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Sample records for academic emergency department

  1. Emerging strategic themes for guiding change in academic radiology departments.

    PubMed

    Chan, Stephen; Gunderman, Richard B

    2005-08-01

    Academic radiologists are faced with increasing demands on their time and energy, particularly in the clinical arena, where larger examination volumes and higher service expectations are the norm for most medical centers. These demands are intensified by the continuing shortage of academic radiologists. If academic radiology departments continue to devote most of their resources to the clinical mission at the expense of research and educational missions, then there are potentially serious adverse consequences for long-term viability of the profession of radiology. This dilemma represents a critical strategic problem, not just for academic radiology but also for the entire profession of radiology. In this article, the success and growth of academic radiology during the 20th century are framed as the result of the dogged pursuit of certain key strategic themes. With the concept of paradigm shift, introduced by Kuhn, several new strategic themes are identified that are just emerging from changes in work practices, organizational structure, and mind-sets in radiology departments at academic medical centers. One benefit of this approach is that it facilitates the ability of radiologists to articulate and focus on those strategic themes that will help academic radiology departments to adapt more rapidly and successfully to environmental changes during the 21st century. PMID:15972339

  2. Tracking emergency department overcrowding in a tertiary care academic institution.

    PubMed

    Bullard, Michael J; Villa-Roel, Cristina; Bond, Kenneth; Vester, Michael; Holroyd, Brian R; Rowe, Brian H

    2009-01-01

    Despite the release of a national report describing key markers of emergency department (ED) overcrowding, limited linear data using these markers have been published. We sought to report the degree and trends of ED overcrowding in a typical academic hospital and to highlight some of the key markers of ED patient flow and care. We conducted a prospective study in a large Canadian urban tertiary care teaching hospital that receives approximately 55,000 annual adult ED visits. A database captured demographic and real-time process of care data for each patient from 2000 to 2007. Descriptive data are reported using Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS) scores. Over the study period, the ED patient visit volume and presentation times remained predictable. Emergent cases (CTAS levels 1-2) doubled from 8 to 16.6%, and urgent cases (CTAS level 3) increased from 40.2 to 50.3%. Moreover, semi-urgent presentations (CTAS level 4) decreased from 42.4 to 28.8%, and non-urgent cases (CTAS level 5) dropped from 9.4 to 4.3%. The median wait time from triage to bed location increased from two minutes (inter-quartile range [IQR] 1, 46) in 2000 to 27 minutes (IQR 2, 110) in 2007, while the median time from bed location to physician remained constant (29 minutes in 2001 versus 28 minutes in 2007). Overall, admissions increased from 20.4 to 23%. Semi-urgent and non-urgent admissions dropped from 11.5 to 7.4% and 3.2 to 1.8%, respectively. Admitted patients "boarding" in the ED increased from 70,955 hours in 2002 to 118,741 hours in 2007, while the number of emergent and urgent patients leaving without being seen increased by more than 400%. ED overcrowding in a tertiary care hospital is primarily a result of access block due to boarding admitted patients, a situation that poses serious risks to the majority of patients who have emergent or urgent conditions that cannot be managed appropriately in the waiting room. PMID:19553772

  3. Optimal older adult emergency care: introducing multidisciplinary geriatric emergency department guidelines from the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Bromley, Marilyn; Caterino, Jeffrey M; Chun, Audrey; Gerson, Lowell W; Greenspan, Jason; Hwang, Ula; John, David P; Lyons, William L; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Mortensen, Betty; Ragsdale, Luna; Rosenberg, Mark; Wilber, Scott

    2014-07-01

    In the United States and around the world, effective, efficient, and reliable strategies to provide emergency care to aging adults is challenging crowded emergency departments (EDs) and strained healthcare systems. In response, geriatric emergency medicine clinicians, educators, and researchers collaborated with the American College of Emergency Physicians, American Geriatrics Society, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society for Academic Emergency Medicine to develop guidelines intended to improve ED geriatric care by enhancing expertise, educational, and quality improvement expectations, equipment, policies, and protocols. These Geriatric Emergency Department Guidelines represent the first formal society-led attempt to characterize the essential attributes of the geriatric ED and received formal approval from the boards of directors of each of the four societies in 2013 and 2014. This article is intended to introduce emergency medicine and geriatric healthcare providers to the guidelines while providing recommendations for continued refinement of these proposals through educational dissemination, formal effectiveness evaluations, cost-effectiveness studies, and eventually institutional credentialing. PMID:24890806

  4. Monetary Resident Incentives: Effect on Patient Satisfaction in an Academic Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Langdorf, Mark I.; Kazzi, A. Antoine; Marwah, Rakesh S.; Bauche, John

    2005-01-01

    Patient satisfaction most be a priority in emergency departments (EDs). The care provided by residents forms much of the patient contact in academic EDs. Objective: To determine if monetary incentives for emergency medicine (EM) residents improve patient satisfaction scores on a mailed survey. Methods: The incentive program ran for nine months, 1999–2000. Press-Ganey surveys responses from ED patients in 456 hospitals; 124 form a peer group of larger, teaching hospitals. Questions relate to: 1) waiting time, 2) taking the problem seriously, 3) treatment information, 4) home care concerns, 5) doctor’s courtesy, and 6) concern with comfort. A 5-point Likert scale ranges from “very poor” (0 points) to “very good” (100). Raw score is the weighted mean, converted to a percentile vs. the peer group. Incentives were three-fold: a year-end event for the EM residents if 80th percentile results were achieved; individual incentives for educational materials of $50/resident (50th percentile), $100 (60th), $150 (70th), or $200 (80th); discount cards for the hospital’s espresso cart. These were distributed by 11 EM faculty (six cards/month) as rewards for outstanding interactions. Program cost was <$8,000, from patient-care revenue. Faculty had similar direct incentives, but nursing and staff incentives were ill defined and indirect. Results: Raw scores ranged from 66.1 (waiting time) to 84.3 (doctor’s courtesy) (n=509 or ∼7.2% of ED volume). Corresponding percentiles were 20th–43rd (mean=31st). We found no difference between the overall scores after the incentives, but three of the six questions showed improvement, with one, “doctors’ courtesy,” reaching 53rd percentile. The faculty funded the 50th percentile reward. Conclusions: Incentives are a novel idea to improve patient satisfaction, but did not foster overall Press-Ganey score improvement. We did find a trend toward improvement for doctor-patient interaction scores. Confounding variables, such

  5. Partnerships with Academic Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes how professional and continuing higher education units can develop and sustain successful partnerships with academic departments in order to deliver educational programs effectively to students.

  6. A report on the Academic Emergency Medicine 2015 consensus conference "Diagnostic imaging in the emergency department: a research agenda to optimize utilization".

    PubMed

    Gunn, Martin L; Marin, Jennifer R; Mills, Angela M; Chong, Suzanne T; Froemming, Adam T; Johnson, Jamlik O; Kumaravel, Manickam; Sodickson, Aaron D

    2016-08-01

    In May 2015, the Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Diagnostic imaging in the emergency department: a research agenda to optimize utilization" was held. The goal of the conference was to develop a high-priority research agenda regarding emergency diagnostic imaging on which to base future research. In addition to representatives from the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine, the multidisciplinary conference included members of several radiology organizations: American Society for Emergency Radiology, Radiological Society of North America, the American College of Radiology, and the American Association of Physicists in Medicine. The specific aims of the conference were to (1) understand the current state of evidence regarding emergency department (ED) diagnostic imaging utilization and identify key opportunities, limitations, and gaps in knowledge; (2) develop a consensus-driven research agenda emphasizing priorities and opportunities for research in ED diagnostic imaging; and (3) explore specific funding mechanisms available to facilitate research in ED diagnostic imaging. Through a multistep consensus process, participants developed targeted research questions for future research in six content areas within emergency diagnostic imaging: clinical decision rules; use of administrative data; patient-centered outcomes research; training, education, and competency; knowledge translation and barriers to imaging optimization; and comparative effectiveness research in alternatives to traditional computed tomography use.

  7. Ethical issues in the response to Ebola virus disease in US emergency departments: a position paper of the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Arvind; Wolf, Lisa; Geiderman, Joel M; Asher, Shellie L; Marco, Catherine A; McGreevy, Jolion; Derse, Arthur R; Otten, Edward J; Jesus, John E; Kreitzer, Natalie P; Escalante, Monica; Levine, Adam C

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in West Africa has presented a significant public health crisis to the international health community and challenged US emergency departments to prepare for patients with a disease of exceeding rarity in developed nations. With the presentation of patients with Ebola to US acute care facilities, ethical questions have been raised in both the press and medical literature as to how US emergency departments, emergency physicians, emergency nurses and other stakeholders in the healthcare system should approach the current epidemic and its potential for spread in the domestic environment. To address these concerns, the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine developed this joint position paper to provide guidance to US emergency physicians, emergency nurses and other stakeholders in the healthcare system on how to approach the ethical dilemmas posed by the outbreak of EVD. This paper will address areas of immediate and potential ethical concern to US emergency departments in how they approach preparation for and management of potential patients with EVD.

  8. Developing a Research Agenda to Optimize Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: An Executive Summary of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Mills, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    The 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization" was held on May 12, 2015, with the goal of developing a high-priority research agenda on which to base future research. The specific aims of the conference were to (1) understand the current state of evidence regarding emergency department (ED) diagnostic imaging use and identify key opportunities, limitations, and gaps in knowledge; (2) develop a consensus-driven research agenda emphasizing priorities and opportunities for research in ED diagnostic imaging; and (3) explore specific funding mechanisms available to facilitate research in ED diagnostic imaging. Over a 2-year period, the executive committee and other experts in the field convened regularly to identify specific areas in need of future research. Six content areas within emergency diagnostic imaging were identified before the conference and served as the breakout groups on which consensus was achieved: clinical decision rules; use of administrative data; patient-centered outcomes research; training, education, and competency; knowledge translation and barriers to imaging optimization; and comparative effectiveness research in alternatives to traditional computed tomography use. The executive committee invited key stakeholders to assist with the planning and to participate in the consensus conference to generate a multidisciplinary agenda. There were a total of 164 individuals involved in the conference and spanned various specialties, including general emergency medicine, pediatric emergency medicine, radiology, surgery, medical physics, and the decision sciences.

  9. Variation of availability and frequency of emergency physician-performed ultrasonography between adult and pediatric patients in the academic emergency department in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chiwon; Kim, Changsun; Kang, Bo Seung; Choi, Hyuk Joong; Cho, Jun Hwi

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study investigates the availability and frequency of emergency physician-performed ultrasonography (USG) in the emergency department (ED) and the status of USG training programs in emergency medicine residencies in academic EDs in Korea. Methods In spring 2014, a link to a 16-question, multiple-choice, and rating scale web-based survey was e-mailed to all 97 academic ED residency training directors in Korea. Results The response rate was 83.5% (81/97). All respondents had their own USG machines in the ED. In total, 82.7% of respondents reported that emergency physician-performed adult USGs were usually conducted daily, whereas only 23.6% performed pediatric USGs daily. Moreover, 55.5% performed pediatric USG fewer than once a week. 74.1% of respondents had education programs for adult USG in residency training, but only 21.0% had programs for pediatric USG. There was a high association between the presence of education programs and the use of USG in both groups. The faculty members who most commonly participated in teaching ED residents how to perform USG were emergency physicians (67.9%). Only 17.3% of respondents reported that they always supported a quality assurance process. The training directors generally agreed with the advantages in emergency physician-performed USGs. Conclusion The availability of ultrasound machines was high both for adult and pediatric EDs. Nevertheless, the frequency of Emergency physician-performed USG for pediatric patients was low, which was related to the lack of the training programs for treating pediatric patients.

  10. Developing a Research Agenda to Optimize Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: An Executive Summary of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Marin, Jennifer R; Mills, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    The 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference, "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization," was held on May 12, 2015, with the goal of developing a high-priority research agenda on which to base future research. The specific aims of the conference were to: 1) understand the current state of evidence regarding emergency department (ED) diagnostic imaging utilization and identify key opportunities, limitations, and gaps in knowledge; 2) develop a consensus-driven research agenda emphasizing priorities and opportunities for research in ED diagnostic imaging; and 3) explore specific funding mechanisms available to facilitate research in ED diagnostic imaging. Over a 2-year period, the executive committee and other experts in the field convened regularly to identify specific areas in need of future research. Six content areas within emergency diagnostic imaging were identified prior to the conference and served as the breakout groups on which consensus was achieved: clinical decision rules; use of administrative data; patient-centered outcomes research; training, education, and competency; knowledge translation and barriers to imaging optimization; and comparative effectiveness research in alternatives to traditional computed tomography use. The executive committee invited key stakeholders to assist with planning and to participate in the consensus conference to generate a multidisciplinary agenda. There were 164 individuals involved in the conference spanning various specialties, including emergency medicine (EM), radiology, surgery, medical physics, and the decision sciences. This issue of AEM is dedicated to the proceedings of the 16th annual AEM consensus conference as well as original research related to emergency diagnostic imaging.

  11. Ethical issues in the response to Ebola virus disease in United States emergency departments: a position paper of the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Arvind; Asher, Shellie L; Wolf, Lisa; Geiderman, Joel M; Marco, Catherine A; McGreevy, Jolion; Derse, Arthur R; Otten, Edward J; Jesus, John E; Kreitzer, Natalie P; Escalante, Monica; Levine, Adam C

    2015-05-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa has presented a significant public health crisis to the international health community and challenged U.S. emergency departments (EDs) to prepare for patients with a disease of exceeding rarity in developed nations. With the presentation of patients with Ebola to U.S. acute care facilities, ethical questions have been raised in both the press and medical literature as to how U.S. EDs, emergency physicians (EPs), emergency nurses, and other stakeholders in the health care system should approach the current epidemic and its potential for spread in the domestic environment. To address these concerns, the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine developed this joint position paper to provide guidance to U.S. EPs, emergency nurses, and other stakeholders in the health care system on how to approach the ethical dilemmas posed by the outbreak of EVD. This paper will address areas of immediate and potential ethical concern to U.S. EDs in how they approach preparation for and management of potential patients with EVD.

  12. Gender differences in acute and chronic pain in the emergency department: results of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference pain section.

    PubMed

    Musey, Paul I; Linnstaedt, Sarah D; Platts-Mills, Timothy F; Miner, James R; Bortsov, Andrey V; Safdar, Basmah; Bijur, Polly; Rosenau, Alex; Tsze, Daniel S; Chang, Andrew K; Dorai, Suprina; Engel, Kirsten G; Feldman, James A; Fusaro, Angela M; Lee, David C; Rosenberg, Mark; Keefe, Francis J; Peak, David A; Nam, Catherine S; Patel, Roma G; Fillingim, Roger B; McLean, Samuel A

    2014-12-01

    Pain is a leading public health problem in the United States, with an annual economic burden of more than $630 billion, and is one of the most common reasons that individuals seek emergency department (ED) care. There is a paucity of data regarding sex differences in the assessment and treatment of acute and chronic pain conditions in the ED. The Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference convened in Dallas, Texas, in May 2014 to develop a research agenda to address this issue among others related to sex differences in the ED. Prior to the conference, experts and stakeholders from emergency medicine and the pain research field reviewed the current literature and identified eight candidate priority areas. At the conference, these eight areas were reviewed and all eight were ratified using a nominal group technique to build consensus. These priority areas were: 1) gender differences in the pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for pain, including differences in opioid tolerance, side effects, or misuse; 2) gender differences in pain severity perceptions, clinically meaningful differences in acute pain, and pain treatment preferences; 3) gender differences in pain outcomes of ED patients across the life span; 4) gender differences in the relationship between acute pain and acute psychological responses; 5) the influence of physician-patient gender differences and characteristics on the assessment and treatment of pain; 6) gender differences in the influence of acute stress and chronic stress on acute pain responses; 7) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating acute pain in ED populations; and 8) gender differences in biological mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating chronic pain development after trauma, stress, or acute illness exposure. These areas represent priority areas for future scientific inquiry, and gaining understanding in these will be essential to improving our understanding of sex and gender

  13. Gender Differences in Acute and Chronic Pain in the Emergency Department: Results of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference Pain Section

    PubMed Central

    Musey, Paul I.; Linnstaedt, Sarah D.; Platts-Mills, Timothy F.; Miner, James R.; Bortsov, Andrey V.; Safdar, Basmah; Bijur, Polly; Rosenau, Alex; Tsze, Daniel S.; Chang, Andrew K.; Dorai, Suprina; Engel, Kirsten; Feldman, James A.; Fusaro, Angela M.; Lee, David C.; Rosenberg, Mark; Keefe, Francis J.; Peak, David A.; Nam, Catherine S.; Patel, Roma G.; Fillingim, Roger B.; McLean, Samuel A.

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a leading public health problem in the United States, with an annual economic burden of more than $630 billion, and is one of the most common reasons that individuals seek emergency department (ED) care. There is a paucity of data regarding sex differences in the assessment and treatment of acute and chronic pain conditions in the ED. The Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference convened in Dallas, Texas in May of 2014 to develop a research agenda to address this issue among others related to sex differences in the ED. Prior to the conference, experts and stakeholders from emergency medicine and the pain research field reviewed the current literature and identified eight candidate priority areas. At the conference, these eight areas were reviewed and all eight were ratified using a nominal group technique to build consensus. These priority areas were: 1) gender differences in the pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic interventions for pain, including differences in opioid tolerance, side effects, or misuse; 2) gender differences in pain severity perceptions, clinically meaningful differences in acute pain, and pain treatment preferences; 3) gender differences in pain outcomes of ED patients across the lifespan; 4) gender differences in the relationship between acute pain and acute psychological responses; 5) the influence of physician-patient gender differences and characteristics on the assessment and treatment of pain; 6) gender differences in the influence of acute stress and chronic stress on acute pain responses; 7) gender differences in biologic mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating acute pain in ED populations; and 8) gender differences in biologic mechanisms and molecular pathways mediating chronic pain development after trauma, stress, or acute illness exposure. These areas represent priority areas for future scientific inquiry, and gaining understanding in these will be essential to improving our understanding of sex and gender

  14. Comparison of HIV Testing Uptake in an Urban Academic Emergency Department Using Different Testing Assays and Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Nyaku, Amesika N; Williams, Lisa M; Galvin, Shannon R

    2016-04-01

    Despite 2006 recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for opt-out HIV testing in all healthcare settings, Emergency Department (ED) testing has been limited. We conducted an observational cohort study to assess the impact of two workflow interventions on the proportion of HIV tests ordered in an urban academic ED. First, a 4(th)-generation HIV antigen/antibody combination test replaced the existing assay, and ED staff continued to notify patients of their reactive tests. Six months later, the HIV Rapid Diagnosis Team, composed of an Infectious Diseases (ID) physician and the HIV Advanced Practice Nurse, immediately assisted with disclosure of positive results to the patients and facilitated linkage to outpatient care. The new assay did not change the proportion of HIV tests ordered (0.14-0.11%, χ2, p = 0.2). However, ID support was associated with a statistically significant increase in the proportion of HIV tests ordered (0.14-0.43%, χ2, p < 0.00010) and a nonstatistically significant increase in the proportion of new HIV diagnoses (1.6-6.8%, Fisher exact test = 0.113). Male gender and lack of insurance were associated with a reactive HIV test. Reduction of barriers to linkage to outpatient HIV care through a collaborative relationship between the ED and ID team increased HIV testing and diagnosis. The role of this model as a component of a universal HIV screening program will need to be further assessed. PMID:26982908

  15. Skin and soft tissue infection management, outcomes, and follow-up in the emergency department of an urban academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Seeleang, Kanokwan; Manning, Mary Lou; Saks, Mark; Winstead, Yvette

    2014-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are among the most common infections treated by emergency department clinicians. The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) as the cause of these infections prompted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Infectious Disease Society of America to publish guidelines for the outpatient management of SSTIs. This study describes the management and outcomes of emergency department patients treated for uncomplicated SSTIs who returned within 30 days of the initial visit. The study found that of 857 eligible patients, only 17.6% returned and of these, 80% had their wound checked or packing removed. The clinicians prescribed antibiotics for the majority of patients, and the selection of antibiotics typically was active against CA-MRSA. Of 91 lesions drained, 24 specimens were obtained for culture and sensitivity. The majority of the initial treatment of patients consisted of incision and drainage with antibiotic prescription. PMID:25356895

  16. Financing Academic Departments of Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liptzin, Benjamin; Meyer, Roger E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the many financial challenges facing academic departments of psychiatry and the resulting opportunities that may arise. Method: The authors review the history of financial challenges, the current economic situation, and what may lie ahead for academic departments of psychiatry. Results: The current environment has…

  17. [Focal point emergency departments].

    PubMed

    Lange, R; Popp, S; Erbguth, F

    2016-06-01

    The number of patients treated in hospital emergency departments in Germany has risen in recent years to approximately 20 million. This escalation also applies to the increasing numbers of patients presenting with neurological symptoms and diseases, which occur in approximately 20 % of emergency patients. In addition to patients with stroke, inflammatory or degenerative central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) disorders who need urgent treatment, more and more patients with nonspecific complaints or conditions attend emergency departments for elective treatment, not least because timely appointments with specialist neurologists in practices could not be obtained. Neurological expertise and presence in emergency departments at the level of specialist standard are therefore indispensable for providing a professional level of treatment, which also corresponds to current legal requirements. The implementation of a generalist emergency physician in Germany, as introduced in some European countries, would mean a retrograde step for neurological expertise in emergency admission management. The discipline of neurology must work together with other emergency disciplines to improve the financing of emergency departments and provide neurologists working there with a substantive curriculum of further and continuing education in emergency-related aspects of neurology. The discipline of neurology has a responsibility to emergency patients within its range of competencies and must, therefore, strengthen and improve its role in healthcare politics and concerning organizational and personnel aspects of neurological emergencies.

  18. [Improving emergency department organisation].

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Youri; Beltramini, Alexandra; Debuc, Erwan; Pateron, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Emergency departments use has been constantly increasing over the world. Overcrowding is defined as a situation which compromises patient safety because of delayed cares. This situation is often reached. Emergency departments have to continuously improve their organization to be able to ensure the same quality of care to a higher number of patients. Thus a good organization is essential: it doesn't always avoid overcrowding. The rest of the hospital has to be involved in this process to ensure efficiency. We examine the various interventions and procedures that can be found in medical literature for improving patients flow and management in emergency departments. PMID:25842427

  19. [Improving emergency department organisation].

    PubMed

    Yordanov, Youri; Beltramini, Alexandra; Debuc, Erwan; Pateron, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Emergency departments use has been constantly increasing over the world. Overcrowding is defined as a situation which compromises patient safety because of delayed cares. This situation is often reached. Emergency departments have to continuously improve their organization to be able to ensure the same quality of care to a higher number of patients. Thus a good organization is essential: it doesn't always avoid overcrowding. The rest of the hospital has to be involved in this process to ensure efficiency. We examine the various interventions and procedures that can be found in medical literature for improving patients flow and management in emergency departments.

  20. [Emergency departments--2016 update].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, M; Brokmann, J C; Gräff, I; Kumle, B; Wilke, P; Gries, A

    2016-04-01

    Acute medical care in hospital emergency departments has experienced rapid development in recent years and gained increasing importance not only from a professional medical point of view but also from an economic and health policy perspective. The present article therefore provides an update on the situation of emergency departments in Germany. Care in emergency departments is provided with an increasing tendency to patients of all ages presenting with varying primary symptoms, complaints, illnesses and injury patterns. In the process, patients reach the emergency department by various routes and structural provision. Cross-sectional communication and cooperation, prioritization and organization of emergency management and especially medical staff qualifications increasingly play a decisive role in this process. The range of necessary knowledge and skills far exceeds the scope of prehospital medical emergency care and the working environment differs substantially. In addition to existing structural and economic problems, the latest developments, as well as future proposals for the design of in-hospital emergency medical care in interdisciplinary emergency departments are described.

  1. Predicting Emergency Department Visits

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Sarah; Grannis, Shaun; Shah, Nigam H.

    2016-01-01

    High utilizers of emergency departments account for a disproportionate number of visits, often for nonemergency conditions. This study aims to identify these high users prospectively. Routinely recorded registration data from the Indiana Public Health Emergency Surveillance System was used to predict whether patients would revisit the Emergency Department within one month, three months, and six months of an index visit. Separate models were trained for each outcome period, and several predictive models were tested. Random Forest models had good performance and calibration for all outcome periods, with area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of at least 0.96. This high performance was found to be due to non-linear interactions among variables in the data. The ability to predict repeat emergency visits may provide an opportunity to establish, prioritize, and target interventions to ensure that patients have access to the care they require outside an emergency department setting. PMID:27570684

  2. Fire Department Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.; Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services.

  3. Planning in Academic Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fountoukidis, Dona; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The efforts of the biology department at William Paterson College, a state college in New Jersey, to use strategic planning at the department level are chronicled. Planning focused on establishing a direction for hiring faculty, developing curriculum, purchasing equipment, and training students. Results, unanticipated outcomes, and lessons learned…

  4. The 2015 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's INDO-US Joint Working Group White Paper on Establishing an Academic Department and Training Pediatric Emergency Medicine Specialists in India

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Prashant; Batra, Prerna; Shah, Binita R; Saha, Abhijeet; Galwankar, Sagar; Aggrawal, Praveen; Hassoun, Ameer; Batra, Bipin; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kalra, Om Prakash; Shah, Dheeraj

    2015-01-01

    The concept of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) is virtually nonexistent in India. Suboptimally, organized prehospital services substantially hinder the evaluation, management, and subsequent transport of the acutely ill and/or injured child to an appropriate facility. Furthermore, the management of the ill child at the hospital level is often provided by overburdened providers who, by virtue of their training, lack experience in the skills required to effectively manage pediatric emergencies. Finally, the care of the traumatized child often requires the involvement of providers trained in different specialities, which further impedes timely access to appropriate care. The recent recognition of Doctor of Medicine (MD) in Emergency Medicine (EM) as an approved discipline of study as per the Indian Medical Council Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to introduce PEM as a formal academic program in India. PEM has to be developed as a 3-year superspeciality course (in PEM) after completion of MD/Diplomate of National Board (DNB) Pediatrics or MD/DNB in EM. The National Board of Examinations (NBE) that accredits and administers postgraduate and postdoctoral programs in India also needs to develop an academic program – DNB in PEM. The goals of such a program would be to impart theoretical knowledge, training in the appropriate skills and procedures, development of communication and counseling techniques, and research. In this paper, the Joint Working Group of the Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (JWG-ACEE-India) gives its recommendations for starting 3-year DM/DNB in PEM, including the curriculum, infrastructure, staffing, and training in India. This is an attempt to provide an uniform framework and a set of guiding principles to start PEM as a structured superspeciality to enhance emergency care for Indian children. PMID:26807394

  5. The 2015 Academic College of Emergency Experts in Indias INDO-US Joint Working Group White Paper on Establishing an Academic Department and Training Pediatric Emergency Medicine Specialists in India.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Prashant; Batra, Prerna; Shah, Binita R; Saha, Abhijeet; Galwankar, Sagar; Aggrawal, Praveen; Hassoun, Ameer; Batra, Bipin; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kalra, Om Prakash; Shah, Dheeraj

    2015-12-01

    The concept of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) is virtually nonexistent in India. Suboptimally organized prehospital services substantially hinder the evaluation, management, and subsequent transport of the acutely ill and/or injured child to an appropriate facility. Furthermore, the management of the ill child at the hospital level is often provided by overburdened providers who, by virtue of their training, lack experience in the skills required to effectively manage pediatric emergencies. Finally, the care of the traumatized child often requires the involvement of providers trained in different specialities, which further impedes timely access to appropriate care. The recent recognition of Doctor of Medicine in Emergency Medicine as an approved discipline of study as per the Indian Medical Council Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to introduce PEM as a formal academic program in India. PEM has to be developed as a 3 year superspeciality course after completion of MD Diplomate of National Board (DNB) Pediatrics or MD DNB in EM. The National Board of Examinations that accredits and administers postgraduate and postdoctoral programs in India also needs to develop an academic program DNB in PEM. The goals of such a program would be to impart theoretical knowledge, training in the appropriate skills and procedures, development of communication and counseling techniques, and research. In this paper, the Joint Working Group of the Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (JWG ACEE India) gives its recommendations for starting 3 year DM DNB in PEM, including the curriculum, infrastructure, staffing, and training in India. This is an attempt to provide an uniform framework and a set of guiding principles to start PEM as a structured superspeciality to enhance emergency care for Indian children.

  6. Repositioning an Academic Department to Stimulate Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrod, Cassandra C.; Daughton, William J.; Murray, Susan L.; Fisher, Caroline M.; Flachsbart, Barry B.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of the market in higher education, and the lack of literature regarding marketing, particularly branding, at the academic department level, presented an opportunity to establish a systematic process for evaluating an academic department's brand meaning. A process for evaluating a brand's meaning for an academic department is…

  7. Managing rural emergency department overcrowding.

    PubMed

    Van Vonderen, Mary L

    2008-01-01

    Emergency department visits reached more than 115 million in 2005, a 30% increase over the past decade. Although much has been written regarding these numbers, little attention has been focused on the impact of overcrowding and volume increases on rural emergency departments. Rural emergency departments face challenges unlike their urban counterparts that make implementation of current overcrowding strategies difficult or impossible. This article addresses these challenges and suggests strategies specific to the needs of rural emergency departments. PMID:18820558

  8. Managing emergency department overcrowding.

    PubMed

    Olshaker, Jonathan S

    2009-11-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding and ambulance diversion has been an increasingly significant national problem for more than a decade. More than 90% of hospital ED directors reported overcrowding as a problem resulting in patients in hallways, full occupancy of ED beds, and long waits, occurring several times a week. Overcrowding has many other potential detrimental effects including diversion of ambulances, frustration for patients and ED personnel, lesser patient satisfaction, and most importantly, greater risk for poor outcomes. This article gives a basic blueprint for successfully making hospital-wide changes using principles of operational management. It briefly covers the causes, significance, and dangers of overcrowding, and then focuses primarily on specific solutions. PMID:19932394

  9. Emergency department overcrowding and children.

    PubMed

    Hostetler, Mark A; Mace, Sharon; Brown, Kathleen; Finkler, Joseph; Hernandez, Dennis; Krug, Steven E; Schamban, Neil

    2007-07-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding has been a serious issue on the national agenda for the past 2 decades and is rapidly becoming an increasingly significant problem for children. The goal of this report is to focus on the issues of overcrowding that directly impact children. Our findings reveal that although overcrowding seems to affect children in ways similar to those of adults, there are several important ways in which they differ. Recent reports document that more than 90% of academic emergency medicine EDs are overcrowded. Although inner-city, urban, and university hospitals have historically been the first to feel the brunt of overcrowding, community and suburban EDs are now also being affected. The overwhelming majority of children (92%) are seen in general community EDs, with only a minority (less than 10%) treated in dedicated pediatric EDs. With the exception of patients older than 65 years, children have higher visit rates than any other age group. Children may be at particularly increased risk for medical errors because of their inherent variability in size and the need for age-specific and weight-based dosing. We strongly recommend that pediatric issues be actively included in all future aspects of research and policy planning issues related to ED overcrowding. These include the development of triage protocols, clinical guidelines, research proposals, and computerized data monitoring systems. PMID:17666940

  10. Academic health departments: from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Conte, Christopher; Chang, Carol S; Malcolm, Jan; Russo, Pamela G

    2006-01-01

    In August of 2003, 23 institutions submitted proposals to build closer ties between state and local public health departments and schools of public health in response to a solicitation from the Association of Schools of Public Health supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This article describes the strategies proposed to build collaboration between public health academia and practice. Qualitative analysis discerned five principal approaches: the development of comprehensive planning processes; reform of the way practica are planned and implemented; the identification and nurturing of boundary-spanning individuals in academia and health agencies; the fostering of new approaches to joint research; and workforce development programs. Major themes that emerged included the importance of achieving a balance of power between academic and health department partners; the need to address cultural differences between institutions; a conviction that efforts at institutional change require both strong leadership and the cultivation of boundary spanners farther down the chain of command; and the idea that prospects for success may be improved if faculty and practitioners have tangible incentives to collaborate.

  11. Optimizing emergency department front-end operations.

    PubMed

    Wiler, Jennifer L; Gentle, Christopher; Halfpenny, James M; Heins, Alan; Mehrotra, Abhi; Mikhail, Michael G; Fite, Diana

    2010-02-01

    As administrators evaluate potential approaches to improve cost, quality, and throughput efficiencies in the emergency department (ED), "front-end" operations become an important area of focus. Interventions such as immediate bedding, bedside registration, advanced triage (triage-based care) protocols, physician/practitioner at triage, dedicated "fast track" service line, tracking systems and whiteboards, wireless communication devices, kiosk self check-in, and personal health record technology ("smart cards") have been offered as potential solutions to streamline the front-end processing of ED patients, which becomes crucial during periods of full capacity, crowding, and surges. Although each of these operational improvement strategies has been described in the lay literature, various reports exist in the academic literature about their effect on front-end operations. In this report, we present a review of the current body of academic literature, with the goal of identifying select high-impact front-end operational improvement solutions. PMID:19556030

  12. Emergency department overcrowding: the Emergency Department Cardiac Analogy Model (EDCAM).

    PubMed

    Richardson, Sandra K; Ardagh, Michael; Gee, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Increasing patient numbers, changing demographics and altered patient expectations have all contributed to the current problem with 'overcrowding' in emergency departments (EDs). The problem has reached crisis level in a number of countries, with significant implications for patient safety, quality of care, staff 'burnout' and patient and staff satisfaction. There is no single, clear definition of the cause of overcrowding, nor a simple means of addressing the problem. For some hospitals, the option of ambulance diversion has become a necessity, as overcrowded waiting rooms and 'bed-block' force emergency staff to turn patients away. But what are the options when ambulance diversion is not possible? Christchurch Hospital, New Zealand is a tertiary level facility with an emergency department that sees on average 65,000 patients per year. There are no other EDs to whom patients can be diverted, and so despite admission rates from the ED of up to 48%, other options need to be examined. In order to develop a series of unified responses, which acknowledge the multifactorial nature of the problem, the Emergency Department Cardiac Analogy model of ED flow, was developed. This model highlights the need to intervene at each of three key points, in order to address the issue of overcrowding and its associated problems.

  13. The emergency department medical director.

    PubMed

    Mayer, T A

    1987-02-01

    This article has presented an overview of the duties, responsibilities, and management roles of the emergency department Medical Director, a position that can be among the most challenging, stimulating, and exciting in medicine. However, prior to accepting a position as an Emergency Department medical director, one should have a clear understanding of what the job entails. Careful discussions with the hospital administration, medical staff, nursing personnel, and staff emergency physicians should be undertaken to learn the perceptions of these people and expectations of the position. Once the job has been accepted, using the roles, responsibilities, and duties detailed herein may be of benefit--but should always be applied with good judgment, tactful cooperation, and common sense. Finally, it should not be surprising to a medical director to find, as Spinoza did many years ago, that the excellent thing he aspires to are as difficult as they are rare.

  14. Generational influences in academic emergency medicine: structure, function, and culture (Part II).

    PubMed

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Larrabee, Hollynn; Dyne, Pamela L; Promes, Susan B

    2011-02-01

    Strategies for approaching generational issues that affect teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology in emergency medicine (EM) have been reported. Tactics to address generational influences involving the structure and function of the academic emergency department (ED), organizational culture, and EM schedule have not been published. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic EM. Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can address some common issues encountered in academic EM. By understanding the differences and strengths of each of the cohorts in academic EM departments and considering simple mitigating strategies, faculty leaders can maximize their cooperative effectiveness and face the challenges of a new millennium.

  15. Academic versus Non-Academic Emerging Adult College Student Technology Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Joan Ann; Walker, Erica

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adult college students have developmental and educational needs which are unique to their phase of life. The purpose of this study was to examine academic and non-academic technology use by emerging adult college students. Survey results (N = 235) provided insights into emerging adult college student technology preferences and frequency…

  16. Emergency department visit volume variability

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seung Woo; Park, Hyun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Objective One of the most important and basic variables in emergency department (ED) operations is patient visit volumes. This variable is usually predicted on the basis of the average ED patient visit volume over a certain period. However, ED patient visit variability is poorly understood. Therefore, we evaluated ED patient visit variability in order to determine if the average can be used to operate EDs. Methods Nationwide ED patient visit data were from the standard emergency patient data of the National Emergency Department Information System. The data are transferred automatically by 141 EDs nationwide. The hourly ED visit volumes over 365 days were determined, and the variability was analyzed to evaluate the representativeness of the average. Results A total of 4,672,275 patient visits were collected in 2013. The numbers of daily ED patient visits were widely dispersed and positively skewed rather than symmetric and narrow with a normal distribution. Conclusion The daily variability of ED visit is too large and it did not show normal distribution. The average visit volume does not adequately represent ED operation. PMID:27752589

  17. Hospital Readmission Through the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Sadrollah; Taghipour, Hamid Reza; Javadzadeh, Hamid Reza; Ghane, Mohammad Reza; Goodarzi, Hassan; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission places a high burden on both health care systems and patients. Most readmissions are thought to be related to the quality of the health care system. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the causes and rates of early readmission in emergency department in a Tehran hospital. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional investigation was performed to study readmission of inpatients at a large academic hospital in Tehran, Iran. Patients admitted to hospital from July 1, 2014 to December 30, 2014 via the emergency department were enrolled. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the distribution demographics in the sample. Data was analyzed by chi2 test using SPSS 20 software. Results The main cause of readmission was complications related to surgical procedures (31.0%). Discharge from hospital based on patient request at the patient's own risk was a risk factor for emergency readmission in 8.5%, a very small number were readmitted after complete treatment (0.6%). The only direct complication of treatment was infection (17%). Conclusions Postoperative complications increase the probability of patients returning to hospital. Physicians, nurses, etc., should focus on these specific patient populations to minimize the risk of postoperative complications. Future studies should assess the relative connections of various types of patient information (e.g., social and psychosocial factors) to readmission risk prediction by comparing the performance of models with and without this information in a specific population. PMID:27626018

  18. Advertising emergency department wait times.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Scott G

    2013-03-01

    Advertising emergency department (ED) wait times has become a common practice in the United States. Proponents of this practice state that it is a powerful marketing strategy that can help steer patients to the ED. Opponents worry about the risk to the public health that arises from a patient with an emergent condition self-triaging to a further hospital, problems with inaccuracy and lack of standard definition of the reported time, and directing lower acuity patients to the higher cost ED setting instead to primary care. Three sample cases demonstrating the pitfalls of advertising ED wait times are discussed. Given the lack of rigorous evidence supporting the practice and potential adverse effects to the public health, caution about its use is advised.

  19. Advertising emergency department wait times.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Scott G

    2013-03-01

    Advertising emergency department (ED) wait times has become a common practice in the United States. Proponents of this practice state that it is a powerful marketing strategy that can help steer patients to the ED. Opponents worry about the risk to the public health that arises from a patient with an emergent condition self-triaging to a further hospital, problems with inaccuracy and lack of standard definition of the reported time, and directing lower acuity patients to the higher cost ED setting instead to primary care. Three sample cases demonstrating the pitfalls of advertising ED wait times are discussed. Given the lack of rigorous evidence supporting the practice and potential adverse effects to the public health, caution about its use is advised. PMID:23599836

  20. Pediatric Ingestions: Emergency Department Management.

    PubMed

    Tarango Md, Stacy M; Liu Md, Deborah R

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric ingestions present a common challenge for emergency clinicians. Each year, more than 50,000 children aged less than 5 years present to emergency departments with concern for unintentional medication exposure, and nearly half of all calls to poison centers are for children aged less than 6 years. Ingestion of magnetic objects and button batteries has also become an increasing source of morbidity and mortality. Although fatal pediatric ingestions are rare, the prescription medications most responsible for injury and fatality in children include opioids, sedative/hypnotics, and cardiovascular drugs. Evidence regarding the evaluation and management of common pediatric ingestions is comprised largely of case reports and retrospective studies. This issue provides a review of these studies as well as consensus guidelines addressing the initial resuscitation, diagnosis, and treatment of common pediatric ingestions. Also discussed are current recommendations for decontamination, administration of antidotes for specific toxins, and management of ingested foreign bodies.

  1. Confidentiality in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Knopp, R K; Satterlee, P A

    1999-05-01

    The ideal of patient confidentiality has mutated over the last several years to accommodate the factors that infringe upon its meaning; such as expanding health care information technologies, physical environments that promote breaches of patient privacy, and health care workers who are unaware of how their routine behavior infringes on patients' right to privacy. This article examines the various ways in which confidentiality is breached in the emergency department and the legal issues involved, and explores options for the improvement of patient privacy for physicians and other health care professionals.

  2. Cost analysis of emergency department.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Di Bella, E; Montefiori, M

    2010-12-01

    This paper is intended to examine both clinical and economic data concerning the activity of an emergency department of an Italian primary Hospital. Real data referring to arrivals, waiting times, service times, severity (according to triage classification) of patients' condition collected along the whole 2009 are matched up with the relevant accounting and economic information concerning the costs faced. A new methodological approach is implemented in order to identify a "standard production cost" and its variability. We believe that this kind of analysis well fits the federalizing process that Italy is experiencing. In fact the federal reform is driving our Country toward a decentralized provision and funding of local public services. The health care services are "fundamental" under the provisions of the law that in turn implies that a standard cost has to be defined for its funding. The standard cost (as it is defined by the law) relies on the concepts of appropriateness and efficiency in the production of the health care service, assuming a standard quality level as target. The identification and measurement of health care costs is therefore a crucial task propaedeutic to health services economic evaluation. Various guidelines with different amount of details have been set up for costing methods which, however, are defined in simplified frameworks and using fictious data. This study is a first attempt to proceed in the direction of a precise definition of the costs inherent to the emergency department activity. PMID:21553561

  3. Hypertensive Emergencies in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Adebayo, Omoyemi; Rogers, Robert L

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension affects approximately one-third of Americans. An additional 30% are unaware that they harbor the disease. Significantly increased blood pressure constitutes a hypertensive emergency that could lead to end-organ damage. When organs such as the brain, heart, or kidney are affected, an intervention that will lower the blood pressure in several hours is indicated. Several pharmacologic options are available for treatment, with intravenous antihypertensive therapy being the cornerstone, but there is no standard of care. Careful consideration of each patient's specific complaint, history, and physical examination guides the emergency physician through the treatment algorithm.

  4. Managing hypopituitarism in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Jeanette

    2015-10-01

    Healthcare professionals manage patients with a vast range of conditions, but often specialise and acquire expertise in specific disease processes. Emergency and pre-hospital clinicians care for patients with various conditions for short periods of time, so have less opportunity to become familiar with more unusual conditions, yet it is vital that they have some knowledge and understanding of these. Patients with rare conditions can present at emergency departments with common complaints, but the effect of their original diagnosis on the presenting complaint may be overlooked or underestimated. This article uses a case study to describe the experience of one patient who presented with vomiting, but who also had hypopituitarism and therefore required specific management she did not at first receive. The article describes hypopituitarism and the initial management of patients with this condition who become unwell, and discusses how the trust responded to the patient's complaint to improve patient safety and care. It has been written with the full participation and consent of the patient and her husband. PMID:26451942

  5. Improving emergency department patient flow

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Paul Richard Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments (ED) face significant challenges in delivering high quality and timely patient care on an ever-present background of increasing patient numbers and limited hospital resources. A mismatch between patient demand and the ED’s capacity to deliver care often leads to poor patient flow and departmental crowding. These are associated with reduction in the quality of the care delivered and poor patient outcomes. A literature review was performed to identify evidence-based strategies to reduce the amount of time patients spend in the ED in order to improve patient flow and reduce crowding in the ED. The use of doctor triage, rapid assessment, streaming and the co-location of a primary care clinician in the ED have all been shown to improve patient flow. In addition, when used effectively point of care testing has been shown to reduce patient time in the ED. Patient flow and departmental crowding can be improved by implementing new patterns of working and introducing new technologies such as point of care testing in the ED.

  6. Proximity and emergency department use

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Patrick; Courteau, Josiane; Vanasse, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine if geographic proximity to an emergency department (ED) is related to ED use in a metropolitan population of patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Design Population-based, retrospective cohort study. Setting The census metropolitan area of Montreal, Que. Participants Cohort of 99 400 patients with diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemia in 2007 without a history of cardiovascular disease. Each patient was spatially referred to 1 of 5857 dissemination areas (DAs). Main outcome measures Annual number of visits to an ED with respect to the distance between the centroid of a patient’s DA and the closest ED, controlling for age, sex, comorbidities, and neighbourhood immigration, social, and material characteristics. Multilevel logistic and negative binomial regressions were used to determine if the proximity to the closest ED was related to ED use, frequent ED use (≥ 4 visits in a year), and number of ED visits. Results A total of 25 889 (26.0%) patients in the cohort visited an ED at least once during a 1-year period, among which 4563 (4.6%) were frequent users with at least 4 visits. These frequent users were responsible for 28 249 (45.5%) of all 62 021 visits to EDs. The distance between a DA and its closest ED was significantly and negatively correlated with ED use (P < .001), even after controlling for confounding variables. Patients living in a DA close to an ED were also more likely to be frequent users, but the extent of use among them (range from 4 to 82 ED visits) was not related to the distance to the closest ED. Conclusion These results suggest that patients at risk of cardiovascular disease living in a metropolitan area are more likely to seek a medical encounter at the ED if they live closer to it. PMID:26505061

  7. Emergency Department Response to SARS, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong-Dar Isaac; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Cheng, Yi-Chang

    2005-01-01

    How emergency departments of different levels and types cope with a large-scale contagious infectious disease is unclear. We retrospectively analyzed the response of 100 emergency departments regarding use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and implementation of infection control measures (ICMs) during the severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak in Taiwan. Emergency department workers in large hospitals were more severely affected by the epidemic. Large hospitals or public hospitals were more likely to use respirators. Small hospitals implemented more restrictive ICMs. Most emergency departments provided PPE (80%) and implemented ICMs (66%) at late stages of the outbreak. Instructions to use PPE or ICMs more frequently originated by emergency department administrators. The difficulty of implementing ICMs was significantly negatively correlated with their effectiveness. Because ability to prepare for and respond to emerging infectious diseases varies among hospitals, grouping infectious patients in a centralized location in an early stage of infection may reduce the extent of epidemics. PMID:16022782

  8. Developing Academic Identities: Persuasive Writing as a Tool to Strengthen Emergent Academic Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbone, Paula M.; Orellana, Marjorie Faulstich

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how writing samples produced by middle school students reveal their emerging academic identities through their rhetorical choices in writing. Analyses of two texts produced by each student revealed students' implicit understandings of the requirements of academic voice. Through comparisons of each student's texts, strategies…

  9. Emerging Infections Program—State Health Department Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Danila, Richard N.; Cieslak, Paul R.; Meek, James I.; Schaffner, William; Smith, Kirk E.; Cartter, Matthew L.; Harrison, Lee H.; Vugia, Duc J.; Lynfield, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    The Emerging Infections Program (EIP) is a collaboration between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and 10 state health departments working with academic partners to conduct active population-based surveillance and special studies for several emerging infectious disease issues determined to need special attention. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funds the 10 EIP sites through cooperative agreements. Our objective was to highlight 1) what being an EIP site has meant for participating health departments and associated academic centers, including accomplishments and challenges, and 2) the synergy between the state and federal levels that has resulted from the collaborative relationship. Sharing these experiences should provide constructive insight to other public health programs and other countries contemplating a collaborative federal–local approach to collective public health challenges. PMID:26289952

  10. Primary care and public emergency department overcrowding.

    PubMed Central

    Grumbach, K; Keane, D; Bindman, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Our objective was to evaluate whether referral to primary care settings would be clinically appropriate for and acceptable to patients waiting for emergency department care for nonemergency conditions. METHODS. We studied 700 patients waiting for emergency department care at a public hospital. Access to alternative sources of medical care, clinical appropriateness of emergency department use, and patients' willingness to use nonemergency services were measured and compared between patients with and without a regular source of care. RESULTS. Nearly half (45%) of the patients cited access barriers to primary care as their reason for using the emergency department. Only 13% of the patients waiting for care had conditions that were clinically appropriate for emergency department services. Patients with a regular source of care used the emergency department more appropriately than did patients without a regular source of care. Thirty-eight percent of the patients expressed a willingness to trade their emergency department visit for an appointment with a physician within 3 days. CONCLUSIONS. Public emergency departments could refer large numbers of patients to appointments at primary care facilities. This alternative would be viable only if the availability and coordination of primary care services were enhanced for low-income populations. PMID:8438975

  11. Emergency department coding and billing.

    PubMed

    Edelberg, Caral

    2004-02-01

    ED coding and billing are challenging additions to the responsibilities of emergency physicians. Assurances that each is performed in the most efficient and accurate manner possible is an essential component of today's emergency medicine practice. Minimizing the risk for submitting fraudulent claims is critical, because it assures the efficient and timely billing of all ED services. For the practice to thrive, each is necessary. PMID:15062501

  12. Leadership and the emergency department.

    PubMed

    LaSalle, Gar

    2004-02-01

    Emergency medicine, as the nation's health care system's safety net, is facing ever increasing demands on its resources and infrastructure. Classic and modern theories of leadership, which include broader based models that in corporate team responsibilities, should be studied by anyone wearing the mantle of leadership in emergency medicine, and the Realpolitik of the modern hospital must be accommodated if leadership efforts are to succeed.

  13. Emergency department triage: an ethical analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Emergency departments across the globe follow a triage system in order to cope with overcrowding. The intention behind triage is to improve the emergency care and to prioritize cases in terms of clinical urgency. Discussion In emergency department triage, medical care might lead to adverse consequences like delay in providing care, compromise in privacy and confidentiality, poor physician-patient communication, failing to provide the necessary care altogether, or even having to decide whose life to save when not everyone can be saved. These consequences challenge the ethical quality of emergency care. This article provides an ethical analysis of "routine" emergency department triage. The four principles of biomedical ethics - viz. respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence and justice provide the starting point and help us to identify the ethical challenges of emergency department triage. However, they do not offer a comprehensive ethical view. To address the ethical issues of emergency department triage from a more comprehensive ethical view, the care ethics perspective offers additional insights. Summary We integrate the results from the analysis using four principles of biomedical ethics into care ethics perspective on triage and propose an integrated clinically and ethically based framework of emergency department triage planning, as seen from a comprehensive ethics perspective that incorporates both the principles-based and care-oriented approach. PMID:21982119

  14. Comparing Institutional Relationships with Academic Departments: A Study of Five Academic Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jenny J.

    2004-01-01

    Any effort to understand academic departments would be facilitated by a better understanding of its relationship between its two larger spheres: the institution and the discipline. This study particularly asks: How do the relationships between institutional culture and the culture of the academic department vary by disciplinary field? Using…

  15. [Care organization at French pediatric emergency department].

    PubMed

    Gras-Le Guen, Christèle; Vrignaud, Bénédicte; Levieux, Karine

    2015-05-01

    The number of children admitted to paediatric emergencies is increasing steadily, and is responsible for an altered quality in the patients' reception and some major perturbations in the care organization. In this context, the primary care physicians play a major role in explaining their patients "how to use" the paediatric emergency department (priority in case of vital emergency, periods with lot of admissions and increased waiting time ...). Everything must be done to find an altemative to the pediatric emergency department passage by facilitating communication between caregivers and for example by offering semi urgent consultations possibility.

  16. Organizational models of emerging academic health science centers in England.

    PubMed

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Davies, Stephen M; Buchan, Alastair M

    2010-08-01

    Recent government policy initiatives to foster medical innovation and high-quality care in England have prompted academic and clinical leaders to develop new organizational models to support the tripartite Flexnerian mission of academic medicine. Medical schools and health care providers have responded by aligning their missions and creating integrated governance structures that strengthen their partnerships. In March 2009, the government officially designated five academic-clinical partnerships as England's first academic health science centers (AHSCs). As academic-clinical integration is likely to continue, future AHSC leaders could benefit from an analysis of models for organizing medical school-clinical enterprise relationships in England's emerging AHSCs. In addition, as the United States ponders health systems reform and universal coverage, U.S. medical leaders may benefit from insight into the workings of academic medicine in England's universal health system. In this article, the authors briefly characterize the organization and financing of the National Health Service and how it supports academic medicine. They review the policy behind the designation of AHSCs. Then, the authors describe contrasting organizational models adopted in two of the newly designated AHSCs and analyze these models using a framework derived from U.S. literature. The authors conclude by outlining the major challenges facing academic medicine in England and offer suggestions for future research collaborations between leaders of AHSCs in the United States and England.

  17. Reaping what we sow: the emerging academic medicine workforce.

    PubMed

    Jeffe, Donna B; Andriole, Dorothy A; Hageman, Heather L; Whelan, Alison J

    2008-09-01

    National efforts to increase diversity of academic medicine faculty led us to study the evolution of medical graduates' academic medicine career intentions. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 1997-2004 U.S. allopathic medical graduates who completed both the Association of American Medical Colleges' Matriculating Student Questionnaire and Graduation Questionnaire, categorizing the evolution of academic medicine career intentions (sustained, emerging, diminished and no intent) by similarities/differences in graduates' responses to the career choice question on both questionnaires. Multivariable logistic regression models identified independent predictors of sustained and emerging intent (compared with no intent) and diminished intent (compared with sustained intent). Of 87,763 graduates, 67% indicated no intent, 20% emerging intent, 8% sustained intent and 5% diminished intent to pursue an academic medicine career. Asians were more likely and underrepresented minorities less likely to have sustained and emerging intent. Women were more likely to have emerging intent. Graduates planning more extensive career involvement in research at matriculation and reporting greater satisfaction with the quality of their medical education, higher clinical clerkship ratings, and lower debt were more likely to have sustained and emerging intent and less likely to have diminished intent. Graduates planning to practice in underserved areas and choosing family medicine were less likely to have sustained and emerging intent and more likely to have diminished intent (all p < 0.05). Findings can inform efforts to develop an academic medicine workforce that can meet our nation's healthcare needs and more equitably reflect the diversity of our society and medical student population. PMID:18807430

  18. Scheduling prioritized patients in emergency department laboratories.

    PubMed

    Azadeh, A; Hosseinabadi Farahani, M; Torabzadeh, S; Baghersad, M

    2014-11-01

    This research focuses on scheduling patients in emergency department laboratories according to the priority of patients' treatments, determined by the triage factor. The objective is to minimize the total waiting time of patients in the emergency department laboratories with emphasis on patients with severe conditions. The problem is formulated as a flexible open shop scheduling problem and a mixed integer linear programming model is proposed. A genetic algorithm (GA) is developed for solving the problem. Then, the response surface methodology is applied for tuning the GA parameters. The algorithm is tested on a set of real data from an emergency department. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm can significantly improve the efficiency of the emergency department by reducing the total waiting time of prioritized patients.

  19. Institutionalizing the academic health department within the context of the 3-fold academic mission.

    PubMed

    Livingood, William C; Goldhagen, Jeffrey; Bryant, Thomas; Harmon, Robert G; Wood, David L

    2014-01-01

    A mature model of an academic health department (AHD) that has been institutionalized over 2 decades is described within the context of the 3-fold traditional mission of academics (teaching, research, and service/practice). This adaptive model for AHDs, based on mutual benefits that can be viewed through the lenses of both the academic health center mission and the public health functions and services, has important implications for AHD sustainability. Continued collaboration in any academic-public health partnership will depend in part on the commitments of the changing leadership. However, institutionalizing support for the academic mission enables this collaboration to transcend changing leadership styles and priorities. The collaboration of Duval County Health Department and University of Florida College of Medicine-Jacksonville is an example of a model of AHD that has endured major changes in leadership within both the academic center and the Duval County Health Department. PMID:24667196

  20. Emerging Trends in Science Education in a Dynamic Academic Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avwiri, H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Emerging Trends in Science Education in a Dynamic Academic Environment highlights the changes that have occurred in science education particularly in institutions of higher learning in southern Nigeria. Impelled by the fact that most Nigerian Universities and Colleges of Education still adhere to the practices and teaching methodologies of the…

  1. Executive summary of the CAEP 2014 Academic Symposium: How to make research succeed in your department.

    PubMed

    Stiell, Ian G; Artz, Jennifer D; Perry, Jeffrey; Vaillancourt, Christian; Calder, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    The vision of the recently created Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) Academic Section is to promote high-quality emergency patient care by conducting world-leading education and research in emergency medicine. The Academic Section plans to achieve this goal by enhancing academic emergency medicine primarily at Canadian medical schools and teaching hospitals. It seeks to foster and develop education, research, and academic leadership amongst Canadian emergency physicians, residents, and students. In this light, the Academic Section began in 2013 to hold the annual Academic Symposia to highlight best practices and recommendations for the three core domains of governance and leadership, education scholarship, and research. Each year, members of three panels are asked to review the literature, survey and interview experts, achieve consensus, and present their recommendations at the Symposium (2013, Education Scholarship; 2014, Research; and 2015, Governance and Funding). Research is essential to medical advancement. As a relatively young specialty, emergency medicine is rapidly evolving to adapt to new diagnostic tools, the challenges of crowding in emergency departments, and the growing needs of emergency patients. There is significant variability in the infrastructure, support, and productivity of emergency medicine research programs across Canada. All Canadians benefit from an investigation of the means to improve research infrastructure, training programs, and funding opportunities. Such an analysis is essential to identify areas for improvement, which will support the expansion of emergency medicine research. To this end, physician-scientist leaders were gathered from across Canada to develop pragmatic recommendations on the improvement of emergency medicine research through a comprehensive analysis of current best practices, systematic literature reviews, stakeholder surveys, and expert interviews.

  2. A Utility Model for Teaching Load Decisions in Academic Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massey, William F.; Zemsky, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Presents a utility model for academic department decision making and describes the structural specifications for analyzing it. The model confirms the class-size utility asymmetry predicted by the authors' academic rachet theory, but shows that marginal utility associated with college teaching loads is always negative. Curricular structure and…

  3. Advantages and Challenges of Working as a Clinician in an Academic Department of Medicine: Academic Clinicians' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Christmas, Colleen; Durso, Samuel C.; Kravet, Steven J.; Wright, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The provision of high-quality clinical care is critical to the mission of academic and nonacademic clinical settings and is of foremost importance to academic and nonacademic physicians. Concern has been increasingly raised that the rewards systems at most academic institutions may discourage those with a passion for clinical care over research or teaching from staying in academia. In addition to the advantages afforded by academic institutions, academic physicians may perceive important challenges, disincentives, and limitations to providing excellent clinical care. To better understand these views, we conducted a qualitative study to explore the perspectives of clinical faculty in prominent departments of medicine. Methods Between March and May 2007, 2 investigators conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with 24 clinically excellent internal medicine physicians at 8 academic institutions across the nation. Transcripts were independently coded by 2 investigators and compared for agreement. Content analysis was performed to identify emerging themes. Results Twenty interviewees (83%) were associate professors or professors, 33% were women, and participants represented a wide range of internal medicine subspecialties. Mean time currently spent in clinical care by the physicians was 48%. Domains that emerged related to faculty's perception of clinical care in the academic setting included competing obligations, teamwork and collaboration, types of patients and productivity expectations, resources for clinical services, emphasis on discovery, and bureaucratic challenges. Conclusions Expert clinicians at academic medical centers perceive barriers to providing excellent patient care related to competing demands on their time, competing academic missions, and bureaucratic challenges. They also believe there are differences in the types of patients seen in academic settings compared with those in the private sector, that there is a “public” nature in

  4. An academic approach to climate change emergency preparedness.

    PubMed

    Trask, Jeffrey A

    To achieve effective emergency management and business continuity, all hazards should be considered during the planning and preparedness process. In recent years, several new hazards have attracted the attention of Emergency Management and Business Continuity practitioners. Climate change presents a unique challenge. Practitioners must rely on historical data combined with scientific projections to guide their planning and preparedness efforts. This article examines how an academic institution's emergency management programme can plan successfully for this hazard by focusing on best practices in the area of building cross-departmental and cross-jurisdictional relationships. Examples of scientific data related to the hazard of climate change will be presented along with the latest guidance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency encouraging the planning for future hazards. The article presents a functional exercise in which this hazard was prominently featured, and presents testimony from subject matter experts. Recommendations for emergency management and business continuity programmes are so provided. PMID:26642169

  5. Palliative social work in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Recognizing that seriously ill patients and their families utilize emergency departments (EDs) for distressing symptoms, changing goals of care, or at the end of life, palliative care and emergency medicine departments are partnering to enhance the care provided to patients with life-limiting illnesses and their families. A social work model for identifying patients with unmet palliative care needs in the ED is included to illustrate the process as well as specific psychosocial interventions that palliative social workers can provide in this environment. As increasing numbers of palliative and emergency medicine departments partner to both improve ED care for patients with life-threatening illness and initiate palliative care consults earlier in hospitalizations, palliative and ED social workers have an opportunity to join their physician and nurse colleagues who are making inroads in this important and growing area.

  6. Orientations to Academic Workloads at Department Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Universities confront many challenges in their efforts to manage staff activity with the aid of workload assessment and allocation systems. This article sets out fresh perspectives from an exploratory study designed to uncover patterns of subjective views about various aspects of workloads. Using Q methodology, academic staff in a single…

  7. Paediatric procedural sedation within the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Krieser, David; Kochar, Amit

    2016-02-01

    Procedural sedation and analgesia in children requires the use of non-pharmacological and pharmacological approaches to facilitate the management of painful procedures. The development of skills in such techniques has mirrored the development of paediatric emergency medicine as a subspecialty. Governance, education and credentialing must facilitate safe sedation practice, using a structured approach, as sedating children in the busy environment of an emergency department is not without risk. Emergency clinicians, patients and caregivers all have a role to play in developing a safe, effective sedation plan. PMID:27062624

  8. Measuring Efficiencies of Academic Departments within a College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauer, Loren W.; Fried, Harold O.; Fry, William E.

    2007-01-01

    Technical and allocative efficiencies of 26 academic departments in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell University are computed using Data Envelopment Analysis over 2004/05. Allocations of faculty time between teaching, research, and extension vary by department and are used as unique prices in calculating allocative…

  9. Quality Improvement Practices in Academic Emergency Medicine: Perspectives from the Chairs

    PubMed Central

    DelliFraine, Jami; Langabeer, James; King, Brent

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess academic emergency medicine (EM) chairs’ perceptions of quality improvement (QI) training programs. Methods A voluntary anonymous 20 item survey was distributed to a sample of academic chairs of EM through the Association of Academic Chairs of Emergency Medicine. Data was collected to assess the percentage of academic emergency physicians who had received QI training, the type of training they received, their perception of the impact of this training on behavior, practice and outcomes, and any perceived barriers to implementing QI programs in the emergency department. Results The response rate to the survey was 69% (N = 59). 59.3% of respondents report that their hospital has a formal QI program for physicians. Chairs received training in a variety of QI programs. The type of QI program used by respondents was perceived as having no impact on goals achieved by QI (χ2 = 12.382; p = 0.260), but there was a statistically significant (χ2 = 14.383; p = 0.006) relationship between whether or not goals were achieved and academic EM chairs’ perceptions about return on investment for QI training. Only 22% of chairs responded that they have already made changes as a result of the QI training. 78.8% of EM chairs responded that quality programs could have a significant positive impact on their practice and the healthcare industry. Chairs perceived that QI programs had the most potential value in the areas of understanding and reducing medical errors and improving patient flow and throughput. Other areas of potential value of QI include improving specific clinical indicators and standardizing physician care. Conclusion Academic EM chairs perceived that QI programs were an effective way to drive needed improvements. The results suggest that there is a high level of interest in QI but a low level of adoption of training and implementation. PMID:21293770

  10. Emergency Department Management Of Acute Infective Endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Steven G; Pfaff, James A; Cuenca, Peter John

    2014-11-01

    Infective endocarditis has a high rate of mortality, and most patients suspected of having the disease will require hospital admission. This review examines the literature as it pertains specifically to emergency clinicians who must maintain vigilance for risk factors and obtain a thorough history, including use of intravenous drugs, in order to guide the workup and treatment. Properly obtained cultures are critical during the evaluation, as they direct the course of antibiotic therapy. Although transthoracic echocardiography is widely available in United States emergency departments, it is not sensitive or specific enough to rule out a diagnosis of infective endocarditis. In high-risk patients, transesophageal echocardiography should be considered.

  11. Cardiac Monitoring in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Zègre-Hemsey, Jessica K; Garvey, J Lee; Carey, Mary G

    2016-09-01

    Patients present to the emergency department (ED) with a wide range of complaints and ED clinicians are responsible for identifying which conditions are life threatening. Cardiac monitoring strategies in the ED include, but are not limited to, 12-lead electrocardiography and bedside cardiac monitoring for arrhythmia and ischemia detection as well as QT-interval monitoring. ED nurses are in a unique position to incorporate cardiac monitoring into the early triage and risk stratification of patients with cardiovascular emergencies to optimize patient management and outcomes. PMID:27484661

  12. Forming an academic health department: a case example.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Charles B; Buchanan, Martha L; Grubaugh, Julie H; Erwin, Paul Campbell

    2014-01-01

    The disconnect between public health practice and its academic base has major implications for training and hiring the future public health workforce, for practice-based research, and ultimately for improving the public's health. To bridge this disconnect, the University of Tennessee Department of Public Health and the Knox County Health Department established an academic health department in early 2011 through a memorandum of understanding. This action followed a long history of informal collaborations, built on mutual trust. The memorandum of understanding identified the scope of academic health department activities, clarified responsibilities of each organization, and created a shared coordinator position. Accomplishments during the first 18 months include improving the efficiency and effectiveness of student field placements; establishing collaborative learning sessions delivered jointly by University of Tennessee Department of Public Health faculty and Knox County Health Department staff; and exploring opportunities for practice-based research. The shared coordinator position and an active steering committee are considered fundamental to achieving sustainable academic-practice linkages.

  13. Emergency department throughput: strategies for success.

    PubMed

    Scrofine, Sharon; Fitzsimons, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Emergency departments are facing challenges that affect their operation such as overcrowding, boarding of admitted patients, poor outcomes due to extended waiting times to see a physician, difficulty meeting patient satisfaction benchmarks, and surges in patient census and acuity. Processes and procedures must be reviewed for effectiveness and dissected for obstacles to survive and flourish in the face of these challenges. In an effort to improve patient satisfaction, decrease waiting times, improve clinical care, and decrease lost revenue from patients leaving without treatment, several methods were investigated and implemented at the Ocean Care Center, New Jersey's 1st satellite emergency department. Innovations included immediate bedding, optimizing use of point-of-care testing, utilizing midlevel providers, utilizing protocol orders, and using nontraditional beds. PMID:25072225

  14. Improving communication between emergency department staff.

    PubMed

    Moore, Kate

    2014-05-01

    During redevelopment of the emergency department at the Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton, it was deemed vital that its internal communication system should be as effective as possible. An audit of staff perceptions of the existing communication system and a relevant literature review were undertaken, therefore, to inform a proposal for the development of a new online system. This article describes the development and implementation of the system. PMID:24806866

  15. Pericardial Effusion in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Pinsker, Jordan E.; Ferry, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    We report the first child presenting to the emergency department with undiagnosed myxedema in whom incidental detection of pericardial effusion led to diagnosis. Moreover, this patient presented with the highest serum thyrotropin concentration reported to date, a phenomenon that caused the hook effect during laboratory analysis. We discuss key elements of the recognition and management of hypothyroidism in the pediatric population and emphasize the importance of annual screening for hypothyroidism in all patients with Down syndrome. PMID:22888197

  16. Preventing 'exit block' in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Cairney, Kevin; Clancy, Elaine

    2014-11-01

    Overcrowding due to poor patient flow increases risk for more than 500,000 patients a year ( College of Emergency Medicine (CEM) 2014 ) and is linked to increased mortality ( Geelhoed and de Klerk 2012 ). CEM ( 2014 ) has called for urgent action to address 'exit block' in UK emergency departments (EDs). In October last year, Croydon Health Services NHS Trust designed and implemented a site practitioner early warning system (SPEWS) to alert staff to capacity and flow pressures in the ED, and to initiate escalation to a nurse-led, protocol-driven response. Under pressurised and time-critical conditions, SPEWS ensures rigour and conformity in exchanges between clinical emergency care staff and managers. The result is closer collaboration between clinicians and managers, optimised patient flow and mitigated risk from exit block. PMID:25369968

  17. Emergency department overcrowding - implications for paediatric emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Douglas

    2007-07-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding has been an international phenomenon for more than 10 years. It is important to understand that ED overcrowding is a measure of health system efficiency and is not strictly related to ED volumes or capacity. ED overcrowding is defined as a situation in which the demand for emergency services exceeds the ability of physicians and nurses to provide quality care within a reasonable time. The major factor resulting in ED overcrowding is the presence of admitted patients in the ED for prolonged periods of time, not a high volume of low-acuity patients. While limited data are available for paediatric EDs, winter respiratory illnesses set the stage for ED overcrowding, which are epidemic in adult or general EDs. Prehospital-, ED- and hospital-related factors are described in the present article, and these may help prevent or manage this important patient safety problem. PMID:19030415

  18. Emergency department overcrowding – implications for paediatric emergency medicine

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding has been an international phenomenon for more than 10 years. It is important to understand that ED overcrowding is a measure of health system efficiency and is not strictly related to ED volumes or capacity. ED overcrowding is defined as a situation in which the demand for emergency services exceeds the ability of physicians and nurses to provide quality care within a reasonable time. The major factor resulting in ED overcrowding is the presence of admitted patients in the ED for prolonged periods of time, not a high volume of low-acuity patients. While limited data are available for paediatric EDs, winter respiratory illnesses set the stage for ED overcrowding, which are epidemic in adult or general EDs. Prehospital-, ED- and hospital-related factors are described in the present article, and these may help prevent or manage this important patient safety problem. PMID:19030415

  19. Forecasting the Emergency Department Patients Flow.

    PubMed

    Afilal, Mohamed; Yalaoui, Farouk; Dugardin, Frédéric; Amodeo, Lionel; Laplanche, David; Blua, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Emergency department (ED) have become the patient's main point of entrance in modern hospitals causing it frequent overcrowding, thus hospital managers are increasingly paying attention to the ED in order to provide better quality service for patients. One of the key elements for a good management strategy is demand forecasting. In this case, forecasting patients flow, which will help decision makers to optimize human (doctors, nurses…) and material(beds, boxs…) resources allocation. The main interest of this research is forecasting daily attendance at an emergency department. The study was conducted on the Emergency Department of Troyes city hospital center, France, in which we propose a new practical ED patients classification that consolidate the CCMU and GEMSA categories into one category and innovative time-series based models to forecast long and short term daily attendance. The models we developed for this case study shows very good performances (up to 91,24 % for the annual Total flow forecast) and robustness to epidemic periods.

  20. Forecasting the Emergency Department Patients Flow.

    PubMed

    Afilal, Mohamed; Yalaoui, Farouk; Dugardin, Frédéric; Amodeo, Lionel; Laplanche, David; Blua, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Emergency department (ED) have become the patient's main point of entrance in modern hospitals causing it frequent overcrowding, thus hospital managers are increasingly paying attention to the ED in order to provide better quality service for patients. One of the key elements for a good management strategy is demand forecasting. In this case, forecasting patients flow, which will help decision makers to optimize human (doctors, nurses…) and material(beds, boxs…) resources allocation. The main interest of this research is forecasting daily attendance at an emergency department. The study was conducted on the Emergency Department of Troyes city hospital center, France, in which we propose a new practical ED patients classification that consolidate the CCMU and GEMSA categories into one category and innovative time-series based models to forecast long and short term daily attendance. The models we developed for this case study shows very good performances (up to 91,24 % for the annual Total flow forecast) and robustness to epidemic periods. PMID:27272135

  1. Improving Emergency Department Door to Doctor Time and Process Reliability

    PubMed Central

    El Sayed, Mazen J.; El-Eid, Ghada R.; Saliba, Miriam; Jabbour, Rima; Hitti, Eveline A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of using lean management methods on improving emergency department door to doctor times at a tertiary care hospital. We performed a before and after study at an academic urban emergency department with 49,000 annual visits after implementing a series of lean driven interventions over a 20 month period. The primary outcome was mean door to doctor time and the secondary outcome was length of stay of both admitted and discharged patients. A convenience sample from the preintervention phase (February 2012) was compared to another from the postintervention phase (mid-October to mid-November 2013). Individual control charts were used to assess process stability. Postintervention there was a statistically significant decrease in the mean door to doctor time measure (40.0 minutes ± 53.44 vs 25.3 minutes ± 15.93 P < 0.001). The postintervention process was more statistically in control with a drop in the upper control limits from 148.8 to 72.9 minutes. Length of stay of both admitted and discharged patients dropped from 2.6 to 2.0 hours and 9.0 to 5.5 hours, respectively. All other variables including emergency department visit daily volumes, hospital occupancy, and left without being seen rates were comparable. Using lean change management techniques can be effective in reducing door to doctor time in the Emergency Department and improving process reliability. PMID:26496278

  2. Building a sustainable Academic Health Department: the South Carolina model.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lillian Upton; Waddell, Lisa; Kyle, Joseph; Hand, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Given the limited resources available to public health, it is critical that university programs complement the development needs of agencies. Unfortunately, academic and practice public health entities have long been challenged in building sustainable collaborations that support practice-based research, teaching, and service. The academic health department concept offers a promising solution. In South Carolina, the partners started their academic health department program with a small grant that expanded into a dynamic infrastructure that supports innovative professional exchange and development programs. This article provides a background and describes the key elements of the South Carolina model: joint leadership, a multicomponent memorandum of agreement, and a shared professional development mission. The combination of these elements allows the partners to leverage resources and deftly respond to challenges and opportunities, ultimately fostering the sustainability of the collaboration.

  3. Emergency Department Overcrowding and Ambulance Turnaround Time

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Jin; Shin, Sang Do; Lee, Eui Jung; Cho, Jin Seong; Cha, Won Chul

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to describe overcrowding in regional emergency departments in Seoul, Korea and evaluate the effect of crowdedness on ambulance turnaround time. Methods This study was conducted between January 2010 and December 2010. Patients who were transported by 119-responding ambulances to 28 emergency centers within Seoul were eligible for enrollment. Overcrowding was defined as the average occupancy rate, which was equal to the average number of patients staying in an emergency department (ED) for 4 hours divided by the number of beds in the ED. After selecting groups for final analysis, multi-level regression modeling (MLM) was performed with random-effects for EDs, to evaluate associations between occupancy rate and turnaround time. Results Between January 2010 and December 2010, 163,659 patients transported to 28 EDs were enrolled. The median occupancy rate was 0.42 (range: 0.10-1.94; interquartile range (IQR): 0.20-0.76). Overcrowded EDs were more likely to have older patients, those with normal mentality, and non-trauma patients. Overcrowded EDs were more likely to have longer turnaround intervals and traveling distances. The MLM analysis showed that an increase of 1% in occupancy rate was associated with 0.02-minute decrease in turnaround interval (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.03). In subgroup analyses limited to EDs with occupancy rates over 100%, we also observed a 0.03 minute decrease in turnaround interval per 1% increase in occupancy rate (95% CI: 0.01 to 0.05). Conclusions In this study, we found wide variation in emergency department crowding in a metropolitan Korean city. Our data indicate that ED overcrowding is negatively associated with turnaround interval with very small practical significance. PMID:26115183

  4. Designing a clinical dashboard to fill information gaps in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Jordan L; Cimino, James J; Fred, Matthew R; Green, Robert A; Vawdrey, David K

    2014-01-01

    Data fragmentation within electronic health records causes gaps in the information readily available to clinicians. We investigated the information needs of emergency medicine clinicians in order to design an electronic dashboard to fill information gaps in the emergency department. An online survey was distributed to all emergency medicine physicians at a large, urban academic medical center. The survey response rate was 48% (52/109). The clinical information items reported to be most helpful while caring for patients in the emergency department were vital signs, electrocardiogram (ECG) reports, previous discharge summaries, and previous lab results. Brief structured interviews were also conducted with 18 clinicians during their shifts in the emergency department. From the interviews, three themes emerged: 1) difficulty accessing vital signs, 2) difficulty accessing point-of-care tests, and 3) difficulty comparing the current ECG with the previous ECG. An emergency medicine clinical dashboard was developed to address these difficulties.

  5. Academic Leadership Development for Department Chairpersons. AIR Forum 1979 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plough, Thomas R.

    A four-year program for academic leadership development of department chairpersons is presented as a strategy for institutional renewal. The program has been used successfully with 100 chairpersons, ranging from the various technologies and sciences to the humanities and social sciences. The program is based on three assumptions. First, that the…

  6. Ranking Academic Departments: Empirical Findings and a Theoretical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, David E.; Karpf, Ronald

    1981-01-01

    The history of evaluations of academic departments through peer review rankings and subsequent attempts to identify empirical correlates of the ratings are reviewed. Findings indicate that American Council on Education rankings can be predicted by the departmental rate of publication in highly cited journals. (Author/MLW)

  7. The Louisiana emergency department behavioral health challenge.

    PubMed

    Griffies, W Scott; Collins, William J; Adams, Arwen E

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina uncovered and exaggerated Louisiana's behavioral health crisis. Patients with mental illness are backlogged in emergency rooms across the state, unable to access inpatient psychiatric treatment. Post-Katrina, part of the department of psychiatry of the Louisiana State University (LSU) New Orleans was displaced to Huey P. Long Medical Center (HPLMC) in Pineville, Louisiana. While displaced, LSU wrote a grant to develop a psychiatric emergency room service at HPLMC and in the process experienced a number of barriers to optimal behavioral healthcare in the emergency department (ED). The ED plays an essential role in our state's system of care for the mentally ill. However, EDs throughout the nation traditionally have not had the provisions necessary for optimal behavioral healthcare. In this article, we will address barriers to implementing proper provisions for sound behavioral healthcare in the ED. We will outline an affordable and available mental health personnel infrastructure that integrates with the ED's medical model of care, and improves quality of care of the mentally ill and the functional level of the ED, as well as the morale and job satisfaction of ED healthcare providers. PMID:18220095

  8. Integration of community pediatricians into an academic department.

    PubMed

    Broffman, G; Stapleton, F B

    1995-01-01

    A process of enhanced participation by community pediatricians in the programs and administration of an academic department is described. We realize that many departments incorporate volunteer faculty into their academic programs without creating a specific structure, such as our divisional classification. The customary paradigm of providing "ad hoc" opportunities and responsibilities for volunteer faculty is somewhat analogous to the traditional "quality assurance" model of management, which is responsive in nature and places the participants in a dependent relationship to the academic leadership. Creating academic division structure allows the volunteer faculty to initiate projects, create interdivisional work teams, and evaluate the results of their involvement and is more reflective of the new "continuous quality improvement" model. This system elevates the volunteer faculty into a partnership relationship with the academic faculty. The sense of ownership and opportunity for personal growth appear to be important drives for sustained community involvement. Although the benefits of our program appear promising, committed leadership within the academy and community will be required for long-term success. Re-analysis of the intramural dynamics and activities following systemic restructuring of the health care system will be of interest.

  9. How Familiar are Clinician Teammates in the Emergency Department?

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, P. Daniel; Pfeiffer, Anthony J.; Lave, Judith R.; Weaver, Matthew D.; Abebe, Kaleab; Krackhardt, David; Arnold, Robert M.; Yealy, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Lack of familiarity between teammates is linked to worsened safety in high-risk settings. The Emergency Department (ED) is a high-risk health care setting where unfamiliar teams are created by diversity in clinician shift schedules and flexibility in clinician movement across the department. We sought to characterize familiarity between clinician teammates in one urban teaching hospital Emergency Department (ED) over a 22-week study period. Methods We used a retrospective study design of shift-scheduling data to calculate the mean weekly hours of familiarity between teammates at the dyadic level, and the proportion of clinicians with a minimum of 2-hours, 5-hours, 10-hours, and 20-hours of familiarity at any given hour during the study period. Results Mean weekly hours of familiarity between ED clinician dyads was 2 hours (SD 1.5). At any given hour over the study period, the proportion of clinicians with a minimum of 2, 5, 10, or 20-hours of familiarity was 80%, 51%, 27%, and 0.8%, respectively. Conclusions In our study, few clinicians could be described as having a high level of familiarity with teammates. The limited familiarity between ED clinicians identified in this study may be a natural feature of ED care delivery in academic settings. We provide a template for measurement of ED team familiarity. PMID:24351519

  10. Evolution of the Academic Health Department through public health academic and practice collaborations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Amy F; Quade, Thomas; Dwinnells, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    In 1997, the Office of Public Health Practice was chartered at Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED). Through this office, public health practitioners and academics have engaged in informal collaborations, formal collaborations, and formal agreements. Projects that have helped public health practitioners included a sanitarian preparation course, educational opportunities, and shared faculty arrangements. The academic programs have benefited through support in accreditation activities, teaching and precepting of public health and medical students, and advice on community-oriented curriculum. Formal affiliation agreements have been developed between the medical school and 5 local health departments, and public health practitioners have been given faculty appointments. Factors that have resulted in the longevity of Academic Health Department relationships through the Office of Public Health Practice include individuals dedicated to these relationships, agencies willing to support collaborative efforts, mutually beneficial activities, and a culture conducive to continued engagement.

  11. Evolution of the Academic Health Department through public health academic and practice collaborations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Amy F; Quade, Thomas; Dwinnells, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    In 1997, the Office of Public Health Practice was chartered at Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED). Through this office, public health practitioners and academics have engaged in informal collaborations, formal collaborations, and formal agreements. Projects that have helped public health practitioners included a sanitarian preparation course, educational opportunities, and shared faculty arrangements. The academic programs have benefited through support in accreditation activities, teaching and precepting of public health and medical students, and advice on community-oriented curriculum. Formal affiliation agreements have been developed between the medical school and 5 local health departments, and public health practitioners have been given faculty appointments. Factors that have resulted in the longevity of Academic Health Department relationships through the Office of Public Health Practice include individuals dedicated to these relationships, agencies willing to support collaborative efforts, mutually beneficial activities, and a culture conducive to continued engagement. PMID:24667189

  12. Anterior Shoulder Dislocations in Busy Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Janitzky, Angelika A.; Akyol, Can; Kesapli, Mustafa; Gungor, Faruk; Imak, Arefe; Hakbilir, Oktay

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Shoulder joint is the most common joint requiring reduction by emergency physicians. Successful reduction is based on the overcoming of resistance of the shoulder muscles. Pain is the most important factor in resistance increase and sedation; analgesia and, in certain cases, intra-articular anesthesia are preferred for reduction. The external rotation (ER) method can provide successful reduction without causing an increase in muscle resistance if applied slowly and gently. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the usefulness of the ERWOSA method in the reduction of acute anterior shoulder dislocations (AASDs). This was a retrospective descriptive study. The records of patients admitted to the emergency department with anterior shoulder dislocation between 2009 and 2011 were reviewed for demographic data, sedation, analgesia, and discharge times. Patients were then divided into ERWOSA (n = 80) and external rotation and sedation-analgesia (ERASA, n = 59) groups, with regard to the application of SA (sedation-analgesia). The study data were analyzed using SPSS version 22.0 software for Windows. Numerical data were presented as mean ± standard deviation and categorical data as rates. A total of 139 patients were included in the study. The patients’ average age was 35 ± 14 years, 108 (77.7%) were male. Successful reduction rates for 59 male and 21 female patients in the ERWOSA group were 83% and 66.7% (78.7% total success), respectively. Successful reduction rates for 49 male and 10 female patients in the ERASA group were 87.7% and 90% (88.1% total success), respectively. The length of stay of the ERWOSA and ERASA groups in emergency services were found to be significantly different, with 55 ± 17 and 118 ± 23 minutes for each group, respectively. There were no complications. The ER method can be used in reduction of anterior shoulder dislocations without sedation and analgesia, if applied slowly enough to overcome

  13. Human Trafficking in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ronak B.; Ahn, Roy; Burke, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Human trafficking continues to persist, affecting up to 200 million people worldwide. As clinicians in emergency departments commonly encounter victims of intimate partner violence, some of these encounters will be with trafficking victims. These encounters provide a rare opportunity for healthcare providers to intervene and help. This case report of a human trafficking patient from a teaching hospital illustrates the complexity in identifying these victims. Clinicians can better identify potential trafficking cases by increasing their awareness of this phenomenon, using qualified interpreters, isolating potential victims by providing privacy and using simple clear reassuring statements ensuring security. A multidisciplinary approach can then be mobilized to help these patients. PMID:21293753

  14. Staffing of accident and emergency departments.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, I P

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine present staffing levels, to find out problems, and to request solutions. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent on two separate occasions to all major accident and emergency (A&E) departments in the United Kingdom. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: There are marked variations in recruiting ability across the country. Presently teaching hospitals are having no major difficulty, but others are only able to obtain junior doctors from outside the United Kingdom. Public expectations and charter standards are difficult to maintain. There is evidence of increasing stress among career and senior A&E medical staff. There is an inexorable but slow increase in year on year workload. PMID:8947802

  15. Management of information within emergencies departments in developing countries: analysis at the National Emergency Department in Benin

    PubMed Central

    Ahanhanzo, Yolaine Glèlè; Kpozehouen, Alphonse; Sopoh, Ghislain; Sossa-Jérôme, Charles; Ouedraogo, Laurent; Wilmet-Dramaix, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of health information is a key pillar in both emergencies reception and handling facilities, given the strategic position and the potential of these facilities within hospitals, and in the monitoring of public health and epidemiology. With the technological revolution, computerization made the information systems evolve in emergency departments, especially in developed countries, with improved performance in terms of care quality, productivity and patient satisfaction. This study analyses the situation of Benin in this field, through the case of the Academic Clinic of Emergency Department of the National University Teaching Hospital of Cotonou, the national reference hospital. Methods The study is cross-sectional and evaluative. Collection techniques are literature review and structured interviews. The components rated are resources, indicators, data sources, data management and the use-dissemination of the information through a model adapted from Health Metrics Network framework. We used quantitative and qualitative analysis. Results The absence of a regulatory framework restricts the operation of the system in all components and accounts for the lack and inadequacy of the dedicated resources. Conclusion Dedication of more resources for this system for crucial needs such as computerization requires sensitization and greater awareness of the administrative authorities about the fact that an effective health information management system is of prime importance in this type of facility. PMID:27800116

  16. International perspectives on emergency department crowding.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; Hilton, Joshua A; Weber, Ellen J; Alkemade, Annechien J; Al Shabanah, Hasan; Anderson, Philip D; Bernhard, Michael; Bertini, Alessio; Gries, André; Ferrandiz, Santiago; Kumar, Vijaya Arun; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Hogan, Barbara; Madsen, Bo; Mason, Suzanne; Ohlén, Gunnar; Rainer, Timothy; Rathlev, Niels; Revue, Eric; Richardson, Drew; Sattarian, Mehdi; Schull, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    The maturation of emergency medicine (EM) as a specialty has coincided with dramatic increases in emergency department (ED) visit rates, both in the United States and around the world. ED crowding has become a public health problem where periodic supply and demand mismatches in ED and hospital resources cause long waiting times and delays in critical treatments. ED crowding has been associated with several negative clinical outcomes, including higher complication rates and mortality. This article describes emergency care systems and the extent of crowding across 15 countries outside of the United States: Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Iran, Italy, The Netherlands, Saudi Arabia, Catalonia (Spain), Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The authors are local emergency care leaders with knowledge of emergency care in their particular countries. Where available, data are provided about visit patterns in each country; however, for many of these countries, no national data are available on ED visits rates or crowding. For most of the countries included, there is both objective evidence of increases in ED visit rates and ED crowding and also subjective assessments of trends toward higher crowding in the ED. ED crowding appears to be worsening in many countries despite the presence of universal health coverage. Scandinavian countries with robust systems to manage acute care outside the ED do not report crowding is a major problem. The main cause for crowding identified by many authors is the boarding of admitted patients, similar to the United States. Many hospitals in these countries have implemented operational interventions to mitigate crowding in the ED, and some countries have imposed strict limits on ED length of stay (LOS), while others have no clear plan to mitigate crowding. An understanding of the causes and potential solutions implemented in these countries can provide a lens into how to mitigate ED crowding in the United States

  17. Nonemergency Medicine-Trained Physician Coverage in Rural Emergency Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Lars E.; Dodoo, Martey; Bennett, Kevin J.; Bazemore, Andrew; Phillips, Robert L., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Rural areas have fewer physicians compared to urban areas, and rural emergency departments often rely on community or contracted providers for staffing. The emergency department workforce is composed of a variety of physician specialties and clinicians. Purpose: To determine the distribution of emergency department clinicians and the…

  18. Infection Prevention in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Stephen Y.; Theodoro, Daniel L.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.; Marschall, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Infection prevention remains a major challenge in emergency care. Acutely ill and injured patients seeking evaluation and treatment in the emergency department (ED) not only have the potential to spread communicable infectious diseases to healthcare personnel and other patients, but are vulnerable to acquiring new infections associated with the care they receive. This article will evaluate these risks and review the existing literature for infection prevention practices in the ED, ranging from hand hygiene, standard and transmission-based precautions, healthcare personnel vaccination, and environmental controls to strategies for preventing healthcare-associated infections. We will conclude by examining what can be done to optimize infection prevention in the ED and identify gaps in knowledge where further research is needed. Successful implementation of evidence-based practices coupled with innovation of novel approaches and technologies tailored specifically to the complex and dynamic environment of the ED are the keys to raising the standard for infection prevention and patient safety in emergency care. PMID:24721718

  19. Severe metabolic alkalosis in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Mennen, M; Slovis, C M

    1988-04-01

    A case of severe metabolic alkalosis (MA) resulting from ingestion of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) is presented. On admission to the emergency department, the patient was alert and stable with an initial examination that was remarkable only for carpopedal spasm. Shortly thereafter, the patient had a sudden, unexpected cardiopulmonary arrest. Following resuscitation, without administration of sodium bicarbonate, the arterial blood gas revealed a pH of 7.73, pO2 of 51 mm Hg, and pCO2 of 52 mm Hg. After admission to the intensive care unit, the patient's MA was corrected using IV 0.25 N hydrochloric acid. The patient remained comatose as a result of severe anoxic encephalopathy and died two weeks after admission. We believe this is the first reported case of severe MA resulting in sudden cardiopulmonary arrest in a previously ambulatory patient. PMID:2833137

  20. Therapy Dogs in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Nickolas; Lubin, Jill; Lubin, Jeffrey; Bankwitz, Blake K.; Castelaz, McAllister; Chen,, Xin; Shackson, Joel C.; Aggarwal, Manik N.; Totten, Vicken Y.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction This study examined acceptance by staff and patients of a therapy dog (TD) in the emergency department (ED). Methods Immediately after TD visits to a University Hospital ED, all available ED staff, patients, and their visitors were invited to complete a survey. Results Of 125 “patient” and 105 staff responses, most were favorable. Ninety-three percent of patients and 95% of staff agreed that TDs should visit EDs; 87.8% of patients and 92% of staff approved of TDs for both adult and pediatric patients. Fewer than 5% of either patients or staff were afraid of the TDs. Fewer than 10% of patients and staff thought the TDs posed a sanitary risk or interfered with staff work. Conclusion Both patients and staff approve of TDs in an ED. The benefits of animal-assisted therapy should be further explored in the ED setting. PMID:22942937

  1. Emergency Department Presentations following Tropical Cyclone Yasi

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Peter; Franklin, Richard Charles; Lawlor, Jenine; Mitchell, Rob; Watt, Kerrianne; Furyk, Jeremy; Small, Niall; Lovegrove, Leone; Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Emergency departments see an increase in cases during cyclones. The aim of this study is to describe patient presentations to the Emergency Department (ED) of a tertiary level hospital (Townsville) following a tropical cyclone (Yasi). Specific areas of focus include changes in: patient demographics (age and gender), triage categories, and classification of diseases. Methods Data were extracted from the Townsville Hospitals ED information system (EDIS) for three periods in 2009, 2010 and 2011 to coincide with formation of Cyclone Yasi (31 January 2011) to six days after Yasi crossed the coast line (8 February 2012). The analysis explored the changes in ICD10-AM 4-character classification and presented at the Chapter level. Results There was a marked increase in the number of patients attending the ED during Yasi, particularly those aged over 65 years with a maximum daily attendance of 372 patients on 4 Feb 2011. The most marked increases were in: Triage categories - 4 and 5; and ICD categories - diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (L00-L99), and factors influencing health care status (Z00-Z99). The most common diagnostic presentation across all years was injury (S00-T98). Discussion There was an increase in presentations to the ED of TTH, which peaked in the first 24 – 48 hours following the cyclone and returned to normal over a five-day period. The changes in presentations were mostly an amplification of normal attendance patterns with some altered areas of activity. Injury patterns are similar to overseas experience. PMID:26111010

  2. Funding Research in Emergency Diagnostic Imaging: Summary of a Panel Discussion at the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Cherney, Alan R; Marin, Jennifer R; Brown, Jeremy; Anise, Ayodola; Krosnick, Steven; Henriksen, Kerm; Lewis, Roger J; Mills, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    As part of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization," a panel of representatives from the National Institute of Health's Office of Emergency Care Research, the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute was assembled to discuss future opportunities for funding research in this particular area of interest. Representatives from these agencies and organizations discussed their missions and priorities and how they distribute funding. They also addressed questions on mechanisms for new and established researchers to secure future funding. PMID:26567519

  3. Funding Research in Emergency Diagnostic Imaging: Summary of a Panel Discussion at the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Cherney, Alan R; Marin, Jennifer R; Brown, Jeremy; Anise, Ayodola; Krosnick, Steven; Henriksen, Kerm; Lewis, Roger J; Mills, Angela M

    2015-12-01

    As part of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization," a panel of representatives from the National Institute of Health's Office of Emergency Care Research, the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute was assembled to discuss future opportunities for funding research in this particular area of interest. Representatives from these agencies and organizations discussed their missions and priorities and how they distribute funding. They also addressed questions on mechanisms for new and established researchers to secure future funding.

  4. An organizational metamodel for hospital emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Kaptan, Kubilay

    2014-10-01

    I introduce an organizational model describing the response of the hospital emergency department. The hybrid simulation/analytical model (called a "metamodel") can estimate a hospital's capacity and dynamic response in real time and incorporate the influence of damage to structural and nonstructural components on the organizational ones. The waiting time is the main parameter of response and is used to evaluate the disaster resilience of health care facilities. Waiting time behavior is described by using a double exponential function and its parameters are calibrated based on simulated data. The metamodel covers a large range of hospital configurations and takes into account hospital resources in terms of staff and infrastructures, operational efficiency, and the possible existence of an emergency plan; maximum capacity; and behavior both in saturated and overcapacitated conditions. The sensitivity of the model to different arrival rates, hospital configurations, and capacities and the technical and organizational policies applied during and before a disaster were investigated. This model becomes an important tool in the decision process either for the engineering profession or for policy makers. PMID:25397658

  5. Palliative Care in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Mierendorf, Susanne M; Gidvani, Vinita

    2014-01-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) is the place where people most frequently seek urgent care. For patients living with chronic disease or malignancy who may be in a crisis, this visit may be pivotal in determining the patients’ trajectory. There is a large movement in education of emergency medicine physicians, hospitalists, and intensivists from acute aggressive interventions to patient-goal assessment, recognizing last stages of life and prioritizing symptom management. Although the ED is not considered an ideal place to begin palliative care, hospital-based physicians may assist in eliciting the patient’s goals of care and discussing prognosis and disease trajectory. This may help shift to noncurative treatment. This article will summarize the following: identification of patients who may need palliation, discussing prognosis, eliciting goals of care and directives, symptom management in the ED, and making plans for further care. These efforts have been shown to improve outcomes and to decrease length of stay and cost. The focus of this article is relieving “patient” symptoms and family distress, honoring the patient’s goals of care, and assisting in transition to a noncurative approach and placement where this may be accomplished. PMID:24694318

  6. Public Health, Hypertension, and the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Brody, Aaron; Janke, Alex; Sharma, Vineet; Levy, Phillip

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is the most common cardiovascular disease worldwide and is associated with severe long-term morbidity when not treated appropriately. Despite this, blood pressure (BP) control remains suboptimal, particularly among underserved populations and those who rely on emergency departments (EDs) as a source of primary care. ED providers encounter patients with severely elevated BP daily, and yet adherence to minimal standards of BP reassessment and referral to outpatient medical care, as recommended by the American College of Emergency Physicians, is limited. Barriers such as provider knowledge deficits, resource constraints, and negative attitudes towards patients who utilize EDs for nonurgent complaints are compounded by perceptions of HTN as a condition that can only be addressed in a primary care setting to contribute to this. Efforts to reduce this gap must go beyond government mandates to address systemic issues including access to care and payment models to encourage health promotion. Additionally, individual physician behavior can be shifted through targeted education, financial incentives, and the accumulation of high-quality evidence to encourage more proactive approaches to the management of uncontrolled HTN in the ED. PMID:27165429

  7. Brief Report: Emergency Department Utilization by Individuals with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannuzzi, Dorothea A.; Cheng, Erika R.; Broder-Fingert, Sarabeth; Bauman, Margaret L.

    2015-01-01

    To identify medical problems most commonly presenting to emergency departments among individuals with autism as compared to non-autistic persons across age groups. Data was obtained from the 2010 National Emergency Department database and was analyzed by age categories: 3-5, 6-11, 12-15, 16-18 and 19 years and older. Epilepsy emerged as the…

  8. [Specific training in psychiatry for nurses in general emergency departments].

    PubMed

    Jobelot, Émilie; Pavon, Gabriella

    2014-12-01

    Specific training in psychiatric emergencies is provided in hospitals which receive such cases. What is the situation for the somatic teams? This article presents the experience of Toulouse Purpan Emergency Department with the role of the triage nurse, who constitutes the first contact with the care universe for patients arriving in the emergency department.

  9. When overcrowding paralyzes an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Twanmoh, Joseph R; Cunningham, Gail P

    2006-06-01

    Emergency department overcrowding is a critical problem nation-wide. A survey by the Lewin Group in 2002 found that 90 percent of Level 1 trauma centers and hospitals with more than 300 beds reported being over capacity. Although ED overcrowding has many causes, external factors are most commonly blamed--too many patients, lack of inpatient capacity, inappropriate use of the ED, the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA), lack of primary care availability, and lack of access to health care for the uninsured. In this article, we describe a series of changes that were implemented in the ED of a regional medical center. Those changes improved operational efficiency, expedited patient care, and reduced ED overcrowding. The changes focused on patient input, throughput, and output. In terms of input, we revamped the triage and admission processes. To improve throughput, we modified the physical layout of the urgent care area to maximize efficiency in staff movement and communications, changed staffing patterns to match anticipated patient volume, and revised our policies regarding exchanges with the radiology staff. To facilitate patient flow out of the ED, we identified the causes of delays in discharges and admissions, instituted the practice of flagging the charts of patients ready for discharge, and implemented admission orders to decrease patient waiting times. Improving patient throughput increases ED efficiency, and thus capacity, in terms of the number of patients that can be treated over a given time period, and it promotes the cost-effective use of institutional resources. Decreased waiting times should ultimately lead to increased patient satisfaction and better patient care. PMID:16838886

  10. Physicians in Hospital Emergency Departments. [Proceedings, New Jersey Training Program].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Rockville, MD. Div. of Emergency Health Services.

    This program was organized in response to the rapidly increasing demands placed upon the emergency departments of general hospitals, and in recognition of the fact that the crucial ingredient in emergency department services is physician capability. The training program was implemented for hospital department physicians and other interested…

  11. Reinventing Emergency Department Flow via Healthcare Delivery Science.

    PubMed

    DeFlitch, Christopher; Geeting, Glenn; Paz, Harold L

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare system flow resulting in emergency departments (EDs) crowding is a quality and access problem. This case study examines an overcrowded academic health center ED with increasing patient volumes and limited physical space for expansion. ED capacity and efficiency improved via engineering principles application, addressing patient and staffing flows, and reinventing the delivery model. Using operational data and staff input, patient and staff flow models were created, identifying bottlenecks (points of inefficiency). A new flow model of emergency care delivery, physician-directed queuing, was developed. Expanding upon physicians in triage, providers passively evaluate all patients upon arrival, actively manage patients requiring fewer resources, and direct patients requiring complex resources to further evaluation in ED areas. Sustained over time, ED efficiency improved as measured by near elimination of "left without being seen" patients and waiting times with improvement in door to doctor, patient satisfaction, and total length of stay. All improvements were in the setting on increased patient volume and no increase in physician staffing. Our experience suggests that practical application of healthcare delivery science can be used to improve ED efficiency.

  12. Assessing the Physical Environment of Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Hassan; Javadzadeh, Hamidreza; Hassanpour, Kasra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emergency Department (ED) is considered to be the heart of a hospital. Based on many studies, a well-organized physical environment can enhance efficacy. Objectives: In this study, we aimed to investigate the influence of physical environment in EDs on efficacy. Materials and Methods: This analytical cross-sectional study was conducted via the faculty members of the ED and residents of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected using a predefined questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and ANOVA were used to analyze the data. Results: Sixty-two participants, including 21 females and 41 males, completed the questionnaires. The mean age of the participants was 37 years (SD: 8.42). The mean work experience was 8 years (SD: 4.52) and all the studied variables varied within a range of 3.3 - 4.2. Time indices had the highest mean among variables followed by capacity, work space, treatment units, critical care units and, triage indices, respectively. Conclusions: In general, time indices including length of patient stay in the ED and space capacity, emphasizing the need to address these shortcomings. PMID:26839860

  13. Managing Pediatric Pain in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Benoit; Trottier, Evelyne D

    2016-08-01

    Far more attention is now given to pain management in children in the emergency department (ED). When a child arrives, pain must be recognized and evaluated using a pain scale that is appropriate to the child's development and regularly assessed to determine whether the pain intervention was effective. At triage, both analgesics and non-pharmacological strategies, such as distraction, immobilization, and dressing should be started. For mild pain, oral ibuprofen can be administered if the child has not received it at home, whereas ibuprofen and paracetamol are suitable for moderate pain. For patients who still require pain relief, oral opioids could be considered; however, many EDs have now replaced this with intranasal fentanyl, which allows faster onset of pain relief and can be administered on arrival pending either intravenous access or definitive care. Intravenous opioids are often required for severe pain, and paracetamol or ibuprofen can still be considered for their likely opioid-sparing effects. Specific treatment should be used for patients with migraine. In children requiring intravenous access or venipuncture, non-pharmacological and pharmacological strategies to decrease pain and anxiety associated with needle punctures are mandatory. These strategies can also be used for laceration repairs and other painful procedures. Despite the gaps in knowledge, pain should be treated with the most up-to-date evidence in children seen in EDs. PMID:27260499

  14. Approach to dizziness in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ileok; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Acute dizziness/vertigo is among the most common causes for visiting the emergency department. The traditional approach to dizziness starts with categorizing dizziness into four types: vertigo, presyncope, disequilibrium, and nonspecific dizziness. However, a recently proposed approach begins with classifying dizziness/vertigo as acute prolonged spontaneous dizziness/vertigo, recurrent spontaneous dizziness/vertigo, recurrent positional vertigo, or chronic persistent dizziness and imbalance. Vestibular neuritis and stroke are key disorders causing acute prolonged spontaneous dizziness/vertigo, but the diagnosis of isolated vascular vertigo has increased by virtue of developments in clinical neurotology and neuroimaging. However, a well-organized bedside examination appears more sensitive than brain imaging in diagnosing strokes presenting with acute dizziness/vertigo. A detailed history is vital to diagnose recurrent spontaneous dizziness/vertigo since confirmatory diagnostic tests are usually unavailable. Isolated positional vertigo is usually caused by benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, which can be treated at the bedside. In recent years, marked progress has occurred in the evaluation/management of acute dizziness/vertigo. However, even with developments in imaging technology, the diagnosis of acute dizziness/vertigo largely relies on bedside examination. PMID:27752577

  15. Occupational Burns Treated in Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Reichard, Audrey A.; Konda, Srinivas; Jackson, Larry L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite reported declines, occupational burn injuries remain a workplace safety concern. More severe burns may result in costly medical treatment and long-term physical and psychological consequences. Methods We used the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System—Occupational Supplement to produce national estimates of burns treated in emergency departments (EDs). We analyzed data trends from 1999 to 2008 and provided detailed descriptions of 2008 data. Results From 1999 to 2008 there were 1,132,000 (95% CI: ±192,300) nonfatal occupational burns treated in EDs. Burn numbers and rates declined approximately 40% over the 10 years. In 2008, men and younger workers 15–24 years old had the highest rates. Scalds and thermal burns accounted for more than 60% of burns. Accommodation and food service, manufacturing, and construction industries had the largest number of burns. Conclusions Despite declining burn rates, emphasis is needed on reducing burn hazards to young food service workers and using job specific hazard analyses to prevent burns. PMID:25678457

  16. Overcrowding in emergency department: an international issue.

    PubMed

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Paladino, Lorenzo; Vaughan, Louella; Lalle, Irene; Magrini, Laura; Magnanti, Massimo

    2015-03-01

    Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) has become an increasingly significant worldwide public health problem in the last decade. It is a consequence of simultaneous increasing demand for health care and a deficit in available hospital beds and ED beds, as for example it occurs in mass casualty incidents, but also in other conditions causing a shortage of hospital beds. In Italy in the last 12-15 years, there has been a huge increase in the activity of the ED, and several possible interventions, with specific organizational procedures, have been proposed. In 2004 in the United Kingdom, the rule that 98 % of ED patients should be seen and then admitted or discharged within 4 h of presentation to the ED ('4 h rule') was introduced, and it has been shown to be very effective in decreasing ED crowding, and has led to the development of further acute care clinical indicators. This manuscript represents a synopsis of the lectures on overcrowding problems in the ED of the Third Italian GREAT Network Congress, held in Rome, 15-19 October 2012, and hopefully, they may provide valuable contributions in the understanding of ED crowding solutions. PMID:25446540

  17. Overcrowding in emergency department: an international issue.

    PubMed

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Paladino, Lorenzo; Vaughan, Louella; Lalle, Irene; Magrini, Laura; Magnanti, Massimo

    2015-03-01

    Overcrowding in the emergency department (ED) has become an increasingly significant worldwide public health problem in the last decade. It is a consequence of simultaneous increasing demand for health care and a deficit in available hospital beds and ED beds, as for example it occurs in mass casualty incidents, but also in other conditions causing a shortage of hospital beds. In Italy in the last 12-15 years, there has been a huge increase in the activity of the ED, and several possible interventions, with specific organizational procedures, have been proposed. In 2004 in the United Kingdom, the rule that 98 % of ED patients should be seen and then admitted or discharged within 4 h of presentation to the ED ('4 h rule') was introduced, and it has been shown to be very effective in decreasing ED crowding, and has led to the development of further acute care clinical indicators. This manuscript represents a synopsis of the lectures on overcrowding problems in the ED of the Third Italian GREAT Network Congress, held in Rome, 15-19 October 2012, and hopefully, they may provide valuable contributions in the understanding of ED crowding solutions.

  18. 34 CFR 648.61 - How must the academic department supervise the training of fellows?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must the academic department supervise the training... academic department supervise the training of fellows? The institution shall provide to fellows at least one academic year of supervised training in instruction at the graduate or undergraduate level at...

  19. 34 CFR 648.61 - How must the academic department supervise the training of fellows?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How must the academic department supervise the training... academic department supervise the training of fellows? The institution shall provide to fellows at least one academic year of supervised training in instruction at the graduate or undergraduate level at...

  20. Hospital and emergency department crowding in the United States.

    PubMed

    Schafermeyer, Robert W; Asplin, Brent R

    2003-02-01

    Every emergency physician in the United States and, for that matter, in many countries around the world recognizes that the demand for timely access to quality emergency care is one that patients highly value. Unfortunately, hospitals in the USA have become stretched beyond capacity, resulting in overloaded emergency departments, diverted ambulances, and greater risks for patients and providers. Some of the causes and consequences of emergency department crowding are unique to the USA health care system, while others are common to countries throughout the world. The goals for this paper are to provide a brief overview of hospital and emergency department crowding in the USA, to identify commonly cited causes of the problem, and to outline future directions in the search for solutions. A large number of hospitals, inpatient beds, and emergency departments have closed during the past 10 years in the USA. In 1992 there were around 6000 hospitals with emergency departments and there are now less than 4000. While hospitals scrambled to decrease an excess supply of inpatient beds, the demand for emergency department care steadily rose. Between 1992 and 2000, the annual number of emergency department visits in the USA increased from 89.8 to 108 million. While some areas of the USA have been affected more seriously than others (particularly the coasts), almost every state has reported problems with boarding of inpatients in the emergency department. Inpatient boarding is the most frequently cited reason for emergency department crowding within the emergency medicine community. United States hospitals are also struggling with a shortage of health care professionals, particularly registered nurses. There are several policy issues that must be addressed to alleviate hospital and emergency department crowding over the long term. We list these as 'long-term' goals simply because policy changes, in the USA, are often incremental and rarely occur quickly. In order to achieve any

  1. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Graham; Marshall, Trudi; Ritchie, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Changing global demography is resulting in older people presenting to emergency departments (EDs) in greater numbers than ever before. They present with greater urgency and are more likely to be admitted to hospital or re-attend and utilize greater resources. They experience longer waits for care and are less likely to be satisfied with their experiences. Not only that, but older people suffer poorer health outcomes after ED attendance, with higher mortality rates and greater dependence in activities of daily living or rates of admission to nursing homes. Older people’s assessment and management in the ED can be complex, time consuming, and require specialist skills. The interplay of multiple comorbidities and functional decline result in the complex state of frailty that can predispose to poor health outcomes and greater care needs. Older people with frailty may present to services in an atypical fashion requiring detailed, multidimensional, and increasingly multidisciplinary care to provide the correct diagnosis and management as well as appropriate placement for ongoing care or admission avoidance. Specific challenges such as delirium, functional decline, or carer strain need to be screened for and managed appropriately. Identifying patients with specific frailty syndromes can be critical to identifying those at highest risk of poor outcomes and most likely to benefit from further specialist interventions. Models of care are evolving that aim to deliver multidimensional assessment and management by multidisciplinary specialist care teams (comprehensive geriatric assessment). Increasingly, these models are demonstrating improved outcomes, including admission avoidance or reduced death and dependence. Delivering this in the ED is an evolving area of practice that adapts the principles of geriatric medicine for the urgent-care environment. PMID:25473275

  2. Measuring Social Contacts in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Lowery-North, Douglas W.; Hertzberg, Vicki Stover; Elon, Lisa; Cotsonis, George; Hilton, Sarah A.; Vaughns, Christopher F.; Hill, Eric; Shrestha, Alok; Jo, Alexandria; Adams, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious individuals in an emergency department (ED) bring substantial risks of cross infection. Data about the complex social and spatial structure of interpersonal contacts in the ED will aid construction of biologically plausible transmission risk models that can guide cross infection control. Methods and Findings We sought to determine the number and duration of contacts among patients and staff in a large, busy ED. This prospective study was conducted between 1 July 2009 and 30 June 2010. Two 12-hour shifts per week were randomly selected for study. The study was conducted in the ED of an urban hospital. There were 81 shifts in the planned random sample of 104 (78%) with usable contact data, during which there were 9183 patient encounters. Of these, 6062 (66%) were approached to participate, of which 4732 (78%) agreed. Over the course of the year, 88 staff members participated (84%). A radiofrequency identification (RFID) system was installed and the ED divided into 89 distinct zones structured so copresence of two individuals in any zone implied a very high probability of contact <1 meter apart in space. During study observation periods, patients and staff were given RFID tags to wear. Contact events were recorded. These were further broken down with respect to the nature of the contacts, i.e., patient with patient, patient with staff, and staff with staff. 293,171 contact events were recorded, with a median of 22 contact events and 9 contacts with distinct individuals per participant per shift. Staff-staff interactions were more numerous and longer than patient-patient or patient-staff interactions. Conclusions We used RFID to quantify contacts between patients and staff in a busy ED. These results are useful for studies of the spread of infections. By understanding contact patterns most important in potential transmission, more effective prevention strategies may be implemented. PMID:23990915

  3. Inside the "Turris Eburnea": Entrepreneurial Scientists Emerging from Academic Hierarchies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peruta, Maria Rosaria Della

    2008-01-01

    Why do inventors and top scientists from leading universities exploit their research results differently from others? Why do apparently similar laboratory experiences make "academic entrepreneurs" achieve different entrepreneurial goals? Does the academic experience have an influence on the willingness to spin off? Or is that willingness simply…

  4. Death of a child in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Patricia J; Barata, Isabel A; Snow, Sally K

    2014-07-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Emergency Physicians, and Emergency Nurses Association have collaborated to identify practices and principles to guide the care of children, families, and staff in the challenging and uncommon event of the death of a child in the emergency department in this policy statement and in an accompanying technical report. PMID:24951421

  5. Death of a child in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Patricia J; Barata, Isabel A; Snow, Sally K

    2014-07-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics, American College of Emergency Physicians, and Emergency Nurses Association have collaborated to identify practices and principles to guide the care of children, families, and staff in the challenging and uncommon event of the death of a child in the emergency department in this policy statement and in an accompanying technical report. PMID:24998713

  6. Emergency Department Treatment of the Mechanically Ventilated Patient.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Rory; Mallemat, Haney

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical ventilation has a long and storied history, but until recently the process required little from the emergency physician. In the modern emergency department, critically ill patients spend a longer period under the care of the emergency physician, requiring a greater understanding of ventilator management. This article serves as an introduction to mechanical ventilation and a user-friendly bedside guide.

  7. An Emerging Typology of Academic Interdisciplinary Gerontology Centers in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertz, Judith E.; Douglass, Carolinda; Johnson, Angela; Richmond, Shirley S.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the organization, characteristics or services offered by academic interdisciplinary gerontology centers located in higher education institutions. This article presents a description and an emerging typology of academic interdisciplinary gerontology centers based on information collected from the Websites of 47 centers. The…

  8. [Position paper for a reform of medical emergency care in German emergency departments].

    PubMed

    Riessen, R; Gries, A; Seekamp, A; Dodt, C; Kumle, B; Busch, H-J

    2015-06-01

    The hospital emergency departments play a central role for the in- and outpatient care of patients with medical emergencies in Germany. In this position paper we point out some general financial and organizational problems of German emergency departments and urge for a higher significance of emergency care in the German health system as an element of public services. The corresponding reform proposals include a change in hospital financing towards a more budget-based system for the emergency departments, an improved structural planning for regional and transregional emergency care, an intensified cooperation with the emergency services of the ambulatory care physicians, a better organizational representation of emergency care within the hospitals and an advancement of emergency medicine in postgraduate medical education.

  9. [Position paper for a reform of medical emergency care in German emergency departments].

    PubMed

    Riessen, R; Gries, A; Seekamp, A; Dodt, C; Kumle, B; Busch, H-J

    2015-06-01

    The hospital emergency departments play a central role for the in- and outpatient care of patients with medical emergencies in Germany. In this position paper we point out some general financial and organizational problems of German emergency departments and urge for a higher significance of emergency care in the German health system as an element of public services. The corresponding reform proposals include a change in hospital financing towards a more budget-based system for the emergency departments, an improved structural planning for regional and transregional emergency care, an intensified cooperation with the emergency services of the ambulatory care physicians, a better organizational representation of emergency care within the hospitals and an advancement of emergency medicine in postgraduate medical education. PMID:26024948

  10. Physician assistants in Australasian emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Close, Benjamin; Zolcinski, Robert

    2016-08-01

    A physician assistant (PA) is a university qualified health professional who's primary role is to provide medical care under the direction and supervision of medical staff. This is a new profession in Australasia. The PA is well suited to working in both rural, regional and urban settings that deliver emergency medical care. A perspective is presented on their role and scope of practice within the Australasian emergency care system supported by some early findings from their use in a tertiary ED.

  11. A subtle mimicker in emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Angelis, Maria Vittoria De; Giacomo, Roberta Di; Muzio, Antonio Di; Onofrj, Marco; Bonanni, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Movement disorder emergencies include any movement disorder which develops over hours to days, in which failure to appropriately diagnose and manage can result in patient morbidity or mortality. Movement disorder emergencies include acute dystonia: sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements. Acute dystonia is a serious challenge for emergency room doctors and neurologists, because of the high probability of misdiagnosis, due to the presence of several mimickers including partial seizures, meningitis, localized tetanus, serum electrolyte level abnormalities, strychnine poisoning, angioedema, malingering, catatonia, and conversion. Methods: We describe 2 examples, accompanied by videos, of acute drug-induced oro-mandibular dystonia, both subsequent to occasional haloperidol intake. Results: Management and treatment of this movement disorder are often difficult: neuroleptics withdrawal, treatment with benzodiazepines, and anticholinergics are recommended. Conclusion: Alternative treatment options are also discussed. PMID:27741141

  12. The Role of Context in Academic Capitalism: The Industry-Friendly Department Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    This study shows a case of a department heavily involved in industry-academia collaborations and patenting activities while exhibiting high levels of academic norms such as teaching, basic research, academic freedom and free dissemination of knowledge. Based on the findings, the author argues that academic capitalism is a highly contextual…

  13. Triage: a working solution to overcrowding in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Chandrakant P.; Carr, Luby M.

    1974-01-01

    Recently, emergency departments across the continent have become crowded with patients requiring non-urgent care. To alleviate this situation at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, receptionists in the emergency department direct patients requiring urgent care to the emergency room and those requiring non-urgent care to a screening clinic (triage). During a two-month period, 13,551 patients visited the emergency department. The triage receptionist sent 8368 patients to the emergency room and 5183 to the screening clinic. About 45% of patients visiting the emergency room had suffered accidents and injuries, and 19% had respiratory illness; 15% of patient visits resulted in admission to hospital. In contrast to this, 49% of patients sent to the screening clinic had respiratory illness and 18% had infective disease; less than 1% of patients needed hospitalization. PMID:4823110

  14. Strategic emergency department design: An approach to capacity planning in healthcare provision in overcrowded emergency rooms.

    PubMed

    Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K; Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios S; Wullschleger, Marcel; Bürki, Leo; Zimmermann, Heinz

    2008-11-17

    Healthcare professionals and the public have increasing concerns about the ability of emergency departments to meet current demands. Increased demand for emergency services, mainly caused by a growing number of minor and moderate injuries has reached crisis proportions, especially in the United Kingdom. Numerous efforts have been made to explore the complex causes because it is becoming more and more important to provide adequate healthcare within tight budgets. Optimisation of patient pathways in the emergency department is therefore an important factor.This paper explores the possibilities offered by dynamic simulation tools to improve patient pathways using the emergency department of a busy university teaching hospital in Switzerland as an example.

  15. Time series modelling and forecasting of emergency department overcrowding.

    PubMed

    Kadri, Farid; Harrou, Fouzi; Chaabane, Sondès; Tahon, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Efficient management of patient flow (demand) in emergency departments (EDs) has become an urgent issue for many hospital administrations. Today, more and more attention is being paid to hospital management systems to optimally manage patient flow and to improve management strategies, efficiency and safety in such establishments. To this end, EDs require significant human and material resources, but unfortunately these are limited. Within such a framework, the ability to accurately forecast demand in emergency departments has considerable implications for hospitals to improve resource allocation and strategic planning. The aim of this study was to develop models for forecasting daily attendances at the hospital emergency department in Lille, France. The study demonstrates how time-series analysis can be used to forecast, at least in the short term, demand for emergency services in a hospital emergency department. The forecasts were based on daily patient attendances at the paediatric emergency department in Lille regional hospital centre, France, from January 2012 to December 2012. An autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) method was applied separately to each of the two GEMSA categories and total patient attendances. Time-series analysis was shown to provide a useful, readily available tool for forecasting emergency department demand. PMID:25053208

  16. Noise in the adult emergency department of Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Douglas; Busch-Vishniac, Ilene J; West, James E

    2007-04-01

    While hospitals are generally noisy environments, nowhere is the pandemonium greater than in an emergency department, where there is constant flow of patients, doctors, nurses, and moving equipment. In this noise study we collected 24 h measurements throughout the adult emergency department of Johns Hopkins Hospital, the top ranked hospital in the U.S. for 16 years running. The equivalent sound pressure level (Leq) throughout the emergency department is about 5 dB(A) higher than that measured previously at a variety of in-patient units of the same hospital. Within the emergency department the triage area at the entrance to the department has the highest Leq, ranging from 65 to 73 dB(A). Sound levels in the emergency department are sufficiently high [on average between 61 and 69 dB(A)] to raise concerns regarding the communication of speech without errors--an important issue everywhere in a hospital and a critical issue in emergency departments because doctors and nurses frequently need to work at an urgent pace and to rely on oral communication.

  17. Emergency Point-of-Care Ultrasound Detection of Papilledema in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yakov, Maxim; Desjardins, Marie-Pier; Fischer, Jason W J

    2015-11-01

    The application of emergency point-of-care ultrasound has been expanding in pediatric emergency medicine for a decade. In this case series, we describe the detection of papilledema in patients presenting to the pediatric emergency department using this technology and its potential impact on their clinical care. PMID:26535499

  18. Profiles of Emergent Literacy Skills among Preschool Children Who Are at Risk for Academic Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabell, Sonia Q.; Justice, Laura M.; Konold, Timothy R.; McGinty, Anita S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore patterns of within-group variability in the emergent literacy skills of preschoolers who are at risk for academic difficulties. We used the person-centered approach of cluster analysis to identify profiles of emergent literacy skills, taking into account both oral language and code-related skills.…

  19. Asthma-related emergency department use: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laurie H; Chambers, Patricia; Dexheimer, Judith W

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic pediatric diseases. Patients with asthma often present to the emergency department for treatment for acute exacerbations. These patients may not have a primary care physician or primary care home, and thus are seeking care in the emergency department. Asthma care in the emergency department is multifaceted to treat asthma patients appropriately and provide quality care. National and international guidelines exist to help drive clinical care. Electronic and paper-based tools exist for both physicians and patients to help improve emergency, home, and preventive care. Treatment of patients with asthma should include the acute exacerbation, long-term management of controller medications, and controlling triggers in the home environment. We will address the current state of asthma research in emergency medicine in the US, and discuss some of the resources being used to help provide a medical home and improve care for patients who suffer from acute asthma exacerbations. PMID:27471415

  20. Asthma-related emergency department use: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Laurie H; Chambers, Patricia; Dexheimer, Judith W

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common chronic pediatric diseases. Patients with asthma often present to the emergency department for treatment for acute exacerbations. These patients may not have a primary care physician or primary care home, and thus are seeking care in the emergency department. Asthma care in the emergency department is multifaceted to treat asthma patients appropriately and provide quality care. National and international guidelines exist to help drive clinical care. Electronic and paper-based tools exist for both physicians and patients to help improve emergency, home, and preventive care. Treatment of patients with asthma should include the acute exacerbation, long-term management of controller medications, and controlling triggers in the home environment. We will address the current state of asthma research in emergency medicine in the US, and discuss some of the resources being used to help provide a medical home and improve care for patients who suffer from acute asthma exacerbations. PMID:27471415

  1. Women Leaders' Construction of Leadership and Management of the Academic Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zulu, C. B.

    2011-01-01

    Research on women in leadership has received growing attention in recent years. But not enough studies have investigated the way women construct leadership and management of the academic department. This article reports on the findings of an inquiry into the experiences of women heads of academic departments (HoDs) at universities in South Africa…

  2. Improving emergency department flow through Rapid Medical Evaluation unit.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Lucas; Josephson, Timothy; Bates, Kathy; Kuipers, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    The Toronto Western Hospital is an academic hospital in Toronto, Canada, with an annual Emergency Department (ED) volume of 64,000 patients. Despite increases in patient volumes of almost six percent per annum over the last decade, there have been no commensurate increases in resources, infrastructure, and staffing. This has led to substantial increase in patient wait times, most specifically for those patients with lower acuity presentations. Despite requiring only minimal care, these patients contribute disproportionately to ED congestion, which can adversely impact resource utilization and quality of care for all patients. We undertook a retrospective evaluation of a quality improvement initiative aimed at improving wait times experienced by patients with lower acuity presentations. A rapid improvement event was organized by frontline workers to rapidly overhaul processes of care, leading to the creation of the Rapid Medical Evaluation (RME) unit - a new pathway of care for patients with lower acuity presentations. The RME unit was designed by re-purposing existing resources and re-assigning one physician and one nurse towards the specific care of these patients. We evaluated the performance of the RME unit through measurement of physician initial assessment (PIA) times and total length of stay (LOS) times for multiple groups of patients assigned to various ED care pathways, during three periods lasting three months each. Weekly measurements of mean and 90th percentile of PIA and LOS times showed special cause variation in all targeted patient groups. Of note, the patients seen in the RME unit saw their median PIA and LOS times decrease from 98min to 70min and from 165min to 130min, respectively, from baseline. Despite ever-growing numbers of patient visits, wait times for all patients with lower acuity presentations remained low, and wait times of patients with higher acuity presentations assigned to other ED care pathways were not adversely affected. By

  3. Assuring Quality Health Care in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Letvak, Susan; Rhew, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The provision of quality healthcare is an international mandate. The provision of quality healthcare for mental health patients poses unique challenges. Nowhere is this challenge greater than in the emergency department. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe evidence-based initiatives for improving the quality of care of mental health patients in the emergency department. Specifically, the use of telepsychiatry and reducing provider biases will be presented. PMID:27417792

  4. Management of migraine headache in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Carrie E; Black, David F; Swanson, Jerry W

    2010-04-01

    Headache is one of the more common reasons for adults to visit an emergency department. Most of these visits are for primary headache disorders, most commonly migraine headache. The authors discuss management options for patients presenting to the emergency department with prolonged, severe, or refractory migraine headaches. Particular attention is given to parenteral treatments and protocols that would not be options as an outpatient. The epidemiology, investigation, and outpatient management of migraine headache are discussed in other articles in this issue. PMID:20352590

  5. Emergent-Collaboration in Web-Supported Academic Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nachmias, R.; Mioduser, D.; Oren, A.; Ram, J.

    Emergent-collaboration is the process by which group configurations and transactional patterns evolve among participants during the course of learning. This study focused on the integration of a Web shell for supporting emergent-collaboration activities in 6 graduate courses (115 students) in the Tel-Aviv University School of Education. The…

  6. Survey of directors of emergency departments in California on overcrowding

    PubMed Central

    Richards, John R; Navarro, Misty L; Derlet, Robert W

    2000-01-01

    Objective To survey the directors of emergency departments in California on their opinions of the extent and factors associated with overcrowding in emergency departments. Methods Surveys were mailed to a random sample of emergency department directors. Questions included estimated magnitude, frequency, causes, and effects of overcrowding. Results Of 160 directors surveyed, 113 (71%) responded, and 109 (96%) reported overcrowding as a problem. All (n = 21) university or county hospital directors and most (n = 88 [96%]) private or community hospital directors reported overcrowding. The 4 private or community hospital directors reporting no overcrowding serve smaller communities with populations less than 250,000. Thirty-two directors (28%) reported daily overcrowding. The most cited causes were increasing patient acuity and volume, hospital bed shortage, laboratory delays, and nursing shortage. These putative causes were similar between university or county and private or community hospital directors, except for consultant delays, which were more prevalent in university or county hospital emergency departments. Conclusions Overcrowding is perceived to be a serious problem by emergency department directors. Many factors may contribute to overcrowding, and most are beyond the control of emergency departments. PMID:10854386

  7. [The nurse consultation in a Swiss university paediatric emergency department].

    PubMed

    Yersin, Corinne; Hemme, Denis; Gehri, Mario; Pittet, Anne; Rey-Bellet Gasser, Céline

    2015-01-01

    In Switzerland, overcrowding in tertiary emergency departments is a frequent problem, resulting in lengthy waiting times, lower satisfaction on the part of families and a risk for patient's safety. The setting up of a nurse consultation in a university paediatric emergency centre has helped to improve the quality of care in this context. PMID:26573404

  8. Electrocardiographic findings in Emergency Department patients with pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Richman, Peter B; Loutfi, Hassan; Lester, Steven J; Cambell, Patricia; Matthews, Jessica; Friese, Jeremy; Wood, Joseph; Kasper, David; Chen, Frederick; Mandell, Mark

    2004-08-01

    To assess the pre-study, null hypothesis that there is no difference in the electrocardiogram (EKG) findings for Emergency Department (ED) patients who rule in vs. rule out for suspected pulmonary embolism, a retrospective review of a cohort of patients with pulmonary embolism and their controls was conducted in an academic, suburban ED. Patients who were evaluated in the ED during a one-year study period for symptoms suggestive of pulmonary embolism were eligible for inclusion. All patients with pulmonary embolism and sex- and age-matched controls comprised the final study groups. Two board-certified cardiologists reviewed each patient's EKG. There were 350 eligible patients identified; 49 patients with pulmonary embolism and 49 controls were entered into the study. The most common rhythm observed in both groups was normal sinus rhythm (67.3% cases vs. 68.6 % controls; p = 1.0). Abnormalities believed to be associated with pulmonary embolism occurred with similar frequency in both case and control groups (sinus tachycardia [18.8 % vs. 11.8%, respectively; p = 0.40]), incomplete right bundle branch block (4.2% vs. 0.0%, respectively; p = 0.24), complete right bundle branch block (4.2% vs. 6.0, respectively; p = 1.0), S1Q3T3 pattern (2.1 vs. 0.0, respectively; p = 0.49), S1Q3 pattern (0.0 vs. 0.0), and extreme right axis (0.0 vs. 0.0). New EKG changes were identified more frequently for patients with pulmonary embolism (33.3% vs. 12.5% controls; p = 0.03), but specific findings were rarely different between cases and controls. In our cohort of ED patients, we did not identify EKG features that are likely to help distinguish patients with pulmonary embolism from those who rule out for the disease.

  9. Improving Emergency Department flow through optimized bed utilization

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Lucas Brien; Simoes, Licinia; Kuipers, Meredith; McGovern, Barb

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, patient volumes in the emergency department (ED) have grown disproportionately compared to the increase in staffing and resources at the Toronto Western Hospital, an academic tertiary care centre in Toronto, Canada. The resultant congestion has spilled over to the ED waiting room, where medically undifferentiated and potentially unstable patients must wait until a bed becomes available. The aim of this quality improvement project was to decrease the 90th percentile of wait time between triage and bed assignment (time-to-bed) by half, from 120 to 60 minutes, for our highest acuity patients. We engaged key stakeholders to identify barriers and potential strategies to achieve optimal flow of patients into the ED. We first identified multiple flow-interrupting challenges, including operational bottlenecks and cultural issues. We then generated change ideas to address two main underlying causes of ED congestion: unnecessary patient utilization of ED beds and communication breakdown causing bed turnaround delays. We subsequently performed seven tests of change through sequential plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles. The most significant gains were made by improving communication strategies: small gains were achieved through the optimization of in-house digital information management systems, while significant improvements were achieved through the implementation of a low-tech direct contact mechanism (a two-way radio or walkie-talkie). In the post-intervention phase, time-to-bed for the 90th percentile of high-acuity patients decreased from 120 minutes to 66 minutes, with special cause variation showing a significant shift in the weekly measurements. PMID:27752312

  10. Academic versus Non-Academic Emerging Adult College Student Technology Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Joan Ann; Walker, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Emerging adult college students have developmental and educational needs which are unique to their phase of life. Emerging adults are also increasingly identified by their technology use and practices. Collegiate instructors will be better equipped for educating these individuals when armed with insights concerning emerging adults' technology…

  11. Executive summary: interventions to improve quality in the crowded emergency department.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; McCarthy, Melissa L

    2011-12-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding is a major public health problem in the United States, with increasing numbers of ED visits, longer lengths of stay in the ED, and the common practice of ED boarding. In the next several years, several measures of ED crowding will be assessed and reported on government websites. In addition, with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), millions more Americans will have health care insurance, many of whom will choose the ED for their care. In June 2011, a consensus conference was conducted in Boston, Massachusetts, by the journal Academic Emergency Medicine entitled "Interventions to Assure Quality in the Crowded Emergency Department." The overall goal of the conference was to develop a series of research agendas to identify promising interventions to safeguard the quality of emergency care during crowded periods and to reduce ED crowding altogether through systemwide solutions. This was achieved through three objectives: 1) a review of interventions that have been implemented to reduce crowding and summarize the evidence of their effectiveness on the delivery of emergency care; 2) to identify strategies within or outside of the health care setting (i.e., policy, engineering, operations management, system design) that may help reduce crowding or improve the quality of emergency care provided during episodes of ED crowding; and 3) to identify the most appropriate design and analytic techniques for rigorously evaluating ED interventions designed to reduce crowding or improve the quality of emergency care provided during episodes of ED crowding. This article describes the background and rationale for the conference and highlights some of the discussions that occurred on the day of the conference. A series of manuscripts on the details of the conference is presented in this issue of Academic Emergency Medicine.

  12. Evolving prehospital, emergency department, and "inpatient" management models for geriatric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Christopher R; Platts-Mills, Timothy F

    2013-02-01

    Alternative management methods are essential to ensure high-quality and efficient emergency care for the growing number of geriatric adults worldwide. Protocols to support early condition-specific treatment of older adults with acute severe illness and injury are needed. Improved emergency department care for older adults will require providers to address the influence of other factors on the patient's health. This article describes recent and ongoing efforts to enhance the quality of emergency care for older adults using alternative management approaches spanning the spectrum from prehospital care, through the emergency department, and into evolving inpatient or outpatient processes of care.

  13. Self-scheduling in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, P G

    1995-02-01

    The primary steps to accomplish successful self-scheduling programs are as follows: 1. An appropriate amount of time must be committed for a trial period; a minimum of 6 months is recommended. In the initial phases of the program, it is important that the manager refrain from intervening in conflict resolution or allowing the staff members to abdicate decision making to management when problems arise. Changes in staff attitudes to assume responsibility for unit coverage emerge, in part, as a result of observing the consequences when it is not done. 2. At least 1 year, and often almost 2 years, are required to achieve smooth-flowing systems. 3. Time is needed for the staff members to become proficient in negotiation. The key to mutual cooperation is that everyone eventually experiences a need for a change in his or her particular schedule. The staff may need assistance in learning how to perceive possible changes or how to approach others. 4. Problems are usually resolved by staff-suggested rule additions or modifications. Rules can be used to help enforce consideration and fairness, but a noncompliant person may need individual attention. PMID:7776585

  14. Factors influencing adherence to an emergency department national protocol.

    PubMed

    Ebben, Remco H A; Vloet, Lilian C M; de Groot, Joke Mintjes; van Achterberg, Theo

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors that influence emergency nurses' adherence to an emergency department national protocol (EDNP). A survey of emergency nurses (n=200) and physicians with medical end responsibility on an emergency department (n=103) was carried out. Emergency nurses' self-reported adherence to the EDNP was 38%, 55% of the nurses and 44% of the physicians were aware of the protocol. Interference with professional autonomy, insufficient organizational support and the EDNP's applicability were indicated as barriers for adherence. The main influencing factor seems awareness. Other factors related to the individual, the organization and to protocol characteristics. Solely disseminating the EDNP is not enough to get the protocol used in clinical practice. PMID:21552130

  15. Emergency department mental health triage consultancy service: a qualitative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wynaden, Dianne; Chapman, Rose; McGowan, Sunita; McDonough, Stuart; Finn, Michael; Hood, Sean

    2003-07-01

    This study evaluated staff perception of a three-month clinical trial of an emergency mental health triage and consultancy service. Eleven night duty emergency department (ED) staff were interviewed on the last night of the trial. Data was analysed according to the standards of qualitative research and through content analysis major themes were identified. Staff-perceived value of the emergency mental health triage and consultancy service to the emergency department was identified under three major themes: "enhancing the quality of service for people requiring psychiatric/psychosocial intervention", "the impact on the ED environment" and "providing education and support". The findings of this study show that ED staff perceived that the emergency mental health triage and consultancy service made a valuable contribution to the overall functioning of the ED. The findings also highlight the advanced practice role undertaken by mental health nurses in the ED.

  16. Academic Risks Associated with Emerging Adults Seeking the College Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strage, Amy; Sorkhabi, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Sadly, data collected from universities across the nation continue to suggest that fully half of the "emerging adults" (Arnett, 2015) who make their way to college will not graduate. This vexing statistic is particularly troublesome because it reflects a tremendous cost--in dollars, in time, and in self-esteem. In this study, we report…

  17. Variation in Readmission Rates by Emergency Departments and Emergency Department Providers Caring for Patients After Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Siddhartha; Lin, Yu-Li; Nattinger, Ann B.; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The role of the emergency department (ED) provider and ED facility in readmissions of recently discharged patients who visit the ED has not been studied. OBJECTIVE To determine the variation in readmission rates by ED facility and ED providers caring for patients after discharge. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study using multilevel, multi-variable models of 100% Texas Medicare claims data from the years 2007 to 2011. SETTING Texas acute-care hospitals and ED facilities. PATIENTS Medicare beneficiaries who visited an ED within 30 days of discharge from a hospital. INTERVENTION None. MEASUREMENT Readmission after an ED visit within 30 days of discharge from an initial hospitalization defined as a hospitalization starting the day of or the day following the ED visit. RESULTS The mean readmission rate following an ED visit was 52.67%. In 2-level models, 14.2% of ED providers readmitted significantly more patients (mean readmission rate of 67.2%) than the mean; 14.7% of ED providers readmitted significantly fewer patients (mean readmission rate of 36.8%) than the mean. After accounting for the ED facility in 3-level models, the variance for the ED providers decreased 65% from 0.2532 to 0.0893. CONCLUSIONS The risk of readmission varies by ED provider caring for patients after discharge. A large part of this variation is explained by the ED facility in which the ED providers practice. Thus, ED provider practices patterns and ED facility systems of care may be a target for interventions to reduce readmissions. PMID:26130443

  18. Rural Emergency Department Staffing and Participation in Emergency Certification and Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Michelle M.; Wholey, Douglas; Moscovice, Ira S.

    2008-01-01

    Context: The practice of emergency medicine presents many challenges in rural areas. Purpose: We describe how rural hospitals nationally are staffing their Emergency Departments (EDs) and explore the participation of rural ED physicians and other health care professionals in selected certification and training programs that teach skills needed to…

  19. 34 CFR 648.60 - When does an academic department make a commitment to a fellow to provide stipend support?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When does an academic department make a commitment to a....60 When does an academic department make a commitment to a fellow to provide stipend support? (a) An academic department makes a commitment to a fellow at any point in his or her graduate study for the...

  20. 34 CFR 648.60 - When does an academic department make a commitment to a fellow to provide stipend support?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When does an academic department make a commitment to a....60 When does an academic department make a commitment to a fellow to provide stipend support? (a) An academic department makes a commitment to a fellow at any point in his or her graduate study for the...

  1. [Vertigo in the Emergency Department: new bedside tests].

    PubMed

    Tamás, T László; Garai, Tibor; Tompos, Tamás; Szirmai, Ágnes

    2016-03-13

    According to international statistics, the first examination of 25% of patients with vertigo is carried out in Emergency Departments. The most important task of the examining physician is to diagnose life threatening pathologic processes. One of the most difficult otoneurological diagnostic challange in Emergency Departments is to differentiate between dangerous posterior scale stroke presenting with isolated vertigo and the benign vestibular neuritis.These two disorders can be safely differentiated using fast, non-invasive, evidence based bedside tests which have been introduced in the past few years. 35% of stroke cases mimicking vestibular neuritis (pseudoneuritis) are misdiagnosed at the Emergency Department, and 40% of these cases develop complications. During the first 48 hours, sensitivity for stroke of the new test that is based on the malfunction of the oculomotor system is better than the diffusion-weighted cranial magnetic resonance imaging. Using special test glasses each component of the new test can be made objective and repeatable.

  2. Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners in Rural Washington Emergency Departments.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Scott C; Hooker, Roderick S

    2016-06-01

    One role of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) is to meet the growing demand for access to rural health care. Critical Access Hospitals, those with less than 25 beds, are usually located in rural communities, often providing continuity of care that clinics cannot deliver. Because little is known about staffing in these small hospital emergency departments, an exploratory study was undertaken using a mixed-methods approach. In Washington State, 18 of the 39 Critical Access Hospitals staff their emergency departments with PAs and NPs. Utilization data were collected through structured interviews by phone or in person on site. Most PAs and NPs lived within the community and staffing tended to be either 24 hours in-house or short notice if they lived or worked nearby. Emergency department visits ranged from 200 to 25,000 per year. All sites were designated level V or IV trauma centers and often managed cardiac events, significant injuries and, in some larger settings, obstetrics. In most instances, PAs were the sole providers in the emergency departments, albeit with physician backup and emergency medical technician support if a surge of emergency cases arose. Two-thirds of the PAs had graduated within the last 5 years. Most preferred the autonomy of the emergency department role and all expressed job satisfaction. Geographically, the more remote a Washington State Critical Access Hospital is, the more likely it will be staffed by PAs/NPs. The diverse utilization of semiautonomous PAs and NPs and their rise in rural hospital employment is a new workforce observation that requires broader investigation.

  3. Donation after cardiac death and the emergency department: ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jeremy R; Schears, Raquel M; Padela, Aasim I

    2014-01-01

    Organ donation after cardiac death (DCD) is increasingly considered as an option to address the shortage of organs available for transplantation, both in the United States and worldwide. The procedures for DCD differ from procedures for donation after brain death and are likely less familiar to emergency physicians (EPs), even as this process is increasingly involving emergency departments (EDs). This article explores the ED operational and ethical issues surrounding this procedure. PMID:24552527

  4. [Usefulness of inflammation and infection biomarkers in the Emergency Department].

    PubMed

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Candel-González, Francisco Javier; González Del Castillo, Juan

    2014-03-01

    Infectious processes account for 10% of patient seen in the emergency department. To administer antibiotics early, and before any other therapeutic-diagnostic decisions (complementary tests, microbiological samples, intensity of hemodynamic support, need for admission, etc.) have direct repercussions on the survival of patients with severe bacterial infections (bacteremia, severe sepsis or septic shock). In this context, the emergency department represents a critical level where the suspicion of infection and it diagnosis is made and treatment is started, and the progression and prognosis will be determined by the speed of this action. However, the clinical manifestations of infectious diseases are often non-specific and variable which makes early recognition of these patients and situations difficult. Inflammation and infection biomarkers have been around for years as helpful tools for improving emergency medical diagnoses and management of infection in the emergency department. The aim of this review is to summarize the published scientific evidence, in order to clarify the existing controversies, comparing the usefulness of the major biomarkers of inflammation and infection. It will alas suggest recommendations for their use in order to improve diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and management of infected patients in the emergency department.

  5. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    PubMed

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective.

  6. ABC estimation of unit costs for emergency department services.

    PubMed

    Holmes, R L; Schroeder, R E

    1996-04-01

    Rapid evolution of the health care industry forces managers to make cost-effective decisions. Typical hospital cost accounting systems do not provide emergency department managers with the information needed, but emergency department settings are so complex and dynamic as to make the more accurate activity-based costing (ABC) system prohibitively expensive. Through judicious use of the available traditional cost accounting information and simple computer spreadsheets. managers may approximate the decision-guiding information that would result from the much more costly and time-consuming implementation of ABC. PMID:10156656

  7. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    PubMed

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective. PMID:26790241

  8. Institutional Struggles for Recognition in the Academic Field: The Case of University Departments in German Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munch, Richard; Baier, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how the application of New Public Management (NPM) and the accompanying rise of academic capitalism in allocating research funds in the German academic field have interacted with a change from federal pluralism to a more stratified system of universities and departments. From this change, a tendency to build cartel-like…

  9. Organizational Learning for Library Enhancements: A Collaborative, Research-Driven Analysis of Academic Department Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Jeffery L.; Dupuis, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a qualitative evaluation methodology of academic departments for library organizational learning and library enhancement planning. This evaluation used campus units' academic program review reports as a data source and employed collaborative content analysis by library liaisons to extract departmental strengths, weaknesses,…

  10. Shared Decision-making in the Emergency Department: Respecting Patient Autonomy When Seconds Count.

    PubMed

    Hess, Erik P; Grudzen, Corita R; Thomson, Richard; Raja, Ali S; Carpenter, Christopher R

    2015-07-01

    Shared decision-making (SDM), a collaborative process in which patients and providers make health care decisions together, taking into account the best scientific evidence available, as well as the patient's values and preferences, is being increasingly advocated as the optimal approach to decision-making for many health care decisions. The rapidly paced and often chaotic environment of the emergency department (ED), however, is a unique clinical setting that offers many practical and contextual challenges. Despite these challenges, in a recent survey emergency physicians reported there to be more than one reasonable management option for over 50% of their patients and that they take an SDM approach in 58% of such patients. SDM has also been selected as the topic on which to develop a future research agenda at the 2016 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, "Shared Decision-making in the Emergency Department: Development of a Policy-relevant Patient-centered Research Agenda" (http://www.saem.org/annual-meeting/education/2016-aem-consensus-conference). In this paper the authors describe the conceptual model of SDM as originally conceived by Charles and Gafni and highlight aspects of the model relevant to the practice of emergency medicine. In addition, through the use of vignettes from the authors' clinical practices, the applicability of SDM to contemporary EM practice is illustrated and the ethical and pragmatic implications of taking an SDM approach are explored. It is hoped that this document will be read in advance of the 2016 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, to facilitate group discussions at the conference.

  11. Generational influences in academic emergency medicine: teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology (part I).

    PubMed

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Mills, Angela M; Brunett, Patrick H; Promes, Susan B

    2011-02-01

    For the first time in history, four generations are working together-traditionalists, baby boomers, generation Xers (Gen Xers), and millennials. Members of each generation carry with them a unique perspective of the world and interact differently with those around them. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic emergency medicine (EM). Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can help address some common issues encountered in academic EM. Through recognition of the unique characteristics of each of the generations with respect to teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology, academicians have the opportunity to strategically optimize interactions with one another. PMID:21314779

  12. Generational Influences in Academic Emergency Medicine: Teaching and Learning, Mentoring, and Technology (Part I)

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Nicholas M.; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Mills, Angela M.; Brunett, Patrick H.; Promes, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time in history, four generations are working together – Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers, and Millennials. Members of each generation carry with them a unique perspective of the world and interact differently with those around them. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic emergency medicine (EM). Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can help address some common issues encountered in academic EM. Through recognition of the unique characteristics of each of the generations with respect to teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology, academicians have the opportunity to strategically optimize interactions with one another. PMID:21314779

  13. The Peregrinating Psychiatric Patient in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Scott A.; Pasic, Jagoda

    2016-01-01

    Many emergency department (ED) psychiatric patients present after traveling. Although such travel, or peregrination, has long been associated with factitious disorder, other diagnoses are more common among travelers, including psychotic disorders, personality disorders, and substance abuse. Travelers’ intense psychopathology, disrupted social networks, lack of collateral informants, and unawareness of local resources complicate treatment. These patients can consume disproportionate time and resources from emergency providers. We review the literature on the emergency psychiatric treatment of peregrinating patients and use case examples to illustrate common presentations and treatment strategies. Difficulties in studying this population and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:27625725

  14. The Peregrinating Psychiatric Patient in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Scott A.; Pasic, Jagoda

    2016-01-01

    Many emergency department (ED) psychiatric patients present after traveling. Although such travel, or peregrination, has long been associated with factitious disorder, other diagnoses are more common among travelers, including psychotic disorders, personality disorders, and substance abuse. Travelers’ intense psychopathology, disrupted social networks, lack of collateral informants, and unawareness of local resources complicate treatment. These patients can consume disproportionate time and resources from emergency providers. We review the literature on the emergency psychiatric treatment of peregrinating patients and use case examples to illustrate common presentations and treatment strategies. Difficulties in studying this population and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  15. The Peregrinating Psychiatric Patient in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Scott A; Pasic, Jagoda

    2016-09-01

    Many emergency department (ED) psychiatric patients present after traveling. Although such travel, or peregrination, has long been associated with factitious disorder, other diagnoses are more common among travelers, including psychotic disorders, personality disorders, and substance abuse. Travelers' intense psychopathology, disrupted social networks, lack of collateral informants, and unawareness of local resources complicate treatment. These patients can consume disproportionate time and resources from emergency providers. We review the literature on the emergency psychiatric treatment of peregrinating patients and use case examples to illustrate common presentations and treatment strategies. Difficulties in studying this population and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:27625725

  16. 34 CFR 648.40 - How does an academic department select fellows?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does an academic department select fellows? 648.40 Section 648.40 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION GRADUATE ASSISTANCE IN AREAS OF NATIONAL NEED How Are...

  17. The Market for Academic Knowledge: Its Historical Emergence and Inherent Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weik, Elke

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the discussion about the marketisation of universities by providing a historical perspective. Going back to the time when the market for academic knowledge emerged, I argue that it was created through incorporating a number of inherent tensions that have been, and still are, shaping its development. I show how these…

  18. The Association between Preschool Children's Social Functioning and Their Emergent Academic Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, David H.; Kupersmidt, Janis B.; Voegler-Lee, Mary Ellen; Marshall, Nastassja A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between social functioning and emergent academic development in a sample of 467 preschool children (M=55.9 months old, SD=3.8). Teachers reported on children's aggression, attention problems, and prosocial skills. Preliteracy, language, and early mathematics skills were assessed with standardized tests. Better…

  19. Practical implications of implementing emergency department crowding interventions: summary of a moderated panel.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; Pilgrim, Randy L; Schneider, Sandra M; Siegel, Bruce; Viccellio, Peter

    2011-12-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding continues to be a major public health problem in the United States and around the world. In June 2011, the Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference focused on exploring interventions to alleviate ED crowding and to generate a series of research agendas on the topic. As part of the conference, a panel of leaders in the emergency care community shared their perspectives on emergency care, crowding, and some of the fundamental issues facing emergency care today. The panel participants included Drs. Bruce Siegel, Sandra Schneider, Peter Viccellio, and Randy Pilgrim. The panel was moderated by Dr. Jesse Pines. Dr. Siegel's comments focused on his work on Urgent Matters, which conducted two multihospital collaboratives related to improving ED crowding and disseminating results. Dr. Schneider focused on the future of ED crowding measures, the importance of improving our understanding of ED boarding and its implications, and the need for the specialty of emergency medicine (EM) to move beyond the discussion of unnecessary visits. Dr. Viccellio's comments focused on several areas, including the need for a clear message about unnecessary ED visits by the emergency care community and potential solutions to improve ED crowding. Finally, Dr. Pilgrim focused on the effect of effective leadership and management in crowding interventions and provided several examples of how these considerations directly affected the success or failure of well-constructed ED crowding interventions. This article describes each panelist's comments in detail.

  20. National survey of pediatric services available in US emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Children account for nearly 20% of all US emergency department (ED) visits, yet previous national surveys found that many EDs lack specialized pediatric care. In response, a 2001 joint policy statement recommended resources needed by EDs for effective pediatric emergency care delivery. We sought to update and enhance previous estimates of pediatric services available in US EDs. Methods We administered a telephone survey to a 5% random sample (n = 279) of all US EDs from the 2007 National Emergency Department Inventory-USA. The survey collected data on local capabilities (including typical management of three clinical scenarios) and prevalence of a coordinator for pediatric emergency care. We used descriptive statistics to summarize data. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the association between survey respondent and ED characteristics as well as the presence of a coordinator for pediatric emergency medicine. Results Data were collected from 238 hospitals (85% response rate). A minority of hospitals had pediatric departments (36%) or intensive care units (12%). The median annual number of ED visits by children was 3,870 (interquartile range 1,500–8,800). Ten percent of hospitals had a separate pediatric ED; only 17% had a designated pediatric emergency care coordinator. Significant positive predictors of a coordinator were an ED pediatric visit volume of ≥1 patient per hour and urban location. Most EDs treated only mild-to-moderate cases of childhood bronchiolitis and asthma exacerbation (77% and 65%, respectively). Less than half (48%) of the hospitals reported the ability to surgically manage a child with acute appendicitis. Conclusion We found little change in pediatric emergency services compared to earlier estimates. Our study results suggest a continued need for improvements to ensure access to emergency care for children. PMID:23618163

  1. Emergency department bedside ultrasound diagnosis of retinoblastoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Presley, Bradley C; Flannigan, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    A 30-month-old boy presented to a Haitian emergency department with proptosis, periorbital edema, and progressive blindness. Bedside ultrasound examination revealed bilateral ocular masses with dense calcifications pathognomonic for retinoblastoma. This case illustrates the diagnostic utility of bedside ultrasound for an advanced case of retinoblastoma in a resource-poor setting. Ocular ultrasound technique is also reviewed. PMID:24084617

  2. [Feedback, a pedagogical tool in the emergency department resuscitation room].

    PubMed

    Santos, Olivier; Cerny, Philippe; Guiraudie, Juluette; Spiette, Catherine; Bounes, Vincent; Oliver, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The specific care provided in the emergency department resuscitation room requires a high level of knowledge, skill and competence. The lessons learned methodology is a dynamic approach and an educational tool which promotes the transfer of knowledge and the continuous improvement of the quality and safety of care. PMID:26027182

  3. Race Disparities in Psychiatric Rates in Emergency Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunen, Seth; Niederhauser, Ronda; Smith, Patrick O.; Morris, Jerry A.; Marx, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    Psychiatric diagnoses based on the International Classification of Diseases--Ninth Revision were examined in the medical discharge records of 33,000 emergency department (ED) patients to determine if (a) psychiatric disorders were underdiagnosed, (b) there were race and gender disparities in psychiatric rates, and (c) psychiatric rates varied as a…

  4. Aftercare, Emergency Department Visits, and Readmission in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlisle, Corine E.; Mamdani, Muhammad; Schachar, Russell; To, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Objective: U.S. and Canadian data demonstrate decreasing inpatient days, increasing nonurgent emergency department (ED) visits, and short supply of child psychiatrists. Our study aims to determine whether aftercare reduces ED visits and/or readmission in adolescents with first psychiatric hospitalization. Method: We conducted a population-based…

  5. Factors Associated with Emergency Department Use among the Rural Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Lin; Shah, Manish N.; Veazie, Peter J.; Friedman, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Context: Emergency Department (ED) use among the rural elderly may present a different pattern from the urban elderly, thus requiring different policy initiatives. However, ED use among the rural elderly has seldom been studied and is little understood. Purpose: To characterize factors associated with having any versus no ED use among the rural…

  6. Models of emergency departments for reducing patient waiting times.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Marek; McLeod, Robert D; Friesen, Marcia R; Podaima, Blake W; Alfa, Attahiru S

    2009-07-02

    In this paper, we apply both agent-based models and queuing models to investigate patient access and patient flow through emergency departments. The objective of this work is to gain insights into the comparative contributions and limitations of these complementary techniques, in their ability to contribute empirical input into healthcare policy and practice guidelines. The models were developed independently, with a view to compare their suitability to emergency department simulation. The current models implement relatively simple general scenarios, and rely on a combination of simulated and real data to simulate patient flow in a single emergency department or in multiple interacting emergency departments. In addition, several concepts from telecommunications engineering are translated into this modeling context. The framework of multiple-priority queue systems and the genetic programming paradigm of evolutionary machine learning are applied as a means of forecasting patient wait times and as a means of evolving healthcare policy, respectively. The models' utility lies in their ability to provide qualitative insights into the relative sensitivities and impacts of model input parameters, to illuminate scenarios worthy of more complex investigation, and to iteratively validate the models as they continue to be refined and extended. The paper discusses future efforts to refine, extend, and validate the models with more data and real data relative to physical (spatial-topographical) and social inputs (staffing, patient care models, etc.). Real data obtained through proximity location and tracking system technologies is one example discussed.

  7. Development and Testing of Emergency Department Patient Transfer Communication Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Communication problems are a major contributing factor to adverse events in hospitals. The contextual environment in small rural hospitals increases the importance of emergency department (ED) patient transfer communication quality. This study addresses the communication problems through the development and testing of ED quality…

  8. Disentangling the Effect of Education on Emergency Department Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dismuke, Clara, E.; Kunz, F. Michael, Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Since Grossman's seminal paper in 1972, there have been a number of studies concerning the effect of education on health and health care demand. Though several studies have distinguished between preventive and curative care, no study has investigated the effects of general education on the utilization of unnecessary emergency department use. We…

  9. Estimating Uncompensated Care Charges at Rural Hospital Emergency Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Kevin J.; Moore, Charity G.; Probst, Janice C.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rural hospitals face multiple financial burdens. Due to federal law, emergency departments (ED) provide a gateway for uninsured and self-pay patients to gain access to treatment. It is unknown how much uncompensated care in rural hospitals is due to ED visits. Purpose: To develop a national estimate of uncompensated care from patients…

  10. Impact of Emergency Department Intimate Partner Violence Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Jayne; Pelucio, Maria Tereza; Casaletto, Jennifer; Thompson, Karen Parker; Barnes, Sherry; Pettit, Erin; Aldrich, Mae

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study is to assess the impact of emergency department (ED) intimate partner violence (IPV) counseling and resource referrals on patient-perceived safety and safety planning. ED patients with risk factors were offered consultation with trained IPV advocacy counselors who completed safety assessments, provided resource…

  11. The Department of Energy's Emergency Response Support and Logistics Assets

    SciTech Connect

    Robert A. Lambert

    1999-10-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) possesses deployable mechanical, electrical, logistical, and communications assets for supporting emergency response operations in a field environment. These assets are operated and maintained by Bechtel Nevada personnel at the DOE's Remote Sensing Laboratory located in Las Vegas, Nevada

  12. Domestic violence. Incidence and prevalence in a northern emergency department.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jane; Bota, Gary W.; Carter, Mary; Bretzlaff-Michaud, Jennifer A.; Sahai, Vic; Rowe, Brian H.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence and prevalence of domestic violence (DV) against women presenting to emergency departments. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study to determine health status and exposure to DV. SETTING: Hospital emergency department in urban northern Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Random sample of women older than 16 presenting to the emergency department for any reason. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographic variables, exposure to DV. RESULTS: Of 1800 potential subjects, 577 (32%) did not fit inclusion criteria. Of the remaining 1223, 983 (80%) agreed to participate. Mean age was 41, 135 of participants (14%) were aboriginal, and 546 (56%) were married. Overall, 725 (74%) had current partners. Incidence of DV resulting in emergency department presentation on the day of assessment was 2%. Of women with partners, 66 (9%) had previously been threatened or injured by those partners. Lifetime prevalence of DV was 51%; physical DV was experienced by 40%. One-year prevalence was 26%. CONCLUSION: Incidence of DV was lower than expected; prevalence of DV was high. PMID:14761109

  13. Models of Emergency Departments for Reducing Patient Waiting Times

    PubMed Central

    Laskowski, Marek; McLeod, Robert D.; Friesen, Marcia R.; Podaima, Blake W.; Alfa, Attahiru S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we apply both agent-based models and queuing models to investigate patient access and patient flow through emergency departments. The objective of this work is to gain insights into the comparative contributions and limitations of these complementary techniques, in their ability to contribute empirical input into healthcare policy and practice guidelines. The models were developed independently, with a view to compare their suitability to emergency department simulation. The current models implement relatively simple general scenarios, and rely on a combination of simulated and real data to simulate patient flow in a single emergency department or in multiple interacting emergency departments. In addition, several concepts from telecommunications engineering are translated into this modeling context. The framework of multiple-priority queue systems and the genetic programming paradigm of evolutionary machine learning are applied as a means of forecasting patient wait times and as a means of evolving healthcare policy, respectively. The models' utility lies in their ability to provide qualitative insights into the relative sensitivities and impacts of model input parameters, to illuminate scenarios worthy of more complex investigation, and to iteratively validate the models as they continue to be refined and extended. The paper discusses future efforts to refine, extend, and validate the models with more data and real data relative to physical (spatial–topographical) and social inputs (staffing, patient care models, etc.). Real data obtained through proximity location and tracking system technologies is one example discussed. PMID:19572015

  14. What general emergency nurses want to know about mental health patients presenting to their emergency department.

    PubMed

    Kerrison, Shirilee A; Chapman, Rose

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a qualitative project conducted to investigate the education and training requirements that non-mental health trained emergency nurses need to enable them to effectively care for psychiatric patients presenting to a West Australian emergency department. Non-mental health trained nurses are ill-equipped in their psychiatric knowledge, assessment and communication skills to provide best possible care to the one in ten patients presenting to the emergency department with a complex mental health issue. The area of assessment and management of mental health patients in the emergency department is a complex one and staff are required to assess, triage and manage these patients appropriately. Furthermore, with aggression and violence increasing, emergency department nurses are concerned about their safety in the workplace. Focus groups with emergency nurses and semi-structured interviews with subject matter experts were conducted at one West Australian teaching hospital. The findings of the project demonstrated that these nurses considered that customer focus, workplace aggression and violence, psychiatric theory, mental health assessment and chemical dependence as key learning areas. These findings will form a platform for further education and training for ED staff.

  15. Advancing the Use of Administrative Data for Emergency Department Diagnostic Imaging Research.

    PubMed

    Kuehl, Damon R; Berdahl, Carl T; Jackson, Tiffany D; Venkatesh, Arjun K; Mistry, Rakesh D; Bhargavan-Chatfield, Mythreyi; Raukar, Neha P; Carr, Brendan G; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Kocher, Keith E

    2015-12-01

    Administrative data are critical to describing patterns of use, cost, and appropriateness of imaging in emergency care. These data encompass a range of source materials that have been collected primarily for a nonresearch use: documenting clinical care (e.g., medical records), administering care (e.g., picture archiving and communication systems), or financial transactions (e.g., insurance claims). These data have served as the foundation for large, descriptive studies that have documented the rise and expanded role of diagnostic imaging in the emergency department (ED). This article summarizes the discussions of the breakout session on the use of administrative data for emergency imaging research at the May 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference, "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization." The authors describe the areas where administrative data have been applied to research evaluating the use of diagnostic imaging in the ED, the common sources for these data, and the strengths and limitations of administrative data. Next, the future role of administrative data is examined for answering key research questions in an evolving health system increasingly focused on measuring appropriateness, ensuring quality, and improving value for health spending. This article specifically focuses on four thematic areas: data quality, appropriateness and value, special populations, and policy interventions.

  16. Family member presence in the pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Eppich, Walter J; Arnold, Linda D

    2003-06-01

    Traditionally, family members were excluded from viewing invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the pediatric emergency department. The concept of family-centered care in the emergency department has now become more widespread. Consequently, family member presence during routine invasive procedures such as venipuncture, intravenous cannulation, urethral catheterization, and lumbar puncture has become more accepted. Survey evidence indicates parents' overwhelming desire to be present for invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Healthcare provider opinions about family witnessed resuscitation lack similar uniformity. Variations in approval of witnessed resuscitation are influenced by occupation, level of training and experience, and prior exposure to family member presence practices. Although several organizations formally support family presence policies, citing benefits for grieving relatives, critics point to a lack of rigor in a large body of the research cited to underpin these endorsements. We review the literature from the perspective of pediatric emergency physicians, offer suggestions for family member presence, and provide directions for future study. PMID:12806260

  17. Gender Differences in Scholarly Productivity Within Academic Gynecologic Oncology Departments

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Emily K.; Blake, Rachel A.; Emerson, Jenna B.; Svider, Peter; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Raker, Christina; Robison, Katina; Stuckey, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate whether there is a gender difference in scholarly productivity among academic gynecologic oncologists. METHODS In this cross-sectional study, the academic rank and gender of gynecologic oncology faculty in the United States were determined from online residency and fellowship directories and departmental web sites. Each individual’s h-index and years of publication were determined from Scopus (a citation database of peer-reviewed literature). The h-index is a quantification of an author’s scholarly productivity that combines the number of publications with the number of times the publications have been cited. We generated descriptive statistics and compared rank, gender, and productivity scores. RESULTS Five hundred seven academic faculty within 137 U.S. teaching programs were identified. Of these, 215 (42%) were female and 292 (58%) were male. Men had significantly higher median h-indices than women, 16 compared with 8, respectively (P<.001). Women were more likely to be of junior academic rank with 63% of assistant professors being female compared with 20% of full professors. When stratifying h-indices by gender and academic rank, men had significantly higher h-indices at the assistant professor level (7 compared with 5, P<.001); however, this difference disappeared at the higher ranks. Stratifying by the years of active publication, there was no significant difference between genders. CONCLUSION Female gynecologic oncologists at the assistant professor level had lower scholarly productivity than men; however, at higher academic ranks, they equaled their male counterparts. Women were more junior in rank, had published for fewer years, and were underrepresented in leadership positions. PMID:26551177

  18. Implementation of TeamSTEPPS in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Turner, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Team training and practice is an essential part of emergency department workflow. TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety) is a teamwork and communication systems model that has the potential to improve patient safety while also addressing aspects of staff satisfaction and morale. This article describes the experience of one emergency department's implementation of TeamSTEPPS, with a focus on methods of training faculty and staff, progression of implementation over a period of time, and evaluation of the process with recommendations for future growth. Background, history, and specific tools used within the department are described, with an emphasis on "briefs," "huddles," and "debriefs" or team "wrap-ups." PMID:22668991

  19. Emergency department management of seizures in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Santillanes, Genevieve; Luc, Quyen

    2015-03-01

    Seizures account for 1% of all emergency department visits for children, and the etiologies range from benign to life-threatening. The challenge for emergency clinicians is to diagnose and treat the life-threatening causes of seizures while avoiding unnecessary radiation exposure and painful procedures in patients who are unlikely to have an emergent pathology. When treating patients in status epilepticus, emergency clinicians are also faced with the challenge of choosing anticonvulsant medications that will be efficacious while minimizing harmful side effects. Unfortunately, evidence to guide the evaluation and management of children presenting with new and breakthrough seizures and status epilepticus is limited. This review summarizes available evidence and guidelines on the diagnostic evaluation of first-time, breakthrough, and simple and complex febrile seizures. Management of seizures in neonates and seizures due to toxic ingestions is also reviewed.

  20. The Association between Preschool Children's Social Functioning and Their Emergent Academic Skills.

    PubMed

    Arnold, David H; Kupersmidt, Janis B; Voegler-Lee, Mary Ellen; Marshall, Nastassja

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between social functioning and emergent academic development in a sample of 467 preschool children (M = 55.9 months old, SD = 3.8). Teachers reported on children's aggression, attention problems, and prosocial skills. Preliteracy, language, and early mathematics skills were assessed with standardized tests. Better social functioning was associated with stronger academic development. Attention problems were related to poorer academic development controlling for aggression and social skills, pointing to the importance of attention in these relations. Children's social skills were related to academic development controlling for attention and aggression problems, consistent with models suggesting that children's social strengths and difficulties are independently related to their academic development. Support was not found for the hypothesis that these relationships would be stronger in boys than in girls. Some relationships were stronger in African American than Caucasian children. Children's self-reported feelings about school moderated several relationships, consistent with the idea that positive feelings about school may be a protective factor against co-occurring academic and social problems.

  1. The Association between Preschool Children’s Social Functioning and Their Emergent Academic Skills

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, David H.; Kupersmidt, Janis B.; Voegler-Lee, Mary Ellen; Marshall, Nastassja

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between social functioning and emergent academic development in a sample of 467 preschool children (M = 55.9 months old, SD = 3.8). Teachers reported on children’s aggression, attention problems, and prosocial skills. Preliteracy, language, and early mathematics skills were assessed with standardized tests. Better social functioning was associated with stronger academic development. Attention problems were related to poorer academic development controlling for aggression and social skills, pointing to the importance of attention in these relations. Children’s social skills were related to academic development controlling for attention and aggression problems, consistent with models suggesting that children’s social strengths and difficulties are independently related to their academic development. Support was not found for the hypothesis that these relationships would be stronger in boys than in girls. Some relationships were stronger in African American than Caucasian children. Children’s self-reported feelings about school moderated several relationships, consistent with the idea that positive feelings about school may be a protective factor against co-occurring academic and social problems. PMID:23002324

  2. A Division of Research in an Academic Clinical Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Traystman, Richard J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses in general the importance of a research division, whether basic or clinical, in an academic setting and factors to consider in establishing one. Uses John Hopkins' newly created research division for Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine to specifically address funding and intra- and interdepartmental clinical research programs. (DC)

  3. The Impact of Physically Embedded Librarianship on Academic Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Toole, Erin; Barham, Rebecca; Monahan, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Academic librarians have been engaged in embedded librarianship for nearly 15 years, yet there are few published research studies on the impact of physically embedded librarians, who work alongside departmental faculty. This study leveraged a change in reference service to analyze what happened when subject librarians moved from the library…

  4. Gender Diversity Strategy in Academic Departments: Exploring Organizational Determinants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Xuhong; Johnson, Japera; Bozeman, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Full inclusion of women into the academics remains a daunting challenge in the United States. The situation is particularly acute within science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields where the underrepresentation of women and their career disadvantages attract a great deal of attention. Based on a dataset combining a survey of…

  5. Orthopedic emergencies: a practical emergency department classification (US-VAGON) in pelvic fractures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Coppola, Paolo T; Coppola, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Trauma is one of the leading causes of death before the age of 40 years and approximately 5% of patients with trauma who require hospital admission have pelvic fractures. This article updates the emergency department classification of pelvic fractures first described in 2000. This information is of practical value to emergency physicians in identifying the potential vascular, genitourinary, gastrointestinal, orthopedic, and neurologic complications and further assists them in the initial evaluation and treatment of patients with pelvic fractures.

  6. Residents values in a rational decision-making model: an interest in academics in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, John Christian; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Santen, Sally

    2016-10-01

    Academic physicians train the next generation of doctors. It is important to understand the factors that lead residents to choose an academic career to continue to effectively recruit residents who will join the national medical faculty. A decision-making theory-driven, large scale assessment of this process has not been previously undertaken. To examine the factors that predict an Emergency resident's interest in pursuing an academic career at the conclusion of training. This study employs the ABEM Longitudinal Survey (n = 365). A logistic regression model was estimated using an interest in an academic career in residency as the dependent variable. Independent variables include gender, under-represented minority status, survey cohort, number of dependent children, possession of an advanced degree, ongoing research, publications, and the appeal of science, independence, and clinical work in choosing EM. Logistic regression resulted in a statistically significant model (p < 0.001). Residents who chose EM due to the appeal of science, had peer-reviewed publications and ongoing research were more likely to be interested in an academic career at the end of residency (p < 0.05). An increased number of children (p < 0.05) was negatively associated with an interest in academics. Individual resident career interests, research productivity, and lifestyle can help predict an interest in pursuing an academic career. Recruitment and enrichment of residents who have similar values and behaviors should be considered in programs interested in generating more graduates who enter an academic career.

  7. Residents values in a rational decision-making model: an interest in academics in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, John Christian; Smith-Coggins, Rebecca; Santen, Sally

    2016-10-01

    Academic physicians train the next generation of doctors. It is important to understand the factors that lead residents to choose an academic career to continue to effectively recruit residents who will join the national medical faculty. A decision-making theory-driven, large scale assessment of this process has not been previously undertaken. To examine the factors that predict an Emergency resident's interest in pursuing an academic career at the conclusion of training. This study employs the ABEM Longitudinal Survey (n = 365). A logistic regression model was estimated using an interest in an academic career in residency as the dependent variable. Independent variables include gender, under-represented minority status, survey cohort, number of dependent children, possession of an advanced degree, ongoing research, publications, and the appeal of science, independence, and clinical work in choosing EM. Logistic regression resulted in a statistically significant model (p < 0.001). Residents who chose EM due to the appeal of science, had peer-reviewed publications and ongoing research were more likely to be interested in an academic career at the end of residency (p < 0.05). An increased number of children (p < 0.05) was negatively associated with an interest in academics. Individual resident career interests, research productivity, and lifestyle can help predict an interest in pursuing an academic career. Recruitment and enrichment of residents who have similar values and behaviors should be considered in programs interested in generating more graduates who enter an academic career. PMID:26885848

  8. Non-emergency attenders at a district general hospital accident and emergency department.

    PubMed

    Thomson, H; Kohli, H S; Brookes, M

    1995-12-01

    Following concern about long waiting times, a survey was carried out in the Accident and Emergency (A&E) department of Monklands District General Hospital over 5 consecutive days to investigate factors related to the bypassing of general practitioners (GPs) by 'self-referred' patients and inappropriate use of the department. Two hundred and forty-five (90.7%) of 270 non-emergency patients who attended the department during GP surgery hours completed a self-administered questionnaire. Variables measured included recent use of health services, perceptions of the GP service and the A&E service and reasons for bypassing the GP. Of the 245 patients, 49 (20%) were defined as inappropriate and 152 (62%) were self-referred. Self-referred patients were no more likely to use the A&E department inappropriately than those who were referred.

  9. Survey of psychiatric assessment rooms in UK emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Jim; Palmer, Lucy; Cawdron, Rohanna

    2016-01-01

    Aims and method We aimed to estimate the proportion of UK emergency departments with a psychiatric assessment room and to determine whether such rooms met criteria for conducting high-risk assessments. Liaison psychiatry services were asked whether their hospital had such a room, whether it met the criteria and whether respondents judged it to be sufficiently safe and private. Results Of the 60 emergency departments included in the survey, 23% had a psychiatric assessment room that met all the safety criteria and was judged to be safe and private. Barriers to the establishment of an appropriate facility included it being a low priority for hospital management, a room being used for other purposes, and balancing safety requirements with the creation of a calming environment. Clinical implications Mental illness is a common reason for presentation to emergency departments. Despite national recommendations, this survey indicates that many departments lack a sufficiently safe and private assessment room, which compromises the safety and privacy of patient care. PMID:27087987

  10. Survey of psychiatric assessment rooms in UK emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Jim; Palmer, Lucy; Cawdron, Rohanna

    2016-04-01

    Aims and method We aimed to estimate the proportion of UK emergency departments with a psychiatric assessment room and to determine whether such rooms met criteria for conducting high-risk assessments. Liaison psychiatry services were asked whether their hospital had such a room, whether it met the criteria and whether respondents judged it to be sufficiently safe and private. Results Of the 60 emergency departments included in the survey, 23% had a psychiatric assessment room that met all the safety criteria and was judged to be safe and private. Barriers to the establishment of an appropriate facility included it being a low priority for hospital management, a room being used for other purposes, and balancing safety requirements with the creation of a calming environment. Clinical implications Mental illness is a common reason for presentation to emergency departments. Despite national recommendations, this survey indicates that many departments lack a sufficiently safe and private assessment room, which compromises the safety and privacy of patient care.

  11. Improving Capacity Management in the Emergency Department: A Review of the Literature, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    McCaughey, Deirdre; Erwin, Cathleen O; DelliFraine, Jami L

    2015-01-01

    Capacity management (CM) is a critical component of maintaining and improving healthcare quality and patient safety. One particular area for concern has been the emergency department and the growing issues of patient overcrowding, boarding, and ambulance diversion, which can result in poor patient care and less efficient operations. This study provides a review of the current and most relevant academic literature on capacity management directly related to hospital emergency departments, identifies strengths and weaknesses of the approaches discussed in the literature, and provides practical recommendations for health services administrators implementing CM in their organizations. An extensive literature search was conducted using several search engines and scholarly databases. Articles were identified based on a combination of keywords and then were reviewed and selected for inclusion in the study in adherence to specified criteria. The CM literature includes a great divergence of themes, topics, and definitions. Twenty-two articles were selected for their relevance to emergency department CM with a focus on operations management concepts. A categorization scheme was used, resulting in four thematic groups of articles: problems, solutions, outcomes, and metrics. Healthcare managers wishing to implement solutions to CM problems have a wide variety of operations literature to draw on that can address scheduling and patient throughput, but there are also a number of studies that consider electronic and technological solutions to CM problems. All of these solutions have the potential to positively influence the quality of patient care, including satisfaction. PMID:26529995

  12. Determinants of Budget Allocations to Academic Departments: A Case Study. ASHE 1987 Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winans, Glen T.

    General fund budgetary determinants in 27 academic departments at the University of California Santa Barbara were studied for the period from 1977/78 through 1983/84. The focus was resource allocation and utilization within departments of the College of Letters and Science. The research design included a pooled multivariate regression analysis of…

  13. A Resource Management Tool for Implementing Strategic Direction in an Academic Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringwood, John V.; Devitt, Frank; Doherty, Sean; Farrell, Ronan; Lawlor, Bob; McLoone, Sean C.; McLoone, Seamus F.; Rogers, Alan; Villing, Rudi; Ward, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on a load balancing system for an academic department, which can be used as an implementation mechanism for strategic planning. In essence, it consists of weighting each activity within the department and performing workload allocation based on this transparent scheme. The experience to date has been very positive, in terms of…

  14. The Academic Department Head: Duties and Compensation. AIR 1994 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grumbles, Kent; Bregman, Norman J.

    A survey was conducted of 114 (a 62.6% response rate) academic deans of predominantly IIA institutions (Carnegie Classification) to gather information concerning the equitable and fair treatment of department heads at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana. The survey revealed that the duties of department heads included teaching/research;…

  15. Raising Minority Academic Achievement: The Department of Defense Model. Pedagogical Inquiry and Praxis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridglall, Beatrice L.; Gordon, Edmund W.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes U.S. Department of Defense Schools, an education system with significant outcomes that may be pertinent to raising academic achievement among minority students. A research group examined the high achievement of African American and Hispanic students in Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) schools. Results find that…

  16. Medical information system in hospital emergency departments' organizational perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dumont, V; Rousseau, A

    2002-01-01

    The study reported in this article examines the implementation of the same software in 3 emergency departments from different Belgian hospitals. It was experienced and perceived very differently as a failure or a success by the units' staff. The software integrates different functionalities, which can be chosen and customized by some members of the units themselves. We will look at the three processes of implementation to find out different plausible explanation for their 'failure or success'. Our approach is developed through the qualitative methodology of case studies. The translation theory is presented as a renewal way of thinking the perceived 'successful or failed' implementation of a new information system and a guide for new project in emergency department. PMID:15058415

  17. Modelling coordination in hospital emergency departments through social network analysis.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Liaquat; Kit Guan, Danny Chun

    2012-04-01

    Coordination theory provides a theoretical framework for analysing complex processes of project groups working towards a common goal. In this study, we explore the relationship between coordination and social networks for the development of a network-based coordination model. This model is applied to measure the performance and quality of complex and dynamic project coordination such as in hospital emergency departments. The dataset used for the study was collected by the 2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey--a national probability sample survey of visits to emergency and outpatient departments of non-Federal, short-stay and general hospitals in the United States. Using social network analysis, this study allows us to understand the possible causes of inefficient coordination performance and coordination quality resulting in access blocks.

  18. Syncope: a review of emergency department management and disposition

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pranjal R; Quinn, James V

    2015-01-01

    Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness due to cerebral hypoperfusion with spontaneous return to baseline function without intervention. It is a common chief complaint of patients presenting to the emergency department. The differential diagnosis for syncope is broad and the management varies significantly depending on the underlying etiology. In the emergency department, determining the cause of a syncopal episode can be difficult. However, a thorough history and certain physical exam findings can assist in evaluating for life-threatening diagnoses. Risk-stratifying patients into low, moderate and high-risk groups can assist in medical decision making and help determine the patient’s disposition. Advancements in ambulatory monitoring have made it possible to obtain prolonged cardiac evaluations of patients in the outpatient setting. This review will focus on the diagnosis and management of the various types of syncope. PMID:27752576

  19. Complementary and alternative pain therapy in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Dillard, James N; Knapp, Sharon

    2005-05-01

    One primary reason patients go to emergency departments is for pain relief. Understanding the physiologic dynamics of pain, pharmacologic methods for treatment of pain, as well CAM therapies used in treatment of pain is important to all providers in emergency care. Asking patients about self-care and treatments used outside of the emergency department is an important part of the patient history. Complementary and alternative therapies are very popular for painful conditions despite the lack of strong research supporting some of their use. Even though evidenced-based studies that are double blinded and show a high degree of interrater observer reliability do not exist, patients will likely continue to seek out CAM therapies as a means of self-treatment and a way to maintain additional life control. Regardless of absolute validity of a therapy for some patients, it is the bottom line: "it seems to help my pain." Pain management distills down to a very simple endpoint, patient relief, and comfort. Sham or science, if the patient feels better, feels comforted, feels less stressed, and more functional in life and their practices pose no health risk, then supporting their CAM therapy creates a true wholistic partnership in their health care.CAM should be relatively inexpensive and extremely safe. Such is not always the case, as some patients have discovered with the use of botanicals. It becomes an imperative that all providers be aware of CAM therapies and informed about potential interactions and side effects when helping patients manage pain and explore adding CAM strategies for pain relief. The use of regulated breathing, meditation, guided imagery, or a massage for a pain sufferer are simple but potentially beneficial inexpensive aids to care that can be easily employed in the emergency department. Some CAM therapies covered here, while not easily practiced in the emergency department, exist as possibilities for exploration of patients after they leave, and may

  20. Complementary and alternative pain therapy in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Dillard, James N; Knapp, Sharon

    2005-05-01

    One primary reason patients go to emergency departments is for pain relief. Understanding the physiologic dynamics of pain, pharmacologic methods for treatment of pain, as well CAM therapies used in treatment of pain is important to all providers in emergency care. Asking patients about self-care and treatments used outside of the emergency department is an important part of the patient history. Complementary and alternative therapies are very popular for painful conditions despite the lack of strong research supporting some of their use. Even though evidenced-based studies that are double blinded and show a high degree of interrater observer reliability do not exist, patients will likely continue to seek out CAM therapies as a means of self-treatment and a way to maintain additional life control. Regardless of absolute validity of a therapy for some patients, it is the bottom line: "it seems to help my pain." Pain management distills down to a very simple endpoint, patient relief, and comfort. Sham or science, if the patient feels better, feels comforted, feels less stressed, and more functional in life and their practices pose no health risk, then supporting their CAM therapy creates a true wholistic partnership in their health care.CAM should be relatively inexpensive and extremely safe. Such is not always the case, as some patients have discovered with the use of botanicals. It becomes an imperative that all providers be aware of CAM therapies and informed about potential interactions and side effects when helping patients manage pain and explore adding CAM strategies for pain relief. The use of regulated breathing, meditation, guided imagery, or a massage for a pain sufferer are simple but potentially beneficial inexpensive aids to care that can be easily employed in the emergency department. Some CAM therapies covered here, while not easily practiced in the emergency department, exist as possibilities for exploration of patients after they leave, and may

  1. Emergency Department Use among Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vohra, Rini; Madhavan, Suresh; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional analyses using Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (2006-2011) was conducted to examine the trends, type of ED visits, and mean total ED charges for adults aged 22-64 years with and without ASD (matched 1:3). Around 0.4% ED visits (n = 25,527) were associated with any ASD and rates of such visits more than doubled from 2006 to…

  2. Medical Identity Theft in the Emergency Department: Awareness is Crucial

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Michelino

    2014-01-01

    Medical Identity theft in the emergency department (ED) can harm numerous individuals, and many frontline healthcare providers are unaware of this growing concern. The two cases described began as typical ED encounters until red flags were discovered upon validating the patient’s identity. Educating all healthcare personnel within and outside the ED regarding the subtle signs of medical identity theft and implementing institutional policies to identify these criminals will discourage further fraudulent behavior. PMID:25493150

  3. Using LEAN to improve a segment of emergency department flow.

    PubMed

    Vose, Courtney; Reichard, Christine; Pool, Susan; Snyder, Megan; Burmeister, David

    2014-11-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding is an organizational concern. This article describes how Toyota LEAN methods were used as a performance improvement framework to address ED overcrowding. This initiative also impacted "bolus of patients" or "batching" concerns, which occur when inpatient units receive an influx of patients from EDs and other areas at the same time. In addition to decreased incidence of overcrowding, the organization realized increased interprofessional collaboration. PMID:25340919

  4. Hand hygiene and aseptic technique in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Al-Damouk, M; Pudney, E; Bleetman, A

    2004-02-01

    Hand hygiene and simple aseptic measures before invasive procedures are effective in reducing rates of healthcare-associated infection. The perceived urgency of a clinical situation in the emergency department, however, may influence medical staff's compliance with good practice in infection control. The aims of this prospective, single-blinded, observational study were twofold. First, to assess doctors' compliance with good practice in hand hygiene between patient episodes and asepsis during invasive procedures in the emergency department. Second, to assess the effect of clinical urgency on compliance with good practice in hand hygiene and asepsis during invasive procedures. Good practice standards for asepsis in invasive procedures and hand hygiene between patient episodes were compiled from a literature search. Doctors' compliance with these standards was observed in two emergency departments (UK and New Zealand). Observed clinical cases were classified as immediate, urgent and non-urgent based on the triage system. There was poor compliance with good practice guidelines for asepsis in invasive procedures in both centres. Staff achieved high compliance with the guidelines in only 27% of cases in the UK and 58% of cases in New Zealand. Clinical urgency did not appear to adversely affect compliance with aseptic good practice. Hand hygiene between patient consultations was very low at 14% in the UK and 12% in New Zealand. Asepsis and hand hygiene was poor in both the UK and New Zealand emergency departments. There may be a need for some compromise in standards of asepsis in very sick patients due to the urgency of the clinical situation. Compliance in all situations especially non-urgent procedures needs to be improved.

  5. Diagnosing and managing acute heart failure in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Dick C.; Peacock, W. Frank

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a clinical syndrome that results from the impairment of ventricular filling or ejection of blood and affects millions of people worldwide. Diagnosis may not be straightforward and at times may be difficult in an undifferentiated patient. However, rapid evaluation and diagnosis is important for the optimal management of acute heart failure. We review the many aspects of diagnosing and treating acute heart failure in the emergency department. PMID:27752588

  6. Real-time demand forecasting in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Jones, Spencer S

    2007-10-11

    Shifts in the supply of and demand for emergency department (ED) services have led to ED overcrowding and make the efficient allocation of ED resources increasingly important. Reliable means of modeling and forecasting the demand for resources are critical to any ED resource planning strategy. Vector Autoregression (VAR) is a flexible multivariate time-series forecasting methodology that is well suited to modeling demand for resources in the ED.

  7. Survey of Bicycle Accidents Presenting in an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Smith, N. A.; Yeats, I. F.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of bicycle accidents presenting in an emergency department was carried out over a 15 week period. Most accidents were the result of loss of control by the cyclist. Although soft tissue injuries predominated, followed by fractures, head injury was the single most common cause for admission to hospital (41.6%). These findings suggest that serious consideration be given to the use of protective headgear.

  8. Medical identity theft in the emergency department: awareness is crucial.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Michelino

    2014-11-01

    Medical identity theft in the emergency department (ED) can harm numerous individuals, and many frontline healthcare providers are unaware of this growing concern. The two cases described began as typical ED encounters until red flags were discovered upon validating the patient's identity. Educating all healthcare personnel within and outside the ED regarding the subtle signs of medical identity theft and implementing institutional policies to identify these criminals will discourage further fraudulent behavior.

  9. Patient Preference for Physician Gender in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Nolen, Haley A; Moore, Justin Xavier; Rodgers, Joel B; Wang, Henry E; Walter, Lauren A

    2016-06-01

    Despite historical gender bias against female physicians, few studies have investigated patients' physician gender preference in the emergency department (ED) setting. We sought to determine if there is an association between ED patient demographics and physician gender preference. We surveyed patients presenting to an ED to determine association between patient demographics and patient physician gender preference for five ED situations: 1) 'routine' visit, 2) emergency visit, 3) 'sensitive' medical visit, 4) minor surgical/'procedural' visit, and 5) 'bad news' delivery. A total of 200 ED patients were surveyed. The majority of ED patients reported no physician gender preference for 'routine' visits (89.5 percent), 'emergent' visits (89 percent), 'sensitive' medical visits (59 percent), 'procedural' visits (89 percent) or when receiving 'bad news' (82 percent). In the setting of 'routine' visits and 'sensitive' medical visits, there was a propensity for same-sex physician preference.

  10. [Ethical and legal aspects at the emergency department

    PubMed

    Carvalho, P R; Torreão, L A

    1999-11-01

    OBJECTIVE: To discuss ethical and legal aspects of physicianś attitudes in emergency departments under the light of Braziĺs codes and laws.METHODS: The authors raise questions based upon case reports and comment using the medical ethical code, laws that protect children and adolescents, hospitalized children and adolescents rights statement and medical federal council decisions.RESULTS: The authors discuss child patients' rights and the parents disclosure right; the problem of domestic violence and abuse and the physician duty to denunciate this kind of practice for the child security and protection; the medical responsability even under workplace adverse conditions, as well as the concerns related to transportation of patients to another hospital; the dilemma between withholding and withdrawing life support measures at the emergency department and the prohibition to certificate death in violent death situations; the autonomy and decision-making capa-city of adolescent patients and their limitations, including violation of confidentiality.CONCLUSIONS: The commentaries presented in the article try to explain to the pediatrician how to identify ethical and legal conflicts in the emergency department and to prepare him (her) to assume attitudes based on codes and legal statements, as well as to respect the patient's rights. PMID:14685477

  11. Assessment and Management of Bullied Children in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Waseem, Muhammad; Ryan, Mary; Foster, Carla Boutin; Peterson, Janey

    2015-01-01

    Bullying is an important public health issue in the United States. Up to 30% of children report exposure to such victimization. Not only does it hurt bully victim, but it also negatively impacts the bully, other children, parents, school staff, and health care providers. Because bullying often presents with accompanying serious emotional and behavioral symptoms, there has been an increase in psychiatric referrals to emergency departments. Emergency physicians may be the first responders in the health care system for bullying episodes. Victims of bullying may present with nonspecific symptoms and be reluctant to disclose being victimized, contributing to the underdiagnosis and underreporting of bully victimization. Emergency physicians therefore need to have heightened awareness of physical and psychosocial symptoms related to bullying. They should rapidly screen for bullying, assess for injuries and acute psychiatric issues that require immediate attention, and provide appropriate referrals such as psychiatry and social services. This review defines bullying, examines its presentations and epidemiology, and provides recommendations for the assessment and evaluation of victims of bullying in the emergency department. PMID:23462401

  12. Impact of a Dedicated Emergency Medicine Teaching Resident Rotation at a Large Urban Academic Center

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, James; Golden, Andrew; Bryant, Alyssa; Babcock, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the face of declining bedside teaching and increasing emergency department (ED) crowding, balancing education and patient care is a challenge. Dedicated shifts by teaching residents (TRs) in the ED represent an educational intervention to mitigate these difficulties. We aimed to measure the perceived learning and departmental impact created by having TR. Methods TRs were present in the ED from 12pm–10pm daily, and their primary roles were to provide the following: assist in teaching procedures, give brief “chalk talks,” instruct junior trainees on interesting cases, and answer clinical questions in an evidence-based manner. This observational study included a survey of fourth-year medical students (MSs), residents and faculty at an academic ED. Surveys measured the perceived effect of the TR on teaching, patient flow, ease of procedures, and clinical care. Results Survey response rates for medical students, residents, and faculty are 56%, 77%, and 75%, respectively. MSs perceived improved procedure performance with TR presence and the majority agreed that the TR was a valuable educational experience. Residents perceived increased patient flow, procedure performance, and MS learning with TR presence. The majority agreed that the TR improved patient care. Faculty agreed that the TR increased resident and MS learning, as well as improved patient care and procedure performance. Conclusion The presence of a TR increased MS and resident learning, improved patient care and procedure performance as perceived by MSs, residents and faculty. A dedicated TR program can provide a valuable resource in achieving a balance of clinical education and high quality healthcare. PMID:26973739

  13. Reflective Decision Making among University Department Heads across Academic Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kampmann, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    Within the scope of leadership and management, decision making greatly defines the role of university administrator, in particular, the university department head and his/her ability to be a reflective practitioner in the realm of decision making. Decision making is one characteristic of university department head work which warrants close…

  14. The Cost of Academic Leadership: Department Chair Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gmelch, Walter H.; Burns, John S.

    Findings from a study that examined stresses associated with the role of the university department chair are presented in this paper. The focuses are on career paths, transitions to the chair position, commitment to administration, role orientation, and strains of chairing. A survey of 808 department chairs in 101 research and doctoral-granting…

  15. 42 CFR 447.54 - Cost sharing for services furnished in a hospital emergency department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... emergency department. 447.54 Section 447.54 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... furnished in a hospital emergency department. (a) The agency may impose cost sharing for non-emergency services provided in a hospital emergency department. The provisions in § 447.56(a) shall apply except...

  16. Policy Measures and Reimbursement for Emergency Medical Imaging in the Era of Payment Reform: Proceedings From a Panel Discussion of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Berdahl, Carl; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Fisher, Nancy L; Burstin, Helen; Pines, Jesse M

    2015-12-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 is expanding the use of quality measurement and promulgating new payment models that place downward pressure on health care utilization and costs. As emergency department (ED) computed tomography utilization has tripled in the past decade, stakeholders have identified advanced imaging as an area where quality and efficiency measures should expand. On May 12, 2015, Academic Emergency Medicine convened a consensus conference titled "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization." As part of the conference, a panel of health care policy leaders and emergency physicians discussed the effect of the ACA and other quality programs on ED diagnostic imaging, specifically the way that quality metrics may affect ED care and how ED diagnostic imaging fits in the broader strategy of the U.S. government. This article discusses the content of the panel's presentations. PMID:26568025

  17. Policy Measures and Reimbursement for Emergency Medical Imaging in the Era of Payment Reform: Proceedings From a Panel Discussion of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference.

    PubMed

    Berdahl, Carl; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Fisher, Nancy L; Burstin, Helen; Pines, Jesse M

    2015-12-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 is expanding the use of quality measurement and promulgating new payment models that place downward pressure on health care utilization and costs. As emergency department (ED) computed tomography utilization has tripled in the past decade, stakeholders have identified advanced imaging as an area where quality and efficiency measures should expand. On May 12, 2015, Academic Emergency Medicine convened a consensus conference titled "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization." As part of the conference, a panel of health care policy leaders and emergency physicians discussed the effect of the ACA and other quality programs on ED diagnostic imaging, specifically the way that quality metrics may affect ED care and how ED diagnostic imaging fits in the broader strategy of the U.S. government. This article discusses the content of the panel's presentations.

  18. Drug-induced angioedema: experience of Italian emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Bertazzoni, G; Spina, M T; Scarpellini, M G; Buccelletti, F; De Simone, M; Gregori, M; Valeriano, V; Pugliese, F R; Ruggieri, M P; Magnanti, M; Susi, B; Minetola, L; Zulli, L; D'Ambrogio, F

    2014-06-01

    Acute angioedema represents a cause of admission to the emergency department requiring rapid diagnosis and appropriate management to prevent airway obstruction. Several drugs, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and oral antidiabetics, have been reported to induce angioedema. The aim of this prospective observational study conducted in a setting of routine emergency care was to evaluate the incidence and extent of drug-induced non-histaminergic angioedema in this specific clinical setting, and to identify the class of drugs possibly associated with angioedema. Patients admitted to seven different emergency departments (EDs) in Rome with the diagnosis of angioedema and urticaria were enrolled during a 6-month period. Of the 120,000 patients admitted at the EDs, 447 (0.37 %) were coded as having angioedema and 655 (0.5 %) as having urticaria. After accurate clinical review, 62 cases were defined as drug-induced, non-histaminergic angioedema. NSAIDs were the most frequent drugs (taken by 22 out of 62 patients) associated with the angioedema attack. Of the remaining patients, 15 received antibiotic treatment and 10 antihypertensive treatment. In addition, we observed in our series some cases of angioedema associated with drugs (such as antiasthmatics, antidiarrheal and antiepileptics) of which there are few descriptions in the literature. The present data, which add much needed information to the existing limited literature on drug-induced angioedema in the clinical emergency department setting, will provide more appropriate diagnosis and management of this potentially life-threatening adverse event.

  19. The Effect of Emergency Department Overcrowding on Efficiency of Emergency Medicine Residents’ Education

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Alimohammadi, Hossein; Derakhshanfar, Hojjat; Kashani, Parvin; Nassiriabrishamchi, Shohreh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Creating a calm and stress-free environment affects education significantly. The effects of the emergency department overcrowding (EDO) on the training of emergency medicine residents (EMR) is a highly debated subject. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of EDO on efficiency of EMR’s education. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the effects of overcrowding on EMR’s education in the resuscitation room and acute care unit. Data collection was done using a questionnaire, which was filled out by the second year EMRs. The crowding level was calculated based on the national emergency department overcrowding scale (NEDOCS). The relationship between the two studied variables was evaluated using independent sample t-test and SPSS 21 statistical software. Results: 130 questionnaires were filled out during 61 shifts. 47 (77.05%) shifts were overcrowded. The attend’s ability to teach was not affected by overcrowding in the resuscitation room (p=0.008). The similar results were seen regarding the attend’s training ability in the acute care unit. Conclusion: It seems that the emergency department overcrowding has no effect on the quality of education to the EMRs. PMID:26495404

  20. Balancing Academic Teaching, Research, and Service: a Paradigm Emerging from NSF-TUES Sponsored Project Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paor, D. G.

    2012-12-01

    As every academic administrator stresses in interviews with new faculty, the role of a professor today involves balancing three areas - teaching, research, and service. Few institutions can afford the old policy of promoting and tenuring faculty based solely on research output and grantsmanship, whilst ignoring poor teaching outcomes. Outreach activities involving parents and the extramural community are increasingly important as expensive universities and four-year colleges seek to demonstrate their relevance in the age of much less expensive community colleges and distance education. Nevertheless, many faculty complain that teaching and outreach duties compete for their valuable research time. Some fields of research have such broad impacts that they merit the dedicated time of our best scientists. However, other research projects constitute little more than publicly funded professorial hobbies. The challenge is to reliably identify and prioritize the research questions that merit investigation. IN ODU's geospatial visualization group, we instituted a policy requiring Ph.D. theses to include a component (at least one chapter) dedicated to the development and testing of learning resources. TAs test visualizations in their lab sections in tandem with their research studies. They must incorporate original geophysical mapping, modeling, and/or analysis in order to justify a degree in the Physics Department (the traditional home of Geophysics at our institution) rather than, say, the College of Education. Geospatial graduate students also train to offer planetarium presentations to the public using digital full-dome projection technology that can be used with a wide range of geoscience and planetary science topics. Thus they tackle the three aspects of academic work from the outset. In contrast, students in other programs frequently serve as TAs in their first and then switch to grant-supported RA work, resulting in a steady stream of new TAs with little or no

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder in the Emergency Department: Good Psychiatric Management.

    PubMed

    Hong, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are high utilizers of psychiatric emergency services and present unique challenges in that setting. Frequently advised to visit an emergency department (ED) if safety is in question, their experiences once there often do not have beneficial effects. Issues specific to patients with BPD in the ED include volatile interactions with staff, repeat visits, concerns about safety (and liability), and disposition. Emergency department staff attitudes toward these patients are frequently negative when compared to patients with other diagnoses, and can detrimentally affect outcomes and perpetuate stigma regarding BPD. These attitudes are often due to lack of education and training about how to understand, approach, and treat the patient with BPD. The limited literature regarding the treatment of BPD in the ED offers few guidelines. This article presents an approach based on Good Psychiatric Management that can reduce negative reactions by ED staff and make ED visits more effective and less harmful. Relevant principles include psychoeducation, the reinforcement of the connection between symptoms and interpersonal stressors, and employment of an active, authentic therapeutic stance. Training ED staff in these principles could lead to attitudinal changes, reduced stigma, and potentially improved outcomes. PMID:27603743

  2. Emergency department mental health triage scales improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Marc; Jarman, Heather; Berk, Michael

    2004-02-01

    The assessment and management of clients with mental illness is an important facet of providing emergency care. In Australian emergency departments, it is usually the generalist registered nurses* without adequate preparation in the assessment and care for clients with mental illness who conduct the initial assessment at triage. A search of the literature revealed a limited number of publications addressing the provision of triage and management guidelines to assist nurses to make objective clinical decisions to ensure appropriate care for clients with mental illness. This paper examines the need for such guidelines and reviews a number of mental health triage scales that have been evaluated for use in emergency departments. Findings show that these triage scales have led to improvements in staff confidence and attitudes when dealing with clients with mental health problems, resulting in improved outcomes for clients. Strengths and limitations of the evaluations have also been explored. Highlighted is the need for consideration of the inclusion of clients' reactions to the impact of this change to service delivery in future evaluations.

  3. Strategies for reducing medication errors in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Weant, Kyle A; Bailey, Abby M; Baker, Stephanie N

    2014-01-01

    Medication errors are an all-too-common occurrence in emergency departments across the nation. This is largely secondary to a multitude of factors that create an almost ideal environment for medication errors to thrive. To limit and mitigate these errors, it is necessary to have a thorough knowledge of the medication-use process in the emergency department and develop strategies targeted at each individual step. Some of these strategies include medication-error analysis, computerized provider-order entry systems, automated dispensing cabinets, bar-coding systems, medication reconciliation, standardizing medication-use processes, education, and emergency-medicine clinical pharmacists. Special consideration also needs to be given to the development of strategies for the pediatric population, as they can be at an elevated risk of harm. Regardless of the strategies implemented, the prevention of medication errors begins and ends with the development of a culture that promotes the reporting of medication errors, and a systematic, nonpunitive approach to their elimination. PMID:27147879

  4. Coarse particles and respiratory emergency department visits in California.

    PubMed

    Malig, Brian J; Green, Shelley; Basu, Rupa; Broadwin, Rachel

    2013-07-01

    Although respiratory disease has been strongly connected to fine particulate air pollution (particulate matter <2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5)), evidence has been mixed regarding the effects of coarse particles (particulate matter from 2.5 to 10 μm in diameter), possibly because of the greater spatial heterogeneity of coarse particles. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between coarse particles and respiratory emergency department visits, including common subdiagnoses, from 2005 to 2008 in 35 California counties. A time-stratified case-crossover design was used to help control for time-invariant confounders and seasonal influences, and the study population was limited to those residing within 20 km of pollution monitors to mitigate the influence of spatial heterogeneity. Significant associations between respiratory emergency department visits and coarse particle levels were observed. Asthma visits showed associations (for 2-day lag, excess risk per 10 μg/m³ = 3.3%, 95% confidence interval: 2.0, 4.6) that were robust to adjustment by other common air pollutants (particles <2.5 μm in diameter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide). Pneumonia and acute respiratory infection visits were not associated, although some suggestion of a relationship with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease visits was present. Our results indicate that coarse particle exposure may trigger asthma exacerbations requiring emergency care, and reducing exposures among asthmatic persons may provide benefits.

  5. A Cultural Hybridization Perspective: Emerging Academic Subculture among International Students from East Asia in U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This research examines the emerging academic subculture of international students from East Asia in U.S. academics from the cultural hybridization perspective. In a knowledge-based economy, international education plays a pivotal role in the global educational environment. Advocacy of international student mobility is essential; international…

  6. Usefulness of video-EEG in the paediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Falsaperla, Raffaele; Striano, Pasquale; Parisi, Pasquale; Lubrano, Riccardo; Mahmood, Fahad; Pavone, Piero; Vitaliti, Giovanna

    2014-07-01

    Over the past two decades the EEG has technically improved from the use of analog to digital machines and more recently to video-EEG systems. Despite these advances, recording a technically acceptable EEG in an electrically hostile environment such as the emergency department (ED) remains a challenge, particularly with infants or young children. In 1996, a meeting of French experts established a set of guidelines for performing an EEG in the ED based on a review of the available literature. The authors highlighted the most suitable indications for an emergency EEG including clinical suspicion of cerebral death, convulsive and myoclonic status epilepticus, focal or generalized relapsing convulsive seizures as well as follow-up of known convulsive patients. They further recommended emergency EEG in the presence of doubt regarding the epileptic nature of the presentation as well as during the initiation or modification of sedation following brain injury. Subsequently, proposals for expanding the use of EEG in emergency patients have been advocated including trauma, vascular and anoxic-ischemic injury due to cardiorespiratory arrest, postinfective encephalopathy and nonconvulsive status epilepticus. The aim of this review is to show the diagnostic importance of video-EEG, as well as highlighting the predictive prognostic factors for positive and negative outcomes, when utilized in the pediatric ED for seizures as well as other neurological presentations. PMID:24917085

  7. Emergency department enlargement in China: exciting or bothering

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Li, Chen; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Hui; Zheng, Liangliang; Yao, Dongqi; Fu, Yangyang; Zhu, Huadong; Guo, Shubin; Wang, Zhong; Walline, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background Emergency department (ED) enlargement became a trend with its development. However, there came some problems such as ED overcrowding and increasing medical disputes. Here we did a survey about the development tendency of EDs in 3A grade hospitals in China, analysed the problems we facing and rendered some solutions combining some special characteristics in China. Methods We randomly selected 17 3A grade general hospitals from 12 provinces from the 50 members of Chinese College of Emergency Physician. A questionnaire survey was conducted. The basic information and problems of EDs were collected and analysed. Results The gross area, the number of beds and the attention paid by the hospitals of EDs increased during the development, so did the patients admitted to EDs, also more doctors and nurses devoted into emergency medicine. But it had become more difficult for doctors to admit ED patients to inpatient wards. Besides the problem of increasing crowding degree, EDs faced more medical disputes and complains during the development. Conclusions ED expanding was the result of emergency medicine development, but the enlargement of ED should be more rational. We should improve our doctors’ medical skills, optimize the health system, pay more attention to preventive medicine and push hard for health-care reform instead of forcing ED enlargement to satisfy the need for ED. PMID:27162657

  8. Overcrowding in the emergency departments: Challenges and opportunities for improvement.

    PubMed

    Baig, Muhammad Akbar; Mian, Asad; Najeed, Fatima; Shahzad, Hira

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of Emergency Medicine, one can observe an increase in the number of Emergency Departments (ED) across the country. However, most EDs struggle due to an overwhelming number of patients. Overcrowding can lead to delays in patient care. For a city like Karachi which is an active disaster zone, preemptive preparedness is required in the face of terror threats and such overcrowding needs to be decreased to a bare minimum. The most frequent causes of prolonged length of stay (LOS) in the ED include non-availability of in-hospital beds, delays in response to subspecialty consultations and escalating medical expenses. All of these can negatively impact patient care by putting patient safety at risk and patient care in jeopardy. There is an increased risk of unintentional medical errors and a concomitant increase in unwanted lawsuits. A few simple interventions which may help alleviate this situation to some extent have been discussed. PMID:26627520

  9. The Integration of Palliative Care into the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Basol, Nursah

    2015-06-01

    Palliative care (PC) is a new and developing area. It aims to provide the best possible quality of life for patients with life-limiting diseases. It does not primarily include life-extending therapies, but rather tries to help patients spend the rest of their lives in the best way. PC patients often are admitted to emergency departments during the course of a disease. The approach and management of PC include differences with emergency medicine. Thus, there are some problems while providing PC in the ED. With this article, the definition, main features, benefits, and problems of providing PC are presented, with the primary aim of emphasizing the importance of PC integration into the ED. PMID:27336074

  10. Improving the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jenni

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) in the emergency department is challenging due to the wide range of non-specific symptoms, lack of clinical diagnostic criteria, and imperfect investigations. Various scoring systems exist in an attempt to limit unnecessary investigations in those with low risk of PE. Following a baseline audit and subsequent PDSA cycles we implemented a flowchart for use in patients suspected of pulmonary embolism encouraging the correct use of the Wells Score and Pulmonary Embolism Rule out Criteria (PERC). The standard used for comparison was based on the NICE guidelines for diagnosis of PE with the addition that PERC could also be used if appropriate. Data was collected over four week periods before and after the introduction of our flowchart in two emergency departments in Melbourne. We aimed to increase documentation of pre-test probability, reduce inappropriate investigations, and increase the use of interim parenteral anticoagulation where there was a delay to imaging. Results showed an increase in the documentation of pre-test probability and the proportion of investigations requested that were inappropriate was reduced. The percentage of inappropriate d-dimers was reduced from 36% to 24%; the percentage of inappropriate CTPAs was reduced from 34% to 10%; and the percentage of inappropriate V/Q scans was reduced from 42% to 14%. Implementation of a simple diagnostic algorithm led to an increase in documentation of pre-test probability and a reduction in inappropriate and unnecessary investigations. This intervention may be applicable to other emergency departments where similar issues in diagnosing pulmonary embolism exist. PMID:26893882

  11. Partnering Effectively With Inpatient Leaders for Improved Emergency Department Throughput

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Stephanie J.; Esbenshade, Angie

    2015-01-01

    The boarding of patients is a root cause of overcrowding in a majority of emergency departments (EDs) nationwide. It reduces capacity to treat ED patients, decreases bed utilization, and compromises quality, safety, and the patient experience. Because of its systemic nature, it can only be effectively addressed through attention and commitment by all stakeholders. Once emergency departments have addressed throughput challenges they can solve on their own, they are ready to focus on proactive communication and teamwork with inpatient leaders to identify and transfer potential admissions more efficiently. No-delay nurse reports are an important tool to reduce time from admit orders to arrival on patient units. An effective hospital-wide flow committee also removes barriers for admitting patients quickly from the emergency department and addresses a revised January 1, 2014, Joint Commission standard that requires goal setting and measurement to mitigate and better manage the boarding of patients. This article discusses who should attend, the scope of the committee charter, how to use a hospital-wide throughput dashboard to measure results, and includes a sample agenda. It is recommended that the committee also assess and evaluate the effectiveness of the surge plan at least every three years to ensure that it meets goals identified by the committee. This article also shares best practices associated with two key tactics to support an effective hospital-wide throughput committee: inpatient bed huddles to expedite inpatient admissions and inpatient leader rounding, where the inpatient leader rounds on boarded ED patients to ensure safety and quality while also establishing ownership for the transition.

  12. On the Frontline: Pediatric Obesity in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Heather M.; Close, Matthew; Jones, Brett; Furtado, Nicholas; Bunney, E. Bradshaw; Mackey, Mark; Marquez, Diego; Edison, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    Obesity among children is rising at an alarming rate. This study examines pediatric emergency department visits for children aged 2 to 17 years to determine the prevalence of normal, overweight, and obesity as well as to characterize discharge diagnosis and level of service among the different groups. The electronic emergency department medical record and billing service data were used in the review process. Body mass index (BMI) and percentiles were calculated using the Centers for Disease Control formulas with overweight being defined as BMI between 85th and 94th sex- and age-specific percentiles and obesity as greater than 95th sex- and age-specific percentile. The study was reviewed and approved by the institutional review board. Of the 596 patients meeting inclusion criteria, there was a predominance of African American and Hispanic patients. Approximately 53% (313) of patients were classified as normal weight, while 46% (272) of patients were either overweight or obese. The percentages of overweight and obesity were similar across racial/ethnic classifications, with a slight predominance of obesity among minority groups (30% and 35%, respectively, in minority groups vs 28% and 25%, respectively, in nonminority groups). There were no statistically significant differences between discharge diagnosis and level of service among the different weight categories. Rates of overweight and obesity in this predominately minority pediatric population were significantly greater than the published national rates. The impact of the epidemic of childhood obesity mandates the need for innovative strategies of weight control and reduction. Emergency departments routinely treat high-risk pediatric populations and can therefore serve as a resource for screening and early referral that has been previously untapped in combating childhood obesity. PMID:22364061

  13. Emergency department visits during an Olympic gold medal television broadcast

    PubMed Central

    Redelmeier, Donald A; Vermeulen, Marian J

    2011-01-01

    Background Practice pattern variations are often attributed to physician decision-making with no accounting for patient preferences. Objective To test whether a mass media television broadcast unrelated to health was associated with changes in the rate and characteristics of visits for acute emergency care. Design Time-series analysis of emergency department visits for any reason. Subjects Population-based sample of all patients seeking emergency care in Ontario, Canada. Measures The broadcast day was defined as the Olympic men’s gold medal ice hockey game final. The control days were defined as the 6 Sundays before and after the broadcast day. Results A total of 99 447 visits occurred over the 7 Sundays, of which 13 990 occurred on the broadcast day. Comparing the broadcast day with control days, we found no significant difference in the hourly rate of visits before the broadcast (544 vs 537, p = 0.41) or after the broadcast (647 vs 639, p = 0.55). In contrast, we observed a significant reduction in hourly rate of visits during the broadcast (647 vs 783, p < 0.001), equal to an absolute decrease of 409 patients, a relative decrease of 17% (95% confidence interval 13–21), or about 136 fewer patients per hour. The relative decrease during the broadcast was particularly large for adult men with low triage severity. The greatest reductions were for patients with abdominal, musculoskeletal or traumatic disorders. Conclusion Mass media television broadcasts can influence patient preferences and thereby lead to a decrease in emergency department visits. PMID:21915235

  14. Emergency Point-of-Care Ultrasound Detection of Cancer in the Pediatric Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Jamjoom, Roaa S; Etoom, Yousef; Solano, Tanya; Desjardins, Marie-Pier; Fischer, Jason W

    2015-08-01

    The use of point-of-care ultrasound in the pediatric emergency department is evolving beyond conventional applications as users become more expert with the technology. In this case series, we describe the potential utility of recognizing abnormal anatomy to impact care in the context of possible cancer in pediatric patients. We describe 4 patients with Langerhans histiocytosis, neuroblastoma, Wilms tumor, and rhabdomyosarcoma, in which point-of-care ultrasound was used to facilitate the diagnoses.

  15. Process Improvements to Reform Patient Flow in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Whatley, Shawn D; Leung, Alexander K; Duic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments (ED) function to diagnose, stabilize, manage and dispose patients as efficiently as possible. Although problems may be suspected at triage, ED physician input is required at each step of the patient journey through the ED, from diagnosis to disposition. If we want timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment and great outcomes, then ED processes should connect patients and physicians as quickly as possible. This article discusses the key concepts of ED patient flow, value and efficiency. Based on these fundamentals, it describes the significant impact of ED process improvements implemented on measures of ED efficiency at a large community ED in Ontario, Canada. PMID:27133605

  16. The management of hyperkalaemia in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Ahee, P; Crowe, A V

    2000-05-01

    Life threatening hyperkalaemia (> 7.0 mmol/l) is commonly associated with acute renal failure. Moderate hyperkalaemia (6.1-6.9 mmol/l) is also common and well tolerated in patients with chronic renal failure. Renal failure is the most common cause of hyperkalaemia although other causes to consider include drugs (potassium sparing diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors), hyperglycaemia, rhabdomyolysis and adrenal insufficiency. Hyperkalaemia affects the cardiac conducting tissue and can cause serious arrhythmias including ventricular fibrillation and asystolic arrest. Therefore it is important to treat hyperkalaemia promptly in the emergency department. This paper evaluates the therapeutic options available for treatment of hyperkalaemia.

  17. Process Improvements to Reform Patient Flow in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Whatley, Shawn D; Leung, Alexander K; Duic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments (ED) function to diagnose, stabilize, manage and dispose patients as efficiently as possible. Although problems may be suspected at triage, ED physician input is required at each step of the patient journey through the ED, from diagnosis to disposition. If we want timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment and great outcomes, then ED processes should connect patients and physicians as quickly as possible. This article discusses the key concepts of ED patient flow, value and efficiency. Based on these fundamentals, it describes the significant impact of ED process improvements implemented on measures of ED efficiency at a large community ED in Ontario, Canada.

  18. Emergency department evaluation and treatment of the shoulder and humerus.

    PubMed

    Bonz, James; Tinloy, Bradford

    2015-05-01

    Shoulder injuries are among the most common musculoskeletal complaints seen in US emergency departments (EDs). ED evaluation of the shoulder must account for the broad range of potential fracture patterns seen in the clavicle, scapula, and humerus. Acromioclavicular dislocation is often encountered in the ED and treatment varies by severity. Dislocation of the shoulder is frequently seen, and the ED physician must be skilled in several reduction techniques to optimize a successful reduction. An understanding of when orthopedic consultation is appropriate and when patients can be dispositioned with timely follow-up are integral to complete patient recovery.

  19. Pediatric migraine: abortive management in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, David C; Spiro, David M; Meckler, Garth D

    2014-02-01

    Studies suggest that headache accounts for approximately 1% of pediatric emergency department (ED) visits. ED physicians must distinguish between primary headaches, such as a tension or migraine, and secondary headaches caused by systemic disease including neoplasm, infection, or intracranial hemorrhage. A recent study found that 40% of children presenting to the ED with headache were diagnosed with a primary headache, and 75% of these were migraine. Once the diagnosis of migraine has been made, the ED physician is faced with the challenge of determining appropriate abortive treatment. This review summarizes the most recent literature on pediatric migraine with an emphasis on diagnosis and abortive treatment in the ED.

  20. Load Balancing at Emergency Departments using ‘Crowdinforming’

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Marcia R; Strome, Trevor; Mukhi, Shamir; McLoed, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background: Emergency Department (ED) overcrowding is an important healthcare issue facing increasing public and regulatory scrutiny in Canada and around the world. Many approaches to alleviate excessive waiting times and lengths of stay have been studied. In theory, optimal ED patient flow may be assisted via balancing patient loads between EDs (in essence spreading patients more evenly throughout this system). This investigation utilizes simulation to explore “Crowdinforming” as a basis for a process control strategy aimed to balance patient loads between six EDs within a mid-sized Canadian city. Methods: Anonymous patient visit data comprising 120,000 ED patient visits over six months to six ED facilities were obtained from the region’s Emergency Department Information System (EDIS) to (1) determine trends in ED visits and interactions between parameters; (2) to develop a process control strategy integrating crowdinforming; and, (3) apply and evaluate the model in a simulated environment to explore the potential impact on patient self-redirection and load balancing between EDs. Results: As in reality, the data available and subsequent model demonstrated that there are many factors that impact ED patient flow. Initial results suggest that for this particular data set used, ED arrival rates were the most useful metric for ED ‘busyness’ in a process control strategy, and that Emergency Department performance may benefit from load balancing efforts. Conclusions: The simulation supports the use of crowdinforming as a potential tool when used in a process control strategy to balance the patient loads between EDs. The work also revealed that the value of several parameters intuitively expected to be meaningful metrics of ED ‘busyness’ was not evident, highlighting the importance of finding parameters meaningful within one’s particular data set. The information provided in the crowdinforming model is already available in a local context at some ED sites

  1. [Gynecological ultrasound examination at the general health care emergency department].

    PubMed

    Forsbom, Otto; Väyrynen, Tapio; Hurskainen, Ritva

    2016-01-01

    Vaginal ultrasound examination is a possible addition for the general health care emergency department. It gives additional information of gynecological illnesses and pregnancy. Ultrasound can guide treatment and make consulting the right specialty easier when treating women with acute abdominal pain. Correctly used ultrasound can also reduce the need for consultation and speed up treatment, especially in early pregnancy. The physician performing the ultrasound should know the diagnostic capabilities of ultrasound and compare findings to the clinical status and history. Ultrasound can't replace clinical history and status in any situation. A pregnancy test, hemoglobin or CRP are often required to achieve diagnosis.

  2. Impact of an Emergency Nurse Coordinator on Work Flow Optimization in an Emergency Department in Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    S, Preethy; Xavier, Teenu; N, Reghunathan; Robin, Metilda; Agrawal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the emergency nurse coordinator in optimization of workflow of the emergency department. A retrospective analysis of all patient encounters in the emergency department between Aug 1 to Sept 31 of 2014 (n = 6,189) and Aug 1 to September 31 of 2015 (n = 8,626) was conducted. There was a statistically significant decrease in the admission time, length of stay, transfer time, and review time of the patients after the introduction of the emergency nurse coordinator in the emergency department. (p < 0.05).

  3. Is there a role for academic medical centers in emerging markets?

    PubMed

    Wiener, Charles M; Thompson, Steven J; Wu, Sandford; Chellappa, Mohan; Hasham, Salim

    2012-01-01

    Governments in emerging markets face mounting challenges in managing health spending, building capability and capacity, modernizing ageing infrastructure, and investing in skills and resources. One path to overcoming these challenges is to establish new public-private models of health care development and delivery based on United States academic medical centers, whose missions are to advance medical education and clinical delivery. Johns Hopkins Medicine is a participant in the collaboration developing between the Perdana University Hospital and the Perdana University Graduate School of Medicine in Malaysia. These two organizations comprise an academic health science center based on the United States model. The Perdana project provides constructive insights into the opportunities and challenges that governments, universities, and the private sector face when introducing new models of patient care that are integrated with medical education, clinical training, and biomedical research.

  4. Emergency Diesel Generator reliability at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    This report is the culmination of the first phase of a comprehensive effort by the Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) Office of Self-Assessment and Emergency Management (DP-9) to assess the reliability and availability of emergency power supplies (i.e., standby or backup supplies providing electric power to systems or equipment that perform functions important to safety) at DOE management concerns over the recent number of reported failures of emergency and back-up supplies to provide power when required. Augmented Evaluation Team (AET) on-site reviews were conducted during the week of September 30, 1991 at Rocky Flats (RF), and the week of October 7, 1991 at the Richland (RL) and Savannah River (SR) sites to investigate the failures. The AET reviews focused on Emergency Diesel Generator (EDG) failures because they were identified as the dominant contributor to power supply failures (46 of the 77 failures involved EDG's, as opposed to other sources such as batteries, motor-generator sets, etc.). The RF, RL, and SR sites were chosen because they were among the leaders in numbers of EDG failures. The objectives of the AET investigations were to collect, analyze, and document factual information concerning the causes, conditions, and circumstances surrounding EDG failures, to conduct a preliminary assessment of the safety significance of the failures and the site specific and generic safety implications for DOE facilities, and to identify appropriate follow-on actions necessary to complete the overall assessment of the adequacy of emergency and back-up power sources. This report presents the AET findings concerning the reliability of EDG's at the RF, RL, and SR sites, and the safety significance of EDG failures.

  5. Diagnosis of Aortic Dissection in Emergency Department Patients is Rare

    PubMed Central

    Alter, Scott M.; Eskin, Barnet; Allegra, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Aortic dissection is a rare event. While the most frequent symptom is chest pain, that is a common emergency department (ED) chief complaint and other diseases causing chest pain occur much more often. Furthermore, 20% of dissections are without chest pain and 6% are painless. For these reasons, diagnosing dissections may be challenging. Our goal was to determine the number of total ED and atraumatic chest pain patients for every aortic dissection diagnosed by emergency physicians. Methods Design: Retrospective cohort. Setting: 33 suburban and urban New York and New Jersey EDs with annual visits between 8,000 and 80,000. Participants: Consecutive patients seen by emergency physicians from 1-1-1996 through 12-31-2010. Observations: We identified aortic dissection and atraumatic chest pain patients using the International Classification of Diseases 9th Revision and Clinical Modification codes. We then calculated the number of total ED and atraumatic chest pain patients for every aortic dissection, along with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results From a database of 9.5 million ED visits, we identified 782 aortic dissections or one for every 12,200 (95% CI [11,400–13,100]) visits. The mean age of dissection patients was 66±16 years and 38% were female. There were 763,000 (8%) with atraumatic chest pain diagnoses. Thus, there is one dissection for every 980 (95% CI [910–1,050]) atraumatic chest pain patients. Conclusion The diagnosis of aortic dissections by emergency physicians is rare and challenging. An emergency physician seeing 3,000 to 4,000 patients a year would diagnose an aortic dissection approximately every three to four years. PMID:26587083

  6. Independent component analysis decomposition of hospital emergency department throughput measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiang; Chu, Henry

    2016-05-01

    We present a method adapted from medical sensor data analysis, viz. independent component analysis of electroencephalography data, to health system analysis. Timely and effective care in a hospital emergency department is measured by throughput measures such as median times patients spent before they were admitted as an inpatient, before they were sent home, before they were seen by a healthcare professional. We consider a set of five such measures collected at 3,086 hospitals distributed across the U.S. One model of the performance of an emergency department is that these correlated throughput measures are linear combinations of some underlying sources. The independent component analysis decomposition of the data set can thus be viewed as transforming a set of performance measures collected at a site to a collection of outputs of spatial filters applied to the whole multi-measure data. We compare the independent component sources with the output of the conventional principal component analysis to show that the independent components are more suitable for understanding the data sets through visualizations.

  7. Building an Automated SOAP Classifier for Emergency Department Reports

    PubMed Central

    Mowery, Danielle; Wiebe, Janyce; Visweswaran, Shyam; Harkema, Hendrik; Chapman, Wendy W.

    2011-01-01

    Information extraction applications that extract structured event and entity information from unstructured text can leverage knowledge of clinical report structure to improve performance. The SOAP (Subjective, Objective, Assessment, Plan) framework, used to structure progress notes to facilitate problem-specific, clinical decision making by physicians, is one example of a well-known, canonical structure in the medical domain. Although its applicability to structuring data is understood, its contribution to information extraction tasks has not yet been determined. The first step to evaluating the SOAP framework’s usefulness for clinical information extraction is to apply the model to clinical narratives and develop an automated SOAP classifier that classifies sentences from clinical reports. In this quantitative study, we applied the SOAP framework to sentences from emergency department reports, and trained and evaluated SOAP classifiers built with various linguistic features. We found the SOAP framework can be applied manually to emergency department reports with high agreement (Cohen’s kappa coefficients over 0.70). Using a variety of features, we found classifiers for each SOAP class can be created with moderate to outstanding performance with F1 scores of 93.9 (subjective), 94.5 (objective), 75.7 (assessment), and 77.0 (plan). We look forward to expanding the framework and applying the SOAP classification to clinical information extraction tasks. PMID:21925286

  8. Scombrotoxinism: Protracted Illness following Misdiagnosis in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Lohiya, Ghan-Shyam; Lohiya, Sapna; Lohiya, Sunita; Krishna, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Background. Scombrotoxinism is an acute toxin-induced illness caused primarily by bacterial synthesis of histamine in decomposed fish. Case Report. Immediately after taking 2-3 bites of cooked salmon, a clerical worker developed oral burning, urticaria, and asthma. In the emergency department, she was diagnosed with “allergies”; scombrotoxinism was never considered. She then developed wide-ranging symptoms (e.g., chronic fatigue, asthma, anxiety, multiple chemical sensitivity, and paresthesiae) and saw many specialists (in pulmonology, otorhinolaryngology, allergy, toxicology, neurology, psychology, and immunology). During the next 500+ days, she had extensive testing (allergy screens, brain MRI, electroencephalogram, electromyogram, nerve conduction velocity, heavy metal screen, and blood chemistry) with essentially normal results. She filed a workers' compensation claim since this injury occurred following a business meal. She was evaluated by a Qualified Medical Evaluator (GL) on day 504, who diagnosed scombrotoxinism. Comment. Scombrotoxinism should be considered in all patients presenting to the emergency department with “oral burning” or allergy symptoms following “fish consumption.” Initial attention to such history would have led to a correct diagnosis and averted this patient's extended illness. Specialist referrals and tests should be ordered only if clinically indicated and not for diagnostic fishing expedition. Meticulous history is crucial in resolving clinical dilemmas. PMID:26357577

  9. Building an automated SOAP classifier for emergency department reports.

    PubMed

    Mowery, Danielle; Wiebe, Janyce; Visweswaran, Shyam; Harkema, Henk; Chapman, Wendy W

    2012-02-01

    Information extraction applications that extract structured event and entity information from unstructured text can leverage knowledge of clinical report structure to improve performance. The Subjective, Objective, Assessment, Plan (SOAP) framework, used to structure progress notes to facilitate problem-specific, clinical decision making by physicians, is one example of a well-known, canonical structure in the medical domain. Although its applicability to structuring data is understood, its contribution to information extraction tasks has not yet been determined. The first step to evaluating the SOAP framework's usefulness for clinical information extraction is to apply the model to clinical narratives and develop an automated SOAP classifier that classifies sentences from clinical reports. In this quantitative study, we applied the SOAP framework to sentences from emergency department reports, and trained and evaluated SOAP classifiers built with various linguistic features. We found the SOAP framework can be applied manually to emergency department reports with high agreement (Cohen's kappa coefficients over 0.70). Using a variety of features, we found classifiers for each SOAP class can be created with moderate to outstanding performance with F(1) scores of 93.9 (subjective), 94.5 (objective), 75.7 (assessment), and 77.0 (plan). We look forward to expanding the framework and applying the SOAP classification to clinical information extraction tasks.

  10. Emergency Department Crowding Disparity: a Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated national differences in emergency department (ED) crowding to identify factors significantly associated with crowding in institutes and communities across Korea. This was a cross-sectional nationwide observational study using data abstracted from the National Emergency Department Information System (NEDIS). We calculated mean occupancy rates to quantify ED crowding status and divided EDs into three groups according to their occupancy rates (cutoffs: 0.5 and 1.0). Factors potentially related to ED crowding were collected from the NEDIS. We performed a multivariate regression analysis to identify variables significantly associated with ED crowding. A total of 120 EDs were included in the final analysis. Of these, 73 were categorized as 'low crowded' (LC, occupancy rate < 0.50), 37 as 'middle crowded' (MC, 0.50 ≤ occupancy rate < 1.00), 10 EDs as 'high crowded' (HC, 1.00 ≤ occupancy rate). The mean ED occupancy rate varied widely, from 0.06 to 2.33. The median value was 0.39 with interquartile ranges (IQRs) from 0.20 to 0.71. Multivariate analysis revealed that after adjustment, ED crowding was significantly associated with the number of visits, percentage of patients referred, number of nurses, and ED disposition. This nationwide study observed significant variety in ED crowding. Several input, throughput, and output factors were associated with crowding. PMID:27478347

  11. Initial management of open hand fractures in an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Capo, John T; Hall, Michael; Nourbakhsh, Ali; Tan, Virak; Henry, Patrick

    2011-12-01

    We retrospectively reviewed the cases of patients with open hand fractures and/or dislocations managed at our institution between 2001 and 2009. The management protocol consisted of irrigation and debridement, reduction (if necessary), splinting, and antibiotics administration in the emergency department. Patients with vascular compromise or severe mangling open wounds were taken to the operating room for treatment. Data regarding demographics, wound size and modified Gustilo-Anderson classification, and timing of interventions were recorded. Included in the study were 145 cases (91 class III, 41 class II, and 13 class I injuries). In 102 cases, definitive and final management took place in the emergency department; in the other 43 cases, additional management took place in the operating room. Antibiotics were administered within 4 hours after injury, and irrigation and debridement were performed within 6 hours. Each of the 2 infections (1.4%) developed in a class III injury. In open hand fractures, particularly type I and type II wounds, the protocol we followed can be appropriate when the injury is not the severe mangling type and does not require acute vascular repair. PMID:22268015

  12. Scombrotoxinism: Protracted Illness following Misdiagnosis in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Lohiya, Ghan-Shyam; Lohiya, Sapna; Lohiya, Sunita; Krishna, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Background. Scombrotoxinism is an acute toxin-induced illness caused primarily by bacterial synthesis of histamine in decomposed fish. Case Report. Immediately after taking 2-3 bites of cooked salmon, a clerical worker developed oral burning, urticaria, and asthma. In the emergency department, she was diagnosed with "allergies"; scombrotoxinism was never considered. She then developed wide-ranging symptoms (e.g., chronic fatigue, asthma, anxiety, multiple chemical sensitivity, and paresthesiae) and saw many specialists (in pulmonology, otorhinolaryngology, allergy, toxicology, neurology, psychology, and immunology). During the next 500+ days, she had extensive testing (allergy screens, brain MRI, electroencephalogram, electromyogram, nerve conduction velocity, heavy metal screen, and blood chemistry) with essentially normal results. She filed a workers' compensation claim since this injury occurred following a business meal. She was evaluated by a Qualified Medical Evaluator (GL) on day 504, who diagnosed scombrotoxinism. Comment. Scombrotoxinism should be considered in all patients presenting to the emergency department with "oral burning" or allergy symptoms following "fish consumption." Initial attention to such history would have led to a correct diagnosis and averted this patient's extended illness. Specialist referrals and tests should be ordered only if clinically indicated and not for diagnostic fishing expedition. Meticulous history is crucial in resolving clinical dilemmas. PMID:26357577

  13. EMDOC (Emergency Department overcrowding) Internet-based safety net research.

    PubMed

    Steele, Robert; Kiss, Attilla

    2008-07-01

    Emergency Department (ED) overcrowding is a national crisis with few prospective data to document its occurrence. The objective of this study was to prospectively collect data on variables involved in Emergency Department overcrowding (EMDOC) using an Internet-based data entry model. A prospective observational Internet-based study involving 18 hospitals over a 13-month period was designed. Investigators input data into the EmDOC Internet site at 10:00 p.m. on 7 random days each month. The study found that the primary reason for ED overcrowding was lack of inpatient beds. Important means were: patient-to-nurse ratio = 2.85, diversion was 7.4 h/24 h, and hospital census was 83%. From ED waiting room to an ED bed took a mean time of 209 min. The mean number of makeshift beds was 3.1. There was no single variable that was noted to define or predict overcrowding. Documentation of factors involved in ED overcrowding found that overcrowding was not just an ED problem, but a problem that occurs due to overcrowding in the entire institution. PMID:17976788

  14. Developing a programme of patient 'streaming' in an emergency department.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bryan; Burscough, Sheila

    2015-05-01

    Orthopaedic and musculoskeletal injuries are commonly identified in the emergency department (ED). Whilst much orthopaedic trauma literature focuses on fractures of the proximal femur, raising key issues such as length of stay and timely discharge, the start of the patients' journey is just as important in ensuring an appropriate assessment and a smooth transition through each stage of care. In the UK targets have been set for proximal hip fractured patients to attend theatre within 48 hours of admission, if fit. Appraising such patients expediently on initial point of contact in the ED has demonstrated that a number of factors can impinge and delay the patients' progress. This said a large number of other orthopaedic and musculoskeletal self presenting patients rely on the same appropriate transition to suitable medical assistance. The emergency department triage system has been used in the UK in its latest format since 2001, yet elderly patients with painful Colles fractures find they wait for specialist attention in a linear queue, possibly over extended lengths of time. This short paper explores how 'streaming' patients in one local ED has improved waiting/treatment times, and identified the fact that in some months (December 2012), 1 in 3 attendees present with a musculoskeletal problem. Using audit data collected over the last four years the benefits of 'streaming' patients is evident.

  15. Availability of ambulance patient care reports in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Dominick; Sinclair, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Clinical handovers of patient care among healthcare professionals is vulnerable to the loss of important clinical information. A verbal report is typically provided by paramedics and documented by emergency department (ED) triage nurses. Paramedics subsequently complete a patient care report which is submitted electronically. This emergency medical system (EMS) patient care report often contains details of paramedic assessment and management that is not all captured in the nursing triage note. EMS patient care reports are often unavailable for review by emergency physicians and nurses. Two processes occur in the distribution of EMS patient care reports. The first is an external process to the ED that is influenced by the prehospital emergency medical system and results in the report being faxed to the ED. The second process is internal to the ED that requires clerical staff to distribute the fax report to accompany patient charts. A baseline audit measured the percentage of EMS patient care reports that were available to emergency physicians at the time of initial patient assessments and showed a wide variation in the availability of EMS reports. Also measured were the time intervals from patient transfer from EMS to ED stretcher until the EMS report was received by fax (external process measure) and the time from receiving the EMS fax report until distribution to patient chart (internal process measure). These baseline measures showed a wide variation in the time it takes to receive the EMS reports by fax and to distribute reports. Improvement strategies consisted of: 1. Educating ED clerical staff about the importance of EMS reports 2. Implementing a new process to minimize ED clerical staff handling of EMS reports for nonactive ED patients 3. Elimination of the automatic retrieval of old hospital charts and their distribution for ED patients 4. Introduction of an electronic dashboard for patients arriving by ambulance to facilitate more efficient distribution of

  16. Availability of ambulance patient care reports in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Dominick; Sinclair, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Clinical handovers of patient care among healthcare professionals is vulnerable to the loss of important clinical information. A verbal report is typically provided by paramedics and documented by emergency department (ED) triage nurses. Paramedics subsequently complete a patient care report which is submitted electronically. This emergency medical system (EMS) patient care report often contains details of paramedic assessment and management that is not all captured in the nursing triage note. EMS patient care reports are often unavailable for review by emergency physicians and nurses. Two processes occur in the distribution of EMS patient care reports. The first is an external process to the ED that is influenced by the prehospital emergency medical system and results in the report being faxed to the ED. The second process is internal to the ED that requires clerical staff to distribute the fax report to accompany patient charts. A baseline audit measured the percentage of EMS patient care reports that were available to emergency physicians at the time of initial patient assessments and showed a wide variation in the availability of EMS reports. Also measured were the time intervals from patient transfer from EMS to ED stretcher until the EMS report was received by fax (external process measure) and the time from receiving the EMS fax report until distribution to patient chart (internal process measure). These baseline measures showed a wide variation in the time it takes to receive the EMS reports by fax and to distribute reports. Improvement strategies consisted of: 1. Educating ED clerical staff about the importance of EMS reports 2. Implementing a new process to minimize ED clerical staff handling of EMS reports for nonactive ED patients 3. Elimination of the automatic retrieval of old hospital charts and their distribution for ED patients 4. Introduction of an electronic dashboard for patients arriving by ambulance to facilitate more efficient distribution of

  17. An Evidence-Based Alcohol Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) Curriculum for Emergency Department (ED) Providers Improves Skills and Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Emergency Departments (EDs) offer an opportunity to improve the care of patients with at-risk and dependent drinking by teaching staff to screen, perform brief intervention and refer to treatment (SBIRT). We describe here the implementation at 14 Academic EDs of a structured SBIRT curriculum to determine if this learning experience…

  18. Does Administrative Location of an Academic Department Affect Educational Emphasis? The Case of Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Shane

    2009-01-01

    This study questions whether administrative location of an academic department influences the qualitative nature of its educational output, as measured by the distribution of field choices among graduating students. To address this question, the author recorded curriculum vitae data on 661 economics PhD candidates, all of whom were on the Spring…

  19. The Administrative Tasks and Professional Development Needs of Heads of Academic Departments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonsdale, Alan J.; Bardsley, W. Neil

    The range of administrative tasks performed by 679 heads of academic departments in Australian colleges of advanced education was surveyed, along with the perceptions of the administrators of their professional development needs. In addition to information about the respondent's appointment and experience, a questionnaire addressed 83 tasks,…

  20. Teaching/Research Relations in Departments: The Perspectives of Built Environment Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durning, Bridget; Jenkins, Alan

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the perceptions of built environment academics in four post-1992 universities in the UK on teaching/research relations. Whilst set in particular departments, institutions and disciplines, it addresses issues that are of central concern worldwide. This study indicates that securing effective teaching/research…

  1. Professional Culture Fit and Work-Related Quality of Life in Academic Departments: A Phenomenographic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canales Opazo, Tatiana Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Although quality of life (QoL) has been a highly investigated issue over the last decades, there is still little agreement on its definition, and even less information about the validity of its measurements in specific settings. Additionally, in complex institutions like a university, functional units such as academic department usually are more…

  2. Promoting Instructional Change: Using Social Network Analysis to Understand the Informal Structure of Academic Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quardokus, Kathleen; Henderson, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Calls for improvement of undergraduate science education have resulted in numerous initiatives that seek to improve student learning outcomes by promoting changes in faculty teaching practices. Although many of these initiatives focus on individual faculty, researchers consider the academic department to be a highly productive focus for creating…

  3. Contrasting Views of Induction: The Experiences of New Academic Staff and Their Heads of Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staniforth, David; Harland, Tony

    2006-01-01

    This article focuses on the induction experiences of new academic staff and the role of their head of department in this process. Respondents reflected on personal experiences and their narratives give a fine-grained account of the same event from two contrasting perspectives. We expected to find that the heads would be key figures in the…

  4. Leadership Experiences and Characteristics of Chairs of Academic Departments of Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Samuel J.; Buckley, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Effective leadership in academic medicine requires a broad constellation of skills, experiences, and core values. The authors sought to describe and define these. Method: The authors conducted a web-based survey among 132 Chairs of North American departments of psychiatry. Results: Eighty-five Chairs (64%) responded to the survey, the…

  5. Why (Not) Assess? Views from the Academic Departments of Finnish Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huusko, Mira; Ursin, Jani

    2010-01-01

    In Europe, national quality assurance systems of higher education have begun to be established. In Finland, this development has had the consequence of forcing universities to take notice of assessment procedures. However, little is known about the procedures taking place in individual academic departments as a result of this pan-European trend.…

  6. Managing the Academic Library Cataloging Department in Changing Times: A State of the Art Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibley, Brenda Parris

    This paper presents an annotated bibliography of articles that provide information on managing the academic library cataloging department. Topics include: hiring tests for technical services support staff; changing roles for professional, paraprofessional staff and support staff; motivating and rewarding cataloging staff; a study of entry level…

  7. A Graphic Analysis of the Instructional Service Function of Academic Departments. AIR Forum 1980 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichard, Donald J.; And Others

    A modified form of vector analysis is examined that was applied to graphs depicting the number of undergraduate student credit hours taken by majors and nonmajors in each of 18 arts and sciences departments. The analysis permitted the identification of instructional service strategies adopted by various academic units and the evaluation of the…

  8. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Six Models in Forecasting Student Demand on Academic Departments. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, R. John; Robertson, Leon B.

    An accurate forecast of the student demand by level on the academic departments of an institution is vital for budget and financial planning decisions, for faculty workload scheduling, and for physical facility planning. Many methods have been used to forecast this demand, ranging from "seat of your pants" guessing to highly complex computer…

  9. Length of Stay of Pediatric Mental Health Emergency Department Visits in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Sarah D.; Case, Brady G.; Olfson, Mark; Linakis, James G.; Laska, Eugene M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare pediatric mental health emergency department visits to other pediatric emergency department visits, focusing on length of stay. Method: We analyzed data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a nationally representative sample of US emergency department visits from 2001 to 2008, for patients aged less than…

  10. Respiratory support for children in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Schibler, Andreas; Franklin, Donna

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory support in paediatric emergency settings ranges from oxygen delivery with subnasal oxygen to invasive mechanical ventilation. Recent data suggest that oxygen can cause reperfusion injuries and should be delivered with caution within well-defined clinical target ranges. Most mild to moderate respiratory distress conditions with an oxygen requirement may benefit from early use of continuous positive airway pressure. High-flow nasal cannula therapy (HFNC) is an emerging alternative way to support the inspiratory effort combined with oxygen delivery and positive expiratory pressures without the need of complicated equipment or good compliance from the child. Besides a positive pressure support effect, HFNC therapy reduces the physiological dead space with improved CO2 clearance. A decrease in heart and respiratory rate within the first few hours after initiation of HFNC therapy is likely to identify responders of the treatment. The use of non-invasive ventilation such as continuous positive airway pressure or the use of bi-level positive airway pressure ventilation in emergency departments has increased, and it has been recognised that continuous positive airway pressure support for older children with asthma is particularly efficient. PMID:27062623

  11. Improving the Quality of Imaging in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, C Craig; Castro, Alexandra

    2015-12-01

    Imaging is critical for the care of emergency department (ED) patients. However, much of the imaging performed for acute care today is overutilization, creating substantial cost without significant benefit. Further, the value of imaging is not easily defined, as imaging only affects outcomes indirectly, through interaction with treatment. Improving the quality, including appropriateness, of emergency imaging requires understanding of how imaging contributes to patient care. The six-tier efficacy hierarchy of Fryback and Thornbury enables understanding of the value of imaging on multiple levels, ranging from technical efficacy to medical decision-making and higher-level patient and societal outcomes. The imaging efficacy hierarchy also allows definition of imaging quality through the Institute of Medicine (IOM)'s quality domains of safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equitability and provides a foundation for quality improvement. In this article, the authors elucidate the Fryback and Thornbury framework to define the value of imaging in the ED and to relate emergency imaging to the IOM quality domains.

  12. Entry overload, emergency department overcrowding, and ambulance bypass

    PubMed Central

    Fatovich, D; Hirsch, R

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To describe an experience of emergency department (ED) overcrowding and ambulance bypass. Methods: A prospective observational study at Royal Perth Hospital, a major teaching hospital. Episodes of ambulance bypass and their characteristics were recorded. Results: From 1 July 1999 to 30 June 2001, there were 141 episodes of ambulance bypass (mean duration 187 min, range 35–995). Monday was the most common day with 39 (28%) episodes. Entry block alone was the most common reason bypass was activated (n=38, 30.4%). The mean number of patients in ED at these times was 40 (occupancy 174%), including nine in the corridor, seven awaiting admission, and 14 waiting to be seen. Episodes attributable to entry block were typically preceded by a presentation rate of ⩾10 patients per hour for ⩾2 hours (OR 6.2, 95% CI 4.3 to 8.5). Mid-afternoon to early evening was the most common time for activation. Ambulance bypass is increasing in frequency and duration. Conclusions: Entry overload resulting in entry block results from overwhelming numbers of patients presenting to the ED in a short space of time. Entry block impairs access to emergency care. Unless something is done in the near future, the general public may no longer be able to rely on EDs for quality and timely emergency care. A "whole of system" approach is necessary to tackle the problem. PMID:12954675

  13. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome at the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taerim; Ahn, Shin; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Seo, Dong Woo; Kim, Won Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is an underestimated cause of thunderclap headache that shares many characteristics with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). This fact makes the two easily confused by emergency physicians. This study evaluated the clinical manifestations, radiological features, and outcomes of patients with RCVS. Methods The electronic medical records of 18 patients meeting the diagnostic criteria of RCVS at our emergency department between January 2013 and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Results The mean patient age was 50.7 years, and 80% were women. Patients with RCVS encountered physicians 4.7 times before receiving an accurate diagnosis. The mean duration of symptoms until diagnosis was 9.3 days. All but one patient experienced severe headache of 8 to 10 on a numerical rating scale. A total of 44% of patients had nausea, and 66% of patients experienced worsening of the headache while gagging, leaning forward, defecating, urinating, or having sexual intercourse. The most frequently affected vessels were the middle cerebral arteries, which demonstrated a characteristic diffuse “string of beads” appearance. Four cases were complicated by SAH. Conclusion Patients with RCVS have a unique set of clinical and imaging features. Emergency physicians should have a high index of suspicion for this clinical entity to improve its rate of detection in patients with thunderclap headache when there is no evidence of aneurysmal SAH. PMID:27752599

  14. Epidemiology of Otologic Diagnoses in United States Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Kozin, Elliott D.; Sethi, Rosh K.V.; Remenschneider, Aaron K.; Kaplan, Alyson; del Portal, Daniel A.; Gray, Stacey T.; Shrime, Mark G.; Lee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Otologic complaints may place a significant burden on emergency departments (EDs) in the United States; however, few studies have comprehensively examined this discrete patient population. We aim to identify utilization of EDs by patients with primary otologic complaints. Study Design Retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) from 2009 through 2011. Methods The NEDS database was queried for patient encounters with a primary otologic diagnosis based on ICD9 codes (380–389). Weighted estimates for demographic, diagnostic characteristics, SES, and trends over time were extracted. Predictors of mortality and admission were determined by multivariable logistic regression. Results A weighted total of 8,611,282 visits between 2009 and 2011 were attributed to otologic diagnoses, representing 2.21% of all ED visits. Stratified by patient age, otologic diagnoses encompassed 1.01% and 6.79% of all adult and pediatric ED visits, respectively. The majority of patients were treated and released (98.17%). The average age of patients presenting with an otologic complaint was 17.9 years (Standard Error [SE] = 0.23). Overall, 62.7% of patients that presented with an otologic complaint were 0–17 years old. The most common diagnoses among all age groups included otitis media NOS (60.6%), infected otitis externa NOS (11.8%), and otalgia NOS (6.8%). Conclusions We provide a comprehensive overview of otologic complaints that are an overlooked diagnostic category in public health research. NEDS data demonstrates significant number of visits related to otologic complaints, especially in the pediatric population, that are non-emergent. PMID:25702897

  15. Intelligent Emergency Department: Validation of Sociometers to Study Workload.

    PubMed

    Yu, Denny; Blocker, Renaldo C; Sir, Mustafa Y; Hallbeck, M Susan; Hellmich, Thomas R; Cohen, Tara; Nestler, David M; Pasupathy, Kalyan S

    2016-03-01

    Sociometers are wearable sensors that continuously measure body movements, interactions, and speech. The purpose of this study is to test sociometers in a smart environment in a live clinical setting, to assess their reliability in capturing and quantifying data. The long-term goal of this work is to create an intelligent emergency department that captures real-time human interactions using sociometers to sense current system dynamics, predict future state, and continuously learn to enable the highest levels of emergency care delivery. Ten actors wore the devices during five simulated scenarios in the emergency care wards at a large non-profit medical institution. For each scenario, actors recited prewritten or structured dialogue while independent variables, e.g., distance, angle, obstructions, speech behavior, were independently controlled. Data streams from the sociometers were compared to gold standard video and audio data captured by two ward and hallway cameras. Sociometers distinguished body movement differences in mean angular velocity between individuals sitting, standing, walking intermittently, and walking continuously. Face-to-face (F2F) interactions were not detected when individuals were offset by 30°, 60°, and 180° angles. Under ideal F2F conditions, interactions were detected 50 % of the time (4/8 actor pairs). Proximity between individuals was detected for 13/15 actor pairs. Devices underestimated the mean duration of speech by 30-44 s, but were effective at distinguishing the dominant speaker. The results inform engineers to refine sociometers and provide health system researchers a tool for quantifying the dynamics and behaviors in complex and unpredictable healthcare environments such as emergency care. PMID:26645317

  16. Review of police inquiries to an accident and emergency department.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, R; Rainer, T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the workload generated by police inquiries to an accident and emergency (A&E) department and the adherence of medical staff to departmental guidelines relating to these inquiries. DESIGN: Prospective analysis of the number, nature, and timing of police inquiries and the information released by medical staff. SETTING: A&E department of an inner city teaching hospital. OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of personal and telephone requests for information from police; completion of a form of inquiry; record of patient consent for release of information. RESULTS: A daily average of 8.7 police inquiries were made, but in only 10% of cases was a form of inquiry completed. The patient's consent for release of information to the police was recorded in 4% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: Police inquiries generate a significant workload for an A&E department, often at clinically busy times. Medical staff need further education to ensure that patient confidentiality is respected while assisting the police with their investigations. Images Figure 2 PMID:8947799

  17. Sedative Dosing of Propofol for Treatment of Migraine Headache in the Emergency Department: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Jarrod; Roper, Grant; Hays, Daniel; Guisto, John

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Migraine headaches requiring an emergency department visit due to failed outpatient rescue therapy present a significant challenge in terms of length of stay (LOS) and financial costs. Propofol therapy may be effective at pain reduction and reduce that length of stay given its pharmacokinetic properties as a short acting intravenous sedative anesthetic and pharmacodynamics on GABA mediated chloride flux. Methods: Case series of 4 patients presenting to an urban academic medical center with migraine headache failing outpatient therapy. Each patient was given a sedation dose (1 mg/kg) of propofol under standard procedural sedation precautions. Results: Each of the 4 patients experienced dramatic reductions or complete resolution of headache severity. LOS for 3 of the 4 patients was 50% less than the average LOS for patients with similar chief complaints to our emergency department. 1 patient required further treatment with standard therapy but had a significant reduction in pain and a shorter LOS. There were no episodes of hypotension, hypoxia, or apnea during the sedations. Conclusion: In this small case series, sedation dose propofol appears to be effective and safe for the treatment of refractory migraines, and may result in a reduced LOS. PMID:24381692

  18. 76 FR 60067 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency-012...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-28

    ... SECURITY Office of the Secretary Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency... Department of Homeland Security proposes to establish a new system of records titled, ``Department of....'' This system of records allows the Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management...

  19. Extending VIVO ontology to represent research and educational resources in an academic biomedical informatics department.

    PubMed

    Nakikj, Drashko; Weng, Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    The increasing need for interdisciplinary team sciences makes it vital for academic research departments to publicize their research and educational resources as part of "linked data" on the semantic web to facilitate research networking and recruitment. We extended an open-source ontology, VIVO, to represent the research and educational resources in an academic biomedical informatics department to enable ontology-based information storage and retrieval. Using participatory design methods, we surveyed representative types of visitors to the department web site to understand their information needs, and incorporated these needs into the ontology design. We added 114 classes and 186 properties to VIVO. Generalizability and scalability are the measures used in our theoretical evaluation.

  20. Death of a child in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Patricia J; Barata, Isabel A; Snow, Sally K

    2014-07-01

    The death of a child in the emergency department (ED) is one of the most challenging problems facing ED clinicians. This revised technical report and accompanying policy statement reaffirm principles of patient- and family-centered care. Recent literature is examined regarding family presence, termination of resuscitation, bereavement responsibilities of ED clinicians, support of child fatality review efforts, and other issues inherent in caring for the patient, family, and staff when a child dies in the ED. Appendices are provided that offer an approach to bereavement activities in the ED, carrying out forensic responsibilities while providing compassionate care, communicating the news of the death of a child in the acute setting, providing a closing ritual at the time of terminating resuscitation efforts, and managing the child with a terminal condition who presents near death in the ED. PMID:24951422

  1. Death of a child in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Patricia; Barata, Isabel; Snow, Sally

    2014-07-01

    The death of a child in the emergency department (ED) is one of the most challenging problems facing ED clinicians. This revised technical report and accompanying policy statement reaffirm principles of patient- and family-centered care. Recent literature is examined regarding family presence, termination of resuscitation, bereavement responsibilities of ED clinicians, support of child fatality review efforts, and other issues inherent in caring for the patient, family, and staff when a child dies in the ED. Appendices are provided that offer an approach to bereavement activities in the ED, carrying out forensic responsibilities while providing compassionate care, communicating the news of the death of a child in the acute setting, providing a closing ritual at the time of terminating resuscitation efforts, and managing the child with a terminal condition who presents near death in the ED. PMID:24998719

  2. Enhancing care of older adults in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Susan E; Clevenger, Carolyn K; Evans, Dian Dowling

    2012-01-01

    The findings from a recent comprehensive systematic review, in combination with a case study, are used to illustrate the importance of translational research to inform advanced practice nursing. The review article discussed in this column is a comprehensive systematic review of age-friendly nursing interventions in the management of older persons in the emergency department (ED). Two themes were synthesized from the research and texts: (1) the ED can be a foreign and challenging environment for older patients, and (2) older ED patients need specialized care to meet their complex physical and psychosocial needs. At the same time, these authors acknowledged that much more high-quality research is needed in this field. Comments by a certified geriatric nurse practitioner elaborate on these findings and provide practical suggestions for the ED advanced practice registered nurse. PMID:22842961

  3. Emergency Department Use Among Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD).

    PubMed

    Vohra, Rini; Madhavan, Suresh; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2016-04-01

    A cross-sectional analyses using Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (2006-2011) was conducted to examine the trends, type of ED visits, and mean total ED charges for adults aged 22-64 years with and without ASD (matched 1:3). Around 0.4% ED visits (n = 25,527) were associated with any ASD and rates of such visits more than doubled from 2006 to 2011 (2549-6087 per 100,000 admissions). Adults with ASD visited ED for: primary psychiatric disorder (15%ASD vs. 4.2%noASD), primary non-psychiatric disorder (16%ASD vs. 14%noASD), and any injury (24%ASD vs. 28%noASD). Mean total ED charges for adults with ASD were 2.3 times higher than for adults without ASD. Findings emphasize the need to examine the extent of frequent ED use in this population.

  4. Process-Improvement Cost Model for the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Dyas, Sheila R; Greenfield, Eric; Messimer, Sherri; Thotakura, Swati; Gholston, Sampson; Doughty, Tracy; Hays, Mary; Ivey, Richard; Spalding, Joseph; Phillips, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present a simplified, activity-based costing approach for hospital emergency departments (EDs) to use with Lean Six Sigma cost-benefit analyses. The cost model complexity is reduced by removing diagnostic and condition-specific costs, thereby revealing the underlying process activities' cost inefficiencies. Examples are provided for evaluating the cost savings from reducing discharge delays and the cost impact of keeping patients in the ED (boarding) after the decision to admit has been made. The process-improvement cost model provides a needed tool in selecting, prioritizing, and validating Lean process-improvement projects in the ED and other areas of patient care that involve multiple dissimilar diagnoses. PMID:26720989

  5. Process-Improvement Cost Model for the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Dyas, Sheila R; Greenfield, Eric; Messimer, Sherri; Thotakura, Swati; Gholston, Sampson; Doughty, Tracy; Hays, Mary; Ivey, Richard; Spalding, Joseph; Phillips, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this report is to present a simplified, activity-based costing approach for hospital emergency departments (EDs) to use with Lean Six Sigma cost-benefit analyses. The cost model complexity is reduced by removing diagnostic and condition-specific costs, thereby revealing the underlying process activities' cost inefficiencies. Examples are provided for evaluating the cost savings from reducing discharge delays and the cost impact of keeping patients in the ED (boarding) after the decision to admit has been made. The process-improvement cost model provides a needed tool in selecting, prioritizing, and validating Lean process-improvement projects in the ED and other areas of patient care that involve multiple dissimilar diagnoses.

  6. Diagnosing Achilles tendon injuries in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Lynda

    2013-09-01

    Achilles tendon (AT) injury is an overuse injury often seen in professional and recreational athletes. It tends to affect men, particularly those in their thirties and forties, more than women, and is typically seen in people who are intermittently active. To ensure AT ruptures are identified and treated effectively, early intervention in emergency departments (EDs) is crucial. This article discusses how advanced nurse practitioners can use their comprehensive problem-solving, clinical decision-making and clinical judgement skills to manage patients who present with suspected AT injury. It also describes the anatomy of tendon rupture, the aetiology and mechanism of injuries, and the importance of assessment and diagnostic tools, therapeutic techniques and management strategies. Finally, it considers the psychological effect this injury can have on patients, while in the ED and after discharge. A case study is included as an example of ED management.

  7. Identification and Management of Information Problems by Emergency Department Staff

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Alison R.; Reddy, Madhu C.

    2014-01-01

    Patient-care teams frequently encounter information problems during their daily activities. These information problems include wrong, outdated, conflicting, incomplete, or missing information. Information problems can negatively impact the patient-care workflow, lead to misunderstandings about patient information, and potentially lead to medical errors. Existing research focuses on understanding the cause of these information problems and the impact that they can have on the hospital’s workflow. However, there is limited research on how patient-care teams currently identify and manage information problems that they encounter during their work. Through qualitative observations and interviews in an emergency department (ED), we identified the types of information problems encountered by ED staff, and examined how they identified and managed the information problems. We also discuss the impact that these information problems can have on the patient-care teams, including the cascading effects of information problems on workflow and the ambiguous accountability for fixing information problems within collaborative teams. PMID:25954457

  8. How we solved the overcrowding problem in our emergency department.

    PubMed Central

    Feferman, I; Cornell, C

    1989-01-01

    Overcrowding in emergency departments presents serious problems to both patients and hospital staff. At Scarborough (Ontario) General Hospital this problem was becoming potentially dangerous until a hospital committee instituted a series of changes that dramatically improved the situation. A geriatrician was appointed to assess and care for the increasing number of elderly and chronic care patients. The beds in various services were reallocated, and more beds were given to the medical service. Surgeons agreed to perform more surgery on an outpatient basis, and the Short-Stay and Ambulatory Procedures units were expanded to handle more procedures. In addition, the implementation of a physician-managed admission system ensured the appropriate admission of patients. The entire system is monitored, and the committee meets regularly to deal with any problems. PMID:2914239

  9. System dynamics and dysfunctionalities: levers for overcoming emergency department overcrowding.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Gordon D

    2011-12-01

    Overcrowding of U.S. emergency departments (EDs) is a widely recognized and growing problem. This presentation offers the perspectives of a primary care physician (PCP) examining the problem at three levels: global health policy, quality process improvement, and more intimate clinical caring. It posits that ED overcrowding is actually a symptom of 10 more fundamental problems in U.S. health care and EDs: variations/supply-demand mismatch; primary care provider shortfalls; limited after-hours access; admission throughput challenges; clinical challenges related to discontinuity patients; clinical challenges related to those with special needs; interruptions; testing logistical challenges; suboptimal information systems; and fragmented/dysfunctional health insurance system, leaving many un- and underinsured. PMID:22168188

  10. A bed management strategy for overcrowding in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Lynn; Ford, Suzanne; Ward-Smith, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, the Institute of Medicine cited growing visit volumes, hospital closures, financial pressures, and operational inefficiencies as the principal reasons for emergency department (ED) overcrowding and called for regulatory measures to resolve the problem. A Midwest medical center with 59,000 annual ED visits instituted a bed management strategy to decrease the need to board, or hold, admitted hospital patients in the ED awaiting transfer to an inpatient care unit. This strategy was successful in improving the hold time from an average of 216 minutes to 103 minutes, or by 52%. This allowed the staff at the hospital to care for an additional 2,936 patients. During this same time, the overall hospital mortality decreased by 0.07% and patient satisfaction scores improved 1%. The greatest outcome from this intervention was realized in the potential revenue increase of over $2 million. PMID:22558725

  11. An early warning system for overcrowding in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Hoot, Nathan; Aronsky, Dominik

    2006-01-01

    Overcrowding of emergency departments impedes health care access and quality nationwide. A real-time early warning system for overcrowding may allow administrators to alleviate the problem before reaching a crisis state. Two original probabilistic models - a logistic regression and a recurrent neural network - were created to predict overcrowding crises one hour in the future. The two original and two pre-existing models were validated at 8,496 observation points from January 1, 2006 to February 28, 2006. All models showed high discriminatory ability in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (logistic regression = .954; recurrent neural network = .957; EDWIN = .879; NEDOCS = .924). At comparable rates of false alarms, the logistic regression gave more advance notice of crises than other models (logistic regression = 62 min; recurrent neural network = 13 min; EDWIN = 0 min; NEDOCS = 0 min). These results demonstrate the feasibility of using models based on key operational variables to anticipate overcrowding crises in real time. PMID:17238359

  12. Predicting asthma-related emergency department visits using big data.

    PubMed

    Ram, Sudha; Zhang, Wenli; Williams, Max; Pengetnze, Yolande

    2015-07-01

    Asthma is one of the most prevalent and costly chronic conditions in the United States, which cannot be cured. However, accurate and timely surveillance data could allow for timely and targeted interventions at the community or individual level. Current national asthma disease surveillance systems can have data availability lags of up to two weeks. Rapid progress has been made in gathering nontraditional, digital information to perform disease surveillance. We introduce a novel method of using multiple data sources for predicting the number of asthma-related emergency department (ED) visits in a specific area. Twitter data, Google search interests, and environmental sensor data were collected for this purpose. Our preliminary findings show that our model can predict the number of asthma ED visits based on near-real-time environmental and social media data with approximately 70% precision. The results can be helpful for public health surveillance, ED preparedness, and targeted patient interventions. PMID:25706935

  13. Transient Global Amnesia: Emergency Department Evaluation And Management.

    PubMed

    Faust, Jeremy Samuel; Nemes, Andreea

    2016-08-01

    Transient global amnesia is a clinically distinct syndrome characterized by the acute inability to form new memories. It can last up to 24 hours. The diagnosis is dependent on eliminating other more serious etiologies including toxic ingestions, acute strokes, complex partial seizures, and central nervous system infections. Transient global amnesia confers no known long-term risks; however, when abnormal signs or symptoms are present, they take precedence and guide the formulation of a differential diagnosis and investigation. In witnessed transient global amnesia with classic features, a minimalist approach is reasonable, avoiding overtesting, inappropriate medication, and medical interventions in favor of observation, ensuring patient safety, and reassuring patients and their families. This review provides a detailed framework for distinguishing transient global amnesia from its dangerous mimics and managing its course in the emergency department. PMID:27416582

  14. Altered Mental Status in Older Emergency Department Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wilber, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Altered mental status is a common chief complaint among older emergency department (ED) patients. Acute changes in mental status are more concerning and are usually secondary to delirium, stupor, and coma. These forms of acute brain dysfunction are commonly precipitated by an underlying medical illness that can be potentially life-threatening and are associated with a multitude of adverse outcomes. Though stupor and coma are easily identifiable, the clinical presentation of delirium can be subtle and is often missed without actively screening for it. For patients with acute brain dysfunction, the ED evaluation should focus on searching for the underlying etiology. Infection is one of the most common precipitants of delirium, but multiple etiologies may exist concurrently. PMID:23177603

  15. Management of atrial fibrillation in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Crozier, I; Melton, I; Pearson, S

    2003-04-01

    Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia and is a frequent cause for presentation to the emergency department. With an understanding of the pathophysiology and types of AF, efficient and effective management strategies for AF can be formulated. Patients with paroxysmal AF will often revert spontaneously and can initially be managed on an outpatient basis, unless an antiarrhythmic is commenced. In patients with AF and severe underlying heart disease, the management is primarily directed at the underlying heart disease, supplemented with rate-controlling measures, and prevention of thromboembolic complications. In patients with persistent AF good rate control, early cardioversion and initiation of an antiarrhythmic are likely to reduce the risk of recurrence. PMID:12680985

  16. Analysis of a US Department of Energy Emergent Technologies Cohort

    SciTech Connect

    Strader, Cliff; Ellis, Elizabeth; Barrie, Martin D; Tankersley, William; Wallace, Phil; Nichols, Gregory

    2012-12-12

    As a major user of engineered nanoparticles, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) uses various methods to monitor the health of emergent technologies workers (ETW) who handle or could potentially be exposed to unbound engineered nanoparticles (UNP). Using data from DOE’s Illness and Injury Surveillance Program (IISP), Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) created a registry of ETWs. IISP currently tracks 125,000 workers at 14 DOE facilities. Workers in IISP, who were classified as ETWs, were placed in a separate database using Microsoft Access. Using SAS (Version 9.2; Cary, NC), the health status of this cohort was analyzed by a variety of different variables such as age, gender, occupation, years of employment, number of years classified as an ETW, and site.

  17. Rapid Antigen Testing for Trichomoniasis in an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Postenrieder, Nikki R.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Hesse, Elizabeth; Kahn, Jessica A.; Ding, Lili; Gaydos, Charlotte A.; Rompalo, Anne; Widdice, Lea E.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Trichomoniasis is a prevalent cause of vaginitis among adolescents that increases the risk of acquiring other sexually transmitted infections and is associated with negative pregnancy outcomes. Therefore, treatment of trichomoniasis is essential for improving sexual and reproductive health outcomes. A timely, sensitive diagnostic test for T vaginalis may increase accuracy of clinician's treatment decisions resulting in more infected women receiving treatment and fewer uninfected women receiving treatment. Methods Retrospective observational study of electronic medical records during 2 time periods: before (pre-POC) and after (post-POC) implementation of the rapid antigen test. Records were collected from women aged 14-20 years who received a T vaginalis test in the emergency department during either study period. The main outcome measures were the rates of accurate treatment, inaccurate treatment, and missed treatment of trichomoniasis in each study period. Results Overall rates of accurate treatment increased from 78.7% pre-POC to 87.7% post-POC (P=0.02). Specifically, rates of not treating uninfected women increased from 61.4% pre-POC to 70.4% post-POC (P=0.06) and rates of treating infected women were the same pre-POC (17.3) and post-POC (17.3, P=0.99). Rates of inaccurate treatment decreased from 23.1% pre-POC to 13.1% post-POC (P=.02). Changes in rates of missed treatment (14.0% pre-POC and 8.8% post-POC, P=0.73) were not statistically significant. Conclusions Point-of-care testing can impact clinical care by decreasing use of antibiotics in uninfected women. The results of this study provide support for the use of a T vaginalis rapid antigen POC test for adolescents presenting to the emergency department. PMID:27207490

  18. Differentiating Childhood Stroke From Mimics in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Yock-Corrales, Adriana; Churilov, Leonid; Monagle, Paul; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Babl, Franz E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Clinical identification of stroke in the pediatric emergency department is critical for improving access to hyperacute therapies. We identified key clinical features associated with childhood stroke or transient ischemic attack compared with mimics. Methods— Two hundred and eighty consecutive children presenting to the emergency department with mimics, prospectively recruited over 18 months from 2009 to 2010, were compared with 102 children with stroke or transient ischemic attack, prospectively/retrospectively recruited from 2003 to 2010. Results— Cerebrovascular diagnoses included arterial ischemic stroke (55), hemorrhagic stroke (37), and transient ischemic attack (10). Mimic diagnoses included migraine (84), seizures (46), Bell’s palsy (29), and conversion disorders (18). Being well in the week before presentation (odds ratio [OR] 5.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.25–14.79), face weakness (OR 2.94, 95% CI 1.19–7.28), arm weakness (OR 8.66, 95% CI, 2.50–30.02), and inability to walk (OR 3.38, 95% CI 1.54–7.42) were independently associated with increased odds of stroke diagnosis. Other symptoms were independently associated with decreased odds of stroke diagnosis (OR 0.28, 95% CI 0.10–0.77). Associations were not observed between seizures or loss of consciousness. Factors associated with stroke differed by arterial and hemorrhagic subtypes. Conclusions— Being well in the week before presentation, inability to walk, face and arm weakness are associated with increased odds of stroke. The lack of positive or negative association between stroke and seizures or loss of consciousness is an important difference to adults. Pediatric stroke pathways and bedside tools need to factor in differences between children and adults and between stroke subtypes. PMID:27601378

  19. Duration of patients’ visits to the hospital emergency department

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Length of stay is an important indicator of quality of care in Emergency Departments (ED). This study explores the duration of patients’ visits to the ED for which they are treated and released (T&R). Methods Retrospective data analysis and multivariate regression analysis were conducted to investigate the duration of T&R ED visits. Duration for each visit was computed by taking the difference between admission and discharge times. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Emergency Department Databases (SEDD) for 2008 were used in the analysis. Results The mean duration of T&R ED visit was 195.7 minutes. The average duration of ED visits increased from 8 a.m. until noon, then decreased until midnight at which we observed an approximately 70-minute spike in average duration. We found a substantial difference in mean duration of ED visits (over 90 minutes) between Mondays and other weekdays during the transition time from the evening of the day before to the early morning hours. Black / African American patients had a 21.4-minute longer mean duration of visits compared to white patients. The mean duration of visits at teaching hospitals was substantially longer than at non-teaching hospitals (243.8 versus 175.6 minutes). Hospitals with large bed size were associated with longer duration of visits (222.2 minutes) when compared to hospitals with small bed size (172.4 minutes) or those with medium bed size (166.5 minutes). The risk-adjusted results show that mean duration of visits on Mondays are longer by about 4 and 9 percents when compared to mean duration of visits on non-Monday workdays and weekends, respectively. Conclusions The duration of T&R ED visits varied significantly by admission hour, day of the week, patient volume, patient characteristics, hospital characteristics and area characteristics. PMID:23126473

  20. Evaluating the quality of the educational environment for medical interns in an emergency department using the DREEM inventory.

    PubMed

    Farahmand, Shervin; Bagheri-Hariri, Shahram; Moghanloo, Samaneh; Basir Ghafouri, Hamed; Saeedi, Morteza; Afzalimoghadam, Mohammad; Gao, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Moving toward establishing more student center educational environment to meet the ever-changing learning expectations in a challenging climate like emergency department for under graduates is an intimidating task. In our newly founded academic emergency department, every step toward scoring as a dynamic and modern educational environment for both undergraduates and postgraduates would be a great success. The last 18 months of undergraduate medical education in Iran is considered as an internship. Interns have two months mandatory emergency department rotation during that period. This study has design to evaluate the medical students' conception about the educational environment using the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire. 156 undergraduate interns during their two months emergency medicine rotation from October 2009 to March 2010 enrolled into a cross sectional observational study to anonymously fill up the DREEM questionnaire  on the last week of the course. The overall mean score of DREEM questionnaire was 134.79 out of 200 for the emergency department.  The mean scores are 135.37 in female (n=87) group and 131.56 in male (n=69) group.  There was not any significant difference between two genders (P>0.05). A score of 134.79 is compatible with the modern universities. Scores of 100 or less indicate serious problems and scores above 170 is compatible with ultimate student centered and modern educational environment. Such an achievement in the start of the new installed Emergency Medicine program is admirable, hence great effort must be put to pinpoint problems and fix them. DREEM questionnaire helped us moving toward a more student center environment in the emergency department.

  1. Emergency department digital radiology: moving from photos to pixels.

    PubMed

    White, Faber A; Zwemer, Frank L; Beach, Christopher; Westesson, Per-Lennart; Fairbanks, Rollin J; Scialdone, Gary

    2004-11-01

    Emergency department (ED) patient care relies heavily on radiologic imaging. As advances in technologic innovation continue to present opportunities to streamline and simplify the delivery of care, emergency medicine (EM) practitioners face the challenge of transitioning from a system of primarily film-based radiography to one that utilizes digitized images. The move to digital radiology can result in enhanced quality of patient care, reduction of errors, and increased ED efficiency; however, making this transition will necessarily involve changes in EM practice. As the technology evolves, digital radiology will gradually become ingrained into everyday practice because of these and other notable benefits; however, EM practitioners will need to overcome several challenges to make the transition smoothly and consider the potential impacts that this change will have on ED workflow. The authors discuss the benefits, challenges, and other operational considerations involved with the ED implementation of digital radiology and close by presenting guiding principles for current and future users. Despite the unresolved issues, digital radiology will mature as a technology and improve EM practice, making it one of the great information technology advances in EM.

  2. What do health savings accounts mean for the emergency department?

    PubMed

    McConnell, K John

    2005-12-01

    The insurance market is evolving, with increased emphasis on plans with high deductibles and a large degree of coinsurance. This article serves as an introduction to the defining characteristics of consumer-driven health care plans and their associated health savings accounts. We discuss the most recent evidence on the adoption of these plans and their effects on use and reimbursement. Compared to many specialties, the emergency department (ED) may be insulated from extensive shopping and price negotiation, because visits to the ED are often for urgent and time-sensitive conditions. However, ED utilization patterns may change if cost-conscious health savings account holders forgo other necessary medical care, or if they seek out substitutes to the ED for less urgent problems. In the long run, the ED may feel the impact of changes that stem from 2 areas: the ability of health savings accounts to control the increase in health care costs, and the potential of health savings accounts to replace or undermine more comprehensive health insurance plans. We note areas that emergency physicians should monitor as health savings accounts become more prominent.

  3. Patient Preference for Physician Gender in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Nolen, Haley A.; Moore, Justin Xavier; Rodgers, Joel B.; Wang, Henry E.; Walter, Lauren A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite historical gender bias against female physicians, few studies have investigated patients’ physician gender preference in the emergency department (ED) setting. We sought to determine if there is an association between ED patient demographics and physician gender preference. We surveyed patients presenting to an ED to determine association between patient demographics and patient physician gender preference for five ED situations: 1) ‘routine’ visit, 2) emergency visit, 3) ‘sensitive’ medical visit, 4) minor surgical/‘procedural’ visit, and 5) ‘bad news’ delivery. A total of 200 ED patients were surveyed. The majority of ED patients reported no physician gender preference for ‘routine’ visits (89.5 percent), ‘emergent’ visits (89 percent), ‘sensitive’ medical visits (59 percent), ‘procedural’ visits (89 percent) or when receiving ‘bad news’ (82 percent). In the setting of ‘routine’ visits and ‘sensitive’ medical visits, there was a propensity for same-sex physician preference. PMID:27354840

  4. Emergency Department Physician Internet Use during Clinical Encounters

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, Robin; Finnell, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the Internet log files from emergency department workstations to determine search patterns, compared them to discharge diagnoses, and the emergency medicine curriculum as a way to quantify physician search behaviors. Methods: The log files from the computers from January 2006 to March 2010 were mapped to the EM curriculum and compared to discharge diagnoses to explore search terms and website usage by physicians and students. Results: Physicians in the ED averaged 1.35 searches per patient encounter using Google.com and UpToDate.com 83.9% of the time. The most common searches were for drug information (23.1%) by all provider types. The majority of the websites utilized were in the third tier evidence level for evidence-based medicine (EBM). Conclusion: We have shown a need for a readily accessible drug knowledge base within the EMR for decision support as well as easier access to first and second tier EBM evidence. PMID:23304394

  5. Health information exchange improves identification of frequent emergency department users.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Jason S; Johnson, Sarah A; Angiollilo, John; Fleischman, William; Onyile, Arit; Kuperman, Gilad

    2013-12-01

    We hypothesized that using communitywide data from a health information exchange (HIE) could improve the ability to identify frequent emergency department (ED) users-those with four or more ED visits in thirty days-by allowing ED use to be measured across unaffiliated hospitals. When we analyzed HIE-wide data instead of site-specific data, we identified 20.3 percent more frequent ED users (5,756 versus 4,785) and 16.0 percent more visits by them to the ED (53,031 versus 45,771). Additionally, we found that 28.8 percent of frequent ED users visited multiple EDs during the twelve-month study period, versus 3.0 percent of all ED users. All three differences were significant ($$p ). An improved ability to identify frequent ED users allows better targeting of case management and other services that can improve frequent ED users' health and reduce their use of costly emergency medical services.

  6. Emergency department external decontamination for hazardous chemical exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lavoie, F.W.; Coomes, T.; Cisek, J.E.; Fulkerson, L. )

    1992-02-01

    Although external decontamination is an integral aspect of the emergency management of hazardous chemicals exposure, no standard protocol or report of human experience is available. We performed a retrospective review of all patients decontaminated in our emergency department over a 6-y period for hazardous chemicals exposure. Patients were treated by a universal substances protocol in a specially designed decontamination area. Ocular irrigation utilizing 1500 ml of normal saline po was employed in 27 patients. Oral mucosal irrigation utilizing 1500 ml water was employed in 2 patients. All 72 patients received skin and hair decontamination. Skin was washed 3 times with detergent and cornmeal mixture, and water irrigation or shower for 3 min. Hair was shampooed 3 times with mild soap for 3 min. A subset of patients (n = 31) received pre-decontamination and post-decontamination skin swabbing. Swabs were analyzed by a certified analytical chemistry laboratory utilizing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Positive pre-decontamination swabs were seen for pesticides and PCBs. All post-decontamination swab analyses were negative, indicating that the method utilized was effective.

  7. Patients who leave the emergency department against medical advice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Choung Ah; Cho, Joon Pil; Choi, Sang Cheon; Kim, Hyuk Hoon; Park, Ju Ok

    2016-01-01

    Objective Discharge against medical advice (DAMA) from the emergency department (ED) accounts for 0.1% to 2.7% of all ED discharges. DAMA carries a risk of increased mortality and readmissions. Our aim was to investigate the general characteristics of DAMA patients and the differences between them and non-DAMA patients. Methods We reviewed data collected by the National Emergency Medical Center between 2010 and 2011. Subjects were categorized into 2 groups, namely, the DAMA group and the non-DAMA group. We compared these groups with respect to age, gender, trauma or non-trauma status, type of hospital, health insurance, level of consciousness on admission, and diagnosis. Results Of 8,000,529 patients, 222,389 (2.78%) left against medical advice. The risk factors for DAMA across all age groups were as follows: no medical insurance (odds ratio [OR], 1.993), initial response to voice (OR, 2.753) or pain (OR, 2.101), trauma admission (OR, 1.126), admission to a local emergency medical center (OR, 1.215), and increased age. A high risk of DAMA was observed among patients with immune, endocrine, psychiatric, neurological, circulatory diseases, and external causes of morbidity and mortality. Conclusion Although DAMA cases account for only a small percentage of hospital discharges, they are important because DAMA patients have high readmission and mortality rates. It is therefore important to understand the general characteristics and predictors of DAMA in order to improve patient outcome and minimize the economic burden on the healthcare system. PMID:27752623

  8. The department of internal medicine: hub of the academic health center response to the aging imperative.

    PubMed

    Hazzard, W R

    2000-08-15

    In the 21st century, geriatrics will increasingly dominate U.S. health care as the median age of the population progressively increases. Academic departments of geriatrics have been created in nations that have already experienced this shift. As an alternative strategy that builds on traditional strengths of academic medicine in the United States, departments of internal medicine should lead a multidepartmental, pan-institutional response to the aging imperative. Recognition of gerontology and geriatric medicine as central to the missions of internal medicine in clinical care, education, and research must be increased. In the process, academic departments of internal medicine will develop a high level of geriatric expertise and will launch many programs that address this challenge. Successful development of geriatric programs will serve as a catalyst to strengthen the integration among and between generalists and subspecialists. This will entail developing optimal sites and systems of geriatric care--at different levels of care and over time--that can enhance the geriatric education of medical students, residents, fellows, and practicing physicians. The study of aging and geriatric health care will also become an integral part of departmental research, in its subspecialty divisions as well as its divisions of general internal medicine and geriatrics. This strategy is urgently recommended as both a challenge and an opportunity for all departments of internal medicine. PMID:10929171

  9. Advancing the research mission in an academic department: the creation of a center for translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Arthur M; Force, Thomas L; Whellan, David J; Bray, Paul F; Cheung, Joseph Y; Koch, Walter J

    2010-08-01

    Multidisciplinary research centers have multiplied in academic medical centers over the past decade and several recent reports have described their structure, strengths and limitations, and the difficulties that they may face. However, little attention has been paid to the role of a multidisciplinary center in the context of a single academic department. In 2003, the Department of Medicine at Jefferson Medical College launched the Center for Translational Medicine in order to facilitate multidisciplinary research, optimally utilize space and resources, enhance the educational experience for trainees, link basic investigation with clinical research programs, and develop a program of research excellence. Herein, we describe the structure of the Center and provide evidence of its success. The development of the Center has resulted in increased total funding, an increased number of students and residents pursuing translational research, a more effective utilization of space, the development of multidisciplinary research projects, and a significant increase in the number of individual and programmatic federally funded grants. Though the creation of the Center was not without challenges, the overall benefits for the department and the university have been substantial. The concept of a translational medicine center may be useful for many departments of academic medical centers.

  10. Use of a mental health emergency care-rural access programme in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Saurman, Emily; Lyle, David; Kirby, Sue; Roberts, Russell

    2014-09-01

    Hospital emergency departments (EDs) are common providers of emergency mental health care. Access to specialist expertise can affect and improve patient outcomes. The Mental Health Emergency Care-Rural Access Programme (MHEC) provides access to mental health specialists for rural and remote communities in western New South Wales. In 2011, 46 of the 48 EDs used the MHEC programme, which provided 1487 clinical services, an average of 29 services per week. This represented 60% of all MHEC activity. A video assessment was conducted during 571 (38%) of these MHEC contacts. Patients attending a non-base hospital (<50 beds) were twice as likely to receive a video assessment as those attending the larger base hospitals, and video was used more with increasing remoteness. Patients from non-base hospitals were also more likely to be admitted locally after a video assessment. When a decision to admit was made, patients from non-base hospital EDs assessed by video were less likely to be transferred out of their community to a mental health inpatient unit than those assessed by telephone triage only (46% vs 62%; P = 0.016). The MHEC programme is a practical, relevant and responsive solution that was designed for the Australian health system, but the same model could be adapted for implementation in other countries.

  11. The challenges of measuring quality-of-care indicators in rural emergency departments: a cross-sectional descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Layani, Géraldine; Fleet, Richard; Dallaire, Renée; Tounkara, Fatoumata K.; Poitras, Julien; Archambault, Patrick; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Ouimet, Mathieu; Gauthier, Josée; Dupuis, Gilles; Tanguay, Alain; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Simard-Racine, Geneviève; Haggerty, Jeannie; Légaré, France

    2016-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based indicators of quality of care have been developed to improve care and performance in Canadian emergency departments. The feasibility of measuring these indicators has been assessed mainly in urban and academic emergency departments. We sought to assess the feasibility of measuring quality-of-care indicators in rural emergency departments in Quebec. Methods: We previously identified rural emergency departments in Quebec that offered medical coverage with hospital beds 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and were located in rural areas or small towns as defined by Statistics Canada. A standardized protocol was sent to each emergency department to collect data on 27 validated quality-of-care indicators in 8 categories: duration of stay, patient safety, pain management, pediatrics, cardiology, respiratory care, stroke and sepsis/infection. Data were collected by local professional medical archivists between June and December 2013. Results: Fifteen (58%) of the 26 emergency departments invited to participate completed data collection. The ability to measure the 27 quality-of-care indicators with the use of databases varied across departments. Centres 2, 5, 6 and 13 used databases for at least 21 of the indicators (78%-92%), whereas centres 3, 8, 9, 11, 12 and 15 used databases for 5 (18%) or fewer of the indicators. On average, the centres were able to measure only 41% of the indicators using heterogeneous databases and manual extraction. The 15 centres collected data from 15 different databases or combinations of databases. The average data collection time for each quality-of-care indicator varied from 5 to 88.5 minutes. The median data collection time was 15 minutes or less for most indicators. Interpretation: Quality-of-care indicators were not easily captured with the use of existing databases in rural emergency departments in Quebec. Further work is warranted to improve standardized measurement of these indicators in rural emergency departments

  12. Global Emergency Medicine Journal Club: A Social Media Discussion About the Lack of Association Between Press Ganey Scores and Emergency Department Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Westafer, Lauren; Hensley, Justin; Shaikh, Sameed; Lin, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Annals of Emergency Medicine collaborated with an educational Web site, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM), to host a public discussion featuring the 2014 Annals article on the association between Press Ganey scores and emergency department (ED) analgesia by Schwartz et al. The objective was to curate a 14-day (December 1 through 14, 2014) worldwide academic dialogue among clinicians in regard to preselected questions about the article. Five online facilitators hosted the multimodal discussion on the ALiEM Web site, Twitter, and Google Hangout. Comments across the social media platforms were curated for this report, as framed by the 4 preselected questions. Engagement was tracked through Web analytic tools and analysis of tweets. Blog comments, tweets, and video expert commentary involving the featured article are summarized and reported. The dialogue resulted in 978 page views from 342 cities in 33 countries on the ALiEM Web site, 464,345 Twitter impressions, and 83 views of the video interview with experts. Of the unique 169 identified tweets, discussion (53.3%) and learning points (32.5%) were the most common category of tweets identified. Common themes that arose in the open-access multimedia discussions included Press Ganey data validity and the utility of patient satisfaction in determining pain treatment efficacy. This educational approach using social media technologies demonstrates a free, asynchronous means to engage a worldwide scholarly discourse. PMID:26003003

  13. Radiologist, obstetric patient, and emergency department provider survey: radiologist-patient interaction in the emergency department setting.

    PubMed

    Erlichman, David B; Stein, Marjorie W; Weiss, Amanda; Mazzariol, Fernanda

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptance of a model of direct interaction between radiologist and patients in the emergency department (ED) setting. The study population was comprised of pregnant patients accrued in a non-consecutive prospective manner from June 2014 to September 2015, who had an obstetrical ultrasound performed in the radiology department of an inner-city tertiary care hospital at the request of the ED. The feasibility and approval of direct communication between radiologist and patient were evaluated by means of a questionnaire presented by an independent observer to the ED provider, patient, and radiologist. The exam enrolled 54 patients. Ultrasound (US) exam results were divided into (31) normal live intrauterine gestation (group 1), (7) abnormal failed intrauterine gestation or ectopic pregnancy (group 2), and (16) indeterminate pregnancies that could not be placed in the former categories and may require a follow-up exam (group 3). Forty-five (83 %) ED providers approved of the radiologist's direct communication with patients. Fifty (93 %) patients stated a better understanding of the radiologist's role in their care after than before the interaction. The radiologists found the interaction with patients to be positive in 52 (96 %) cases. Direct communication between radiologist and patient yielded a good acceptance by the radiologist, ED provider, and patient. More importantly, after the encounter, the vast majority of patients reported a better understanding of the radiologist's role in their care. PMID:26965006

  14. State of Emergency Medicine in Switzerland: a national profile of emergency departments in 2006

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Emergency departments (EDs) are an essential component of any developed health care system. There is, however, no national description of EDs in Switzerland. Our objective was to establish the number and location of EDs, patient visits and flow, medical staff and organization, and capabilities in 2006, as a benchmark before emergency medicine became a subspecialty in Switzerland. Methods In 2007, we started to create an inventory of all hospital-based EDs with a preliminary list from the Swiss Society of Emergency and Rescue Medicine that was improved with input from ED physicians nationwide. EDs were eligible if they offered acute care 24 h per day, 7 days per week. Our goal was to have 2006 data from at least 80% of all EDs. The survey was initiated in 2007 and the 80% threshold reached in 2012. Results In 2006, Switzerland had a total of 138 hospital-based EDs. The number of ED visits was 1.475 million visits or 20 visits per 100 inhabitants. The median number of visits was 8,806 per year; 25% of EDs admitted 5,000 patients or less, 31% 5,001-10,000 patients, 26% 10,001-20,000 patients, and 17% >20,000 patients per year. Crowding was reported by 84% of EDs with >20,000 visits/year. Residents with limited experience provided care for 77% of visits. Imaging was not immediately available for all patients: standard X-ray within 15 min (70%), non-contrast head CT scan within 15 min (38%), and focused sonography for trauma (70%); 67% of EDs had an intensive care unit within the hospital, and 87% had an operating room always available. Conclusions Swiss EDs were significant providers of health care in 2006. Crowding, physicians with limited experience, and the heterogeneity of emergency care capabilities were likely threats to the ubiquitous and consistent delivery of quality emergency care, particularly for time-sensitive conditions. Our survey establishes a benchmark to better understand future improvements in Swiss emergency care. PMID:23842482

  15. Integrating palliative care in oncologic emergency departments: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Elsayem, Ahmed F; Elzubeir, Hiba E; Brock, Patricia A; Todd, Knox H

    2016-01-01

    Although visiting the emergency departments (EDs) is considered poor quality of cancer care, there are indications these visits are increasing. Similarly, there is growing interest in providing palliative care (PC) to cancer patients in EDs. However, this integration is not without major challenges. In this article, we review the literature on why cancer patients visit EDs, the rates of hospitalization and mortality for these patients, and the models for integrating PC in EDs. We discuss opportunities such integration will bring to the quality of cancer care, and resource utilization of resources. We also discuss barriers faced by this integration. We found that the most common reasons for ED visits by cancer patients are pain, fever, shortness of breath, and gastrointestinal symptoms. The majority of the patients are admitted to hospitals, about 13% of the admitted patients die during hospitalization, and some patients die in ED. Patients who receive PC at an ED have shorter hospitalization and lower resource utilization. Models based solely on increasing PC provision in EDs by PC specialists have had modest success, while very limited ED-based PC provision has had slightly higher impact. However, details of these programs are lacking, and coordination between ED based PC and hospital-wide PC is not clear. In some studies, the objectives were to improve care in the communities and reduce ED visits and hospitalizations. We conclude that as more patients receive cancer therapy late in their disease trajectory, more cancer patients will visit EDs. Integration of PC with emergency medicine will require active participation of ED physicians in providing PC to cancer patients. PC specialist should play an active role in educating ED physicians about PC, and provide timely consultations. The impact of integrating PC in EDs on quality and cost of cancer care should be studied. PMID:27081645

  16. Breaking bad (news) death-telling in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bogle, Angela M; Go, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Many physicians struggle with death-telling in sudden death. Families can be negatively impacted by suboptimal death-telling. Appropriate preparation and education can make death notification less stressful for the physician and may help decrease the development of pathologic grief in the surviving family members that can occur when death is unexpected. Although still controversial, there is a growing body of evidence that family witnessed resuscitation may be beneficial to the grieving process and desired by the public. A previously healthy 21-year-old male comes toyour community emergency department (ED) for a cough that started 4 days ago. He denies fever, shortness of breath, and chest pain. He does admit to a remote history of drug abuse. He states he is feeling "OK" and is only here because his family insisted he come because they were worried he might have pneumonia. His vital signs are normal and he appears well; therefore, he is triaged to the waiting room. About 30 minutes lates the patient complains of shortness of breath and he is brought back to an exam room. The patient is now hypotensive, tachycardic, and pulse oximetry is noted to be 87% on room air. A chest x-ray reveals severe pulmonary edema and an EKG shows ST segment elevation in multiple leads. The patient is taken to the cardiac catheterization lab by the interventional cardiologist, who makes the diagnosis of a ruptured aortic valve due to damage from endocarditis. The patient is returned to the ED to await emergent transfer to a tertiary facility; however, the patient rapidly decompensates and a Code Blue is called. Despite the absence of return of spontaneous circulation, resuscitation efforts are prolonged while the ED social worker attempts to contact the patient's family to come to the ED. Finally, the resuscitation is terminated and the patient is pronounced dead. Several hours later the patient's elderly mother arrives and asks you: "What's going on with Mikey?"

  17. The San Bernardino, California, Terror Attack: Two Emergency Departments' Response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Carol; Walters, Elizabeth; Borger, Rodney; Clem, Kathleen; Fenati, Gregory; Kiemeney, Michael; Seng, Sakona; Yuen, Ho-Wang; Neeki, Michael; Smith, Dustin

    2016-01-01

    On December 2, 2015, a terror attack in the city of San Bernardino, California killed 14 Americans and injured 22 in the deadliest attack on U.S. soil since September 11, 2001. Although emergency personnel and law enforcement officials frequently deal with multi-casualty incidents (MCIs), what occurred that day required an unprecedented response. Most of the severely injured victims were transported to either Loma Linda University Medical Center (LLUMC) or Arrowhead Regional Medical Center (ARMC). These two hospitals operate two designated trauma centers in the region and played crucial roles during the massive response that followed this attack. In an effort to shed a light on our response to others, we provide an account of how these two teaching hospitals prepared for and coordinated the medical care of these victims. In general, both centers were able to quickly mobilize large number of staff and resources. Prior disaster drills proved to be invaluable. Both centers witnessed excellent teamwork and coordination involving first responders, law enforcement, administration, and medical personnel from multiple specialty services. Those of us working that day felt safe and protected. Although we did identify areas we could have improved upon, including patchy communication and crowd-control, they were minor in nature and did not affect patient care. MCIs pose major challenges to emergency departments and trauma centers across the country. Responding to such incidents requires an ever-evolving approach as no two incidents will present exactly alike. It is our hope that this article will foster discussion and lead to improvements in management of future MCIs.

  18. Breaking bad (news) death-telling in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Bogle, Angela M; Go, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Many physicians struggle with death-telling in sudden death. Families can be negatively impacted by suboptimal death-telling. Appropriate preparation and education can make death notification less stressful for the physician and may help decrease the development of pathologic grief in the surviving family members that can occur when death is unexpected. Although still controversial, there is a growing body of evidence that family witnessed resuscitation may be beneficial to the grieving process and desired by the public. A previously healthy 21-year-old male comes toyour community emergency department (ED) for a cough that started 4 days ago. He denies fever, shortness of breath, and chest pain. He does admit to a remote history of drug abuse. He states he is feeling "OK" and is only here because his family insisted he come because they were worried he might have pneumonia. His vital signs are normal and he appears well; therefore, he is triaged to the waiting room. About 30 minutes lates the patient complains of shortness of breath and he is brought back to an exam room. The patient is now hypotensive, tachycardic, and pulse oximetry is noted to be 87% on room air. A chest x-ray reveals severe pulmonary edema and an EKG shows ST segment elevation in multiple leads. The patient is taken to the cardiac catheterization lab by the interventional cardiologist, who makes the diagnosis of a ruptured aortic valve due to damage from endocarditis. The patient is returned to the ED to await emergent transfer to a tertiary facility; however, the patient rapidly decompensates and a Code Blue is called. Despite the absence of return of spontaneous circulation, resuscitation efforts are prolonged while the ED social worker attempts to contact the patient's family to come to the ED. Finally, the resuscitation is terminated and the patient is pronounced dead. Several hours later the patient's elderly mother arrives and asks you: "What's going on with Mikey?" PMID:25812264

  19. Attitudes towards homeless people among emergency department teachers and learners: a cross-sectional study of medical students and emergency physicians

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Medical students’ attitudes and beliefs about homeless people may be shaped by the attitudes of their teachers and one of the most common sites for learning about homeless patients is the emergency department. The objective of this study was to determine if medical students in the preclinical and clinical years and emergency medicine faculty and residents have different attitudes and beliefs about homeless people. Methods The Health Professional Attitudes Toward the Homeless Inventory (HPATHI), was administered to all medical students, and emergency medicine physicians and residents at a large academic health sciences center in Canada. The HPATHI examines attitudes, interest and confidence on a 5-point Likert scale. Differences among groups were examined using the Kruskal Wallis test and Pearson’s chi-square test. Results The HPATHI was completed by 371 individuals, for an overall response rate of 55%. Analysis of dichotomized median and percentage results revealed 5/18 statements were significant by both methods. On the attitudes subscales physicians and residents as a group were more negative for 2/9 statements and on the confidence subscale more positive for 1/4 statements. The interest subscale achieved overall statistical significance with decreased positive responses among physicians and residents compared to medical students in 2/5 statements. Conclusion This study revealed divergences in attitudes, interests and beliefs among medical students and emergency medicine physicians and residents. We offer strategies for training interventions and systemic support of emergency faculty. Emergency medicine physicians can examine their role in the development of medical students through both formal and informal teaching in the emergency department. PMID:23968336

  20. Nursing home-acquired pneumonia presenting at the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rui; Oliveira, Sara; Almeida, André

    2016-10-01

    Nursing home-acquired pneumonia (NHAP) is one of the most common infections arising amongst nursing home residents, and its incidence is expected to increase as population ages. The NHAP recommendation for empiric broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy, arising from the concept of healthcare-associated pneumonia, has been challenged by recent studies reporting low rates of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria. This single center study analyzes the results of NHAP patients admitted through the Emergency Department (ED) at a tertiary center during the year 2010. There were 116 cases, male gender corresponded to 34.5 % of patients and median age was 84 years old (IQR 77-90). Comorbidities were present in 69.8 % of cases and 48.3 % of patients had used healthcare services during the previous 90 days. In-hospital mortality rate was 46.6 % and median length-of-stay was 9 days. Severity assessment at the Emergency Department provided CURB65 index score and respective mortality (%) results: zero: n = 0; one: n = 7 (0 %); two: n = 18 (38.9 %); three: n = 26 (38.5 %); four: n = 30 (53.3 %); and five; n = 22 (68.2 %); and sepsis n = 50 (34.0 %), severe sepsis n = 43 (48.8 %) and septic shock n = 22 (72.7 %). Significant risk factors for in-hospital mortality in multivariate analysis were polypnea (p = 0.001), age ≥ 75 years (p = 0.02), and severe sepsis or shock (p = 0.03) at the ED. Microbiological testing in 78.4 % of cases was positive in 15.4 % (n = 15): methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (26.7 %), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (20.0 %), S. pneumoniae (13.3 %), Escherichia coli (13.3 %), others (26.7 %); the rate of MDR bacteria was 53.3 %. This study reveals high rates of mortality and MDR bacteria among NHAP hospital admissions supporting the use of empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy in these patients.

  1. Psychological reaction to hospitalization and illness in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Heiskell, L E; Pasnau, R O

    1991-02-01

    standing over them with nasogastric tubes, intravenous lines, Foley catheters, arterial blood gases, subclavians, and dermal cut-downs. This is an overwhelming nightmare that can be relieved only by the empathic and caring physician and emergency department staff. The stress of medical illness and/or hospitalization can be overwhelming for some patients and is usually followed by some form of psychological response. Current understanding of the psychological impact of illness is based upon psychological defenses, coping mechanisms, and individual personality. It is the ability of the emergency physician to identify defenses, coping skills and personality types that will aid him or her in the medical management of the patients in their time of illness and hospitalization.

  2. Study Designs and Evaluation Models for Emergency Department Public Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Kerry B.; Ranney, Megan L.; Vaca, Federico E.; D’Onofrio, Gail; Rothman, Richard E.; Rhodes, Karin V.; Becker, Bruce; Haukoos, Jason S.

    2011-01-01

    Public health research requires sound design and thoughtful consideration of potential biases that may influence the validity of results. It also requires careful implementation of protocols and procedures that are likely to translate from the research environment to actual clinical practice. This article is the product of a breakout session from the 2009 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference entitled “Public Health in the ED: Screening, Surveillance, and Intervention” and serves to describe in detail aspects of performing emergency department (ED)-based public health research, while serving as a resource for current and future researchers. In doing so, the authors describe methodologic features of study design, participant selection and retention, and measurements and analyses pertinent to public health research. In addition, a number of recommendations related to research methods and future investigations related to public health work in the ED are provided. Public health investigators are poised to make substantial contributions to this important area of research, but this will only be accomplished by employing sound research methodology in the context of rigorous program evaluation. PMID:20053232

  3. Online Health Information Impacts Patients’ Decisions to Seek Emergency Department Care

    PubMed Central

    Pourmand, Ali; Sikka, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the impact of online health information (OHI) and patients’ decisions to seek emergency department (ED) care. Methods: We conducted a survey of a convenience sample of 489 ambulatory patients at an academic ED between February and September 2006. The primary measure was the prevalence of Internet use, and the secondary outcome was the impact of OHI on patients’ decision to seek ED care. Results: The study group comprised 175 (38%) males. Mean age was 33 years old; 222 (45.4%) patients were white, 189 (38.7%) patients were African American, and 33 (6.7%) were Hispanic. 92.6% had Internet access, and 94.5% used email; 58.7% reported that OHI was easy to locate, while 49.7% felt that it was also easy to understand. Of the subjects who had Internet access, 15.1% (1.6, 95% CI 1.3–2.0) stated that they had changed their decision to seek care in the ED. Conclusion: This study suggests that Internet access in an urban adult ED population may mirror reported Internet use among American adults. Many ED patients report that they are able to access and understand online health information, as well as use it to make decisions about seeking emergency care. PMID:21691522

  4. Correlates of Gambling Among Youth in an Inner City Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Abby L.; Walton, Maureen A.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Resko, Stella M.; Duan, Linping

    2009-01-01

    Correlates of past year gambling were examined in a diverse sample of 1128 youth ages 14–18 (45.9% female, 58.0% African American) presenting to an inner city emergency department (ED). Overall, 22.5% of the sample reported past year gambling. Male youth were more likely to gamble than female youth and African American youth reported higher rates of past year gambling than non-African American youth. Significant bivariate correlates of gambling included lower academic achievement, being out of school, working more than 20 hours per week, alcohol and marijuana use, alcohol problems, severe dating violence, moderate and severe general violence, and carrying a weapon. When examined simultaneously, being male, African American, out of school, working for pay, alcohol and marijuana use, severe general violence and carrying a weapon all emerged as significant correlates of past year gambling, largest amount of money gambled, and gambling frequency. In addition, involvement in severe dating violence was associated with frequency and largest amount gambled. The results suggest that gambling is common among youth in the inner city and is associated with several risk behaviors. The inner city ED may provide a context for screening and intervention to address multiple risk behaviors. PMID:19290695

  5. Commentary: Interim leadership of academic departments at U.S. medical schools.

    PubMed

    Grigsby, R Kevin; Aber, Robert C; Quillen, David A

    2009-10-01

    Medical schools and teaching hospitals are experiencing more frequent turnover of department chairs. Loss of a department chair creates instability in the department and may have a negative effect on the organization at large. Interim leadership of academic departments is common, and interim chairs are expected to immediately demonstrate skills and leadership abilities. However, little is known about how persons are prepared to assume the interim chair role. Newer competencies for effective leadership include an understanding of the business of medicine, interpersonal and communication skills, the ability to deal with conflict and solve adaptive challenges, and the ability to build and work on teams. Medical schools and teaching hospitals need assistance to meet the unique training and support needs of persons serving as interim leaders. For example, the Association of American Medical Colleges and individual chair societies can develop programs to allow current chairs to reflect on their present positions and plan for the future. Formal leadership training, mentorship opportunities, and conscientious succession planning are good first steps in preparing to meet the needs of academic departments during transitions in leadership. Also, interim leadership experience may be useful as a means for "opening the door" to underrepresented persons, including women, and increasing the diversity of the leadership team.

  6. Systematic review of emergency department crowding: causes, effects, and solutions.

    PubMed

    Hoot, Nathan R; Aronsky, Dominik

    2008-08-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding represents an international crisis that may affect the quality and access of health care. We conducted a comprehensive PubMed search to identify articles that (1) studied causes, effects, or solutions of ED crowding; (2) described data collection and analysis methodology; (3) occurred in a general ED setting; and (4) focused on everyday crowding. Two independent reviewers identified the relevant articles by consensus. We applied a 5-level quality assessment tool to grade the methodology of each study. From 4,271 abstracts and 188 full-text articles, the reviewers identified 93 articles meeting the inclusion criteria. A total of 33 articles studied causes, 27 articles studied effects, and 40 articles studied solutions of ED crowding. Commonly studied causes of crowding included nonurgent visits, "frequent-flyer" patients, influenza season, inadequate staffing, inpatient boarding, and hospital bed shortages. Commonly studied effects of crowding included patient mortality, transport delays, treatment delays, ambulance diversion, patient elopement, and financial effect. Commonly studied solutions of crowding included additional personnel, observation units, hospital bed access, nonurgent referrals, ambulance diversion, destination control, crowding measures, and queuing theory. The results illustrated the complex, multifaceted characteristics of the ED crowding problem. Additional high-quality studies may provide valuable contributions toward better understanding and alleviating the daily crisis. This structured overview of the literature may help to identify future directions for the crowding research agenda.

  7. Emergency Department Use Among Older Adults With Dementia.

    PubMed

    LaMantia, Michael A; Stump, Timothy E; Messina, Frank C; Miller, Douglas K; Callahan, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Although persons with dementia are frequently hospitalized, relatively little is known about the health profile, patterns of health care use, and mortality rates for patients with dementia who access care in the emergency department (ED). We linked data from our hospital system with Medicare and Medicaid claims, Minimum Data Set, and Outcome and Assessment Information Set data to evaluate 175,652 ED visits made by 10,354 individuals with dementia and 15,020 individuals without dementia over 11 years. Survival rates after ED visits and associated charges were examined. Patients with dementia visited the ED more frequently, were hospitalized more often than patients without dementia, and had an increased odds of returning to the ED within 30 days of an index ED visit compared with persons who never had a dementia diagnosis (odds ratio, 2.29; P<0.001). Survival rates differed significantly between patients by dementia status (P<0.001). Mean Medicare payments for ED services were significantly higher among patients with dementia. These results show that older adults with dementia are frequent ED visitors who have greater comorbidity, incur higher charges, are admitted to hospitals at higher rates, return to EDs at higher rates, and have higher mortality after an ED visit than patients without dementia.

  8. Recognition and management of seizures in children in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Edward; Dey, Indranil; Scammell, Andrea; Burnage, Katy; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2016-09-01

    Seizure is defined as 'a sudden surge of electrical activity in the brain, which usually affects how a person appears or acts for a short time'. Children who have experienced seizures commonly present to emergency departments (EDs), and detailed history taking will usually help differentiate between epileptic and non-epileptic events. ED nurses are often the first health professionals to manage children with seizures, and this is best done by following the ABCDE approach. Treatment involves termination of seizures with anticonvulsants, and children may need other symptomatic management. Seizures in children can be an extremely distressing experience for parents, who should be supported and kept informed by experienced ED nurses. Nurses also play a vital role in educating parents on correct administration of anticonvulsants and safety advice. This article discusses the aetiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of children with seizures, with particular emphasis on epilepsy. It includes two reflective case studies to highlight the challenges faced by healthcare professionals managing children who present with convulsions. PMID:27615348

  9. Diagnostic testing of the emergency department patient with chest pain.

    PubMed

    Zalenski, R J; Shamsa, F H

    1998-07-01

    In evaluating patients with nondiagnostic initial clinical or electrocardiogram (ECG) findings for acute cardiac ischemia, continuous 12-lead ECG monitoring increases the detection of diagnostic ECG findings, including ST-segment elevation, in patients awaiting hospital admission. Rest scanning with technitium-99m sestamibi is able to risk stratify low-moderate risk patients into lower and higher risk groups for cardiac events. Caveats include the reduced sensitivity of scanning of patients who are pain free and the need for follow-up exercise scans for patients free of perfusion defects at rest. Cardiac markers, particularly the troponins, show great promise for the detection of a larger part of the spectrum of acute coronary syndromes in the emergency department, including patients with minimal myocardial damage and higher risk for short-term death and nonfatal acute myocardial infarction. Accelerated diagnostic protocols using serial testing with cardiac markers, ECGs and then provocative testing over a 14-hour period, are feasible, safe, and cost-effective. PMID:10091020

  10. Assessment of suicidal youth in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Berk, Michele S; Asarnow, Joan R

    2015-06-01

    Accurate evaluation of suicidal adolescents in the emergency department (ED) is critical for safety and linkage to follow-up care. We examined self-reports of 181 adolescents who presented to an ED with suicidal ideation (SI) or a suicide attempt (SA). Parents also completed self-reports. Results showed fair agreement between parents and youth on the reason for the ED visit (e.g., SI vs. SA) and greater agreement between independent judges and youths than between judges and parents. In accordance with accepted definitions of suicide attempts (e.g., Crosby, Ortega, & Melanson, 2011; O'Carroll, Berman, Maris, Moscicki, Tanney, & Silverman, 1996, p. 237; Posner, Oquendo, Gould, Stanley, & Davies, 2007, p. 1035; Silverman, Berman, Sanddal, O'Carroll, & Joiner, 2007, p. 248), most youth with SA as the reason for the ED visit reported some intent to die associated with the attempt. Finally, youth presenting to the ED with SA did not differ clinically from youth presenting with SI, and almost half of youths with SI reported past suicide attempts. These results highlight the need to emphasize adolescents' reports in clinical decision making, suggest adolescents' defined suicide attempts similarly to published definitions, and show that assessment of past SAs, as well as present suicidal thoughts and behaviors, is critical in determining future risk.

  11. Hemodynamic measurements for evaluating vasovagal syncope in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Stewart Siu-Wa; Mo, Junrong; Graham, Colin Alexander; Rainer, Timothy Hudson

    2015-01-01

    Syncope is a sudden and transient loss of consciousness and postural tone, with spontaneous recovery without medical intervention. It accounts for 1.0% to 1.5% of emergency department (ED) visits and up to 6% of hospital admissions. Vasovagal syncope may be the cause of syncope in 21% to 40% of cases. A 53-year-old Chinese woman was brought to the ED by ambulance after a near-syncope episode while performing gentle morning exercises. She was hypotensive and bradycardic in the ambulance. Upon arrival at the ED, her blood pressure was 89/61 mmHg. The use of a Doppler cardiac output monitor readily demonstrated that the patient’s systemic vascular resistance was reduced, with cardiac output at the lower limit of the normal range. These hemodynamic data were useful in supporting the diagnosis of vasovagal syncope; they helped in the risk stratification of our patient with syncope, and guided the management and subsequent disposition decision.

  12. Decreased health care quality associated with emergency department overcrowding.

    PubMed

    Miró, O; Antonio, M T; Jiménez, S; De Dios, A; Sánchez, M; Borrás, A; Millá, J

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the influence of overcrowding on health care quality provided by emergency departments (ED). The study was carried out in an urban, university tertiary care hospital. All patients seen at the internal medicine unit (IMU) of the ED who returned during the following 72 hours, and those who died in the ED rooms were included in the study. During a consecutive period of 2 years (104 weeks), we prospectively quantified the number of weekly visits, revisits and deaths. We calculated revisit and mortality rates (in respect of percentage of all visited patients) for each week. Correlation between the number of weekly visits, and revisit and mortality rates was assessed using a simple linear regression model. We consigned 81,301 visits, 1137 revisits and 648 deaths; mean (+/- SD) number of weekly visits, revisits and deaths were 782 (68), 10.93 (3.97) and 6.23 (3.04) respectively; weekly revisit rate was 1.40% (0.48%) and weekly mortality rate was 0.79% (0.36%). We observed a significant, positive correlation between mortality rates and weekly number of visits (p = 0.01). Although a similar trend was also found for revisit rates, such an increase did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.06). It is concluded that since revisit and mortality rates constitute good health care quality markers, present data demonstrate that ED overcrowding implies a decrease in the health care quality provided by it.

  13. A stochastic optimization model for shift scheduling in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    El-Rifai, Omar; Garaix, Thierry; Augusto, Vincent; Xie, Xiaolan

    2015-09-01

    Excessive waiting time in Emergency Departments (ED) can be both a cause of frustration and more importantly, a health concern for patients. Waiting time arises when the demand for work goes beyond the facility's service capacity. ED service capacity mainly depends on human resources and on beds available for patients. In this paper, we focus on human resources organization in an ED and seek to best balance between service quality and working conditions. More specifically, we address the personnel scheduling problem in order to optimize the shift distribution among employees and minimize the total expected patients' waiting time. The problem is also characterized by a multi-stage re-entrant service process. With an appropriate approximation of patients' waiting times, we first propose a stochastic mixed-integer programming model that is solved by a sample average approximation (SAA) approach. The resulting personnel schedules are then evaluated using a discrete-event simulation model. Numerical experiments are then performed with data from a French hospital to compare different personnel scheduling strategies.

  14. Paediatric femur fractures at the emergency department: accidental or not?

    PubMed

    Hoytema van Konijnenburg, Eva M M; Vrolijk-Bosschaart, Thekla F; Bakx, Roel; Van Rijn, Rick R

    2016-01-01

    Only a small proportion of all paediatric fractures is caused by child abuse or neglect, especially in highly prevalent long bone fractures. It can be difficult to differentiate abusive fractures from non-abusive fractures. This article focuses on femoral fractures in young children. Based on three cases, this article presents a forensic evidence-based approach to differentiate between accidental and non-accidental causes of femoral fractures. We describe three cases of young children who were presented to the emergency department because of a suspected femur fracture. Although in all cases, the fracture had a similar location and appearance, the clinical history and developmental stage of the child led to three different conclusions. In the first two cases, an accidental mechanism was a plausible conclusion, although in the second case, neglect of parental supervision was the cause for concern. In the third case, a non-accidental injury was diagnosed and appropriate legal prosecution followed. Any doctor treating children should always be aware of the possibility of child abuse and neglect in children with injuries, especially in young and non-mobile children presenting with an unknown trauma mechanism. If a suspicion of child abuse or neglect arises, a thorough diagnostic work-up should be performed, including a full skeletal survey according to the guidelines of the Royal College of Radiologists and the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. In order to make a good assessment, the radiologist reviewing the skeletal survey needs access to all relevant clinical and social information.

  15. Variation in Physician Practice Styles within and across Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Van Parys, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Despite the significant responsibility that physicians have in healthcare delivery, we know surprisingly little about why physician practice styles vary within or across institutions. Estimating variation in physician practice styles is complicated by the fact that patients are rarely randomly assigned to physicians. This paper uses the quasi-random assignment of patients to physicians in emergency departments (EDs) to show how physicians vary in their treatment of patients with minor injuries. The results reveal a considerable degree of variation in practice styles within EDs; physicians at the 75th percentile of the spending distribution spend 20% more than physicians at the 25th percentile. Observable physician characteristics do not explain much of the variation across physicians, but there is a significant degree of sorting between physicians and EDs over time, with high-cost physicians sorting into high-cost EDs as they gain experience. The results may shed light on why some EDs remain persistently higher-cost than others. PMID:27517464

  16. [Aggressions towards nurses in emergency departments: an international literature review].

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Lorenzo; Bambi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Workplace violence is a widespread phenomenon in every kind of settings. Among these ones there are emergency departments (ED), that have distinctive features as like the large daily number of patients' presentations, and high emotional content or stressing situations related to the management of diagnostic-therapeutic priorities. We reviewed the medical and nursing literature to quantify the international widespread of aggressions towards nurses working in EDs, distinguish the typologies and the perpetrators, and identify the consequences on victims and healthcare organizations. Original papers were searched using Medline, CINHAL, and Medscape databases.  35 research articles met the inclusion criteria, but 6 were not retrieved. The rate of verbal abuses reported by ED nurses varies from 50% to 100% of those who were surveyed, while physical violence ranges between 16.7% and 72%. Patients and relatives are the main perpetrators, followed by doctors, and, only in lower percentages, by nurses colleagues. Alcohol, drugs abuse, and overcrowding in EDs are acknowledged as motivating factors for violent events. Under-reporting of aggressions is frequent up to the 80% of victims, and some papers report that nurses consider assaults as a normal part of their work. There is a direct relation between aggressions and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disturb syndrome. Moreover there is a sense of continuous fear in nurses, causing the likelihood of workplace leaving. Special educational courses seem to be effective in diminishing the number of aggressions and to adopt adequate adaptive behaviors. 

  17. Modeling emergency department operations using advanced computer simulation systems.

    PubMed

    Saunders, C E; Makens, P K; Leblanc, L J

    1989-02-01

    We developed a computer simulation model of emergency department operations using simulation software. This model uses multiple levels of preemptive patient priority; assigns each patient to an individual nurse and physician; incorporates all standard tests, procedures, and consultations; and allows patient service processes to proceed simultaneously, sequentially, repetitively, or a combination of these. Selected input data, including the number of physicians, nurses, and treatment beds, and the blood test turnaround time, then were varied systematically to determine their simulated effect on patient throughput time, selected queue sizes, and rates of resource utilization. Patient throughput time varied directly with laboratory service times and inversely with the number of physician or nurse servers. Resource utilization rates varied inversely with resource availability, and patient waiting time and patient throughput time varied indirectly with the level of patient acuity. The simulation can be animated on a computer monitor, showing simulated patients, specimens, and staff members moving throughout the ED. Computer simulation is a potentially useful tool that can help predict the results of changes in the ED system without actually altering it and may have implications for planning, optimizing resources, and improving the efficiency and quality of care.

  18. Modified emergency department thoracotomy for postablation cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Thomas E; Haug, Eric W

    2012-04-01

    Cardiac dysrhythmias are a common problem in the United States. Radiofrequency ablation is being used more frequently as a treatment for these diagnoses. Although rare, serious complications such as cardiac tamponade have been reported as a result of ablation procedures. Traditionally, emergency department (ED) thoracotomy has been reserved for cases of traumatic arrest only. We report a case of a successful modified ED thoracotomy in a patient with postablation cardiac tamponade and subsequent obstructive shock who failed intravenous fluid resuscitation, pressor administration, and multiple attempts at pericardiocentesis. In this case, a modified approach was used to incise the pericardium. Although this was associated with large blood loss, we believed that using the traditional method of completely removing the pericardium would have resulted in uncontrolled hemorrhage. Instead, our method led to successful resuscitation of the patient until definitive care was available. A smaller pericardial incision than is traditionally used during ED thoracotomy deserves further consideration and research to determine whether and when it may be most useful as a temporizing treatment of cardiac tamponade when other methods have failed. PMID:22104519

  19. Epidemiologic findings of cancer detected in a pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Kundra, Manu; Stankovic, Curt; Gupta, Nimisha; Thomas, Ronald; Hamre, Merlin; Mahajan, Prashant

    2009-05-01

    This study describes epidemiologic findings of pediatric cancer diagnosed in the emergency department (ED) setting. Medical records are retrospectively reviewed on all patients in the hospital's cancer database between 2000 and 2004 who were diagnosed as having cancer or whose oncologic diagnosis was missed during their ED presentation. Of 427 patients identified in the cancer database, 18% (77 of 427) are analyzed. Oncologic diagnosis was missed in 5% (4 of 77) of the eligible patients initially presenting to the ED. The incidence of cancer in the ED is 22.8 cases per 100,000 ED visits. The most prevalent cancer is related to the hematologic system (37.7%), followed by the central nervous system (31.2%) and the abdomen (22.1%). Hematologic, central nervous system, and abdominal cancers constitute approximately 90% of all childhood cancers. Cancer is diagnosed frequently in our ED patient population. Based on the prevalence of certain tumors, the diagnostic approach to children with hematologic, neurologic, or abdominal complaints should include evaluation for any underlying cancer.

  20. Reducing Hospital Readmissions via Optimization of Emergency Department Care.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Lisa M; Schmidt, Kathryn A; Richards, Christopher T; McHugh, Megan C; Holl, Jane L; Adams, James G; Ladner, Daniela P

    2016-04-01

    Over the past 5 years, early hospital readmissions have become a national focus. With several recent publications highlighting the high rates of early hospital readmissions among transplant recipients, more work is needed to identify risk factors and strategies for reducing unnecessary readmissions among this patient population. Although the American Society of Transplant Surgeons is advocating the exclusion of transplant recipients from the calculation of hospital readmission rates, the outcome of their advocacy efforts remains uncertain. One potential strategy for reducing early hospital readmissions is to critically examine care received by transplant recipients in the emergency department (ED), a critical pathway to readmission. As a starting point, research is needed to assess rates of ED presentation among transplant recipients, diagnostic algorithms, and communication among clinical teams. Mixed-methods studies that enhance understanding of system-level barriers to optimized evaluation and treatment of transplant recipients in the ED may lead to quality improvement interventions that reduce unnecessary readmissions, even if the rates of transplant recipients presenting to the ED remains high.

  1. Emergency department utilization and subsequent prescription drug overdose death

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Joanne E.; DiMaggio, Charles J.; Keyes, Katherine M.; Doyle, John J.; Richardson, Lynne D.; Li, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prescription drug overdose (PDO) deaths are a critical public health problem in the United States. This study aims to assess the association between emergency department (ED) utilization patterns in a cohort of ED patients and the risk of subsequent unintentional PDO mortality. Methods Using data from the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System for 2006–2010, a nested case-control design was used to examine the relationship between ED utilization patterns in New York State residents of age 18–64 years and subsequent PDO death. Results The study sample consisted of 2732 case patients who died of PDO and 2732 control ED patients who were selected through incidence density sampling. With adjustment for demographic characteristics, and diagnoses of pain, substance abuse, and psychiatric disorders, the estimated odds ratios of PDO death relative to one ED visit or less in the previous year were 4.90 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.50–5.34) for those with two ED visits, 16.61 (95% CI: 14.72–18.75) for those with three ED visits, and 48.24 (95% CI: 43.23–53.83) for those with four ED visits or more. Conclusions Frequency of ED visits is strongly associated with the risk of subsequent PDO death. Intervention programs targeting frequent ED users are warranted to reduce PDO mortality. PMID:25935710

  2. Nurse-patient/visitor communication in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Constance; Fielden, Nina M; Meyer, Kate H; Albert, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Patients and visitors need to be encouraged to express their needs and be provided with enough relevant information so that treatment and recovery from illness are optimized. In the emergency department, it is important for nurses to create an environment of trust, respect, and acceptance. Using a survey design, a convenience sample of nurses and patients/visitors described patient/visitor communication needs and determined if needs were met during the ED encounter. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Mantel Haenszel chi(2) tests were used to determine associations between patient-rated importance of nurse communication needs and nursing communication performance. Sixty-four nurses and 123 patients/visitors completed a communication needs survey. More than 80% of patients answered "excellent" or "very good" to 6 of the top 10 important communication needs. Patient and nurse importance differed significantly on only 2 communication needs: calm voice and social status (nurses rated these needs of higher importance than patients; P = .01, P = .006). Patient-ranked importance was positively associated with patient opinion of how well needs were met in 6 of 19 patient/visitor communication needs; that is, not making assumptions about social status (P = .0006), offering reassurance to calm fears (P = .004), and teaching about primary medical concerns/conditions (P = .01). Nurse and patient/visitor perceptions of important communication are similar. Educating nurses about patient/visitor communication needs is the first step in enhancing how well nurses meet those needs.

  3. Acute bilateral vision loss in emergency department: A case report.

    PubMed

    Tanrikulu, Ceren Sen; Hocagil, Hilal; Kaya, Ural; Hocagil, Abdullah Cuneyt

    2016-03-01

    Stroke occurs due to the interruption of blood flow to the brain and it is divided into ischemic and hemorrhagic. In the ischemic strokes, while the most commonly affected vessel is median cerebral artery (MCA), it is particularly affected bilateral posterior cerebral artery (PCA) is very rare condition. In this study, a case of sudden loss of vision and bilateral occipital infarct associated with bilateral vertebral system pathology and methylene tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene mutation were reported. A 62-year-old man was admitted with sudden loss of vision complaint starting 10 h before applying to emergency department. The patient was oriented and cooperative. On neurological examination, there was complete loss of vision in the right eye and only a response to light in the left eye. On the brain computerized tomography (CT), ischemic lesions were observed in the bilateral occipital areas and on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there were foci showing diffusion limitation in cortico-subcortical areas of bilateral parieto-occipital region. On the detailed examination at the clinic, MTHFR (a1298c) gene mutation was detected. Bilateral occipital infarction is rare and its diagnosis can be difficult because of its atypical symptoms. Therefore, occipital infarction should be suspected when the only sign is isolated vision loss in patients with risk factor for thromboembolism in their history and detailed visual-neurological examination of these patients should be performed. PMID:27239639

  4. An Early Warning System for Overcrowding in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Hoot, Nathan; Aronsky, Dominik

    2006-01-01

    Overcrowding of emergency departments impedes health care access and quality nationwide. A real-time early warning system for overcrowding may allow administrators to alleviate the problem before reaching a crisis state. Two original probabilistic models – a logistic regression and a recurrent neural network – were created to predict overcrowding crises one hour in the future. The two original and two pre-existing models were validated at 8,496 observation points from January 1, 2006 to February 28, 2006. All models showed high discriminatory ability in terms of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (logistic regression = .954; recurrent neural network = .957; EDWIN = .879; NEDOCS = .924). At comparable rates of false alarms, the logistic regression gave more advance notice of crises than other models (logistic regression = 62 min; recurrent neural network = 13 min; EDWIN = 0 min; NEDOCS = 0 min). These results demonstrate the feasibility of using models based on key operational variables to anticipate overcrowding crises in real time. PMID:17238359

  5. Emergency Department Screening for Suicide and Mental Health Risk.

    PubMed

    Babeva, Kalina; Hughes, Jennifer L; Asarnow, Joan

    2016-11-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among youth ages 10-24. An estimated 1.5 million US adolescents receive their primary health care in the emergency department (ED); this is particularly true for low-income and minority youths who often lack a regular source of care. ED visits can provide a window of opportunity to screen and identify youths with suicide and mental health risk, triage youths based on need, and facilitate effective follow-up care. Recently developed brief therapeutic assessment approaches have demonstrated success in improving rates of follow-up care after discharge from the ED. Furthermore, there is some data supporting clinical benefits when youths receive evidence-based outpatient follow-up care. ED screening combined with effective follow-up, therefore, may provide one strategy for improving mental health and reducing health disparities in our nation. This paper reviews the context in which ED screenings occur, available tools and strategies, and evidence for the effectiveness of tested approaches. PMID:27671917

  6. Emergency department crowding and risk of preventable medical errors.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Stephen K; Huckins, David S; Liu, Shan W; Pallin, Daniel J; Sullivan, Ashley F; Lipton, Robert I; Camargo, Carlos A

    2012-04-01

    The objective of the study is to determine the association between emergency department (ED) crowding and preventable medical errors (PME). This was a retrospective cohort study of 533 ED patients enrolled in the National ED Safety Study (NEDSS) in four Massachusetts EDs. Individual patients' average exposure to ED crowding during their ED visit was compared with the occurrence of a PME (yes/no) for the three diagnostic categories in NEDSS: acute myocardial infarction, asthma exacerbation, and dislocation requiring procedural sedation. To accommodate site-to-site differences in available administrative data, ED crowding was measured using one of three previously validated crowding metrics (ED Work Index, ED Workscore, and ED Occupancy). At each site, the continuous measure was placed into site-specific quartiles, and these quartiles then were combined across sites. We found that 46 (8.6%; 95% confidence interval, 6.4-11.3%) of the 533 patients experienced a PME. For those seen during higher levels of ED crowding (quartile 4 vs. quartile 1), the occurrence of PMEs was more than twofold higher, both on unadjusted analysis and adjusting for two potential confounders (diagnosis, site). The association appeared non-linear, with most PMEs occurring at the highest crowding level. We identified a direct association between high levels of ED crowding and risk of preventable medical errors. Further study is needed to determine the generalizability of these results. Should such research confirm our findings, we would suggest that mitigating ED crowding may reduce the occurrence of preventable medical errors.

  7. Using online analytical processing to manage emergency department operations.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Bradley D; Asplin, Brent R

    2004-11-01

    The emergency department (ED) is a unique setting in which to explore and evaluate the utility of information technology to improve health care operations. A potentially useful software tool in managing this complex environment is online analytical processing (OLAP). An OLAP system has the ability to provide managers, providers, and researchers with the necessary information to make decisions quickly and effectively by allowing them to examine patterns and trends in operations and patient flow. OLAP software quickly summarizes and processes data acquired from a variety of data sources, including computerized ED tracking systems. It allows the user to form a comprehensive picture of the ED from both system-wide and patient-specific perspectives and to interactively view the data using an approach that meets his or her needs. This article describes OLAP software tools and provides examples of potential OLAP applications for care improvement projects, primarily from the perspective of the ED. While OLAP is clearly a helpful tool in the ED, it is far more useful when integrated into the larger continuum of health information systems across a hospital or health care delivery system. PMID:15528586

  8. The emergency department medical director as supervisor of medical professionals.

    PubMed

    Vidrine, Lawrence R

    2004-02-01

    The overall success of the ED in the eyes of its customers demands the successful performance of a complex operation involving a team of skilled professionals from various disciplines interacting with support staff and the public. The strong personalities, intelligence, and training of emergency physicians provides the medical director significant challenges as their supervisor. The ED medical staff provides a great impact on the culture and overall perceived performance of the department. It is essential that their leader provide clear direction regarding the performance expectations of the organization for the medical staff. A systematic approach to developing and expressing those expectations, providing timely feedback regarding performance to those expectations, and addressing variation from expectations can provide a valuable tool in supporting the ED medical director's success. This article has been a brief overview of the basic components ofa performance management system for physicians. It has described a process for arriving at explicit performance expectations across dimensions commonly associated with a medical practice, an approach to measuring critical performance factors and delivering ongoing routine feedback to individuals and the group regarding performance to expectations. Finally, it addressed important steps to include in the management of marginal and exceptional performers to preserve the functional integrity and long-term success of the ED. In adopting this approach to the supervisory responsibilities of the medical director, a strong foundation is established for successful performance management.

  9. Presentations to Emergency Departments for COPD: A Time Series Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rosychuk, Rhonda J; Youngson, Erik; Rowe, Brian H

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common respiratory condition characterized by progressive dyspnea and acute exacerbations which may result in emergency department (ED) presentations. This study examines monthly rates of presentations to EDs in one Canadian province. Methods. Presentations for COPD made by individuals aged ≥55 years during April 1999 to March 2011 were extracted from provincial databases. Data included age, sex, and health zone of residence (North, Central, South, and urban). Crude rates were calculated. Seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) time series models were developed. Results. ED presentations for COPD totalled 188,824 and the monthly rate of presentation remained relatively stable (from 197.7 to 232.6 per 100,000). Males and seniors (≥65 years) comprised 52.2% and 73.7% of presentations, respectively. The ARIMA(1,0, 0) × (1,0, 1)12 model was appropriate for the overall rate of presentations and for each sex and seniors. Zone specific models showed relatively stable or decreasing rates; the North zone had an increasing trend. Conclusions. ED presentation rates for COPD have been relatively stable in Alberta during the past decade. However, their increases in northern regions deserve further exploration. The SARIMA models quantified the temporal patterns and can help planning future health care service needs. PMID:27445514

  10. Presentations to Emergency Departments for COPD: A Time Series Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Youngson, Erik; Rowe, Brian H.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common respiratory condition characterized by progressive dyspnea and acute exacerbations which may result in emergency department (ED) presentations. This study examines monthly rates of presentations to EDs in one Canadian province. Methods. Presentations for COPD made by individuals aged ≥55 years during April 1999 to March 2011 were extracted from provincial databases. Data included age, sex, and health zone of residence (North, Central, South, and urban). Crude rates were calculated. Seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA) time series models were developed. Results. ED presentations for COPD totalled 188,824 and the monthly rate of presentation remained relatively stable (from 197.7 to 232.6 per 100,000). Males and seniors (≥65 years) comprised 52.2% and 73.7% of presentations, respectively. The ARIMA(1,0, 0) × (1,0, 1)12 model was appropriate for the overall rate of presentations and for each sex and seniors. Zone specific models showed relatively stable or decreasing rates; the North zone had an increasing trend. Conclusions. ED presentation rates for COPD have been relatively stable in Alberta during the past decade. However, their increases in northern regions deserve further exploration. The SARIMA models quantified the temporal patterns and can help planning future health care service needs. PMID:27445514

  11. Emergency department throughput, crowding, and financial outcomes for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Handel, Daniel A; Hilton, Joshua A; Ward, Michael J; Rabin, Elaine; Zwemer, Frank L; Pines, Jesse M

    2010-08-01

    Emergency department (ED) crowding has been identified as a major public health problem in the United States by the Institute of Medicine. ED crowding not only is associated with poorer patient outcomes, but it also contributes to lost demand for ED services when patients leave without being seen and hospitals must go on ambulance diversion. However, somewhat paradoxically, ED crowding may financially benefit hospitals. This is because ED crowding allows hospitals to maximize occupancy with well-insured, elective patients while patients wait in the ED. In this article, the authors propose a more holistic model of hospital flow and revenue that contradicts this notion and offer suggestions for improvements in ED and hospital management that may not only reduce crowding and improve quality, but also increase hospital revenues. Also proposed is that increased efficiency and quality in U.S. hospitals will require changes in systematic microeconomic and macroeconomic incentives that drive the delivery of health services in the United States. Finally, the authors address several questions to propose mutually beneficial solutions to ED crowding that include the realignment of hospital incentives, changing culture to promote flow, and several ED-based strategies to improve ED efficiency.

  12. Do Patient-Centered Medical Homes Reduce Emergency Department Visits?

    PubMed Central

    David, Guy; Gunnarsson, Candace; Saynisch, Philip A; Chawla, Ravi; Nigam, Somesh

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether adoption of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) reduces emergency department (ED) utilization among patients with and without chronic illness. Data Sources Data from approximately 460,000 Independence Blue Cross patients enrolled in 280 primary care practices, all converting to PCMH status between 2008 and 2012. Research Design We estimate the effect of a practice becoming PCMH-certified on ED visits and costs using a difference-in-differences approach which exploits variation in the timing of PCMH certification, employing either practice or patient fixed effects. We analyzed patients with and without chronic illness across six chronic illness categories. Principal Findings Among chronically ill patients, transition to PCMH status was associated with 5–8 percent reductions in ED utilization. This finding was robust to a number of specifications, including analyzing avoidable and weekend ED visits alone. The largest reductions in ED visits are concentrated among chronic patients with diabetes and hypertension. Conclusions Adoption of the PCMH model was associated with lower ED utilization for chronically ill patients, but not for those without chronic illness. The effectiveness of the PCMH model varies by chronic condition. Analysis of weekend and avoidable ED visits suggests that reductions in ED utilization stem from better management of chronic illness rather than expanding access to primary care clinics. PMID:25112834

  13. Emergency Department Death Rates Dropped By Nearly 50 Percent, 1997-2011.

    PubMed

    Kanzaria, Hemal K; Probst, Marc A; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-07-01

    Between 1997 and 2011, there was a nearly 50 percent reduction in US emergency department mortality rates for adults. This trend likely has many causes, related to advances in palliative, prehospital, and emergency care. PMID:27385248

  14. The effect of admitted patients in the emergency department on rates of hospital admissions

    PubMed Central

    Fogarty, Eoin M; Cummins, Fergal

    2013-01-01

    Emergency Department overcrowding with admitted inpatients is a common international occurrence. We undertook a retrospective review to compare patient admission rates from patients presenting to our Emergency Department with the level of overcrowding with admitted inpatients on that particular day in the Emergency Department. Over the 2-year study period there was no change in the rate or absolute number of admissions per day compared with the level of inpatient overcrowding. PMID:23073760

  15. The effect of admitted patients in the emergency department on rates of hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Eoin M; Cummins, Fergal

    2013-09-01

    Emergency Department overcrowding with admitted inpatients is a common international occurrence. We undertook a retrospective review to compare patient admission rates from patients presenting to our Emergency Department with the level of overcrowding with admitted inpatients on that particular day in the Emergency Department. Over the 2-year study period there was no change in the rate or absolute number of admissions per day compared with the level of inpatient overcrowding. PMID:23073760

  16. Emergency department crowding in Singapore: Insights from a systems thinking approach

    PubMed Central

    Schoenenberger, Lukas K; Bayer, Steffen; Ansah, John P; Matchar, David B; Mohanavalli, Rajagopal L; Lam, Sean SW; Ong, Marcus EH

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Emergency Department crowding is a serious and international health care problem that seems to be resistant to most well intended but often reductionist policy approaches. In this study, we examine Emergency Department crowding in Singapore from a systems thinking perspective using causal loop diagramming to visualize the systemic structure underlying this complex phenomenon. Furthermore, we evaluate the relative impact of three different policies in reducing Emergency Department crowding in Singapore: introduction of geriatric emergency medicine, expansion of emergency medicine training, and implementation of enhanced primary care. Methods: The construction of the qualitative causal loop diagram is based on consultations with Emergency Department experts, direct observation, and a thorough literature review. For the purpose of policy analysis, a novel approach, the path analysis, is applied. Results: The path analysis revealed that both the introduction of geriatric emergency medicine and the expansion of emergency medicine training may be associated with undesirable consequences contributing to Emergency Department crowding. In contrast, enhancing primary care was found to be germane in reducing Emergency Department crowding; in addition, it has apparently no negative side effects, considering the boundary of the model created. Conclusion: Causal loop diagramming was a powerful tool for eliciting the systemic structure of Emergency Department crowding in Singapore. Additionally, the developed model was valuable in testing different policy options. PMID:27757231

  17. Collegiate-Based Emergency Medical Service: Impact on Alcohol-Related Emergency Department Transports at a Small Liberal Arts College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Joshua B.; Olson, Mark H.; Kelly, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors examined the impact of a collegiate-based emergency medical service (CBEMS) on the frequency of emergency department (ED) transports. Participants: Students transported to the ED for acute alcohol intoxication during the Fall 2008 and the Fall 2009 semesters (N = 50). Methods: The frequency of students receiving…

  18. Safety and Efficacy of Antihypertensive Prescription at Emergency Department Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Aaron; Rahman, Tahsin; Reed, Brian; Millis, Scott; Ference, Brian; Flack, John M.; Levy, Phillip D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor blood pressure (BP) control is a primary risk factor for target organ damage in the heart, brain, and kidney. Uncontrolled hypertension is common among emergency department (ED) patients, particularly in underresourced settings, but it is unclear what role ED providers should play in the management of chronic antihypertensive therapy. Objectives The objective was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of prescribing antihypertensive therapy from the ED. Methods This was a retrospective study of data pooled from two prospective, longitudinal, randomized controlled trials, both of which enrolled ED patients with asymptomatic hypertension. Antihypertensives were prescribed at emergency physician discretion, and this was not related to randomization arm. Demographic data, BP at screening and randomization visit, and data on adverse effects potentially related to antihypertensive therapy were compiled. Means were compared using Student’s t-tests, and proportions were compared using chi-square tests. The effect of antihypertensive therapy on BP control was further analyzed using multivariable regression modeling controlling for age, race, sex, hypertension history, study cohort, and ED BP. Results Data were abstracted for 217 subjects. The median interval from ED visit to randomization was 12 days. Seventy-six subjects (35%) received one or more prescriptions for antihypertensive therapy. Age, sex, race, hypertension history, and mean duration of hypertension were equivalent between groups. Although mean ED BP was higher among those who received prescriptions, the mean systolic BP (sBP) reduction from ED to randomization was significantly greater (difference = 19 mm Hg, 95% confidence interval = 12 to 26 mm Hg). No patient in either group had an sBP less than 100 mm Hg at randomization. On multiple regression modeling, randomization sBP reduction was independently associated with antihypertensive prescription (p = 0.001). The incidence of adverse effects

  19. Adolescent Suicide Risk Screening in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    King, Cheryl A.; O'Mara, Roisin M.; Hayward, Charles N.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Many adolescents who die by suicide have never obtained mental health services. In response to this, the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention recommends screening for elevated suicide risk in emergency departments (EDs). This cross-sectional study was designed to examine 1) the concurrent validity and utility of an adolescent suicide risk screen for use in general medical EDs and 2) the prevalence of positive screens for adolescent males and females using two different sets of screening criteria. Methods Participants were 298 adolescents seeking pediatric or psychiatric emergency services (50% male; 83% white, 16% black or African American, 5.4% Hispanic). The inclusion criterion was age 13 to 17 years. Exclusion criteria were severe cognitive impairment, no parent or legal guardian present to provide consent, or abnormal vital signs. Parent or guardian consent and adolescent assent were obtained for 61% of consecutively eligible adolescents. Elevated risk was defined as 1) Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire-Junior [SIQ-JR] score of ≥31 or suicide attempt in the past 3 months or 2) alcohol abuse plus depression (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-3 [AUDIT-3] score of ≥3, Reynolds Adolescent Depression Scale-2 [RADS-2] score of ≥76). The Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS) and Problem Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers (POSIT) were used to ascertain concurrent validity. Results Sixteen percent (n = 48) of adolescents screened positive for elevated suicide risk. Within this group, 98% reported severe suicide ideation or a recent suicide attempt (46% attempt and ideation, 10% attempt only, 42% ideation only) and 27% reported alcohol abuse and depression. Nineteen percent of adolescents who screened positive presented for nonpsychiatric reasons. One-third of adolescents with positive screens were not receiving any mental health or substance use treatment. Demonstrating concurrent validity, the BHS scores of adolescents with positive screens

  20. The academic health center in complex humanitarian emergencies: lessons learned from the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Christine; Theodosis, Christian; Bills, Corey; Kim, Jimin; Kinet, Melodie; Turner, Madeleine; Millis, Michael; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Olopade, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    On January 12, 2010, a 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck Haiti. The event disrupted infrastructure and was marked by extreme morbidity and mortality. The global response to the disaster was rapid and immense, comprising multiple actors-including academic health centers (AHCs)-that provided assistance in the field and from home. The authors retrospectively examine the multidisciplinary approach that the University of Chicago Medicine (UCM) applied to postearthquake Haiti, which included the application of institutional structure and strategy, systematic deployment of teams tailored to evolving needs, and the actual response and recovery. The university mobilized significant human and material resources for deployment within 48 hours and sustained the effort for over four months. In partnership with international and local nongovernmental organizations as well as other AHCs, the UCM operated one of the largest and more efficient acute field hospitals in the country. The UCM's efforts in postearthquake Haiti provide insight into the role AHCs can play, including their strengths and limitations, in complex disasters. AHCs can provide necessary intellectual and material resources as well as technical expertise, but the cost and speed required for responding to an emergency, and ongoing domestic responsibilities, may limit the response of a large university and hospital system. The authors describe the strong institutional backing, the detailed predeployment planning and logistical support UCM provided, the engagement of faculty and staff who had previous experience in complex humanitarian emergencies, and the help of volunteers fluent in the local language which, together, made UCM's mission in postearthquake Haiti successful.

  1. Public Health in the Emergency Department: Overcoming Barriers to Implementation and Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Mary Pat; Vaca, Federico E.; Field, Craig; Rhodes, Karin

    2011-01-01

    This article is the outcome of a consensus building workshop entitled, “Overcoming Barriers to Implementation and Dissemination” convened at the 2009 Academic Emergency Medicine Consensus Conference, “Public Health in the ED: Surveillance, Screening, and Intervention.” The participants were asked to address potential methods for overcoming barriers to the dissemination and implementation in the emergency department (ED) of evidenced-based practices to improve public health. The panel discussed three broad areas of interest including methods for disseminating evidence-based practices, barriers encountered during the process of implementation, and the importance of involvement in activities outside the ED including engagement in policy development and improvement. Four recommendations were discussed in detail and consensus was reached. The recommendations included 1) researchers and advocates should disseminate findings through multiple forums beyond peer-reviewed publications when an ED-based public health intervention has enough evidence to support integration into the routine practice of emergency care; 2) local barriers to implementation of public health interventions should be recognized and well understood from multiple perspectives prior to implementation; 3) innovation must be put into place and adapted based on local institutional context and culture as barriers and the best methods for overcoming them will vary across institutions; and 4) use of legislation, regulation, and incentives outside of the ED should support and strengthen ED-based interventions. For each area of interest, research dimensions to extend the current understanding of methods for effectively and efficiently implementing evidence-based public health interventions in the ED were discussed and consensus was achieved. PMID:20053233

  2. Knowledge Translation and Barriers to Imaging Optimization in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda.

    PubMed

    Probst, Marc A; Dayan, Peter S; Raja, Ali S; Slovis, Benjamin H; Yadav, Kabir; Lam, Samuel H; Shapiro, Jason S; Farris, Coreen; Babcock, Charlene I; Griffey, Richard T; Robey, Thomas E; Fortin, Emily M; Johnson, Jamlik O; Chong, Suzanne T; Davenport, Moira; Grigat, Daniel W; Lang, Eddy L

    2015-12-01

    Researchers have attempted to optimize imaging utilization by describing which clinical variables are more predictive of acute disease and, conversely, what combination of variables can obviate the need for imaging. These results are then used to develop evidence-based clinical pathways, clinical decision instruments, and clinical practice guidelines. Despite the validation of these results in subsequent studies, with some demonstrating improved outcomes, their actual use is often limited. This article outlines a research agenda to promote the dissemination and implementation (also known as knowledge translation) of evidence-based interventions for emergency department (ED) imaging, i.e., clinical pathways, clinical decision instruments, and clinical practice guidelines. We convened a multidisciplinary group of stakeholders and held online and telephone discussions over a 6-month period culminating in an in-person meeting at the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference. We identified the following four overarching research questions: 1) what determinants (barriers and facilitators) influence emergency physicians' use of evidence-based interventions when ordering imaging in the ED; 2) what implementation strategies at the institutional level can improve the use of evidence-based interventions for ED imaging; 3) what interventions at the health care policy level can facilitate the adoption of evidence-based interventions for ED imaging; and 4) how can health information technology, including electronic health records, clinical decision support, and health information exchanges, be used to increase awareness, use, and adherence to evidence-based interventions for ED imaging? Advancing research that addresses these questions will provide valuable information as to how we can use evidence-based interventions to optimize imaging utilization and ultimately improve patient care.

  3. Clinical Pharmacy Services in Canadian Emergency Departments: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wanbon, Richard; Lyder, Catherine; Villeneuve, Eric; Shalansky, Stephen; Manuel, Leslie; Harding, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing clinical pharmacy services in emergency departments (EDs) is important because adverse drug events commonly occur before, during, and after ED encounters. Survey studies in the United States have indicated a relatively low presence of clinical pharmacy services in the ED setting, but a descriptive survey specific to Canada has not yet been performed. Objectives: To describe the current status of pharmacy services in Canadian EDs and potential barriers to implementing pharmacy services in this setting. Methods: All Canadian hospitals with an ED and at least 50 acute care beds were contacted to identify the presence of dedicated ED pharmacy services (defined as at least 0.5 full-time equivalent [FTE] position). Three different electronic surveys were then distributed by e-mail to ED pharmacy team members (if available), pharmacy managers (at hospitals without an ED pharmacy team), and ED managers (all hospitals). The surveys were completed between July and September 2013. Results: Of the 243 hospitals identified, 95 (39%) had at least 0.5 FTE clinical pharmacy services in the ED (based on initial telephone screening). Of the 60 ED pharmacy teams that responded to the survey, 56 had pharmacists (27 of which also had ED pharmacy technicians) and 4 had pharmacy technicians (without pharmacists). Forty-four (79%) of the 56 ED pharmacist services had been established within the preceding 10 years. Order clarification, troubleshooting, medication reconciliation, and assessment of renal dosing were the services most commonly provided. The large majority of pharmacy managers and ED managers identified the need for ED pharmacy services where such services do not yet exist. Inadequate funding, competing priorities, and lack of training were the most commonly reported barriers to providing this service. Conclusions: Although the establishment of ward-based pharmacy services in Canadian EDs has increased over the past 10 years, lack of funding and a lack of

  4. Prevalence of victims of violence admitted to an emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Hofner, M; Python, N; Martin, E; Gervasoni, J; Graz, B; Yersin, B

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To collect data on the consultation frequency and demographic profile of victims of violence attending an emergency department (ED) in Switzerland. Methods: We undertook screening of all admitted adult patients (>16 years) in the ED of the CHUV, Lausanne, Switzerland, over a 1 month period, using a modified version of the Partner Violence Screen questionnaire. Exclusionary criteria were: life threatening injury (National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics score ⩾4), or inability to understand or speak French, to give oral informed consent, or to be questioned without a family member or accompanying person being present. Data were collected on history of physical and/or psychological violence during the previous 12 months, the type of violence experienced by the patient, and if violence was the reason for the current consultation. Sociodemographic data were obtained from the registration documents. Results: The final sample consisted of 1602 patients (participation rate of 77.2%), with a refusal rate of 1.1%. Violence during the past 12 months was reported by 11.4% of patients. Of the total sample, 25% stated that violence was the reason for the current consultation; of these, 95% of patients were confirmed as victims of violence by the ED physicians. Patients reporting violence were more likely to be young and separated from their partner. Men were more likely to be victims of public violence and women more commonly victims of domestic violence. Conclusions: Based on this monthly prevalence rate, we estimate that over 3000 adults affected by violence consult our ED per annum. This underlines the importance of the problem and the need to address it. Health services organisations should establish measures to improve quality of care for victims. Guidelines and educational programmes for nurses and physicians should be developed in order to enhance providers' skills and basic knowledge of all types of violence, how to recognise and interact appropriately

  5. Emergency department thoracotomy: too little, too much, or too late.

    PubMed

    Capote, Allan; Michael, Andrew; Almodovar, Jorge; Chan, Patricia; Skinner, Ruby; Martin, Maureen

    2013-10-01

    Emergency department thoracotomy (EDT) is a dramatic lifesaving procedure demanding timely surgical intervention, technical expertise, and coordinated resuscitation efforts. Inappropriate use is costly and futile. All patients admitted to a Level II trauma center who underwent EDT from January 2003 to July 2012 were studied. The primary end point was appropriateness of EDT. Secondary end points were staff exposure, survival, and return to normal function. Eighty-seven patients including 59 patients with penetrating wounds had a mean loss of vital signs (LOV) 11.6 ±10.6 minutes and Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 45.8 ± 16.1, whereas 28 blunt injury patients had a mean LOV of 10.4 ± 11.5 minutes and ISS of 50.4 ± 19.4. Mortality was 81 per cent (48 of 59) in penetrating injury and 93 per cent (26 of 28) in blunt injury patients, respectively (odds ratio [OR] 2.99; P 0.21). Fifty-five EDTs were indicated with 10 survivors (18.2%) and 32 not indicated with three survivors (9.4%). Surgeons adhered to guidelines more compared with ED physicians (OR, 4.9; P = 0.03) whose patients were more likely to die (OR, 3.52; P = 0.124). Survivors (11 of 13 [84.6%]) were discharged home without significant long-term neurologic disability. EDT is lifesaving when performed for penetrating injury by experienced surgeons following established guidelines but futile in blunt injury or when performed by nonsurgeons regardless of mechanism.

  6. Adding More Junior Residents May Worsen Emergency Department Crowding

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Takahisa; Nishiyama, Kei; Hayashi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background Although increasing staff numbers during shifts when emergency department (ED) crowding is severe can help meet patient demand, it remains unclear how different types of added staff, particularly junior residents, may affect crowding. Methods To identify associations between types of staff and ED crowding, we conducted a cross-sectional, single-center study in the ED of a large, teaching hospital in Japan between January and December 2012. Patients who visited the ED during the study period were enrolled. We excluded (1) patients previously scheduled to visit the ED, and (2) neonates transferred from other hospitals. During the study period, 27,970 patients were enrolled. Types of staff analyzed were junior (first and second year) residents, senior (third to fifth year) residents, attending (board-certified) physicians, and nurses. A generalized linear model was applied to length of ED stay for all patients as well as admitted and discharged patients to quantify an association with the additional staff. Results In the model, addition of one attending physician or senior resident was associated with decreased length of ED stay for total patients by 3.88 or 1.64 minutes, respectively (95% CI, 2.20–5.56 and 0.81–2.48 minutes); while additional nursing staff had no association. Surprisingly, however, one additional junior resident was associated with prolonged length of ED stay for total patients by 0.97 minutes (95% CI 0.37–1.57 minutes) and for discharged patients by 1.01 minutes (95% CI 0.45–1.59 minutes). Conclusion Staffing adjustments aimed at alleviating ED crowding should focus on adding more senior staff during peak-volume shifts. PMID:25369063

  7. The Changing Use of Intravenous Opioids in an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Mark E.; Wintemute, Garen J.; Clarke, Samuel O.; Roche, Bailey M.; Chenoweth, James A.; Gutierrez, Rory; Albertson, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Government agencies are increasingly emphasizing opioid safety in hospitals. In 2012, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) started a sentinel event program, the “Safe Use of Opioids in Hospitals.” We sought to determine if opioid use patterns in our emergency department (ED) changed from 2011, before the program began, to 2013, after start of the program. Methods This was a retrospective study of all adult ED patients who received an intravenous opioid and had a serum creatinine measured. We recorded opioids used, dose prescribed, and serum creatinine. As an index of the safety of opioids, uses of naloxone after administration of an opioid was recorded. Results Morphine is still the most commonly used opioid by doses given, but its percentage of opioids used decreased from 68.9% in 2011 to 52.8% in 2013. During the same period, use of hydromorphone increased from 27.5% to 42.9%, while the use of fentanyl changed little (3.6% to 4.3%). Naloxone administration was rare after an opioid had been given. Opioids were not dosed in an equipotent manner. Conclusion The use of hydromorphone in our ED increased by 56% (absolute increase of 15.4%), while the use of morphine decreased by 30.5% (absolute decrease 16.1%) of total opioid use from 2011 to 2013. The JCAHO program likely was at least indirectly responsible for this change in relative dosing of the opioids. Based on frequency of naloxone administered after administration of an opioid, the use of opioids was safe. PMID:26759658

  8. Suicide screening in schools, primary care and emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Lisa M.; Ballard, Elizabeth D.; Pao, Maryland

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review Every year, suicide claims the lives of tens of thousands of young people worldwide. Despite its high prevalence and known risk factors, suicidality is often undetected. Early identification of suicide risk may be an important method of mitigating this public health crisis. Screening youth for suicide may be a critical step in suicide prevention. This paper reviews suicide screening in three different settings: schools, primary care clinics and emergency departments (EDs). Recent findings Unrecognized and thus untreated suicidality leads to substantial morbidity and mortality. With the onus of detection falling on nonmental health professionals, brief screening tools can be used to initiate more in-depth evaluations. Nonetheless, there are serious complexities and implications of screening all children and adolescents for suicide. Recent studies show that managing positive screens is a monumental challenge, including the problem of false positives and the burden subsequently posed on systems of care. Furthermore, nearly 60% of youth in need of mental health services do not receive the care they need, even after suicide attempt. Schools, primary care clinics and EDs are logical settings where screening that leads to intervention can be initiated. Summary Valid, brief and easy-to-administer screening tools can be utilized to detect risk of suicide in children and adolescents. Targeted suicide screening in schools, and universal suicide screening in primary care clinics and EDs may be the most effective way to recognize and prevent self-harm. These settings must be equipped to manage youth who screen positive with effective and timely interventions. Most importantly, the impact of suicide screening in various settings needs to be further assessed. PMID:19617829

  9. Reducing Anxiety in the Pediatric Emergency Department: A Comparative Trial

    PubMed Central

    Heilbrunn, Benjamin R.; Wittern, Rachael E.; Lee, Justin B.; Pham, Phung K.; Hamilton, Anita H.; Nager, Alan L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Anxiety among patients in a Pediatric Emergency Department (PED) can be significant but often goes unaddressed. Objective To determine whether exposure to Child Life (CL) or Hospital Clowning (HC) can reduce anxiety in children presenting to a PED. Methods Patients were randomized to CL, HC or control and assessed upon: entry to examination room (T1), prior to physician arrival (T2) and during physician examination (T3), using the modified Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (m-YPAS). CL and HC interventions occurred for 5–10 minutes prior to physician entry. Effects were analyzed using mixed ANOVA. Results m-YPAS scores ranged from 23 to 59, with a higher score indicating increased anxiety. Mixed ANOVA on the study sample (n=113) showed a significant interaction between groups (CL, HC, control) and time, p = .02. Further analyses indicated effect of group only at T2 (MCL = 23.8, 95% CI 23.2–24.5; MHC = 25.2, 95% CI 24.2–26.2; Mcontrol = 26.1, 95% CI 24.2–27.9), p = .02. Sub-analysis of patients with T1 m-YPAS score ≥ 28 (n=56) showed a significant interaction between group and time, p = .01. Further analysis showed effect of group only at T2 (MCL = 24.4, 95% CI 23.3–25.6; MHC = 27.0, 95% CI 25.2–28.7; Mcontrol = 29.2, 95% CI 25.6–32.7), p = .003. Conclusion CL services can reduce SA for patients presenting to a PED with heightened anxiety at baseline. This reduction occurred immediately following CL intervention, but was not observed in patients exposed to HC or during physician examination. PMID:25271180

  10. Hepatitis C Virus Screening and Emergency Department Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    White, Douglas A. E.; Anderson, Erik S.; Pfeil, Sarah K.; Deering, Laura J.; Todorovic, Tamara; Trivedi, Tarak K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent studies demonstrate high rates of previously undiagnosed hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among patients screened in urban emergency departments (ED). Experts caution, however, that public health interventions, such as screening for infectious diseases, must not interfere with the primary mission of EDs to provide timely acute care. Increases in ED length of stay (LOS) have been associated with decreased quality of ED care. Objective In this study, we assess the influence of an integrated HCV screening protocol on ED LOS. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study analyzing timestamp data for all discharged patients over a 1-year period. The primary outcome compared the median LOS in minutes between patients who completed HCV screening and those who did not. Further analysis compared LOS for HCV screening by whether or not complete blood count (CBC) testing was conducted. Results Of 69,639 visits, 2,864 (4%) had HCV screening tests completed and 272 (9.5%) were antibody positive. The median LOS for visits that included HCV screening was greater than visits that did not include screening (151 versus 119 minutes, P < 0.001). Among the subset of visits in which CBC testing was conducted, there was no significant difference in median LOS between visits that also included HCV screening and those that did not (240 versus 242 minutes, P = 0.68). Conclusion Integrated HCV screening modestly prolongs ED LOS. However, among patients undergoing other blood tests, screening had no effect on LOS. Programs may consider routinely offering HCV screening to patients who are undergoing laboratory testing. PMID:27760176

  11. PEarly Postoperative Emergency Department Care of Abdominal Transplant Recipients1

    PubMed Central

    McElroy, Lisa M.; Schmidt, Kathryn A.; Richards, Christopher T.; Lapin, Brittany; Abecassis, Michael M.; Holl, Jane L.; Adams, James; Ladner, Daniela P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Research on post-transplant care has predominantly focused on predictors of readmission with little attention to emergency department (ED) visits. The goal of this study was to describe early postoperative ED care of transplant recipients. Methods A secondary database analysis of adult patients who underwent abdominal organ transplantation between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2013 and sought ED care within one year post-transplantation was conducted. Survival was compared using the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to adjust for pertinent covariates. Results A total of 1,900 abdominal organ transplants were performed during the study period. Of these, 37% (N=711) transplant recipients sought care in the ED (1,343 total visits) with 1.89 mean ED visits per recipient. Of recipients seen in the ED, 58% received a kidney transplant and 28% received a liver transplant, with 45% of recipients presenting within the first 60 postoperative days. The most common chief complaints were gastroenterological (17%) and abnormal laboratory values or vital signs (17%). In total, 74% of recipients were readmitted and 50% of admitted patients were discharged in less than 24 hours. Transplant recipients with ED visits had lower 3-year graft (81% vs. 87%; p<0.001) and patient (89% vs. 93%; p=0.002) survival. Conclusion Transplant recipients have a high frequency of ED visits in the first post-transplantation year and high rates of subsequent hospital admission. Further investigation is needed to understand what drives recipient presentation to the ED and create care models that achieve the best outcomes. PMID:26050012

  12. Paediatric femur fractures at the emergency department: accidental or not?

    PubMed

    Hoytema van Konijnenburg, Eva M M; Vrolijk-Bosschaart, Thekla F; Bakx, Roel; Van Rijn, Rick R

    2016-01-01

    Only a small proportion of all paediatric fractures is caused by child abuse or neglect, especially in highly prevalent long bone fractures. It can be difficult to differentiate abusive fractures from non-abusive fractures. This article focuses on femoral fractures in young children. Based on three cases, this article presents a forensic evidence-based approach to differentiate between accidental and non-accidental causes of femoral fractures. We describe three cases of young children who were presented to the emergency department because of a suspected femur fracture. Although in all cases, the fracture had a similar location and appearance, the clinical history and developmental stage of the child led to three different conclusions. In the first two cases, an accidental mechanism was a plausible conclusion, although in the second case, neglect of parental supervision was the cause for concern. In the third case, a non-accidental injury was diagnosed and appropriate legal prosecution followed. Any doctor treating children should always be aware of the possibility of child abuse and neglect in children with injuries, especially in young and non-mobile children presenting with an unknown trauma mechanism. If a suspicion of child abuse or neglect arises, a thorough diagnostic work-up should be performed, including a full skeletal survey according to the guidelines of the Royal College of Radiologists and the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. In order to make a good assessment, the radiologist reviewing the skeletal survey needs access to all relevant clinical and social information. PMID:26642309

  13. Revisits within 48 Hours to a Thai Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Nithimathachoke, Adisak; Tirrell, Gregory Philip; Surawongwattana, Sataporn; Liu, Shan Woo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Emergency department (ED) revisits are a common ED quality measure. This study was undertaken to ascertain the contributing factors of revisits within 48 hours to a Thai ED and to explore physician-related, illness-related, and patient-related factors behind those revisits. Methods. This study was a chart review from one tertiary care, urban Thai hospital from October 1, 2009, to September 31, 2010. We identified patients who returned to the ED within 48 hours for the same or related complaints after their initial discharge. Three physicians classified revisit as physician-related, illness-related, and patient-related factors. Results. Our study included 172 ED patients' charts. 86/172 (50%) were male and the mean age was 38 ± 5.6 (SD) years. The ED revisits contributing factors were physician-related factors [86/172 (50.0%)], illness-related factors [61/172 (35.5%)], and patient-related factor [25/172 (14.5%)], respectively. Among revisits classified as physician-related factors, 40/86 (46.5%) revisits were due to misdiagnosis and 36/86 (41.9%) were due to suboptimal management. Abdominal pain [27/86 (31.4%)] was the majority of physician-related chief complaints, followed by fever [16/86 (18.6%)] and dyspnea [15/86 (17.4%)]. Conclusion. Misdiagnosis and suboptimal management contributed to half of the 48-hour repeat ED visits in this Thai hospital. PMID:27478642

  14. State-of-the-Art Article: Emergent Bilingual Students in Secondary School--Along the Academic Language and Literacy Continuum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menken, Kate

    2013-01-01

    This article offers a critical review of research about emergent bilingual students in secondary school, where the academic demands placed upon them are great, and where instruction typically remains steadfast in its monolingualism. I focus on recent scholarship about the diversity within this student population, and center on "students with…

  15. Enhancing International Collaboration among Academic Developers in Established and Emerging Contexts: Moving toward a Post-Colonial Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Virginia S.; DeZure, Deborah; Debowski, Shelda; Ho, Angela; Li, Kang

    2013-01-01

    With the acceleration of globalization, academic developers from institutions and countries with established educational development programs and networks are called upon increasingly to share their expertise and offer guidance to colleagues in emerging higher education contexts. Based on a higher education conference held in Beijing in 2009, this…

  16. Seasonal Patterns of Asthma in Children and Adolescents Presenting at Emergency Departments in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Won, Youn Kyoung; Hwang, Tae ho; Roh, Eui Jung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Seasonal variations in asthma-related hospitalizations and emergency department visits have long been recognized. This study aimed to investigate the seasonal patterns of asthma in children and adolescents who presented at emergency departments in Korea. Methods We analyzed the National Emergency Department Information System records from 117 emergency departments in Korea that comprised all of the patients with asthma who were aged 3-18 years and who presented at the emergency departments from 2007 to 2012. The children and adolescents were divided into 3 groups based on their ages, namely, 3-6 years, 7-12 years, and 13-18 years. The data were tabulated, and graphs were created to show the seasonal trends in the monthly numbers of emergency department visits as a consequence of asthma. Results A total of 41,128 subjects were identified, and the male-to-female ratio was 1:0.5. General ward admissions comprised 42.6% (n=17,524 patients) of the emergency department visits, and intensive care unit admissions comprised 0.8% (n=335 patients) of the emergency department visits. The monthly numbers of emergency department visits for asthma varied according to the season, with high peaks during fall, which was from September to November, and low levels in summer, which was from June to August. Conclusions Important differences in the seasonal patterns of emergency department visits for asthma were evident in children and adolescents. Identifying seasonal trends in asthma-related emergency department visits may help determine the causes and reduce the likelihood of asthma exacerbation. PMID:26922932

  17. Serum procalcitonin measurement as diagnostic and prognostic marker in febrile adult patients presenting to the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Hausfater, Pierre; Juillien, Gaëlle; Madonna-Py, Beatrice; Haroche, Julien; Bernard, Maguy; Riou, Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Identification of bacterial infections is crucial if treatment is to be initiated early and antibiotics used rationally. The primary objective of this study was to test the efficiency of procalcitonin (PCT) in identifying bacterial/parasitic episodes among febrile adult patients presenting to an emergency department. Secondary objectives were to identify clinical or biological variables associated with either bacterial/parasitic infection or critical illness. Methods This was a prospective, single centre, non-interventional study, conducted in the adult emergency department of an academic tertiary care hospital. We included patients with body temperature of 38.5°C or greater. A serum sample for measurement of PCT was collected in the emergency room. Patients were followed up until day 30. After reviewing the medical files, two independent experts, who were blind to the PCT results, classified each of the patients as having a bacterial/parasitic infection, viral infection, or another diagnosis. Results Among 243 patients included in the study, 167 had bacterial/parasitic infections, 35 had viral infections and 41 had other diagnoses. The PCT assay, with a 0.2 μg/l cutoff value, had a sensitivity of 0.77 and a specificity of 0.59 in diagnosing bacterial/parasitic infection. Of the patients with PCT 5 μg/l or greater, 51% had critical illness (death or intensive care unit admission) as compared with 13% of patients with lower PCT values. Conclusion Bearing in mind the limitations of an observational study design, the judgements of the emergency department physicians were reasonably accurate in determining the pretest probability of bacterial/parasitic infection. PCT may provide additional, valuable information on the aetiology and prognosis of infection in the emergency department. PMID:17521430

  18. A major sporting event does not necessarily mean an increased workload for accident and emergency departments. Euro96 Group of Accident and Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, M. W.; Allan, T. F.; Wilson, S.

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether there were any changes in attendance at accident and emergency departments that could be related to international football matches (Euro96 tournament). METHOD: Fourteen accident and emergency departments (seven adjacent to and seven distant from a Euro96 venue) provided their daily attendance figures for a nine week period: three weeks before, during, and after the tournament. The relation between daily attendance rates and Euro96 football matches was assessed using a generalised linear model and analysis of variance. The model took into account underlying trends in attendance rates including day of the week. RESULTS: The 14 hospitals contributed 172 366 attendances (mean number of daily attendances 195). No association was shown between the number of attendances at accident and emergency departments and the day of the football match, whether the departments were near to or distant from stadia or the occurrence of a home nation match. The only observed independent predictors of variation were day of the week and week of the year. Attendance rates were significantly higher on Sunday and/or Monday; Monday was about 9% busier than the daily average. Increasing attendance was observed over time for 86% of the hospitals. CONCLUSION: Large sports tournaments do not increase the number of patients attending accident and emergency departments. Special measures are not required for major sporting events over and above the capacity of an accident and emergency department to increase its throughput on other days. 


 PMID:10522636

  19. Funding mechanisms for gender-specific research: proceedings from a panel discussion at the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Basmah; Greenberg, Marna R; Anise, Ayodola; Brown, Jeremy; Conwit, Robin; Filart, Rosemarie; Scott, Jane; Choo, Esther K

    2014-12-01

    As part of the 2014 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference "Gender-Specific Research in Emergency Care: Investigate, Understand, and Translate How Gender Affects Patient Outcomes," we assembled a diverse panel of representatives from federal and nonfederal funding agencies to discuss future opportunities for sex- and gender-specific research. The discussion revolved around the mission and priorities of each organization, as well as its interest in promoting sex- and gender-specific research. The panelists were asked to provide specific examples of funding lines generated or planned for as pertinent to emergency care. Training opportunities for future researchers in this area were also discussed. PMID:25413301

  20. Strategies for dealing with emergency department overcrowding: a one-year study on how bedside registration affects patient throughput times.

    PubMed

    Takakuwa, Kevin M; Shofer, Frances S; Abbuhl, Stephanie B

    2007-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if the implementation of bedside registration would affect patient throughput times in an urban, academic emergency department. This was a before-and-after interventional study. An 8-month period before initiating bedside registration in November 2001 was compared to three subsequent 4-month intervals. Four times of day and three triage classifications were examined. Data were analyzed using a three-way analysis of covariance. There were 58,225 patient encounters analyzed. There was a significant difference in time from triage to room after bedside registration began (p < 0.0001). When examined by triage class, there were no differences in triage-to-room for emergent patients, a significant decrease for urgent patients initially and a significant decrease for non-urgent patients. Bedside registration by time of day initially reduced all four time-of-day periods but over the year they returned to pre-bedside registration levels, except for the morning period. Bedside registration decreased triage-to-room times for non-urgent patients and urgent patients initially, but this was not sustained at the end of 1 year. It had no effect on emergent patients who are routinely taken into the patient care area immediately. The sustainable effects of bedside registration were during the morning time when emergency department beds were available. PMID:17499684

  1. Consensus-based Recommendations for Research Priorities Related to Interventions to Safeguard Patient Safety in the Crowded Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Fee, Christopher; Hall, Kendall; Morrison, J. Bradley; Stephens, Robert; Cosby, Karen; Fairbanks, Rollin (Terry) J.; Youngberg, Barbara; Lenehan, Gail; Abualenain, Jameel; O’Connor, Kevin; Wears, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the results of the Interventions to Safeguard Safety breakout session of the 2011 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference entitled “Interventions to Assure Quality in the Crowded Emergency Department.” Using a multistep nominal group technique, experts in emergency department (ED) crowding, patient safety, and systems engineering defined knowledge gaps and priority research questions related to the maintenance of safety in the crowded ED. Consensus was reached for seven research priorities related to interventions to maintain safety in the setting of a crowded ED. Included among these are: 1) How do routine corrective processes and compensating mechanism change during crowding? 2) What metrics should be used to determine ED safety? 3) How can checklists ensure safer care and what factors contribute to their success or failure? 4) What constitutes safe staffing levels / ratios? 5) How can we align emergency medicine (EM)-specific patient safety issues with national patient safety issues? 6) How can we develop metrics and skills to recognize when an ED is getting close to catastrophic overload conditions? and 7) What can EM learn from experts and modeling from fields outside of medicine to develop innovative solutions? These priorities have the potential to inform future clinical and human factors research and extramural funding decisions related to this important topic. PMID:22168192

  2. Consensus-based recommendations for research priorities related to interventions to safeguard patient safety in the crowded emergency department.

    PubMed

    Fee, Christopher; Hall, Kendall; Morrison, J Bradley; Stephens, Robert; Cosby, Karen; Fairbanks, Rollin Terry J; Youngberg, Barbara; Lenehan, Gail; Abualenain, Jameel; O'Connor, Kevin; Wears, Robert

    2011-12-01

    This article describes the results of the Interventions to Safeguard Safety breakout session of the 2011 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference entitled "Interventions to Assure Quality in the Crowded Emergency Department." Using a multistep nominal group technique, experts in emergency department (ED) crowding, patient safety, and systems engineering defined knowledge gaps and priority research questions related to the maintenance of safety in the crowded ED. Consensus was reached for seven research priorities related to interventions to maintain safety in the setting of a crowded ED. Included among these are: 1) How do routine corrective processes and compensating mechanism change during crowding? 2) What metrics should be used to determine ED safety? 3) How can checklists ensure safer care and what factors contribute to their success or failure? 4) What constitutes safe staffing levels/ratios? 5) How can we align emergency medicine (EM)-specific patient safety issues with national patient safety issues? 6) How can we develop metrics and skills to recognize when an ED is getting close to catastrophic overload conditions? and 7) What can EM learn from experts and modeling from fields outside of medicine to develop innovative solutions? These priorities have the potential to inform future clinical and human factors research and extramural funding decisions related to this important topic.

  3. Emergency department management of ventriculoperitoneal cerebrospinal fluid shunts.

    PubMed

    Madsen, M A

    1986-11-01

    Emergency physicians must be familiar with VP shunts in order to recognize critical complications associated with these devices. Knowledge of the major types of shunt devices commonly used and the mechanics of those devices allows emergency physicians to evaluate patients with shunts in an orderly manner.

  4. Recent Suicidal Ideation among Patients in an Inner City Emergency Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilgen, Mark A.; Walton, Maureen A.; Cunningham, Rebecca M.; Barry, Kristen L.; Chermack, Steve T.; De Chavez, Peter; Blow, Frederic C.

    2009-01-01

    The rates and associated features of suicidal ideation among 5,641 patients seeking routine, nonsuicide related care in an inner-city emergency department were examined. Approximately 8% of patients seeking routine care in the emergency department reported some form of suicidal ideation within the past 2 weeks. Suicidal ideation was common in…

  5. [Benefit of a geriatric mobile team in the emergency departments: a ten-year review].

    PubMed

    Natali, Jean-Philippe; Schwald, Nathalie; Bach, Frédérique; Bourgouin, Gaëlle; Chiffray, Dominique; Bloch, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    A geriatric mobile team was created in the emergency department of Cochin Hospital in Paris, in 2005. This key player in the multi-disciplinary management of elderly patients in the emergency department and in the geriatric care pathway, showed, during its 10-year of existence, its utility. PMID:26574128

  6. Impact of a School-based Health Center on Emergency Department Use by Elementary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Thomas L.; D'angelo, Sandra L.; Davis, James

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the impact of two elementary level school based health centers (SBHCs), located in schools within high-poverty, inner city neighborhoods, on emergency department visits by children enrolled in the SBHC. Overall, SBHCs resulted in significant decreases in non-urgent emergency department visits, but not in urgent visits. Medicaid-insured…

  7. Effects of Social Work Intervention on Nonemergent Pediatric Emergency Department Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Judith W.; Roberts, Diane; Campbell, James; Solomon, Karen Sofranko; Brouhard, Ben H.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether social work intervention would reduce nonemergent visits to the emergency department and increase scheduled pediatric visits. A high-risk repeater group of 104 pediatric patients with three or more emergency department visits was randomly selected to receive social work intervention. Control and…

  8. Adoption of Health Information Exchange by Emergency Physicians at Three Urban Academic Medical Centers

    PubMed Central

    Genes, N.; Shapiro, J.; Vaidya, S.; Kuperman, G.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Emergency physicians are trained to make decisions quickly and with limited patient information. Health Information Exchange (HIE) has the potential to improve emergency care by bringing relevant patient data from non-affiliated organizations to the bedside. NYCLIX (New York CLinical Information eXchange) offers HIE functionality among multiple New York metropolitan area provider organizations and has pilot users in several member emergency departments (EDs). Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews at three participating EDs with emergency physicians trained to use NYCLIX. Among “users” with > 1 login, responses to questions regarding typical usage scenarios, successful retrieval of data, and areas for improving the interface were recorded. Among “non-users” with ≤1 login, questions about NYCLIX accessibility and utility were asked. Both groups were asked to recall items from prior training regarding data sources and availability. Results Eighteen NYCLIX pilot users, all board certified emergency physicians, were interviewed. Of the 14 physicians with more than one login ,half estimated successful retrieval of HIE data affecting patient care. Four non-users (one login or less) cited forgotten login information as a major reason for non-use. Though both groups made errors, users were more likely to recall true NYCLIX member sites and data elements than non-users. Improvements suggested as likely to facilitate usage included a single automated login to both the ED information system (EDIS) and HIE, and automatic notification of HIE data availability in the EDIS All respondents reported satisfaction with their training. Conclusions Integrating HIE into existing ED workflows remains a challenge, though a substantial fraction of users report changes in management based on HIE data. Though interviewees believed their training was adequate, significant errors in their understanding of available NYCLIX data elements and participating sites

  9. Emergency medicine physician attitudes toward HPV vaccine uptake in an emergency department setting

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Mandy; Okugo, Glory

    2014-01-01

    A physician's recommendation is the most effective published method of motivating HPV vaccination initiation. The emergency department (ED) is the 'public health safety net', and often the only access to care for underserved populations. Recommendation of the HPV vaccine in the ED is a potential avenue to improve vaccination rates among sub-populations who do not have access to routine medical care. We assessed willingness of EM physicians to recommend the vaccine, target high-risk women, and disclose perceived barriers to vaccination in the ED. A cross sectional study using an 11-item survey, was used to assess physician attitudes toward recommending the HPV vaccine in an ED setting to age eligible patients. 67.4% stated they would recommend the vaccine, 23.9% were neutral, and 8.7% would not recommend the vaccine to age eligible patients in the ED. 41% noted lack of adequate reimbursement for vaccination as a barrier to vaccination in the ED (P < 0.05). Physicians were comfortable targeting women at high risk for cervical cancer for vaccination (P < 0.05). EM physicians are comfortable targeting high-risk women for HPV vaccination in an ED setting. Support of EM physicians in the national effort to improve HPV vaccine uptake is an important step in eradicating a largely preventable yet lethal cancer. PMID:25483493

  10. Return to the emergency department after ventricular shunt evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sarda, Samir; Simon, Harold K; Hirsh, Daniel A; Wang, Andrew; Shane Tubbs, R; Chern, Joshua J

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Patients with CSF shunts are medically complex and frequently present to the emergency department (ED) with suspected shunt malfunction. After adequate evaluation in the ED and proper disposition, some patients return to the ED within a short period of time. In this study, the authors examined the reasons for ED revisits within 7 days of the index ED visit to discern possible preventable returns. METHODS There were 3080 index ED visits made by patients with shunted hydrocephalus between 2010 and 2013. Index ED visits preceded by another ED visit or neurosurgical procedure within 60 days were excluded. Index ED visits for reasons unrelated to shunt function and those that led directly to admissions and shunt revision surgeries were also excluded. The remaining 1509 ED visits were eligible for analysis in this study. Final dispositions from the index ED visit included home (1176 cases), admission to the neurosurgery service for observation (134 cases), and admission to other services (199 cases). Subsequent events within 7 days, including ED revisits, hospital admissions, and shunt-related surgery were recorded, and reasons for the ED revisits were categorized based on whether the visit was related to shunt function concerns. Clinical and socioeconomic factors were analyzed for their association with ED revisits by using statistical methods. RESULTS Of the 1176 patients discharged home from the ED after shunt function evaluation, 101 (8.6%) returned to the ED within 7 days. Of the 134 patients admitted to the neurosurgery service for observation only, 8 (6.0%) returned to the ED within 7 days of discharge. Of the 199 patients admitted to hospital services other than neurosurgery, 13 (6.5%) returned to the ED within 7 days of discharge. The reasons for ED revisits vary (total of 122 visits combining the 3 groups), but at least 60% of the revisits were clearly unrelated to shunt function. A younger age, daytime arrival to the ED, and living within the

  11. Therapeutic Hypothermia Protocol in a Community Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Kulstad, Christine E.; Holt, Shannon C.; Abrahamsen, Aaron A.; Lovell, Elise O.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome in patients resuscitated after out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) from ventricular fibrillation/ventricular tachycardia (VF/VT). We evaluated the effects of using a TH protocol in a large community hospital emergency department (ED) for all patients with neurological impairment after resuscitated OHCA regardless of presenting rhythm. We hypothesized improved mortality and neurological outcomes without increased complication rates. Methods: Our TH protocol entails cooling to 33°C for 24 hours with an endovascular catheter. We studied patients treated with this protocol from November 2006 to November 2008. All non-pregnant, unresponsive adult patients resuscitated from any initial rhythm were included. Exclusion criteria were initial hypotension or temperature less than 30°C, trauma, primary intracranial event, and coagulopathy. Control patients treated during the 12 months before the institution of our TH protocol met the same inclusion and exclusion criteria. We recorded survival to hospital discharge, neurological status at discharge, and rates of bleeding, sepsis, pneumonia, renal failure, and dysrhythmias in the first 72 hours of treatment. Results: Mortality rates were 71.1% (95% CI, 56–86%) for 38 patients treated with TH and 72.3% (95% CI 59–86%) for 47 controls. In the TH group, 8% of patients (95% CI, 0–17%) had a good neurological outcome on discharge, compared to 0 (95% CI 0–8%) in the control group. In 17 patients with VF/VT treated with TH, mortality was 47% (95% CI 21–74%) and 18% (95% CI 0–38%) had good neurological outcome; in 9 control patients with VF/VT, mortality was 67% (95% CI 28–100%), and 0% (95% CI 0–30%) had good neurological outcome. The groups were well-matched with respect to sex and age. Complication rates were similar or favored the TH group. Conclusion: Instituting a TH protocol for OHCA patients with any

  12. Emergency Department of a Rural Hospital in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tara; Gaus, David; Herrera, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a paucity of data studying patients and complaints presenting to emergency departments (EDs) in low- and middle-income countries. The town of Pedro Vicente Maldonado (PVM) is located in the northwestern highlands of Ecuador. Hospital PVM (HPVM) is a rural teaching hospital providing family medicine residency training. These physicians provide around-the-clock acute medical care in HPVM’s ED. This study provides a first look at a functioning ED in rural Latin America by reviewing one year of ED visits to HPVM. Methods All ED visits between April 14, 2013, and April 13, 2014, were included and analyzed, totaling 1,239 patient visits. Data were collected from their electronic medical record and exported into a de-identified Excel® database where it was sorted and categorized. Variables included age, gender, mode of arrival, insurance type, month and day of the week of the service, chief complaint, laboratory and imaging requests, and disposition. We performed descriptive statistics, and where possible, comparisons using Student’s T or chi-square, as appropriate. Results Of the 1239 total ED visits, 48% were males and 52% females; 93% of the visits were ambulatory, and 7% came by ambulance. Sixty-three percent of the patients had social security insurance. The top three chief complaints were abdominal pain (25.5%), fever (15.1%) and trauma (10.8%). Healthcare providers requested labs on 71.3% of patients and imaging on 43.2%. The most frequently requested imaging studies were chest radiograph (14.9%), upper extremity radiograph (9.4%), and electrocardiogram (9.0%). There was no seasonal or day-of-week variability to number of ED patients. The chief complaint of human or animal bite made it more likely the patient would be admitted, and the chief complaint of traumatic injury made it more likely the patient would be transferred. Conclusion Analysis of patients presenting to a rural ED in Ecuador contributes to the global study of acute care in

  13. Medication Overdoses at a Public Emergency Department in Santiago, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera, Pablo; Garrido, Marcela; Lessard, Eli; Swanson, Julian; Mallon, William K.; Saldias, Fernando; Basaure, Carlos; Lara, Barbara; Swadron, Stuart P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction While a nationwide poison control registry exists in Chile, reporting to the center is sporadic and happens at the discretion of the treating physician or by patients’ self-report. Moreover, individual hospitals do not monitor accidental or intentional poisoning in a systematic manner. The goal of this study was to identify all cases of intentional medication overdose (MO) that occurred over two years at a large public hospital in Santiago, Chile, and examine its epidemiologic profile. Methods This study is a retrospective, explicit chart review conducted at Hospital Sótero del Rio from July 2008 until June 2010. We included all cases of identified intentional MO. Alcohol and recreational drugs were included only when they were ingested with other medications. Results We identified 1,557 cases of intentional MO and analyzed a total of 1,197 cases, corresponding to 0.51% of all emergency department (ED) presentations between July 2008 and June 2010. The median patient age was 25 years. The majority was female (67.6%). Two peaks were identified, corresponding to the spring of each year sampled. The rate of hospital admission was 22.2%. Benzodiazepines, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) were the causative agents most commonly found, comprising 1,044 (87.2%) of all analyzed cases. Acetaminophen was involved in 81 (6.8%) cases. More than one active substance was involved in 35% of cases. In 7.3% there was ethanol co-ingestion and in 1.0% co-ingestion of some other recreational drug (primarily cocaine). Of 1,557 cases, six (0.39%) patients died. TCA were involved in two of these deaths. Conclusion Similar to other developed and developing nations, intentional MO accounts for a significant number of ED presentations in Chile. Chile is unique in the region, however, in that its spectrum of intentional overdoses includes an excess burden of tricyclic antidepressant and benzodiazepine overdoses, a relatively low rate

  14. Nursing management of aggression in a Singapore emergency department: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mei Fen; Lopez, Violeta; Cleary, Michelle

    2015-09-01

    In Singapore, anecdotal evidence suggests that nurses are concerned about managing aggressive incidents in the emergency department. In this study, registered nurses' perceptions of managing aggressive patients in an emergency department were explored. Ten registered nurses from the emergency department of an acute public hospital in Singapore were interviewed. Four overarching themes emerged from the thematic analysis: (i) impact of aggressive patients on nurses; (ii) nursing assessment of aggressive behaviors; (iii) nursing management of aggressive behaviors; and (iv) organizational support and responsiveness. Further research is required to better support nurses to deliver optimal care for aggressive patients and achieve positive and effective outcomes.

  15. Public health in the emergency department: surveillance, screening, and intervention--funding and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Woolard, Robert; Degutis, Linda C; Mello, Michael; Rothman, Richard; Cherpitel, Cheryl J; Post, Lori A; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Haukoos, Jason S; Hungerford, Daniel W

    2009-11-01

    This article summarizes the work and discussions of the funding and sustainability work group at the 2009 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Public Health in the ED: Surveillance, Screening, and Intervention." The funding and sustainability session participants were asked to address the following overarching question: "What are the opportunities and what is needed to encourage academic emergency medicine (EM) to take advantage of the opportunities for funding available for public health research initiatives and build stronger academic programs focusing on public health within EM?" Prior to the session, members of the group reviewed research funding for EM in public health, as well as the priorities of federal agencies and foundations. Recommendations for actions by EM summarize the findings of workshop.

  16. Education in medical billing benefits both neurology trainees and academic departments.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Jeff L

    2014-11-11

    The objective of residency training is to produce physicians who can function independently within their chosen subspecialty and practice environment. Skills in the business of medicine, such as clinical billing, are widely applicable in academic and private practices but are not commonly addressed during formal medical education. Residency and fellowship training include limited exposure to medical billing, but our academic department's performance of these skills was inadequate: in 56% of trainee-generated outpatient notes, documentation was insufficient to sustain the chosen billing level. We developed a curriculum to improve the accuracy of documentation and coding and introduced practice changes to address our largest sources of error. In parallel, we developed tools that increased the speed and efficiency of documentation. Over 15 months, we progressively eliminated note devaluation, increased the mean level billed by trainees to nearly match that of attending physicians, and increased outpatient revenue by $34,313/trainee/year. Our experience suggests that inclusion of billing education topics into the formal medical curriculum benefits both academic medical centers and trainees.

  17. Outlaw motorcycle gangs: aspects of the one-percenter culture for emergency department personnel to consider.

    PubMed

    Bosmia, Anand N; Quinn, James F; Peterson, Todd B; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-07-01

    Outlaw motorcycle gangs (OMGs) are an iconic element of the criminal landscape in the United States, the country of their origin. Members of OMGs may present to the emergency department (ED) as a result of motor vehicle accidents or interpersonal violence. When one member of an OMG is injured, other members and associates are likely to arrive in the ED to support the injured member. The extant literature for ED personnel lacks an overview of the culture of OMGs, a culture that promotes the display of unique symbols and that holds certain paraphernalia as integral to an outlaw biker's identity and pride. The objective of this manuscript is to discuss various aspects of the culture of OMGs so that ED personnel may better understand the mentality of the outlaw biker. Knowledge of their symbols, values, and hierarchy can be crucial to maintaining order in the ED when an injured outlaw biker presents to the ED. We used standard search engines to obtain reports from law enforcement agencies and studies in academic journals on OMGs. We present the observations of 1 author who has conducted ethnographic research on outlaw bikers since the 1980s.

  18. Voluntary Medical Incident Reporting Tool to Improve Physician Reporting of Medical Errors in an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Nnaemeka G.; Doshi, Pratik B.; Miller, Sara K.; McCarthy, James J.; Hoot, Nathan R.; Darger, Bryan F.; Benitez, Roberto C.; Chathampally, Yashwant G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Medical errors are frequently under-reported, yet their appropriate analysis, coupled with remediation, is essential for continuous quality improvement. The emergency department (ED) is recognized as a complex and chaotic environment prone to errors. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of a web-based ED-specific incident reporting system using an iterative process. Methods A web-based, password-protected tool was developed by members of a quality assurance committee for ED providers to report incidents that they believe could impact patient safety. Results The utilization of this system in one residency program with two academic sites resulted in an increase from 81 reported incidents in 2009, the first year of use, to 561 reported incidents in 2012. This is an increase in rate of reported events from 0.07% of all ED visits to 0.44% of all ED visits. In 2012, faculty reported 60% of all incidents, while residents and midlevel providers reported 24% and 16% respectively. The most commonly reported incidents were delays in care and management concerns. Conclusion Error reporting frequency can be dramatically improved by using a web-based, user-friendly, voluntary, and non-punitive reporting system. PMID:26759657

  19. Outlaw Motorcycle Gangs: Aspects of the One-Percenter Culture for Emergency Department Personnel to Consider

    PubMed Central

    Bosmia, Anand N.; Quinn, James F.; Peterson, Todd B.; Griessenauer, Christoph J.; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2014-01-01

    Outlaw motorcycle gangs (OMGs) are an iconic element of the criminal landscape in the United States, the country of their origin. Members of OMGs may present to the emergency department (ED) as a result of motor vehicle accidents or interpersonal violence. When one member of an OMG is injured, other members and associates are likely to arrive in the ED to support the injured member. The extant literature for ED personnel lacks an overview of the culture of OMGs, a culture that promotes the display of unique symbols and that holds certain paraphernalia as integral to an outlaw biker’s identity and pride. The objective of this manuscript is to discuss various aspects of the culture of OMGs so that ED personnel may better understand the mentality of the outlaw biker. Knowledge of their symbols, values, and hierarchy can be crucial to maintaining order in the ED when an injured outlaw biker presents to the ED. We used standard search engines to obtain reports from law enforcement agencies and studies in academic journals on OMGs. We present the observations of 1 author who has conducted ethnographic research on outlaw bikers since the 1980s. PMID:25035762

  20. Frequency, determinants and impact of overcrowding in emergency departments in Canada: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Bond, Kenneth; Ospina, Maria B; Blitz, Sandra; Afilalo, Marc; Campbell, Sam G; Bullard, Michael; Innes, Grant; Holroyd, Brian; Curry, Gil; Schull, Michael; Rowe, Brian H

    2007-01-01

    Several reports have documented the prevalence and severity of emergency department (ED) overcrowding at specific hospitals or cities in Canada; however, no study has examined the issue at a national level. A 54-item, self-administered, postal and web-based questionnaire was distributed to 243 ED directors in Canada to collect data on the frequency, impact and factors associated with ED overcrowding. The survey was completed by 158 (65% response rate) ED directors, 62% of whom reported overcrowding as a major or severe problem during the past year. Directors attributed overcrowding to a variety of issues including a lack of admitting beds (85%), lack of acute care beds (74%) and the increased length of stay of admitted patients in the ED (63%). They perceived ED overcrowding to have a major impact on increasing stress among nurses (82%), ED wait times (79%) and the boarding of admitted patients in the ED while waiting for beds (67%). Overcrowding is not limited to large urban centres; nor is it limited to academic and teaching hospitals. The perspective of ED directors reinforces the need for further examination of effective policies and interventions to reduce ED overcrowding. PMID:18019897

  1. Overcrowding in medium-volume emergency departments: effects of aged patients in emergency departments on wait times for non-emergent triage-level patients.

    PubMed

    Knapman, Mary; Bonner, Ann

    2010-06-01

    This study aims to examine patient wait times from triaging to physician assessment in the emergency department (ED) for non-emergent patients, and to see whether patient flow and process (triage) are impacted by aged patients. A retrospective study method was used to analyse 185 patients in three age groups. Key data recorded were triage level, wait time to physician assessment and ED census. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to determine the strength of association with increased wait time. A longer average wait time for all patients occurred when there was an increase in the number of patients aged > or = 65 years in the ED. Further analysis showed 12.1% of the variation extending ED wait time associated with the triage process was explained by the number of patients aged > or = 65 years. In addition, extended wait time, overcrowding and numbers of those who left without being seen were strongly associated (P < 0.05) with the number of aged patients in the ED. The effects of aged patients on ED structure and process have significant implications for nursing. Nursing process and practice sets clear responsibilities for nursing to ensure patient safety. However, the impact of factors associated with aged patients in ED, nursing's role and ED process can negatively impact performance expectations and requires further investigation. PMID:20618543

  2. Emergency department use as a component of total ambulatory care: a population perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mustard, C A; Kozyrskyj, A L; Barer, M L; Sheps, S

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (a) To describe the overall proportion of ambulatory care provided in emergency departments for a complete urban population, (b) to describe the variation across small geographic areas in the overall proportion of ambulatory care provided in emergency departments and (c) to identify attributes of small-area populations that are related to the provision of high proportions of total ambulatory care in emergency departments. DESIGN: Cross-sectional ecologic study combining 4 sources of secondary data on health service utilization and socioeconomic status. SETTING: Winnipeg. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 657,871 residents of metropolitan Winnipeg in the period April 1991 to March 1992, grouped into 112 neighbourhoods. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: A proportion calculated, for each neighbourhood population, from the estimated count of emergency department visits divided by the population's use of total ambulatory care for a sample of 55 days in the study period. RESULTS: The overall proportion of ambulatory care provided in emergency departments was 4.9% (range 2.6% to 10.8%), representing 35.5 emergency department visits per 100 person-years. Neighbourhoods with a higher proportion of total ambulatory care provided in emergency departments were characterized by lower mean household income, a higher proportion of emergency department visits for mental illness and a higher proportion of residents with treaty Indian status. Measures of need for medical care for were not consistently associated with the proportion of ambulatory care received in emergency departments. CONCLUSIONS: In a health care system with an adequate supply of primary care physicians and universal insurance, this study has documented significant variation across small geographic areas in the proportion of total ambulatory care received in emergency departments. In the absence of strong evidence that this variation was associated with underlying need, the results suggest that attention be paid to the

  3. The Department Chair as Academic Leader. American Council on Education/Oryx Press Series on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Irene W. D.; Higgerson, Mary Lou; Gmelch, Walter H.; Tucker, Allan

    This book provides a comprehensive guide to the role of the academic department chair in a time when the chair's role is rapidly becoming more important and more complex. Part 1 describes the new roles chairs face, followed by a general discussion of their responsibilities. Part 2 is concerned with the department chair's work with people,…

  4. Emergency Department Frequent Utilization for Non-Emergent Presentments: Results from a Regional Urban Trauma Center Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives First, to test a model of the drivers of frequent emergency department utilization conceptualized as falling within predisposing, enabling, and need dimensions. Second, to extend the model to include social networks and service quality as predictors of frequent utilization. Third, to illustrate the variation in thresholds that define frequent utilization in terms of the number of emergency department encounters by the predictors within the model. Data Source Primary data collection over an eight week period within a level-1 trauma urban hospital’s emergency department. Study Design Representative randomized sample of 1,443 adult patients triaged ESI levels 4–5. Physicians and research staff interviewed patients as they received services. Relationships with the outcome variable, utilization, were tested using logistic regression to establish odds-ratios. Principal Findings 70.6 percent of patients have two or more, 48.3 percent have three or more, 25.3 percent have four or more, and 14.9 percent have five or more emergency department visits within 12 months. Factors associated with frequent utilization include gender, race, poor mental health, mental health drugs, prescription drug abuse, social networks, employment, perceptions of service quality, seriousness of condition, persistence of condition, and previous hospital admittance. Conclusions Interventions targeting associated factors will change global emergency department encounters, although the mutability varies. Policy interventions to address predisposing factors such as substance abuse or access to mental health treatment as well as interventions that speak to enabling factors such as promoting the resiliency of social networks may result in decreased frequency of emergency department utilization. PMID:26784515

  5. Waiting Times in Emergency Department After Using the Emergency Severity Index Triage Tool

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodian, Farzad; Eqtesadi, Razie; Ghareghani, Atefe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hospital emergency departments (EDs) are as barometers of the health care system. Crowded EDs threaten delivery of timely care. Prolonged ED wait times reduce the quality of care and increase adverse and sometimes irreversible events. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the patients' waiting time at Namazi and Shahid Faghihi hospitals in Shiraz, Iran. Patients and Methods: This analytical cross-sectional study was conducted in two phases from December 2012 to May 2013. First, the researcher attended the EDs of the two hospitals and recorded the information of 900 patients who entered the ED, including arrival time, level of triage, and time of first visit by physician. Then, among patients admitted to the ED units, 273 were followed and waiting times for the first physician order in the referral unit and the commencement of clinical interventions (defined as check time by the nurse) were recorded. Results: The median waiting time from arrival to first visit by physician for the 900 patients included in the study was 8 (5-14) minutes [median (interquartile range)]. For the patients admitted to referral units, waiting time was 84 (43-145) minutes for the physician order and 85 (45-147) minutes for the commencement of first clinical intervention; 75% of the patients in triage level I, 84.6% in triage level II, and 95.6% in triage level III were visited within the target time limit. Conclusions: Waiting time for commencement of clinical action in patients admitted to the EDs was considerably high for patients with higher priorities; so, rapid care of critically ill patients, identified during the triage process, should be emphasized. PMID:25738132

  6. Promoting Gender Equity in Academic Departments: a Study of Department Heads in Top-Ranked Chemistry Departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockard, Jean; Greene, Jessica; Lewis, Priscilla; Richmond, Geraldine

    Although the proportion of doctoral degrees in chemistry that have gone to women has increased markedly over the past few decades, the representation of women among higher education faculty has not increased at the same rate. This paper reports the results of a systematic effort to change this pattern by increasing the commitment of department heads in leading departments to the hiring and support of women faculty. Results indicate that participants in a carefully planned intervention changed their attitudes regarding reasons underlying women's underrepresentation and barriers to their progress in the field from pre- to postworkshop. Participants also reported commitment to change immediately after the event and engaging in a number of specific change efforts in the following months. While the quality of these change efforts was not related to changes in attitudes, those with fewer women in their department were more likely to report more fully on change efforts.

  7. Emergency Department Visits by Older Adults for Motor Vehicle Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Jody A.; Ginde, Adit A.; Lowenstein, Steven R.; Betz, Marian E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To describe the epidemiology and characteristics of emergency department (ED) visits by older adults for motor vehicle collisions (MVC) in the United States (U.S.). Methods: We analyzed ED visits for MVCs using data from the 2003–2007 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). Using U.S. Census data, we calculated annual incidence rates of driver or passenger MVC-related ED visits and examined visit characteristics, including triage acuity, tests performed and hospital admission or discharge. We compared older (65+ years) and younger (18–64 years) MVC patients and calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to measure the strength of associations between age group and various visit characteristics. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of admissions for MVC-related injuries among older adults. Results: From 2003–2007, there were an average of 237,000 annual ED visits by older adults for MVCs. The annual ED visit rate for MVCs was 6.4 (95% CI 4.6–8.3) visits per 1,000 for older adults and 16.4 (95% CI 14.0–18.8) visits per 1,000 for younger adults. Compared to younger MVC patients, after adjustment for gender, race and ethnicity, older MVC patients were more likely to have at least one imaging study performed (OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.46–9.36). Older MVC patients were not significantly more likely to arrive by ambulance (OR 1.47; 95% CI 0.76–2.86), have a high triage acuity (OR 1.56; 95% CI 0.77–3.14), or to have a diagnosis of a head, spinal cord or torso injury (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.42–2.23) as compared to younger MVC patients after adjustment for gender, race and ethnicity. Overall, 14.5% (95% CI 9.8–19.2) of older MVC patients and 6.1% (95% CI 4.8–7.5) of younger MVC patients were admitted to the hospital. There was also a non-statistically significant trend toward hospital admission for older versus younger MVC patients (OR 1.78; 95% CI 0.71–4.43), and

  8. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan, U.S. Department of Energy Region 6

    SciTech Connect

    Marsha Keister

    2010-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Region 6 Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan (TEPP Plan) operates within the framework of the DOE emergency management system for developing, coordinating, and directing emergency planning, preparedness, and readiness assurance activities for radiological transportation incidents. The DOE Region 6 TEPP Plan is a narrative description of the DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program activities, training and technical assistance provided to states and tribes along DOE's transportation corridors in DOE Region 6.

  9. HIV testing in US emergency departments, outpatient ambulatory medical departments, and physician offices, 1992-2010.

    PubMed

    Tai, Miao; Merchant, Roland C

    2014-01-01

    In 1993, 2001, and 2006, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released revised recommendations aimed to expand HIV screening in health-care settings, increase the number of people who are aware of their infection, improve the health of those who are infected, and reduce HIV transmission. It is unclear how responsive health-care settings have been on a national level to these three successively revised sets of CDC recommendations. This study estimated the extent of HIV testing in US emergency departments (EDs), outpatient ambulatory medical care departments (OPDs), and physician offices among 13- to 64-year-olds from 1992 to 2010 to determine their responsiveness to CDC recommendations to expand HIV testing. The report includes data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) and the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), which are national probability sample surveys conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) for CDC. Over the entire study period, HIV testing was significantly greater in OPDs than in EDs (p < 0.01) and physician offices (p < 0.01). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that Hispanic and Black patients and those receiving Medicaid were more likely to be tested for HIV. Logistic regression tests of trend for the entire study period did not demonstrate significant increases in testing at EDs (Odds ratios [OR] 1.00 [0.97-1.03]) or OPDs (OR 1.01 [0.98-1.04]). For physician offices, there was no change in HIV testing for 1993-1999 (OR 1.03 [0.99-1.06]), but there was a relative increase for the entire study period (OR 1.04 [1.02-1.06]) because of more HIV testing in 2009 and 2010 in this setting. However, there were no differences in HIV testing for each setting for the interval years after revised CDC HIV testing recommendations were released for 1993-2001, 2002-2006, and 2007-2010.

  10. A Multimedia Medical Communication Link Between A Radiology Department And An Emergency Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Morris; Robertson, John G.; Belanger, Garry; Georganas, Nicolas D.; Mastronardi, Jim; Cohn-Sfetcu, Sorin; Dillon, Richard F.; Tombaugh, Jo W.

    1989-05-01

    The most critical aspect of a radiologist's work is the communication of his findings to the attending physician responsible for the patient's care. This is also the part of the process that is least well organized and the most subject to failure. At the University of Ottawa Medical Communications Research Centre we are investigating technical means to improve communications between radiologists and attending physicians. We first introduce the radiology communication service problem and show why it is essentially a multimedia communication problem. We then briefly describe a multimedia communication system designed and implemented by our research team. The multimedia system consists of several workstations linked by the Hospital's LAN. Each physician workstation comprises a Compaq 386/20 Mhertz microcomputer with 16 Mbytes of RAM, a 500 Mbyte image disk, an image memory which drives a 1000 line monochrome monitor. The images are digitized using a Konica laser-based film digitizer (2430 by 2000 10-bit pixels for a standard chest radiograph). The multimedia file server manager station is built around a PC-AT compatible with a Northern Telecom MERIDIAN SL-1ST digital PBX and a Meridian Mail digital voice messaging system. This last device is used to store voice data and is linked via the PBX to the workstations' digital telephones. A SYTEK 6000 local area network (LAN) links all workstations to the file server. All data, image and graphic information is transmitted via this network, while the twisted pair connections linking the digital PBX to the telephone sets are used for transmitting voice data. Finally, we provide details of an in-hospital trial linking the Department of Radiological Sciences and the Emergency Department at the Ottawa Civic Hospital, a 950 bed tertiary care teaching hospital.

  11. Initiatives to reduce overcrowding and access block in Australian emergency departments: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Kimberley; Morphet, Julia; Jones, Tamsin; Innes, Kelli; Griffiths, Debra; Williams, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Australian emergency departments are experiencing an increasing demand for their services. Patient throughput continues to expand resulting in overcrowding and access block where patients cannot gain entry to appropriate hospital beds. This is despite both state and federal governments implementing numerous schemes to address the complex causes of stress on emergency departments. This paper explores the current literature and highlights the key strategies adopted by different emergency departments to reduce delays and streamline patient flow, including: waiting room nurses; streaming; rapid assessment teams; short stay units and care coordination programmes. Many of these initiatives have proven successful at reducing the number of people re-presenting to the emergency department, addressing time delays and improving the management of existing resources and patient flow. More recent changes include increasing the scope of practice and workload for triage nurses. With the recent introduction of the National Emergency Access Target, which requires that most patients presenting to Australian emergency departments are reviewed and transferred or discharged from the department within 4h, traditional roles of nurses in the emergency department are changing and expanding to meet the needs of modern healthcare systems.

  12. Initiatives to reduce overcrowding and access block in Australian emergency departments: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Kimberley; Morphet, Julia; Jones, Tamsin; Innes, Kelli; Griffiths, Debra; Williams, Allison

    2014-01-01

    Australian emergency departments are experiencing an increasing demand for their services. Patient throughput continues to expand resulting in overcrowding and access block where patients cannot gain entry to appropriate hospital beds. This is despite both state and federal governments implementing numerous schemes to address the complex causes of stress on emergency departments. This paper explores the current literature and highlights the key strategies adopted by different emergency departments to reduce delays and streamline patient flow, including: waiting room nurses; streaming; rapid assessment teams; short stay units and care coordination programmes. Many of these initiatives have proven successful at reducing the number of people re-presenting to the emergency department, addressing time delays and improving the management of existing resources and patient flow. More recent changes include increasing the scope of practice and workload for triage nurses. With the recent introduction of the National Emergency Access Target, which requires that most patients presenting to Australian emergency departments are reviewed and transferred or discharged from the department within 4h, traditional roles of nurses in the emergency department are changing and expanding to meet the needs of modern healthcare systems. PMID:25632734

  13. Non-fatal occupational injuries and illnesses treated in hospital emergency departments in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, L

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To estimate the number and rate of occupational injuries and illnesses treated in hospital emergency departments and to characterize the nature, event, and source of injury and illness. Setting—Twenty four hour emergency departments in hospitals in the United States. Methods—Surveillance for occupational injuries and illnesses was conducted in a national probability based sample of hospital emergency departments through the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). Worker demographics, nature of injury and disposition, and incident circumstances were abstracted from emergency department medical records, typically within 24–72 hours of treatment. Results—Approximately 3.6 million occupational injuries and illnesses were treated in emergency departments in 1998. Younger workers, particularly males, continue to have the highest rates of work related injuries. Together, lacerations, punctures, amputations, and avulsions represented one fourth of the emergency department treated injuries, mostly to hand and fingers. Sprains and strains, largely to the trunk, also accounted for one fourth of the injuries. The three leading injury events were contact with objects, bodily reactions and exertions, and falls. Conclusions—Despite apparent decreases in rates, youth continue to have a high burden of injury in the workplace. However, three fourths of all emergency department treated injuries occur to workers 20–44 years of age. Emergency department surveillance is particularly amenable to capture of young worker injuries and provides a wealth of injury details to guide prevention efforts—efforts that will likely reduce occupational injuries as these workers age. Emergency department surveillance also provides injury estimates with few demographic or employer constraints, other than the medical venue used. PMID:11565966

  14. An Innovative Educational and Mentorship Program for Emergency Medicine Women Residents to Enhance Academic Development and Retention.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Kriti; Takayesu, James Kimo; Arbelaez, Christian; Peak, David; Nadel, Eric S

    2015-11-01

    Given the discrepancy between men and women's equal rates of medical school matriculation and their rates of academic promotion and leadership role acquisition, the need to provide mentorship and education to women in academic medicine is becoming increasingly recognized. Numerous large-scale programs have been developed to provide support and resources for women's enrichment and retention in academic medicine. Analyses of contributory factors to the aforementioned discrepancy commonly cite insufficient mentoring and role modeling as well as challenges with organizational navigation. Since residency training has been shown to be a critical juncture for making the decision to pursue an academic career, there is a need for innovative and tailored educational and mentorship programs targeting residents. Acknowledging residents' competing demands, we designed a program to provide easily accessible mentorship and contact with role models for our trainees at the departmental and institutional levels. We believe that this is an important step towards encouraging women's pursuit of academic careers. Our model may be useful to other emergency medicine residencies looking to provide such opportunities for their women residents. PMID:25915003

  15. Inhaled corticosteroid prescribing from the emergency department for children with asthma.

    PubMed

    Shedd, Glenn Clinton; Evans, Dian Dowling

    2012-01-01

    In the article "Frequency of Prescription of Inhaled Corticosteroids to Children With Asthma in U.S. Emergency Departments," the authors conducted a secondary data analysis from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey database to examine inhaled corticosteroid prescribing patterns of providers caring for children with asthma visiting emergency departments. We review and critique this article and use a case study module to illustrate the importance of the research findings and how they relate to practice in the emergency department in light of current national guidelines for managing asthma exacerbations.

  16. Emergency department diagnosis of supraspinatus tendon calcification and shoulder impingement syndrome using bedside ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Riley, David C; Kaufman, Martha; Ward, Theresa M; Acevedo, Yesenia; Guerra, Rodney; Folorunsho, Adenike

    2013-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 2-day history of severe left shoulder pain made worse with movement. Emergency department (ED) bedside point-of-care static and dynamic ultrasound examination of the supraspinatus tendon revealed supraspinatus tendon calcification with impingement syndrome, and the patient was urgently referred to orthopedics after ED pain control was achieved. Bedside shoulder and supraspinatus tendon evaluation with static and dynamic ultrasonography can assist in the rapid diagnosis of supraspinatus tendon calcification and supraspinatus tendon impingement syndrome in the emergency department.

  17. Exotic snakes are not always found in exotic places: how poison centres can assist emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Lubich, Carol; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2007-11-01

    Emergency departments throughout the USA may have some familiarity with the management of envenomation from indigenous snake species such as Crotalinae (rattlesnakes) and Micrurus (coral snakes). However, venomous species may include exotic reptiles whose bites pose substantial treatment challenges due to both a lack of experience and the difficulty in obtaining antivenoms. Two pet cobra envenomation incidents illustrate the challenges that face emergency departments, especially in urban settings, that are confronted with these exposures. It is important for emergency departments to be aware of the large underground presence of exotic venomous reptile pets and to utilise the expertise of regional poison centres that will also assist in the procurement of exotic antivenoms.

  18. Increasing the Number of Certified Registered Nurses in an Emergency Department: A Cohort Program Implementation.

    PubMed

    Neira, Paula M; Maliszewski, Barbara; Toledo, RaniMaria; Borries, Kimberly; Baptiste, Diana-Lyn

    2016-01-01

    Nationally, hospital emergency departments are met with challenges because of increasing patient demands, overcrowding, and the need to protect patient safety. It is imperative that frontline emergency department nurses are prepared to meet the complex needs of diverse patient populations by having appropriate continuing education, training, and institutional resources. Professional certification is associated with improved patient safety, higher organizational performance scores, professional growth, and credibility among nurses. The purpose of this article is to describe the process and outcome of a nursing professional development-practitioner-led intervention to promote professional certification among nurses in an urban adult emergency department while reducing overall cost of institutional support for certification preparation. PMID:27648902

  19. Delirium in Older Emergency Department Patients: Recognition, Risk Factors, and Psychomotor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin H.; Zimmerman, Eli E.; Cutler, Nathan; Schnelle, John; Morandi, Alessandro; Dittus, Robert S.; Storrow, Alan B.; Ely, E. Wesley

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Missing delirium in the emergency department (ED) has been described as a medical error, yet this diagnosis is frequently unrecognized by emergency physicians. Identifying a subset of patients at high risk for delirium may improve delirium screening compliance by emergency physicians. We sought 1) to determine how often delirium is missed in the ED and how often these missed cases are detected by admitting hospital physicians at the time of admission, 2) to identify delirium risk factors in older ED patients, and 3) to characterize delirium by psychomotor subtypes in the ED setting. Methods This cross-sectional study was a convenience sample of patients conducted at a tertiary care, academic ED. English speaking patients who were 65 years and older and present in the ED for less than 12 hours at the time of enrollment were included. Patients were excluded if they refused consent, were previously enrolled, had severe dementia, were unarousable to verbal stimuli for all delirium assessments, or had incomplete data. Delirium status was determined by using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit (CAM-ICU) administered by trained research assistants. Recognition of delirium by emergency and hospital physicians was determined from the medical record, blinded to CAM-ICU status. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent delirium risk factors. The Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale was used to classify delirium by its psychomotor subtypes. Results Inclusion and exclusion criteria were met in 303 patients and 25 (8.3%) presented to the ED with delirium. The vast majority (92.0%, 95%CI: 74.0% - 99.0%) of delirious patients had the hypoactive psychomotor subtype. Of the 25 patients with delirium, 19 (76.0%, 95%CI: 54.9% - 90.6%) were not recognized to be delirious by the emergency physician. Of the 16 admitted delirious patients who were undiagnosed by the emergency physicians, 15 (93.8%, 95%CI: 69.8% - 99.8%) remained

  20. Screening for Suicidal Ideation and Attempts among Emergency Department Medical Patients: Instrument and Results from the Psychiatric Emergency Research Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Michael H.; Abar, Beau W.; McCormick, Mark; Barnes, Donna H.; Haukoos, Jason; Garmel, Gus M.; Boudreaux, Edwin D.

    2013-01-01

    Joint Commission National Patient Safety Goal 15 calls for organizations "to identify patients at risk for suicide." Overt suicidal behavior accounts for 0.6% of emergency department (ED) visits, but incidental suicidal ideation is found in 3%-11.6%. This is the first multicenter study of suicide screening in EDs. Of 2,243 patients in…

  1. The impact of SARS on a tertiary care pediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Boutis, Kathy; Stephens, Derek; Lam, Kelvin; Ungar, Wendy J.; Schuh, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    Background The Greater Toronto Area (GTA) was considered a “hot zone” for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003. In accordance with mandated city-wide infection control measures, the Hospital for Sick Children (HSC) drastically reduced all services while maintaining a fully operational emergency department. Because of the GTA health service suspensions and the overlap of SARS-like symptoms with many common childhood illnesses, this introduced the potential for a change in the volumes of patients visiting the emergency department of the only regional tertiary care children's hospital. Methods We compared HSC emergency department patient volumes, admission rates and length of stay in the emergency department in the baseline years of 2000–2002 (non-SARS years) with those in 2003 (SARS year). The data from the prior years were modeled as a time series. Using an interrupted time series analysis, we compared the 2003 data for the periods before, during and after the SARS periods with the modeled data for significant differences in the 3 aforementioned outcomes of interest. Results Compared with the 2000–2002 data, we found no differences in visits, admission rates or length of stay in the pre-SARS period in 2003. There were significant decreases in visits and length of stay (p < 0.001) and increases in admission rates (p < 0.001) during the periods in 2003 when there were new and active cases of SARS in the GTA. All 3 outcomes returned to expected estimates coincident with the absence of SARS cases from September to December 2003. Interpretation During the SARS outbreak in the GTA, the HSC emergency department experienced significantly reduced volumes of patients with low-acuity complaints. This gives insight into utilization rates of a pediatric emergency department during a time when there was additional perceived risk in using emergency department services and provides a foundation for emergency department preparedness policies for SARS-like public

  2. Expectations of Care, Perceived Safety, and Anxiety following Acute Behavioural Disturbance in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Lim, Magdalen; Weiland, Tracey; Gerdtz, Marie; Dent, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Objective. We explored perspectives of emergency department users (patients and visitors) regarding the management of acute behavioural disturbances in the emergency department and whether these disturbances influenced their levels of anxiety. Methods. Emergency department patients and visitors were surveyed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and a purpose-designed questionnaire and semistructured interview. The main outcome measures were themes that emerged from the questionnaires, the interviews, and scores from the state component of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Results. 70 participants were recruited. Users of the emergency department preferred behaviourally disturbed people be managed in a separate area from the general emergency department population so that the disturbance was inaudible (n = 32) and out of view (n = 40). The state anxiety levels of those that witnessed an acute behavioural disturbance were within the normal range and did not differ to that of ED patients that were not present during such a disturbance (median, control = 37, Code Grey = 33). Conclusions. Behavioural disturbances in the emergency department do not provoke anxiety in other users. However, there is a preference that such disturbances be managed out of visual and audible range. Innovative design features may be required to achieve this.

  3. Exploring the views of emergency department staff on the use of videoconferencing for mental health emergencies in southwestern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Pangka, Kyle R; Chandrasena, Ranjith; Wijeratne, Nishardi; Mann, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Patients presenting to a rural emergency department (ED) with mental health symptoms have difficulty accessing services of mental health professionals [1,2]. Videoconferencing (VC) has been found to improve patient access to health services that require specialist care in rural EDs [3,4,5]. Although previous studies highlight the benefit of using VC for patients presenting with mental health emergencies, no study has investigated the current views and use of VC for mental health emergencies in EDs in Southwestern Ontario [3,5,6]. To explore the views of ED staff regarding the use of VC in mental health emergencies, structured telephone interviews were conducted with representatives from EDs in the Erie St. Clair and Southwest Local Health Integration Networks (LHIN). Participants noted that using VC for mental health emergencies may improve patient experience and benefit crisis response teams. VC was perceived by some participants as a means to expedite the direct assessment of a patient presenting with a mental health emergency by a mental health specialist. However several participants stated that using VC for mental health emergencies strains ED resources. Lack of use and difficulty accessing a psychiatrist were identified as potential barriers to implementing the use of VC for mental health emergencies.

  4. Rising pressure: hospital emergency departments as barometers of the health care system.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ann S; Gerland, Anneliese M; Pham, Hoangmai H; Berenson, Robert A

    2005-11-01

    Pressures--ranging from persuading specialists to provide on-call coverage to dealing with growing numbers of patients with serious mental illness--are building in already-crowded hospital emergency departments (EDs) across the country, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2005 site visits to 12 nationally representative communities. As the number of ED visits rises significantly faster than population growth, many hospitals are expanding emergency department capacity. At the same time, hospitals face an ongoing nursing shortage, contributing to tight inpatient capacity that in turn hinders admitting ED patients. In their role as hospitals' "front door" for attracting insured inpatient admissions, emergency departments also increasingly are expected to help hospitals compete for insured patients while still meeting obligations to provide emergency care to all-comers under federal law. Failure to address these growing pressures may compromise access to emergency care for patients and spur already rapidly rising health care costs.

  5. Rising pressure: hospital emergency departments as barometers of the health care system.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ann S; Gerland, Anneliese M; Pham, Hoangmai H; Berenson, Robert A

    2005-11-01

    Pressures--ranging from persuading specialists to provide on-call coverage to dealing with growing numbers of patients with serious mental illness--are building in already-crowded hospital emergency departments (EDs) across the country, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2005 site visits to 12 nationally representative communities. As the number of ED visits rises significantly faster than population growth, many hospitals are expanding emergency department capacity. At the same time, hospitals face an ongoing nursing shortage, contributing to tight inpatient capacity that in turn hinders admitting ED patients. In their role as hospitals' "front door" for attracting insured inpatient admissions, emergency departments also increasingly are expected to help hospitals compete for insured patients while still meeting obligations to provide emergency care to all-comers under federal law. Failure to address these growing pressures may compromise access to emergency care for patients and spur already rapidly rising health care costs. PMID:16299951

  6. An approach to radiation safety department benchmarking in academic and medical facilities.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Richard P

    2015-02-01

    Based on anecdotal evidence and networking with colleagues at other facilities, it has become evident that some radiation safety departments are not adequately staffed and radiation safety professionals need to increase their staffing levels. Discussions with management regarding radiation safety department staffing often lead to similar conclusions. Management acknowledges the Radiation Safety Officer (RSO) or Director of Radiation Safety's concern but asks the RSO to provide benchmarking and justification for additional full-time equivalents (FTEs). The RSO must determine a method to benchmark and justify additional staffing needs while struggling to maintain a safe and compliant radiation safety program. Benchmarking and justification are extremely important tools that are commonly used to demonstrate the need for increased staffing in other disciplines and are tools that can be used by radiation safety professionals. Parameters that most RSOs would expect to be positive predictors of radiation safety staff size generally are and can be emphasized in benchmarking and justification report summaries. Facilities with large radiation safety departments tend to have large numbers of authorized users, be broad-scope programs, be subject to increased controls regulations, have large clinical operations, have significant numbers of academic radiation-producing machines, and have laser safety responsibilities.

  7. Ultrasound guidance for central vascular access in the pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Skippen, Peter; Kissoon, Niranjan

    2007-03-01

    Central vascular access is sometimes required for hemodynamic monitoring and infusion of fluids and medications in the pediatric emergency department. In many cases, it is attempted after failed peripheral venous and intraosseous access. Some evidence exists demonstrating benefits of ultrasound (US)-guided central vascular cannulation in adults in emergency departments. With appropriate education in its use, US-guided cannulation of central veins in children is likely to be associated with less complications and greater success. In the pediatric emergency department, the femoral vein is the most practical central venous cannulation site. A sound educational and quality assurance program is necessary for US-guided cannulation in the pediatric emergency department. PMID:17413442

  8. Implementing the EQUiPPED Medication Management Program at 5 VA Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberg, Ann E.; Stevens, Melissa; Echt, Katharina V.; Hastings, S. Nicole; Powers, James; Markland, Alayne; Hwang, Ula; Hung, William; Belbis, Stephanie; Vaughan, Camille P.

    2016-01-01

    The Enhancing Quality of Prescribing Practices for Older Veterans Discharged From the Emergency Department (EQUiPPED) program aimed to reduce potentially inappropriate medication prescribing to older adults at 5 VAMCs.

  9. Update on Emergency Department Visits Involving Energy Drinks: A Continuing Public Health Concern

    MedlinePlus

    Update on Emergency Department Visits Involving Energy Drinks: A Continuing Public Health Concern Energy drinks are flavored beverages containing high amounts of caffeine and typically other additives, such as ...

  10. Adolescent depression and emergency department use: the roles of suicidality and deliberate self-harm.

    PubMed

    Bethell, Jennifer; Rhodes, Anne E

    2008-02-01

    Depression is associated with increased health service use; clarifying the processes involved may offer strategies to reduce the disorder's individual and societal burdens. This review hypothesizes roles for suicidality and deliberate self-harm to partially explain a relationship between adolescent depression and increased emergency department use. Briefly, depression is associated with suicidality and deliberate self-harm, both of which are likely common among emergency department presentations in this age group. The overlap of depression with suicidality and deliberate self-harm has implications for suicide prevention strategies that emphasize diagnosing and treating adolescent depression. First, identifying and referring depression among these emergency department presentations is promising, but limitations must be addressed. Second, interventions for adolescent depression also may affect the health conditions associated with increased emergency department use, including suicidality and deliberate self-harm. However, much more research is needed on the pathways involved before such benefits, including cost offset, can be reasonably anticipated.

  11. 78 FR 69861 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security, Federal Emergency Management Agency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Management Agency, Federal Government--001 National Defense Executive Reserve System of Records AGENCY.../Federal Emergency Management Agency/Federal Government--001 National Defense Executive Reserve System...

  12. A group-based tasks allocation algorithm for the optimization of long leave opportunities in academic departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyono Obono, S. D.; Basak, Sujit Kumar

    2011-12-01

    The general formulation of the assignment problem consists in the optimal allocation of a given set of tasks to a workforce. This problem is covered by existing literature for different domains such as distributed databases, distributed systems, transportation, packets radio networks, IT outsourcing, and teaching allocation. This paper presents a new version of the assignment problem for the allocation of academic tasks to staff members in departments with long leave opportunities. It presents the description of a workload allocation scheme and its algorithm, for the allocation of an equitable number of tasks in academic departments where long leaves are necessary.

  13. Trends in academic health sciences libraries and their emergence as the “knowledge nexus” for their academic health centers*

    PubMed Central

    Kronenfeld, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify trends in academic health sciences libraries (AHSLs) as they adapt to the shift from a print knowledgebase to an increasingly digital knowledgebase. This research was funded by the 2003 David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship. Methods: The author spent a day and a half interviewing professional staff at each library. The questionnaire used was sent to the directors of each library in advance of the visit, and the directors picked the staff to be interviewed and set up the schedule. Results: Seven significant trends were identified. These trends are part of the shift of AHSLs from being facility and print oriented with a primary focus on their role as repositories of a print-based knowledgebase to a new focus on their role as the center or “nexus” for the organization, access, and use of an increasingly digital-based knowledgebase. Conclusion: This paper calls for a national effort to develop a new model or structure for health sciences libraries to more effectively respond to the challenges of access and use of a digital knowledgebase, much the same way the National Library of Medicine did in the 1960s and 1970s in developing and implementing the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. The paper then concludes with some examples or ideas for research to assist in this process. PMID:15685271

  14. Allocating scarce resources in disasters: emergency department principles.

    PubMed

    Hick, John L; Hanfling, Dan; Cantrill, Stephen V

    2012-03-01

    Decisions about medical resource triage during disasters require a planned structured approach, with foundational elements of goals, ethical principles, concepts of operations for reactive and proactive triage, and decision tools understood by the physicians and staff before an incident. Though emergency physicians are often on the front lines of disaster situations, too often they have not considered how they should modify their decisionmaking or use of resources to allow the "greatest good for the greatest number" to be accomplished. This article reviews key concepts from the disaster literature, providing the emergency physician with a framework of ethical and operational principles on which medical interventions provided may be adjusted according to demand and the resources available. Incidents may require a range of responses from an institution and providers, from conventional (maximal use of usual space, staff, and supplies) to contingency (use of other patient care areas and resources to provide functionally equivalent care) and crisis (adjusting care provided to the resources available when usual care cannot be provided). This continuum is defined and may be helpful when determining the scope of response and assistance necessary in an incident. A range of strategies is reviewed that can be implemented when there is a resource shortfall. The resource and staff requirements of specific incident types (trauma, burn incidents) are briefly considered, providing additional preparedness and decisionmaking tactics to the emergency provider. It is difficult to think about delivering medical care under austere conditions. Preparation and understanding of the decisions required and the objectives, strategies, and tactics available can result in better-informed decisions during an event. In turn, adherence to such a response framework can yield thoughtful stewardship of resources and improved outcomes for a larger number of patients.

  15. Pediatric nonenvironmental hypothermia presenting to the emergency department: Episodic spontaneous hypothermia with hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Richard A; Rittichier, Kristine K

    2003-02-01

    Cases of pediatric nonenvironmental hypothermia are uncommon. When presenting to the emergency department, these patients are often evaluated for possible sepsis/shock, brain tumors, endocrine disorders, and drug ingestions. We report a case of a 5-year-old girl who presented to the pediatric emergency department on two occasions with hypothermia and lethargy. She was found to have an unusual cause of her symptoms: episodic spontaneous hypothermia with hyperhidrosis. PMID:12592112

  16. Chest Pain of Uncertain Aetiology: Role of Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Firas; Sawh, Chris; Garg, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing role of computed tomographic (CT) in the assessment of acute chest pain in the emergency department especially when the diagnosis is not clear. We report a case where non ECG gated contrast enhanced CT in the emergency department for rule-out of pulmonary embolus guided to the actual diagnosis, which was, acute coronary event, as evidenced by the presence of perfusion defect. PMID:27733870

  17. Lean Manufacturing Improves Emergency Department Throughput and Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kane, Marlena; Chui, Kristen; Rimicci, Janet; Callagy, Patrice; Hereford, James; Shen, Sam; Norris, Robert; Pickham, David

    2015-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team led by nursing leadership and physicians developed a plan to meet increasing demand and improve the patient experience in the ED without expanding the department's current resources. The approach included Lean tools and engaged frontline staff and physicians. Applying Lean management principles resulted in quicker service, improved patient satisfaction, increased capacity, and reduced resource utilization. Incorporating continuous daily management is necessary for sustainment of continuous improvement activities. PMID:26252725

  18. Lean Manufacturing Improves Emergency Department Throughput and Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Kane, Marlena; Chui, Kristen; Rimicci, Janet; Callagy, Patrice; Hereford, James; Shen, Sam; Norris, Robert; Pickham, David

    2015-09-01

    A multidisciplinary team led by nursing leadership and physicians developed a plan to meet increasing demand and improve the patient experience in the ED without expanding the department's current resources. The approach included Lean tools and engaged frontline staff and physicians. Applying Lean management principles resulted in quicker service, improved patient satisfaction, increased capacity, and reduced resource utilization. Incorporating continuous daily management is necessary for sustainment of continuous improvement activities.

  19. Caring for military children in the emergency department: the essentials.

    PubMed

    Ling, Catherine; Johnson, Heather

    2013-11-01

    The life of a military child has several challenges that can provide opportunities for resilience or risk for vulnerability. Nurses in emergent/urgent care may encounter military children when they are in a stressful transition such as during a move or deployment. Understanding the unique lifestyle of military children and implementing some key suggestions for practice can improve outcomes for this population. This article highlights the exceptional context of military children, military transitions, and opportunities to recognize families who are at risk and strategies to reach out using the I CARE (identify, correlate, ask, ready resources, and encourage) framework.

  20. Emergency department management of patients internally contaminated with radioactive material

    DOE PAGES

    Kazzi, Ziad; Buzzell, Jennifer; Bertelli, Luiz; Christensen, Doran

    2014-11-15

    After a radiation emergency that involves the dispersal of radioactive material, patients can become externally and internally contaminated with one or more radionuclides. Internal contamination can lead to the delivery of harmful ionizing radiation doses to various organs and tissues or the whole body. The clinical consequences can range from acute radiation syndrome (ARS) to the long term development of cancer. Estimating the amount of radioactive material absorbed into the body can guide the management of patients. Treatment includes, in addition to supportive care and long term monitoring, certain medical countermeasures like Prussian blue, Calcium DTPA and Zinc DTPA.

  1. Overcrowding and clinical risk in Emergency Departments. A model for the reduction in NEDOCS: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Todisco, Celestino

    2015-01-01

    Overcrowding in Emergency Departments represents one of the main concerns in effective hospital management today. In order to reduce this phenomenon, this study experimented with a new organizational model that exploited available resources, without incurring additional costs. Through the redistribution of hospital beds, it was possible to reduce access blocks in the Emergency Department of the test hospital. The observational period of this study was of 120 days, and daily surveys of crowding were performed at predetermined intervals. The measurement of overcrowding was calculated utilizing the National Emergency Department Overcrowding Score. The findings reveal a significant reduction in overcrowding due to an increase of only 6 beds in the Emergency Department. Currently, it is known that the principle cause of overcrowding is attributed to a lack of hospital beds for inpatients. Numerous studies have shown that through the lengthening of inpatient hospitalizations it is possible to improve crowding levels in Emergency Department. This findings of this study robustly demonstrate that a small increase in the number of available beds available in emergency department leads to a decrease in all variables of the NEDOCS, and in particular, that of the severely and dangerous overcrowding score. PMID:26422432

  2. Tumor lysis syndrome in the emergency department: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ñamendys-Silva, Silvio A; Arredondo-Armenta, Juan M; Plata-Menchaca, Erika P; Guevara-García, Humberto; García-Guillén, Francisco J; Rivero-Sigarroa, Eduardo; Herrera-Gómez, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is the most common oncologic emergency. It is caused by rapid tumor cell destruction and the resulting nucleic acid degradation during or days after initiation of cytotoxic therapy. Also, a spontaneous form exists. The metabolic abnormalities associated with this syndrome include hyperkalemia, hyperphosphatemia, hypocalcemia, hyperuricemia, and acute kidney injury. These abnormalities can lead to life-threatening complications, such as heart rhythm abnormalities and neurologic manifestations. The emergency management of overt TLS involves proper fluid resuscitation with crystalloids in order to improve the intravascular volume and the urinary output and to increase the renal excretion of potassium, phosphorus, and uric acid. With this therapeutic strategy, prevention of calcium phosphate and uric acid crystal deposition within renal tubules is achieved. Other measures in the management of overt TLS are prescription of hypouricemic agents, renal replacement therapy, and correction of electrolyte imbalances. Hyperkalemia should be treated quickly and aggressively as its presence is the most hazardous acute complication that can cause sudden death from cardiac arrhythmias. Treatment of hypocalcemia is reserved for patients with electrocardiographic changes or symptoms of neuromuscular irritability. In patients who are refractory to medical management of electrolyte abnormalities or with severe cardiac and neurologic manifestations, early dialysis is recommended. PMID:27147889

  3. Individual-Level and Socio-Structural Characteristics of Violence: An Emergency Department Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Douglas J.; Hassett-Walker, Constance

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a data collection system to provide information about assault-related injuries within Newark, New Jersey. In 2001, Emergency Department (ED) staff at the six hospitals providing emergency medical care within the city collected data on all assault-related ED visits. Individual-level (n = 1,204) and…

  4. Improving Emergency Department Triage Classification with Computerized Clinical Decision Support at a Pediatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunisch, Joseph Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Emergency Severity Index (ESI) is an emergency department (ED) triage classification system based on estimated patient-specific resource utilization. Rules for a computerized clinical decision support (CDS) system based on a patient's chief complaint were developed and tested using a stochastic model for predicting ESI scores.…

  5. Relationships of hospital-based emergency department culture to work satisfaction and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses.

    PubMed

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Wan, Thomas T H; Hsu, Chung-Ping Cliff; Hung, Feng-Ru; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Given the limited studies on emergency care management, this study aimed to explore the relationships of emergency department (ED) culture values to certain dimensions of ED physicians' and nurses' work satisfaction and intent to leave. Four hundred and forty-two emergency medical professionals completed the employee satisfaction questionnaire across 119 hospital-based EDs, which had culture value evaluations filed, were used as unit of analysis in this study. Adjusting the personal and employment backgrounds, and the surrounded EDs' unit characteristics and environmental factors, multiple regression analyses revealed that clan and market cultures were related to emergency physicians' work satisfaction and intent to leave. On the other hand, adhocracy, market and hierarchical cultures were related to emergency nurses' work satisfaction. There do exist different patterns among various culture types on various work satisfaction dimensions and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses. The findings could offer hospital and ED leaders insights for changes or for building a better atmosphere to enhance the work life of emergency physicians and nurses. PMID:22673696

  6. Clinical review: Emergency department overcrowding and the potential impact on the critically ill

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Robert M; Trzeciak, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Critical care constitutes a significant and growing proportion of the practice of emergency medicine. Emergency department (ED) overcrowding in the USA represents an emerging threat to patient safety and could have a significant impact on the critically ill. This review describes the causes and effects of ED overcrowding; explores the potential impact that ED overcrowding has on care of the critically ill ED patient; and identifies possible solutions, focusing on ED based critical care. PMID:15987383

  7. 20 CFR 671.130 - When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... emergency grants be submitted to the Department? 671.130 Section 671.130 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMERGENCY GRANTS FOR DISLOCATED WORKERS § 671.130 When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?...

  8. 20 CFR 671.130 - When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... emergency grants be submitted to the Department? 671.130 Section 671.130 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR NATIONAL EMERGENCY GRANTS FOR DISLOCATED WORKERS § 671.130 When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department? (a)...

  9. 20 CFR 671.130 - When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... emergency grants be submitted to the Department? 671.130 Section 671.130 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR NATIONAL EMERGENCY GRANTS FOR DISLOCATED WORKERS § 671.130 When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department? (a)...

  10. 20 CFR 671.130 - When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... emergency grants be submitted to the Department? 671.130 Section 671.130 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMERGENCY GRANTS FOR DISLOCATED WORKERS § 671.130 When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?...

  11. 20 CFR 671.130 - When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... emergency grants be submitted to the Department? 671.130 Section 671.130 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMERGENCY GRANTS FOR DISLOCATED WORKERS § 671.130 When should applications for national emergency grants be submitted to the Department?...

  12. Identification of inappropriate medication use in elderly patients with frequent emergency department visits

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jeffrey; Marr, Patricia; Kwan, Debbie; Meiyappan, Soumia; Adcock, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the demographic and health care characteristics of elderly family health team patients who are frequent emergency department (ED) users, focusing on potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) and access to primary care services. Design: Cross-sectional retrospective chart review. Setting: Academic family medicine clinic in Toronto, Ontario. Participants: A total of 46 elderly patients (age >65 years) with 4 or more visits to a University Health Network–affiliated ED between April 1, 2010, and March 31, 2011. Main outcome measures: Using the validated STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Persons’ potentially inappropriate Prescriptions) criteria, PIMs were identified. The primary objective was to determine whether PIMs were associated with more frequent ED use. The secondary objective was to determine whether patients who had previously undergone a clinic pharmacist-led medication review had fewer PIMs. We also determined the health characteristics of these patients at the time of their last ED visit of the study period. Utilization of primary care resources, both prior to and after ED visits, was determined. Results: Sixty-five percent of patients were taking at least 1 PIM. The total number of PIMs in the study population was 71. Having more PIMs was significantly correlated with a higher number of ED visits (r = 0.32, p < 0.05). Patients with a previous medication review had a similar number of PIMs compared with those without a review. The mean number of concurrent medications was 12.1 and the mean Charlson Comorbidity Index score was 3.7. Significant delay between hospital discharge and primary care follow-up (median 13 days) was observed. Conclusion: Elderly patients who are more frequent ED users have a greater number of PIMs. Primary care resources appear to be underused in this population. PMID:25360151

  13. Correlates of depressive symptoms among at-risk youth presenting to the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Ranney, Megan L.; Walton, Maureen; Whiteside, Lauren; Epstein-Ngo, Quyen; Patton, Rikki; Chermack, Stephen; Blow, Fred; Cunningham, Rebecca M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The study's objective was to identify correlates of depressive symptoms among at-risk youth in an urban emergency department (ED). Method A systematic sample of adolescents (ages 14–18) in the ED were recruited as part of a larger study. Participants reporting past-year alcohol use and peer aggression self-administered a survey assessing: demographics, depressive symptoms, and risk/protective factors. Logistic regression identified factors associated with depressive symptoms. Results Among 624 adolescents (88% response rate) meeting eligibility criteria, 22.8% (n=142) screened positive fordepressive symptoms. In logistic regression, depressive symptoms were positively associated with female gender (OR 2.84, 95% CI 1.78–4.51), poor academic performance (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.01–2.44), binge drinking (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.21–2.91), community violence exposure (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.59–3.18), and dating violence (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.36–3.38), and were negatively associated with same sex mentorship (OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.29–0.91) and older age (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.34–0.89). Including gender interaction terms did not significantly change findings. Conclusions Screening and intervention approaches for youth in the urban ED should address the co-occurrence of depressive symptoms with peer and dating violence, alcohol, and non-marijuana illicit drug use. PMID:23810465

  14. Multiplex PCR To Diagnose Bloodstream Infections in Patients Admitted from the Emergency Department with Sepsis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tsalik, Ephraim L.; Jones, Daphne; Nicholson, Bradly; Waring, Lynette; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Park, Lawrence P.; Glickman, Seth W.; Caram, Lauren B.; Langley, Raymond J.; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C.; Cairns, Charles B.; Rivers, Emanuel P.; Otero, Ronny M.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Fowler, Vance G.; Woods, Christopher W.

    2010-01-01

    Sepsis is caused by a heterogeneous group of infectious etiologies. Early diagnosis and the provision of appropriate antimicrobial therapy correlate with positive clinical outcomes. Current microbiological techniques are limited in their diagnostic capacities and timeliness. Multiplex PCR has the potential to rapidly identify bloodstream infections and fill this diagnostic gap. We identified patients from two large academic hospital emergency departments with suspected sepsis. The results of a multiplex PCR that could detect 25 bacterial and fungal pathogens were compared to those of blood culture. The results were analyzed with respect to the likelihood of infection, sepsis severity, the site of infection, and the effect of prior antibiotic therapy. We enrolled 306 subjects with suspected sepsis. Of these, 43 were later determined not to have infectious etiologies. Of the remaining 263 subjects, 70% had sepsis, 16% had severe sepsis, and 14% had septic shock. The majority had a definite infection (41.5%) or a probable infection (30.7%). Blood culture and PCR performed similarly with samples from patients with clinically defined infections (areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves, 0.64 and 0.60, respectively). However, blood culture identified more cases of septicemia than PCR among patients with an identified infectious etiology (66 and 46, respectively; P = 0.0004). The two tests performed similarly when the results were stratified by sepsis severity or infection site. Blood culture tended to detect infections more frequently among patients who had previously received antibiotics (P = 0.06). Conversely, PCR identified an additional 24 organisms that blood culture failed to detect. Real-time multiplex PCR has the potential to serve as an adjunct to conventional blood culture, adding diagnostic yield and shortening the time to pathogen identification. PMID:19846634

  15. Feasibility of Tablet Computer Screening for Opioid Abuse in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Scott G.; Horton, Laura C.; Green, Traci C.; Butler, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tablet computer-based screening may have the potential for detecting patients at risk for opioid abuse in the emergency department (ED). Study objectives were a) to determine if the revised Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain (SOAPP®-R), a 24-question previously paper-based screening tool for opioid abuse potential, could be administered on a tablet computer to an ED patient population; b) to demonstrate that >90% of patients can complete the electronic screener without assistance in <5 minutes and; c) to determine patient ease of use with screening on a tablet computer. Methods This was a cross-sectional convenience sample study of patients seen in an urban academic ED. SOAPP®-R was programmed on a tablet computer by study investigators. Inclusion criteria were patients ages ≥18 years who were being considered for discharge with a prescription for an opioid analgesic. Exclusion criteria included inability to understand English or physical disability preventing use of the tablet. Results 93 patients were approached for inclusion and 82 (88%) provided consent. Fifty-two percent (n=43) of subjects were male; 46% (n=38) of subjects were between 18–35 years, and 54% (n=44) were >35 years. One hundred percent of subjects completed the screener. Median time to completion was 148 (interquartile range 117.5–184.3) seconds, and 95% (n=78) completed in <5 minutes. 93% (n=76) rated ease of completion as very easy. Conclusions It is feasible to administer a screening tool to a cohort of ED patients on a tablet computer. The screener administration time is minimal and patient ease of use with this modality is high. PMID:25671003

  16. Frequency of medication errors in an emergency department of a large teaching hospital in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Vazin, Afsaneh; Zamani, Zahra; Hatam, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of determining the frequency of medication errors (MEs) occurring in tertiary care emergency department (ED) of a large academic hospital in Iran. The incidence of MEs was determined through the disguised direct observation method conducted by a trained observer. A total of 1,031 medication doses administered to 202 patients admitted to the tertiary care ED were observed over a course of 54 6-hour shifts. Following collection of the data and analysis of the errors with the assistance of a clinical pharmacist, frequency of errors in the different stages was reported and analyzed in SPSS-21 software. For the 202 patients and the 1,031 medication doses evaluated in the present study, 707 (68.5%) MEs were recorded in total. In other words, 3.5 errors per patient and almost 0.69 errors per medication are reported to have occurred, with the highest frequency of errors pertaining to cardiovascular (27.2%) and antimicrobial (23.6%) medications. The highest rate of errors occurred during the administration phase of the medication use process with a share of 37.6%, followed by errors of prescription and transcription with a share of 21.1% and 10% of errors, respectively. Omission (7.6%) and wrong time error (4.4%) were the most frequent administration errors. The less-experienced nurses (P=0.04), higher patient-to-nurse ratio (P=0.017), and the morning shifts (P=0.035) were positively related to administration errors. Administration errors marked the highest share of MEs occurring in the different medication use processes. Increasing the number of nurses and employing the more experienced of them in EDs can help reduce nursing errors. Addressing the shortcomings with further research should result in reduction of MEs in EDs. PMID:25525391

  17. Frequency of medication errors in an emergency department of a large teaching hospital in southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Vazin, Afsaneh; Zamani, Zahra; Hatam, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted with the purpose of determining the frequency of medication errors (MEs) occurring in tertiary care emergency department (ED) of a large academic hospital in Iran. The incidence of MEs was determined through the disguised direct observation method conducted by a trained observer. A total of 1,031 medication doses administered to 202 patients admitted to the tertiary care ED were observed over a course of 54 6-hour shifts. Following collection of the data and analysis of the errors with the assistance of a clinical pharmacist, frequency of errors in the different stages was reported and analyzed in SPSS-21 software. For the 202 patients and the 1,031 medication doses evaluated in the present study, 707 (68.5%) MEs were recorded in total. In other words, 3.5 errors per patient and almost 0.69 errors per medication are reported to have occurred, with the highest frequency of errors pertaining to cardiovascular (27.2%) and antimicrobial (23.6%) medications. The highest rate of errors occurred during the administration phase of the medication use process with a share of 37.6%, followed by errors of prescription and transcription with a share of 21.1% and 10% of errors, respectively. Omission (7.6%) and wrong time error (4.4%) were the most frequent administration errors. The less-experienced nurses (P=0.04), higher patient-to-nurse ratio (P=0.017), and the morning shifts (P=0.035) were positively related to administration errors. Administration errors marked the highest share of MEs occurring in the different medication use processes. Increasing the number of nurses and employing the more experienced of them in EDs can help reduce nursing errors. Addressing the shortcomings with further research should result in reduction of MEs in EDs. PMID:25525391

  18. Predictors of Patient Satisfaction With Pain Management in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Echo; Fung, Sierra; Rubal-Peace, Georgina; Patanwala, Asad E

    2016-01-01

    To identify predictors of patient satisfaction with pain control measured after emergency department (ED) discharge. This was a prospective, cross-sectional study conducted in an academic, urban ED in the United States. Adult patients with a pain-related complaint were interviewed via telephone within 72 hr of discharge from the ED. A standardized questionnaire was used to obtain demographic and clinical information. The primary outcome of interest was patient satisfaction with pain management in the ED measured using the following question: "How often was your pain well controlled in the ED?" (0-10 scale; 0 = never, 10 = always). Linear regression analyses were used to identify predictors of pain satisfaction. The study included 75 patients. The mean age of patients was 43 ± 18 years, and the majority of patients were female (n = 47; 63%). There were 24 patients (32%) who had chronic pain conditions, 23 (31%) with depression, and 2 patients who admitted to using heroin. In the multivariate regression analysis, patient perception of enough pain medication provision (coefficient = 2.81; 95% CI [1.35, 4.26]; p < 0.001), staff helpfulness (coefficient = 0.35; 95% CI [0.10, 0.59]; p = 0.006), report of generalized pain (coefficient = -1.62; 95% CI [-2.87, -0.36]; p = 0.013), and lowest pain score achieved in the ED (coefficient = -0.30; 95% CI [-0.53, -0.04]; p = 0.021) was significantly associated with patient satisfaction (model R = 0.57). Patient perception of enough pain medication provision, staff helpfulness, lowest pain scores achieved, and patient report of generalized pain were associated with satisfaction with pain management in the ED. PMID:27139133

  19. Repeat epinephrine treatments for food-related allergic reactions that present to the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Aleena; Rudders, Susan A; Corel, Blanka; Garth, Alisha M; Clark, Sunday; Camargo, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    To date, there are sparse data on epinephrine treatment for food-related anaphylaxis in adults. We sought to establish the frequency of more than one epinephrine treatment for adult patients who present with food-related anaphylaxis to the emergency department (ED). We performed a chart review, at two academic centers, of all adults presenting to the ED for food allergy (ICD9CM codes 693.1, 995.0, 995.1, 995.3, 995.7, 995.60-995.69, 558.3, 692.5, and 708.X) between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2006. We focused on causative foods; treatments, including the number of epinephrine treatments given before and during the ED visit; and disposition. Through random sampling and appropriate weighting, the 486 reviewed cases represented a study cohort of 1286 patients. The median age was 36 years and the cohort was 62% women. Shellfish (23%), peanuts (12%), tree nuts (14%), and fish (14%) provoked the allergic reaction most commonly. Most patients (62%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 57-68%) met criteria for food-related anaphylaxis. In the ED, anaphylaxis patients received epinephrine (18%), antihistamines (91%), corticosteroids (81%), and inhaled albuterol (19%). Overall, 17% (95% CI, 9-25%) of patients with food-related anaphylaxis given epinephrine received >1 dose over the course of their reaction. Among anaphylaxis patients admitted to the hospital, only 10% included anaphylaxis in the discharge diagnosis. At ED discharge (82% of patients), 18% were referred to an allergist and 39% were prescribed self-injectable epinephrine. Among ED patients with food-related anaphylaxis treated with epinephrine, 17% were given >1 dose. This study supports the recommendation that patients at risk for food-related anaphylaxis should carry 2 doses of epinephrine.

  20. Instructional change in academic departments: An analysis from the persepctive of two environment-focused change strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quardokus, Kathleen M.

    Numerous reports demand changes in college and university teaching practices. This is especially true for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. STEM stakeholders are concerned about student retention within STEM majors, as well as the lack of sufficient graduates with the knowledge to advance these fields. A common conclusion of these reports is that teaching practices must change. Although these calls for change have occurred for decades, STEM fields have yet to experience widespread change. Thus, there is a need for more effective change strategies. Recently, researchers have suggested that effective change strategies should focus on changing the environments of academic departments. This is in contrast to most commonly-used change strategies that focus on individual instructors. Environmentfocused change strategies have two main varieties: those that have a goal of implementing prescribed outcomes, and those that expect the outcomes to emerge from the change process. Yet, little is known about how to enact environment-focused change strategies. The goal of this research is to provide guidance for change agents and researchers by analyzing a large-scale change initiative from the perspective of two environment-focused change strategies: Kotter's eight-stage leadership process (prescribed) and complexity leadership theory (emergent). This analysis was guided by two research questions. 1. Within the context of a higher education change initiative, how is the change process described from the perspectives of two distinct leadership theories? 2. How do these descriptions frame problems and solutions associated with change? Each change strategy identified different activities as contributing to change as well as different missed opportunities. For example, when the change vision was not communicated effectively, the eight-stage leadership process indicated that the involvement of the department chair was needed, while complexity

  1. Emergency department managers warned of 'catastrophic' crowding due to elderly.

    PubMed

    2008-02-01

    While a new study indicates there may be twice as many elderly patients visiting your ED in 2013 as there were in 2003, there are steps to minimize the amount of time they spend in your department. Develop a list of outpatient links to home health agencies, visiting nurse organizations, care centers, nursing homes, and assisted living facilities. Negotiate a reimbursement arrangement that provides an incentive for administration to help move your patients upstairs more quickly. Make sure your staff are aware of the unique presentations seen in the elderly. This will help speed diagnosis and care.

  2. Infant Trauma Management in the Emergency Department: An Emergency Medicine Simulation Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Sarah; Whalen, Desmond

    2015-01-01

    In a trauma situation, it is essential that emergency room physicians are able to think clearly, make decisions quickly and manage patients in a way consistent with their injuries. In order for emergency medicine residents to adequately develop the skills to deal with trauma situations, it is imperative that they have the opportunity to experience such scenarios in a controlled environment with aptly timed feedback. In the case of infant trauma, sensitivities have to be taken that are specific to pediatric medicine. The following describes a simulation session in which trainees were tasked with managing an infantile patient who had experienced a major trauma as a result of a single vehicle accident. The described simulation session utilized human patient simulators and was tailored to junior (year 1 and 2) emergency medicine residents. PMID:26487992

  3. Jehovah's Witnesses in the emergency department: what are their rights?

    PubMed

    Woolley, S

    2005-12-01

    The Jehovah's Witnesses Society is best known to outsiders for its refusal of blood products, even when such a refusal may result in death. Since the introduction of the blood ban in 1945, Jehovah's Witness (JW) parents have fought for their rights to refuse blood on behalf of their children, based on religious beliefs and their right to raise children as they see fit. Adolescent JWs have also sought to refuse blood products based on their beliefs, regardless of the views of their parents. Adult JWs have fought to protect their autonomy when making both contemporaneous and advance treatment refusal. The refusal of blood products by JWs raises ethical and legal dilemmas that are not easily answered. Do an individual's rights (namely bodily control, right to privacy, right to decide about life/death issues, right to religious freedom) outweigh society's rights (namely the preservation of life, the prevention of suicide, the protection of innocent third parties, and the maintenance of the ethical integrity of the medical profession)? Does the right to choose outweigh the value of human life? For doctors, conflict occurs between the desire to respect patient autonomy and the need to provide good medical care. The Watchtower Society (the JW governing body) imposes a strict code of moral standards among its members, and it is unlikely that individual JWs are making truly autonomous decisions about blood transfusions. While young children and adolescents are protected by the courts and conscious adults are afforded autonomy, dilemmas still arise in the emergency situation. This article examines the rights of young children, adolescents, and adults, focusing in the latter half on adults in the emergency situation. PMID:16299196

  4. Emergency point-of-care ultrasound diagnosis of hematocolpometra and imperforate hymen in the pediatric emergency department.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jason W; Kwan, Charisse W

    2014-02-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented to the pediatric emergency department with a history of difficulty voiding and was found to have a firm, tender suprapubic mass on examination. Transabdominal emergency point-of-care ultrasound was used at the bedside to diagnose hematocolpometra due to an imperforate hymen. The diagnosis was confirmed by a comprehensive abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging in the radiology suite. The patient was discharged on oral contraceptive medication and scheduled for an outpatient surgical hymenectomy following consultation with the gynecology service.

  5. 76 FR 8758 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency-002...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... titled, ``Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency--002 Quality Assurance... Homeland Security Internal Affairs system of records [November 18, 2008, 73 FR 67529]. The Department... Security Internal Affairs system of records [November 18, 2008, 73 FR 67529]. In order to provide...

  6. Adult Status Epilepticus: A Review of the Prehospital and Emergency Department Management.

    PubMed

    Billington, Michael; Kandalaft, Osama R; Aisiku, Imoigele P

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation in the prehospital and emergency department setting and status epilepticus represents an emergency neurologic condition. The classification and various types of seizures are numerous. The objectives of this narrative literature review focuses on adult patients with a presentation of status epilepticus in the prehospital and emergency department setting. In summary, benzodiazepines remain the primary first line therapeutic agent in the management of status epilepticus, however, there are new agents that may be appropriate for the management of status epilepticus as second- and third-line pharmacological agents. PMID:27563928

  7. Brief Intervention for Emergency Department Patients with Alcohol Misuse: Implications for Current Practice

    PubMed Central

    Woolard, Robert; Cherpitel, Cheryl; Kathleen, Thompson

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews studies and current practices of brief motivational intervention in the emergency department and identifies factors related to the effectiveness of brief intervention. Studies of brief intervention in the emergency department have had mixed results with most studies showing improvements in both intervention and control groups. Most report brief intervention reducing alcohol’s negative consequences without reducing consumption. Clinical practice is incorporating brief intervention as part of emergency treatment and further research is needed to determine the factors most responsible for the improvements noted in most studies. PMID:21886943

  8. [Acute analgesia: implementation of a dedicated protocol in an emergency department].

    PubMed

    Ramlawi, Majd; Villar, Adolfo; Luthy, Christophe; Sarasin, François

    2014-06-25

    Acute pain relief is an ongoing challenge for both nurses and emergency physicians. Its management remains suboptimal or delayed, despite the existence of valid recommendations. The complexity of the emergency department and the diversity of encountered situations justify a tailored approach, taking into account the patient's clinical characteristics and needs. Such an approach must, under safety conditions assign sufficient autonomy to care providers in order to achieve pain relief. The benefits of an optimal analgesia are numerous. They include a greater patient satisfaction, a reduced length of stay, and a rapid return to mobility. This article highlights the key elements of acute pain management in the emergency department of the Geneva University Hospitals.

  9. Adult Status Epilepticus: A Review of the Prehospital and Emergency Department Management

    PubMed Central

    Billington, Michael; Kandalaft, Osama R.; Aisiku, Imoigele P.

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are a common presentation in the prehospital and emergency department setting and status epilepticus represents an emergency neurologic condition. The classification and various types of seizures are numerous. The objectives of this narrative literature review focuses on adult patients with a presentation of status epilepticus in the prehospital and emergency department setting. In summary, benzodiazepines remain the primary first line therapeutic agent in the management of status epilepticus, however, there are new agents that may be appropriate for the management of status epilepticus as second- and third-line pharmacological agents. PMID:27563928

  10. [The department of interdisciplinary emergency medicine: organization, structure and process optimization].

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Michael; Pietsch, Christian; Gries, André

    2009-06-01

    The essential tasks of a department of interdisciplinary emergency medicine are the initial triage and assessment of vital function as well as the subsequent organization und initiation of emergency treatment. A previously defined set of diagnostic and therapeutic measures is carried out before the patient is allocated to an in-hospital clinical service and is admitted to a ward. Moreover, diagnosis and treatment for outpatients are performed. "Time" is a critical factor to be considered for all organizational and structural aspects of a department of interdisciplinary emergency medicine.

  11. Local Health Department Planning for a Radiological Emergency: An Application of the AHP2 Tool to Emergency Preparedness Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    McKallagat, Chris; Klebesadal, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Objective We tested the Analytical Hierarchy Process tool for its use in public health to identify potential gaps in emergency preparedness by local health departments (LHDs) in California and Hawaii during a radiological emergency. Methods We developed a dedicated tool called All-Hazards Preparedness Squared (AHP2) that can be used by those who are responsible for all-hazards preparedness planning and response to guide them while making strategic decisions both in preparing for and responding to a slow-moving incident while it is unfolding. The tool is an Internet-based survey that can be distributed among teams responsible for emergency preparedness and response. Twenty-eight participants from 16 LHDs in California and Hawaii responsible for coordinating preparedness and response in a radiological emergency participated in using the tool in 2013. We used the data to compare the perceived importance of different elements of preparedness among participants and identify gaps in preparedness of their organizations for meeting the challenges presented by a radiological incident. Results Clarity of information and transfer of information (to and from agency to public, state, and federal partners) were public health officials' dominant concerns while responding to an emergency. Participants also found that there were gaps in the adequacy of training and awareness of the chain of command during a radiological emergency. Conclusion This preliminary study indicates that the AHP2 tool could be used for decision making in all-hazards preparedness planning and response. PMID:25355985

  12. From Access to Excess: Changing Roles and Relationships for Distance Education, Continuing Education, and Academic Departments in American Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashcroft, Judy Copeland

    2013-01-01

    In American universities, early distance education needed both continuing education and academic departments for establishing institutional cooperation, developing quality standards, adapting to change, and finding a funding model. Today, the Internet and the need for additional revenue are driving new distance education models.

  13. Middle-Level Academic Management: A Case Study on the Roles of the Heads of Department at a Vietnamese University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Thi Lan Huong

    2013-01-01

    Middle-level academic managers play a central role in university management; however, their roles are not always clear and straightforward. Although this research subject has been comprehensively investigated in the last 40 years, most studies are western-biased. This study examines the roles of Heads of Department in a newly established…

  14. Is the Process the Problem? Impact of Selection Methods on Reported Job Satisfaction among Academic Department Chairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairchild, Julie E.

    2013-01-01

    The problem of low job satisfaction (JS) among academic department chairs (ADC) may result from the selection process. ADC searches seldom comply with best practices for hiring or are predictive of a good fit. Formal searches are seldom used. Some incumbents did not want the job. Research into the history, nature, and problems of the position…

  15. Female Academic Department Chairs at a Public, Very High Research Activity University: Exploring Their Career Pathways to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Marthe, Tamara Jaslene Marcelle

    2012-01-01

    The advancement of women into academic leadership remains a problem facing public, high-research activity universities. While there are more women who are qualified to assume the position of department chair in research institutions today than there were 30 years ago, women still lag behind their male counterparts in holding these academic…

  16. Mission-Based Management in Higher Education: How Do Academic Department Chairpersons Align Decision-Making with Their Organizational Mission?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlavac, Craig

    2012-01-01

    The academic department chairperson continues to face significant challenges in the administration of the contemporary university. Due to retrenchment resultant from the 2008 Global Financial Crisis (GFC), higher education has already faced significant financial cutbacks, and more reductions seem inevitable. Particularly susceptible are…

  17. Medical Team Evaluation: Effect on Emergency Department Waiting Time and Length of Stay

    PubMed Central

    Lauks, Juliane; Mramor, Blaz; Baumgartl, Klaus; Maier, Heinrich; Nickel, Christian H.; Bingisser, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Emergency Departments (ED) are trying to alleviate crowding using various interventions. We assessed the effect of an alternative model of care, the Medical Team Evaluation (MTE) concept, encompassing team triage, quick registration, redesign of triage rooms and electronic medical records (EMR) on door-to-doctor (waiting) time and ED length of stay (LOS). We conducted an observational, before-and-after study at an urban academic tertiary care centre. On July 17th 2014, MTE was initiated from 9:00 a.m. to 10 p.m., 7 days a week. A registered triage nurse was teamed with an additional senior ED physician. Data of the 5-month pre-MTE and the 5-month MTE period were analysed. A matched comparison of waiting times and ED LOS of discharged and admitted patients pertaining to various Emergency Severity Index (ESI) triage categories was performed based on propensity scores. With MTE, the median waiting times improved from 41.2 (24.8–66.6) to 10.2 (5.7–18.1) minutes (min; P < 0.01). Though being beneficial for all strata, the improvement was somewhat greater for discharged, than for admitted patients. With a reduction from 54.3 (34.2–84.7) to 10.5 (5.9–18.4) min (P < 0.01), in terms of waiting times, MTE was most advantageous for ESI4 patients. The overall median ED LOS increased for about 15 min (P < 0.01), increasing from 3.4 (2.1–5.3) to 3.7 (2.3–5.6) hours. A significant increase was observed for all the strata, except for ESI5 patients. Their median ED LOS dropped by 73% from 1.2 (0.8–1.8) to 0.3 (0.2–0.5) hours (P < 0.01). In the same period the total orders for diagnostic radiology increased by 1,178 (11%) from 10,924 to 12,102 orders, with more imaging tests being ordered for ESI 2, 3 and 4 patients. Despite improved waiting times a decrease of ED LOS was only seen in ESI level 5 patients, whereas in all the other strata ED LOS increased. We speculate that this was brought about by the tendency of triage physicians to order more diagnostic radiology

  18. Emergency department use by people with HIV in Ontario: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ryan; Kendall, Claire E.; Burchell, Ann N.; Bayoumi, Ahmed M.; Loutfy, Mona R.; Raboud, Janet; Glazier, Richard H.; Rourke, Sean; Antoniou, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emergency department use may reflect poor access to primary care. Our objective was to compare rates and causes of emergency department use between adults living with and without HIV. Methods: We conducted a population-based study involving Ontario residents living with and without HIV between Apr. 1, 2011, and Mar. 31, 2012. We frequency matched adults with HIV to 4 HIV-negative people by age, sex and census division, and used random-effects negative binomial regression to compare rates of emergency department use. We classified visits as low urgency or high urgency, and also examined visits for ambulatory care sensitive conditions. Hospital admission following an emergency department visit was a secondary outcome. Results: We identified 14 534 people with HIV and 58 136 HIV-negative individuals. Rates of emergency department use were higher among people with HIV (67.3 v. 31.2 visits per 100 person-years; adjusted rate ratio 1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.51-1.65). Similar results were observed for low-urgency visits. With the exception of hypertension, visit rates for ambulatory care sensitive conditions were higher among people with HIV. People with HIV were also more likely than HIV-negative individuals to be admitted to hospital following an emergency department visit (adjusted odds ratio 1.55, 95% CI 1.43-1.69). Interpretation: Compared with HIV-negative individuals, people with HIV had high rates of emergency department use, including potentially avoidable visits. These findings strongly support the need for comprehensive care for people with HIV. PMID:27398370

  19. Evaluation of chest pain in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Jesse, R L; Kontos, M C

    1997-04-01

    The evaluation of chest pain in the emergency setting should be systematic, risk based, and goal driven. An effective program must be able to evaluate all patients with equal thoroughness under the assumption that any patient with chest pain could potentially be having an MI. The initial evaluation is based on the history, a focused physical examination, and the ECG. This information is sufficient to categorize patients into groups at high, moderate, and low risk. Table 14 is a template for a comprehensive chest-pain evaluation program. Patients at high risk need rapid initiation of appropriate therapy: thrombolytics or primary angioplasty for the patients with MIs or aspirin/heparin for the patients with unstable angina. Patients at moderate risk need to have an acute coronary syndrome ruled in or out expediently and additional comorbidities addressed before discharge. Patients at low risk also need to be evaluated, and once the likelihood of an unstable acute coronary syndrome is eliminated, they can be discharged with further evaluation performed as outpatients. Subsequent evaluation should attempt to assign a definitive diagnosis while also addressing issues specific to risk reduction, such as cholesterol lowering and smoking cessation. It is well documented that 4% to 5% of patients with MIs are inadvertently missed during the initial evaluation. This number is surprisingly consistent among many studies using various protocols and suggests that an initial evaluation limited to the history, physical examination, and ECG will fail to identify the small number of these patients who otherwise appear at low risk. The solution is to improve the sensitivity of the evaluation process to identify these patients. It appears that more than simple observation is required, and at the present time, no simple laboratory test can meet this need. However, success has been reported with a number of strategies including emergency imaging with either radionuclides such as

  20. Profile of geriatric pelvic fractures presenting to the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Alost, T; Waldrop, R D

    1997-10-01

    Few studies have examined differences in mechanism, presentation, and outcome of trauma in geriatric patients. This study compared pelvic fractures and associated injuries in geriatric and nongeriatric patients. The medical charts of all patients presenting to a large urban emergency medicine teaching program with a pelvic fracture between January 1, 1987 and December 31, 1993 were retrospectively reviewed by study-blinded physicians. Data collected included mechanism and site of injury, associated injuries, disposition (admission or discharge), need for operative repair, length of hospital stay, as well as subsequent deaths and causes. The data were stratified into patients less than 65 years of age (group A) and 65 years or older (group B). Two-hundred five pelvic fractures were reviewed with 85 (41%) in group B. A significantly greater number of pelvic fractures in group B occurred by fall (86% v 25%, P < .05) and significantly less by motor vehicle accident (14% v 75%, P < .05). Site of pelvic fracture differed significantly only in the decreased number of geriatric iliac fractures (6% v 16%, P < .05). The sites of pelvic fractures for geriatric patients in descending order were multiple sites (58%), pubic rami (56%), acetabulum (19%), ischium (11%), iliac (6%), and sacroiliac (2%), and did not differ from nongeriatric patients. Geriatric patients had significantly fewer total associated injuries (40% v 61%, P < .05) although associated chest injuries were significantly more common (21% v 8%, P < .05). Death occurred in three (3%) nongeriatric and nine (11%) geriatric patients. Six geriatric deaths were caused by exacerbation of underlying cardiovascular disease. Geriatric patients underwent significantly fewer operative procedures (6% v 43%, P < .05) but there were no significant differences in the percent admitted (85%) or mean length of hospital stay (9.59 days). Despite the decreased severity of pelvic fractures, care must be taken to prevent morbidity