of the uranium in water of the Bol'shaya Tel' River connected with the activity of MCC. The excess uranium content in the Kan River requires additional studies to ascertain the fraction of uranium of technogenic origin connected with the activity of the electrochemical plant (ECP) (Fig. 1, Table 4).

  12. Heavy metal content in vegetables and fruits cultivated in Baia Mare mining area (Romania) and health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Roba, Carmen; Roşu, Cristina; Piştea, Ioana; Ozunu, Alexandru; Baciu, Călin

    2016-04-01

    Information about heavy metal concentrations in food products and their dietary intake are essential for assessing the health risk of local inhabitants. The main purposes of the present study were (1) to investigate the concentrations of Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd in several vegetables and fruits cultivated in Baia Mare mining area (Romania); (2) to assess the human health risk associated with the ingestion of contaminated vegetables and fruits by calculating the daily intake rate (DIR) and the target hazard quotient (THQ); and (3) to establish some recommendations on human diet in order to assure an improvement in food safety. The concentration order of heavy metals in the analyzed vegetable and fruit samples was Zn > Cu > Pb > Cd. The results showed the heavy metals are more likely to accumulate in vegetables (10.8-630.6 mg/kg dw for Zn, 1.4-196.6 mg/kg dw for Cu, 0.2-155.7 mg/kg dw for Pb, and 0.03-6.61 mg/kg dw for Cd) than in fruits (4.9-55.9 mg/kg dw for Zn, 1.9-24.7 mg/kg dw for Cu, 0.04-8.82 mg/kg dw for Pb, and 0.01-0.81 mg/kg dw for Cd). Parsley, kohlrabi, and lettuce proved to be high heavy metal accumulators. By calculating DIR and THQ, the data indicated that consumption of parsley, kohlrabi, and lettuce from the area on a regular basis may pose high potential health risks to local inhabitants, especially in the area located close to non-ferrous metallurgical plants (Romplumb SA and Cuprom SA) and close to Tăuții de Sus tailings ponds. The DIR for Zn (85.3-231.6 μg/day kg body weight) and Cu (25.0-44.6 μg/day kg body weight) were higher in rural areas, while for Pb (0.6-3.1 μg/day kg body weight) and Cd (0.22-0.82 μg/day kg body weight), the DIR were higher in urban areas, close to the non-ferrous metallurgical plants SC Romplumb SA and SC Cuprom SA. The THQ for Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd was higher than 5 for <1, <1, 12, and 6% of samples which indicates that those consumers may experience major health risks.

  13. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains the updated academic standards of Arizona for Grade 8. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 8; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (4) Reading…

  14. Arizona Academic Standards: Grade 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for grade 4. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 4; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (4)…

  15. Arizona Academic Standards, High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' updated academic standards for high school. The contents of this document contain: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--High School; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Proficiency and Distinction (Grades 9-12); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Proficiency and…

  16. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains an updated academic standards of Arizona public schools for grade 5. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 5; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades…

  17. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for grade 2. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 2; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades 1-3); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades 1-3); (4)…

  18. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains an updated academic standards of Arizona public schools for grade 6. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 6; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades 4-8); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Essentials (Grades…

  19. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for Grade 1. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 1; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades 1-3); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades 1-3); (4)…

  20. Arizona Academic Standards, Grade 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This publication contains Arizona public schools' academic standards for grade 3. The contents of this document include the following: (1) The Arts Standard 2006--Grade 3; (2) Comprehensive Health Education/Physical Activity Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades 1-3); (3) Foreign and Native Language Standards 1997--Foundations (Grades 1-3); (4)…

  1. The Enhancement of Water Ice Content in the Local Area Northeast of Arcadia Planitia: Evidence from Neutron Data from HEND (Mars Odyssey) and Elevation from MOLA (MGS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanin, A. B.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Tretyakov, V.; Smith, D. E.; Zuber, M. T.; Boynton, W.; Saunders, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    The first year of neutron mapping measurements from the Mars Odyssey spacecraft revealed enormous hydrogen-rich regions in the southern and northern hemispheres of the Martian crust that imply significant amounts of near surface water ice. The hydrogen-rich areas of the southern and northern regions appear generally comparable in spatial extent and water ice content. This observation is interesting in light of topography measured by the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft, which shows a significant difference in elevation between northern lowlands and southern highlands that could imply a difference in seasonal CO2 condensation. In this study we correlate the high energy neutron flux observed by HEND (Mars Odyssey) and surface elevation measured by MOLA in order to interpret the seasonal change in epithermal neutron flux in terms near-surface water ice content.

  2. Evaluation of microelement contents in Clethra barbinervis as food for human and animals in contrasting geological areas.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Asako K; Tomioka, Rie; Takenaka, Chisato

    2016-04-01

    The young leaves of Clethra barbinervis Sieb. et Zucc, which is a deciduous tree species found in secondary forests widely in Japan, are used in spring as a local traditional food by local populations, and the bark of this plant is also preferred by sika deer, Cervus nippon. However, C. barbinervis has been known to accumulate heavy metals in its leaves. Then, we aimed to clarify the characteristics of microelement contents in C. barbinervis and to discuss the value of this species as food for humans and animals through the analysis of seasonal changes and distribution in various organs of C. barbinervis growing under two different geological conditions. We found that C. barbinervis is an accumulating and tolerant plant for Ni, Co and Mn. It accumulates Ni from serpentine soil containing Ni at high concentration, and Co and Mn from acidic soils based on crystalline schist. The seasonal variation in element concentrations in leaves indicates that the young leaves contain Cu at high concentration and that eating them in spring season may be advantageous to humans, due to the associated increase in Cu intake. The high concentrations of Cu and Zn in the bark of C. barbinervis might explain why deer prefer to eat the bark of this species. PMID:26119806

  3. Evaluation of microelement contents in Clethra barbinervis as food for human and animals in contrasting geological areas.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Asako K; Tomioka, Rie; Takenaka, Chisato

    2016-04-01

    The young leaves of Clethra barbinervis Sieb. et Zucc, which is a deciduous tree species found in secondary forests widely in Japan, are used in spring as a local traditional food by local populations, and the bark of this plant is also preferred by sika deer, Cervus nippon. However, C. barbinervis has been known to accumulate heavy metals in its leaves. Then, we aimed to clarify the characteristics of microelement contents in C. barbinervis and to discuss the value of this species as food for humans and animals through the analysis of seasonal changes and distribution in various organs of C. barbinervis growing under two different geological conditions. We found that C. barbinervis is an accumulating and tolerant plant for Ni, Co and Mn. It accumulates Ni from serpentine soil containing Ni at high concentration, and Co and Mn from acidic soils based on crystalline schist. The seasonal variation in element concentrations in leaves indicates that the young leaves contain Cu at high concentration and that eating them in spring season may be advantageous to humans, due to the associated increase in Cu intake. The high concentrations of Cu and Zn in the bark of C. barbinervis might explain why deer prefer to eat the bark of this species.

  4. Adiposity and Physical Activity Are Not Related to Academic Achievement in School-Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Monique M.; Martin, Corby K.; Han, Hongmei; Newton, Robert; Sothern, Melinda; Webber, Larry S.; Davis, Allison B.; Williamson, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the hypotheses that in elementary school students: 1) adiposity and academic achievement are negatively correlated and 2) physical activity and academic achievement are positively correlated. Method Participants were 1963 children in fourth through sixth grades. Adiposity was assessed by calculating body mass index (BMI) percentile and percent body fat and academic achievement with statewide standardized tests in four content areas. Socioeconomic status and age were control variables. A subset of participants (n = 261) wore an accelerometer for three days to provide objective measurement of physical activity. Additionally, the association between weight status and academic achievement was examined by comparing children who could be classified as “extremely obese” and the rest of the sample, as well as comparing children who could be classified as normal weight, overweight, or obese. Extreme obesity was defined as >= 1.2 times the 95th percentile. Results Results indicated that there were no significant associations between adiposity or physical activity and achievement in students. No academic achievement differences were found between children with BMI percentiles within the extreme obesity range and those who did not fall within the extreme obesity classification. Additionally, no academic achievement differences were found for children with BMI percentiles within the normal weight, overweight, or obese ranges. Conclusion These results do not support the hypotheses that increased adiposity is associated with decreased academic achievement or that greater physical activity is related to improved achievement. However, these results are limited by methodological weaknesses, especially the use of cross-sectional data. PMID:22617499

  5. Relationship between specific surface area and the dry end of the water retention curve for soils with varying clay and organic carbon contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resurreccion, Augustus C.; Moldrup, Per; Tuller, Markus; Ferré, T. P. A.; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen

    2011-06-01

    Accurate description of the soil water retention curve (SWRC) at low water contents is important for simulating water dynamics and biochemical vadose zone processes in arid environments. Soil water retention data corresponding to matric potentials of less than -10 MPa, where adsorptive forces dominate over capillary forces, have also been used to estimate soil specific surface area (SA). In the present study, the dry end of the SWRC was measured with a chilled-mirror dew point psychrometer for 41 Danish soils covering a wide range of clay (CL) and organic carbon (OC) contents. The 41 soils were classified into four groups on the basis of the Dexter number (n = CL/OC), and the Tuller-Or (TO) general scaling model describing water film thickness at a given matric potential (<-10 MPa) was evaluated. The SA estimated from the dry end of the SWRC (SA_SWRC) was in good agreement with the SA measured with ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (SA_EGME) only for organic soils with n > 10. A strong correlation between the ratio of the two surface area estimates and the Dexter number was observed and applied as an additional scaling function in the TO model to rescale the soil water retention curve at low water contents. However, the TO model still overestimated water film thickness at potentials approaching ovendry condition (about -800 MPa). The semi-log linear Campbell-Shiozawa-Rossi-Nimmo (CSRN) model showed better fits for all investigated soils from -10 to -800 MPa and yielded high correlations with CL and SA. It is therefore recommended to apply the empirical CSRN model for predicting the dry part of the water retention curve (-10 to -800 MPa) from measured soil texture or surface area. Further research should aim to modify the more physically based TO model to obtain better descriptions of the SWRC in the very dry range (-300 to -800 MPa).

  6. Texture, Carbonate Content, and Preliminary Maps of Surficial Sediments of the Flower Garden Banks Area, Northwestern Gulf of Mexico Outer Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scanlon, Kathryn M.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Rozycki, Jill E.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to release texture and carbonate content analyses of 107 seafloor sediments collected within and near the East and West Flower Garden Banks areas of the Sanctuary and to show relationships between these data and existing bathymetric data. The sediment data, in conjunction with previously collected geological, geophysical and biological data were used to construct a reconnaissance-scale map of the distribution of seafloor sediment types. This map will be useful for resource managers and can be used, with additional data, as a basis for future habitat mapping.

  7. Wisconsin's Model Academic Standards for Art and Design Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Public Instruction, Madison.

    This Wisconsin academic standards guide for art and design explains what is meant by academic standards. The guide declares that academic standards specify what students should know and be able to do; what students might be asked to do to give evidence of standards; how well students must perform; and that content, performance, and proficiency…

  8. Heavy Metal Content in Airborne Dust of Childhood Leukemia Cluster Areas: Even Small Towns Have Air Pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, P. R.; Witten, M. L.

    2004-12-01

    Currently in the US, there are at least two ongoing clusters of childhood leukemia, where the incidence rate over the last several years has exceeded the national norm. In Fallon, Nevada, a town of 8,000 people, 16 children have been diagnosed with leukemia since 1995, three of whom have died. In Sierra Vista, Arizona, a town of 38,000 people, 12 children have been diagnosed since 1998, two of whom have died. A possible third cluster of childhood leukemia and other cancers is being monitored in Elk Grove, California, a suburb of Sacramento. For the purpose of characterizing the heavy metal content of airborne dust of these three communities, total suspended particulate samples were collected from each town as well as from nearby towns that could be considered as control comparisons. Sampling was done using portable high-volume blowers and glass- or quartz-fiber filter media. Filters were measured for elemental concentrations using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. To date, our most notable results are from the Nevada region. Compared to other control towns in the region, Fallon had significantly more tungsten in its airborne dust. Uranium was also higher in dust of Fallon than in other control towns. Uranium is a known health hazard, though it is not necessarily specifically related to childhood leukemia. The role of tungsten in childhood leukemia has not been widely studied. However, other research has identified tungsten exposure as an environmental concern in Fallon. A CDC study of human tissue samples from Fallon has shown high tungsten levels in people of Fallon, and a USGS study of drinking water in Fallon also has shown high tungsten there. Tree-ring research on selected trees has shown high tungsten values in recent rings compared to earlier rings. While these multiple indications of tungsten in the Fallon environment do not directly lead to the conclusion that tungsten causes leukemia, they do combine to suggest that biomedical research on the

  9. Lead-rich sediments, Coeur d'Alene River Valley, Idaho: area, volume, tonnage, and lead content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bookstrom, Arthur A.; Box, Stephen E.; Campbell, Julie K.; Foster, Kathryn I.; Jackson, Berne L.

    2001-01-01

    In north Idaho, downstream from the Coeur d?Alene (CdA) silver-lead-zinc mining district, lead-rich sediments, containing at least 1,000 ppm of lead, cover approximately 61 km2 (or 73 percent) of the 84-km2 floor of the CdA River valley, from the confluence of its North and South Forks to the top of its delta-front slope, in CdA Lake. Concentrations of lead (Pb) in surface sediments range from 15 to about 38,500 ppm, and average 3,370 ppm, which is 112 times the mean background concentration (30 ppm) of Pb in uncontaminated sediments of the CdA and St. Joe River valleys. Most of the highest concentrations of Pb are in sediments within or near the river channel, or near the base of the stratigraphic section of Pb-rich sediments. Ranges of Pb concentration in Pb-rich sediments gradually decrease with increasing distance from the river and its distributaries. Ranges of thickness of Pb-rich sediments generally decrease abruptly with increasing distance from the river, from about 3 + 3 m in the river channel to about 1 + 1m on upland riverbanks, levees and sand splays, to about 0.3 + 0.3 m in back-levee marshes and lateral lakes. Thickness of Pb-rich dredge spoils (removed from the river and deposited on Cataldo-Mission Flats) is mostly in the range 4 + 4 m, thinning away from an outfall zone north and west of the river, near the formerly dredged channel reach near Cataldo Landing. We attribute lateral variation in ranges of thickness and Pb content of Pb-rich sediments to the dynamic balance between decreasing floodwater flow velocity with increasing distance from the river and the quantity, size, density, and Pb content of particles mobilized, transported, and deposited. We present alternative median- and mean-based estimates of the volume of Pbrich sediments, their wet and dry tonnage, and their tonnage of contained Pb. We calculate separate pairs of estimates for 23 Estimation Units, each of which corresponds to a major depositional environment, divided into down

  10. [Determination of tracer gas contents in sediment pore water of gas hydrate area by two-dimensional gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hu; Yang, Qunhui; Ji, Fuwu; Zhou, Huaiyang; Xue, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    A two-dimensional gas chromatographic instrument was established by the capillary flow technology (Deans Switch) and two columns (PoraPLOT Q and Molsieve 5A) and three detectors (pulsed discharge helium ionization detector, flame photometric detector and thermal conductivity detector). The instrument can be used to measure tracer gases simultaneously including hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. The detection limits of the hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide were 0.51, 0.17, 82 and 0.08 micromol/mol, and the calibration curves presented good linear relationships in the range of 2-1030, 0.6-501, 120-10500 and 0.2- 49.1 micromol/mol, respectively. The relative standard deviations were less than 10% for the measurements of ten standard gases. By this method, the tracer gases in the sediment pore water of gas hydrate area in South China Sea had been detected. This method is simple, sensitive, and suitable for on-board detection. Compared with the usual methods for measuring tracer gases, the amount of a sample necessary is reduced greatly. It is useful for the survey of gas hydrate and hydrothermal resources below sea floor and for the research of dissolved gases in the ocean.

  11. The Effects of E-Mail Messages in a Distance Learning University on Perceived Academic and Social Support, Academic Satisfaction, and Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heiman, Tali

    2008-01-01

    The study examines the effects of e-mail messages on students' perceived social support, academic satisfaction, academic outcomes, and on students' coping modes. E-mails with a social or academic content were submitted by the university academic staff responsible for the courses to the 229 undergraduate students enrolled in an online social…

  12. Research Trends in Turkish Distance Education: A Content Analysis of Dissertations, 1986-2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozkurt, Aras; Kumtepe, Evrim Genc; Kumtepe, Alper Tolga; Aydin, Irem Erdem; Bozkaya, Müjgan; Aydin, Cengiz Hakan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a content analytic approach on doctoral dissertations in the field of distance education in Turkish Higher Education context from the years of 1986 through 2014. A total of 61 dissertations were examined to explore keywords, academic discipline, research areas, theoretical/conceptual frameworks, research designs, research…

  13. Disentangling scene content from spatial boundary: complementary roles for the parahippocampal place area and lateral occipital complex in representing real-world scenes.

    PubMed

    Park, Soojin; Brady, Timothy F; Greene, Michelle R; Oliva, Aude

    2011-01-26

    Behavioral and computational studies suggest that visual scene analysis rapidly produces a rich description of both the objects and the spatial layout of surfaces in a scene. However, there is still a large gap in our understanding of how the human brain accomplishes these diverse functions of scene understanding. Here we probe the nature of real-world scene representations using multivoxel functional magnetic resonance imaging pattern analysis. We show that natural scenes are analyzed in a distributed and complementary manner by the parahippocampal place area (PPA) and the lateral occipital complex (LOC) in particular, as well as other regions in the ventral stream. Specifically, we study the classification performance of different scene-selective regions using images that vary in spatial boundary and naturalness content. We discover that, whereas both the PPA and LOC can accurately classify scenes, they make different errors: the PPA more often confuses scenes that have the same spatial boundaries, whereas the LOC more often confuses scenes that have the same content. By demonstrating that visual scene analysis recruits distinct and complementary high-level representations, our results testify to distinct neural pathways for representing the spatial boundaries and content of a visual scene.

  14. Stability High Salt Content Waste Using Sol Gel Process. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference Number 0236

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Mixed waste sludges, soils, and homogeneous solids containing high levels of salt ( ~ greater than 15% by weight ) have proven to be difficult to stabilize due to the soluble nature of the salts. The current stabilization technique for high salt waste, grouting with Portland cement, is limited to low waste loadings. The presence of salts interfere with the hydration and curing of the cement, cause waste form deteriorating mineral expansions, or result in an undesirable separate phase altogether. Improved technologies for the stabilization of salt waste must be able to accommodate higher salt loadings, while maintaining structural integrity, chemical durability, and leach resistance. In a joint collaboration supported by the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Arizona Materials Laboratory (AML) at the University of Arizona have developed a sol-gel (wet-chemical) based, low-temperature-processing route for the stabilization of salt-containing mixed wastes. By blending and reacting liquid precursors at room temperature with salt waste, strong, impermeable “polyceram” matrices have been formed that encapsulate the environmentally hazardous waste components. As depicted by Figure 1, polycerams are hybrid organic/inorganic materials with unique properties derived from the chemical combination of polymer (organic) and ceramic (inorganic) components. For this application, the stabilizing polyceram matrices contain polybutadiene-based polymer components and silicon dioxide (SiO2) as the inorganic component. Polybutadiene (PBD) is a strong, tough, waterresistant plastic and its use in the polyceram promotes these same characteristics in the waste form. The PBD polymer component is modified to increase its reactivity with the SiO2 precursor during sol-gel processing. When combined, the polymer and SiO2 precursors react, gel, solidify, and encapsulate the

  15. [Distribution and Content of Transferable Nitrogen in the Soil of Water Level Fluctuating Zones of Mainstream and Its Tributary of Three Gorges Reservoir Areas During the Dry Period].

    PubMed

    2016-03-15

    In order to find the intrinsic correlation between water eutrophication and transformation of nitrogen in soil of water level fluctuating zone (WLFZ) of Three Gorges Reservoir Areas (TGRA), the method of sequential extraction process was applied to analyze the content and distribution characteristics of total transferable nitrogen (TF-N) in the mainstream of Yangtze River (Wanzhou section) and its tributaries of Mixi and Zhuxi River. The results showed that, compared with the main stream, the contents of soil organic matter (SOM) and total nitrogen (TN) were higher, while cation exchange capacity( CEC) and pH value were lower in the tributaries during the dry period. The main species of TF-N in soil was organic matter-sulfide form of nitrogen (OSF-N) in the WLFZ and the content of different TF-N species was in the order of OSF-N > iron-manganese oxide form of nitrogen (IMOF-N) > ion extractable form of nitrogen (IEF-N) > carbonate form of nitrogen (CF-N). The spatial distribution pattern of total TF-N was in the order of Zhuxi River > Mixi Valley > the main stem of Yangtze River. There were no significant differences between IEF-N and OSF-N contents both in the main and tributaries of Yangtze River. The distribution of CF-N and IMOF-N had similar patterns, whereas the TF-N showed a reverse pattern in comparison with the former two species in the main and tributary of Yangtze River, which was a main factor of TF-N differences between the main steam and tributaries of the Yangtze River.

  16. Fluid inclusion from drill hole DW-5, Hohi geothermal area, Japan: Evidence of boiling and procedure for estimating CO2 content

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sasada, M.; Roedder, E.; Belkin, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    Fluid inclusion studies have been used to derive a model for fluid evolution in the Hohi geothermal area, Japan. Six types of fluid inclusions are found in quartz obtained from the drill core of DW-5 hole. They are: (I) primary liquid-rich with evidence of boiling; (II) primary liquid-rich without evidence of boiling; (III) primary vapor-rich (assumed to have been formed by boiling); (IV) secondary liquid-rich with evidence of boiling; (V) secondary liquid-rich without evidence of boiling; (VI) secondary vapor-rich (assumed to have been formed by boiling). Homogenization temperatures (Th) range between 196 and 347??C and the final melting point of ice (Tm) between -0.2 and -4.3??C. The CO2 content was estimated semiquantitatively to be between 0 and 0.39 wt. % based on the bubble behavior on crushing. NaCl equivalent solid solute salinity of fluid inclusions was determined as being between 0 and 6.8 wt. % after minor correction for CO2 content. Fluid inclusions in quartz provide a record of geothermal activity of early boiling and later cooling. The CO2 contents and homogenization temperatures of fluid inclusions with evidence of boiling generally increase with depth; these changes, and NaCl equivalent solid solute salinity of the fluid can be explained by an adiabatic boiling model for a CO2-bearing low-salinity fluid. Some high-salinity inclusions without CO2 are presumed to have formed by a local boiling process due to a temperature increase or a pressure decrease. The liquid-rich primary and secondary inclusions without evidence of boiling formed during the cooling process. The salinity and CO2 content of these inclusions are lower than those in the boiling fluid at the early stage, probably as a result of admixture with groundwater. ?? 1986.

  17. [Distribution and Content of Transferable Nitrogen in the Soil of Water Level Fluctuating Zones of Mainstream and Its Tributary of Three Gorges Reservoir Areas During the Dry Period].

    PubMed

    2016-03-15

    In order to find the intrinsic correlation between water eutrophication and transformation of nitrogen in soil of water level fluctuating zone (WLFZ) of Three Gorges Reservoir Areas (TGRA), the method of sequential extraction process was applied to analyze the content and distribution characteristics of total transferable nitrogen (TF-N) in the mainstream of Yangtze River (Wanzhou section) and its tributaries of Mixi and Zhuxi River. The results showed that, compared with the main stream, the contents of soil organic matter (SOM) and total nitrogen (TN) were higher, while cation exchange capacity( CEC) and pH value were lower in the tributaries during the dry period. The main species of TF-N in soil was organic matter-sulfide form of nitrogen (OSF-N) in the WLFZ and the content of different TF-N species was in the order of OSF-N > iron-manganese oxide form of nitrogen (IMOF-N) > ion extractable form of nitrogen (IEF-N) > carbonate form of nitrogen (CF-N). The spatial distribution pattern of total TF-N was in the order of Zhuxi River > Mixi Valley > the main stem of Yangtze River. There were no significant differences between IEF-N and OSF-N contents both in the main and tributaries of Yangtze River. The distribution of CF-N and IMOF-N had similar patterns, whereas the TF-N showed a reverse pattern in comparison with the former two species in the main and tributary of Yangtze River, which was a main factor of TF-N differences between the main steam and tributaries of the Yangtze River. PMID:27337886

  18. Identifying potential academic leaders

    PubMed Central

    White, David; Krueger, Paul; Meaney, Christopher; Antao, Viola; Kim, Florence; Kwong, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify variables associated with willingness to undertake leadership roles among academic family medicine faculty. Design Web-based survey. Bivariate and multivariable analyses (logistic regression) were used to identify variables associated with willingness to undertake leadership roles. Setting Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario. Participants A total of 687 faculty members. Main outcome measures Variables related to respondents’ willingness to take on various academic leadership roles. Results Of all 1029 faculty members invited to participate in the survey, 687 (66.8%) members responded. Of the respondents, 596 (86.8%) indicated their level of willingness to take on various academic leadership roles. Multivariable analysis revealed that the predictors associated with willingness to take on leadership roles were as follows: pursuit of professional development opportunities (odds ratio [OR] 3.79, 95% CI 2.29 to 6.27); currently holding at least 1 leadership role (OR 5.37, 95% CI 3.38 to 8.53); a history of leadership training (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.25 to 2.78); the perception that mentorship is important for one’s current role (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.40 to 3.60); and younger age (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.99). Conclusion Willingness to undertake new or additional leadership roles was associated with 2 variables related to leadership experiences, 2 variables related to perceptions of mentorship and professional development, and 1 demographic variable (younger age). Interventions that support opportunities in these areas might expand the pool and strengthen the academic leadership potential of faculty members. PMID:27331226

  19. Seasonal variations in leaf area index, leaf chlorophyll, and water content; scaling-up to estimate fAPAR and carbon balance in a multilayer, multispecies temperate forest.

    PubMed

    Gond, Valéry; De Pury, David G. G.; Veroustraete, Frank; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    1999-08-01

    Seasonal differences in phenology between coniferous and deciduous tree species need to be considered when developing models to estimate CO(2) exchange in temperate forest ecosystems. Because seasonal variations in CO(2) flux in temperate forests are closely correlated with plant phenology, we quantified the phenology of forest species in a multilayered forest with patches of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and oak (Quercus robur L.) in Brasschaat, Belgium. A scaling-up modeling approach was developed to simulate reflectance at the leaf and canopy scales over a one-year cycle. Chlorophyll concentration, water content, specific leaf area and leaf area index of the forest species were measured throughout an entire year (1997). Scaling-up from the leaf to canopy was achieved by linking the PROSPECT and SAIL models. The result is the annual progression of the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fAPAR) in a 1 km(2) forest area, which can be directly related to high-resolution, remotely sensed data.

  20. Hospital outpatient perceptions of the physical environment of waiting areas: the role of patient characteristics on atmospherics in one academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Yen; Wang, Mu-Chia; Liao, Wei-Tsen; Lu, Jui-Heng; Sun, Pi-hung; Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Breen, Gerald-Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background This study examines hospital outpatient perceptions of the physical environment of the outpatient waiting areas in one medical center. The relationship of patient characteristics and their perceptions and needs for the outpatient waiting areas are also examined. Method The examined medical center consists of five main buildings which house seventeen primary waiting areas for the outpatient clinics of nine medical specialties: 1) Internal Medicine; 2) Surgery; 3) Ophthalmology; 4) Obstetrics-Gynecology and Pediatrics; 5) Chinese Medicine; 6) Otolaryngology; 7) Orthopedics; 8) Family Medicine; and 9) Dermatology. A 15-item structured questionnaire was developed to rate patient satisfaction covering the four dimensions of the physical environments of the outpatient waiting areas: 1) visual environment; 2) hearing environment; 3) body contact environment; and 4) cleanliness. The survey was conducted between November 28, 2005 and December 8, 2005. A total of 680 outpatients responded. Descriptive, univariate, and multiple regression analyses were applied in this study. Results All of the 15 items were ranked as relatively high with a range from 3.362 to 4.010, with a neutral score of 3. Using a principal component analysis' summated scores of four constructed dimensions of patient satisfaction with the physical environments (i.e. visual environment, hearing environment, body contact environment, and cleanliness), multiple regression analyses revealed that patient satisfaction with the physical environment of outpatient waiting areas was associated with gender, age, visiting frequency, and visiting time. Conclusion Patients' socio-demographics and context backgrounds demonstrated to have effects on their satisfaction with the physical environment of outpatient waiting areas. In addition to noticing the overall rankings for less satisfactory items, what should receive further attention is the consideration of the patients' personal characteristics when

  1. Development of a medical academic degree system in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lijuan; Wang, Youxin; Peng, Xiaoxia; Song, Manshu; Guo, Xiuhua; Nelson, Hugh; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Context The Chinese government launched a comprehensive healthcare reform to tackle challenges to health equities. Medical education will become the key for successful healthcare reform. Purpose We describe the current status of the Chinese medical degree system and its evolution over the last 80 years. Content Progress has been uneven, historically punctuated most dramatically by the Cultural Revolution. There is a great regional disparity. Doctors with limited tertiary education may be licensed to practice, whereas medical graduates with advanced doctorates may have limited clinical skills. There are undefined relationships between competing tertiary training streams, the academic professional degree, and the clinical residency training programme (RTP). The perceived quality of training in both streams varies widely across China. As the degrees of master or doctor of academic medicine is seen as instrumental in career advancement, including employability in urban hospitals, attainment of this degree is sought after, yet is often unrelated to a role in health care, or is seen as superior to clinical experience. Meanwhile, the practical experience gained in some prestigious academic institutions is deprecated by the RTP and must be repeated before accreditation for clinical practice. This complexity is confusing both for students seeking the most appropriate training, and also for clinics, hospitals and universities seeking to recruit the most appropriate applicants. Conclusion The future education reforms might include: 1) a domestic system of ‘credits’ that gives weight to quality clinical experience vs. academic publications in career advancement, enhanced harmonisation between the competing streams of the professional degree and the RTP, and promotion of mobility of staff between areas of excellence and areas of need; 2) International – a mutual professional and academic recognition between China and other countries by reference to the Bologna Accord

  2. Academic Inbreeding in the Portuguese Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavares, Orlanda; Cardoso, Sónia; Carvalho, Teresa; Sousa, Sofia Branco; Santiago, Rui

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses the inbreeding phenomena in Portuguese public universities. Inbreeding is defined as the recruitment of academics by the same institution that awarded their PhDs. Focusing on 1,217 PhD-holding Portuguese academics, belonging to four public universities and to six disciplinary areas, inbreeding is analysed in order to understand…

  3. Academic Growth Made by Learning Disabled Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dannenbring, Gary L.; Lanning-Ventura, Suzanne

    The study examined the academic growth of students (N=326) identified as learning disabled since 1981 in a 9-county area of Iowa. All students in the study had been given at least one academic achievement test twice and the second testing was at least 90 days but not more than 1095 days after the first testing. The basic measure of growth was the…

  4. The Academic Controversy Technique: Towards Cooperative Debates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, George M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce and explain a cooperative learning technique, Academic Controversy (Johnson, Johnson, & Smith, 1996), also known as Cooperative Controversy, Structured Controversy and Structured Academic Controversy, that has potential for use in education and other areas, and has support in both research and theory.…

  5. Fighting the War on Academic Terrorism. Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Sandra N.

    2005-01-01

    While the attention of the country is focused on the global and national war on terrorism, the war on academic terrorism is being waged in classrooms, infiltrating the gifted programs, and altering the outcomes derived for students participating in gifted programs. The war on academic terrorism is related to the broad areas of curriculum and…

  6. Child and youth practice area publications in the American Journal of Occupational Therapy in 2008 and 2009: a content analysis, methodology overview, and summary.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ted

    2010-01-01

    In this review, 39 articles published in the American journal of occupational therapy in 2008 and 2009 that were categorized in the practice area of children and youth were examined using content analysis. The most frequent type of research published was basic research, which accounted for 38.5% (n=15) of the 39 studies published on the topic. Instrument development and testing and effectiveness studies were the next two most frequently noted research approaches, accounting for 25.6% (n=10) and 20.5% (n=8) of the studies, respectively. Among the 8 effectiveness studies, the level of evidence distribution was as follows: Level I, 3; Level III, 2; Level IV, 1; and Level V, 2. Quantitative studies were the predominant research paradigm used with 76.9% (n=30) of the studies.

  7. Ideas Exchange: Physical Education as a Dynamic Content Area Should Motivate Students to Be Physically Active. What New Ideas Can You Suggest to Kick Off the New School Year and Get Everyone "Moving" in the Right Direction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Melissa A.; Wright, James; Magnotta, John; Goldberg, Mark; Muller, Barbara; Reitz, Adam; Zavatto, Laura; Christenson, Bob; Winiecki, Tom; Beardsley, Rita; Connors, Shelly; Robelee, Margaret E.; Gosset, Michael; Mavrek, Srecko

    2010-01-01

    Physical education as a dynamic content area should motivate students to be physically active. In this article, readers suggest new ideas to kick off the new school year and get everyone "moving" in the right direction.

  8. Zoned chromites with high Mn-contents in the Fe-Ni-Cr-laterite ore deposits from the Edessa area in Northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michailidis, K. M.

    1990-07-01

    The mineralogy of the transported Fe-Ni-Cr-laterite ore bodies from the Edessa area in Northern Greece was studied. The special emphasis was on the textural features and chemistry of chromite. The chromite was residually inherited in laterites from weathered ultramafic rocks and it displays zonation. Three main zones were optically distinguished: an inner chromite zone, an intermediate ferritechromite zone and a magnetite rim. These three zones have distinct compositions. The major oxides MgO and Al2O3 decrease from the chromite core to the ferritechromite zone, while FeOt increases and Cr2O3 either increases or decreases. A characteristic chemical feature of the chromite is the very high Mn-content in the ferritechromite zone, up to 20%wt MnO. Chemical zonation has, however, been detected in optically unzoned chromite cores rimmed by magnetite. The zoning and the high Mn-content of the chromite is a result of serpentinization in the presence of Mn-rich fluids, following lateritic weathering and finally Alpine low-grade metamorphism.

  9. Why Do Academics Blog? An Analysis of Audiences, Purposes and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mewburn, Inger; Thomson, Pat

    2013-01-01

    Academics are increasingly being urged to blog in order to expand their audiences, create networks and to learn to write in more reader friendly style. This paper holds this advocacy up to empirical scrutiny. A content analysis of 100 academic blogs suggests that academics most commonly write about academic work conditions and policy contexts,…

  10. Reading-Writing Relationships in First and Second Language Academic Literacy Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabe, William; Zhang, Cui

    2016-01-01

    Reading and writing relations, as this concept applies to academic learning contexts, whether as a major way to learn language or academic content, is a pervasive issue in English for academic purposes (EAP) contexts. In many cases, this major link between reading/writing and academic learning is true even though explicit discussions of this…

  11. Gateways among Academic Computer Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCredie, John W.

    1984-01-01

    Local area networks for intracampus facilities and national inter-campus networks are discussed. Descriptions of some of these networks (ARPAnet, BITNET, CSNET, EDUNET, MAILNET, RLIN, AND USENET) are provided that illustrate the wide range of academic applications currently available. (Author/MLW)

  12. Instructing Students in Academic Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Paul A.; Federici, Elizabeth; Buehler, Marianne A.

    2010-01-01

    Plagiarism is a great temptation to students in this digital age, in areas ranging from the purchase of term papers on the internet to improper citing of sources in reports to the inappropriate use of clickers in the classroom. The authors have explored attitudes about academic integrity among college science students using a survey that was…

  13. Academic Achievement and Class Placement in High School: Do Students with Learning Disabilities Achieve More in One Class Placement than Another?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fore, Cecil, III; Hagan-Burke, Shanna; Burke, Mack D.; Boon, Richard T.; Smith, Steve

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine classroom placement, inclusive versus non-inclusive, relative to the academic performance of students with specific learning disabilities in secondary content area classrooms. Fifty-seven high school students with learning disabilities were assessed using the Grade Level Short Form of the "Multilevel…

  14. Assessment Accommodations on Tests of Academic Achievement for Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: A Qualitative Meta-Analysis of the Research Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawthon, Stephanie; Leppo, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The authors conducted a qualitative meta-analysis of the research on assessment accommodations for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. There were 16 identified studies that analyzed the impact of factors related to student performance on academic assessments across different educational settings, content areas, and types of assessment…

  15. The National Ocean Sciences Bowl: Extending the Reach of a High School Academic Competition to College, Careers, and a Lifelong Commitment to Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Kristina; Walters, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Researchers have begun tracking a group of high ability high school students from high school into college study. These students indicated an interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) content areas, and specifically ocean sciences, through participation in a regional or national academic competition in high school--The…

  16. Using the Academic Skills Inventory to Assess the Biology Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seifert, Kyle; Hurney, Carol A.; Wigtil, Clifton J.; Sundre, Donna L.

    2009-01-01

    The Academic Skills Inventory (Kruger and Zechmeister, 2001) was developed at Loyola University of Chicago and originally designed for use with psychology majors. It was later extended for use in a variety of academic programs. The Academic Skills Inventory (ASI) assesses student self-reports of behaviors in 10 skill areas: (1) written and oral…

  17. Professional Learning Communities Facilitator's Guide for the What Works Clearinghouse™ Practice Guide: Teaching Academic Content and Literacy to English Learners in Elementary and Middle School. REL 2015-105

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimino, Joseph A.; Taylor, Mary Jo; Morris, Joan

    2015-01-01

    This facilitator's guide is designed to assist professional learning communities (PLCs) in applying evidence-based strategies to help K-8 English learners acquire the language and literacy skills needed to succeed academically. Through this collaborative learning experience, educators will expand their knowledge base as they read, discuss, share,…

  18. Professional Learning Communities Facilitator's Guide Handouts for the What Works Clearinghouse™ Practice Guide: Teaching Academic Content and Literacy to English Learners in Elementary and Middle School. REL 2015-105

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimino, Joseph A.; Taylor, Mary Jo; Morris, Joan

    2015-01-01

    These handouts, which are meant to accompany the facilitator's guide, are designed to assist professional learning communities (PLCs) in applying evidence-based strategies to help K-8 English learners acquire the language and literacy skills needed to succeed academically. The facilitator's guide uses a five-step process for collaborative…

  19. Social Justice and English Language Learners in the Borderland: A Personal Narrative of a Committed Principal Determined to Take the Steps Necessary for English Language Learners to Achieve and Succeed in Academic Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lechuga, Mary Helen

    2009-01-01

    This study embraces the pedagogy that this school's educators believed in and utilized to enhance and expand the academic knowledge of those students who posses a language different from the English language. This research study, represented in a personal narrative, attempts to question the widespread thinking that places all validity on using…

  20. Preliminary engineering report waste area grouping 5, Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks content removal project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) requires a Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) for federal facilities placed on the National Priorities List. The Oak Ridge Reservation was placed on that list on December 21, 1989, and the agreement was signed in November 1991 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region IV, and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). The effective date of the FFA is January 1, 1992. One objective of the FFA is to ensure that liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that are removed from service are evaluated and remediated through the CERCLA process. Five inactive LLLW tanks, designated T-1, T-2, T-3, T-4, and T-9, located at the Old Hydrofracture (OHF) Facility in the Melton Valley area of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been evaluated and are now entering the remediation phase. As a precursor to final remediation, this project will remove the current liquid and sludge contents of each of the five tanks (System Requirements Document, Appendix A). It was concluded in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis [EE/CA] for the Old Hydrofracture Facility Tanks (DOE 1996) that sluicing and pumping the contaminated liquid and sludge from the five OHF tanks was the preferred removal action. Evaluation indicated that this alternative meets the removal action objective and can be effective, implementable, and cost-effective. Sluicing and removing the tank contents was selected because this action uses (1) applicable experience, (2) the latest information about technologies and techniques for removing the wastes from the tanks, and (3) activities that are currently acceptable for storage of transuranic (TRU) mixed waste.

  1. Petrographic And Geochemical Relationships And Environmentally Significant Trace Element Contents Of Miocene Coals in The Çayirli (Erzincan) Area, Eastern Anatolia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalcin Erik, Nazan

    2014-05-01

    This study has done related to the petrographic, coal-quality and the environmental influences of the Çayırlı coal field in the Eastern Anatolia. The region is one of the best examples of a continental collision zone in the world and located in a North-south converging collision zone between the Eurasian and the Arabian Plates. The geological units on the North of the basin are the peridotites and on the South, the Upper Triassic to Lower Cretaceous limestone. Tertiary sedimentary units also occupy a significant part of the geological features. Lower Miocene sediments include recifal limestone, marls, green clay and coal seams. The Çayırlı mining area in Eastern Anatolia region, contains these Miocene aged coals. These coals is characterized by high vitrinite and inertinite and low liptinite contents. The coals are Bituminous coal rank, with vitrinite reflectance ranging from 0.53 to 0.58%. Chemically, the coal in this study is characterised by low moisture, ash yield and sulfur content. The Çayırlı coal consist mainly of SiO2 and CaO, with secondary Fe2O3, Al2O3, and minor proportions of TiO2, P2O5 and other oxides. Several trace elements of environmental concern namely As, U and Be in Çayırlı coal are above the world averages, while Ni and Pb concentrations are less than the world average. However, As, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, U and V contents of this coal are below Turkish averages. It can clearly observed that the concentration of the elements is highest in the high ash coal levels. Among the potentially hazardous trace elements, Be, Co, Ni, Se and U may be of little or no health and environmental concerns, wheras As, Pb, Sb, and Th require further examination for their potential health and environmental concerns. These properties may be related to evaluation of the coal forming environment from more reducing contitions in a marine influenced lower delta plain environment for investigated coals. On the basis of analytical data, there is no possibility that

  2. Effects of Subsetting by Parent Materials on Prediction of Soil Organic Matter Content in a Hilly Area Using Vis–NIR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shengxiang; Shi, Xuezheng; Wang, Meiyan; Zhao, Yongcun

    2016-01-01

    Assessment and monitoring of soil organic matter (SOM) quality are important for understanding SOM dynamics and developing management practices that will enhance and maintain the productivity of agricultural soils. Visible and near-infrared (Vis–NIR) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (350–2500 nm) has received increasing attention over the recent decades as a promising technique for SOM analysis. While heterogeneity of sample sets is one critical factor that complicates the prediction of soil properties from Vis–NIR spectra, a spectral library representing the local soil diversity needs to be constructed. The study area, covering a surface of 927 km2 and located in Yujiang County of Jiangsu Province, is characterized by a hilly area with different soil parent materials (e.g., red sandstone, shale, Quaternary red clay, and river alluvium). In total, 232 topsoil (0–20 cm) samples were collected for SOM analysis and scanned with a Vis–NIR spectrometer in the laboratory. Reflectance data were related to surface SOM content by means of a partial least square regression (PLSR) method and several data pre-processing techniques, such as first and second derivatives with a smoothing filter. The performance of the PLSR model was tested under different combinations of calibration/validation sets (global and local calibrations stratified according to parent materials). The results showed that the models based on the global calibrations can only make approximate predictions for SOM content (RMSE (root mean squared error) = 4.23–4.69 g kg−1; R2 (coefficient of determination) = 0.80–0.84; RPD (ratio of standard deviation to RMSE) = 2.19–2.44; RPIQ (ratio of performance to inter-quartile distance) = 2.88–3.08). Under the local calibrations, the individual PLSR models for each parent material improved SOM predictions (RMSE = 2.55–3.49 g kg−1; R2 = 0.87–0.93; RPD = 2.67–3.12; RPIQ = 3.15–4.02). Among the four different parent materials, the largest R2

  3. Short-term low-protein diet during pregnancy alters islet area and protein content of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Salvatierra, Cristiana S B; Reis, Sílvia R L; Pessoa, Ana F M; De Souza, Letícia M I; Stoppiglia, Luiz F; Veloso, Roberto V; Reis, Marise A B; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C; Colodel, Edson M; Arantes, Vanessa C; Latorraca, Márcia Q

    2015-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways mediate β cell growth, proliferation, survival and death. We investigated whether protein restriction during pregnancy alters islet morphometry or the expression and phosphorylation of several proteins involved in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. As controls, adult pregnant and non-pregnant rats were fed a normal-protein diet (17%). Pregnant and non-pregnant rats in the experimental groups were fed a low-protein diet (6%) for 15 days. Low protein diet during pregnancy increased serum prolactin level, reduced serum corticosterone concentration and the expression of both protein kinase B/AKT1 (AKT1) and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K), as well as the islets area, but did not alter the insulin content of pancreatic islets. Pregnancy increased the expression of the Src homology/collagen (SHC) protein and the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) independent of diet. ERK1/2 phosphorylation (pERK1/2) was similar in islets from pregnant and non-pregnant rats fed a low-protein diet, and was higher in islets from pregnant rats than in islets from non-pregnant rats fed a normal-protein diet. Thus, a short-term, low-protein diet during pregnancy was sufficient to reduce the levels of proteins in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and affect islet morphometry. PMID:25860970

  4. Short-term low-protein diet during pregnancy alters islet area and protein content of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Salvatierra, Cristiana S B; Reis, Sílvia R L; Pessoa, Ana F M; De Souza, Letícia M I; Stoppiglia, Luiz F; Veloso, Roberto V; Reis, Marise A B; Carneiro, Everardo M; Boschero, Antonio C; Colodel, Edson M; Arantes, Vanessa C; Latorraca, Márcia Q

    2015-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways mediate β cell growth, proliferation, survival and death. We investigated whether protein restriction during pregnancy alters islet morphometry or the expression and phosphorylation of several proteins involved in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. As controls, adult pregnant and non-pregnant rats were fed a normal-protein diet (17%). Pregnant and non-pregnant rats in the experimental groups were fed a low-protein diet (6%) for 15 days. Low protein diet during pregnancy increased serum prolactin level, reduced serum corticosterone concentration and the expression of both protein kinase B/AKT1 (AKT1) and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K), as well as the islets area, but did not alter the insulin content of pancreatic islets. Pregnancy increased the expression of the Src homology/collagen (SHC) protein and the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) independent of diet. ERK1/2 phosphorylation (pERK1/2) was similar in islets from pregnant and non-pregnant rats fed a low-protein diet, and was higher in islets from pregnant rats than in islets from non-pregnant rats fed a normal-protein diet. Thus, a short-term, low-protein diet during pregnancy was sufficient to reduce the levels of proteins in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway and affect islet morphometry.

  5. Metal contents in Porites corals: Anthropogenic input of river run-off into a coral reef from an urbanized area, Okinawa.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A A; Inoue, Y; Ohde, S

    2004-02-01

    In order to monitor pollutants from urban areas to coral reefs, metal contents in Porites coral samples collected from the Hija River mouth and at nearby sites from the estuary were analyzed. The corals were cleaned by oxidative and reductive treatments to effectively eliminate detritus and organic materials. Metal-to-calcium (Me/Ca) ratios in the samples were determined by ICP-MS. Filtered samples of river water were also measured similarly for metal concentrations. The extent of anthropogenic contribution by riverine input was assessed by comparing the Me/Ca values in corals to those of Rukan-sho, an unpolluted coral reef. High riverine inputs of Mn, Cd, Zn and Ag were observed from Me/Ca values in the coral samples. Manganese in the coral samples showed strong dependence on salinity, varying inversely to the distance from terrestrial sources. Considering a lead background of 25.0 nmol/mol measured in the Rukan-sho corals, Pb/Ca in corals of the Hija River estuary that are two and three times higher may indicate lead enrichment in the river mouth. Because Pb is only moderately high in the Hija River water compared to its concentration in surface seawater, lead may have accumulated in the estuarine water and sediments, resulting in an elevated concentration of lead available for coral uptake.

  6. [Nitrates and nitrites content in the samples taken from the dug and drilled wells from the area of Podkarpacie region as a methemoglobinemia risk factors].

    PubMed

    Bilek, Maciej; Rybakowa, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the nitrates and nitrites content in water samples taken from fourteen dug and drilled wells from the area of Podkarpacie, as well as a summary of the previously performed analysis. Private water intakes are not under the supervision of the State Sanitary Inspection. So in the case of exceeding the standards provided by the Regulation of the Minister of Health, regulating the requirements for drinking water, private water intakes can be a serious threat to the health of consumers. Particularly at risk are infants, in whom nitrates and especially nitrites can cause, among others, methemoglobinemia. The analysis was performed by ion chromatography method, making it possible to simultaneously determining the concentrations of nitrates and nitrites. As it turned out there was no presence of nitrites in the water of the tested wells. In five samples taken from the dug wells nitrates concentration exceeding the norm of 50 mg/L have been reported. In two cases, exceeding the nitrate concentrations were significant: 96.53 mg L and 204.65 mg/L.

  7. Academic Delay of Gratification and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    2011-01-01

    The ability to delay gratification is the cornerstone of all academic achievement and education. It is by delaying gratification that learners can pursue long-term academic and career goals. In general, "delay of gratification" refers to an individual's ability to forgo immediate rewards for the sake of more valuable ones later (Mischel, 1996).…

  8. Association of Academic Physiatrists

    MedlinePlus

    ... RFC Newsletter - Physiatry in Motion Discussion Forums FileShare Libraries Membership Directory About AAP President's Message Mission & Strategic ... children('.slide-panel.notactive').removeClass('notactive'); autoPlay();}); }); Your Academic Home for Physiatry The Association of Academic Physiatrists ( ...

  9. The effects of academic literacy instruction on engagement and conceptual understanding of biology of ninth-grade students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Susan C.

    Academic language, discourse, vocabulary, motivation, and comprehension of complex texts and concepts are keys to learning subject-area content. The need for a disciplinary literacy approach in high school classrooms accelerates as students become increasing disengaged in school and as content complexity increases. In the present quasi-experimental mixed-method study, a ninth-grade biology unit was designed with an emphasis on promoting academic literacy skills, discourse, meaningful constructivist learning, interest development, and positive learning experiences in order to learn science content. Quantitative and qualitative analyses on a variety of measures completed by 222 students in two high schools revealed that those who received academic literacy instruction in science class performed at significantly higher levels of conceptual understanding of biology content, academic language and vocabulary use, reasoned thought, engagement, and quality of learning experience than control-group students receiving traditionally-organized instruction. Academic literacy was embedded into biology instruction to engage students in meaning-making discourses of science to promote learning. Academic literacy activities were organized according the phases of interest development to trigger and sustain interest and goal-oriented engagement throughout the unit. Specific methods included the Generative Vocabulary Matrix (GVM), scenario-based writing, and involvement in a variety of strategically-placed discourse activities to sustain or "boost" engagement for learning. Traditional instruction for the control group included teacher lecture, whole-group discussion, a conceptual organizer, and textbook reading. Theoretical foundations include flow theory, sociocultural learning theory, and interest theory. Qualitative data were obtained from field notes and participants' journals. Quantitative survey data were collected and analyzed using the Experience Sampling Method (ESM) to

  10. Visualizing Keyword Distribution across Multidisciplinary C-Space; Google Meets eBay: What Academic Librarians Can Learn from Alternative Information Providers; Trends in Use of Electronic Journals in Higher Education in the UK-Views of Academic Staff and Students; DOI: A 2003 Progress Report; Understanding the International Audiences for Digital Cultural Content.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beagle, Donald; Kenney, Anne R.; McGovern, Nancy Y.; Martinez, Ida T.; Heidig, Lance J.; Bonthron, Karen; Urquhart, Christine; Thomas, Rhian; Ellis, David; Everitt, Jean; Lonsdale, Ray; McDermott, Elizabeth; Morris, Helen; Phillips, Rebecca; Spink, Sian; Yeoman, Alison; Armstrong, Chris; Fenton, Roger; Paskin, Norman; Miller, Paul; Dawson, David; Perkins, John

    2003-01-01

    Includes five articles that discusses c-space as a visualization schema related to keyword distribution in information retrieval; academic librarians and alternative information providers, such as Google and eBay; electronic journal use in higher education in the United Kingdom; digital object identifiers; and international audiences for digital…

  11. The College Newspaper Press: An Analysis of Its Development Since 1968 in Four Dimensional Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, George Paul

    This dissertation analyzes four dimensional areas of the college newspaper--scope and function, legal control, business organization, and news and editorial content--from 1968 to the beginning of the 1974-75 academic year. The methodology took the form of a necessary illumination of the literature and other secondary investigation, an evaluation…

  12. Academic Inbreeding in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael H.

    1977-01-01

    Academic inbreeding, the employment for faculty positions of persons who receive their graduate training at the same academic institution, is considered detrimental to an institution's academic environment. Results of a study conducted at 54 universities revealed that almost half the faculty (48 percent) in collegiate nursing programs are drawn…

  13. What Is Academic Vocabulary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F.; Graves, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors address the construct of "academic vocabulary." First, they attempt to bring some clarity to a constellation of terms surrounding academic vocabulary. Second, they compare and contrast definitions of academic vocabulary. Third, they review typologies that researchers and writers have proposed to organize academic…

  14. The Academic Adviser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the idea that "academic" advisers are "academics" who play a major role in connecting the general education curriculum to the students' experience as well as connecting the faculty to the students' holistic experience of the curriculum. The National Academic Advising Association Concept of Academic…

  15. Bridges to Academic Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gornowich, Barbara Bernstein; Nelson, Anthony

    The materials comprise the curriculum for an introductory course in academic writing for limited English proficient adult or college students. The guide is intended for the upper end of a survival language skills course or the lowest end of an academic developmental writing sequence. The curriculum instructs students on academic life and assists…

  16. Caring for academic ophthalmology in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Mandić, Zdravko; Vatavuk, Zoran

    2004-06-01

    Like any other area of academic medicine in Croatia, academic ophthalmology has always been limited by or has depended on the factors outside the profession itself: during the communist regime, it was mostly political and ideological correctness of academic ophthalmologists, and today during the social and economic transition, it is the lack of finances, planning, and sophisticated technology. The four university eye clinics, which are the pillars of academic ophthalmology in Croatia, provide health care to most difficult cases, educate students, residents, and specialists, and do research. On the other hand, they lack equipment, room, and financial recognition. This ever growing imbalance between requirements imposed on academic ophthalmology today and its possibilities make it less and less attractive, especially in comparison with private practice. The possible solution lies in increasing the independence of ophthalmology from pharmaceutical industry and politics, especially in research and financial aspects.

  17. Estimating leaf functional traits by inversion of PROSPECT: Assessing leaf dry matter content and specific leaf area in mixed mountainous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Abebe Mohammed; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Duren, Iris van; Heiden, Uta; Heurich, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Assessments of ecosystem functioning rely heavily on quantification of vegetation properties. The search is on for methods that produce reliable and accurate baseline information on plant functional traits. In this study, the inversion of the PROSPECT radiative transfer model was used to estimate two functional leaf traits: leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and specific leaf area (SLA). Inversion of PROSPECT usually aims at quantifying its direct input parameters. This is the first time the technique has been used to indirectly model LDMC and SLA. Biophysical parameters of 137 leaf samples were measured in July 2013 in the Bavarian Forest National Park, Germany. Spectra of the leaf samples were measured using an ASD FieldSpec3 equipped with an integrating sphere. PROSPECT was inverted using a look-up table (LUT) approach. The LUTs were generated with and without using prior information. The effect of incorporating prior information on the retrieval accuracy was studied before and after stratifying the samples into broadleaf and conifer categories. The estimated values were evaluated using R2 and normalized root mean square error (nRMSE). Among the retrieved variables the lowest nRMSE (0.0899) was observed for LDMC. For both traits higher R2 values (0.83 for LDMC and 0.89 for SLA) were discovered in the pooled samples. The use of prior information improved accuracy of the retrieved traits. The strong correlation between the estimated traits and the NIR/SWIR region of the electromagnetic spectrum suggests that these leaf traits could be assessed at canopy level by using remotely sensed data.

  18. The academic advantage: gender disparities in patenting.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Cassidy R; Ni, Chaoqun; West, Jevin D; Larivière, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed gender disparities in patenting by country, technological area, and type of assignee using the 4.6 million utility patents issued between 1976 and 2013 by the United States Patent and Trade Office (USPTO). Our analyses of fractionalized inventorships demonstrate that women's rate of patenting has increased from 2.7% of total patenting activity to 10.8% over the nearly 40-year period. Our results show that, in every technological area, female patenting is proportionally more likely to occur in academic institutions than in corporate or government environments. However, women's patents have a lower technological impact than that of men, and that gap is wider in the case of academic patents. We also provide evidence that patents to which women--and in particular academic women--contributed are associated with a higher number of International Patent Classification (IPC) codes and co-inventors than men. The policy implications of these disparities and academic setting advantages are discussed.

  19. Travel tips for a journey into academic administration.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Carl

    2004-11-01

    A first-time administrator in a nursing academic setting can succeed in service to students and colleagues. To find the greatest personal contentment in this new role, the author suggests clarifying a personal purpose statement and becoming more self-aware. The author provides tips for finding exhilarating academic administration experiences in terms of association, action, and achievement. PMID:15559777

  20. Social Bookmarking in Academic Libraries: Trends and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redden, Carla S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an exploration of the potential utilization of social bookmarking web sites by academic libraries. These web sites, which allow users and organizations to create accounts for bookmarking online content, provide academic libraries tools to collaborate and network, organize and share electronic resources and teach information…

  1. Academic help seeking: theory and strategies for nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Carolyn J

    2007-10-01

    This article examines the topic of academic student help seeking and its significance to nursing faculty. Content includes definitions of help seeking, pertinent theory and research on the influence of individual and environmental factors on academic help-seeking behaviors, and suggested strategies in assisting undergraduate nursing students in help seeking endeavors.

  2. 34 CFR 200.3 - Designing State Academic Assessment Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 200.1(b); (ii) Be valid, reliable, and of high technical quality; (iii) Express student results in terms of the State's student academic achievement standards; and (iv) Be designed to provide a coherent... accurately the depth and breadth of the State's academic content standards; and (B) Express student...

  3. 34 CFR 200.3 - Designing State Academic Assessment Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 200.1(b); (ii) Be valid, reliable, and of high technical quality; (iii) Express student results in terms of the State's student academic achievement standards; and (iv) Be designed to provide a coherent... accurately the depth and breadth of the State's academic content standards; and (B) Express student...

  4. 34 CFR 200.3 - Designing State Academic Assessment Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 200.1(b); (ii) Be valid, reliable, and of high technical quality; (iii) Express student results in terms of the State's student academic achievement standards; and (iv) Be designed to provide a coherent... accurately the depth and breadth of the State's academic content standards; and (B) Express student...

  5. 34 CFR 200.3 - Designing State Academic Assessment Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 200.1(b); (ii) Be valid, reliable, and of high technical quality; (iii) Express student results in terms of the State's student academic achievement standards; and (iv) Be designed to provide a coherent... accurately the depth and breadth of the State's academic content standards; and (B) Express student...

  6. 34 CFR 200.3 - Designing State Academic Assessment Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 200.1(b); (ii) Be valid, reliable, and of high technical quality; (iii) Express student results in terms of the State's student academic achievement standards; and (iv) Be designed to provide a coherent... accurately the depth and breadth of the State's academic content standards; and (B) Express student...

  7. An Analysis of Academic Library Web Pages for Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Susan J.; Juricek, John Eric; Xu, F. Grace

    2008-01-01

    Web sites are increasingly used by academic libraries to promote key services and collections to teaching faculty. This study analyzes the content, location, language, and technological features of fifty-four academic library Web pages designed especially for faculty to expose patterns in the development of these pages.

  8. A suggested core content for education scholarship fellowships in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Yarris, Lalena M; Coates, Wendy C; Lin, Michelle; Lind, Karen; Jordan, Jaime; Clarke, Sam; Guth, Todd A; Santen, Sally A; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2012-12-01

    A working group at the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference on education research in emergency medicine (EM) convened to develop a curriculum for dedicated postgraduate fellowships in EM education scholarship. This fellowship is intended to create future education scholars, equipped with the skills to thrive in academic careers. This proceedings article reports on the consensus of a breakout session subgroup tasked with defining a common core content for education scholarship fellowships. The authors propose that the core content of an EM education scholarship fellowship can be categorized in four distinct areas: career development, theories of learning and teaching methods, education research methods, and educational program administration. This core content can be incorporated into curricula for education scholarship fellowships in EM or other fields and can also be adapted for use in general medical education fellowships.

  9. The Academic Clubs: Theory to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bicknell, Noel

    2010-01-01

    The Lab School of Washington (LSW) uses a unique approach to teaching social studies and humanities content. As part of its arts-driven lower school program, each child spends 40 minutes a day in dedicated rooms that simulate a specific historical time and place. Called "academic clubs," teachers use these spaces to teach thematic, arts-based,…

  10. Academic Journal Embargoes and Full Text Databases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Sam

    2003-01-01

    Documents the reasons for embargoes of academic journals in full text databases (i.e., publisher-imposed delays on the availability of full text content) and provides insight regarding common misconceptions. Tables present data on selected journals covering a cross-section of subjects and publishers and comparing two full text business databases.…

  11. Academic Procrastination: The Perspective of University Counsellors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrzek, Justine; Grunschel, Carola; Fries, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antecedents and consequences of academic procrastination in students who frequent university counselling in regard to this issue. To undertake this, semi-structured interviews with 12 experienced university counsellors in German universities were conducted. A qualitative content analysis resulted in…

  12. The Cosmic-Ray and Gas Content of the Cygnus Region as Measured in Gamma Rays by the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2011-01-01

    Context. The Cygnus region hosts a giant molecular-cloud complex which actively forms massive stars. Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar gas and radiation fields make it shine at y-ray energies. Several gamma-ray pulsars and other energetic sources are seen in this direction. Aims. In this paper we analyse the gamma-ray emission measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope in the energy range from 100 Me V to 100 Ge V in order to probe the gas and cosmic-ray content over the scale of the whole Cygnus complex. The gamma-ray emission on the scale of the central massive stellar clusters and from individual sources is addressed elsewhere. Methods. The signal from bright pulsars is largely reduced by selecting photons in their off-pulse phase intervals. We compare the diffuse gamma-ray emission with interstellar gas maps derived from radio/mm-wave lines and visual extinction data. and a global model of the region, including other pulsars and gamma-ray sources, is sought. Results. The integral H I emissivity above 100 MeV averaged over the whole Cygnus complex amounts to 12.06 +/- 0.11 (stat.) (+0.15 -0.84) (syst.J] x 10(exp -26) photons /s / sr / H-atom, where the systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty on the H I opacity to calculate its column densities. The integral emissivity and its spectral energy distribution are both consistent within the systematics with LAT measurements in the interstellar space near the solar system. The average X(sub co) N(H2)/W(sub co) ratio is found to be [1.68 +/- 0.05 (stat.) (H I opacity)] x 1020 molecules cm-2 (K km/s /r, consistent with other LAT measurements in the Local Arm. We detect significant gamma-ray emission from dark neutral gas for a mass corresponding to approx 40% of that traced by CO. The total interstellar mass in the Cygnus complex inferred from its gamma-ray emission amounts to 8(+5 -1) x 10(exp 6) Solar M at a distance of 1.4 kpc. Conclusions. Despite the conspicuous star formation activity and large

  13. Credit Quandaries: How Career and Technical Education Teachers Can Teach Courses That Include Academic Credit. Ask the Team

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacques, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Many career and technical education (CTE) courses not only provide students with vocational and technical skills and knowledge, but engage them in academic content as well. Designed thoughtfully, these courses can address rigorous academic content standards and be as intellectually demanding as traditional academic courses (Southern Regional…

  14. Early Career Academic Perceptions, Attitudes and Professional Development Activities: Questioning the Teaching and Research Gap to Further Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Kelly E.; Lodge, Jason M.; Bosanquet, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Early career academia is a challenging time, particularly as academics are facing increasing pressures to excel across a range of areas. Boyer argued for the "true scholar" versed in the overlapping areas of scholarship in research, teaching, integration and engagement. Academic developers have an important role to play in assisting the…

  15. The Academic Structure in Japan: Institutional Hierarchy and Academic Mobility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arimoto, Akira

    The characteristics of the Japanese academic structure are examined with attention to the evolution of institutional hierarchy, the closed academic structure, and the effects of the academic structure upon academic research. The evolution of Japan's institutional hierarchy in academics has been tightly related to factors of nationalism,…

  16. Partnerships with Academic Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes how professional and continuing higher education units can develop and sustain successful partnerships with academic departments in order to deliver educational programs effectively to students.

  17. Ethics and academic integrity.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2015-01-01

    Academics from across the globe must navigate ever-increasing demands for research, practice, and educational productivity. With the increased demands, nurse faculty must choose value priorities and actions that reflect academic integrity. What does it mean to choose actions that reflect personal integrity in the academic arena? This article begins an important nursing philosophical and theoretical discussion that members and future members of the discipline of nursing must reflect upon and grapple with as they consider what it potentially means to act with straight thinking and integrity in academics. PMID:25520458

  18. Motivation and academic achievement in medical students

    PubMed Central

    Yousefy, Alireza; Ghassemi, Gholamreza; Firouznia, Samaneh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Despite their ascribed intellectual ability and achieved academic pursuits, medical students’ academic achievement is influenced by motivation. This study is an endeavor to examine the role of motivation in the academic achievement of medical students. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional correlational study, out of the total 422 medical students, from 4th to final year during the academic year 2007–2008, at School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, 344 participated in completion of the Inventory of School Motivation (ISM), comprising 43 items and measuring eight aspects of motivation. The gold standard for academic achievement was their average academic marks at pre-clinical and clinical levels. Data were computer analyzed by running a couple of descriptive and analytical tests including Pearson Correlation and Student's t-student. Results: Higher motivation scores in areas of competition, effort, social concern, and task were accompanied by higher average marks at pre-clinical as well as clinical levels. However, the latter ones showed greater motivation for social power as compared to the former group. Task and competition motivation for boys was higher than for girls. Conclusion: In view of our observations, students’ academic achievement requires coordination and interaction between different aspects of motivation. PMID:23555107

  19. The Impact of Children's Social Adjustment on Academic Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Derosier, Melissa E; Lloyd, Stacey W

    2011-01-01

    This study tested whether social adjustment added to the prediction of academic outcomes above and beyond prior academic functioning. School records and peer-, teacher-, and self-report measures were collected for 1,255 third grade children in the fall and spring of the school year. Social acceptance by and aggression with peers were included as measures of social adjustment. Academic outcomes included math and reading GPA, classroom behavior, academic self-esteem, and absenteeism. As expected, support for the causal model was found where both forms of social adjustment contributed independently to the prediction of each area of academic adjustment. Gender differences in the patterns of results were present, particularly for the impact of aggression on academic adjustment. Discussion focuses on the implications for social-emotional literacy programs to prevent negative academic outcomes.

  20. Physically Active Academic Lessons in Elementary Children

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, John B.; Jowers, Esbelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although schools are an ideal location to conduct interventions that target children, the emphasis on standardized testing makes it difficult to implement interventions that do not directly support academic instruction. In response, physically active academic lessons have been developed as a strategy to increase physical activity while also addressing core educational goals. Texas I-CAN! is one incarnation of this approach. Methods We will review on-going research on the impact of these active lessons on: teacher implementation, child step count, child attention control, and academic performance. Results The collected studies support the impact of physically active academic lessons on each area of interest. Conclusions If these data can be replicated, it suggests that teachers might find these lessons of benefit to their primary role as educators, which should ease dissemination of these and other physically active lessons in elementary schools. PMID:21281672

  1. Content-Based ESL Instruction: Long-Term Effects and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Bailin

    2006-01-01

    Content-based language instruction has become a widely adopted pedagogical approach to EAP. This paper reports the results of a study of the effects of content-based ESL instruction on students' future academic performance. The study used college academic records to evaluate the academic performance of two groups of ESL students who enrolled as…

  2. Reading in the Content Areas: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through June 1978 (Vol. 38 Nos. 7 through 12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.

    This collection of abstacts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 16 titles deal with the following topics: a comparison of social science textbooks with student reading levels; the correlation between eighth graders' reading ability and their comprehension of content textbooks; the effects of…

  3. The Academic Generation Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dronzek, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The current generation gap in academia is different--fundamentally shaped by the structural problems of academic employment. The job market has especially exacerbated tensions between senior and junior faculty by ratcheting up expectations and requirements at every stage of the academic career. The disparities have been mentioned often enough to…

  4. Marketing Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallon, Melissa, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Ask any academic librarian if marketing their library and its services is an important task, and the answer will most likely be a resounding "yes!" Particularly in economically troubled times, librarians are increasingly called upon to promote their services and defend their library's worth. Since few academic libraries have in-house marketing…

  5. Facility Focus: Academic Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Humanities Building at Rice University, the Health Sciences Center at Lake Sumter Community College, and the Norman S. and Lida M. Smith Academic Technology Center at Bentley College as examples of the importance of academic buildings in helping define campus image. Includes photographs. (EV)

  6. Academic Researchers Speak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergom, Inger; Waltman, Jean; August, Louise; Hollenshead, Carol

    2010-01-01

    Non-tenure-track (NTT) research faculty are perhaps the most under-recognized group of academic professionals on the campuses today, despite their increasingly important role within the expanding academic research enterprise. The American Association for the Advancement of Science reports that the amount of federal spending on R&D has more than…

  7. Becoming an Academic Researcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angervall, Petra; Gustafsson, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The neo-liberal restructuring of academia justifies research concerning what constitutes academic work, what it means to be an academic researcher and how researchers manoeuvre in academia. The aim of this article is to investigate how this reshaping of higher education affects how research careers are formed and impacts on "becoming…

  8. California Redefines Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trow, Martin A.

    2003-01-01

    In the spring of 2003, University of California President Richard Atkinson forwarded to the U.C. Academic Senate a proposed revision of the existing regulation bearing on how university teachers should treat contentious and disputed issues, both political and academic, in their classrooms. The existing regulation on this matter, APM-010, had been…

  9. Academic Freedom Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the author's enduring concerns about the concept of academic freedom is with semantics. It has seemed to him that one of the biggest difficulties with discussions of academic freedom (as with many conversations about "value-laden" terms such as "democracy," "equity," and "justice") is that people begin from different positions and with…

  10. Academic Identities under Threat?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Sue

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the lived experience of practising academics as part of an inquiry into the vexed question of "academic identities". Identity is understood not as a fixed property, but as part of the lived complexity of a person's project. The article reports on data from a small study in one university. The data suggest that academic…

  11. Arbitration in Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Joel, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Questions and issues critical to an understanding of arbitration in higher education are discussed. Aspects of the academic arbitration model are defined. The following four topics are examined: (1) the procedural similarities and differences between academic arbitration and the industrial model; (2) the possible inherent conflict between academic…

  12. Impulsivity and Academic Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderman, Eric M.; Cupp, Pamela K.; Lane, Derek

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relations between academic cheating and impulsivity in a large sample of adolescents enrolled in high school health education classes. Results indicated that impulsivity predicts academic cheating for students who report extensive involvement in cheating. However, students who engage in extensive cheating are less likely…

  13. The Academic Dean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowker, Lee H.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the academic dean, role conflicts, and the occupational experiences and performance of deans are considered. Role conflict for academic deans is related to clashing constituencies, role ambiguity, lack of correspondence between organization requirements and the personalities of incumbent deans, changing organizational needs over time,…

  14. Understanding Academic Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Paul; Sanders, Lalage

    2006-01-01

    This paper draws on the psychological theories of self-efficacy and the self-concept to understand students' self-confidence in academic study in higher education as measured by the Academic Behavioural Confidence scale (ABC). In doing this, expectancy-value theory and self-efficacy theory are considered and contrasted with self-concept and…

  15. Academic Freedom and Me

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Ian

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a personal history of the author's own relationships with the concept of academic freedom. The article is subdivided into 3 prehistories, 7 incidents, 3 disjunctions, and 3 myths. The author discusses the complications of politics, culture, and academic freedom in one career.

  16. Thinking Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Lis

    2016-01-01

    This lecture argues that the politicisation and instrumentalisation of the university caused by neoliberal frames has as a result the depoliticisation of knowledge and of the academic as individual. This depoliticisation has turned academic freedom into a right to disengage not only from the political fight around these issues but also from the…

  17. Step-by-Step Guide to Producing a Comprehensive Academic Advising Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Jerry; Ford, Sheila Stoma

    1993-01-01

    Procedures for creating a guide to academic advising are outlined, including obtaining administrative commitment; clarifying responsibilities and chain of command; identifying general and specific objectives; developing content; organizing content; entering production; and revising. (MSE)

  18. Reengineering Academic Medical Centers: Reengineering Academic Values?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korn, David

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of academic medical centers (AMCs) looks at: change due to heavy federal funding in recent decades; adverse consequences, including deemphasis on education in favor of research and clinical service delivery, and discrepancies between AMC internal and external labor markets; and challenges to medical education in research, education, and…

  19. The Ethical Academic: Academics as Public Intellectuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-five years ago, American sociologist Robert Neelly Bellah (Bellah, et al., 1986: 303) critiqued the growing isolation of intellectuals within universities and called for a return to "social science as public philosophy." Little seems to have changed. My thirty-seven year experience at the University of Alberta suggests that academics see…

  20. Leaf shrinkage: a predictive indicator of the potential variation of the surface area-to-volume ratio according to the leaf moisture content.

    PubMed

    Essaghi, Salaheddine; Hachmi, M'hamed; Yessef, Mohammed; Dehhaoui, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Leaf shrinkage provides insights into the potential variation of foliar SVR, within the same species, when leaf moisture content is changing in response to water deficit. Since SVR is among the most significant plant flammability features, leaf shrinkage would be a relevant component of fuel hazard assessment through its influence on SVR, enhancing-if it is taken into account-thereby the wildfire prediction accuracy. The purpose of this work is, first, to consider the leaf shrinkage by characterizing the plant species towards the shrinkability of their leaves, taking account the possible site effect, to characterize the behavior of shrinkage as a function of moisture content and finally to perform a classification for some dominant Mediterranean species based on the shrinkage levels. The assessment of the hierarchical relationships between the dimensional shrinkages is also aimed. Leaves and needles of thirteen tree and shrub species were harvested from six different sites in western Rif Mountains. Leaves dimensions and moisture content were measured regularly during a gradual drying at the laboratory. Dimensional shrinkages were calculated at each moisture content level. Dimensional shrinkages behaved similarly whether in leaf or timber and kept the same reporting relationships between each other. Among the species sampled in different sites, site effect is significant only in Pinus canariensis and Pistacia lentiscus. A classification of the plant species was carried out in three separate classes. Generally, shrinkage class of the plant species studied gave an idea on its flammability ranking reported in the literature, implying thus a cause-and-effect relationship between both parameters. PMID:27536513

  1. Preservice Teachers' Professional Knowledge and Its Relation to Academic Self-Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulick, Isabell; Großschedl, Jörg; Harms, Ute; Möller, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the factorial structure of preservice teachers' academic self-concept with regard to three domains of professional knowledge (content knowledge [CK], pedagogical content knowledge [PCK], and pedagogical/psychological knowledge [PPK]). We also analyzed the relation between preservice teachers' academic self-concept and their…

  2. Beyond Vocabulary: Exploring Cross-Disciplinary Academic-Language Proficiency and Its Association with Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uccelli, Paola; Galloway, Emily Phillips; Barr, Christopher D.; Meneses, Alejandra; Dobbs, Christina L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite a long-standing awareness of academic language as a pedagogically relevant research area, the construct of academic-language proficiency, understood as a more comprehensive set of skills than just academic vocabulary, has remained vaguely specified. In this study, we explore a more inclusive operationalization of an academic-language…

  3. An Academic Curriculum Will Close the Academic Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palumbo, Anthony; Kramer-Vida, Louisa

    2012-01-01

    America's unyielding academic achievement gap has been a national priority for a long time; yet, some schools have succeeded with academically disadvantaged youth. Usually, these institutions embrace a culture of success and follow an academic curriculum that is grounded in core knowledge and scholastic vocabulary. Academically disadvantaged…

  4. Academic Capitalism and Academic Culture: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar; Berger, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    This case study investigated the impact of academic capitalism on academic culture by examining the perspectives of faculty members in an American academic department with significant industrial funding. The results of this study indicate that faculty members believe that the broad integrity of the academic culture remains unaffected in this…

  5. Academic Analytics: A New Tool for a New Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, John P.; DeBlois, Peter B.; Oblinger, Diana G.

    2007-01-01

    In responding to internal and external pressures for accountability in higher education, especially in the areas of improved learning outcomes and student success, IT leaders may soon become critical partners with academic and student affairs. IT can help answer this call for accountability through "academic analytics," which is emerging as a new…

  6. Inspiring Academics to Engage in Collegial Socialization: Pedagogical Provocations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanuka, Heather; Braga, John

    2011-01-01

    Academics who engage in collegial socialization can benefit in a variety of ways. The challenge, however, is creating a culture which inspires, within a voluntary model, academics to participate in such activities. Teaching development programs have tended to focus on teaching competencies and problem areas through offerings of workshops. It has…

  7. Academic Relations between Canada and China: 1970-95.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Martin

    This report reviews development of Sino-Canadian academic relations over the past 25 years. It offers an overview of four periods of Sino-Canadian academic relations (1970-79, 1979-83, 1983-89, and 1989-95), and briefly describes a number of programs in six areas: (1) foreign trade and economic cooperation, (2) foreign affairs and international…

  8. The Protean Challenge of Game Collections at Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Emma; Mould, David; Smith, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The rise of game development and game studies on university campuses prompts academic libraries to consider how to support teaching and research in this area. This article examines current issues and challenges in the development of game collections at academic libraries. The gaming ecosystem has become more complex and libraries may need to move…

  9. Tablets: A Survey of Circulation Policies at Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derr, Janice; Tolppanen, Bradley P.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a Web-based survey regarding the circulation of tablets in academic libraries. The survey, which was completed by 61 respondents, identifies the most common circulation policies and procedures used. These results will help other academic institutions develop their own policy or update existing ones. Areas of…

  10. Policies and Procedures for Academic Affairs , California State College, Penn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Coll., PA.

    Policies and procedures for academic affairs are detailed in the 1974-1975 edition of the faculty handbook. Areas of concern are presented alphabetically and include: absences, academic classification, admissions requirements, advanced standing, appealing grades, curriculum changes, course or college withdrawal, fees, graduate courses and…

  11. The Resilient Mind: The Psychology of Academic Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, Erik E.

    2008-01-01

    Using six years of data chronicling the experiences of 50 academically resilient college students, this article focuses on the seldom-researched area of the psychology of academic resilience. Ubiquitous stressors such as subpar public schooling and the lack of social and cultural capital; psychosocial issues that arise during the resilience…

  12. Writing Abilities Longitudinally Predict Academic Outcomes of Adolescents with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molitor, Stephen J.; Langberg, Joshua M.; Bourchtein, Elizaveta; Eddy, Laura D.; Dvorsky, Melissa R.; Evans, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often experience a host of negative academic outcomes, and deficits in reading and mathematics abilities contribute to these academic impairments. Students with ADHD may also have difficulties with written expression, but there has been minimal research in this area and it is not clear…

  13. Socialization to Academic Language in a Kindergarten Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of academic language for students' success in schools, this article reports on an investigation of how narrative-focused literacy events in the classroom provide opportunities for academic language socialization. Data were collected from one public elementary school in a major metropolitan area in the Mid-Atlantic region…

  14. Academic freedom and academic-industry relationships in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Streiffer, Robert

    2006-06-01

    Commercial academic-industry relationships (AIRs) are widespread in biotechnology and have resulted in a wide array of restrictions on academic research. Objections to such restrictions have centered on the charge that they violate academic freedom. I argue that these objections are almost invariably unsuccessful. On a consequentialist understanding of the value of academic freedom, they rely on unfounded empirical claims about the overall effects that AIRs have on academic research. And on a rights-based understanding of the value of academic freedom, they rely on excessively lavish assumptions about the kinds of activities that academic freedom protects.

  15. Flickr's Potential as an Academic Image Resource: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angus, Emma; Stuart, David; Thelwall, Mike

    2010-01-01

    Many web 2.0 sites are extremely popular and contain vast amounts of content, but how much of this content is useful in academia? This exploratory paper investigates the potential use of the popular web 2.0 image site Flickr as an academic image resource. The study identified images tagged with any one of 12 subject names derived from recognized…

  16. A Comparative Study of Teacher Education Institutions and Machine Tool Manufacturers to Determine Course Content for a Machine Tool Maintenance Course in the Woodworking Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polette, Douglas Lee

    To determine what type of maintenance training the prospective industrial arts teacher should receive in the woodworking area and how this information should be taught, a research instrument was constructed using information obtained from a review of relevant literature. Specific data on machine tool maintenance was gathered by the use of two…

  17. Identifying challenges for academic leadership in medical universities in Iran.

    PubMed

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Masiello, Italo

    2010-05-01

    CONTEXT The crucial role of academic leadership in the success of higher education institutions is well documented. Medical education in Iran has been integrated into the health care system through a complex organisational change. This has called into question the current academic leadership, making Iranian medical universities and schools a good case for exploring the challenges of academic leadership. OBJECTIVES This study explores the leadership challenges perceived by academic managers in medical schools and universities in Iran. METHODS A qualitative study using 18 face-to-face, in-depth interviews with academic managers in medical universities and at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education in Iran was performed. All interviews were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis. RESULTS The main challenges to academic leadership could be categorised under three themes, each of which included three sub-themes: organisational issues (inefficacy of academic governance; an overly extensive set of missions and responsibilities; concerns about the selection of managers); managerial issues (management styles; mismatch between authority and responsibilities; leadership capabilities), and organisational culture (tendency towards governmental management; a boss-centred culture; low motivation). CONCLUSIONS This study emphasises the need for academic leadership development in Iranian medical schools and universities. The ability of Iranian universities to grow and thrive will depend ultimately upon the application of leadership skills. Thus, it is necessary to better designate authorities, roles of academic staff and leaders at governance. PMID:20518985

  18. Identifying challenges for academic leadership in medical universities in Iran.

    PubMed

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Masiello, Italo

    2010-05-01

    CONTEXT The crucial role of academic leadership in the success of higher education institutions is well documented. Medical education in Iran has been integrated into the health care system through a complex organisational change. This has called into question the current academic leadership, making Iranian medical universities and schools a good case for exploring the challenges of academic leadership. OBJECTIVES This study explores the leadership challenges perceived by academic managers in medical schools and universities in Iran. METHODS A qualitative study using 18 face-to-face, in-depth interviews with academic managers in medical universities and at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education in Iran was performed. All interviews were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis. RESULTS The main challenges to academic leadership could be categorised under three themes, each of which included three sub-themes: organisational issues (inefficacy of academic governance; an overly extensive set of missions and responsibilities; concerns about the selection of managers); managerial issues (management styles; mismatch between authority and responsibilities; leadership capabilities), and organisational culture (tendency towards governmental management; a boss-centred culture; low motivation). CONCLUSIONS This study emphasises the need for academic leadership development in Iranian medical schools and universities. The ability of Iranian universities to grow and thrive will depend ultimately upon the application of leadership skills. Thus, it is necessary to better designate authorities, roles of academic staff and leaders at governance.

  19. Male Student-Athlete Perceptions of University Academic Staff Expectations: A Qualitative Analysis of Perceptions, Value and Academic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbeck, Teresa A.

    2010-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 male collegiate student-athletes in a revenue-generating sport in an effort to better inform current academic support practitioners how to best serve this population. The inquiry focused on student-athlete perceptions of two areas: (1) perceptions regarding the expectations academic personnel have…

  20. Is There an "Academic Vocabulary"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, Ken; Tse, Polly

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the notion of "academic vocabulary": the assumption that students of English for academic purposes (EAP) should study a core of high frequency words because they are common in an English academic register. We examine the value of the term by using Cox-head's (2000) Academic Word List (AWL) to explore the distribution of its…

  1. The Rewards of Academic Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Christina

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies of academic leadership confirm what many academic leaders know from personal experience: academic leadership is a complex and demanding role with significant stress and high burnout and turnover rates (Brown, 2002; Brown and Moshavi, 2002). In the light of these issues, an exploration of the nature of academic leadership and its…

  2. Academic Freedom and Organisational Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, William G.

    2001-01-01

    Summarizes prominent current arguments on academic freedom's endangerment by managerialism and discusses their limitations. Defines a new vision of academic freedom informed by thinking on globalization. Presents findings from interviews with Australian faculty about academic freedom and discusses ways to ensure that academic freedom endures in…

  3. Academic Writing and Tacit Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elton, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    The genre of academic writing is discipline dependent, so that neither specialists in academic writing nor practising academics in a discipline can, independently of each other, provide students with the necessary help to develop the ability to write in their academic disciplines. Furthermore, the rules are largely tacit, i.e. they are not…

  4. Establishing a 'track record': research productivity and nursing academe.

    PubMed

    Emden, C

    1998-01-01

    Many nursing academics in Australia are finding to their dismay that an outstanding teaching career and exemplary professional contribution to their field--and a PhD--are not enough to achieve promotion within their university, or secure a new academic post. One must also possess a proven or established 'track record' in research and publication. The operational funding arrangements for Australian universities rely in part on the research productivity of their academic staff members. This places special expectation upon the way academics conduct their scholarly work. Nursing academics are under particular pressure: as relative newcomers to the university scene, most find themselves considered as early career researchers with weak track records. This paper reviews relevant research and draws upon personal experience in the area of research development, to highlight how nursing academics may most strategically establish a research and publication record with a view to career advancement.

  5. Turning Academic Educators On to Voc Ed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauber, Robert T.

    1978-01-01

    To acquaint home school academic teachers with the area vocational school staff, programs, and students, an inservice program for high school teachers, counselors, and administrators in Erie County, Pennsylvania, was held during the 1976-77 school year. Contributing to its success were vo-tech students acting as tutors for the shop experience part…

  6. The McDonaldization of Academic Libraries?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the McDonaldization thesis that suggests that many aspects of the fast food industry are making their way into other areas of society. Explores whether this thesis is applicable to academic libraries, focusing on efficiency, calculability, predictability, control, user expectations, pros and cons of teams, and creativity and information…

  7. Children's Physical Fitness and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittberg, Richard A.; Northrup, Karen L.; Cottrel, Lesley

    2009-01-01

    Background: Childhood obesity is a major public health threat. Increased fitness may have a positive influence on cognitive performance in both adults and children. Purpose: To examine which aspects of children's fitness assessment are associated with their performance on four different academic areas. Methods: FITNESSGRAM measures aerobic…

  8. Environmental Variables as Predictors of Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Ronald W.

    This project used six environmental variables identified by Dave (1963) and Wolf (1964) and three additional variables (identification with models, range of social interaction, and perception of practical value of education) to predict academic achievement in six-year-old Mexican-American children from an economically depressed area. The children…

  9. Research Productivity and Academics' Conceptions of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela; Boud, David; Namgung, Sang Un; Lucas, Lisa; Crawford, Karin

    2016-01-01

    This paper asks the question: do people with different levels of research productivity and identification as a researcher think of research differently? It discusses a study that differentiated levels of research productivity among English and Australian academics working in research-intensive environments in three broad discipline areas: science,…

  10. Reconciling Writing in Academic and Workplace Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kryder, LeeAnne

    1995-01-01

    Investigates some of the disjunctions between writing as it is taught in academic institutions and writing as it is employed in professional workplaces, especially in the areas of writing context, time pressure, collaboration, and consequences of writing. Considers how these disjunctions might be addressed in the writing classroom. (TB)

  11. Advancing Academic Achievement in the Heterogeneous Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Linda; And Others

    This master's project analyzed the implementation of a program designed to address the academic needs of all students in a heterogeneous classroom. The targeted population consisted of secondary parochial school students from working and middle class backgrounds in or around a large midwestern metropolitan area. Problems of underachievement were…

  12. Gifted Student Academic Achievement and Program Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Katrina Ann Woolsey

    2010-01-01

    Gifted academic achievement has been identified as a major area of interest for educational researchers. The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether there was a relation between the quality of gifted programs as perceived by teachers, coordinators and supervisors of the gifted and the achievement of the same gifted students in 6th and 7th…

  13. Ethnicity, Drug User Status and Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dozier, Arthur Lee; Barnes, Michael James

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the impact of drug use and race on school performance. Results based on 38 students show significant main effects for both race and user status, suggesting an interaction between the two. Black users and nonusers did not differ across academic areas, although large differences for Whites and Latinos emerged. (RJM)

  14. Wisconsin's Model Academic Standards for Visual Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolay, Pauli; Grady, Susan; Stefonek, Thomas

    To assist parents and educators in preparing students for the 21st century, Wisconsin citizens have become involved in the development of challenging academic standards in 12 curricular areas. Having clear standards for students and teachers makes it possible to develop rigorous local curricula and valid, reliable assessments. This model of…

  15. Ambivalences: Voices of Indonesian Academic Discourse Gatekeepers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basthomi, Yazid

    2012-01-01

    This article presents voices of academic discourse gatekeepers in the Indonesian context. It reports on results of an attempt to re-read (re-analyze and re-interpret) the transcripts of interviews with Indonesian journal editors/reviewers in the area of English Language Teaching (ELT). The interviews were made with five editors/reviewers of two…

  16. Assessment of heavy metal contents in surface soil in the Lhasa-Shigatse-Nam Co area of the Tibetan Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Huiting; Li, Ji; Zhang, Chengzhong; Tian, Zhenyu; Liu, Xin; Tang, Chen; Han, Ying; Liu, Wenbin

    2014-08-01

    Eight important heavy metals (As, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Mn, and Hg) were investigated in surface soil samples collected from the Lhasa-Shigatse-Nam Co region, Tibetan Plateau, China. The mean contents of As, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, Mn, and Hg in the samples were 39.5, 57.4, 28.5, 48.2, 15.7, 79.2, 637 and 0.0175 mg/kg, respectively. All metals were divided into three clusters by cluster analysis. The results of geoaccumulation index indicated that no samples were polluted by Cr, Pb, Zn, and Mn, and samples were polluted with As, Cu, Ni, and Hg to different degrees. All surface soils had a low ecological risk with potential ecological risk index below 150, indicating a low ecological risk. As, Pb, and Hg were the primary contributors to potential ecological risk.

  17. Seasonal fluctuations of tissue mercury contents in the European shore crab Carcinus maenas from low and high contamination areas (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal).

    PubMed

    Pereira, E; Abreu, S N; Coelho, J P; Lopes, C B; Pardal, M A; Vale, C; Duarte, A C

    2006-11-01

    The main objective was to study the seasonal variation of mercury concentrations in different tissues (muscle, hepatopancreas and gills) of Carcinus maenas from low and high Hg contaminated areas, a valuable resource in temperate estuaries and a possible pathway for human uptake. Individuals of two size classes (around 35 and 55 mm cephalothorax wide) were captured monthly between March 1999 and May 2000 in two areas of Ria de Aveiro: in the main navigation channel that connects the lagoon to the sea, and in the inner lagoon area heavily contaminated by mercury (maximum Hg in sediments of 5.4 microg g(-1)). Pronounced decreases in salinity and temperature and reduced food availability in winter seemed to be the responsible for the decline of the crab condition index (0.75-0.45) in larger individuals. Muscle and hepatopancreas exhibited higher mercury concentrations than gills, with concentrations in the contaminated site ranging from 0.03 to 0.63 microg g(-1) and 0.02 to 0.34 microg g(-1), respectively. Linear regressions between muscle and hepatopancreas (r=0.94, p<0.001) and muscle and gills (r=0.97, p<0.001) suggested a rapid redistribution of mercury inside the organism. During winter, a rapid elimination of mercury was found in the three analysed tissues followed by uptake. Larger crabs presented elimination rates from 18 to 34 ng g(-1) per week, while the smaller crabs showed lower elimination rates (10-24 ng g(-1) per week). The uptake was similar in both size classes (11-15 ng g(-1) and 8.1-15 ng g(-1) per week, respectively for large and small crabs). Our results suggest that C. maenas harvested in the contaminated areas must be considered with caution, since Hg concentrations were found to exceed the threshold concentration allowed for human consumption (0.5 microg g(-1)). PMID:16824552

  18. The Marketing Concept in an Academic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rešetová, Kvetoslava

    2013-01-01

    Universities, as subjects of the academic environment, are institutions with the priority of education and research. The task of the marketing concept in the academic field is to communicate with all important target groups to support a stronger position and their perception of the school. The aim of the intervention is to increase the prestige, improve awareness, support positive attitudes, and present successful results in all areas of activity. This means creation and protection of a positive image, which enables higher interest of all target groups and secures better awareness about it.

  19. Assessment accommodations on tests of academic achievement for students who are deaf or hard of hearing: a qualitative meta-analysis of the research literature.

    PubMed

    Cawthon, Stephanie; Leppo, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The authors conducted a qualitative meta-analysis of the research on assessment accommodations for students who are deaf or hard of hearing. There were 16 identified studies that analyzed the impact of factors related to student performance on academic assessments across different educational settings, content areas, and types of assessment accommodations. The meta-analysis found that the results of analyses of group effects of accommodated versus unaccommodated test formats are often not significant, test-level factors exist that can affect how students perceive the assessments, and differences exist in how test items function across different conditions. Student-level factors, including educational context and academic proficiency, influence accommodations' role in assessment processes. The results of this analysis highlight the complexity of and intersections between student-level factors, test-level factors, and larger policy contexts. Findings are discussed within the context of larger changes in academic assessment, including computer-based administration and high-stakes testing. PMID:24133960

  20. Laboratory Investigation of Direct Measurement of Ice Water Content, Ice Surface Area, and Effective Radius of Ice Crystals Using a Laser-Diffraction Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerber, H.; DeMott, P. J.; Rogers, D. C.

    1995-01-01

    The aircraft microphysics probe, PVM-100A, was tested in the Colorado State University dynamic cloud chamber to establish its ability to measure ice water content (IWC), PSA, and Re in ice clouds. Its response was compared to other means of measuring those ice-cloud parameters that included using FSSP-100 and 230-X 1-D optical probes for ice-crystal concentrations, a film-loop microscope for ice-crystal habits and dimensions, and an in-situ microscope for determining ice-crystal orientation. Intercomparisons were made in ice clouds containing ice crystals ranging in size from about 10 microns to 150 microns diameter, and ice crystals with plate, columnar, dendritic, and spherical shapes. It was not possible to determine conclusively that the PVM accurately measures IWC, PSA, and Re of ice crystals, because heat from the PVM evaporated in part the crystals in its vicinity in the chamber thus affecting its measurements. Similarities in the operating principle of the FSSP and PVM, and a comparison between Re measured by both instruments, suggest, however, that the PVM can make those measurements. The resolution limit of the PVM for IWC measurements was found to be on the order of 0.001 g/cubic m. Algorithms for correcting IWC measured by FSSP and PVM were developed.

  1. Core Academic Language Skills: Moving beyond Vocabulary Knowledge to Predict Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uccelli, Paola; Galloway, Emily Phillips; Kim, Ha Yeon; Barr, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Despite a longstanding awareness of academic language as a pedagogically-relevant research area, the construct of academic language proficiency--understood as a more comprehensive set of skills than just academic vocabulary--has remained only vaguely specified. This study examines the potential--for both research and practice--of a more inclusive…

  2. Utilizing Data on Academic Dishonesty at the University of New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloeppel, Kimmerly M.

    2011-01-01

    Academic integrity (AI) and academic dishonesty (AD) have been intensified areas of concern in higher education. This research study explored issues of students' AD at the University of New Mexico (UNM). With the rise in academic dishonesty, this study was conducted with the intention of determining how AD can be deterred or discouraged.…

  3. Taking Responsibility for Academic Integrity: A Collaborative Teaching and Learning Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Julianne; Donnelly, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    La Trobe University, like many Australian universities, states that it values honest academic endeavour (Academic Integrity Policy 2011), and it can provide examples of good teaching practice in the areas of academic integrity, proper acknowledgment and avoiding plagiarism. Rather than relying on the chance that individuals will just develop good…

  4. The Self Concept Change as a Tool for Developmental Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugur, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    The main goals of academic advising are not only to improving social and academic success of students during academic year, but to improve the retention of the students with the successful interventions inside the educational system. Many areas of practice and research are mentioned in the scientific literature. One of them is improving students'…

  5. Whistleblowing in academic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, R; Strain, J

    2004-01-01

    The authors present and discuss cases of academic medicine failing to address unethical behaviour in academic science and, thereby, illustrate the scope and seriousness of the problem. The Olivieri/Apotex affair is just another instance of academic medicine's dereliction in a case of scientific fraud and misconduct. Instead of vigorously supporting their faculty member in her efforts to honestly communicate her findings and to protect patients from the risks associated with the use of the study drug, the University of Toronto collaborated with the Apotex company's "stalling tactics," closed down Dr Olivieri's laboratory, harassed her, and ultimately dismissed her. The authors argue that the incentives for addressing problematic behaviour have to be revised in order to effect a change in the current pattern of response that occurs in academic medicine. An externally imposed realignment of incentives could convert the perception of the whistleblower, from their present caste as the enemy within, into a new position, as valued friend of the institution. The authors explain how such a correction could encourage appropriate reactions to scientific misconduct from academic medicine. PMID:14872069

  6. Effects of nonfiction guided interactive read-alouds and think-alouds on fourth grader's depth of content area science vocabulary knowledge and comprehension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Tania Tamara

    Effects of nonfiction guided interactive read-alouds and think-alouds as a supplement to basal science textbooks on three vocabulary measures, definitions, examples, and characteristics, and one multiple-choice comprehension measure were assessed for 127 fourth graders over three time periods: pretest, posttest, and a 2-week delayed posttest. Two of three fourth-grade elementary science teachers implemented a series of 12 content-enhanced guided interactive scripted lessons. Two of these teachers implemented two treatments each. The first condition employed basal science textbooks as the text for guided interactive read-alouds and think-alouds while the second treatment employed basal science textbooks in conjunction with nonfiction text sets as the texts for guided interactive read-alouds and think-alouds. The third teacher, guided by traditional lesson plans, provided students with silent independent reading instruction using basal science textbooks. Multivariate analyses of variance and analyses of variance tests showed that mean scores for both treatment groups significantly improved on definitions and characteristics measures at posttest and either stabilized or slightly declined at delayed posttest. The treatment-plus group lost considerably on the examples posttest measure. The treatment group improved mean scores on the examples posttest measure, outperforming the treatment-plus group and the control group. Alternately, the control group significantly improved on the delayed posttest examples measure. Additionally, the two groups implementing guided interactive read-alouds and think-alouds performed better than the independent reading group on multiple-choice comprehension measures at posttest and sustained those gains 2 weeks later on delayed posttests. Findings maintain the incremental nature of vocabulary acquisition and development research and emphasize the roles of listening and speaking as critical features for integrating vocabulary into long

  7. Lateral variation in oxygen fugacity and halogen contents in early Cretaceous magmas in Jiaodong area, East China: Implication for triggers of the destruction of the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao-Long; He, Peng-Li; Wang, Xue; Zhong, Jun-Wei; Xu, Yi-Gang

    2016-04-01

    Pacific subduction has been suggested as the trigger of the destruction of the North China Craton, but evidence for it remains ambiguous. To further investigate this issue, we studied Wulian pyroxene monzonite (123 ± 1 Ma) in the west and Rushan gabbro-diorite (115 ± 1 Ma) in the east of the Sulu orogen, East China. The rocks of both locations are characterized by low TiO2 but high SiO2 and K2O, fractionated REE patterns with notable negative Ta-Nb-Ti anomalies, and by high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios and strongly negative εNd (t) and εHf (t) values. These geochemical and isotopic characteristics can be interpreted to be formed by partial melting of enriched lithosphere mantle refertilized by recycled crustal materials that were associated with the Sulu orogeny. Oxygen fugacities of the Rushan gabbro-diorites, estimated based on magnetite-ilmenite equilibration, are significantly higher than those of Wulian pyroxene monzonite. This lateral difference is mirrored by lower F and F/Cl but higher Cl in biotite in the Rushan gabbro-diorite compared to Wulian pyroxene monzonite. All these data suggest a spatially heterogeneous Cretaceous mantle source in terms of halogens and water contents beneath the Sulu orogen, which was most likely caused by the subduction processes of the Pacific plate. H2O-rich fluid in the mantle beneath the east of the Sulu orogen closer to the mantle wedge was prominently from early dehydration of subducted slab at shallow depth, while F-bearing fluid to further west was released by dehydrated deeper slab or stagnant oceanic slab within the mantle transition zone.

  8. Becoming and Being an Academic: The Perspectives of Chinese Staff in Two Research-Intensive UK Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Xiaoli; Di Napoli, Roberto; Borg, Michaela; Maunder, Rachel; Fry, Heather; Walsh, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an interview study investigating the experiences of academic acculturation (a process of mutual influence and enrichment with regard to academic practice) of a group of Chinese academic staff in two research-intensive UK universities. Following a systematic content-based analysis, three major themes emerged as salient,…

  9. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  10. Lost in transition?: a discursive analysis of academic nursing in Ireland.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Martin S

    2010-07-01

    A critical discourse analysis of Irish nurse academics' comments reveals a dependent, fragmented discipline with a weak academic infrastructure, prone to colonization by other discourses. Respondents lack a language that articulates an academic and professional nursing identity, the form and content of educational programs that are distinctively nursing, and lack the proper focus and scope of nursing research. These findings are discussed in light of the role of academic clinical practice and nursing discipline-specific discourses in providing the conditions of possibility for the establishment, maintenance, and reproduction of a critical mass of nurse scholars with both academic and clinical legitimacy.

  11. The relationship between magnetic parameters and heavy metal contents of indoor dust in e-waste recycling impacted area, Southeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zongmin; Han, Zhixuan; Bi, Xiangyang; Yang, Wenlin

    2012-09-01

    Environmental contamination due to uncontrolled e-waste recycling is an emerging global problem. The aim of this study is to test the applicability of magnetic methods for detecting the metal pollutants emitted from e-waste recycling activities. Dust samples collected from a typical e-waste recycling region in Guiyu, Guangdong Province, China, were investigated using magnetic, geochemical, micro-morphological and mineralogical analysis. The values of mass-specific susceptibility (χ) and saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) in dusts from e-waste recycling impacted areas ranged from 101 to 636×10(-8) m(3) kg(-1) and from 10.5 to 85.2×10(-3) Am(2) kg(-1), respectively. There was a significant correlation between SIRM and χ (r(2)=0.747, p<0.001), indicating that ferrimagnetic minerals were dominating χ in the dust samples. The values of χ(fd)% varied from 2.6 to 4.6% with a mean of 3.4%, which suggested that magnetic carriers in the dusts are predominately coarse-grained particles. Two shapes of magnetic particles, spherule (10-150 μm) and angular-shaped particles (30-300 μm), were identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) analyses. κ-T curves, magnetic hysteresis loops and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that these magnetic particles were magnetite and goethite. There were significant correlations between SIRM and heavy metals (especially Cd, Co, Fe, Ni and Zn) as well as the Tomlinson pollution load index (PLI) of the dust, indicating that SIRM can be used as an efficient proxy for metal pollution in the e-waste recycling impacted area. PMID:22796729

  12. The relationship between magnetic parameters and heavy metal contents of indoor dust in e-waste recycling impacted area, Southeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zongmin; Han, Zhixuan; Bi, Xiangyang; Yang, Wenlin

    2012-09-01

    Environmental contamination due to uncontrolled e-waste recycling is an emerging global problem. The aim of this study is to test the applicability of magnetic methods for detecting the metal pollutants emitted from e-waste recycling activities. Dust samples collected from a typical e-waste recycling region in Guiyu, Guangdong Province, China, were investigated using magnetic, geochemical, micro-morphological and mineralogical analysis. The values of mass-specific susceptibility (χ) and saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) in dusts from e-waste recycling impacted areas ranged from 101 to 636×10(-8) m(3) kg(-1) and from 10.5 to 85.2×10(-3) Am(2) kg(-1), respectively. There was a significant correlation between SIRM and χ (r(2)=0.747, p<0.001), indicating that ferrimagnetic minerals were dominating χ in the dust samples. The values of χ(fd)% varied from 2.6 to 4.6% with a mean of 3.4%, which suggested that magnetic carriers in the dusts are predominately coarse-grained particles. Two shapes of magnetic particles, spherule (10-150 μm) and angular-shaped particles (30-300 μm), were identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) analyses. κ-T curves, magnetic hysteresis loops and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that these magnetic particles were magnetite and goethite. There were significant correlations between SIRM and heavy metals (especially Cd, Co, Fe, Ni and Zn) as well as the Tomlinson pollution load index (PLI) of the dust, indicating that SIRM can be used as an efficient proxy for metal pollution in the e-waste recycling impacted area.

  13. Women in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Bickel, J

    2000-01-01

    Women now constitute 43% of US medical students, 37% of residents, and 27% of full-time medical school faculty. Less than 11% of women faculty are full professors, however, compared to 31% of men, and these proportions haven't changed in more than 15 years. Since the proportion of women reaching the top ranks remains relatively low, the pool of women available for leadership positions in academic medicine is still small. This review article first summarizes recent data on women's representation in academic medicine and then discusses why they are not succeeding at the same pace as men. Reasons include a complex combination of women's choices, sexism, cultural stereotypes, constraints in combining family responsibilities with professional opportunities, and lack of effective mentoring. Multiple approaches are required to overcome these "cumulative disadvantages," among them improving the gender climate at academic medical centers; the mentoring of women faculty, residents, and students; and skill-building opportunities for women.

  14. Measurement of academic entitlement.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian K

    2013-10-01

    Members of Generation Y, or Millennials, have been accused of being lazy, whiny, pampered, and entitled, particularly in the college classroom. Using an equity theory framework, eight items from a measure of work entitlement were adapted to measure academic entitlement in a university setting in three independent samples. In Study 1 (n = 229), confirmatory factor analyses indicated good model fit to a unidimensional structure for the data. In Study 2 (n = 200), the questionnaire predicted unique variance in university satisfaction beyond two more general measures of dispositional entitlement. In Study 3 (n = 161), the measure predicted unique variance in perceptions of grade fairness beyond that which was predicted by another measure of academic entitlement. This analysis provides evidence of discriminant, convergent, incremental, concurrent criterion-related, and construct validity for the Academic Equity Preference Questionnaire.

  15. Measurement of academic entitlement.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian K

    2013-10-01

    Members of Generation Y, or Millennials, have been accused of being lazy, whiny, pampered, and entitled, particularly in the college classroom. Using an equity theory framework, eight items from a measure of work entitlement were adapted to measure academic entitlement in a university setting in three independent samples. In Study 1 (n = 229), confirmatory factor analyses indicated good model fit to a unidimensional structure for the data. In Study 2 (n = 200), the questionnaire predicted unique variance in university satisfaction beyond two more general measures of dispositional entitlement. In Study 3 (n = 161), the measure predicted unique variance in perceptions of grade fairness beyond that which was predicted by another measure of academic entitlement. This analysis provides evidence of discriminant, convergent, incremental, concurrent criterion-related, and construct validity for the Academic Equity Preference Questionnaire. PMID:24597456

  16. Inadequate Progress for Women in Academic Medicine: Findings from the National Faculty Study

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Christine M.; Kaplan, Samantha A.; Raj, Anita; Freund, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Women have entered academic medicine in significant numbers for 4 decades and now comprise 20% of full-time faculty. Despite this, women have not reached senior positions in parity with men. We sought to explore the gender climate in academic medicine as perceived by representatives to the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) Group on Women in Medicine and Science (GWIMS) and Group on Diversity and Inclusion (GDI). Methods: We conducted a qualitative analysis of semistructured telephone interviews with GWIMS and GDI representatives and other senior leaders at 24 randomly selected medical schools of the 1995 National Faculty Study. All were in the continental United States, balanced for public/private status and AAMC geographic region. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and organized into content areas before an inductive thematic analysis was conducted. Themes that were expressed by multiple informants were studied for patterns of association. Results: Five themes were identified: (1) a perceived wide spectrum in gender climate; (2) lack of parity in rank and leadership by gender; (3) lack of retention of women in academic medicine (the “leaky pipeline”); (4) lack of gender equity in compensation; and (5) a disproportionate burden of family responsibilities and work-life balance on women's career progression. Conclusions: Key informants described improvements in the climate of academic medicine for women as modest. Medical schools were noted to vary by department in the gender experience of women, often with no institutional oversight. Our findings speak to the need for systematic review by medical schools and by accrediting organizations to achieve gender equity in academic medicine. PMID:25658907

  17. Academic medicine in Russia.

    PubMed

    Burger, Edward J; Ziganshina, Lilia; Ziganshin, Airat U

    2004-12-01

    Academic medicine, along with professionalism of the medical community in Russia underwent a remarkable evolution from the Revolution through the decline of the Soviet Union. The Soviet period brought about an enormous expansion of numbers of admissions to medical schools and a corresponding increase in the number of new physicians. Academic medical institutions were separated from institutions of higher learning in general and medical science was separated from the mainstream of science. Many of these features have been reversed in the past 14 years and re-professionalization of medicine has resumed. PMID:15578798

  18. Determination of the site of CO₂ sensing in poplar: is the area-based N content and anatomy of new leaves determined by their immediate CO₂ environment or by the CO₂ environment of mature leaves?

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Shin-Ichi; Warren, Charles R; Turpin, David H; Livingston, Nigel J

    2011-05-01

    Exposure to an elevated CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]) generally decreases leaf N content per unit area (N(area)) and stomatal density, and increases leaf thickness. Mature leaves can 'sense' elevated [CO(2)] and this regulates stomatal development of expanding leaves (systemic regulation). It is unclear if systemic regulation is involved in determination of leaf thickness and N(area)-traits that are significantly correlated with photosynthetic capacity. A cuvette system was used whereby [CO(2)] around mature leaves was controlled separately from that around expanding leaves. Expanding leaves of poplar (Populus trichocarpa×P. deltoides) seedlings were exposed to elevated [CO(2)] (720 μmol mol(-1)) while the remaining mature leaves inside the cuvette were under ambient [CO(2)] of 360 μmol mol(-1). Reverse treatments were performed. Exposure of newly developing leaves to elevated [CO(2)] increased their thickness, but when mature leaves were exposed to elevated [CO(2)] the increase in thickness of new leaves was less pronounced. The largest response to [CO(2)] was reflected in the palisade tissue thickness (as opposed to the spongy tissue) of new leaves. The N(area) of new leaves was unaffected by the local [CO(2)] where the new leaves developed, but decreased following the exposure of mature leaves to elevated [CO(2)]. The volume fraction of mesophyll cells compared with total leaf and the mesophyll cell density changed in a manner similar to the response of N(area). These results suggest that N(area) is controlled independently of the leaf thickness, and suggest that N(area) is under systemic regulation by [CO(2)] signals from mature leaves that control mesophyll cell division.

  19. Mantakassa: an epidemic of spastic paraparesis associated with chronic cyanide intoxication in a cassava staple area of Mozambique. 2. Nutritional factors and hydrocyanic acid content of cassava products*

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    An outbreak of spastic paraparesis which mostly affected women and children occurred in a northern province of Mozambique in 1981. The epidemic was related to chronic cyanide intoxication associated with a diet consisting almost exclusively of cassava. A prolonged drought in the area had exhausted all food resources except cassava, especially the bitter varieties. A nutritional, toxicological and botanical investigation was carried out in two of the five districts affected. The main findings were that cyanide levels were unusually high in the cassava plant as a consequence of the drought with daily intakes estimated at 15-31.5 mg HCN. Detoxification of the bitter varieties by sun-drying was inadequate because of the general food shortage, and metabolic detoxification was probably reduced owing to the absence of sulfur-containing amino acids in the diet. The raw and dried uncooked cassava was eaten mostly by women and children. The nutritional status of the population, however, was not very poor and symptoms of advanced under-nutrition were rarely seen. PMID:6088100

  20. Shallow groundwater and cultivated soil suitability assessments with respect to heavy metal content in the Köprübaşi U mineralization area (Manisa, Turkey).

    PubMed

    Kaçmaz, Hülya; Eran Nakoman, M

    2010-07-01

    Shallow groundwater and cultivated soil samples were collected from the area within Köprübaşi U mineralization and analyzed to determine U and selected heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, As, Pb, Zn, Cr, Co and Ba). After this, the suitability of the shallow groundwater and soil samples were evaluated for irrigation, livestock watering and agricultural use, respectively. One groundwater sample (4) showed Mn-concentration of 112.6, exceeding the FAO (Ayers and Westcot 1985) livestock drinking limit (50 microg/l). Nevertheless, the amount of heavy metals including Fe, Cu, As, Pb, Zn, Cr and Co in groundwater is not high for irrigation and livestock drinking water standards cited by the FAO (Ayers and Westcot 1985). On the other hand, all cultivated soil samples have higher uranium concentrations than the typical concentration of natural uranium in soil (ATSDR 1999). The majority of the cultivated soil samples showed higher concentrations than the values for heavy metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, As, Pb, Zn, Cr, Co, Ba) found in normal soils of the world (Connor and Shacklette 1975). However, according to G.L.C guidelines, these soils are classified as uncontaminated with Mn, Cu, Pb, Zn and Cr, slightly contaminated with Ba and As.