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Sample records for academic healthcare system

  1. PERCEPTION OF ACADEMIC PHARMACISTS TOWARDS THEIR ROLE IN HEALTHCARE SYSTEM OF A DEVELOPING COUNTRY, PAKISTAN: A QUANTITATIVE SIGHT.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Azhar, Saira; Murtaza, Ghulam; Bin Asad, Muhammad Hassham Hassan; Shah, Syed Haider; Karim, Sabiha; Shi, Chenghe

    2015-01-01

    To investigate perception of academic pharmacists towards their role in healthcare system of a developing country, Pakistan, was the aim of this study. The study participants consisted of academic pharmacists from the government and private universities of Pakistan. Study was conducted for a period of three months, from January to March 2011, in Pakistan. Academic pharmacists were informed regarding the aim, objective and nature of the study. Verbal consent was given and execution of the study took place. Main sections of the questionnaire were comprised of series of statements pertaining to pharmacist perception and experience with the pharmacists. During the period, of January to April, the total number of questionnaires received from different government and private universities was 113. The response rate based on the 205 academic pharmacists working in universities during the study period was 63.9%. A majority (93.9%) of the respondents were satisfied working as academic pharmacist, 68.7% expressed that their interest in research is the reason to embark carrier as an academic pharmacist. Only half (55.7%) of the respondents agreed about pharmacy curriculum standard in Pakistan, and their satisfaction towards curriculum is less, as after the implementation of Pharm. D. (Doctor of Pharmacy). In the country, the curriculum is still focusing more towards theoretical knowledge rather than practical. In this case significant difference was noted with respect to university (p = 0.012). Academic pharmacists do have concern about the pharmacy profession in Pakistan. They ascertain the key issues facing the profession and its educators. Recommendations have been made to improve the current pharmacy curricula in order that future pharmacists in Pakistan practice effectively with the collaboration of other healthcare professionals. PMID:26642689

  2. [Healthcare value chain: a model for the Brazilian healthcare system].

    PubMed

    Pedroso, Marcelo Caldeira; Malik, Ana Maria

    2012-10-01

    This article presents a model of the healthcare value chain which consists of a schematic representation of the Brazilian healthcare system. The proposed model is adapted for the Brazilian reality and has the scope and flexibility for use in academic activities and analysis of the healthcare sector in Brazil. It places emphasis on three components: the main activities of the value chain, grouped in vertical and horizontal links; the mission of each link and the main value chain flows. The proposed model consists of six vertical and three horizontal links, amounting to nine. These are: knowledge development; supply of products and technologies; healthcare services; financial intermediation; healthcare financing; healthcare consumption; regulation; distribution of healthcare products; and complementary and support services. Four flows can be used to analyze the value chain: knowledge and innovation; products and services; financial; and information. PMID:23099762

  3. Integrated healthcare information systems.

    PubMed

    Miller, J

    1995-01-01

    When it comes to electronic data processing in healthcare, we offer a guarded, but hopeful, prognosis. To be sure, the age of electronic information processing has hit healthcare. Employers, insurance companies, hospitals, physicians and a host of ancillary service providers are all being ushered into a world of high speed, high tech electronic information. Some are even predicting that the health information business will grow from $20 billion to over $100 billion in a decade. Yet, out industry lags behind other industries in its overall movement to the paperless world. Selecting and installing the most advanced integrated information system isn't a simple task, as we've seen. As in life, compromises can produce less than optimal results. Nevertheless, integrated healthcare systems simply won't achieve their goals without systems designed to support the operation of a continuum of services. That's the reality! It is difficult to read about the wonderful advances in other sectors, while realizing that many trees still fall each year in the name of the health care industry. Yes, there are some outstanding examples of organizations pushing the envelop in a variety of areas. Yet from a very practical standpoint, many (like our physician's office) are still struggling or are on the sidelines wondering what to do. Given the competitive marketplace, organizations without effective systems may not have long to wonder and wait.

  4. Public policy and healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Nuwer, Marc R

    2013-01-01

    Public policy in healthcare affects physician and patient choices. In many ways it may limit choices. These choices present conflicts that are discussed here. Some issues depend on the laws enacted to enable either a single-payer system or that mixed with a private-payer system. In each case, the systems attain some cost controls through means such as gatekeepers, long wait lists, authorization processes, national fee schedules, complex coding schemes, or placing physicians on salary. National health systems are compared here. No one system has proven completely satisfactory, and each has its advantages. There are many factors that contribute to the escalating costs of care that lead to many healthcare public policies to constrain costs. Initiatives to incentivize preventive actions are a more positive step, but ones that are difficult to define in detail.

  5. Shaping humane healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Nancy A

    2007-01-01

    Transforming the culture of the workplace to improve patient satisfaction, nurse retention, and patient care outcomes requires a wide range of nursing leadership skills. Lessons learned from other organizations and from the successful transformation of the public mental health system of care are discussed. Innate tendencies of organizations to simplify in efforts to manage complexities of the workplace contribute to the challenge. Key to improving nurses' satisfaction is assisting them to experience themselves as effective and their work as meaningful. A model entitled BRIDGES is presented that emphasizes the importance of collaboration, effective communication, and mission focus to our success.

  6. Communication Systems in Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Coiera, Enrico

    2006-01-01

    The care of patients now almost inevitably seems to involve many different individuals, all needing to share patient information and discuss their management. As a consequence there is increasing interest in, and use of, information and communication technologies to support health services. Yet, while there is significant discussion of, and investment in, information technologies, communication systems receive much less attention and the clinical adoption of even simpler services like voice-mail or electronic mail is still not commonplace in many health services. There remain enormous gaps in our broad understanding of the role of communication services in health care delivery. Laboratory medicine is perhaps even more poorly studied than many other areas, such as the interface between primary care and hospital services. Given this lack of specific information about laboratory communication services, this paper will step back and generally review the components of a communication system, including the basic concepts of a communication channel, service, device and interaction mode. The review will then try and summarise some of what is known about specific communication problems that arise across health services in the main, including the community and hospital service delivery. PMID:17077879

  7. Healthcare system simulation using Witness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakdaman, Masoud; Zeinahvazi, Milad; Zohoori, Bahareh; Nasiri, Fardokht; Yew Wong, Kuan

    2013-02-01

    Simulation techniques have a proven track record in manufacturing industry as well as other areas such as healthcare system improvement. In this study, simulation model of a health center in Malaysia is developed through the application of WITNESS simulation software which has shown its flexibility and capability in manufacturing industry. Modelling procedure is started through process mapping and data collection and continued with model development, verification, validation and experimentation. At the end, final results and possible future improvements are demonstrated.

  8. An Academic Healthcare Twitter Account: The Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Widmer, R Jay; Engler, Nicole B; Geske, Jeffrey B; Klarich, Kyle W; Timimi, Farris K

    2016-06-01

    With more than 300 million monthly active users, Twitter is a powerful social media tool in healthcare, yet the characterization of an academic healthcare Twitter account remains poor to date. We assessed basic gender and geographic data on the account's "followers," as well as categorization of each tweet based on content type. We analyzed the impressions, engagements, retweets, favorites, replies, hashtag clicks, and detail expansions using both Sprinklr and Twitter Analytics. Over a period of 12 months, the account amassed 1,235 followers, with 54 percent being male and 68 percent residing in the United States. Of the 1,635 tweets sent out over the life of the account, we report more than 382,464 impressions, 6,023 engagements, 1,255 retweets, 776 favorites, and 1,654 embedded media clicks in this period. When broken down by tweet category, publication tweets garnered the highest engagement with an estimated mean number of clicks per tweet of 8.2 ± 81.9. Original content had higher total engagement per tweet than retweeted material (2.8 ± 9.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.9 engagements per tweet; p < 0.0001). Tweets regarding internal, national, and continuing medical education events had similar engagement. Herein is the first publication within the medical literature describing a "case series" of cardiovascular tweets over 12 months. We highlight a rapidly emerging group of interactive followers, a successful means by which to disseminate and engage in breaking topics throughout the cardiovascular field, and the importance of combining physician-led knowledge with intermittent marketing messages. PMID:27327062

  9. An Academic Healthcare Twitter Account: The Mayo Clinic Experience.

    PubMed

    Widmer, R Jay; Engler, Nicole B; Geske, Jeffrey B; Klarich, Kyle W; Timimi, Farris K

    2016-06-01

    With more than 300 million monthly active users, Twitter is a powerful social media tool in healthcare, yet the characterization of an academic healthcare Twitter account remains poor to date. We assessed basic gender and geographic data on the account's "followers," as well as categorization of each tweet based on content type. We analyzed the impressions, engagements, retweets, favorites, replies, hashtag clicks, and detail expansions using both Sprinklr and Twitter Analytics. Over a period of 12 months, the account amassed 1,235 followers, with 54 percent being male and 68 percent residing in the United States. Of the 1,635 tweets sent out over the life of the account, we report more than 382,464 impressions, 6,023 engagements, 1,255 retweets, 776 favorites, and 1,654 embedded media clicks in this period. When broken down by tweet category, publication tweets garnered the highest engagement with an estimated mean number of clicks per tweet of 8.2 ± 81.9. Original content had higher total engagement per tweet than retweeted material (2.8 ± 9.2 vs. 0.2 ± 0.9 engagements per tweet; p < 0.0001). Tweets regarding internal, national, and continuing medical education events had similar engagement. Herein is the first publication within the medical literature describing a "case series" of cardiovascular tweets over 12 months. We highlight a rapidly emerging group of interactive followers, a successful means by which to disseminate and engage in breaking topics throughout the cardiovascular field, and the importance of combining physician-led knowledge with intermittent marketing messages.

  10. Policy Capacity in the Learning Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, William

    2015-01-01

    Pierre-Gerlier Forest and his colleagues make a strong argument for the need to expand policy capacity among healthcare actors. In this commentary, I develop an additional argument in support of Forest et al view. Forest et al rightly point to the need to have embedded policy experts to successfully translate healthcare reform policy into healthcare change. Translation of externally generated innovation policy into local solutions is only one source of healthcare system change. We also need to build learning healthcare systems that can discover new health solutions at the frontline of care. Enhanced policy capacity staffing in those organizations will be key to building continuously learning health systems. PMID:26673470

  11. Architecture and implementation for a system enabling smartphones to access smart card based healthcare records.

    PubMed

    Karampelas, Vasilios; Pallikarakis, Nicholas; Mantas, John

    2013-01-01

    The healthcare researchers', academics' and practitioners' interest concerning the development of Healthcare Information Systems has been on a steady rise for the last decades. Fueling this steady rise has been the healthcare professional need of quality information, in every healthcare provision incident, whenever and wherever this incident may take place. In order to address this need a truly mobile health care system is required, one that will be able to provide a healthcare provider with accurate patient-related information regardless of the time and place that healthcare is provided. In order to fulfill this role the present study proposes the architecture for a Healthcare Smartcard system, which provides authenticated healthcare professionals with remote mobile access to a Patient's Healthcare Record, through their Smartphone. Furthermore the research proceeds to develop a working prototype system.

  12. Architecture and implementation for a system enabling smartphones to access smart card based healthcare records.

    PubMed

    Karampelas, Vasilios; Pallikarakis, Nicholas; Mantas, John

    2013-01-01

    The healthcare researchers', academics' and practitioners' interest concerning the development of Healthcare Information Systems has been on a steady rise for the last decades. Fueling this steady rise has been the healthcare professional need of quality information, in every healthcare provision incident, whenever and wherever this incident may take place. In order to address this need a truly mobile health care system is required, one that will be able to provide a healthcare provider with accurate patient-related information regardless of the time and place that healthcare is provided. In order to fulfill this role the present study proposes the architecture for a Healthcare Smartcard system, which provides authenticated healthcare professionals with remote mobile access to a Patient's Healthcare Record, through their Smartphone. Furthermore the research proceeds to develop a working prototype system. PMID:23823404

  13. Academic preparation for healthcare executive-track personnel.

    PubMed

    Smith, P M; Vorderer, L H; Dwore, R B; Murray, B P; Parsons, R J; Gustafson, G

    1998-01-01

    This study focuses on career aspirations of executive-track health care administrative personnel and their perceptions of the competencies required to become hospital chief executive officers (CEOs). This article examines these topics using the results of a 1994 survey of 162 junior- and mid-level healthcare managers who work in hospitals in a western state. Respondents included 34 CEO aspirants and 128 CEO nonaspirants. The majority of both groups reported high satisfaction with several work-related activities. Significantly more CEO nonaspirants than CEO aspirants perceived a need for additional self-development in several work areas. CEO aspirants reported that CEOs five years from now would need improved strategy formulation and negotiation skills. CEO aspirants also perceived that in the future, successful CEOs will have to be more proficient in several areas, such as interpersonal skills and medical staff relations. Three lists of academic subject matter considered important to career preparation were generated from (1) the Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) undergraduate standards, combined with curriculum graduate standards of the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA); (2) study participants' responses; and (3) professional literature. When compared for relatedness, the contents of the three lists were not significantly different statistically. The implications of these findings for health administration education are discussed. PMID:10345893

  14. Systems Architecture for a Nationwide Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Abin, Jorge; Nemeth, Horacio; Friedmann, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    From a national level to give Internet technology support, the Nationwide Integrated Healthcare System in Uruguay requires a model of Information Systems Architecture. This system has multiple healthcare providers (public and private), and a strong component of supplementary services. Thus, the data processing system should have an architecture that considers this fact, while integrating the central services provided by the Ministry of Public Health. The national electronic health record, as well as other related data processing systems, should be based on this architecture. The architecture model described here conceptualizes a federated framework of electronic health record systems, according to the IHE affinity model, HL7 standards, local standards on interoperability and security, as well as technical advice provided by AGESIC. It is the outcome of the research done by AGESIC and Systems Integration Laboratory (LINS) on the development and use of the e-Government Platform since 2008, as well as the research done by the team Salud.uy since 2013.

  15. Unemployment and health: the healthcare system's role.

    PubMed

    Harris, E; Webster, I W; Harris, M F; Lee, P J

    1998-03-16

    Experts from the South Western Sydney Area Health Service and the University of New South Wales say there are few reports of healthcare interventions to address the impact of unemployment on health. They outline possible strategies, which include providing accessible and appropriate healthcare; developing the healthcare system's capacity to deal with the health problems of unemployed people; collaborating with other agencies and sectors working on this issue; acting as an advocate for unemployed people; undertaking research; and providing training, work experience and employment opportunities within the healthcare system. Long term solutions lie in increasing employment and training opportunities. Nevertheless, there is a clear role for the healthcare system in reducing the health impacts of unemployment and ensuring that poor health does not act as a barrier to returning to work. PMID:9549538

  16. Decision-making in healthcare as a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Kuziemsky, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare transformation requires a change in how the business of healthcare is done. Traditional decision-making approaches based on stable and predictable systems are inappropriate in healthcare because of the complex nature of healthcare delivery. This article reviews challenges to using traditional decision-making approaches in healthcare and how insight from Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) could support healthcare management. The article also provides a system model to guide decision-making in healthcare as a CAS.

  17. UNIX and healthcare systems: a good marriage.

    PubMed

    Wieners, W

    1992-08-01

    Powerful and versatile, UNIX makes open systems affordable in today's complex healthcare marketplace. As more emphasis is placed on combining the best systems for the least money, UNIX plays an important role. How many hospitals are using it already?

  18. Healthcare Delivery Systems at Higher Educational Institutions in India

    PubMed Central

    Yeravdekar, Rajiv Chintaman; Yeravdekar, Vidya Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    Background: The interrelation between health and academic performance is well established. Academic institutions have a larger mandate, beyond academic instruction alone. The objective is to contribute holistically to student development through various paradigms, ultimately culminating in student success. To meet the global challenges of a changing educational system, educational institutions today are therefore vying to be Centers of Excellence, aiming to develop the overall personality of the student. Fundamental to this ideology and with student success as the common denominator, student Wellness assumes critical significance. Higher education institutions, especially universities offer varying levels of healthcare services. Health Promoting University (HPU) projects have therefore been implemented in the West. Unlike in the West, the concept of a Health Promoting University is nascent in India. Methods: A total of 1071 responses to a structured questionnaire administered to the students were studied. Results: In general, there appears to be a lack of awareness regarding the importance of addressing student healthcare issues. Consequently, the spectrum of healthcare services provided is varied and scattered. This encompasses infrastructure, manpower, resource allocation etc. Conclusions: The collective responses obtained could provide the basis for a policy formulation. The policy formulation in turn could be the basis of a national consensus for health care delivery systems operational at higher educational institutions in India. PMID:25317306

  19. Academic Radiology in the New Healthcare Delivery Environment

    PubMed Central

    Qayyum, Aliya; Yu, John-Paul J.; Kansagra, Akash P.; von Fischer, Nathaniel; Costa, Daniel; Heller, Matthew; Kantartzis, Stamatis; Plowman, R. Scooter; Itri, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing concerns over the rising cost of health care are driving large-scale changes in the way that health care is practiced and reimbursed in the United States. To effectively implement and thrive within this new health care delivery environment, academic medical institutions will need to modify financial and business models and adapt institutional cultures. In this paper, we review the expected features of the new health care environment from the perspective of academic radiology departments. Our review will include background on Accountable Care Organizations, identify challenges associated with the new managed care model, and outline key strategies—including expanding the use of existing information technology infrastructure, promoting continued medical innovation, balancing academic research with clinical care, and exploring new roles for radiologists in efficient patient management—that will ensure continued success for academic radiology. PMID:24200477

  20. Engineering healthcare as a service system.

    PubMed

    Tien, James M; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Pascal J

    2010-01-01

    Engineering has and will continue to have a critical impact on healthcare; the application of technology-based techniques to biological problems can be defined to be technobiology applications. This paper is primarily focused on applying the technobiology approach of systems engineering to the development of a healthcare service system that is both integrated and adaptive. In general, healthcare services are carried out with knowledge-intensive agents or components which work together as providers and consumers to create or co-produce value. Indeed, the engineering design of a healthcare system must recognize the fact that it is actually a complex integration of human-centered activities that is increasingly dependent on information technology and knowledge. Like any service system, healthcare can be considered to be a combination or recombination of three essential components - people (characterized by behaviors, values, knowledge, etc.), processes (characterized by collaboration, customization, etc.) and products (characterized by software, hardware, infrastructures, etc.). Thus, a healthcare system is an integrated and adaptive set of people, processes and products. It is, in essence, a system of systems which objectives are to enhance its efficiency (leading to greater interdependency) and effectiveness (leading to improved health). Integration occurs over the physical, temporal, organizational and functional dimensions, while adaptation occurs over the monitoring, feedback, cybernetic and learning dimensions. In sum, such service systems as healthcare are indeed complex, especially due to the uncertainties associated with the human-centered aspects of these systems. Moreover, the system complexities can only be dealt with methods that enhance system integration and adaptation. PMID:20543250

  1. Unix becoming healthcare's standard operating system.

    PubMed

    Gardner, E

    1991-02-11

    An unfamiliar buzzword is making its way into healthcare executives' vocabulary, as well as their computer systems. Unix is being touted by many industry observers as the most likely candidate to be a standard operating system for minicomputers, mainframes and computer networks.

  2. Accelerating change: Fostering innovation in healthcare delivery at academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Andrey; Barnett, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) have the potential to be leaders in the era of healthcare delivery reform, but most have yet to display a commitment to delivery innovation on par with their commitment to basic research. Several institutional factors impede delivery innovation including the paucity of adequate training in design and implementation of new delivery models and the lack of established pathways for academic career advancement outside of research. This paper proposes two initiatives to jumpstart disruptive innovation at AMCs: an institutional "innovation incubator" program and a clinician-innovator career track coupled with innovation training programs.

  3. Personal healthcare system using cloud computing.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Mayuzumi, Yuuki; Kodama, Naoki; Sato, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    A personal healthcare system used with cloud computing has been developed. It enables a daily time-series of personal health and lifestyle data to be stored in the cloud through mobile devices. The cloud automatically extracts personally useful information, such as rules and patterns concerning lifestyle and health conditions embedded in the personal big data, by using a data mining technology. The system provides three editions (Diet, Lite, and Pro) corresponding to users' needs.

  4. Overview of healthcare system in the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The healthcare system in the Czech Republic underwent and still is undergoing dramatic changes since the Velvet revolution in 1989. History of the Czech healthcare system, main healthcare laws, and the current status of healthcare documented in the main healthcare indicators is described based on the several main sources as well as delivery of health services and the role of the main actors in healthcare system. The material is based mainly on Czech Health Statistics 2009, and HiT Summary, Health Care Systems in Translation, 2005, public information of Ministry of Health CR. PMID:22738178

  5. Economics and resourcing of complex healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Baghbanian, Abdolvahab; Torkfar, Ghazal

    2012-11-01

    With rapid increases in healthcare spending over recent years, health economic evaluation might be thought to be increasing in importance to decision-makers. Such evaluations are designed to inform the efficient management of healthcare resources. However, research into health policy decisions often report, at best, moderate use of economic evaluation information, especially at the local level of administration. Little attention seems to have been given to the question of why economic evaluations have been underused and why they may yield different results in different contexts. There are many barriers to applying economic evaluations in situations which combine complexity with uncertainty. These barriers call for innovative and creative responses to economic evaluation of healthcare interventions. One response is to view economic evaluations in the context of complex adaptive systems theory. Such theory offers a conceptual framework that takes into account contextual factors, multiple input and output, multiple perspectives and uncertainty involved in healthcare interventions. This article illustrates how complexity theory can enrich and broaden policy-makers' understanding of why economic evaluations have not always been as successful as health economists would have hoped. It argues for health economists to emphasise contextual knowledge and relativist understanding of decision contexts rather than seeking more technically sound evidence-based reviews including economic evaluations.

  6. Flexible solution for interoperable cloud healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Vida, Mihaela Marcella; Lupşe, Oana Sorina; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Bernad, Elena

    2012-01-01

    It is extremely important for the healthcare domain to have a standardized communication because will improve the quality of information and in the end the resulting benefits will improve the quality of patients' life. The standards proposed to be used are: HL7 CDA and CCD. For a better access to the medical data a solution based on cloud computing (CC) is investigated. CC is a technology that supports flexibility, seamless care, and reduced costs of the medical act. To ensure interoperability between healthcare information systems a solution creating a Web Custom Control is presented. The control shows the database tables and fields used to configure the two standards. This control will facilitate the work of the medical staff and hospital administrators, because they can configure the local system easily and prepare it for communication with other systems. The resulted information will have a higher quality and will provide knowledge that will support better patient management and diagnosis. PMID:22874196

  7. Human factors systems approach to healthcare quality and patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Wetterneck, Tosha B.; Rivera-Rodriguez, A. Joy; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Hoonakker, Peter; Holden, Richard; Gurses, Ayse P.

    2013-01-01

    Human factors systems approaches are critical for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. The SEIPS (Systems Engineering Initiative for Patient Safety) model of work system and patient safety is a human factors systems approach that has been successfully applied in healthcare research and practice. Several research and practical applications of the SEIPS model are described. Important implications of the SEIPS model for healthcare system and process redesign are highlighted. Principles for redesigning healthcare systems using the SEIPS model are described. Balancing the work system and encouraging the active and adaptive role of workers are key principles for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. PMID:23845724

  8. Connecting consumer choice to the healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Enthoven, Alain

    2006-01-01

    American healthcare needs to be reformed into competing, efficient, comprehensive care systems. To get there from here, we need a health insurance market in which each person or household has a wide, responsible, informed, individual multiple choice of health care financing and delivery plans. The point of this is competing delivery systems, not just competing carriers. To compete, some carriers will create or contract with selective delivery systems or doctors selected for their quality and cost-effectiveness. Others will already be teamed up with large multispecialty group practices. On the other hand, high deductible plans will not help us get to a reformed delivery system. PMID:17260543

  9. Clinical information systems for integrated healthcare networks.

    PubMed Central

    Teich, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    In the 1990's, a large number of hospitals and medical practices have merged to form integrated healthcare networks (IHN's). The nature of an IHN creates new demands for information management, and also imposes new constraints on information systems for the network. Important tradeoffs must be made between homogeneity and flexibility, central and distributed governance, and access and confidentiality. This paper describes key components of clinical information systems for IHN's, and examines important design decisions that affect the value of such systems. Images Figure 1 PMID:9929178

  10. Ethics Leadership in Research, Healthcare and Organizational Systems: Commentary and Critical Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabriele, Edward F.

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades there has arisen a greater awareness of the ever present need for critical academic reflection on the nature of ethics leadership and committees in research, healthcare, and organizational systems. Yet what is meant by ethics itself? How is ethics understood as a historical phenomenon? What challenges must ethics leaders face…

  11. [The subject in academic literature on healthcare management: notes on the issue of autonomy].

    PubMed

    Abrahão, Ana Lucia; Martins, Carla Macedo; Geisler, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    The paper analyses concepts of the 'subject' in academic literature on Healthcare Management. The corpus of the survey consists of papers published in journals in the Collective Health field over the past five years. The papers examined for this analysis consider that (healthcare) work in the context of capitalism is based on an antinomy that we call "autonomy-control", striving to explore the possibilities of surmounting this antinomy in each concept. The analysis lists three different concepts of the subject: psychological-cognitivist, psychoanalytical-subjectivist and historical-communicative. This paper also discusses the relationship between these concepts of subject and their possibilities of producing autonomy on one hand, and the capitalist organization of culture and labor on the other. PMID:18813538

  12. The healthcare system and provision of oral healthcare in European Union member states. Part 4: Greece.

    PubMed

    Damaskinos, P; Koletsi-Kounari, H; Economou, C; Eaton, K A; Widström, E

    2016-03-11

    This paper presents a description of the healthcare system and how oral healthcare is organised and provided in Greece, a country in a deep economic and social crisis. The national health system is underfunded, with severe gaps in staffing levels and the country has a large private healthcare sector. Oral healthcare has been largely provided in the private sector. Most people are struggling to survive and have no money to spend on general and oral healthcare. Unemployment is rising and access to healthcare services is more difficult than ever. Additionally, there has been an overproduction of dentists and no development of team dentistry. This has led to under or unemployment of dentists in Greece and their migration to other European Union member states, such as the United Kingdom, where over 600 Greek dentists are currently working. PMID:26964601

  13. Service models for remote healthcare monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Bridget A

    2010-01-01

    These scenarios reflect where the future is heading for remote health monitoring technology and service expectations. Being able to manage a "system of systems" with timely service hand-off over seams of responsibility and system interfaces will become very important for a BMET or clinical engineer. These interfaces will include patient homes, clinician homes, commercial/civilian infrastructure, public utilities, vendor infrastructure as well as internal departmental domains. Concurrently, technology is changing rapidly resulting in newer software delivery modes and hardware appliances as well as infrastructure changes. Those who are able to de-construct the complex systems and identify infrastructure assumptions and seams of servicing responsibility will be able to better understand and communicate the expectations for service of these systems. Moreover, as identified in Case 1, prodigious use of underlying system monitoring tools (managing the "meta-data") could move servicing of these remote systems from a reactive approach to a proactive approach. A prepared healthcare organization will identify their current and proposed future service combination use cases and design service philosophies and expectations for those use cases, while understanding the infrastructure assumptions and seams of responsibility. This is the future of technical service to the healthcare clinicians and patients. PMID:22049611

  14. Academic Research Integration System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surugiu, Iula; Velicano, Manole

    2008-01-01

    This paper comprises results concluding the research activity done so far regarding enhanced web services and system integration. The objective of the paper is to define the software architecture for a coherent framework and methodology for enhancing existing web services into an integrated system. This document presents the research work that has…

  15. Prevalence and compensation of academic leaders, professors, and trustees on publicly traded US healthcare company boards of directors: cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Timothy S; Good, Chester B

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the prevalence, characteristics, and compensation of members of the boards of directors of healthcare industry companies who hold academic appointments as leaders, professors, or trustees. Design Cross sectional study. Setting US healthcare companies publicly traded on the NASDAQ or New York Stock Exchange in 2013. Participants 3434 directors of pharmaceutical, biotechnology, medical equipment and supply, and healthcare provider companies. Main outcome measures Prevalence, annual compensation, and beneficial stock ownership of directors with affiliations as leaders, professors, or trustees of academic medical and research institutions. Results 446 healthcare companies met the study search criteria, of which 442 (99%) had publicly accessible disclosures on boards of directors. 180 companies (41%) had one or more academically affiliated directors. Directors were affiliated with 85 geographically diverse non-profit academic institutions, including 19 of the top 20 National Institute of Health funded medical schools and all of the 17 US News honor roll hospitals. Overall, these 279 academically affiliated directors included 73 leaders, 121 professors, and 85 trustees. Leaders included 17 chief executive officers and 11 vice presidents or executive officers of health systems and hospitals; 15 university presidents, provosts, and chancellors; and eight medical school deans or presidents. The total annual compensation to academically affiliated directors for their services to companies was $54 995 786 (£35 836 000; €49 185 900) (median individual compensation $193 000) and directors beneficially owned 59 831 477 shares of company stock (median 50 699 shares). Conclusions A substantial number and diversity of academic leaders, professors, and trustees hold directorships at US healthcare companies, with compensation often approaching or surpassing common academic clinical salaries. Dual obligations to for profit company

  16. Healthcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Smith, Nicole; Gulish, Artem; Beach, Bennett H.

    2012-01-01

    This report, provides detailed analyses and projections of occupations in healthcare fields, and wages earned. In addition, the important skills and work values associated with workers in those fields of healthcare are discussed. Finally, the authors analyze the implications of research findings for the racial, ethnic, and class diversity of the…

  17. Patient-centredness in integrated healthcare delivery systems - needs, expectations and priorities for organised healthcare systems

    PubMed Central

    Juhnke, Christin; Mühlbacher, Axel C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patient-centred healthcare is becoming a more significant success factor in the design of integrated healthcare systems. The objective of this study is to structure a patient-relevant hierarchy of needs and expectations for the design of organised healthcare delivery systems. Methods A questionnaire with 84 items was conducted with N = 254 healthcare experts and N = 670 patients. Factor analyses were performed using SPSS©18. The number of factors retained was controlled by Kaiser's criterion, validation of screeplots and interpretability of the items. Cronbach's α was used to assess the internal consistency of the subscales. Results Exploratory factor analysis led to 24 factors in the expert sample and 20 in the patient sample. After analysing the screeplots, confirmatory factor analyses were computed for 7-factor solutions accounting for 42.963% of the total variance and Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin of 0.914 for the patients (experts: 38.427%, Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin = 0.797). Cronbach's α ranged between 0.899 and 0.756. Based on the analysis, coordinated care could be differentiated into seven dimensions: access, data and information, service and infrastructure, professional care, interpersonal care, individualised care, continuity and coordination. Conclusion and Discussion The study provides insight into patient and experts expectations towards the organisation of integrated healthcare delivery systems. If providers and payers can take into account patient needs and expectations while implementing innovative healthcare delivery systems, greater acceptance and satisfaction will be achieved. In the best case, this will lead to better adherence resulting in better clinical outcomes. PMID:24363639

  18. Picture archiving and communications systems for integrated healthcare information solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldburgh, Mitchell M.; Glicksman, Robert A.; Wilson, Dennis L.

    1997-05-01

    The rapid and dramatic shifts within the US healthcare industry have created unprecedented needs to implement changes in the delivery systems. These changes must not only address the access to healthcare, but the costs of delivery, and outcomes reporting. The resulting vision to address these needs has been called the Integrated Healthcare Solution whose core is the Electronic Patient Record. The integration of information by itself is not the issue, nor will it address the challenges in front of the healthcare providers. The process and business of healthcare delivery must adopt, apply and expand its use of technology which can assist in re-engineering the tools for healthcare. Imaging is becoming a larger part of the practice of healthcare both as a recorder of health status and as a defensive record for gatekeepers of healthcare. It is thus imperative that imaging specialists adopt technology which competitively integrates them into the process, reduces the risk, and positively effects the outcome.

  19. Multimodal flexible sensor for healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Ho, Van Anh; Imai, Sho; Hirai, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes potential applications of our previously developed fabric sensor into wearable healthcare or nursing systems based on its sensing modalities. This sensor is knitted from tension-sensitive electro-conductive yarns; whose structure has an elastic core, wound around by two separated tension-sensitive electro-conductive threads. This makes the sensor inherently flexible and stretchable, allowing it to conform to any complicated surface. We have equipped the sensor with three modalities, including proximity that allows the sensor to estimate a distance from the sensor to human hand and activates a light touch sensing, which could initiate comfortable and friendly interfaces in order to reduce burden of patients/disable people during interactions with healthcare devices; tactile perception that can measures contact force or applied load, especially realize slippage acting on the sensor surface, which is promising to be embedded into wearable devices or smart carpets; and tensile that can quantify a volume's contraction/expansion, which can be employed to monitoring muscles activity and so on. PMID:25571358

  20. Personalized biomedical devices & systems for healthcare applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, I.-Ming; Phee, Soo Jay; Luo, Zhiqiang; Lim, Chee Kian

    2011-03-01

    With the advancement in micro- and nanotechnology, electromechanical components and systems are getting smaller and smaller and gradually can be applied to the human as portable, mobile and even wearable devices. Healthcare industry have started to benefit from this technology trend by providing more and more miniature biomedical devices for personalized medical treatments in order to obtain better and more accurate outcome. This article introduces some recent development in non-intrusive and intrusive biomedical devices resulted from the advancement of niche miniature sensors and actuators, namely, wearable biomedical sensors, wearable haptic devices, and ingestible medical capsules. The development of these devices requires carful integration of knowledge and people from many different disciplines like medicine, electronics, mechanics, and design. Furthermore, designing affordable devices and systems to benefit all mankind is a great challenge ahead. The multi-disciplinary nature of the R&D effort in this area provides a new perspective for the future mechanical engineers.

  1. The Italian health-care system.

    PubMed

    France, George; Taroni, Francesco; Donatini, Andrea

    2005-09-01

    Italy's national health service is statutorily required to guarantee the uniform provision of comprehensive care throughout the country. However, this is complicated by the fact that, constitutionally, responsibility for health care is shared between the central government and the 20 regions. There are large and growing differences in regional health service organisation and provision. Public health-care expenditure has absorbed a relatively low share of gross domestic product, although in the last 25 years it has consistently exceeded central government forecasts. Changes in payment systems, particularly for hospital care, have helped to encourage organisational appropriateness and may have contributed to containing expenditure. Tax sources used to finance the Servizio Sanitario Nazionale (SSN) have become somewhat more regressive. The limited evidence on vertical equity suggests that the SSN ensures equal access to primary care but lower income groups face barriers to specialist care. The health status of Italians has improved and compares favourably with that in other countries, although regional disparities persist.

  2. Validity of Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Indicators at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Leavell, Patricia; Stockslager, Gregory; Mays, Catherine; Harvey, Dale; Duane, Therese M

    2013-06-01

    The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality developed Patient Safety Indicators (PSI) to screen for in-hospital complications and patient safety events through International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification coding. The purpose of this study was to validate 10 common surgically related PSIs at our academic medical center and investigate the causes for inaccuracies. We reviewed patient records between October 2011 and September 2012 at our urban academic medical center for 10 common surgically related PSIs. The records were reviewed for incorrectly identified PSIs and a subset was further reviewed for the contributing factors. There were 93,169 charts analyzed for PSIs and 358 PSIs were identified (3.84 per 1000 cases). The overall positive predictive value (PPV) was 83 per cent (95% confidence interval 79 to -86%). The lowest PPVs were associated with catheter-related bloodstream infections (67%), postoperative respiratory failure (71%), and pressure ulcers (79%). The most common contributing factors for incorrect PSIs were coding errors (30%), documentation errors (19%), and insufficient criteria for PSI in the chart (16%). We conclude that the validity of PSIs is low and could be improved by increased education for clinicians and coders. In their current form, PSIs remain suboptimal for widespread use in public reporting and pay-for-performance evaluation. PMID:23711266

  3. Healthcare standards based sensory data exchange for Home Healthcare Monitoring System.

    PubMed

    Khan, Wajahat Ali; Hussain, Maqbool; Afzal, Muhammad; Amin, Muhammad Bilal; Lee, Sungyoung

    2012-01-01

    Interoperability is the among the key functionalities of an intelligent systems. Home Healthcare Monitoring Systems (HHMS) investigates patients activities at home, but lacks critical information exchange with Health Management Information System (HMIS). This information is vital for physicians to take necessary steps for timely and effective healthcare provisioning for patients. Physicians can only monitor and prescribe patients in time, if the data is shared with their HMIS. HMIS can be compliant to different healthcare standards. Therefore, mediation system is required to enable interoperability between HHMS and HMIS such that physicians and patients information can easily be exchanged. We propose Interoperability Mediation System (IMS) that provides interoperability services for exchange of information among HHMS and HMIS. We consider that HMIS are compliant to two heterogeneous EHR standards (HL7 CDA and openEHR). Alzheimer's patient case study is described as a proof of concept. Sensory information gathered at HHMS, is communicated with HMIS compliant to EHR based healthcare standards. Sensors information in XML form is converted by interoperability service to HL7 CDA and openEHR instances and communicated to HMIS afterwards. This allows the physicians registered with HHMS to monitor the patient using their HMIS and provide timely healthcare information.

  4. Using ESB and BPEL for evolving healthcare systems towards SOA.

    PubMed

    Papakonstantinou, D; Malamateniou, F; Vassilacopoulos, G

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare organizations often face the challenge of integrating diverse and geographically disparate information technology systems to respond to changing requirements and to exploit the capabilities of modern technologies. Hence, systems evolution, through modification and extension of the existing information technology infrastructure, becomes a necessity. This paper takes a process perspective of healthcare delivery within and across organizational boundaries and the presents a disciplined approach for evolving healthcare systems towards a service-oriented architecture using the enterprise system bus middleware technology for resolving integration issues and the business process execution language for supporting collaboration requirements. PMID:18487821

  5. Development of a medical academic degree system in China

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lijuan; Wang, Youxin; Peng, Xiaoxia; Song, Manshu; Guo, Xiuhua; Nelson, Hugh; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Context The Chinese government launched a comprehensive healthcare reform to tackle challenges to health equities. Medical education will become the key for successful healthcare reform. Purpose We describe the current status of the Chinese medical degree system and its evolution over the last 80 years. Content Progress has been uneven, historically punctuated most dramatically by the Cultural Revolution. There is a great regional disparity. Doctors with limited tertiary education may be licensed to practice, whereas medical graduates with advanced doctorates may have limited clinical skills. There are undefined relationships between competing tertiary training streams, the academic professional degree, and the clinical residency training programme (RTP). The perceived quality of training in both streams varies widely across China. As the degrees of master or doctor of academic medicine is seen as instrumental in career advancement, including employability in urban hospitals, attainment of this degree is sought after, yet is often unrelated to a role in health care, or is seen as superior to clinical experience. Meanwhile, the practical experience gained in some prestigious academic institutions is deprecated by the RTP and must be repeated before accreditation for clinical practice. This complexity is confusing both for students seeking the most appropriate training, and also for clinics, hospitals and universities seeking to recruit the most appropriate applicants. Conclusion The future education reforms might include: 1) a domestic system of ‘credits’ that gives weight to quality clinical experience vs. academic publications in career advancement, enhanced harmonisation between the competing streams of the professional degree and the RTP, and promotion of mobility of staff between areas of excellence and areas of need; 2) International – a mutual professional and academic recognition between China and other countries by reference to the Bologna Accord

  6. Public trust in the healthcare system in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Peters, Dexnell; Youssef, Farid F

    2016-04-01

    Broadly defined, trust in the healthcare system is concerned with how the public perceives the system and the actors therein as it pertains to their ability to both deliver services and seek the best interests of their clientele. Trust is important because it impacts upon a range of health behaviors including compliance and ultimately affects the ability of the healthcare system to meet its goals. While several studies exist on public trust within the developed world, few studies have explored this issue in developing countries. This paper therefore assesses public trust in the healthcare system of a developing small island nation, Trinidad and Tobago. A cross-sectional survey of adults was conducted using a questionnaire that has been successfully used across Europe. We report that trust levels in the healthcare system in Trinidad and Tobago are relatively low with less than 50% of persons indicating fair trust in the healthcare system. In addition, individual health professionals also did not score highly with lowest scores found for nurses and complementary therapists. Results on four out of five dimensions of trust also demonstrated scores significantly lower than those reported in more developed nations. Open-ended comments supported these findings with the majority of persons indicating a lack of confidence in the healthcare system. These results may reflect the reality in the wider developing world, and we suggest that bolstering trust is a needed area of focus in the delivery of healthcare services throughout the nation. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The influence of power in the Canadian healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Seenandan-Sookdeo, Kendra-Ann I

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a review of the literature as it relates to the influence of the word power in the context of the Canadian healthcare system. The concept of power is used to explore issues of gender and the evolution of advanced nurse practice in the development of the Canadian healthcare system. Furthermore, issues related to the call for interprofessional collaboration are addressed. Healthcare workers, in particular nurses, are trusted in a society that seeks, promotes, and aspires for power and control. In addition, societal norms continue to shape our healthcare reform. As a consequence, the discussion centers on a call for true collaboration among our healthcare providers and concludes with implications for nursing.

  8. Utilizing Health Information Technology to Support Universal Healthcare Delivery: Experience of a National Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Min-Huei; Iqbal, Usman; Scholl, Jeremiah; Huang, Chih-Wei; Nguyen, Phung Anh; Lee, Peisan; García-Romero, Maria Teresa; Li, Yu-Chuan Jack; Jian, Wen-Shan

    2015-09-01

    Recent discussions have focused on using health information technology (HIT) to support goals related to universal healthcare delivery. These discussions have generally not reflected on the experience of countries with a large amount of experience using HIT to support universal healthcare on a national level. HIT was compared globally by using data from the Ministry of the Interior, Republic of China (Taiwan). Taiwan has been providing universal healthcare since 1995 and began to strategically implement HIT on a national level at that time. Today the national-level HIT system is more extensive in Taiwan than in many other countries and is used to aid administration, clinical care, and public health. The experience of Taiwan thus can provide an illustration of how HIT can be used to support universal healthcare delivery. In this article we present an overview of some key historical developments and successes in the adoption of HIT in Taiwan over a 17-year period, as well as some more recent developments. We use this experience to offer some strategic perspectives on how it can aid in the adoption of large-scale HIT systems and on how HIT can be used to support universal healthcare delivery.

  9. Healthcare system evolution towards SOA: a security perspective.

    PubMed

    Koufi, Vassiliki; Malamateniou, Flora; Vassilacopoulos, George; Papakonstantinou, Despina

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare providers often face the challenge of integrating diverse and geographically disparate IT systems to respond to changing requirements and to exploit the capabilities of modern technologies. Hence, systems evolution, through modification and extension of the existing IT infrastructure, becomes a necessity. This paper assumes a healthcare systems evolution towards a service-oriented architecture (SOA) and places emphasis on the development of an appropriate authorization model and mechanism that ensures authorized access to integrated patient information through web service invocations.

  10. An overview of the healthcare system in the Slovak Republic.

    PubMed

    Kapalla, Marko; Kapallová, Dagmar; Turecký, Ladislav

    2010-12-01

    Healthcare system in Slovakia is neither Bismarck nor Beveridge nor National Health Insurance model, although it has certain features of all. The healthcare contributions are mandatory and are paid to the health insurance company. An insured citizen is almost unlimited as for the amount of healthcare spending but the reimbursement limits are set for the particular healthcare providers. Over 98% of the population is covered by health insurance. Public healthcare expenditure has been approximately 3400 millions € in 2009, which represents around 5.36% of gross domestic product. Around 78% of the 5.4 million population may be regarded to as relatively healthy. The 22% suffer of the most common diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, respiratory diseases, psychiatric diseases, infectious diseases and cancer. New government has now a unique opportunity to implement the concept of predictive, preventive and personalized medicine for the benefit of each citizen and the entire country.

  11. National quality improvement policies and strategies in European healthcare systems

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, E; Walshe, K

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This survey provides an overview of the development of policies and strategies for quality improvement in European healthcare systems, by mapping quality improvement policies and strategies, progress in their implementation, and early indications of their impact. Study design: A survey of quality improvement policies and strategies in healthcare systems of the European Union was conducted in 2005 for the first phase of the Methods of Assessing Response to Quality Improvement Strategies (MARQuIS) project. Participants: The survey, completed by 68 key experts in quality improvement from 24 European Union member states, represents their views and accounts of quality improvement policies and strategies in their healthcare systems. Principal findings: There are substantial international and intra-national variations in the development of healthcare quality improvement. Legal requirements for quality improvement strategies are an important driver of progress, along with the activities of national governments and professional associations and societies. Patient and service user organisations appear to have less influence on quality improvement. Wide variation in voluntary and mandatory coverage of quality improvement policies and strategies across sectors can potentially lead to varying levels of progress in implementation. Many healthcare organisations lack basic infrastructure for quality improvement. Conclusions: Some convergence can be observed in policies on quality improvement in healthcare. Nevertheless, the growth of patient mobility across borders, along with the implications of free market provisions for the organisation and funding of healthcare systems in European Union member states, require policies for cooperation and learning transfer. PMID:19188457

  12. ARTEMIS: towards a secure interoperability infrastructure for healthcare information systems.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Mike; Wilken, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The ARTEMIS project is developing a semantic web service based P2P interoperability infrastructure for healthcare information systems. The strict legislative framework in which these systems are deployed means that the interoperability of security and privacy mechanisms is an important requirement in supporting communication of electronic healthcare records across organisation boundaries. In ARTEMIS, healthcare providers define semantically annotated security and privacy policies for web services based on organisational requirements. The ARTEMIS mediator uses these semantic web service descriptions to broker between organisational policies by reasoning over security and clinical concept ontologies.

  13. Building China's municipal healthcare performance evaluation system: a Tuscan perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Barsanti, Sara; Bonini, Anna

    2012-08-01

    Regional healthcare performance evaluation systems can help optimize healthcare resources on regional basis and improve the performance of healthcare services provided. The Tuscany region in Italy is a good example of an institution which meets these requirements. China has yet to build such a system based on international experience. In this paper, based on comparative studies between Tuscany and China, we propose that the managing institutions in China's experimental cities can select and commission a third-party agency to, respectively, evaluate the performance of their affiliated hospitals and community health service centers. Following some features of the Tuscan experience, the Chinese municipal healthcare performance evaluation system can be built by focusing on the selection of an appropriate performance evaluation agency, the design of an adequate performance evaluation mechanism and the formulation of a complete set of laws, rules and regulations. When a performance evaluation system at city level is formed, the provincial government can extend the successful experience to other cities.

  14. Integrating hospital information systems in healthcare institutions: a mediation architecture.

    PubMed

    El Azami, Ikram; Cherkaoui Malki, Mohammed Ouçamah; Tahon, Christian

    2012-10-01

    Many studies have examined the integration of information systems into healthcare institutions, leading to several standards in the healthcare domain (CORBAmed: Common Object Request Broker Architecture in Medicine; HL7: Health Level Seven International; DICOM: Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine; and IHE: Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise). Due to the existence of a wide diversity of heterogeneous systems, three essential factors are necessary to fully integrate a system: data, functions and workflow. However, most of the previous studies have dealt with only one or two of these factors and this makes the system integration unsatisfactory. In this paper, we propose a flexible, scalable architecture for Hospital Information Systems (HIS). Our main purpose is to provide a practical solution to insure HIS interoperability so that healthcare institutions can communicate without being obliged to change their local information systems and without altering the tasks of the healthcare professionals. Our architecture is a mediation architecture with 3 levels: 1) a database level, 2) a middleware level and 3) a user interface level. The mediation is based on two central components: the Mediator and the Adapter. Using the XML format allows us to establish a structured, secured exchange of healthcare data. The notion of medical ontology is introduced to solve semantic conflicts and to unify the language used for the exchange. Our mediation architecture provides an effective, promising model that promotes the integration of hospital information systems that are autonomous, heterogeneous, semantically interoperable and platform-independent.

  15. Classification of healthcare systems: Can we go further?

    PubMed

    Toth, Federico

    2016-05-01

    This article addresses the issue of the classification of healthcare systems, with the intent to take a step further than the previously analysed models of healthcare organisation. As concerns the financing of healthcare services, the standard tripartite classification (according to which healthcare systems are divided into three groups: voluntary insurance, social health insurance and universal coverage) is enriched with two additional types: compulsory national health insurance and residual programs. With respect to the provision of services and the relationship between insurers and providers, it is important to distinguish between vertically integrated and separated systems. What differentiates this analysis from the majority of previous studies is its underlying logic. Assuming that all systems are hybrid, the article proposes to put aside the classic logic for classifying healthcare systems (according to which individual countries are pigeonholed into different classes depending on the prevailing system) in favour of the identikit logic. The concept of segmentation (of healthcare services or population) proves to be remarkably useful to this purpose. PMID:27041537

  16. Mobile healthcare applications: system design review, critical issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mirza Mansoor; GholamHosseini, Hamid; Connolly, Martin J

    2015-03-01

    Mobile phones are becoming increasingly important in monitoring and delivery of healthcare interventions. They are often considered as pocket computers, due to their advanced computing features, enhanced preferences and diverse capabilities. Their sophisticated sensors and complex software applications make the mobile healthcare (m-health) based applications more feasible and innovative. In a number of scenarios user-friendliness, convenience and effectiveness of these systems have been acknowledged by both patients as well as healthcare providers. M-health technology employs advanced concepts and techniques from multidisciplinary fields of electrical engineering, computer science, biomedical engineering and medicine which benefit the innovations of these fields towards healthcare systems. This paper deals with two important aspects of current mobile phone based sensor applications in healthcare. Firstly, critical review of advanced applications such as; vital sign monitoring, blood glucose monitoring and in-built camera based smartphone sensor applications. Secondly, investigating challenges and critical issues related to the use of smartphones in healthcare including; reliability, efficiency, mobile phone platform variability, cost effectiveness, energy usage, user interface, quality of medical data, and security and privacy. It was found that the mobile based applications have been widely developed in recent years with fast growing deployment by healthcare professionals and patients. However, despite the advantages of smartphones in patient monitoring, education, and management there are some critical issues and challenges related to security and privacy of data, acceptability, reliability and cost that need to be addressed.

  17. Mobile healthcare applications: system design review, critical issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mirza Mansoor; GholamHosseini, Hamid; Connolly, Martin J

    2015-03-01

    Mobile phones are becoming increasingly important in monitoring and delivery of healthcare interventions. They are often considered as pocket computers, due to their advanced computing features, enhanced preferences and diverse capabilities. Their sophisticated sensors and complex software applications make the mobile healthcare (m-health) based applications more feasible and innovative. In a number of scenarios user-friendliness, convenience and effectiveness of these systems have been acknowledged by both patients as well as healthcare providers. M-health technology employs advanced concepts and techniques from multidisciplinary fields of electrical engineering, computer science, biomedical engineering and medicine which benefit the innovations of these fields towards healthcare systems. This paper deals with two important aspects of current mobile phone based sensor applications in healthcare. Firstly, critical review of advanced applications such as; vital sign monitoring, blood glucose monitoring and in-built camera based smartphone sensor applications. Secondly, investigating challenges and critical issues related to the use of smartphones in healthcare including; reliability, efficiency, mobile phone platform variability, cost effectiveness, energy usage, user interface, quality of medical data, and security and privacy. It was found that the mobile based applications have been widely developed in recent years with fast growing deployment by healthcare professionals and patients. However, despite the advantages of smartphones in patient monitoring, education, and management there are some critical issues and challenges related to security and privacy of data, acceptability, reliability and cost that need to be addressed. PMID:25476753

  18. Healthcare Information Systems to Assess Influenza Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Figar, S.; Aliperti, V.; Salazar, E.; Otero, C.; Schpilberg, M.; Taliercio, V.; Otero, P.; de Quirós, F. González Bernaldo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a private HIS could have detected the influenza epidemic outbreaks earlier through changes in morbidity and mortality patterns. Methods Data Source included a health information system (HIS) from an academic tertiary health care center integrating administrative and clinical applications. It used a local interface terminology server which provides support through data autocoding of clinical documentation. Specific data subsets were created to compare the burden of influenza during the epidemiological week (EW) 21 to 26 for years 2007 to 2009 among 150,000 Health Maintenance Organization members in Argentina. The threshold for identifying an epidemic was considered met when the weekly influenza-like illness (ILI) rate exceeded 200 per 100,000 visits. Case fatality rates and mortality rates of severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) from 2007 to 2009 were retrospectively compared. Case fatality rates and mortality rates for A/H1N1 influenza 2009 also were estimated. Results The HIS detected the outbreak in EW 23 while the government Ministry of Health (MoH) gave a national epidemic alert during EW 25. The number of visits for ILI increased more than fourfold when comparing 2009 to the period 2007-2008. The SARI mortality rate in 2009 was higher than in 2008 (RR 2.8; 95%CI 1.18-6.63) and similar to that of 2007 (RR 1.05; 95%CI 0.56-1.49). 2009 was the first year with mortalities younger than 65 years attributable to SARI. The estimated A/H1N1 case fatality rate for SARI was 6.2% (95%CI 2.5 to 15.5) and A/H1N1 mortality rate was 6 per 100,000 (95%CI 0 to 11.6). Conclusion Our HIS detected the outbreak two weeks before than the MoH gave a national alert. The information system was useful in assessing morbidity and mortality during the 2009 influenza epidemic H1N1 outbreak suggesting that with a private-public integration a more real-time outbreak and disease surveillance system could be implemented. PMID:23616861

  19. Effective healthcare system response to consecutive Florida hurricanes.

    PubMed

    Banks, Laura L; Shah, Mark B; Richards, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    In September 2004, two consecutive hurricanes (Hurricane Frances and Hurricane Jeanne) made landfall in Stuart, FL, and created healthcare needs that overtaxed the capacity of the local healthcare system. To determine the character and structure of the response to these hurricanes, researchers from the University of New Mexico, Center for Disaster Medicine conducted both a structured written survey of employees and a guided group interview with healthcare system management. The written survey queried staff on topics related to their ability and willingness to get to work and stay at work during the storms. The roundtable interview with leadership resulted in analysis of the preexisting Emergency Operations Plan and its use during the storms, including preparation and execution of plans for staffing, facility operation, communication, community resource utilization, and recovery. In addition, the interaction with federally deployed Disaster Medical Assistance Teams was documented and reviewed. In general, prior planning on the part of the healthcare system in Stuart, FL, resulted in a successful response to both hurricanes. Employees were willing and able to provide the necessary care for patients during the hurricanes, overcoming many physical and emotional barriers that arose during the month-long response. These barriers included concern for the safety of family and pets, inoperable or insufficient communication methods, and damage to employees' personal property and homes. Recommendations for healthcare system preparedness and response were formulated by the researchers based on this healthcare system's successful response to back-to-back hurricanes, including recommendations for interacting with disaster medical resources.

  20. Cyberterrorism: is the U.S. healthcare system safe?

    PubMed

    Harries, David; Yellowlees, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The Internet has brought with it many benefits; key among them has been its ability to allow the expansion of communication and transfer of all kinds of information throughout the U.S. healthcare system. As a consequence, healthcare has become increasingly dependent on the activities carried out in that environment. It is this very dependence that increases the likelihood of individuals or organizations conducting activities through the Internet that will cause physical and/or psychological harm. These activities have become known by the term "cyberterrorism." In the healthcare landscape this can appear in a variety of forms, such as bringing down a hospital computer system or publicly revealing private medical records. Whatever shape it takes, the general effects are the same: patient care is compromised, and trust in the health system is diminished. Fortunately no significant cyber attack has been successfully launched against a U.S. healthcare organization to date. However, there is evidence to suggest that cyber threats are increasing and that much of the U.S. healthcare system is ill equipped to deal with them. Securing cyberspace is not an easy proposition as the threats are constantly changing, and recognizing that cyberterrorism should be part of a broader information technology risk management strategy, there are several"best practices" that can be adopted by healthcare organizations to protect themselves against cyber attacks.

  1. Cyberterrorism: is the U.S. healthcare system safe?

    PubMed

    Harries, David; Yellowlees, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The Internet has brought with it many benefits; key among them has been its ability to allow the expansion of communication and transfer of all kinds of information throughout the U.S. healthcare system. As a consequence, healthcare has become increasingly dependent on the activities carried out in that environment. It is this very dependence that increases the likelihood of individuals or organizations conducting activities through the Internet that will cause physical and/or psychological harm. These activities have become known by the term "cyberterrorism." In the healthcare landscape this can appear in a variety of forms, such as bringing down a hospital computer system or publicly revealing private medical records. Whatever shape it takes, the general effects are the same: patient care is compromised, and trust in the health system is diminished. Fortunately no significant cyber attack has been successfully launched against a U.S. healthcare organization to date. However, there is evidence to suggest that cyber threats are increasing and that much of the U.S. healthcare system is ill equipped to deal with them. Securing cyberspace is not an easy proposition as the threats are constantly changing, and recognizing that cyberterrorism should be part of a broader information technology risk management strategy, there are several"best practices" that can be adopted by healthcare organizations to protect themselves against cyber attacks. PMID:23113795

  2. Interorganisational Integration: Healthcare Professionals’ Perspectives on Barriers and Facilitators within the Danish Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Frølich, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Despite many initiatives to improve coordination of patient pathways and intersectoral cooperation, Danish health care is still fragmented, lacking intra- and interorganisational integration. This study explores barriers to and facilitators of interorganisational integration as perceived by healthcare professionals caring for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease within the Danish healthcare system. Methods: Seven focus groups were conducted in January through July 2014 with 21 informants from general practice, local healthcare centres and a pulmonary department at a university hospital in the Capital Region of Denmark. Results and discussion: Our results can be grouped into five influencing areas for interorganisational integration: communication/information transfer, committed leadership, patient engagement, the role and competencies of the general practitioner and organisational culture. Proposed solutions to barriers in each area hold the potential to improve care integration as experienced by individuals responsible for supporting and facilitating it. Barriers and facilitators to integrating care relate to clinical, professional, functional and normative integration. Especially, clinical, functional and normative integration seems fundamental to developing integrated care in practice from the perspective of healthcare professionals. PMID:27616948

  3. Change readiness for SAP in the Canadian healthcare system.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Mary Lou; Downer, Pauline

    2004-01-01

    The study described in this article was designed to assess the change readiness for e-business cost management systems (particularly SAP) within the Canadian healthcare system. Previous studies and experts suggest that change readiness is an important variable in the application of e-business cost management system implementation. One hundred and fifty-four chief executive officers within the Canadian healthcare system were surveyed. The response rate was 25.9 percent. The survey included a demographic sheet, which supported a better understanding of the profile of Canadian healthcare CEOs, their operational budget responsibilities, and their feelings toward e-business cost management systems. A change readiness instrument reviewed CEOs' change readiness scores in relation to four independent variables (implementation of an e-business cost management system, healthcare restructuring, budget size and tenure of the CEO). There was a significant difference between change readiness scores and the implementation of an e-business cost management system. Given the small sample size (n = 40), findings are limited. However the study offers more information on this issue than is found in the Canadian healthcare literature to date.

  4. Information security requirements in patient-centred healthcare support systems.

    PubMed

    Alsalamah, Shada; Gray, W Alex; Hilton, Jeremy; Alsalamah, Hessah

    2013-01-01

    Enabling Patient-Centred (PC) care in modern healthcare requires the flow of medical information with the patient between different healthcare providers as they follow the patient's treatment plan. However, PC care threatens the stability of the balance of information security in the support systems since legacy systems fall short of attaining a security balance when sharing their information due to compromises made between its availability, integrity, and confidentiality. Results show that the main reason for this is that information security implementation in discrete legacy systems focused mainly on information confidentiality and integrity leaving availability a challenge in collaboration. Through an empirical study using domain analysis, observations, and interviews, this paper identifies a need for six information security requirements in legacy systems to cope with this situation in order to attain the security balance in systems supporting PC care implementation in modern healthcare.

  5. ERP (enterprise resource planning) systems can streamline healthcare business functions.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, E K; Christenson, E

    2001-05-01

    Enterprise resource planning (ERP) software applications are designed to facilitate the systemwide integration of complex processes and functions across a large enterprise consisting of many internal and external constituents. Although most currently available ERP applications generally are tailored to the needs of the manufacturing industry, many large healthcare systems are investigating these applications. Due to the significant differences between manufacturing and patient care, ERP-based systems do not easily translate to the healthcare setting. In particular, the lack of clinical standardization impedes the use of ERP systems for clinical integration. Nonetheless, an ERP-based system can help a healthcare organization integrate many functions, including patient scheduling, human resources management, workload forecasting, and management of workflow, that are not directly dependent on clinical decision making. PMID:11351810

  6. Forming design teams to develop healthcare information systems.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Naveed; Jones, Donald R; Van Tran, Hien; Moses, Beulah

    2006-01-01

    Healthcare information systems are assuming an increasingly critical role in providing quality patient care in an effective and efficient manner. However, the success of these systems in achieving these goals remains a lingering concern. Consequently, investigating and devising strategies to enhance the likelihood of success of a healthcare information system continues to draw research interest. One strategy recommended by both researchers and practitioners alike is the participation of the target users in the design and development of the information system. However, practical considerations mandate representative, rather than universal, participation of users. Unfortunately, the information systems literature offers few guidelines for selecting user representatives to serve on a design team. This lack of guidelines easily results in system designers talking with the wrong users or managers assigning the wrong users to the design team. On the basis of the theoretical paradigms underlying the user participation and design team concepts, the authors examined and derived user characteristics that are considered the most critical criteria for selecting user members of a design team. They then report on a field survey they conducted to validate the derived criteria in healthcare information systems context. The authors conclude that the system-related functional expertise should be the primary criterion employed to select healthcare personnel to participate in system design and development. Other criteria, such as users' communication skills, computing backgrounds, and personality traits, should be given secondary considerations. Ignoring these guidelines can render user participation superfluous, resulting in system failures. PMID:16573013

  7. Applying e-procurement system in the healthcare: the EPOS paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketikidis, Panayiotis H.; Kontogeorgis, Apostolos; Stalidis, George; Kaggelides, Kostis

    2010-03-01

    One of the goals of procurement is to establish a competitive price, while e-procurement utilises electronic commerce to identify potential sources of supply, to purchase goods and services, to exchange contractual information and to interact with suppliers. Extensive academic work has been extensively devoted to e-procurement in diverse industries. However, applying e-procurement in the healthcare sector remains unexplored. It lacks an efficient e-procurement mechanism that will enable hospitals and healthcare suppliers to electronically exchange contractual information, aided by the technologies of optimisation and business rules. The development and deployment of e-procurement requires a major effort in the coordination of complex interorganisational business process. This article presents an e-procurement optimised system (EPOS) for the healthcare marketplace, a complete methodological approach for deploying and operating such system, as piloted in public and private hospitals in three European countries (Greece, Spain and Belgium) and suppliers of healthcare items in the fourth country (Italy). The efficient e-procurement mechanism that EPOS suggests enables hospitals and pharmaceutical and medical equipment suppliers to electronically exchange contractual information.

  8. Enhancing Health-Care Services with Mixed Reality Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stantchev, Vladimir

    This work presents a development approach for mixed reality systems in health care. Although health-care service costs account for 5-15% of GDP in developed countries the sector has been remarkably resistant to the introduction of technology-supported optimizations. Digitalization of data storing and processing in the form of electronic patient records (EPR) and hospital information systems (HIS) is a first necessary step. Contrary to typical business functions (e.g., accounting or CRM) a health-care service is characterized by a knowledge intensive decision process and usage of specialized devices ranging from stethoscopes to complex surgical systems. Mixed reality systems can help fill the gap between highly patient-specific health-care services that need a variety of technical resources on the one side and the streamlined process flow that typical process supporting information systems expect on the other side. To achieve this task, we present a development approach that includes an evaluation of existing tasks and processes within the health-care service and the information systems that currently support the service, as well as identification of decision paths and actions that can benefit from mixed reality systems. The result is a mixed reality system that allows a clinician to monitor the elements of the physical world and to blend them with virtual information provided by the systems. He or she can also plan and schedule treatments and operations in the digital world depending on status information from this mixed reality.

  9. Integration of advanced practice providers into the Israeli healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Aaron, Eliana Marcus; Andrews, Caryn Scheinberg

    2016-01-01

    Many countries around the world have integrated various types of Advanced Practice Providers (APPs) into their healthcare systems. The main motivating factors for recognizing and developing APPs worldwide include physician shortages and the need for improved access or delivery (US, France, Belgium, Scotland, Switzerland), reduced residency hours (US, UK), shortages in underserved regions (US, Canada, Finland, Australia), and cost containment (Germany, Netherlands, UK, US). Israel is experiencing a shortage of physicians in peripheral geographic regions and in critical medical specialties. Recent by-laws approved by the Knesset (Parliament), combined with Israel Ministry of Health (MOH) policies, have thus far been unable to fully address the shortages. To understand the potential contribution of APPs in Israel, we evaluated the international historical foundations and development of APP roles. We assessed how APPs have impacted healthcare in other countries by analyzing public data and published international research about APP education, safety, quality of care, motivators, barriers, and impact. We found that APPs are recognized in dozens of countries, and have similar scopes of practice, graduate level education requirements (in developed countries), and clinical training. At the same time, there is wide variability among countries in the actual function and independence of the advanced practice nurse (APN), particularly the nurse practitioner (NP). APPs have been established as cost effective, safe healthcare providers who improve healthcare access. Israel has begun to introduce APPs, specifically NPs, in a variety of fields, including geriatrics, palliative care and diabetic care. We recommend a rapid expansion of existing and new APP roles into the Israeli healthcare system based on evidence and the recommendations of international evaluations by non-government organizations. By shifting the education to a university setting, mirroring successful, evidence

  10. [Current legislation in the healthcare system 2015/2016].

    PubMed

    Martenstein, I; Wienke, A

    2016-03-01

    The energy of the legislator in the healthcare system was barely stoppable in 2015. Many new laws have been brought into force and legal initiatives have also been implemented. The Hospital Structure Act, the Treatment Enhancement Act, amendments of the official medical fee schedules for physicians, the Prevention Act, the E-Health Act, the Anti-corruption Act, the hospital admission guidelines and amendments of the model specialty training regulations are just some of the essential alterations that lie ahead of the medical community. This article gives a review of the most important new legislative regulations in the healthcare system and presents the fundamental consequences for the practice. PMID:26915069

  11. [Current legislation in the healthcare system 2015/2016].

    PubMed

    Martenstein, I; Wienke, A

    2016-05-01

    The energy of the legislator in the healthcare system was barely stoppable in 2015. Many new laws have been brought into force and legal initiatives have also been implemented. The Hospital Structure Act, the Treatment Enhancement Act, amendments of the official medical fee schedules for physicians, the Prevention Act, the E-Health Act, the Anti-corruption Act, the hospital admission guidelines and amendments of the model specialty training regulations are just some of the essential alterations that lie ahead of the medical community. This article gives a review of the most important new legislative regulations in the healthcare system and presents the fundamental consequences for the practice. PMID:27072311

  12. [Current legislation in the healthcare system 2015/2016].

    PubMed

    Martenstein, I; Wienke, A

    2016-03-01

    The energy of the legislator in the healthcare system was barely stoppable in 2015. Many new laws have been brought into force and legal initiatives have also been implemented. The Hospital Structure Act, the Treatment Enhancement Act, amendments of the official medical fee schedules for physicians, the Prevention Act, the E-Health Act, the Anti-corruption Act, the hospital admission guidelines and amendments of the model specialty training regulations are just some of the essential alterations that lie ahead of the medical community. This article gives a review of the most important new legislative regulations in the healthcare system and presents the fundamental consequences for the practice.

  13. [Current legislation in the healthcare system 2015/2016].

    PubMed

    Martenstein, I; Wienke, A

    2016-05-01

    The energy of the legislator in the healthcare system was barely stoppable in 2015. Many new laws have been brought into force and legal initiatives have also been implemented. The Hospital Structure Act, the Treatment Enhancement Act, amendments of the official medical fee schedules for physicians, the Prevention Act, the E-Health Act, the Anti-corruption Act, the hospital admission guidelines and amendments of the model specialty training regulations are just some of the essential alterations that lie ahead of the medical community. This article gives a review of the most important new legislative regulations in the healthcare system and presents the fundamental consequences for the practice.

  14. Automatic Data Processing System and Procedures, Computerized Academic Counseling System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagorski, Henry J.; And Others

    The Computerized Academic Counseling System (CACS) designed by the System Development Corporation is reviewed. Aspects of the system, constructed to assist counselors in guiding undergraduates in the selection of academic majors, which are discussed include: problem definition, system analysis, design rationale, methodology, measurement…

  15. Healthcare Decision Support System for Administration of Chronic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Ji-In; Yang, Jung-Gi; Lee, Young-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objectives A healthcare decision-making support model and rule management system is proposed based on a personalized rule-based intelligent concept, to effectively manage chronic diseases. Methods A Web service was built using a standard message transfer protocol for interoperability of personal health records among healthcare institutions. An intelligent decision service is provided that analyzes data using a service-oriented healthcare rule inference function and machine-learning platform; the rules are extensively compiled by physicians through a developmental user interface that enables knowledge base construction, modification, and integration. Further, screening results are visualized for the self-intuitive understanding of personal health status by patients. Results A recommendation message is output through the Web service by receiving patient information from the hospital information recording system and object attribute values as input factors. The proposed system can verify patient behavior by acting as an intellectualized backbone of chronic diseases management; further, it supports self-management and scheduling of screening. Conclusions Chronic patients can continuously receive active recommendations related to their healthcare through the rule management system, and they can model the system by acting as decision makers in diseases management; secondary diseases can be prevented and health management can be performed by reference to patient-specific lifestyle guidelines. PMID:25152830

  16. Web-based healthcare hand drawing management system.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Weng, Yung-Ching; Chen, Chi-Huang; Hsu, Kai-Ping; Lin, Jeng-Wei; Lai, Feipei

    2010-01-01

    The paper addresses Medical Hand Drawing Management System architecture and implementation. In the system, we developed four modules: hand drawing management module; patient medical records query module; hand drawing editing and upload module; hand drawing query module. The system adapts windows-based applications and encompasses web pages by ASP.NET hosting mechanism under web services platforms. The hand drawings implemented as files are stored in a FTP server. The file names with associated data, e.g. patient identification, drawing physician, access rights, etc. are reposited in a database. The modules can be conveniently embedded, integrated into any system. Therefore, the system possesses the hand drawing features to support daily medical operations, effectively improve healthcare qualities as well. Moreover, the system includes the printing capability to achieve a complete, computerized medical document process. In summary, the system allows web-based applications to facilitate the graphic processes for healthcare operations.

  17. Building China's municipal healthcare performance evaluation system: a Tuscan perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Barsanti, Sara; Bonini, Anna

    2012-08-01

    Regional healthcare performance evaluation systems can help optimize healthcare resources on regional basis and improve the performance of healthcare services provided. The Tuscany region in Italy is a good example of an institution which meets these requirements. China has yet to build such a system based on international experience. In this paper, based on comparative studies between Tuscany and China, we propose that the managing institutions in China's experimental cities can select and commission a third-party agency to, respectively, evaluate the performance of their affiliated hospitals and community health service centers. Following some features of the Tuscan experience, the Chinese municipal healthcare performance evaluation system can be built by focusing on the selection of an appropriate performance evaluation agency, the design of an adequate performance evaluation mechanism and the formulation of a complete set of laws, rules and regulations. When a performance evaluation system at city level is formed, the provincial government can extend the successful experience to other cities. PMID:22687705

  18. [Restructuring the healthcare system: redesigning based on needs].

    PubMed

    Szentes, Tamás; Vályi-Nagy, István

    2015-01-18

    The main task of a healthcare system is the provision of the healthcare services demanded by the population. These needs are mostly defined by the epidemiological status, which has been significantly changed during the last century. Due to development of medical science and technology, the main health problems in modern industrial societies are related to chronic diseases rather than infectious diseases occurring at the beginning of the 20th century. However, healthcare services provided by health institutions are still reactive, formed as reactions to current conditions, and they are hardly suited to requirements related to chronic diseases. This paper outlines international and national healthcare models and their shortcomings, and it traces novel paths of a future solution. The structure of the optimal model is suited to systematically produce the services which are needed by the population, decisively in the case of chronic, non communicable diseases. This can significantly relieve the expensive, technology-based reactive care system, nevertheless, it can provide efficient services in case of tertiary prevention. The configuration of this system is cheap, there is no need of significant infrastructure, but needs massive human resource, so that it can be rationally designed in parallel with the constriction of the reactive care system.

  19. Design of an image-enabled electronic healthcare record system for regional collaborative healthcare applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Yang, Yuanyuan; He, Zhenyu; Sun, Jianyong; Ling, Tonghui; Zhang, Jianguo

    2009-02-01

    Shanghai is piloting to develop an EHR system to solve the problems of medical document sharing for collaborative healthcare, the solution of which is considering to following IHE XDS (cross-enterprise document sharing) and XCA (cross-community access) technical profiles as well as combined with grid storage for images. The first phase of the project targets text and image documents sharing cross four local domains or communities, each of which consists of multiple hospitals. The prototype system was designed and developed with service-oriented architecture (SOA) and Event-Driven Architecture (EDA), basing on IHE XDS.b and XCA profiles, and consists of four level components: one central city registry; the multiple domain registries, each of which is for one local domain or community; the multiple repositories corresponding to multiple local domain registries; and multiple document source agents, each of which is located in each hospital to provide the patient healthcare information. The system was developed and tested for performance evaluation including data publication, user query and image retrieval. The results are extremely positive and demonstrate that the designed EHR solution based on SOA with grid concept can scale effectively to serve medical document sharing cross-domain or community in a large city.

  20. Primary healthcare information system--the cornerstone for the next generation healthcare sector in Republic of Croatia.

    PubMed

    Koncar, Miroslav; Gvozdanović, Darko

    2006-01-01

    At no time in the history of medicine has the growth in knowledge and technologies been so profound [Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, Institute of Medicine (IOM), 2001. ISBN 0-309-07280-8]. However, healthcare delivery systems today are not able to keep up with the pace. Studies have shown that it takes an average of about 17 years for new knowledge generated by randomized trials to be incorporated into practice [B. Andrew, S. Boren, Managing clinical knowledge for health care improvement, in: Yearbook of Medical Informatics, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, 2000, pp. 65-70]. It is safe to say that today healthcare systems "have the data, but not information". In order to provide highest quality patient care, Republic of Croatia has started the process of introducing enterprise information systems to support business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: to provide efficient healthcare related data management in support of decision-making processes; and to support continuous process of healthcare resources spending optimization. The first initiated project refers to Primary Healthcare Information System (PHCIS) that provides domain of primary care with state-of-the-art enterprise information system that connects General Practitioners, Pediatricians and Gynecologists offices with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Public Health Institute. In the years to come, PHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of healthcare (e.g. hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories) into single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of PHCIS, explains challenges that were faced in designing and implementing the system, and elaborates PHCIS role as the cornerstone for the next generation healthcare provisioning in Republic of Croatia.

  1. Primary healthcare information system--the cornerstone for the next generation healthcare sector in Republic of Croatia.

    PubMed

    Koncar, Miroslav; Gvozdanović, Darko

    2006-01-01

    At no time in the history of medicine has the growth in knowledge and technologies been so profound [Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, Institute of Medicine (IOM), 2001. ISBN 0-309-07280-8]. However, healthcare delivery systems today are not able to keep up with the pace. Studies have shown that it takes an average of about 17 years for new knowledge generated by randomized trials to be incorporated into practice [B. Andrew, S. Boren, Managing clinical knowledge for health care improvement, in: Yearbook of Medical Informatics, National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD, 2000, pp. 65-70]. It is safe to say that today healthcare systems "have the data, but not information". In order to provide highest quality patient care, Republic of Croatia has started the process of introducing enterprise information systems to support business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: to provide efficient healthcare related data management in support of decision-making processes; and to support continuous process of healthcare resources spending optimization. The first initiated project refers to Primary Healthcare Information System (PHCIS) that provides domain of primary care with state-of-the-art enterprise information system that connects General Practitioners, Pediatricians and Gynecologists offices with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Public Health Institute. In the years to come, PHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of healthcare (e.g. hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories) into single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of PHCIS, explains challenges that were faced in designing and implementing the system, and elaborates PHCIS role as the cornerstone for the next generation healthcare provisioning in Republic of Croatia. PMID:16213189

  2. Hospital Systems, Convenient Care Strategies, and Healthcare Reform.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Amer; Shay, Patrick; Roscoe, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Retail clinics (RCs) and urgent care centers (UCCs) are convenient care models that emerged on the healthcare scene in the past 10 to 15 years. Characterized as disruptive innovations, these models of healthcare delivery seem to follow a slightly different path from each other. Hospital systems, the very organizations that were originally threatened by convenient care models, are developing them and partnering with existing models. We posit that legislative changes such as the Affordable Care Act created challenges for hospital systems that accelerated their adoption of these models. In this study, we analyze 117 hospital systems in six states and report on their convenient care strategies. Our data suggest that UCCs are more prevalent than RCs among hospital systems, and that large and unexplained state-by-state variations exist in the adoption of these strategies. We also postulate about the future role of hospital systems in leading these innovations. PMID:27111934

  3. New context and old challenges in the healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Peiró, Manel; Barrubés, Joan

    2012-07-01

    The economic crisis cannot conceal the need for transformation of the National Health System. The financial difficulties of healthcare systems whose spending is growing at a faster rate than the economy have been well known for years. The development and diffusion of new technologies, increased use of health services, rising drug costs, inflation of prices, and the inefficiency of the system explain the new context. The challenges facing the healthcare system are not new: address the debt, improve funding, review the list of services, transform the governance of the system and provide the institutions with real management autonomy. The gravity of the economic situation can be an opportunity to carry out the long-awaited changes. PMID:22633113

  4. An academic hospitalist model to improve healthcare worker communication and learner education: Results from a quasi-experimental study at a veterans affairs medical center

    PubMed Central

    Saint, Sanjay; Fowler, Karen E; Krein, Sarah L; Flanders, Scott A; Bodnar, Timothy W; Young, Eric; Moseley, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although hospitalists may improve efficiency and quality of inpatient care, their effect on healthcare-worker communication and education has been less well-studied. OBJECTIVE To test various approaches to improving healthcare-worker communication and learner education within the context of a newly designed academic hospital medicine program. DESIGN Before-and-after design with concurrent control group. SETTING A Midwestern Veterans Affairs medical center. INTERVENTION Multimodal systems redesign of 1 of 4 medical teams (Gold team) that included clinical modifications (change in rounding structure, with inclusion of nurses, a Clinical Care Coordinator, and a pharmacist) and educational interventions (providing explicit expectations of learners and providing a reading list for both learners and attending physicians). MEASUREMENTS Number of admissions, length of stay, readmissions, house officer and medical student ratings of attendings' teaching, medical student internal medicine National Board of Medical Examiners Subject Examination (“shelf” exam) scores, and clinical staff surveys. RESULTS Length of stay was reduced by about 0.3 days on all teams after the initiative began (P = 0.004), with no significant differences between Gold and non-Gold teams. The majority of physicians (83%) and nurses (68%) felt that including nurses during rounds improved healthcare-worker communication; significantly more nurses were satisfied with communication with the Gold team than with the other teams (71% vs 53%; P = 0.02). Gold attendings generally received higher teaching scores compared with non-Gold attendings, and third-year medical students on the Gold team scored significantly higher on the shelf exam compared with non–Gold team students (84 vs 82; P = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS Academic hospitalists working within a systems redesign intervention were able to improve healthcare-worker communication and enhance learner education without increasing

  5. Decision Support Systems for Academic Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Laurence J.; Greenwood, Allen G.

    1984-01-01

    The history and features of Decision Support Systems (DSS) and use of the approach by academic administrators are discussed. The objective of DSS is to involve the manager/decision maker in the decision-analysis process while simultaneously relieving that person of the burden of developing and performing detailed analysis. DSS represents a…

  6. Decision Support Systems in Academic Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turban, Efraim; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents an overview of a computerized Decision Support System (DSS) for academic administrators. Following a discussion of its capabilities, the various components of a DSS are examined as well as the development tools needed. Examples follow of DSS in two universities, and various development and implementation issues are considered. (TE)

  7. A secure steganography for privacy protection in healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Tang, Guangming; Sun, Yifeng

    2013-04-01

    Private data in healthcare system require confidentiality protection while transmitting. Steganography is the art of concealing data into a cover media for conveying messages confidentially. In this paper, we propose a steganographic method which can provide private data in medical system with very secure protection. In our method, a cover image is first mapped into a 1D pixels sequence by Hilbert filling curve and then divided into non-overlapping embedding units with three consecutive pixels. We use adaptive pixel pair match (APPM) method to embed digits in the pixel value differences (PVD) of the three pixels and the base of embedded digits is dependent on the differences among the three pixels. By solving an optimization problem, minimal distortion of the pixel ternaries caused by data embedding can be obtained. The experimental results show our method is more suitable to privacy protection of healthcare system than prior steganographic works.

  8. An integrated healthcare enterprise information portal and healthcare information system framework.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, S L; Lai, Feipei; Cheng, P H; Chen, J L; Lee, H H; Tsai, W N; Weng, Y C; Hsieh, S H; Hsu, K P; Ko, L F; Yang, T H; Chen, C H

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents an integrated, distributed Healthcare Enterprise Information Portal (HEIP) and Hospital Information Systems (HIS) framework over wireless/wired infrastructure at National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH). A single sign-on solution for the hospital customer relationship management (CRM) in HEIP has been established. The outcomes of the newly developed Outpatient Information Systems (OIS) in HIS are discussed. The future HEIP blueprints with CRM oriented features: e-Learning, Remote Consultation and Diagnosis (RCD), as well as on-Line Vaccination Services are addressed. Finally, the integrated HEIP and HIS architectures based on the middleware technologies are proposed along with the feasible approaches. The preliminary performance of multi-media, time-based data exchanges over the wireless HEIP side is collected to evaluate the efficiency of the architecture. PMID:17946647

  9. Asan Medical Information System for Healthcare Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyeon Jeong; Kim, Woo Sung; Min, Sung Woo; Kim, Sun Ja; Lee, Yong Su; Lee, Young Ha; Nam, Sang Woo; Eo, Gi Seung; Seo, Sook Gyoung; Nam, Mi Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This purpose of this paper is to introduce the status of the Asan Medical Center (AMC) medical information system with respect to healthcare quality improvement. Methods Asan Medical Information System (AMIS) is projected to become a completely electronic and digital information hospital. AMIS has played a role in improving the health care quality based on the following measures: safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, privacy, and security. Results AMIS consisted of several distinctive systems: order communication system, electronic medical record, picture archiving communication system, clinical research information system, data warehouse, enterprise resource planning, IT service management system, and disaster recovery system. The most distinctive features of AMIS were the high alert-medication recognition & management system, the integrated and severity stratified alert system, the integrated patient monitoring system, the perioperative diabetic care monitoring and support system, and the clinical indicator management system. Conclusions AMIS provides IT services for AMC, 7 affiliated hospitals and over 5,000 partners clinics, and was developed to improve healthcare services. The current challenge of AMIS is standard and interoperability. A global health IT strategy is needed to get through the current challenges and to provide new services as needed. PMID:21818439

  10. Designing an architectural style for Pervasive Healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Rafe, Vahid; Hajvali, Masoumeh

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, the Pervasive Healthcare (PH) systems are considered as an important research area. These systems have a dynamic structure and configuration. Therefore, an appropriate method for designing such systems is necessary. The Publish/Subscribe Architecture (pub/sub) is one of the convenient architectures to support such systems. PH systems are safety critical; hence, errors can bring disastrous results. To prevent such problems, a powerful analytical tool is required. So using a proper formal language like graph transformation systems for developing of these systems seems necessary. But even if software engineers use such high level methodologies, errors may occur in the system under design. Hence, it should be investigated automatically and formally that whether this model of system satisfies all their requirements or not. In this paper, a dynamic architectural style for developing PH systems is presented. Then, the behavior of these systems is modeled and evaluated using GROOVE toolset. The results of the analysis show its high reliability.

  11. Healthcare Analytics: Creating a Prioritized Improvement System with Performance Benchmarking.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Eugene; Kolker, Evelyne

    2014-03-01

    The importance of healthcare improvement is difficult to overstate. This article describes our collaborative work with experts at Seattle Children's to create a prioritized improvement system using performance benchmarking. We applied analytics and modeling approaches to compare and assess performance metrics derived from U.S. News and World Report benchmarking data. We then compared a wide range of departmental performance metrics, including patient outcomes, structural and process metrics, survival rates, clinical practices, and subspecialist quality. By applying empirically simulated transformations and imputation methods, we built a predictive model that achieves departments' average rank correlation of 0.98 and average score correlation of 0.99. The results are then translated into prioritized departmental and enterprise-wide improvements, following a data to knowledge to outcomes paradigm. These approaches, which translate data into sustainable outcomes, are essential to solving a wide array of healthcare issues, improving patient care, and reducing costs.

  12. Healthcare Analytics: Creating a Prioritized Improvement System with Performance Benchmarking.

    PubMed

    Kolker, Eugene; Kolker, Evelyne

    2014-03-01

    The importance of healthcare improvement is difficult to overstate. This article describes our collaborative work with experts at Seattle Children's to create a prioritized improvement system using performance benchmarking. We applied analytics and modeling approaches to compare and assess performance metrics derived from U.S. News and World Report benchmarking data. We then compared a wide range of departmental performance metrics, including patient outcomes, structural and process metrics, survival rates, clinical practices, and subspecialist quality. By applying empirically simulated transformations and imputation methods, we built a predictive model that achieves departments' average rank correlation of 0.98 and average score correlation of 0.99. The results are then translated into prioritized departmental and enterprise-wide improvements, following a data to knowledge to outcomes paradigm. These approaches, which translate data into sustainable outcomes, are essential to solving a wide array of healthcare issues, improving patient care, and reducing costs. PMID:27447311

  13. Rationing and competition in the Dutch health-care system.

    PubMed

    Schut, Frederik T; Van de Ven, Wynand P M M

    2005-09-01

    In this paper we examine the goals and effects of health-care policy in the Netherlands over the period 1980--2000. During this period Dutch health-care policy is marked by a peculiar combination of increasingly stringent cost-containment policies alongside a persistent pursuit of market-oriented reforms. The main goal of cost containment was to keep labour costs down under the restriction of universal equal access to health care. Supply and price control policies were quite successful in achieving cost containment, but in due course prolonged quantity rationing began to jeopardise universal physical access to health services. The main goal of market-oriented health-care reforms is to increase the system's efficiency and its responsiveness to patient's needs, while maintaining equal access. The feasibility of the reforms crucially hinges on the realisation of adequate methods of risk adjustment, product classification and quality measurement, an appropriate consumer information system and an effective competition policy. Realising these preconditions requires a lengthy and cautious implementation process. Although considerable progress has been made in setting the appropriate stage for regulated competition in Dutch health care, the role of the market is still limited. PMID:16161190

  14. The future of cost accounting systems in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Ladd, R D; Feverstein, T M

    1987-07-01

    The development of cost accounting/cost management programs provides one of the most exciting systems development opportunities for healthcare professionals. Despite countervailing factors, the requirement for cost management information is here to stay. The current status of systems development can be described as a positive step by a majority of institutions. To address system requirements, there are currently 16 mainframe computer, 20 minicomputer and 29 microcomputer software programs available. The availability of these software resources identifies numerous alternatives for future cost accounting/cost management applications. For the question has become, not "if" you require a cost management application, but rather what kind.

  15. Healthcare information system approaches based on middleware concepts.

    PubMed

    Holena, M; Blobel, B

    1997-01-01

    To meet the challenges for efficient and high-level quality, health care systems must implement the "Shared Care" paradigm of distributed co-operating systems. To this end, both the newly developed and legacy applications must be fully integrated into the care process. These requirements can be fulfilled by information systems based on middleware concepts. In the paper, the middleware approaches HL7, DHE, and CORBA are described. The relevance of those approaches to the healthcare domain is documented. The description presented here is complemented through two other papers in this volume, concentrating on the evaluation of the approaches, and on their security threats and solutions. PMID:10175361

  16. Reforming healthcare systems on a locally integrated basis: is there a potential for increasing collaborations in primary healthcare?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    . This is with the exception of private medical clinics, where collaborations decreased both outside and within LHNs. Conclusion Health system reforms aimed at creating geographically based networks influenced primary healthcare practices’ both among themselves (horizontal collaborations) and with hospitals (vertical collaborations). There is evidence of increased collaborations within defined geographic areas, particularly among new type of primary healthcare. PMID:23835105

  17. Healthcare professionals' experiences with EHR-system access control mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Faxvaag, Arild; Johansen, Trond S; Heimly, Vigdis; Melby, Line; Grimsmo, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Access control mechanisms might influence on the information seeking and documentation behavior of clinicians. In this study, we have surveyed healthcare professionals in nursing homes and hospitals on their attitudes to, and experiences with using access control mechanisms. In some situations, the access control mechanisms of the EHR system made clinicians postpone documentation work. Their practice of reading what others have documented was also influenced. Not all clinicians logged out of the system when they left a workstation, and some clinicians reported to do some of their documentation work in the name of others. The reported practices might have implications for the safety of the patient.

  18. Wireless Network of Collaborative Physiological Signal Devices in a U-Healthcare System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Joonyoung; Kim, Daeyoung

    We designed and implemented collaborative physiological signal devices in a u-healthcare(ubiquitous healthcare) system. In this system, wireless body area network (WBAN) such as ZigBee is used to communicate between physiological signal devices and the mobile system. WBAN device needs a specific function for ubiquitous healthcare application. We show several collaborative physiological devices and propose WBAN mechanism such as a fast scanning algorithm, a dynamic discovery and installation mechanism, a reliable data transmission, a device access control for security, and a healthcare profile for u-healthcare system.

  19. China's public health-care system: facing the challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanli

    2004-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) crisis in China revealed not only the failures of the Chinese health-care system but also some fundamental structural deficiencies. A decentralized and fragmented health system, such as the one found in China, is not well-suited to making a rapid and coordinated response to public health emergencies. The commercial orientation of the health sector on the supply-side and lack of health insurance coverage on the demand-side further exacerbate the problems of the under-provision of public services, such as health surveillance and preventive care. For the past 25 years, the Chinese Government has kept economic development at the top of the policy agenda at the expense of public health, especially in terms of access to health care for the 800 million people living in rural areas. A significant increase in government investment in the public health infrastructure, though long overdue, is not sufficient to solve the problems of the health-care system. China needs to reorganize its public health system by strengthening both the vertical and horizontal connections between its various public health organizations. China's recent policy of establishing a matching-fund financed rural health insurance system presents an exciting opportunity to improve people's access to health care. PMID:15500285

  20. IT management and governance systems and their emergence in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Mohrmann, Gregg; Kropf, Roger

    2007-01-01

    Today's healthcare IT departments are challenged with understanding the total service demand imposed by their user communities and how much of their limited resources are available to meet that demand. This challenge is being addressed through the use of new IT management and governance (IT-MG) systems. This software supports IT governance and project and portfolio management. IT-MG is a relatively new term to healthcare; it entails reviewing and managing demand for IT services from inception to completion through the application of IT resources. These systems help save time through automated reporting and quicker delivery of services; they save money by more effectively addressing resource needs on time and on budget. The systems also reduce the number of administrative tasks through process automation; increase customer satisfaction by communicating services and deliverables more quickly and accurately; and help executives make better and more informed decisions about priorities and expectations through reporting that was previously nonexistent. This article will explore IT-MG systems and present a case study of a hospital that rapidly implemented this type of system. PMID:17299923

  1. Policy Capacity in the Learning Healthcare System Comment on "Health Reform Requires Policy Capacity".

    PubMed

    Gardner, William

    2015-01-01

    Pierre-Gerlier Forest and his colleagues make a strong argument for the need to expand policy capacity among healthcare actors. In this commentary, I develop an additional argument in support of Forest et al view. Forest et al rightly point to the need to have embedded policy experts to successfully translate healthcare reform policy into healthcare change. Translation of externally generated innovation policy into local solutions is only one source of healthcare system change. We also need to build learning healthcare systems that can discover new health solutions at the frontline of care. Enhanced policy capacity staffing in those organizations will be key to building continuously learning health systems. PMID:26673470

  2. The Indiana University Center for Healthcare Innovation and Implementation Science: Bridging healthcare research and delivery to build a learning healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Azar, Jose; Adams, Nadia; Boustani, Malaz

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, it is estimated that 75,000 deaths every year could be averted if the healthcare system implemented high quality care more effectively and efficiently. Patient harm in the hospital occurs as a consequence of inadequate procedures, medications and other therapies, nosocomial infections, diagnostic evaluations and patient falls. Implementation science, a new emerging field in healthcare, is the development and study of methods and tools aimed at enhancing the implementation of new discoveries and evidence into daily healthcare delivery. The Indiana University Center for Healthcare Innovation and Implementation Science (IU-CHIIS) was launched in September 2013 with the mission to use implementation science and innovation to produce great-quality, patient-centered and cost-efficient healthcare delivery solutions for the United States of America. Within the first 24 months of its initiation, the IU-CHIIS successfully scaled up an evidence-based collaborative care model for people with dementia and/or depression, successfully expanded the Accountable Care Unit model positively impacting the efficiency and quality of care, created the first Certificate in Innovation and Implementation Science in the US and secured funding from National Institutes of Health to investigate innovations in dementia care. This article summarizes the establishment of the IU-CHIIS, its impact and outcomes and the lessons learned during the journey.

  3. The Indiana University Center for Healthcare Innovation and Implementation Science: Bridging healthcare research and delivery to build a learning healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Azar, Jose; Adams, Nadia; Boustani, Malaz

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, it is estimated that 75,000 deaths every year could be averted if the healthcare system implemented high quality care more effectively and efficiently. Patient harm in the hospital occurs as a consequence of inadequate procedures, medications and other therapies, nosocomial infections, diagnostic evaluations and patient falls. Implementation science, a new emerging field in healthcare, is the development and study of methods and tools aimed at enhancing the implementation of new discoveries and evidence into daily healthcare delivery. The Indiana University Center for Healthcare Innovation and Implementation Science (IU-CHIIS) was launched in September 2013 with the mission to use implementation science and innovation to produce great-quality, patient-centered and cost-efficient healthcare delivery solutions for the United States of America. Within the first 24 months of its initiation, the IU-CHIIS successfully scaled up an evidence-based collaborative care model for people with dementia and/or depression, successfully expanded the Accountable Care Unit model positively impacting the efficiency and quality of care, created the first Certificate in Innovation and Implementation Science in the US and secured funding from National Institutes of Health to investigate innovations in dementia care. This article summarizes the establishment of the IU-CHIIS, its impact and outcomes and the lessons learned during the journey. PMID:26028451

  4. Physician density planning in a public healthcare system: Complexities, threats and opportunities-The case of the Israeli healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Gamzu, Ronni; Kaidar, Nir; Afek, Arnon; Horev, Tuvia

    2016-08-01

    Human-resource planning in healthcare is one of the most significant challenges that healthcare systems worldwide face. Among all healthcare professions, the planning of physician supply is the most complex of all due to physicians' lengthy training and many specialties. Forecasts showing a disturbing downward trend in the ratio of physicians to population in Israel prompted the Israeli Government in 2010 to establish a committee mandated to predict demand for physicians and recommend steps to adjust supply to it. The committee analyzed numerous variables that affect physician supply and demand and recommended measures that in greater part were implemented. The article discusses the methodology of the committee, its recommendations, and their implementation such as a 52% increase in the number of first-year medical students between 2010 and 2012. Its analysis of the current situation shows that the implementation of the recommendations successfully stemmed the decrease in physician density and attained the committee's other long-term objectives: physician density of 2.9 per 1000 of population and an increase (32.5%) in the number of physicians who began training in targeted specialties. PMID:27496154

  5. Security of healthcare information systems based on the CORBA middleware.

    PubMed

    Blobel, B; Holena, M

    1997-01-01

    The development of healthcare systems in accordance to the "Shared Care" paradigm results in co-operative health information systems across the boundaries of organisational, technological, and policy domains. Increasingly, these distributed and heterogeneous systems are based on middleware approaches, such as CORBA. Regarding the sensitivity of personal and medical data, such open, distributed, and heterogeneous health information systems demand a high level of data protection and data security, both with respect to patient information and with respect to users. The security concepts and measures available and additionally needed in health information systems based on CORBA architecture are described in this paper. The proposed security solution is also open to other middleware approaches, such as DHE or HL7. PMID:10179515

  6. Security of healthcare information systems based on the CORBA middleware.

    PubMed

    Blobel, B; Holena, M

    1997-01-01

    The development of healthcare systems in accordance to the "Shared Care" paradigm results in co-operative health information systems across the boundaries of organisational, technological, and policy domains. Increasingly, these distributed and heterogeneous systems are based on middleware approaches, such as CORBA. Regarding the sensitivity of personal and medical data, such open, distributed, and heterogeneous health information systems demand a high level of data protection and data security, both with respect to patient information and with respect to users. The security concepts and measures available and additionally needed in health information systems based on CORBA architecture are described in this paper. The proposed security solution is also open to other middleware approaches, such as DHE or HL7.

  7. Utah healthcare system watches over Olympians and spectators.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2002-01-01

    For the first time in Olympic history, a single organization was tapped to provide medical services when Intermountain Health Care (IHC), Salt Lake City, was named for the 2002 Olympic and Paralympic Games in Utah. IHC, a charitable, community owned, integrated, not-for-profit healthcare system serving patients in Utah and Idaho, spent four years developing and implementing a plan to deliver medical services to both Olympians and spectators. Nearly 350 IHC doctors, nurses, physical therapists and other professionals donated their services for the Olympics without compensation as part of their not-for-profit mission. In addition, about 1,000 IHC employees applied to be general volunteers during the games.

  8. Achieving Equity in an Evolving Healthcare System: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Williams, Joni Strom; Walker, Rebekah J; Egede, Leonard E

    2016-01-01

    For decades, disparities in health have been well documented in the United States and regrettably, remain prevalent despite evidence and appeals for their elimination. Compared with the majority, racial and ethnic minorities continue to have poorer health status and health outcomes for most chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, cancer and end-stage renal disease. Many factors, such as affordability, access and diversity in the healthcare system, influence care and outcomes, creating challenges that make the task of eliminating health disparities and achieving health equity daunting and elusive. Novel strategies are needed to bring about much needed change in the complex and evolving United States healthcare system. Although not exhaustive, opportunities such as (1) developing standardized race measurements across health systems, (2) implementing effective interventions, (3) improving workforce diversity, (4) using technological advances and (5) adopting practices such as personalized medicine may serve as appropriate starting points for moving toward health equity. Over the past several decades, diversity in the U.S. population has increased significantly and is expected to increase exponentially in the near future. As the population becomes more diverse, it is important to recognize the possibilities of new and emerging disparities. It is imperative that steps are taken to eliminate the current gap in care and prevent new disparities from developing. Therefore, we present challenges and offer recommendations for facilitating the process of eliminating health disparities and achieving health equity across diverse populations.

  9. The role of privacy protection in healthcare information systems adoption.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chien-Lung; Lee, Ming-Ren; Su, Chien-Hui

    2013-10-01

    Privacy protection is an important issue and challenge in healthcare information systems (HISs). Recently, some privacy-enhanced HISs are proposed. Users' privacy perception, intention, and attitude might affect the adoption of such systems. This paper aims to propose a privacy-enhanced HIS framework and investigate the role of privacy protection in HISs adoption. In the proposed framework, privacy protection, access control, and secure transmission modules are designed to enhance the privacy protection of a HIS. An experimental privacy-enhanced HIS is also implemented. Furthermore, we proposed a research model extending the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology by considering perceived security and information security literacy and then investigate user adoption of a privacy-enhanced HIS. The experimental results and analyses showed that user adoption of a privacy-enhanced HIS is directly affected by social influence, performance expectancy, facilitating conditions, and perceived security. Perceived security has a mediating effect between information security literacy and user adoption. This study proposes several implications for research and practice to improve designing, development, and promotion of a good healthcare information system with privacy protection.

  10. Achieving Equity in an Evolving Healthcare System: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Williams, Joni Strom; Walker, Rebekah J; Egede, Leonard E

    2016-01-01

    For decades, disparities in health have been well documented in the United States and regrettably, remain prevalent despite evidence and appeals for their elimination. Compared with the majority, racial and ethnic minorities continue to have poorer health status and health outcomes for most chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, cancer and end-stage renal disease. Many factors, such as affordability, access and diversity in the healthcare system, influence care and outcomes, creating challenges that make the task of eliminating health disparities and achieving health equity daunting and elusive. Novel strategies are needed to bring about much needed change in the complex and evolving United States healthcare system. Although not exhaustive, opportunities such as (1) developing standardized race measurements across health systems, (2) implementing effective interventions, (3) improving workforce diversity, (4) using technological advances and (5) adopting practices such as personalized medicine may serve as appropriate starting points for moving toward health equity. Over the past several decades, diversity in the U.S. population has increased significantly and is expected to increase exponentially in the near future. As the population becomes more diverse, it is important to recognize the possibilities of new and emerging disparities. It is imperative that steps are taken to eliminate the current gap in care and prevent new disparities from developing. Therefore, we present challenges and offer recommendations for facilitating the process of eliminating health disparities and achieving health equity across diverse populations. PMID:26802756

  11. MEDICARE PAYMENTS AND SYSTEM-LEVEL HEALTH-CARE USE

    PubMed Central

    ROBBINS, JACOB A.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid growth of Medicare managed care over the past decade has the potential to increase the efficiency of health-care delivery. Improvements in care management for some may improve efficiency system-wide, with implications for optimal payment policy in public insurance programs. These system-level effects may depend on local health-care market structure and vary based on patient characteristics. We use exogenous variation in the Medicare payment schedule to isolate the effects of market-level managed care enrollment on the quantity and quality of care delivered. We find that in areas with greater enrollment of Medicare beneficiaries in managed care, the non–managed care beneficiaries have fewer days in the hospital but more outpatient visits, consistent with a substitution of less expensive outpatient care for more expensive inpatient care, particularly at high levels of managed care. We find no evidence that care is of lower quality. Optimal payment policies for Medicare managed care enrollees that account for system-level spillovers may thus be higher than those that do not. PMID:27042687

  12. The chief nurse executive role in large healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Englebright, Jane; Perlin, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Community hospitals are most frequently led by nonclinicians. Although some may have employed physician leaders, most often clinical leadership is provided by a chief nurse executive (CNE) or chief nursing officer. Clinical leadership of community hospital and health systems may similarly be provided by a system-level nursing executive or, often, by a council of facility CNEs. The increasingly competitive healthcare environment in which value-based purchasing of healthcare and pay-for-performance programs demand improved clinical performance for financial success has led to reconsideration of whether a council model can provide either the leadership or adequate attention to clinical (and operational) improvement. In turn, community hospitals and health systems look to CNE or chief nursing officer roles at the highest level of the organization as resources that are able to segue between the clinical and operational domains, translating clinical performance demands into operating strategies and tactics. This article explores CNE characteristics required for success in these increasingly responsible and visible roles.

  13. Wireless Health Data Exchange for Home Healthcare Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitous home healthcare systems have been playing an increasingly significant role in the treatment and management of chronic diseases, such as diabetes and hypertension, but progress has been hampered by the lack of standardization in the exchange of medical health care information. In an effort to establish standardization, this paper proposes a home healthcare monitoring system data exchange scheme between the HL7 standard and the IEEE1451 standard. IEEE1451 is a standard for special sensor networks, such as industrial control and smart homes, and defines a suite of interfaces that communicate among heterogeneous networks. HL7 is the standard for medical information exchange among medical organizations and medical personnel. While it provides a flexible data exchange in health care domains, it does not provide for data exchange with sensors. Thus, it is necessary to develop a data exchange schema to convert data between the HL7 and the IEEE1451 standard. This paper proposes a schema that can exchange data between HL7 devices and the monitoring device, and conforms to the IEEE 1451 standard. The experimental results and conclusions of this approach are presented and show the feasibility of the proposed exchange schema. PMID:22319296

  14. Is public health ready to participate in the transformation of the healthcare system?

    PubMed

    Millar, John; Bruce, Ted; Cheng, Siu Mee; Masse, Richard; McKeown, David

    2013-01-01

    The healthcare system in Canada is undergoing significant transformation in response to three major interrelated pressures: the overall burden of illness is rising, patients are getting poor quality of care and healthcare costs are inexorably rising. One idea to guide this change is to transform the primary care system into a community-based primary healthcare (CBPH) system. This paper discusses, in particular, the readiness of public health to participate in the transformation to a CBPH system.

  15. A data-mining framework for transnational healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chia-Ping; Jigjidsuren, Chinburen; Dorjgochoo, Sarangerel; Chen, Chi-Huang; Chen, Wei-Hsin; Hsu, Chih-Kuo; Wu, Jin-Ming; Hsueh, Chih-Wen; Lai, Mei-Shu; Tan, Ching-Ting; Altangerel, Erdenebaatar; Lai, Feipei

    2012-08-01

    Medical resources are important and necessary in health care. Recently, the development of methods for improving the efficiency of medical resource utilization is an emerging problem. Despite evidence supporting the use of order sets in hospitals, only a small number of health information systems have successfully equipped physicians with analysis of complex order sequences from clinical pathway and clinical guideline. This paper presents a data-mining framework for transnational healthcare system to find alternative practices, including transfusion, pre-admission tests, and evaluation of liver diseases. However, individual countries vary with respect to geographical location, living habits, and culture, so disease risks and treatment methods also vary across countries. To realize the difference, a service-oriented architecture and cloud-computing technology are applied to analyze these medical data. The validity of the proposed system is demonstrated in including Taiwan and Mongolia, to ensure the feasibility of our approach. PMID:21584772

  16. Systems Medicine: The Future of Medical Genomics, Healthcare, and Wellness.

    PubMed

    Saqi, Mansoor; Pellet, Johann; Roznovat, Irina; Mazein, Alexander; Ballereau, Stéphane; De Meulder, Bertrand; Auffray, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genomics have led to the rapid and relatively inexpensive collection of patient molecular data including multiple types of omics data. The integration of these data with clinical measurements has the potential to impact on our understanding of the molecular basis of disease and on disease management. Systems medicine is an approach to understanding disease through an integration of large patient datasets. It offers the possibility for personalized strategies for healthcare through the development of a new taxonomy of disease. Advanced computing will be an important component in effectively implementing systems medicine. In this chapter we describe three computational challenges associated with systems medicine: disease subtype discovery using integrated datasets, obtaining a mechanistic understanding of disease, and the development of an informatics platform for the mining, analysis, and visualization of data emerging from translational medicine studies.

  17. The Imminent Healthcare and Emergency Care Crisis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tetsuji; Nishida, Masamichi; Suzuki, Yuriko; Kobayashi, Kunio

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Japan has a universal healthcare system, and this paper describes the reality of the healthcare services provided, as well as current issues with the system. Methods Academic, government, and press reports on Japanese healthcare systems and healthcare guidelines were reviewed. Results The universal healthcare system of Japan is considered internationally to be both low-cost and effective because the Japanese population enjoys good health status with a long life expectancy, while healthcare spending in Japan is below the average given by the Organization for Economic Corporation and Development (OECD). However, in many regions of Japan the existing healthcare resources are seriously inadequate, especially with regard to the number of physicians and other health professionals. Because healthcare is traditionally viewed as “sacred” work in Japan, healthcare professionals are expected to make large personal sacrifices. Also, public attitudes toward medical malpractice have changed in recent decades, and medical professionals are facing legal issues without experienced support of the government or legal professionals. Administrative response to the lack of resources and collaboration among communities are beginning, and more efficient control and management of the healthcare system is under consideration. Conclusion The Japanese healthcare system needs to adopt an efficient medical control organization to ease the strain on existing healthcare professionals and to increase the number of physicians and other healthcare resources. Rather than continuing to depend on healthcare professionals being able and willing to make personal sacrifices, the government, the public and medical societies must cooperate and support changes in the healthcare system. PMID:19561714

  18. Selecting a commercial clinical information system: an academic medical center's experience.

    PubMed

    Wong, E T; Abendroth, T W

    1994-01-01

    Choosing a commercial clinical information system to meet the information needs of patient care, research, education, administration, finance, and ongoing changes of the healthcare system of an academic medical center is a challenging task. For the past six months, The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center undertook this task through (i) establishing a task force, (ii) assessing end-user information needs, (iii) understanding future institutional development and strategies, (iv) conceptualizing the ideal system, (v) identifying a short list of vendors, (vi) sending RFIs to vendors, (vii) visiting vendors' headquarters, (viii) technical review, (ix) reference calls, (x) using consultation services, (xi) on-site demonstration, and (xii) visiting the vendor's clients. PMID:7950008

  19. Selecting a commercial clinical information system: an academic medical center's experience.

    PubMed

    Wong, E T; Abendroth, T W

    1994-01-01

    Choosing a commercial clinical information system to meet the information needs of patient care, research, education, administration, finance, and ongoing changes of the healthcare system of an academic medical center is a challenging task. For the past six months, The Milton S. Hershey Medical Center undertook this task through (i) establishing a task force, (ii) assessing end-user information needs, (iii) understanding future institutional development and strategies, (iv) conceptualizing the ideal system, (v) identifying a short list of vendors, (vi) sending RFIs to vendors, (vii) visiting vendors' headquarters, (viii) technical review, (ix) reference calls, (x) using consultation services, (xi) on-site demonstration, and (xii) visiting the vendor's clients.

  20. Scalable Collaborative Infrastructure for a Learning Healthcare System (SCILHS): architecture.

    PubMed

    Mandl, Kenneth D; Kohane, Isaac S; McFadden, Douglas; Weber, Griffin M; Natter, Marc; Mandel, Joshua; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Weiler, Sarah; Klann, Jeffrey G; Bickel, Jonathan; Adams, William G; Ge, Yaorong; Zhou, Xiaobo; Perkins, James; Marsolo, Keith; Bernstam, Elmer; Showalter, John; Quarshie, Alexander; Ofili, Elizabeth; Hripcsak, George; Murphy, Shawn N

    2014-01-01

    We describe the architecture of the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) funded Scalable Collaborative Infrastructure for a Learning Healthcare System (SCILHS, http://www.SCILHS.org) clinical data research network, which leverages the $48 billion dollar federal investment in health information technology (IT) to enable a queryable semantic data model across 10 health systems covering more than 8 million patients, plugging universally into the point of care, generating evidence and discovery, and thereby enabling clinician and patient participation in research during the patient encounter. Central to the success of SCILHS is development of innovative 'apps' to improve PCOR research methods and capacitate point of care functions such as consent, enrollment, randomization, and outreach for patient-reported outcomes. SCILHS adapts and extends an existing national research network formed on an advanced IT infrastructure built with open source, free, modular components.

  1. Scalable Collaborative Infrastructure for a Learning Healthcare System (SCILHS): Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Mandl, Kenneth D; Kohane, Isaac S; McFadden, Douglas; Weber, Griffin M; Natter, Marc; Mandel, Joshua; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Weiler, Sarah; Klann, Jeffrey G; Bickel, Jonathan; Adams, William G; Ge, Yaorong; Zhou, Xiaobo; Perkins, James; Marsolo, Keith; Bernstam, Elmer; Showalter, John; Quarshie, Alexander; Ofili, Elizabeth; Hripcsak, George; Murphy, Shawn N

    2014-01-01

    We describe the architecture of the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) funded Scalable Collaborative Infrastructure for a Learning Healthcare System (SCILHS, http://www.SCILHS.org) clinical data research network, which leverages the $48 billion dollar federal investment in health information technology (IT) to enable a queryable semantic data model across 10 health systems covering more than 8 million patients, plugging universally into the point of care, generating evidence and discovery, and thereby enabling clinician and patient participation in research during the patient encounter. Central to the success of SCILHS is development of innovative ‘apps’ to improve PCOR research methods and capacitate point of care functions such as consent, enrollment, randomization, and outreach for patient-reported outcomes. SCILHS adapts and extends an existing national research network formed on an advanced IT infrastructure built with open source, free, modular components. PMID:24821734

  2. Library outreach near and far: programs to staff and patients of the Piedmont Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Edie; Leslie, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    The librarians at the Sauls Memorial Library at Piedmont Hospital describe two services they offer to Piedmont Healthcare personnel and patients. Included are the system-wide library outreach program and the Sauls Memorial Library Business Center at the main hospital. These services create good will between patients, employees, and the healthcare system, and are also vital elements in promoting and marketing the library. This article illustrates the steps that were taken to create these services within Piedmont Healthcare's growing system.

  3. WISH: a Wireless Mobile Multimedia Information System in Healthcare using RFID.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weider D; Ray, Pradeep; Motoc, Tiberiu

    2008-05-01

    It is important to improve the efficiency of healthcare-related operations and the associated costs. Healthcare organizations are constantly under increased pressure to streamline operations and provide enhanced services to their patients. Wireless mobile computing technology has the potential to provide the desired benefits and would be a critical part of today's healthcare information system. In this paper, a system is presented to better facilitate the functions of physicians and medical staff in healthcare by using modern wireless mobile technology, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tools, and multimedia streaming. The paper includes a case study of the development of such a system in the context of healthcare in the United States. The results of the study show how wireless mobile multimedia systems can be developed for the improvement of the quality and efficiency in healthcare for other nations as well. Our testing data show a time reduction of more than 50% in the daily activities of hospital staff.

  4. A reliable architectural style for designing pervasive healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Rafe, Vahid; Hajvali, Masoumeh

    2014-09-01

    The evolution of wireless communication technologies opened the way to the definition of innovative e-Health systems aimed at providing a continuous and remote support to patients and new instruments to improve the workflow of the medical personnel. Nowadays, pervasive healthcare systems are a major step in this regard. The safety-critical systems on one hand and their failure in communication (i.e. sending and receiving messages) in other hand may lead to disaster results in the systems. Moreover, the need for high quality services in such systems, and the access to various types of Quality of Services such as reliability in software development has been increasing in the past years. In this paper, firstly we extend the core meta-model of the previously designed style for designing the structures of such systems in order to reach a high level of reliability in messaging. Secondly, their configuration mechanisms in controlling the communicative errors will be modeled using graph transformation rules. Finally, the correctness of the model is analyzed by model checking techniques. The results of the analysis show its high reliability.

  5. Patient Education as an Information System, Healthcare Tool and Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirhonen, Antti; Silvennoinen, Minna; Sillence, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Patient education (PE) has a crucial role in the function of a healthcare organisation. For the care process of a patient, it is essential to get the right information at the right moment and in the right form. This paper analyses PE as the primary mode of interaction between a patient and a healthcare organisation. The approach is illustrated…

  6. "Academic Freedom" or "Bottom Line": Public College Healthcare Professionals Teaching in a Global Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Kelly; Muzzin, Linda

    2014-01-01

    College faculty teaching in the health professions work within a unionized, neoliberal system designed to produce competent graduates trained to work in the health care hierarchy. The workers trained include community care assistants, two levels of nurses (practical nurses and baccalaureate nurses, the latter in collaboration with university…

  7. Advancing Coordinated Care in Four Provincial Healthcare Systems: Evaluating a Knowledge-Exchange Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Renee; Parker, Victoria; Phillips, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This research project created and evaluated a knowledge-exchange intervention designed to facilitate an increase in organizational readiness for implementing coordinated stroke care in four primarily rural provincial healthcare systems. Intervention: Knowledge brokers were linked to networks within, across and outside the provinces to support, inform and disseminate best practice recommendations for coordinated stroke care within the provincial healthcare systems. Findings: The intervention increased awareness and dissemination of recommendations, which stimulated the implementation of coordinated stroke care. Similar knowledge-exchange interventions might work in other healthcare jurisdictions with similar demographics, to promote evidence-informed improvements in healthcare. PMID:22851988

  8. Intelligent diagnosis and prescription for a customized physical fitness and healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Liu, Hsiao-Man; Huang, Chung-Lin

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of the era of global high-tech industry and commerce and its associated sedentary lifestyle, opportunities for physical activity are reduced. People's physical fitness and health is deteriorating. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a system that can enhance people's physical fitness and health. However, it is difficult for general physical fitness and healthcare systems to meet individualized needs. The main purpose of this research is to develop a method of intelligent diagnosis and prescription for a customized physical fitness and healthcare system. The proposed system records all processes of the physical fitness and healthcare system via a wireless sensor network and the results of the diagnosis and prescription will be generated by fuzzy logic inference. It will improve individualized physical fitness and healthcare. Finally, we demonstrate the advantages of intelligent diagnosis and prescription for a customized physical fitness and healthcare system.

  9. Intelligent diagnosis and prescription for a customized physical fitness and healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Liu, Hsiao-Man; Huang, Chung-Lin

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of the era of global high-tech industry and commerce and its associated sedentary lifestyle, opportunities for physical activity are reduced. People's physical fitness and health is deteriorating. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a system that can enhance people's physical fitness and health. However, it is difficult for general physical fitness and healthcare systems to meet individualized needs. The main purpose of this research is to develop a method of intelligent diagnosis and prescription for a customized physical fitness and healthcare system. The proposed system records all processes of the physical fitness and healthcare system via a wireless sensor network and the results of the diagnosis and prescription will be generated by fuzzy logic inference. It will improve individualized physical fitness and healthcare. Finally, we demonstrate the advantages of intelligent diagnosis and prescription for a customized physical fitness and healthcare system. PMID:26444803

  10. Systems Analysis Approach to Academic Planning, Part I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwagbaraocha, Joel O.

    This paper presents concepts relevant to, and the benefits to be gained from, using a "systems" model in thinking about academic planning in general and curriculum development in particular. An attempt is made to show how the "systems" approach provides key tools for a diagnosis of academic structure in a college or university. In doing so, the…

  11. Source characterization of nervous system active pharmaceutical ingredients in healthcare wastewaters

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nervous system active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), including anti-depressants and opioids, are important clinically administered pharmaceuticals within healthcare facilities. Concentrations and mass loadings of ten nervous system APIs and three nervous system API metaboli...

  12. Hepatitis B vaccination coverage and documented seroprotection among matriculating healthcare students at an academic institution in the United States.

    PubMed

    Tohme, Rania A; Ribner, Bruce; Huey, Michael J; Spradling, Philip R

    2011-08-01

    We evaluated hepatitis B vaccination coverage and documentation of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs) concentration among a cohort of healthcare students. Of 4,075 students, 59.8% had documentation of vaccination and 83.8% had anti-HBs concentration greater than or equal to 10 mIU/mL. Documenting hepatitis B vaccination and anti-HBs concentration among healthcare students is needed to prevent transmission in healthcare settings. PMID:21768768

  13. Do reviews of healthcare interventions teach us how to improve healthcare systems?

    PubMed

    Pawson, Ray; Greenhalgh, Joanne; Brennan, Cathy; Glidewell, Elizabeth

    2014-08-01

    Planners, managers and policy makers in modern health services are not without ingenuity - they will always try, try and try again. They face deep-seated or 'wicked' problems, which have complex roots in the labyrinthine structures though which healthcare is delivered. Accordingly, the interventions devised to deal with such stubborn problems usually come in the plural. Many different reforms are devised to deal with a particular stumbling block, which may be implemented sequentially, simultaneously or whenever policy fashion or funding dictates. This paper examines this predicament from the perspective of evidence based policy. How might researchers go about reviewing the evidence when they are faced with multiple or indeed competing interventions addressing the same problem? In the face of this plight a rather unheralded form of research synthesis has emerged, namely the 'typological review'. We critically review the fortunes of this strategy. Separating the putative reforms into series of subtypes and producing a scorecard of their outcomes has the unintended effect of divorcing them all from an understanding of how organisations change. A more fruitful approach may lie in a 'theory-driven review' underpinned by an understanding of dynamics of social change in complex organisations. We test this thesis by examining the primary and secondary research on the many interventions designed to tackle a particularly wicked problem, namely the inexorable rise in demand for healthcare.

  14. The health-care system: an assessment and reform agenda.

    PubMed

    Mataria, Awad; Khatib, Rana; Donaldson, Cam; Bossert, Thomas; Hunter, David J; Alsayed, Fahed; Moatti, Jean-Paul

    2009-04-01

    Attempts to establish a health plan for the occupied Palestinian territory were made before the 1993 Oslo Accords. However, the first official national health plan was published in 1994 and aimed to regulate the health sector and integrate the activities of the four main health-care providers: the Palestinian Ministry of Health, Palestinian non-governmental organisations, the UN Relief and Works Agency, and a cautiously developing private sector. However, a decade and a half later, attempts to create an effective, efficient, and equitable system remain unsuccessful. This failure results from arrangements for health care established by the Israeli military government between 1967 and 1994, the nature of the Palestinian National Authority, which has little authority in practice and has been burdened by inefficiency, cronyism, corruption, and the inappropriate priorities repeatedly set to satisfy the preferences of foreign aid donors. Although similar problems exist elsewhere, in the occupied Palestinian territory they are exacerbated and perpetuated under conditions of military occupation. Developmental approaches integrated with responses to emergencies should be advanced to create a more effective, efficient, and equitable health system, but this process would be difficult under military occupation.

  15. Identity Management Systems in Healthcare: The Issue of Patient Identifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soenens, Els

    According to a recent recommendation of the European Commission, now is the time for Europe to enhance interoperability in eHealth. Although interoperability of patient identifiers seems promising for matters of patient mobility, patient empowerment and effective access to care, we see that today there is indeed a considerable lack of interoperability in the field of patient identification. Looking from a socio-technical rather than a merely technical point of view, one can understand the fact that the development and implementation of an identity management system in a specific healthcare context is influenced by particular social practices, affected by socio-economical history and the political climate and regulated by specific data protection legislations. Consequently, the process of making patient identification in Europe more interoperable is a development beyond semantic and syntactic levels. In this paper, we gives some examples of today’s patient identifier systems in Europe, discuss the issue of interoperability of (unique) patient identifiers from a socio-technical point of view and try not to ignore the ‘privacy side’ of the story.

  16. Corruption in health-care systems and its effect on cancer care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Saskia; Njuguna, Festus; Olbara, Gilbert; Sindano, Solomon; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Supriyadi, Eddy; Kaspers, Gertjan

    2015-08-01

    At the government, hospital, and health-care provider level, corruption plays a major role in health-care systems in Africa. The returns on health investments of international financial institutions, health organisations, and donors might be very low when mismanagement and dysfunctional structures of health-care systems are not addressed. More funding might even aggravate corruption. We discuss corruption and its effects on cancer care within the African health-care system in a sociocultural context. The contribution of high-income countries in stimulating corruption is also described. Corrupt African governments cannot be expected to take the initiative to eradicate corruption. Therefore, international financial institutions, health organisations, and financial donors should use their power to demand policy reforms of health-care systems in Africa troubled by the issue of corruption. These modifications will ameliorate the access and quality of cancer care for patients across the continent, and ultimately improve the outcome of health care to all patients. PMID:26248847

  17. Corruption in health-care systems and its effect on cancer care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Saskia; Njuguna, Festus; Olbara, Gilbert; Sindano, Solomon; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Supriyadi, Eddy; Kaspers, Gertjan

    2015-08-01

    At the government, hospital, and health-care provider level, corruption plays a major role in health-care systems in Africa. The returns on health investments of international financial institutions, health organisations, and donors might be very low when mismanagement and dysfunctional structures of health-care systems are not addressed. More funding might even aggravate corruption. We discuss corruption and its effects on cancer care within the African health-care system in a sociocultural context. The contribution of high-income countries in stimulating corruption is also described. Corrupt African governments cannot be expected to take the initiative to eradicate corruption. Therefore, international financial institutions, health organisations, and financial donors should use their power to demand policy reforms of health-care systems in Africa troubled by the issue of corruption. These modifications will ameliorate the access and quality of cancer care for patients across the continent, and ultimately improve the outcome of health care to all patients.

  18. Healthcare is primary.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2(nd) National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on "healthcare" in India. The theme of this conference was "Healthcare is Primary." The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the "general health system" instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, "family medicine" (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation. PMID:26985402

  19. Healthcare is primary.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2(nd) National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on "healthcare" in India. The theme of this conference was "Healthcare is Primary." The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the "general health system" instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, "family medicine" (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation.

  20. An analysis of the healthcare informatics and systems in Southeast Asia: a current perspective from seven countries.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Q T; Naguib, R N G; Abd Ghani, M K; Bali, R K; Lee, I M

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the healthcare systems in Southeast Asia, with a focus on the healthcare informatics development and deployment in seven countries, namely, Singapore, Cambodia, Malaysia, Thailand, Laos, the Philippines and Vietnam. Brief geographic and demographic information is provided for each country, followed by a historical review of the national strategies for healthcare informatics development. An analysis of the state-of-the-art healthcare infrastructure is also given, along with a critical appraisal of national healthcare provisions.

  1. Primary healthcare system and practice characteristics in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Hwee Sing; Lim, Yee Wei; Vrijhoef, Hubertus Jm

    2014-01-01

    It is crucial to adapt and improve the (primary) health care systems of countries to prepare for future patient profiles and their related needs. The main aim of this study was to acquire a comprehensive overview of the perceptions of primary care experts in Singapore about the state of primary care in Singapore, and to compare this with the state of primary care in other countries. Notwithstanding ranked 2(nd) in terms of efficiency of health care, Singapore is facing significant health care challenges. Emails were sent to 85 experts, where they were asked to rate Singapore's primary care system based on nine internationally adopted health system characteristics and six practice characteristics (response rate = 29%). The primary care system in Singapore received an average of 10.9 out of 30 possible points. Lowest ratings were given to: earnings of primary care physicians compared to specialists, requirement for 24 hr accessibility of primary care services, standard of family medicine in academic departments, reflection of community served by practices in patient lists, and the access to specialists without needing to be referred by primary care physicians. Singapore was categorized as a 'low' primary care country according to the experts. PMID:25120380

  2. A novel web-enabled healthcare solution on health vault system.

    PubMed

    Liao, Lingxia; Chen, Min; Rodrigues, Joel J P C; Lai, Xiaorong; Vuong, Son

    2012-06-01

    Complicated Electronic Medical Records (EMR) systems have created problems in systems regarding an easy implementation and interoperability for a Web-enabled Healthcare Solution, which is normally provided by an independent healthcare giver with limited IT knowledge and interests. An EMR system with well-designed and user-friendly interface, such as Microsoft HealthVault System used as the back-end platform of a Web-enabled healthcare application will be an approach to deal with these problems. This paper analyzes the patient oriented Web-enabled healthcare service application as the new trend to delivery healthcare from hospital/clinic-centric to patient-centric, the current e-healthcare applications, and the main backend EMR systems. Then, we present a novel web-enabled healthcare solution based on Microsoft HealthVault EMR system to meet customers' needs, such as, low total cost, easily development and maintenance, and good interoperability. A sample system is given to show how the solution can be fulfilled, evaluated, and validated. We expect that this paper will provide a deep understanding of the available EMR systems, leading to insights for new solutions and approaches driven to next generation EMR systems.

  3. The role of pharmacoeconomics in current Indian healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Akram; Patel, Isha; Parimilakrishnan, Sundararajan; Mohanta, Guru Prasad; Chung, HaeChung; Chang, Jongwha

    2013-01-01

    Phamacoeconomics can aid the policy makers and the healthcare providers in decision making in evaluating the affordability of and access to rational drug use. Efficiency is a key concept of pharmacoeconomics, and various strategies are suggested for buying the greatest amount of benefits for a given resource use. Phamacoeconomic evaluation techniques such as cost minimization analysis, cost effectiveness analysis, cost benefit analysis, and cost utilization analysis, which support identification and quantification of cost of drugs, are conducted in a similar way, but vary in measurement of value of health benefits and outcomes. This article provides a brief overview about pharmacoeconomics, its utility with respect to the Indian pharmaceutical industry, and the expanding insurance system in India. Pharmacoeconomic evidences can be utilized to support decisions on licensing, pricing, reimbursement, and maintenance of formulary procedure of pharmaceuticals. For the insurance companies to give better facility at minimum cost, India must develop the platform for pharmacoeconomics with a validating methodology and appropriate training. The role of clinical pharmacists including PharmD graduates are expected to be more beneficial than the conventional pharmacists, as they will be able to apply the principles of economics in daily basis practice in community and hospital pharmacy. PMID:24991597

  4. Academic Literacies and Systemic Functional Linguistics: How Do They Relate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Caroline; Donohue, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Two approaches to English for Academic Purposes (EAP) research and teaching which have arisen in recent years are systemic functional linguistics (SFL) approaches in Australia and elsewhere (e.g. Hood, 2006; Lee, 2010; Woodward-Kron, 2009) and Academic Literacies approaches in the UK and elsewhere (e.g. Lillis & Scott, 2008; Thesen & Pletzen,…

  5. Incorporating Academic Standards in Instructional Systems Design Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Charles Xiaoxue

    Almost every state is "imposing" academic standards. Helping students to meet those standards is a key task for teachers and school administrators, as well as instructional systems designers. Thus, instructional designers in the K-12 environments are facing the challenge of using appropriately and effectively academic standards in their…

  6. Job Evaluation Systems in Academic Libraries: Current Issues and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewey, Barbara J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the increasing managerial importance of job evaluation to libraries, compares typical job evaluation systems in academic libraries with innovative ones in selected academic settings and notes that job evaluation development has resulted in libraries focusing on specific personnel issues and developing new directions in the job evaluation…

  7. It is time to talk about people: a human-centered healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Examining vulnerabilities within our current healthcare system we propose borrowing two tools from the fields of engineering and design: a) Reason's system approach [1] and b) User-centered design [2,3]. Both approaches are human-centered in that they consider common patterns of human behavior when analyzing systems to identify problems and generate solutions. This paper examines these two human-centered approaches in the context of healthcare. We argue that maintaining a human-centered orientation in clinical care, research, training, and governance is critical to the evolution of an effective and sustainable healthcare system. PMID:21110859

  8. Intelligent scheduling of execution for customized physical fitness and healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Liu, Hsiao-Man; Huang, Chung-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Physical fitness and health of white collar business person is getting worse and worse in recent years. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a system which can enhance physical fitness and health for people. Although the exercise prescription can be generated after diagnosing for customized physical fitness and healthcare. It is hard to meet individual execution needs for general scheduling of physical fitness and healthcare system. So the main purpose of this research is to develop an intelligent scheduling of execution for customized physical fitness and healthcare system. The results of diagnosis and prescription for customized physical fitness and healthcare system will be generated by fuzzy logic Inference. Then the results of diagnosis and prescription for customized physical fitness and healthcare system will be scheduled and executed by intelligent computing. The scheduling of execution is generated by using genetic algorithm method. It will improve traditional scheduling of exercise prescription for physical fitness and healthcare. Finally, we will demonstrate the advantages of the intelligent scheduling of execution for customized physical fitness and healthcare system.

  9. Intelligent scheduling of execution for customized physical fitness and healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Liu, Hsiao-Man; Huang, Chung-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Physical fitness and health of white collar business person is getting worse and worse in recent years. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a system which can enhance physical fitness and health for people. Although the exercise prescription can be generated after diagnosing for customized physical fitness and healthcare. It is hard to meet individual execution needs for general scheduling of physical fitness and healthcare system. So the main purpose of this research is to develop an intelligent scheduling of execution for customized physical fitness and healthcare system. The results of diagnosis and prescription for customized physical fitness and healthcare system will be generated by fuzzy logic Inference. Then the results of diagnosis and prescription for customized physical fitness and healthcare system will be scheduled and executed by intelligent computing. The scheduling of execution is generated by using genetic algorithm method. It will improve traditional scheduling of exercise prescription for physical fitness and healthcare. Finally, we will demonstrate the advantages of the intelligent scheduling of execution for customized physical fitness and healthcare system. PMID:26444822

  10. Printable low-cost sensor systems for healthcare smart textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Pratyush; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Oh, Sechang; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Mathur, Gyanesh N.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2011-04-01

    Smart textiles-based wearable health monitoring systems (ST-HMS) have been presented as elegant solutions to the requirements of individuals across a wide range of ages. They can be used to monitor young or elderly recuperating /convalescent patients either in hospital or at home, or they can be used by young athletes to monitor important physiological parameters to better design their training or fitness program. Business and academic interests, all over the world, have fueled a great deal of work in the development of this technology since 1990. However, two important impediments to the development of ST-HMS are:-integration of flexible electrodes, flexible sensors, signal conditioning circuits and data logging or wireless transmission devices into a seamless garment and a means to mass manufacture the same, while keeping the costs low. Roll-to-roll printing and screen printing are two low cost methods for large scale manufacturing on flexible substrates and can be extended to textiles as well. These two methods are, currently, best suited for planar structures. The sensors, integrated with wireless telemetry, facilitate development of a ST-HMS that allows for unobtrusive health monitoring. In this paper, we present our results with planar screen printable sensors based on conductive inks which can be used to monitor EKG, abdominal respiration effort, blood pressure, pulse rate and body temperature. The sensor systems were calibrated, and tested for sensitivity, reliability and robustness to ensure reuse after washing cycles.

  11. The role of communication servers in the architecture of healthcare information systems.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, K U

    1997-01-01

    Communication between departmental subsystems within a hospital information system (HIS) is more and more supported by dedicated communication servers (CS). One of the main advantages is a centralized and standardized flow of information. Beside this "classic" approach a communication server may be embedded on at least two other hierarchical levels in the architecture of healthcare information systems: in an organizational unit within a hospital (subsystem) but also in large scale healthcare information systems covering aspects of communication between the involved external healthcare providers. PMID:10175357

  12. The secret art of managing healthcare expenses: investigating implicit rationing and autonomy in public healthcare systems

    PubMed Central

    Lauridsen, S M R; Norup, M S; Rossel, P J H

    2007-01-01

    Rationing healthcare is a difficult task, which includes preventing patients from accessing potentially beneficial treatments. Proponents of implicit rationing argue that politicians cannot resist pressure from strong patient groups for treatments and conclude that physicians should ration without informing patients or the public. The authors subdivide this specific programme of implicit rationing, or “hidden rationing”, into local hidden rationing, unsophisticated global hidden rationing and sophisticated global hidden rationing. They evaluate the appropriateness of these methods of rationing from the perspectives of individual and political autonomy and conclude that local hidden rationing and unsophisticated global hidden rationing clearly violate patients' individual autonomy, that is, their right to participate in medical decision‐making. While sophisticated global hidden rationing avoids this charge, the authors point out that it nonetheless violates the political autonomy of patients, that is, their right to engage in public affairs as citizens. A defence of any of the forms of hidden rationing is therefore considered to be incompatible with a defence of autonomy. PMID:18055900

  13. Data Privacy in Cloud-assisted Healthcare Systems: State of the Art and Future Challenges.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Anam; Abbas, Haider

    2016-06-01

    The widespread deployment and utility of Wireless Body Area Networks (WBAN's) in healthcare systems required new technologies like Internet of Things (IoT) and cloud computing, that are able to deal with the storage and processing limitations of WBAN's. This amalgamation of WBAN-based healthcare systems to cloud-based healthcare systems gave rise to serious privacy concerns to the sensitive healthcare data. Hence, there is a need for the proactive identification and effective mitigation mechanisms for these patient's data privacy concerns that pose continuous threats to the integrity and stability of the healthcare environment. For this purpose, a systematic literature review has been conducted that presents a clear picture of the privacy concerns of patient's data in cloud-assisted healthcare systems and analyzed the mechanisms that are recently proposed by the research community. The methodology used for conducting the review was based on Kitchenham guidelines. Results from the review show that most of the patient's data privacy techniques do not fully address the privacy concerns and therefore require more efforts. The summary presented in this paper would help in setting research directions for the techniques and mechanisms that are needed to address the patient's data privacy concerns in a balanced and light-weight manner by considering all the aspects and limitations of the cloud-assisted healthcare systems. PMID:27155893

  14. Data Privacy in Cloud-assisted Healthcare Systems: State of the Art and Future Challenges.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Anam; Abbas, Haider

    2016-06-01

    The widespread deployment and utility of Wireless Body Area Networks (WBAN's) in healthcare systems required new technologies like Internet of Things (IoT) and cloud computing, that are able to deal with the storage and processing limitations of WBAN's. This amalgamation of WBAN-based healthcare systems to cloud-based healthcare systems gave rise to serious privacy concerns to the sensitive healthcare data. Hence, there is a need for the proactive identification and effective mitigation mechanisms for these patient's data privacy concerns that pose continuous threats to the integrity and stability of the healthcare environment. For this purpose, a systematic literature review has been conducted that presents a clear picture of the privacy concerns of patient's data in cloud-assisted healthcare systems and analyzed the mechanisms that are recently proposed by the research community. The methodology used for conducting the review was based on Kitchenham guidelines. Results from the review show that most of the patient's data privacy techniques do not fully address the privacy concerns and therefore require more efforts. The summary presented in this paper would help in setting research directions for the techniques and mechanisms that are needed to address the patient's data privacy concerns in a balanced and light-weight manner by considering all the aspects and limitations of the cloud-assisted healthcare systems.

  15. Software engineering principles applied to large healthcare information systems--a case report.

    PubMed

    Nardon, Fabiane Bizinella; de A Moura, Lincoln

    2007-01-01

    São Paulo is the largest city in Brazil and one of the largest cities in the world. In 2004, São Paulo City Department of Health decided to implement a Healthcare Information System to support managing healthcare services and provide an ambulatory health record. The resulting information system is one of the largest public healthcare information systems ever built, with more than 2 million lines of code. Although statistics shows that most software projects fail, and the risks for the São Paulo initiative were enormous, the information system was completed on-time and on-budget. In this paper, we discuss the software engineering principles adopted that allowed to accomplish that project's goals, hoping that sharing the experience of this project will help other healthcare information systems initiatives to succeed.

  16. Software engineering principles applied to large healthcare information systems--a case report.

    PubMed

    Nardon, Fabiane Bizinella; de A Moura, Lincoln

    2007-01-01

    São Paulo is the largest city in Brazil and one of the largest cities in the world. In 2004, São Paulo City Department of Health decided to implement a Healthcare Information System to support managing healthcare services and provide an ambulatory health record. The resulting information system is one of the largest public healthcare information systems ever built, with more than 2 million lines of code. Although statistics shows that most software projects fail, and the risks for the São Paulo initiative were enormous, the information system was completed on-time and on-budget. In this paper, we discuss the software engineering principles adopted that allowed to accomplish that project's goals, hoping that sharing the experience of this project will help other healthcare information systems initiatives to succeed. PMID:17911673

  17. Building a sustainable clinical academic workforce to meet the future healthcare needs of Australia and New Zealand: report from the first summit meeting.

    PubMed

    Windsor, J; Searle, J; Hanney, R; Chapman, A; Grigg, M; Choong, P; Mackay, A; Smithers, B M; Churchill, J A; Carney, S; Smith, J A; Wainer, Z; Talley, N J; Gladman, M A

    2015-09-01

    The delivery of healthcare that meets the requirements for quality, safety and cost-effectiveness relies on a well-trained medical workforce, including clinical academics whose career includes a specific commitment to research, education and/or leadership. In 2011, the Medical Deans of Australia and New Zealand published a review on the clinical academic workforce and recommended the development of an integrated training pathway for clinical academics. A bi-national Summit on Clinical Academic Training was recently convened to bring together all relevant stakeholders to determine how best to do this. An important part understood the lessons learnt from the UK experience after 10 years since the introduction of an integrated training pathway. The outcome of the summit was to endorse strongly the recommendations of the medical deans. A steering committee has been established to identify further stakeholders, solicit more information from stakeholder organisations, convene a follow-up summit meeting in late 2015, recruit pilot host institutions and engage the government and future funders.

  18. Building a sustainable clinical academic workforce to meet the future healthcare needs of Australia and New Zealand: report from the first summit meeting.

    PubMed

    Windsor, J; Searle, J; Hanney, R; Chapman, A; Grigg, M; Choong, P; Mackay, A; Smithers, B M; Churchill, J A; Carney, S; Smith, J A; Wainer, Z; Talley, N J; Gladman, M A

    2015-09-01

    The delivery of healthcare that meets the requirements for quality, safety and cost-effectiveness relies on a well-trained medical workforce, including clinical academics whose career includes a specific commitment to research, education and/or leadership. In 2011, the Medical Deans of Australia and New Zealand published a review on the clinical academic workforce and recommended the development of an integrated training pathway for clinical academics. A bi-national Summit on Clinical Academic Training was recently convened to bring together all relevant stakeholders to determine how best to do this. An important part understood the lessons learnt from the UK experience after 10 years since the introduction of an integrated training pathway. The outcome of the summit was to endorse strongly the recommendations of the medical deans. A steering committee has been established to identify further stakeholders, solicit more information from stakeholder organisations, convene a follow-up summit meeting in late 2015, recruit pilot host institutions and engage the government and future funders. PMID:26332622

  19. Applying analytic hierarchy process to assess healthcare-oriented cloud computing service systems.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wen-Hwa; Qiu, Wan-Li

    2016-01-01

    Numerous differences exist between the healthcare industry and other industries. Difficulties in the business operation of the healthcare industry have continually increased because of the volatility and importance of health care, changes to and requirements of health insurance policies, and the statuses of healthcare providers, which are typically considered not-for-profit organizations. Moreover, because of the financial risks associated with constant changes in healthcare payment methods and constantly evolving information technology, healthcare organizations must continually adjust their business operation objectives; therefore, cloud computing presents both a challenge and an opportunity. As a response to aging populations and the prevalence of the Internet in fast-paced contemporary societies, cloud computing can be used to facilitate the task of balancing the quality and costs of health care. To evaluate cloud computing service systems for use in health care, providing decision makers with a comprehensive assessment method for prioritizing decision-making factors is highly beneficial. Hence, this study applied the analytic hierarchy process, compared items related to cloud computing and health care, executed a questionnaire survey, and then classified the critical factors influencing healthcare cloud computing service systems on the basis of statistical analyses of the questionnaire results. The results indicate that the primary factor affecting the design or implementation of optimal cloud computing healthcare service systems is cost effectiveness, with the secondary factors being practical considerations such as software design and system architecture. PMID:27441149

  20. Applying analytic hierarchy process to assess healthcare-oriented cloud computing service systems.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wen-Hwa; Qiu, Wan-Li

    2016-01-01

    Numerous differences exist between the healthcare industry and other industries. Difficulties in the business operation of the healthcare industry have continually increased because of the volatility and importance of health care, changes to and requirements of health insurance policies, and the statuses of healthcare providers, which are typically considered not-for-profit organizations. Moreover, because of the financial risks associated with constant changes in healthcare payment methods and constantly evolving information technology, healthcare organizations must continually adjust their business operation objectives; therefore, cloud computing presents both a challenge and an opportunity. As a response to aging populations and the prevalence of the Internet in fast-paced contemporary societies, cloud computing can be used to facilitate the task of balancing the quality and costs of health care. To evaluate cloud computing service systems for use in health care, providing decision makers with a comprehensive assessment method for prioritizing decision-making factors is highly beneficial. Hence, this study applied the analytic hierarchy process, compared items related to cloud computing and health care, executed a questionnaire survey, and then classified the critical factors influencing healthcare cloud computing service systems on the basis of statistical analyses of the questionnaire results. The results indicate that the primary factor affecting the design or implementation of optimal cloud computing healthcare service systems is cost effectiveness, with the secondary factors being practical considerations such as software design and system architecture.

  1. Integrating Social impacts on Health and Health-Care Systems in Systemic Seismic Vulnerability Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz-Plapp, T.; Khazai, B.; Daniell, J. E.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a new method for modeling health impacts caused by earthquake damage which allows for integrating key social impacts on individual health and health-care systems and for implementing these impacts in quantitative systemic seismic vulnerability analysis. In current earthquake casualty estimation models, demand on health-care systems is estimated by quantifying the number of fatalities and severity of injuries based on empirical data correlating building damage with casualties. The expected number of injured people (sorted by priorities of emergency treatment) is combined together with post-earthquake reduction of functionality of health-care facilities such as hospitals to estimate the impact on healthcare systems. The aim here is to extend these models by developing a combined engineering and social science approach. Although social vulnerability is recognized as a key component for the consequences of disasters, social vulnerability as such, is seldom linked to common formal and quantitative seismic loss estimates of injured people which provide direct impact on emergency health care services. Yet, there is a consensus that factors which affect vulnerability and post-earthquake health of at-risk populations include demographic characteristics such as age, education, occupation and employment and that these factors can aggravate health impacts further. Similarly, there are different social influences on the performance of health care systems after an earthquake both on an individual as well as on an institutional level. To link social impacts of health and health-care services to a systemic seismic vulnerability analysis, a conceptual model of social impacts of earthquakes on health and the health care systems has been developed. We identified and tested appropriate social indicators for individual health impacts and for health care impacts based on literature research, using available European statistical data. The results will be used to

  2. Potentiality of Big Data in the Medical Sector: Focus on How to Reshape the Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Kyoungyoung

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The main purpose of this study was to explore whether the use of big data can effectively reduce healthcare concerns, such as the selection of appropriate treatment paths, improvement of healthcare systems, and so on. Methods By providing an overview of the current state of big data applications in the healthcare environment, this study has explored the current challenges that governments and healthcare stakeholders are facing as well as the opportunities presented by big data. Results Insightful consideration of the current state of big data applications could help follower countries or healthcare stakeholders in their plans for deploying big data to resolve healthcare issues. The advantage for such follower countries and healthcare stakeholders is that they can possibly leapfrog the leaders' big data applications by conducting a careful analysis of the leaders' successes and failures and exploiting the expected future opportunities in mobile services. Conclusions First, all big data projects undertaken by leading countries' governments and healthcare industries have similar general common goals. Second, for medical data that cuts across departmental boundaries, a top-down approach is needed to effectively manage and integrate big data. Third, real-time analysis of in-motion big data should be carried out, while protecting privacy and security. PMID:23882412

  3. A clinical information system strategic planning model for integrated healthcare delivery networks.

    PubMed

    Snyder-Halpern, R; Chervany, N L

    2000-12-01

    As healthcare organizations are transformed into consolidated healthcare delivery networks, their success is increasingly dependent on the integration and effectiveness of their clinical information systems (CIS). Greater financial investments are being made in CIS products and services to support processes related to clinical care oversight, direct care delivery, and ancillary clinical services. To make good investment decisions, these enterprises must engage in a comprehensive strategic planning process that tightly links their healthcare delivery network clinical strategy, CIS strategic vision, and specific CIS investments. The authors illustrate the linkages among these three strategic planning stages through the application of a clinical information system strategic planning model to a case example.

  4. Task Force 62 Medical Brigade combat healthcare support system in the mature Iraq theater of operations.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Patrick D

    2008-01-01

    Leading a deployed combat healthcare system is a very complex task and requires a command and control structure that is a unique blend of technical and tactical expertise to efficaciously deliver world-class medical care to America's sons and daughters. The medical task force in Iraq has successfully managed the transformation of the medical footprint from a tactically arrayed set of disparate medical units to a nascent integrated healthcare system with many features similar to the best healthcare systems in the United States. The American public demands, and Soldiers, Marines, Sailors, Airmen, and Coast Guardsmen deserve US quality medical care, whether they are being treated at a military medical center in the US, or a US medical facility in Iraq. This article presents an overview of the 62nd Medical Brigade's development of the combat healthcare support system during its tenure leading the US medical task force in Iraq. PMID:20088050

  5. Healthcare systems and chronic kidney disease: putting the patient in control.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Claudio; Mason, Giacomo; Nayak Karopadi, Akash; Milburn, Alan; Hegbrant, Jörgen

    2014-05-01

    Today, health policy seems to be on the top of governments' agendas around the world. Healthcare systems are challenged by a number of phenomena happening on a global scale; these trends include demographic change in terms of an ageing population, an increase in chronic disease, patients having higher expectations on healthcare delivery and above all a major pressure on public finances to slow increasing healthcare expenditures. Such developments are forcing policy-makers to reform healthcare systems. First, there is a tendency towards decentralization of responsibilities. Second, governments are moving towards reimbursement schemes rewarding good outcomes and performance. Third, great importance is being attributed to transparency and accountability, and to introduce competition in healthcare. Fourth, attention is being shifted from simple treatment of a disease towards preventive initiatives, in a more holistic approach to health. Finally, healthcare policy-makers are recognizing the importance of empowering patients to give them control over decisions regarding their own health. These dynamics can be observed in chronic kidney disease, the management of which is a huge economic burden to healthcare systems globally, and which represents a good example of a field where important changes can be witnessed in therapy, technology, delivery and financing.

  6. Bosnia and Herzegovina Healthcare System Preparedness for Pandemic Influenza as of 2010

    PubMed Central

    Begic, Almir; Pilav, Aida; Dzananovic, Lejla; Cavaljuga, Semra

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine if Bosnia and Herzegovina healthcare system is prepared for influenza pandemic; and to indicate strengths and weaknesses in planed resolution of pandemic influenza in Bosnia and Herzegovina healthcare system. Methodology: Qualitative systematic review, comparing established elements of healthcare systems with WHO’s guidelines on pandemic preparedness. Critical evaluations of available findings on preparedness of healthcare system of Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H) compared in details to preparedness of healthcare system of United Kingdom (UK) but in certain elements with some other European countries. Results and Discussion: Analysis of preparedness plans of B&H and UK are presented in details, with comparison of B&H with eight other countries by WHO guidelines categories and phases of pandemic preparedness and contingency plans. Conclusions: Disregarding the obstacles in B&H health care system policy Bosnia and Herzegovina has preparedness plans, that are made based on WHO’s guidelines but unlike all other analyzed countries does not have contingency plan. This can be seen as strength while weaknesses of B&H’s healthcare system are: late forming of preparedness plan with poor implementation of set activities, and lack of contingency plan. PMID:24511267

  7. Specific factors influencing information system/information and communication technology sourcing strategies in healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Potančok, Martin; Voříšek, Jiří

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare facilities use a number of information system/information and communication technologies. Each healthcare facility faces a need to choose sourcing strategies most suitable to ensure provision of information system/information and communication technology services, processes and resources. Currently, it is possible to observe an expansion of sourcing possibilities in healthcare informatics, which creates new requirements for sourcing strategies. Thus, the aim of this article is to identify factors influencing information system/information and communication technology sourcing strategies in healthcare facilities. The identification was based on qualitative research, namely, a case study. This study provides a set of internal and external factors with their impact levels. The findings also show that not enough attention is paid to these factors during decision-making.

  8. The application of the unified modeling language in object-oriented analysis of healthcare information systems.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vinod

    2002-10-01

    This paper concerns itself with the beneficial effects of the Unified Modeling Language (UML), a nonproprietary object modeling standard, in specifying, visualizing, constructing, documenting, and communicating the model of a healthcare information system from the user's perspective. The author outlines the process of object-oriented analysis (OOA) using the UML and illustrates this with healthcare examples to demonstrate the practicality of application of the UML by healthcare personnel to real-world information system problems. The UML will accelerate advanced uses of object-orientation such as reuse technology, resulting in significantly higher software productivity. The UML is also applicable in the context of a component paradigm that promises to enhance the capabilities of healthcare information systems and simplify their management and maintenance.

  9. Perspectives on efficiency and quality in an ever changing system: Healthcare 2010.

    PubMed

    Butala, Neel

    2010-06-01

    The Healthcare 2010 conference at the Omni New Haven Hotel at Yale in April focused on how different stakeholders in the healthcare industry can excel in light of the recent landmark health-reform bill. A session titled "Maintaining Efficiency and Quality in an Ever Changing System" provided valuable insights into several perceptions of these two tenets, with respect to both the current state of U.S. healthcare and the recent reform. The engaging dialog that ensued concerning payer, provider, public, and patient perspectives yielded a unique view of the dynamic interplay between efficiency and quality in the context of the current healthcare system. While the discussion highlighted differences in the definitions of efficiency and quality upheld by the various players, a unifying theme emerged: In order to excel in this ever changing system, incentive structures will have to evolve to take full advantage of the potential synergies between the two. PMID:20589190

  10. Client-server, distributed database strategies in a healthcare record system for a homeless population.

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, H. C.; Barnett, G. O.

    1993-01-01

    A computer-based healthcare record system being developed for Boston's Healthcare for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) uses client-server and distributed database technologies to enhance the delivery of healthcare to patients of this unusual population. The needs of physicians, nurses and social workers are specifically addressed in the application interface so that an integrated approach to healthcare for this population can be facilitated. These patients and their providers have unique medical information needs that are supported by both database and applications technology. To integrate the information capabilities with the actual practice of providers of care to the homeless, this computer-based record system is designed for remote and portable use over regular phone lines. An initial standalone system is being used at one major BHCHP site of care. This project describes methods for creating a secure, accessible, and scalable computer-based medical record using client-server, distributed database design. PMID:8130445

  11. Specific factors influencing information system/information and communication technology sourcing strategies in healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Potančok, Martin; Voříšek, Jiří

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare facilities use a number of information system/information and communication technologies. Each healthcare facility faces a need to choose sourcing strategies most suitable to ensure provision of information system/information and communication technology services, processes and resources. Currently, it is possible to observe an expansion of sourcing possibilities in healthcare informatics, which creates new requirements for sourcing strategies. Thus, the aim of this article is to identify factors influencing information system/information and communication technology sourcing strategies in healthcare facilities. The identification was based on qualitative research, namely, a case study. This study provides a set of internal and external factors with their impact levels. The findings also show that not enough attention is paid to these factors during decision-making. PMID:25759064

  12. Academic Counselling in ODL: Information System for Capacity Building of Academic Counselors' in IGNOU

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishore, S.

    2014-01-01

    Indira Gandhi national Open University (IGNOU) is an apex body for open and distance learning (ODL) system in India. The university has nation-wide operation and pioneer in distance education. IGNOU has an hqrs, 67 Regional Centres and about 3400 Study Centres throughout India. The study centres are the academic contact point for distance learners…

  13. Careers in Academe: The Academic Labour Market as an Eco-System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baruch, Yehuda

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the contrast between stable and dynamic labour markets in academe in light of career theories that were originally developed for business environments. Design/methodology/approach: A conceptual design, offering the eco-system as a framework. Findings: It evaluates their relevance and applicability to dynamic and…

  14. Vaccination: the cornerstone of an efficient healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    Rémy, Vanessa; Zöllner, York; Heckmann, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination has made an important contribution to the decreased incidence of numerous infectious diseases and associated mortality. In 2013, it was estimated that 103 million cases of childhood diseases in the United States had been prevented by the use of vaccines since 1924. These health effects translate into positive economic results, as vaccination can provide significant savings by avoiding the direct and indirect costs associated with treating the disease and possible long-term disability. A recent US study estimated that every dollar spent on childhood vaccination could save US$3 from a payer perspective and US$10 from a societal perspective. The first vaccines set a high standard from a public health ‘return on investment’ perspective, because they are highly cost-saving. Today, however, where only a few healthcare interventions are considered to be cost-saving, the challenge that decision-makers typically face is to identify such healthcare interventions that are deemed cost-effective, that is, provide extra benefit at a reasonable extra cost. Some of the newer vaccines provide a solution to some of today's important health issues, such as cervical cancers with human papillomavirus vaccines, or debilitating diseases with herpes zoster vaccines. These recent, more expensive vaccines have been shown to be cost-effective in several economic analyses. Overall, vaccination can still be regarded as one of the most cost-effective healthcare interventions. PMID:27123189

  15. ICT use for information management in healthcare system for chronic disease patient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzyniak, Zbigniew M.; Lisiecka-Biełanowicz, Mira

    2013-10-01

    Modern healthcare systems are designed to fulfill needs of the patient, his system environment and other determinants of the treatment with proper support of technical aids. A whole system of care is compatible to the technical solutions and organizational framework based on legal rules. The purpose of this study is to present how can we use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) systemic tools in a new model of patient-oriented care, improving the effectiveness of healthcare for patients with chronic diseases. The study material is the long-term process of healthcare for patients with chronic illness. Basing on the knowledge of the whole circumstances of patient's ecosystem and his needs allow us to build a new ICT model of long term care. The method used is construction, modeling and constant improvement the efficient ICT layer for the patient-centered healthcare model. We present a new constructive approach to systemic process how to use ICT for information management in healthcare system for chronic disease patient. The use of ICT tools in the model for chronic disease can improve all aspects of data management and communication, and the effectiveness of long-term complex healthcare. In conclusion: ICT based model of healthcare can be constructed basing on the interactions of ecosystem's functional parts through information feedback and the provision of services and models as well as the knowledge of the patient itself. Systematic approach to the model of long term healthcare assisted functionally by ICT tools and data management methods will increase the effectiveness of patient care and organizational efficiency.

  16. How Secure Is Your Information System? An Investigation into Actual Healthcare Worker Password Practices

    PubMed Central

    Cazier, Joseph A; Medlin, B. Dawn

    2006-01-01

    For most healthcare information systems, passwords are the first line of defense in keeping patient and administrative records private and secure. However, this defense is only as strong as the passwords employees chose to use. A weak or easily guessed password is like an open door to the medical records room, allowing unauthorized access to sensitive information. In this paper, we present the results of a study of actual healthcare workers' password practices. In general, the vast majority of these passwords have significant security problems on several dimensions. Implications for healthcare professionals are discussed. PMID:18066366

  17. THE DESIGN OF PERFORMANCE MONITORING SYSTEMS IN HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS: A STAKEHOLDER PERSPECTIVE.

    PubMed

    Rouhana, Rima E; Van Caillie, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring hospitals performance is evolving over time in search of more efficiency by integrating additional levels of care, reducing costs and keeping staff up-to-date. To fulfill these three potentially divergent aspects and to monitor performance, healthcare administrators are using dissimilar management control tools. To explain why, we suggest to go beyond traditional contingent factors to assess the role of the different stakeholders that are at the heart of any healthcare organization. We rely first on seminal studies to appraise the role of the main healthcare players and their influence on some organizational attributes. We then consider the managerial awareness and the perception of a suitable management system to promote a strategy-focused organization. Our methodology is based on a qualitative approach of twenty-two case studies, led in two heterogeneous environments (Belgium and Lebanon), comparing the managerial choice of a management system within three different healthcare organizational structures. Our findings allow us to illustrate, for each healthcare player, his positioning within the healthcare systems. Thus, we define how his role, perception and responsiveness manipulate the organization's internal climate and shape the design of the performance monitoring systems. In particular, we highlight the managerial role and influence on the choice of an adequate management system. PMID:27169164

  18. THE DESIGN OF PERFORMANCE MONITORING SYSTEMS IN HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS: A STAKEHOLDER PERSPECTIVE.

    PubMed

    Rouhana, Rima E; Van Caillie, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring hospitals performance is evolving over time in search of more efficiency by integrating additional levels of care, reducing costs and keeping staff up-to-date. To fulfill these three potentially divergent aspects and to monitor performance, healthcare administrators are using dissimilar management control tools. To explain why, we suggest to go beyond traditional contingent factors to assess the role of the different stakeholders that are at the heart of any healthcare organization. We rely first on seminal studies to appraise the role of the main healthcare players and their influence on some organizational attributes. We then consider the managerial awareness and the perception of a suitable management system to promote a strategy-focused organization. Our methodology is based on a qualitative approach of twenty-two case studies, led in two heterogeneous environments (Belgium and Lebanon), comparing the managerial choice of a management system within three different healthcare organizational structures. Our findings allow us to illustrate, for each healthcare player, his positioning within the healthcare systems. Thus, we define how his role, perception and responsiveness manipulate the organization's internal climate and shape the design of the performance monitoring systems. In particular, we highlight the managerial role and influence on the choice of an adequate management system.

  19. Development and User Research of a Smart Bedside Station System toward Patient-Centered Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee-Hyuck; Baek, Hyunyoung; Ryu, Borim; Chung, Eunja; Kim, Kidong; Yi, Jay Chaeyong; Park, Soo Beom; Hwang, Hee

    2015-09-01

    User experience design that reflects real-world application and aims to support suitable service solutions has arisen as one of the current issues in the medical informatics research domain. The Smart Bedside Station (SBS) is a screen that is installed on the bedside for the personal use and provides a variety of convenient services for the patients. Recently, bedside terminal systems have been increasingly adopted in hospitals due to the rapid growth of advanced technology in healthcare at the point of care. We designed user experience (UX) research to derive users' unmet needs and major functions that are frequently used in the field. To develop the SBS service, a service design methodology, the Double Diamond Design Process Model, was undertaken. The problems or directions of the complex clinical workflow of the hospital, the requirements of stakeholders, and environmental factors were identified through the study. The SBS system services provided to patients were linked to the hospital's main services or to related electronic medical record (EMR) data. Seven key services were derived from the results of the study. The primary services were as follows: Bedside Check In and Out, Bedside Room Service, Bedside Scheduler, Ready for Rounds, My Medical Chart, Featured Healthcare Content, and Bedside Community. This research developed a patient-centered SBS system with improved UX using service design methodology applied to complex and technical medical services, providing insights to improve the current healthcare system.

  20. Barriers to healthcare coordination in market-based and decentralized public health systems: a qualitative study in healthcare networks of Colombia and Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Ingrid; Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; De Paepe, Pierre; Ferreira da Silva, Maria Rejane; Unger, Jean-Pierre; Vázquez, María-Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Although integrated healthcare networks (IHNs) are promoted in Latin America in response to health system fragmentation, few analyses on the coordination of care across levels in these networks have been conducted in the region. The aim is to analyse the existence of healthcare coordination across levels of care and the factors influencing it from the health personnel’ perspective in healthcare networks of two countries with different health systems: Colombia, with a social security system based on managed competition and Brazil, with a decentralized national health system. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive–interpretative study was conducted, based on a case study of healthcare networks in four municipalities. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with a three stage theoretical sample of (a) health (112) and administrative (66) professionals of different care levels, and (b) managers of providers (42) and insurers (14). A thematic content analysis was conducted, segmented by cases, informant groups and themes. The results reveal poor clinical information transfer between healthcare levels in all networks analysed, with added deficiencies in Brazil in the coordination of access and clinical management. The obstacles to care coordination are related to the organization of both the health system and the healthcare networks. In the health system, there is the existence of economic incentives to compete (exacerbated in Brazil by partisan political interests), the fragmentation and instability of networks in Colombia and weak planning and evaluation in Brazil. In the healthcare networks, there are inadequate working conditions (temporary and/or part-time contracts) which hinder the use of coordination mechanisms, and inadequate professional training for implementing a healthcare model in which primary care should act as coordinator in patient care. Reforms are needed in these health systems and networks in order to modify incentives

  1. Barriers to healthcare coordination in market-based and decentralized public health systems: a qualitative study in healthcare networks of Colombia and Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Ingrid; Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; De Paepe, Pierre; Ferreira da Silva, Maria Rejane; Unger, Jean-Pierre; Vázquez, María-Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Although integrated healthcare networks (IHNs) are promoted in Latin America in response to health system fragmentation, few analyses on the coordination of care across levels in these networks have been conducted in the region. The aim is to analyse the existence of healthcare coordination across levels of care and the factors influencing it from the health personnel' perspective in healthcare networks of two countries with different health systems: Colombia, with a social security system based on managed competition and Brazil, with a decentralized national health system. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive-interpretative study was conducted, based on a case study of healthcare networks in four municipalities. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with a three stage theoretical sample of (a) health (112) and administrative (66) professionals of different care levels, and (b) managers of providers (42) and insurers (14). A thematic content analysis was conducted, segmented by cases, informant groups and themes. The results reveal poor clinical information transfer between healthcare levels in all networks analysed, with added deficiencies in Brazil in the coordination of access and clinical management. The obstacles to care coordination are related to the organization of both the health system and the healthcare networks. In the health system, there is the existence of economic incentives to compete (exacerbated in Brazil by partisan political interests), the fragmentation and instability of networks in Colombia and weak planning and evaluation in Brazil. In the healthcare networks, there are inadequate working conditions (temporary and/or part-time contracts) which hinder the use of coordination mechanisms, and inadequate professional training for implementing a healthcare model in which primary care should act as coordinator in patient care. Reforms are needed in these health systems and networks in order to modify incentives, strengthen

  2. Barriers to healthcare coordination in market-based and decentralized public health systems: a qualitative study in healthcare networks of Colombia and Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Ingrid; Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; De Paepe, Pierre; Ferreira da Silva, Maria Rejane; Unger, Jean-Pierre; Vázquez, María-Luisa

    2016-07-01

    Although integrated healthcare networks (IHNs) are promoted in Latin America in response to health system fragmentation, few analyses on the coordination of care across levels in these networks have been conducted in the region. The aim is to analyse the existence of healthcare coordination across levels of care and the factors influencing it from the health personnel' perspective in healthcare networks of two countries with different health systems: Colombia, with a social security system based on managed competition and Brazil, with a decentralized national health system. A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive-interpretative study was conducted, based on a case study of healthcare networks in four municipalities. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with a three stage theoretical sample of (a) health (112) and administrative (66) professionals of different care levels, and (b) managers of providers (42) and insurers (14). A thematic content analysis was conducted, segmented by cases, informant groups and themes. The results reveal poor clinical information transfer between healthcare levels in all networks analysed, with added deficiencies in Brazil in the coordination of access and clinical management. The obstacles to care coordination are related to the organization of both the health system and the healthcare networks. In the health system, there is the existence of economic incentives to compete (exacerbated in Brazil by partisan political interests), the fragmentation and instability of networks in Colombia and weak planning and evaluation in Brazil. In the healthcare networks, there are inadequate working conditions (temporary and/or part-time contracts) which hinder the use of coordination mechanisms, and inadequate professional training for implementing a healthcare model in which primary care should act as coordinator in patient care. Reforms are needed in these health systems and networks in order to modify incentives, strengthen

  3. Population aging and its impacts: strategies of the health-care system in Taipei.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Hsien; Chou, Ming-Yueh; Liang, Chih-Kuang; Peng, Li-Ning; Chen, Liang-Kung

    2010-11-01

    Taiwan is one of the fastest aging countries in the world. As such, the government has developed various strategies to promote an age-friendly health-care system. Health services are supported by National Health Insurance (NHI), which insures over 97% of citizens and over 99% of health-care institutes. The current health-care system has difficulties in caring for older patients with multiple comorbidities, complex care needs, functional impairments, and post-acute care needs. Taipei, an international metropolis with a well-preserved tradition of filial piety in Chinese societies, has developed various strategies to overcome the aforementioned barriers to an age-friendly health-care system. These include an emphasis on general medical care and a holistic approach in all specialties, development of a geriatrics specialty training program, development of post-acute services, and strengthening of linkages between health and social care services. Despite achievements thus far, challenges still include creating a more extensive integration between medical specialties, promotion of an interdisciplinary care model across specialties and health-care settings, and integration of health and social care services. The experiences of Taipei in developing an age-friendly health-care service system may be a culturally appropriate model for other Chinese and Asian communities.

  4. Healthcare is primary

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman

    2015-01-01

    India is undergoing a rapid transformation in terms of governance, administrative reforms, newer policy develoment, and social movements. India is also considered one of the most vibrant economies in the world. The current discourse in public space is dominated by issues such as economic development, security, corruption free governance, gender equity, and women safety. Healthcare though remains a pressing need of population; seems to have taken a backseat. In the era of decreasing subsidies and cautious investment in social sectors, the 2nd National Conference on Family Medicine and Primary Care 2015 (FMPC) brought a focus on “healthcare” in India. The theme of this conference was “Healthcare is Primary.” The conference participants discussed on the theme of why healthcare should be a national priority and why strong primary care should remain at the center of healthcare delivery system. The experts recommended that India needs to strengthen the “general health system” instead of focusing on disease based vertical programs. Public health system should have capacity and skill pool to be able to deliver person centered comprehensive health services to the community. Proactive implementation of policies towards human resource in health is the need of the hour. As the draft National Health Policy 2015 is being debated, “family medicine” (academic primary care), the unfinished agenda of National Health Policy 2002, remains a priority area of implementation. PMID:26985402

  5. The healthcare system and the provision of oral healthcare in EU Member States: France.

    PubMed

    Pegon-Machat, E; Faulks, D; Eaton, K A; Widström, E; Hugues, P; Tubert-Jeannin, S

    2016-02-26

    The French oral health system is based on the provision of dental treatment and is organised around a fee-per-item model. The system is funded by a complex mix of public and complementary health insurance schemes. The system is successful in that it provides access to affordable dental treatment to the majority of the French population. However, France had the highest health expenditure as a share of gross domestic product (GDP) of all European Union countries in 2008 and rising oral health inequalities may be exacerbated by the manner in which oral health care is provided and funded. In addition, there is no organised national strategy for the prevention of oral diseases or for oral health promotion. PMID:26917309

  6. X-PAT: a multiplatform patient referral data management system for small healthcare institution requirements.

    PubMed

    Masseroli, Marco; Marchente, Mario

    2008-07-01

    We present X-PAT, a platform-independent software prototype that is able to manage patient referral multimedia data in an intranet network scenario according to the specific control procedures of a healthcare institution. It is a self-developed storage framework based on a file system, implemented in eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and PHP Hypertext Preprocessor Language, and addressed to the requirements of limited-dimension healthcare entities (small hospitals, private medical centers, outpatient clinics, and laboratories). In X-PAT, healthcare data descriptions, stored in a novel Referral Base Management System (RBMS) according to Health Level 7 Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 (CDA R2) standard, can be easily applied to the specific data and organizational procedures of a particular healthcare working environment thanks also to the use of standard clinical terminology. Managed data, centralized on a server, are structured in the RBMS schema using a flexible patient record and CDA healthcare referral document structures based on XML technology. A novel search engine allows defining and performing queries on stored data, whose rapid execution is ensured by expandable RBMS indexing structures. Healthcare personnel can interface the X-PAT system, according to applied state-of-the-art privacy and security measures, through friendly and intuitive Web pages that facilitate user acceptance. PMID:18632322

  7. The development of a risk identification screening framework for healthcare information systems.

    PubMed

    Keay, Elizabeth; Kushniruk, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Health information systems are costly, especially when they are not used or when they impede workflow. Risk assessment is used to identify and remedy problem areas so that systems are safe. While there are discussions of design project risk management, for example, see McConnell [1], there is little information about screening the fit of a system with respect to its users, the task and the healthcare organization. Such analyses could be important in improving the fit of information systems in healthcare, thereby decreasing risk of system and project failure. A risk-screening framework for health informatics is presented. PMID:19380968

  8. IS: the neural nexus. Why you should consider information systems as the central nervous system of an integrated healthcare network.

    PubMed

    Garets, D E; Miles, P V

    1994-02-01

    Until now, utilization of information systems in America's healthcare industry has been anything but scientific. And individual healthcare providers have managed to deliver the world's best healthcare services despite lousy information systems, lack of clinical outcomes data, lack of adequate service costing data and lack of customer satisfaction data. The key to the scientific improvement of the health status of a community health network is the acquisition and application of knowledge, which we believe to be wholly dependent upon scientifically designed clinical information systems. We've got some work to do. PMID:10132404

  9. Healthcare IT system in the midst of and after Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster : Grand design for reconstruction of Tohoku-region healthcare IT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi

    In this article, we described what was really going in the disaster medical care at the Great East Japan Earthquake, mainly in Ishinomaki and Kesen-numa areas. As for exchange tools of the disaster information, in contrast to the breakdown of fixed-line and mobile phone, MCA radio system, satellite mobiles and internet, especially SNS, were greatly helpful. Learned from the disaster experiences, we are making the grand design for “disaster-robust” regional healthcare IT systems, which are composed of (1) cloud center storing whole-prefecture medical records, (2) SS-MIX based regional healthcare information systems of “the second medical care zones”, (3) ASP/SaaS typed electronic medical record system for all clinics located at Pacific coastal areas, and (4) wireless communication environment supporting comprehensive care of elderly for daily living activities.

  10. [Competition in healthcare--a health systems' perspective].

    PubMed

    Busse, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    That "more competition in healthcare primarily produces more needs-based equity, better quality, higher efficiency, reduced costs and less bureaucracy" is a familiar claim. But is it correct? Three types of competition can be identified within a triangle: (1) competition among third-party-payers for insured individuals/customers, (2) competition among providers for patients, and (3) competition among third-party payers for contracts with providers--and vice versa. German and international evidence for these three types of competition demonstrates that many expectations--e.g., that patients can be steered based on quality information--are wishful thinking. Instead of market and competition, regulation is needed (e.g., in the form of an effective risk-based allocation mechanism) to ensure high-quality care for those 5% of the population incurring 50% of the healthcare expenditures (i.e., the seriously ill patients), while at the same time competition based on selective contracts does not pay off for the majority of the population due to high transaction costs.

  11. Return Migrants’ Experience of Access to Care in Corrupt Healthcare Systems: The Bosnian Example

    PubMed Central

    Neerup Handlos, Line; Fog Olwig, Karen; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Norredam, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Equal and universal access to healthcare services is a core priority for a just health system. A key societal determinant seen to create inequality in access to healthcare is corruption in the healthcare system. How return migrants’ access to healthcare is affected by corruption is largely unstudied, even though return migrants may be particularly vulnerable to problems related to corruption due to their period of absence from their country of origin. This article investigates how corruption in the healthcare sector affects access to healthcare for refugees who repatriated to Bosnia, a country with a high level of corruption, from Denmark, a country with a low level of corruption. The study is based on 18 semi-structured interviews with 33 refugees who returned after long-term residence in Denmark. We found that the returned refugees faced greater problems with corruption than was the case for those who had not left the country, as doctors considered them to be better endowed financially and therefore demanded larger bribes from them than they did from those who had remained in Bosnia. Moreover, during their stay abroad the returnees had lost the connections that could have helped them sidestep the corruption. Returned refugees are thus particularly vulnerable to the effects of corruption. PMID:27657096

  12. Web-Based Integrated Public Healthcare Information System of Korea: Development and Performance

    PubMed Central

    Park, Minsu; Lee, Jaegook; Kim, Sung-Soo; Han, Bum Soo; Mo, Kyoung Chun; Lee, Hyung Seok

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The Web-based integrated public healthcare information system (PHIS) of Korea was planned and developed from 2005 to 2010, and it is being used in 3,501 regional health organizations. This paper introduces and discusses development and performance of the system. Methods We reviewed and examined documents about the development process and performance of the newly integrated PHIS. The resources we analyzed the national plan for public healthcare, information strategy for PHIS, usage and performance reports of the system. Results The integrated PHIS included 19 functional business areas, 47 detailed health programs, and 48 inter-organizational tasks. The new PHIS improved the efficiency and effectiveness of the business process and inter-organizational business, and enhanced user satisfaction. Economic benefits were obtained from five categories: labor, health education and monitoring, clinical information management, administration and civil service, and system maintenance. The system was certified by a patent from the Korean Intellectual Property Office and accredited as an ISO 9001. It was also reviewed and received preliminary comments about its originality, advancement, and business applicability from the Patent Cooperation Treaty. It has been found to enhance the quality of policy decision-making about regional healthcare at the self-governing local government level. Conclusions PHIS, a Web-based integrated system, has contributed to the improvement of regional healthcare services of Korea. However, when it comes to an appropriate evolution, the needs and changing environments of community-level healthcare service and IT infrastructure should be analyzed properly in advance. PMID:24523997

  13. Healthcare system financing and profits: all that glitters is not gold.

    PubMed

    Zelený, Tomáš; Bencko, Vladimír

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this paper is an analysis of two main attributes of healthcare systems. First of the main attributes is the trend of ever growing expenditures of healthcare systems all across the world. Second attribute is the efficiency of chosen mixed healthcare systems, where mixed system is one which features involvement of both private and public sector. Countries chosen for analysis are USA as the country with high private sector influence on healthcare, France with its mediocre influence and Japan, where the private companies participate in health care but are very strictly regulated by a zero profit rule, and the Czech Republic, where public sector dominates the health care. The result is that the systems with higher influence of the private sector tend to have lesser occupancy, not significantly better performance and higher expenditures. This raise doubts whether the private sector brings anything of value for the patients within the healthcare system. However, more detailed analysis should be carried out to confirm or refuse this hypothesis. PMID:26036091

  14. Using ESB and BPEL for Evolving Healthcare Systems Towards Pervasive, Grid-Enabled SOA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koufi, V.; Malamateniou, F.; Papakonstantinou, D.; Vassilacopoulos, G.

    Healthcare organizations often face the challenge of integrating diverse and geographically disparate information technology systems to respond to changing requirements and to exploit the capabilities of modern technologies. Hence, systems evolution, through modification and extension of the existing information technology infrastructure, becomes a necessity. Moreover, the availability of these systems at the point of care when needed is a vital issue for the quality of healthcare provided to patients. This chapter takes a process perspective of healthcare delivery within and across organizational boundaries and presents a disciplined approach for evolving healthcare systems towards a pervasive, grid-enabled service-oriented architecture using the enterprise system bus middleware technology for resolving integration issues, the business process execution language for supporting collaboration requirements and grid middleware technology for both addressing common SOA scalability requirements and complementing existing system functionality. In such an environment, appropriate security mechanisms must ensure authorized access to integrated healthcare services and data. To this end, a security framework addressing security aspects such as authorization and access control is also presented.

  15. Healthcare system financing and profits: all that glitters is not gold.

    PubMed

    Zelený, Tomáš; Bencko, Vladimír

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this paper is an analysis of two main attributes of healthcare systems. First of the main attributes is the trend of ever growing expenditures of healthcare systems all across the world. Second attribute is the efficiency of chosen mixed healthcare systems, where mixed system is one which features involvement of both private and public sector. Countries chosen for analysis are USA as the country with high private sector influence on healthcare, France with its mediocre influence and Japan, where the private companies participate in health care but are very strictly regulated by a zero profit rule, and the Czech Republic, where public sector dominates the health care. The result is that the systems with higher influence of the private sector tend to have lesser occupancy, not significantly better performance and higher expenditures. This raise doubts whether the private sector brings anything of value for the patients within the healthcare system. However, more detailed analysis should be carried out to confirm or refuse this hypothesis.

  16. Trials without tribulations: Minimizing the burden of pragmatic research on healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Larson, Eric B; Tachibana, Chris; Thompson, Ella; Coronado, Gloria D; DeBar, Lynn; Dember, Laura M; Honda, Stacey; Huang, Susan S; Jarvik, Jeffrey G; Nelson, Christine; Septimus, Edward; Simon, Greg; Johnson, Karin E

    2016-09-01

    Pragmatic clinical trials are increasingly common because they have the potential to yield findings that are directly translatable to real-world healthcare settings. Pragmatic clinical trials need to integrate research into clinical workflow without placing an undue burden on the delivery system. This requires a research partnership between investigators and healthcare system representatives. This paper, organized as a series of case studies drawn from our experience in the NIH Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory, presents guidance from informational interviews of physician-scientists, health services researchers, and delivery system leaders who recently launched pragmatic clinical trials. PMID:27637816

  17. An enhanced mobile-healthcare emergency system based on extended chaotic maps.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Chi; Hsu, Che-Wei; Lai, Yan-Ming; Vasilakos, Athanasios

    2013-10-01

    Mobile Healthcare (m-Healthcare) systems, namely smartphone applications of pervasive computing that utilize wireless body sensor networks (BSNs), have recently been proposed to provide smartphone users with health monitoring services and received great attentions. An m-Healthcare system with flaws, however, may leak out the smartphone user's personal information and cause security, privacy preservation, or user anonymity problems. In 2012, Lu et al. proposed a secure and privacy-preserving opportunistic computing (SPOC) framework for mobile-Healthcare emergency. The brilliant SPOC framework can opportunistically gather resources on the smartphone such as computing power and energy to process the computing-intensive personal health information (PHI) in case of an m-Healthcare emergency with minimal privacy disclosure. To balance between the hazard of PHI privacy disclosure and the necessity of PHI processing and transmission in m-Healthcare emergency, in their SPOC framework, Lu et al. introduced an efficient user-centric privacy access control system which they built on the basis of an attribute-based access control mechanism and a new privacy-preserving scalar product computation (PPSPC) technique. However, we found out that Lu et al.'s protocol still has some secure flaws such as user anonymity and mutual authentication. To fix those problems and further enhance the computation efficiency of Lu et al.'s protocol, in this article, the authors will present an improved mobile-Healthcare emergency system based on extended chaotic maps. The new system is capable of not only providing flawless user anonymity and mutual authentication but also reducing the computation cost. PMID:24018958

  18. Intelligent Counseling System: A 24 x 7 Academic Advisor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Chun Ming; Tsang, Eva Y. M.; Lam, S. S.; Pang, Dominic C. W.

    2010-01-01

    Universities are increasingly looking into self-service systems with intelligent digital agents to supplement or replace labor-intensive services, such as academic counseling. The Open University of Hong Kong has developed an intelligent online system that instantly responds to enquiries about career development, learning modes, program/course…

  19. Perspectives on Integrated Academic Information Management Systems (IAIMS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunin, Lois F. (Ed.); Ball, Marion J. (Ed.)

    1988-01-01

    Various aspects of the Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) initiative sponsored by the National Library of Medicine are explored in 10 articles. An overview of the program, the technologies involved, examples of implementation, approaches to integrated information systems, and the future of the program are discussed. (CLB)

  20. What Indicates Competency in Systems Based Practice? An Analysis of Perspective Consistency among Healthcare Team Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Mark J.; Naqvi, Zoon; Encandela, John A.; Bylund, Carma L.; Dean, Randa; Calero-Breckheimer, Ayxa; Schmidt, Hilary J.

    2009-01-01

    In many parts of the world the practice of medicine and medical education increasingly focus on providing patient care within context of the larger healthcare system. Our purpose is to solicit perceptions of all professional stakeholders (e.g. nurses) of the system regarding the U.S. ACGME competency Systems Based Practice to uncover the extent to…

  1. A modified no-fault malpractice system can resolve multiple healthcare system deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Segal, Jeffrey J; Sacopulos, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Medical professional liability in the United States, as measured by total premiums paid by physicians and healthcare facilities, costs approximately $30 billion a year in direct expenses, less than 2% of the entire annual healthcare expenditures. Only a fraction of those dollars reach patients who are negligently injured. Nonetheless, the tort system has far-reaching effects that create substantial indirect costs. Medical malpractice litigation is pervasive and physicians practice defensively to avoid being named in a suit. Those extra expenditures provide little value to patients. Despite an elaborate existing tort system, patient safety remains a vexing problem. Many injured patients are denied access to timely, reasonable remedies. We propose a no-fault system supplemented by a variation of the traditional tort system whereby physicians are incentivized to follow evidence-based guidelines. The proposed system would guarantee a substantial decrease in, but not elimination of, litigation. The system would lower professional liability premiums. Injured patients would ordinarily be compensated with no-fault disability and life insurance proceeds. To the extent individual physicians pose a recurrent danger, their care would be reviewed on an administrative level. Savings would be invested in health information technology and purchase of insurance coverage for the uninsured. We propose a financial model based on publicly accessible sources.

  2. [Data coding in the Israeli healthcare system - do choices provide the answers to our system's needs?].

    PubMed

    Zelingher, Julian; Ash, Nachman

    2013-05-01

    The IsraeLi healthcare system has undergone major processes for the adoption of health information technologies (HIT), and enjoys high Levels of utilization in hospital and ambulatory care. Coding is an essential infrastructure component of HIT, and ts purpose is to represent data in a simplified and common format, enhancing its manipulation by digital systems. Proper coding of data enables efficient identification, storage, retrieval and communication of data. UtiLization of uniform coding systems by different organizations enables data interoperability between them, facilitating communication and integrating data elements originating in different information systems from various organizations. Current needs in Israel for heaLth data coding include recording and reporting of diagnoses for hospitalized patients, outpatients and visitors of the Emergency Department, coding of procedures and operations, coding of pathology findings, reporting of discharge diagnoses and causes of death, billing codes, organizational data warehouses and national registries. New national projects for cLinicaL data integration, obligatory reporting of quality indicators and new Ministry of Health (MOH) requirements for HIT necessitate a high Level of interoperability that can be achieved only through the adoption of uniform coding. Additional pressures were introduced by the USA decision to stop the maintenance of the ICD-9-CM codes that are also used by Israeli healthcare, and the adoption of ICD-10-C and ICD-10-PCS as the main coding system for billing purpose. The USA has also mandated utilization of SNOMED-CT as the coding terminology for the ELectronic Health Record problem list, and for reporting quality indicators to the CMS. Hence, the Israeli MOH has recently decided that discharge diagnoses will be reported using ICD-10-CM codes, and SNOMED-CT will be used to code the cLinical information in the EHR. We reviewed the characteristics, strengths and weaknesses of these two coding

  3. [Data coding in the Israeli healthcare system - do choices provide the answers to our system's needs?].

    PubMed

    Zelingher, Julian; Ash, Nachman

    2013-05-01

    The IsraeLi healthcare system has undergone major processes for the adoption of health information technologies (HIT), and enjoys high Levels of utilization in hospital and ambulatory care. Coding is an essential infrastructure component of HIT, and ts purpose is to represent data in a simplified and common format, enhancing its manipulation by digital systems. Proper coding of data enables efficient identification, storage, retrieval and communication of data. UtiLization of uniform coding systems by different organizations enables data interoperability between them, facilitating communication and integrating data elements originating in different information systems from various organizations. Current needs in Israel for heaLth data coding include recording and reporting of diagnoses for hospitalized patients, outpatients and visitors of the Emergency Department, coding of procedures and operations, coding of pathology findings, reporting of discharge diagnoses and causes of death, billing codes, organizational data warehouses and national registries. New national projects for cLinicaL data integration, obligatory reporting of quality indicators and new Ministry of Health (MOH) requirements for HIT necessitate a high Level of interoperability that can be achieved only through the adoption of uniform coding. Additional pressures were introduced by the USA decision to stop the maintenance of the ICD-9-CM codes that are also used by Israeli healthcare, and the adoption of ICD-10-C and ICD-10-PCS as the main coding system for billing purpose. The USA has also mandated utilization of SNOMED-CT as the coding terminology for the ELectronic Health Record problem list, and for reporting quality indicators to the CMS. Hence, the Israeli MOH has recently decided that discharge diagnoses will be reported using ICD-10-CM codes, and SNOMED-CT will be used to code the cLinical information in the EHR. We reviewed the characteristics, strengths and weaknesses of these two coding

  4. Community-, Healthcare- and Hospital-Acquired Severe Sepsis Hospitalizations in the University HealthSystem Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Page, David B.; Donnelly, John P.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Severe sepsis poses a major burden on the U.S. healthcare system. Previous epidemiologic studies have not differentiated community-acquired severe sepsis from healthcare-associated severe sepsis or hospital-acquired severe sepsis hospitalizations. We sought to compare and contrast community-acquired severe sepsis, healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and hospital-acquired severe sepsis hospitalizations in a national hospital sample. Setting United States Interventions None Measurements & Main Results Prevalence of community-acquired severe sepsis, healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and hospital-acquired severe sepsis, adjusted hospital mortality, length of hospitalization, length of stay in an ICU, and hospital costs. Among 3,355,753 hospital discharges, there were 307,491 with severe sepsis, including 193,081 (62.8%) community-acquired severe sepsis, 79,581 (25.9%) healthcare-associated severe sepsis, and 34,829 (11.3%) hospital-acquired severe sepsis. Hospital-acquired severe sepsis and healthcare-associated severe sepsis exhibited higher in-hospital mortality than community-acquired severe sepsis (hospital-acquired [19.2%] vs healthcare-associated [12.8%] vs community-acquired [8.6%]). Hospital-acquired severe sepsis had greater resource utilization than both healthcare-associated severe sepsis and community-acquired severe sepsis, with higher median length of hospital stay (hospital acquired [17 d] vs healthcare associated [7 d] vs community-acquired [6 d]), median length of ICU stay (hospital-acquired [8 d] vs healthcare-associated [3 d] vs community-acquired [3 d]), and median hospital costs (hospital-acquired [$38,369] vs healthcare-associated [$8,796] vs community-acquired [$7,024]). Conclusions In this series, severe sepsis hospitalizations included CA-SS (62.8%), HCA-SS (25.9%) and HA-SS (11.3%) cases. HA-SS was associated with both higher mortality and resource utilization than CA-SS and HCA-SS. PMID:26110490

  5. Future of the US healthcare system and the effects on the practice of hand surgery.

    PubMed

    Pushman, Allison G; Chung, Kevin C

    2009-06-01

    The multitier healthcare system of the USA has several major flaws. High costs and uncertain quality of care indicate that this system is no longer practical. Several improvement initiatives, such as the Oregon Health Plan, Leapfrog, Lean Manufacturing, and Pay-for-Performance have been implemented into the current system. All of these quality improvement models are being experimented in a limited fashion and do not address the biggest problem in the US healthcare, inequality of care. There is now increasing support for a universal health coverage model as an ethically sound and just way to decrease health disparities in the USA. The current quality initiatives as well as an adoption of universal coverage appear to be the best way to improve quality of care, reduce cost, and increase equality in healthcare. These initiatives may have considerable effects on the practice of hand surgery in the near future, and thus, it is important for the field of hand surgery to become more engaged in advocacy and public policy arena. The purpose of this paper is to examine the current problems in the US healthcare system and to evaluate potential solutions that will enhance quality while simultaneously curbing the unchecked increase in healthcare expenditure. PMID:19156466

  6. Rural system addresses social, economic needs. Cooperation, education, and advocacy revitalize a region's healthcare delivery.

    PubMed

    Rheinecker, P

    1992-01-01

    In recent years leaders at Presentation Health System (PHS), Sioux Falls, SD, have expanded their mission to help strengthen local communities economically and socially. PHS now offers support to rural leaders in business, politics, and healthcare through its Center for Rural Health and Economic Development. In addition, educational outreach coordinators have created programs that address the needs of the entire rural community. To establish an effective network of services in the region, two of the system's tertiary care hospitals are collaborating to provide emergency helicopter service. These larger facilities also extend outreach services to rural hospitals and clinics. PHS assists rural hospitals in grant writing and in adapting to changing government reimbursement rules. In addition, the healthcare system coordinates a group purchasing program and a debt collection agency. An important voice for its region's healthcare needs, PHS has worked with the state of South Dakota to address problems and concerns about emergency medical services. The system also publishes Report, a quarterly newsletter that keeps rural residents abreast of healthcare issues affecting them. Two years ago, PHS's Center for Rural Health and Economic Development sponsored its first Invitational Rural Health Leadership Conference. These annual conferences bring together leaders to examine ways to improve rural healthcare delivery by strengthening the social and economic fabric of rural communities. PMID:10119539

  7. Establishment, Present Condition, and Developmental Direction of the New Korean Healthcare Accreditation System

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hoo-Sun

    2012-01-01

    On July 23rd, 2010 a revised medical law (Article 58) was passed to change existing evaluation system of medical institutions to an accreditation system. The new healthcare accreditation system was introduced to encourage medical institutions to work voluntarily and continuously to improve patient safety and medical service quality. Changes regarding the healthcare accreditation system included the establishment of an accreditation agency, the voluntary participation of medical institutions, accreditation standards centering on the treatment process and patient safety, tracing methodology, and the announcement of comprehensive results concerning accreditation. Despite varying views on the healthcare accreditation system, including some that are critical, it is meaningful that the voluntary nature of the system acknowledges that the medical institutions must be active agents in improving medical service quality. Healthcare quality is not improved instantaneously, but instead gradually through continuous communication within the clinical field. For this accreditation system to be successful, followings are essential: the accreditation agency becomes financially independent and is managed efficiently, the autonomy and regulation surrounding the system are balanced, the professionalism of the system is ensured, and the medical field plays an active role in the operation of the system. PMID:22661873

  8. A scalable healthcare information system based on a service-oriented architecture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tzu-Hsiang; Sun, Yeali S; Lai, Feipei

    2011-06-01

    Many existing healthcare information systems are composed of a number of heterogeneous systems and face the important issue of system scalability. This paper first describes the comprehensive healthcare information systems used in National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH) and then presents a service-oriented architecture (SOA)-based healthcare information system (HIS) based on the service standard HL7. The proposed architecture focuses on system scalability, in terms of both hardware and software. Moreover, we describe how scalability is implemented in rightsizing, service groups, databases, and hardware scalability. Although SOA-based systems sometimes display poor performance, through a performance evaluation of our HIS based on SOA, the average response time for outpatient, inpatient, and emergency HL7Central systems are 0.035, 0.04, and 0.036 s, respectively. The outpatient, inpatient, and emergency WebUI average response times are 0.79, 1.25, and 0.82 s. The scalability of the rightsizing project and our evaluation results show that the SOA HIS we propose provides evidence that SOA can provide system scalability and sustainability in a highly demanding healthcare information system.

  9. Healthcare information systems: data mining methods in the creation of a clinical recommender system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, L.; Street, W. N.; Xu, E.

    2011-05-01

    Recommender systems have been extensively studied to present items, such as movies, music and books that are likely of interest to the user. Researchers have indicated that integrated medical information systems are becoming an essential part of the modern healthcare systems. Such systems have evolved to an integrated enterprise-wide system. In particular, such systems are considered as a type of enterprise information systems or ERP system addressing healthcare industry sector needs. As part of efforts, nursing care plan recommender systems can provide clinical decision support, nursing education, clinical quality control, and serve as a complement to existing practice guidelines. We propose to use correlations among nursing diagnoses, outcomes and interventions to create a recommender system for constructing nursing care plans. In the current study, we used nursing diagnosis data to develop the methodology. Our system utilises a prefix-tree structure common in itemset mining to construct a ranked list of suggested care plan items based on previously-entered items. Unlike common commercial systems, our system makes sequential recommendations based on user interaction, modifying a ranked list of suggested items at each step in care plan construction. We rank items based on traditional association-rule measures such as support and confidence, as well as a novel measure that anticipates which selections might improve the quality of future rankings. Since the multi-step nature of our recommendations presents problems for traditional evaluation measures, we also present a new evaluation method based on average ranking position and use it to test the effectiveness of different recommendation strategies.

  10. Modeling a better way: navigating the healthcare system for patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Seek, AmyJ; Hogle, William P

    2007-02-01

    The coordination of services for patients with suspected or newly diagnosed lung cancer produces improved patient outcomes, particularly in their quality of life. Evidence-based practice demonstrates improved outcomes from the multimodality therapies offered today, especially for patients with lung cancer; however, navigating through the healthcare system is especially challenging for patients. In developing the Multidisciplinary Lung Cancer Clinic at Frederick Memorial Hospital, navigation challenges in the healthcare system have been addressed. Patients are receptive and pleased with the approach, in which a nurse practitioner coordinates services and provides guidance and support for patients. The program offers benefits to patients with lung cancer in the community hospital setting. A similar program can be implemented in community cancer centers for patients with other diagnoses to improve outcomes and satisfaction with the healthcare system.

  11. Clinical pharmacists: The major support to Indian healthcare system in near future.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Prasanna R; Vantipalli, Raghuram; Chaitanya Lakshmi, C H; Rao, E Jagadeswara; Regmi, Bishnu; Ahad, Abdul; Nirojini, P Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacy practice is still in the initial stages of development in India, but launching of Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) study program has brought serious discussions about clinical pharmacy in the country. As the profession is in budding stage in the country, the patients, physicians, nurses, other healthcare providers, recruiters in pharmaceutical industries, prospective students, and their parents have numerous questions about this profession and study course. The objective of this article is to create awareness about clinical pharmacy services (CPS) and to introduce the role of clinical pharmacists (CPs). After reading this article, one will know about the usefulness of CPs in the Indian healthcare system against the current flaws in the system. The article describes the role of CPs in the hospitals, in research, in pharmaceutical/contract research companies, in community service and it also tells about the related myths and facts. Prospective job opportunities for CPs, present challenges and the possible solutions are elaborated as well. In conclusion, CPs are going to be the major support to the Indian healthcare system in near future; the reasons being (1) CPS are beneficial in many ways to improve healthcare; CPS have already proved their importance in western countries (2) India was never officially and efficiently exposed to CPS; so launching of CPS shall revolutionize the country's healthcare scenario. PMID:26229349

  12. Clinical pharmacists: The major support to Indian healthcare system in near future.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Prasanna R; Vantipalli, Raghuram; Chaitanya Lakshmi, C H; Rao, E Jagadeswara; Regmi, Bishnu; Ahad, Abdul; Nirojini, P Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacy practice is still in the initial stages of development in India, but launching of Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) study program has brought serious discussions about clinical pharmacy in the country. As the profession is in budding stage in the country, the patients, physicians, nurses, other healthcare providers, recruiters in pharmaceutical industries, prospective students, and their parents have numerous questions about this profession and study course. The objective of this article is to create awareness about clinical pharmacy services (CPS) and to introduce the role of clinical pharmacists (CPs). After reading this article, one will know about the usefulness of CPs in the Indian healthcare system against the current flaws in the system. The article describes the role of CPs in the hospitals, in research, in pharmaceutical/contract research companies, in community service and it also tells about the related myths and facts. Prospective job opportunities for CPs, present challenges and the possible solutions are elaborated as well. In conclusion, CPs are going to be the major support to the Indian healthcare system in near future; the reasons being (1) CPS are beneficial in many ways to improve healthcare; CPS have already proved their importance in western countries (2) India was never officially and efficiently exposed to CPS; so launching of CPS shall revolutionize the country's healthcare scenario.

  13. Clinical pharmacists: The major support to Indian healthcare system in near future

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Prasanna R.; Vantipalli, Raghuram; Chaitanya Lakshmi, C. H.; Rao, E. Jagadeswara; Regmi, Bishnu; Ahad, Abdul; Nirojini, P. Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacy practice is still in the initial stages of development in India, but launching of Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) study program has brought serious discussions about clinical pharmacy in the country. As the profession is in budding stage in the country, the patients, physicians, nurses, other healthcare providers, recruiters in pharmaceutical industries, prospective students, and their parents have numerous questions about this profession and study course. The objective of this article is to create awareness about clinical pharmacy services (CPS) and to introduce the role of clinical pharmacists (CPs). After reading this article, one will know about the usefulness of CPs in the Indian healthcare system against the current flaws in the system. The article describes the role of CPs in the hospitals, in research, in pharmaceutical/contract research companies, in community service and it also tells about the related myths and facts. Prospective job opportunities for CPs, present challenges and the possible solutions are elaborated as well. In conclusion, CPs are going to be the major support to the Indian healthcare system in near future; the reasons being (1) CPS are beneficial in many ways to improve healthcare; CPS have already proved their importance in western countries (2) India was never officially and efficiently exposed to CPS; so launching of CPS shall revolutionize the country's healthcare scenario. PMID:26229349

  14. Healthcare international.

    PubMed

    Hensley, S; Jaklevic, M C; Rauber, C; Weissenstein, E; Moore, J D; Shinkman, R; Pallarito, K; Katzman, C N; Hallam, K; Morrissey, J

    1998-11-01

    How people are treated when they need medical care depends on where in the world they are. In deciding which tools of the medical trade are used to treat disease and when they're used, location is paramount. A country's social policy, healthcare payment systems and cultural factors bear heavily on the utilization of medical technology. The cover story kicks off the magazine's third international healthcare section. PMID:10186352

  15. Online System Adoption and K-12 Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmons, R.

    2015-01-01

    This study seeks to understand the relationship between K-12 online system adoption (e.g., Blackboard, Edmodo, WordPress) and school-level academic achievement ratings. Utilizing a novel approach to data collection via website data extraction and indexing of all school websites in a target state in the United States (n?=?732) and merging these…

  16. Motivational Systems Theory and the Academic Performance of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Michael M.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored the validity of the Motivational Systems Theory (MST) as a measure of performance of college students pursuing business degrees and the level of academic performance attained across gender and race lines. This goal is achieved by investigating the relationships between motivational strategies, biological factors, responsive…

  17. Writing by Academics: A Transactional and Systems Approach to Academic Writing Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempenaar, Larissa Elisabeth; Murray, Rowena

    2016-01-01

    The literature on academic writing in higher education contains a wealth of research and theory on students' writing, but much less on academics' writing. In performative higher education cultures, discussions of academics' writing mainly concern outputs, rather than the process of producing them. This key component of academic work remains…

  18. Impact of new water systems on healthcare-associated colonization or infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Annick; Quantin, Catherine; Vanhems, Philippe; Lucet, Jean-Christophe; Bertrand, Xavier; Astruc, Karine; Chavanet, Pascal; Aho-Glélé, Ludwig S.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We aimed to study the impact of new water systems, which were less contaminated with P. aeruginosa, on the incidence of healthcare-associated P. aeruginosa cases (colonizations or infections) in care units that moved to a different building between 2005 and 2014. Methods: Generalized Estimated Equations were used to compare the incidence of P. aeruginosa healthcare-associated cases according to the building. Results: Twenty-nine units moved during the study period and 2,759 cases occurred in these units. No difference was observed when the new building was compared with older buildings overall. Conclusion: Our results did not support our hypothesis of a positive association between water system contamination and the incidence of healthcare-associated P. aeruginosa cases. These results must be confirmed by linking results of water samples and patients’ data. PMID:27274443

  19. The Academic System in American Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touraine, Alain

    Although the American system of higher education has been concerned with developing its own unity as a social institution, this book demonstrates that the system has always remained sensitive to three societal factors. There are the changing needs of society; the struggles for control over the sources of culture, knowledge and power within…

  20. Fool-proofing design and crisis management for customized intelligent physical fitness and healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Huang, Chung-Lin; Liu, Hsiao-Man

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it is quite important to develop a customized system which can enhance physical fitness and health for people. And the system reliability is more important. In the paper, a fool-proofing design and crisis management for customized physical fitness and healthcare system is proposed. It is designed to prevent the failure of the various mechanisms of customized physical fitness and healthcare system, including records, surveillance, assessments, predictions, diagnosis, prescription, and scheduling. It is separated into (1) fool-proofing design module (2) crisis management module. The fool-proofing indexes are set to prevent the failure of the various mechanisms. The states of the various mechanisms are managed by the auto-checked fool-proofing indexes. If mistakes prevention was fail, we have to execute the crisis management for stopping harmful results. The crisis management will find the error level and response the solution by using fuzzy method. By the experiments, we can find the advantages of the fool-proofing design and crisis management for customized physical fitness and healthcare system. And it is effective to prevent the failure of the various mechanisms of intelligent customized physical fitness and healthcare system.

  1. Five types of OECD healthcare systems: empirical results of a deductive classification.

    PubMed

    Böhm, Katharina; Schmid, Achim; Götze, Ralf; Landwehr, Claudia; Rothgang, Heinz

    2013-12-01

    This article classifies 30 OECD healthcare systems according to a deductively generated typology by Rothgang and Wendt [1]. This typology distinguishes three core dimensions of the healthcare system: regulation, financing, and service provision, and three types of actors: state, societal, and private actors. We argue that there is a hierarchical relationship between the three dimensions, led by regulation, followed by financing and finally service provision, where the superior dimension restricts the nature of the subordinate dimensions. This hierarchy rule limits the number of theoretically plausible types to ten. To test our argument, we classify 30 OECD healthcare systems, mainly using OECD Health Data and WHO country reports. The classification results in five system types: the National Health Service, the National Health Insurance, the Social Health Insurance, the Etatist Social Health Insurance, and the Private Health System. All five types belong to the group of healthcare system types considered theoretically plausible. Merely Slovenia does not comply with our assumption of a hierarchy among dimensions and typical actors due to its singular transformation history.

  2. Fool-proofing design and crisis management for customized intelligent physical fitness and healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Huang, Chung-Lin; Liu, Hsiao-Man

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it is quite important to develop a customized system which can enhance physical fitness and health for people. And the system reliability is more important. In the paper, a fool-proofing design and crisis management for customized physical fitness and healthcare system is proposed. It is designed to prevent the failure of the various mechanisms of customized physical fitness and healthcare system, including records, surveillance, assessments, predictions, diagnosis, prescription, and scheduling. It is separated into (1) fool-proofing design module (2) crisis management module. The fool-proofing indexes are set to prevent the failure of the various mechanisms. The states of the various mechanisms are managed by the auto-checked fool-proofing indexes. If mistakes prevention was fail, we have to execute the crisis management for stopping harmful results. The crisis management will find the error level and response the solution by using fuzzy method. By the experiments, we can find the advantages of the fool-proofing design and crisis management for customized physical fitness and healthcare system. And it is effective to prevent the failure of the various mechanisms of intelligent customized physical fitness and healthcare system. PMID:26578277

  3. How might healthcare systems influence speed of cancer diagnosis: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Brown, Sally; Castelli, Michele; Hunter, David J; Erskine, Jonathan; Vedsted, Peter; Foot, Catherine; Rubin, Greg

    2014-09-01

    Striking differences exist in outcomes for cancer between developed countries with comparable healthcare systems. We compare the healthcare systems of 3 countries (Denmark, Norway, Sweden), 3 UK jurisdictions (England, Wales and Northern Ireland), 3 Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario) and 2 Australian states (New South Wales, Victoria) using a framework which assesses the possible contribution of primary care systems to a range of health outcomes, drawing on key characteristics influencing population health. For many of the characteristics we investigated there are no significant differences between those countries with poorer cancer outcomes (England and Denmark) and the rest. In particular, regulation, financing, the existence of patient lists, the GP gatekeeping role, direct access to secondary care, the degree of comprehensiveness of primary care services, the level of cost sharing and the type of primary care providers within healthcare systems were not specifically and consistently associated with differences between countries. Factors that could have an influence on patient and professional behaviour, and consequently contribute to delays in cancer diagnosis and poorer cancer outcomes in some countries, include centralisation of services, free movement of patients between primary care providers, access to secondary care, and the existence of patient list systems. It was not possible to establish a causal correlation between healthcare system characteristics and cancer outcomes. Further studies should explore in greater depth the associations between single health system factors and cancer outcomes, recognising that in complex systems where context is all-important, it will be difficult to establish causal relationships. Better understanding of the interaction between healthcare system variables and patient and professional behaviour may generate new hypotheses for further research.

  4. How might healthcare systems influence speed of cancer diagnosis: A narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Sally; Castelli, Michele; Hunter, David J.; Erskine, Jonathan; Vedsted, Peter; Foot, Catherine; Rubin, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Striking differences exist in outcomes for cancer between developed countries with comparable healthcare systems. We compare the healthcare systems of 3 countries (Denmark, Norway, Sweden), 3 UK jurisdictions (England, Wales and Northern Ireland), 3 Canadian provinces (British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario) and 2 Australian states (New South Wales, Victoria) using a framework which assesses the possible contribution of primary care systems to a range of health outcomes, drawing on key characteristics influencing population health. For many of the characteristics we investigated there are no significant differences between those countries with poorer cancer outcomes (England and Denmark) and the rest. In particular, regulation, financing, the existence of patient lists, the GP gatekeeping role, direct access to secondary care, the degree of comprehensiveness of primary care services, the level of cost sharing and the type of primary care providers within healthcare systems were not specifically and consistently associated with differences between countries. Factors that could have an influence on patient and professional behaviour, and consequently contribute to delays in cancer diagnosis and poorer cancer outcomes in some countries, include centralisation of services, free movement of patients between primary care providers, access to secondary care, and the existence of patient list systems. It was not possible to establish a causal correlation between healthcare system characteristics and cancer outcomes. Further studies should explore in greater depth the associations between single health system factors and cancer outcomes, recognising that in complex systems where context is all-important, it will be difficult to establish causal relationships. Better understanding of the interaction between healthcare system variables and patient and professional behaviour may generate new hypotheses for further research. PMID:24980792

  5. YUCSA: A CLIPS expert database system to monitor academic performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toptsis, Anestis A.; Ho, Frankie; Leindekar, Milton; Foon, Debra Low; Carbonaro, Mike

    1991-01-01

    The York University CLIPS Student Administrator (YUCSA), an expert database system implemented in C Language Integrated Processing System (CLIPS), for monitoring the academic performance of undergraduate students at York University, is discussed. The expert system component in the system has already been implemented for two major departments, and it is under testing and enhancement for more departments. Also, more elaborate user interfaces are under development. We describe the design and implementation of the system, problems encountered, and immediate future plans. The system has excellent maintainability and it is very efficient, taking less than one minute to complete an assessment of one student.

  6. An effectiveness analysis of healthcare systems using a systems theoretic approach

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Sheuwen; Inder, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of accreditation and quality measurement and reporting to improve healthcare quality and patient safety has been widespread across many countries. A review of the literature reveals no association between the accreditation system and the quality measurement and reporting systems, even when hospital compliance with these systems is satisfactory. Improvement of health care outcomes needs to be based on an appreciation of the whole system that contributes to those outcomes. The research literature currently lacks an appropriate analysis and is fragmented among activities. This paper aims to propose an integrated research model of these two systems and to demonstrate the usefulness of the resulting model for strategic research planning. Methods/design To achieve these aims, a systematic integration of the healthcare accreditation and quality measurement/reporting systems is structured hierarchically. A holistic systems relationship model of the administration segment is developed to act as an investigation framework. A literature-based empirical study is used to validate the proposed relationships derived from the model. Australian experiences are used as evidence for the system effectiveness analysis and design base for an adaptive-control study proposal to show the usefulness of the system model for guiding strategic research. Results Three basic relationships were revealed and validated from the research literature. The systemic weaknesses of the accreditation system and quality measurement/reporting system from a system flow perspective were examined. The approach provides a system thinking structure to assist the design of quality improvement strategies. The proposed model discovers a fourth implicit relationship, a feedback between quality performance reporting components and choice of accreditation components that is likely to play an important role in health care outcomes. An example involving accreditation surveyors is developed that

  7. [Nursing and the humanization of the end- of-life care within healthcare systems].

    PubMed

    Gómez Arca, Marina

    2014-01-01

    The reflection upon the humanisation of the end-of-life process within healthcare systems and the implication of healthcare professionals is the main objective of this article. The evolution of the model of care and nurses leadership role at the end-of-life process is evaluated. This analysis starts from the first European references regarding advance wills, made in 1997 at the Oviedo Convention, until the introduction of the idea of advance directives incorporated into Spanish law in 2002. It sets the concept of advance planning in health-related decisions, which establishes a process of voluntary dialogue where every person can clarify values, preferences and wishes regarding the final moments of life, with the support of the healthcare professionals.

  8. Developing a marketing function in public healthcare systems: a framework for action.

    PubMed

    Lega, Federico

    2006-10-01

    The scope of this paper is to analyse the contribution that a marketing function can bring to the wide variety of healthcare organizations operating in public health systems (PHSs). While extensive research on marketing applied to healthcare services has been elaborated in competitive and managed care contexts, marketing is a rather new issue in PHSs and little research has been conducted to assess its relevance and benefits in these environments. This study tackles that gap and is based on a review of the current literature in order to provide answers to the following points: - definition of the scopes of marketing and of the elements that affect its incorporation in the healthcare sector; - conceptualization of the possible approaches to marketing by health organizations operating in PHSs; - discussion of the resulting framework for action.

  9. [Nursing and the humanization of the end- of-life care within healthcare systems].

    PubMed

    Gómez Arca, Marina

    2014-01-01

    The reflection upon the humanisation of the end-of-life process within healthcare systems and the implication of healthcare professionals is the main objective of this article. The evolution of the model of care and nurses leadership role at the end-of-life process is evaluated. This analysis starts from the first European references regarding advance wills, made in 1997 at the Oviedo Convention, until the introduction of the idea of advance directives incorporated into Spanish law in 2002. It sets the concept of advance planning in health-related decisions, which establishes a process of voluntary dialogue where every person can clarify values, preferences and wishes regarding the final moments of life, with the support of the healthcare professionals. PMID:25132259

  10. Validation of Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnoses in Large Healthcare Systems with Electronic Medical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Karen J.; Lutsky, Marta A.; Yau, Vincent; Qian, Yinge; Pomichowski, Magdalena E.; Crawford, Phillip M.; Lynch, Frances L.; Madden, Jeanne M.; Owen-Smith, Ashli; Pearson, John A.; Pearson, Kathryn A.; Rusinak, Donna; Quinn, Virginia P.; Croen, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    To identify factors associated with valid Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) diagnoses from electronic sources in large healthcare systems. We examined 1,272 charts from ASD diagnosed youth <18 years old. Expert reviewers classified diagnoses as confirmed, probable, possible, ruled out, or not enough information. A total of 845 were classified with…

  11. [Scientific evidence and the cost of innovations in the health-care system].

    PubMed

    Porzsolt, Franz; Schreyögg, Jonas

    2009-08-01

    When depicting the relationship between evidence and the cost of an innovation in the health-care system, the overall risks of assessment, the redistribution of risks in a regulated market, and the ethical consequences must first be taken into account. There are also evidence-based criteria and economic considerations which are relevant when calculating the cost of an innovation. These topics can indicate, but not exhaustively deal with the complicated relationship between scientific evidence and calculating the cost of an innovation in the health-care system. The following three statements summarize the current considerations in the continuing discussion of this topic: *Scientific evidence undoubtedly exists which should be taken into consideration when calculating the cost of an innovation in the health-care system. *The existing scientific evidence is, however, not sufficient to reach such a decision. Additional information about the benefit perceived by the patient is required. *No standardized method exists to measure this additional information. Therefore, a definition problem also exists in the health-care system when setting a price according to scientific evidence.

  12. A Data Analytical Framework for Improving Real-Time, Decision Support Systems in Healthcare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahav, Inbal

    2010-01-01

    In this dissertation we develop a framework that combines data mining, statistics and operations research methods for improving real-time decision support systems in healthcare. Our approach consists of three main concepts: data gathering and preprocessing, modeling, and deployment. We introduce the notion of offline and semi-offline modeling to…

  13. Curing an ill healthcare system: transparent multilateral benefits, cost, and quality.

    PubMed

    Emery, Douglas W; De Brantes, Francois

    2015-02-01

    A transparent, smart, multilateral benefits system can lead the way to healthcare reform with health and economic benefits for all based on: Provider competition guided by quality measurements, clinical nuance, and price competition. Shared risk among consumers, employers, and plans. Economic incentives for all parties. PMID:26665544

  14. Develop security architecture for both in-house healthcare information systems and electronic patient record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Chen, Xiaomeng; Zhuang, Jun; Jiang, Jianrong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Dongqing; Huang, H. K.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we presented a new security approach to provide security measures and features in both healthcare information systems (PACS, RIS/HIS), and electronic patient record (EPR). We introduced two security components, certificate authoring (CA) system and patient record digital signature management (DSPR) system, as well as electronic envelope technology, into the current hospital healthcare information infrastructure to provide security measures and functions such as confidential or privacy, authenticity, integrity, reliability, non-repudiation, and authentication for in-house healthcare information systems daily operating, and EPR exchanging among the hospitals or healthcare administration levels, and the DSPR component manages the all the digital signatures of patient medical records signed through using an-symmetry key encryption technologies. The electronic envelopes used for EPR exchanging are created based on the information of signers, digital signatures, and identifications of patient records stored in CAS and DSMS, as well as the destinations and the remote users. The CAS and DSMS were developed and integrated into a RIS-integrated PACS, and the integration of these new security components is seamless and painless. The electronic envelopes designed for EPR were used successfully in multimedia data transmission.

  15. Adhesive and nonadhesive systems for health-care packaging.

    PubMed

    Pilchik, R

    2000-04-01

    This review of the important attributes of adhesive systems also assesses the potential benefits of nonadhesive systems, such as peelable films, which are gaining favour as cost-saving alternatives. PMID:10947334

  16. [A system of indicators for identifying the specific healthcare needs of communities by large health departments].

    PubMed

    Ciaralli, Fabrizio; D'Ascanio, Italo; Saffioti, Concetto; Spunticchia, Giorgio; Perria, Carla; Vicario, Gianni; Zega, Maurizio; Panà, Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Clinical governance of healthcare and community services by healthcare organizations requires the use of validated tools for identifying the specific healthcare needs of the local population. The population served by a local health organization may be large and although data regarding this population as a whole is useful for a preliminary evaluation, it may be too generic for an accurate estimation of the healthcare needs at the district level since different districts may face different challenges and have profoundly different realities. In this context, it can be strategically useful to use a system of indicators targeted at districts, the latter regarded as the basic unit of the health care system and characterized by a relatively constant structure and size.A set of district indicators has been developed and adopted by a local health authority in Rome (Italy) "ASL Roma B", as part of a collaborative project with the Public Health Agency of the Lazio region. In this paper, we present the main results of the first four years of implementation of the system (from 2007 to 2010).The data shows that even within a metropolitan health organization serving an apparently homogeneous population, health needs, provision of services and outcomes may vary greatly between different districts suggesting the adoption of diverse operational strategies. PMID:23064091

  17. Healthcare system and the wealth-health gradient: a comparative study of older populations in six countries.

    PubMed

    Maskileyson, Dina

    2014-10-01

    The present study provides a comparative analysis of the association between wealth and health in six healthcare systems (Sweden, the United Kingdom, Germany, the Czech Republic, Israel, the United States). National samples of individuals fifty years and over reveal considerable cross-country variations in health outcomes. In all six countries wealth and health are positively associated. The findings also show that state-based healthcare systems produce better population health outcomes than private-based healthcare systems. The results indicate that in five out of the six countries studied, the wealth-health gradients were remarkably similar, despite significant variations in healthcare system type. Only in the United States was the association between wealth and health substantially different from, and much greater than that in the other five countries. The findings suggest that private-based healthcare system in the U.S. is likely to promote stronger positive associations between wealth and health.

  18. Ethnomedicine in healthcare systems of the world: a Semester at Sea pilot survey in 11 countries

    PubMed Central

    Muleady-Mecham, Nancy E.; Schley, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Background An understanding and appreciation for the varied healthcare systems in use throughout the world are increasingly vital for medical personnel as patient populations are now composed of ethnically diverse people with wide-ranging belief systems. Objective While not a statistically valid survey, this pilot study gives a global overview of healthcare differences around the world. Design A pilot study of 459 individuals from 11 different countries around the world was administered by 33 students in the upper division course, People, Pathology, and World Medicine from Semester at Sea, Fall 2007, to ascertain trends in healthcare therapies. Open-ended surveys were conducted in English, through an interpreter, or in the native language. Results Western hospital use ranked highly for all countries, while ethnomedical therapies were utilized to a lesser degree. Among the findings, mainland China exhibited the greatest overall percentage of ethnomedical therapies, while the island of Hong Kong, the largest use of Western hospitals. Conclusions The figures and trends from the surveys suggest the importance of understanding diverse cultural healthcare beliefs when treating individuals of different ethnic backgrounds. The study also revealed the increasingly complex and multisystem-based medical treatments being used internationally. PMID:20027263

  19. Governance, policy and system-level efforts to support safer healthcare.

    PubMed

    Baker, Ross G

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 10 years there have been concerted efforts across Canada to create safer healthcare systems both by improving practices at the frontline and by creating an environment that encourages the development of effective safety practices and a safety culture. There have been major changes in organizational policies regarding the disclosure of adverse events to patient and families, the reporting of patient safety incidents to facilitate learning, and new accreditation requirements. Governing bodies for healthcare organizations have been given clearer accountabilities for quality of care and patient safety, and improved performance measurement, greater engagement of patients and families, and a trend toward greater transparency have aided efforts to improve patient safety. However, some areas where changes were anticipated, including the reform of medical liability processes and changes to regulations that govern health professional practices have not progressed as much as some expected. Overall, a decade following the release of the Canadian Adverse Events Study and the creation of the Canadian Patient Safety Institute many healthcare organizations have made only limited progress toward the creation of "a culture of safety" and a safer healthcare system.

  20. The enhancement of security in healthcare information systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Hui; Chung, Yu-Fang; Chen, Tzer-Shyong; Wang, Sheng-De

    2012-06-01

    With the progress and the development of information technology, the internal data in medical organizations have become computerized and are further established the medical information system. Moreover, the use of the Internet enhances the information communication as well as affects the development of the medical information system that a lot of medical information is transmitted with the Internet. Since there is a network within another network, when all networks are connected together, they will form the "Internet". For this reason, the Internet is considered as a high-risk and public environment which is easily destroyed and invaded so that a relevant protection is acquired. Besides, the data in the medical network system are confidential that it is necessary to protect the personal privacy, such as electronic patient records, medical confidential information, and authorization-controlled data in the hospital. As a consequence, a medical network system is considered as a network requiring high security that excellent protections and managerial strategies are inevitable to prevent illegal events and external attacks from happening. This study proposes secure medical managerial strategies being applied to the network environment of the medical organization information system so as to avoid the external or internal information security events, allow the medical system to work smoothly and safely that not only benefits the patients, but also allows the doctors to use it more conveniently, and further promote the overall medical quality. The objectives could be achieved by preventing from illegal invasion or medical information being stolen, protecting the completeness and security of medical information, avoiding the managerial mistakes of the internal information system in medical organizations, and providing the highly-reliable medical information system.

  1. [The five commandments for preparing the Israeli healthcare system for emergencies].

    PubMed

    Adini, Bruria; Laor, Danny; Cohen, Robert; Lev, Boaz; Israeli, Avi

    2010-07-01

    In the last decade, the Israeli healthcare system dealt with many casualties that resulted from terrorist actions and at the same time maintained preparedness for other potential hazards such as natural disasters, toxicological, chemical, radiological and biological events. There are various models for emergency preparedness that are utilized in different countries. The aim of the article is to present the structure and the methodology of the Israeli healthcare system for emergencies. Assuring emergency preparedness for the different scenarios is based on 5 major components that include: comprehensive contingency planning; control and command of operations; central control of readiness; capacity building; coordination and collaboration among the numerous emergency agencies. CLose working relationships between the military and civilian systems characterize the operations of the emergency system. There is a mutual sharing of information, coordinated operations to achieve risk assessment and determine priorities, and consensual allocation of resources. The ability of the medical system to operate in optimal coordination with interface bodies, including the Israel Defense Forces, is derived from three main elements: the shortage of resources necessitate that all agencies work together to develop an effective response to emergencies; the Israeli society is characterized by transition of personnel from the military to the civilian system which promotes joint operations, whereas in most other countries these systems are completely separated; and also developing mechanisms for continuous and coordinated operation in routine and emergency times, such as the Supreme Health Authority. The Israeli healthcare system was put to the test several times in the Last decade, during the terror wave that occurred between 2001-2006, the 2nd Lebanon War and in operation "Cast Lead". An extensive process of learning lessons, conducted during and following each of these periods, and the

  2. [Growing market of health services. Starting points for a modern healthcare system].

    PubMed

    Oberender, P; Zerth, J

    2006-08-01

    As is the case in other areas of social security services, the German system of statutory health insurance has been battling aggravated financing problems since the mid-1990s. Public discussion in systems similar to Germany that are financed by contributions is mainly typified by the concepts of cost explosion and stability of premium rates. The German healthcare system faces the problem of finding an appropriate control strategy that makes it possible on the one hand to master the exogenous challenges posed by demography, especially advances in medical technology, and on the other hand to ensure that the chances inherent in the "growing market of health services" are not unduly regulated. Against the background of ongoing unemployment, it cannot be considered a long-term solution to continue in regulating a potential employment market with cost-cutting measures or even to favor a healthcare system financed by taxes.

  3. Integrating radiology information systems with healthcare delivery environments using DICOM and HL7 standards.

    PubMed

    Blazona, Bojan; Koncar, Miroslav

    2006-01-01

    Integration based on open standards, in order to achieve communication and information interoperability, is one of the key aspects of modern health care information systems. Interoperability presents data and communication layer interchange. In this context we identified the HL7 standard as the world's leading medical Information and communication technology (ICT) standard for the business layer in healthcare information systems and we tried to explore the ability to exchange clinical documents with minimal integrated healthcare information systems (IHCIS) change. We explored HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) abilities to achieve radiology information system integration (DICOM) to IHCIS (HL7). We introduced the use of WADO service interconnection to IHCIS and finally CDA rendering in widely used Internet explorers.

  4. Integrating radiology information systems with healthcare delivery environments using DICOM and HL7 standards.

    PubMed

    Blazona, Bojan; Koncar, Miroslav

    2006-01-01

    Integration based on open standards, in order to achieve communication and information interoperability, is one of the key aspects of modern health care information systems. Interoperability presents data and communication layer interchange. In this context we identified the HL7 standard as the world's leading medical Information and communication technology (ICT) standard for the business layer in healthcare information systems and we tried to explore the ability to exchange clinical documents with minimal integrated healthcare information systems (IHCIS) change. We explored HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA) abilities to achieve radiology information system integration (DICOM) to IHCIS (HL7). We introduced the use of WADO service interconnection to IHCIS and finally CDA rendering in widely used Internet explorers. PMID:17108539

  5. Ontology and terminology servers in agent-based health-care information systems.

    PubMed

    Falasconi, S; Lanzola, G; Stefanelli, M

    1997-01-01

    A new research paradigm is emerging based on the multi-agent system architectural framework, allowing human and software agents to interoperate and thus cooperate within common application areas. Within a multi-agent system, the different "views of the world" of knowledgeable agents are to be bridged through their commitment to common ontologies and terminologies. We developed a general methodology for the design or integration of new components into a Health-care Information System conceived as a network of software and human agents. In our view, ontological and terminological services are entrusted to dedicated agents, namely ontology and terminology servers, allowing the configuration of suitable application ontologies for distributed applications. The role is described that such servers, operatively coordinated in order to preserve semantic coherence, should play within a distributed Health-care Information System. PMID:9121372

  6. [Colombian healthcare reform: a proposal for adjusting healthcare-related insurance and financing].

    PubMed

    García-Ubaque, Juan C; García-Ubaque, César A; Benítez, Luisa F C

    2012-10-01

    Colombian healthcare system reform (incorporated over fifteen years ago) has been the frequent object of analysis and the system currently seems to be facing one of its most serious crises. This has led to large-scale change being suggested from many social, professional and academic spaces, ranging from varied adjustments to the healthcare-related insurance model's total elimination. Research over the last ten years has suggested a balance of what may have been central to the current problem and has suggested that, although adjustment must be made from a wide national consensus, it is reasonable to maintain a healthcare-related insurance model as long as this reflects the learning achieved to date. Precautions and the necessary control measures must be taken to impede a fresh wave of frustration regarding the aim of ensuring a healthcare system which would be more equitable for all. PMID:24652366

  7. [Colombian healthcare reform: a proposal for adjusting healthcare-related insurance and financing].

    PubMed

    García-Ubaque, Juan C; García-Ubaque, César A; Benítez, Luisa F C

    2012-10-01

    Colombian healthcare system reform (incorporated over fifteen years ago) has been the frequent object of analysis and the system currently seems to be facing one of its most serious crises. This has led to large-scale change being suggested from many social, professional and academic spaces, ranging from varied adjustments to the healthcare-related insurance model's total elimination. Research over the last ten years has suggested a balance of what may have been central to the current problem and has suggested that, although adjustment must be made from a wide national consensus, it is reasonable to maintain a healthcare-related insurance model as long as this reflects the learning achieved to date. Precautions and the necessary control measures must be taken to impede a fresh wave of frustration regarding the aim of ensuring a healthcare system which would be more equitable for all.

  8. [The Colombian healthcare system: 20 years of achievements and problems].

    PubMed

    Calderón, Carlos Alberto Agudelo; Botero, Jaime Cardona; Bolaños, Jesús Ortega; Martínez, Rocio Robledo

    2011-06-01

    An overview of some of the key processes and results of Colombia's National Health System is presented. A systematic review of the literature evaluating the quality of the evidence published in indexed journals and literature not published in journals was made. Health system financial resources have seen a sustained increase while spending on health has remained at around 8% of GNP. Coverage, measured by affiliation to contributory and subsidized regimes, is in the order of 92% of the total population. The Mandatory Health Plan, defining the benefits to which one has access, has been broadly maintained but has been hampered by mechanisms for making legal complaints, thereby leading to financial deficits. The health system has contributed towards improving the poorest sector's income, but inequalities persist due to the lack of universal coverage, differences in health plans and the system's expenditure according to the population's income. Advances made in the National Health System have been positive but universality has not been achieved and this has stagnated in matters regarding access to services and equality. PMID:21709979

  9. [The Colombian healthcare system: 20 years of achievements and problems].

    PubMed

    Calderón, Carlos Alberto Agudelo; Botero, Jaime Cardona; Bolaños, Jesús Ortega; Martínez, Rocio Robledo

    2011-06-01

    An overview of some of the key processes and results of Colombia's National Health System is presented. A systematic review of the literature evaluating the quality of the evidence published in indexed journals and literature not published in journals was made. Health system financial resources have seen a sustained increase while spending on health has remained at around 8% of GNP. Coverage, measured by affiliation to contributory and subsidized regimes, is in the order of 92% of the total population. The Mandatory Health Plan, defining the benefits to which one has access, has been broadly maintained but has been hampered by mechanisms for making legal complaints, thereby leading to financial deficits. The health system has contributed towards improving the poorest sector's income, but inequalities persist due to the lack of universal coverage, differences in health plans and the system's expenditure according to the population's income. Advances made in the National Health System have been positive but universality has not been achieved and this has stagnated in matters regarding access to services and equality.

  10. Toward the modelling of safety violations in healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Ken

    2013-09-01

    When frontline staff do not adhere to policies, protocols, or checklists, managers often regard these violations as indicating poor practice or even negligence. More often than not, however, these policy and protocol violations reflect the efforts of well intentioned professionals to carry out their work efficiently in the face of systems poorly designed to meet the diverse demands of patient care. Thus, non-compliance with institutional policies and protocols often signals a systems problem, rather than a people problem, and can be influenced among other things by training, competing goals, context, process, location, case complexity, individual beliefs, the direct or indirect influence of others, job pressure, flexibility, rule definition, and clinician-centred design. Three candidates are considered for developing a model of safety behaviour and decision making. The dynamic safety model helps to understand the relationship between systems designs and human performance. The theory of planned behaviour suggests that intention is a function of attitudes, social norms and perceived behavioural control. The naturalistic decision making paradigm posits that decisions are based on a wider view of multiple patients, expertise, systems complexity, behavioural intention, individual beliefs and current understanding of the system. Understanding and predicting behavioural safety decisions could help us to encourage compliance to current processes and to design better interventions.

  11. Toward the modelling of safety violations in healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Ken

    2013-09-01

    When frontline staff do not adhere to policies, protocols, or checklists, managers often regard these violations as indicating poor practice or even negligence. More often than not, however, these policy and protocol violations reflect the efforts of well intentioned professionals to carry out their work efficiently in the face of systems poorly designed to meet the diverse demands of patient care. Thus, non-compliance with institutional policies and protocols often signals a systems problem, rather than a people problem, and can be influenced among other things by training, competing goals, context, process, location, case complexity, individual beliefs, the direct or indirect influence of others, job pressure, flexibility, rule definition, and clinician-centred design. Three candidates are considered for developing a model of safety behaviour and decision making. The dynamic safety model helps to understand the relationship between systems designs and human performance. The theory of planned behaviour suggests that intention is a function of attitudes, social norms and perceived behavioural control. The naturalistic decision making paradigm posits that decisions are based on a wider view of multiple patients, expertise, systems complexity, behavioural intention, individual beliefs and current understanding of the system. Understanding and predicting behavioural safety decisions could help us to encourage compliance to current processes and to design better interventions. PMID:23580631

  12. Management of rheumatoid arthritis (Aamavata) using symbiohealth healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    Basisht, Gopal K.; Singh, Ram Harsh; Chandola, Harimohan

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), according to modern medicine, and Aamavata according to Ayurveda, has an etiological and clinical relationship. Aamavata is a disease complex of which RA is a part. A comparative study of the pathophysiology of this disease by both systems reveals that modern medicine has investigated the mechanism of inflammation and has developed an offense strategy to control it. Ayurveda follows a defense strategy and it focuses its search on the etiological process, where disequilibrium at a higher level of physiology affects the gastrointestinal tract, causing an immune response that results in inflammation. Understanding the pathophysiology of both systems will help the treating physician to institute a dual treatment plan of modern medicine's offense strategy and Ayurvedic medicine's defense strategy at appropriate stages of the disease. Studying the pathophsiology of the two systems also gives insight into the genetic and epigenetic phenomenon in the treatment of disease and opens the doors for groundbreaking research. PMID:23723661

  13. Harvard Catalyst | The Clinical Translational Science Center IND/IDE Consult Service: providing an IND/IDE consult service in a decentralized network of academic healthcare centers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min J; Winkler, Sabune J; Bierer, Barbara E; Wolf, Delia

    2014-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations require sponsors of clinical investigations involving an investigational drug or device to submit an Investigational New Drug (IND) or Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application. Strict adherence to applicable regulations is vital to the success of clinical research. Unlike most major pharmaceutical sponsors, investigator sponsors often do not fully appreciate their regulatory obligations nor have resources to ensure compliance. As a result they can place themselves and their institutions at risk. Nevertheless, investigator-initiated clinical trials are vital to the further development of innovative drugs, biologics, and medical devices. The IND/IDE Subcommittee under the Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program at Harvard Catalyst, The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center worked in collaboration with Harvard and Harvard affiliated institutions to create and launch an IND/IDE Consult Service in a decentralized network of collaborating Academic Healthcare Centers (AHC). The IND/IDE Consult Service offers expertise, resources, and shared experiences to assist sponsor-investigators and IRBs in meeting regulatory requirements for conducting and reviewing investigator-initiated IND/IDE studies. The scope of the services provided by the Harvard Catalyst IND/IDE Consult Service are described, including the specifics of the service, lessons learned, and challenges faced, in a scalable model that builds inter-institutional capacity.

  14. [Pediatric care in Brazil's Unified Health System: reflections on the role of pediatricians in Family Healthcare Strategy].

    PubMed

    Rivorêdo, Carlos Roberto Soares Freire de; Oliveira, Gustavo Nunes; Mendes, Roberto Teixeira

    2011-10-01

    This essay seeks to contribute to the elucidation of the potential activities of pediatricians in the Family Healthcare Strategy. The origins, types of care and inherent implications to the process of change in the Healthcare Model that are being implemented in the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS) since the Basic Operational Norms were instituted in 1996 are duly presented.

  15. Good Medicine and Good Healthcare Demand Good Information (Systems).

    PubMed

    Winter, A; Hilgers, R-D; Hofestädt, R; Hübner, U; Knaup-Gregori, P; Ose, C; Schmoor, C; Timmer, A; Wege, D

    2015-01-01

    The demand for evidence-based health informatics and benchmarking of 'good' information systems in health care gives an opportunity to continue reporting on recent papers in the German journal GMS Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (MIBE) here. The publications in focus deal with a comparison of benchmarking initiatives in German-speaking countries, use of communication standards in telemonitoring scenarios, the estimation of national cancer incidence rates and modifications of parametric tests. Furthermore papers in this issue of MIM are introduced which originally have been presented at the Annual Conference of the German Society of Medical Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology. They deal as well with evidence and evaluation of 'good' information systems but also with data harmonization, surveillance in obstetrics, adaptive designs and parametrical testing in statistical analysis, patient registries and signal processing. PMID:26395286

  16. Development of smart toothbrush monitoring system for ubiquitous healthcare.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Whan; Lee, Kang-Hwi; Kim, Kyeong-Seop; Kim, Dong-Jun; Kim, Kyungho

    2006-01-01

    The design of an intelligent toothbrush, capable of monitoring brushing motion, orientation through the grip axis, during toothbrushing is described. Inappropriate tooth-brushing styles, even in adults, sometimes cause dental problems, cavities, gingivitis, etc. This smart system provides user to monitor his or her brushing pattern using accelerometer and magnetic sensors for evaluation of toothbrushing style. Directional information of toothbrush with respect to the earth's magnetic field and activity data were measured by a miniaturized low-power micro-controller, MSP430 and transmitted to personal computer by 2.4 GHz radio transmitter, nRF2401. A personal computer provides an on-line display of activity and orientation measurements during toothbrushing. The signal trace is then analyzed to extract clinically relevant information. This preliminary study showed that the proposed monitoring system was conceived to aid dental care personnel in patient education and instruction in oral hygiene regarding brushing style. PMID:17945966

  17. Creating and standardizing annual chemotherapy competencies throughout a healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Nancy; Sugarman, Cathleen; Beener, Elizabeth; Agan, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Changes in chemotherapy delivery from inpatient to outpatient settings and transition from intravenous to oral administration threaten the competency level of chemotherapy nurses. To standardize care and demonstrate competency across five hospital campuses and four outpatient infusion centers, one health system developed a hands-on competency evaluation for chemotherapy nurses based on a scenario approach. Results included improved confidence, competence, identification of variation, and standardization of equipment, process, and policy. PMID:25608095

  18. Space Medicine Issues and Healthcare Systems for Space Exploration Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheuring, Richard A.; Jones, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews issues of health care in space. Some of the issues reviewed are: (1) Physiological adaptation to microgravity, partial gravity, (2) Medical events during spaceflight, (3) Space Vehicle and Environmental and Surface Health Risks, (4) Medical Concept of Operations (CONOPS), (4a) Current CONOPS & Medical Hardware for Shuttle (STS) and ISS, (4b) Planned Exploration Medical CONOPS & Hardware needs, (5) Exploration Plans for Lunar Return Mission & Mars, and (6) Developing Medical Support Systems.

  19. Experiences of patients identifying with chronic Lyme disease in the healthcare system: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic Lyme disease is a term that describes a constellation of persistent symptoms in patients with or without evidence of previous Borrelia burgdorferi infection. Patients labeled as having chronic Lyme disease have a substantial clinical burden. Little is known about chronic Lyme disease patient experiences in the healthcare system and their relationships with healthcare providers. The purpose of this study was to gather insights about the experiences of patients who carry a diagnosis of chronic Lyme disease in the United States healthcare system. Methods Qualitative, phenomenological study in 12 adult participants who identified themselves as having chronic Lyme disease. Semi-structured face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted, 60–90 minutes in length, focusing on perceptions of disease burden and of their healthcare providers, using the dimensions of the Health Belief Model. Transcribed interviews were analyzed for emergent topics and themes in the categories of beliefs/understanding, personal history/narrative, consequences/limitations, management, and influences on care. Results Enrollment continued until theoretical saturation was obtained. Four major themes emerged from participants’ descriptions of their experiences and perceptions: 1) changes in health status and the social impact of chronic Lyme disease, 2) doubts about recovery and the future, 3) contrasting doctor-patient relationships, 4) and the use of unconventional therapies to treat chronic Lyme disease. Conclusions Participants reported a significant decline in health status associated with chronic Lyme disease and were often unsatisfied with care in conventional settings. Negative experiences were associated with reports of dismissive, patronizing, and condescending attitudes. Positive experiences were associated with providers who were reported to be attentive, optimistic, and supportive. Consultations with CAM practitioners and use of CAM therapies were common. Actively

  20. Cancer management: the difficulties of a target-driven healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Beverley

    This article gives a reflective overview on cancer management from a urological perspective. It is based on anecdotal evidence and observations of local practice, and highlights some of the inherent difficulties of delivering a robust service in a target-driven healthcare system. Cancer is a complex disease. It is crucial that stringent measures are used to ensure those affected by it receive care that is of the highest quality, delivered in a timely manner, and tailored to meet the individual's needs. In 2000, the Government's attempt to increase competition among healthcare providers in the delivery of care, and thereby healthcare quality and efficiency, resulted in a number of healthcare reforms being introduced in the UK. Central to these were the NHS Cancer Waiting Time standards, which were designed to fast-track care delivery in the management of cancer patients. The multidisciplinary teams play a pivotal role in this process and their contribution is imperative to achieving the desired outcomes. It is acknowledged that targets can be beneficial, but there are clear unintended consequences as well. Increases in urgent referrals result in significant screening demands and, consequently, newly diagnosed cancers. This, combined with factors such as patient choice and costs, put added pressure on NHS establishments and health professionals to deliver care within the target specifications. PMID:27172506

  1. Cancer management: the difficulties of a target-driven healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Beverley

    This article gives a reflective overview on cancer management from a urological perspective. It is based on anecdotal evidence and observations of local practice, and highlights some of the inherent difficulties of delivering a robust service in a target-driven healthcare system. Cancer is a complex disease. It is crucial that stringent measures are used to ensure those affected by it receive care that is of the highest quality, delivered in a timely manner, and tailored to meet the individual's needs. In 2000, the Government's attempt to increase competition among healthcare providers in the delivery of care, and thereby healthcare quality and efficiency, resulted in a number of healthcare reforms being introduced in the UK. Central to these were the NHS Cancer Waiting Time standards, which were designed to fast-track care delivery in the management of cancer patients. The multidisciplinary teams play a pivotal role in this process and their contribution is imperative to achieving the desired outcomes. It is acknowledged that targets can be beneficial, but there are clear unintended consequences as well. Increases in urgent referrals result in significant screening demands and, consequently, newly diagnosed cancers. This, combined with factors such as patient choice and costs, put added pressure on NHS establishments and health professionals to deliver care within the target specifications.

  2. 'I think it will eventually be done away with': Attitudes among healthcare professionals towards the current system of animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Dignon, Andrée

    2016-08-01

    This article describes a study of attitudes to the current system of animal experimentation (for the production of health interventions) among 52 UK healthcare professionals. These healthcare professionals participated in three separate focus groups (of 18, 17 and 17 participants) and were invited to respond to the question 'what is your opinion about the current system of animal testing?' The study focused specifically on their views of the current system (rather than their views of animal testing in general). The healthcare professionals were critical of the current system, particularly with regard to regulation, secrecy, validity, unnecessary suffering and welfare.

  3. Challenges of managing people with multimorbidity in today's healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Keith; Mercer, Stewart W

    2015-01-01

    Multimorbidity is a growing issue and poses a major challenge to health care systems around the world. Multimorbidity is related to ageing but many studies have now shown that it is also socially patterned, being more common and occurring at an earlier age in areas of high socioeconomic deprivation. There is lack of research on patients with multimorbidity, and thus guidelines are based on single-conditions. Polypharmacy is common in multimorbidity, increasing drug-disease and drug-drug interactions. Multimorbid patients need holistic care, but secondary care services are highly specialised and thus are often duplicative and fragmented and thus increase treatment burden in multimorbid patients. The cost of care is high in multimorbidity, due to high rates of primary and secondary care consultations and unplanned hospital admissions. The combination of mental and physical conditions increases complexity of care, and costs. Mental-physical multimorbidity is especially common in deprived areas.General practitioners and primary care teams have a key role in managing patients with multimorbidity, using a patient-centred generalist approach. Consultation length and continuity of care may need to be substantially enhanced in order to enable such patients. This will require a radical change in how health care systems are organised and funded in order to effectively meet the challenges of multimorbidity. PMID:26462820

  4. Challenges of managing people with multimorbidity in today's healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Keith; Mercer, Stewart W

    2015-10-14

    Multimorbidity is a growing issue and poses a major challenge to health care systems around the world. Multimorbidity is related to ageing but many studies have now shown that it is also socially patterned, being more common and occurring at an earlier age in areas of high socioeconomic deprivation. There is lack of research on patients with multimorbidity, and thus guidelines are based on single-conditions. Polypharmacy is common in multimorbidity, increasing drug-disease and drug-drug interactions. Multimorbid patients need holistic care, but secondary care services are highly specialised and thus are often duplicative and fragmented and thus increase treatment burden in multimorbid patients. The cost of care is high in multimorbidity, due to high rates of primary and secondary care consultations and unplanned hospital admissions. The combination of mental and physical conditions increases complexity of care, and costs. Mental-physical multimorbidity is especially common in deprived areas.General practitioners and primary care teams have a key role in managing patients with multimorbidity, using a patient-centred generalist approach. Consultation length and continuity of care may need to be substantially enhanced in order to enable such patients. This will require a radical change in how health care systems are organised and funded in order to effectively meet the challenges of multimorbidity.

  5. Light and shadows of the Korean healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Moon, Tai Joon

    2012-05-01

    This article reviewed achievements and challenges of the National Health Insurance of the Republic of Korea and shared thoughts on its future directions. Starting with large workplaces of 500 or more employees in 1977, Korea's National Health Insurance successfully achieved universal coverage within just 12 yr in 1989. This amazing pace of growth was possible due to a positive combination of strong political will and rapid economic growth. Key features of Korea's experience in achieving universal coverage include 1) gradual expansion of coverage, 2) careful consideration to maintain sound insurance finances, and 3) introducing multiple health insurance societies (multiple payer system) at the initial stage. Introduction of the health insurance has dramatically improved Korea's health indicators and has fueled the rapid growth of basic medical infrastructure including medical institutions and professionals. On the other hand, the successful expansion was not free from side-effects. Although coverage has gradually expanded, benefits are still relatively low. The current situation warrants concern because coverage expansion is driven by welfare populism asserted by irresponsible political slogans and lacks a social consensus on basic principles and philosophy regarding the expansion. Concentration of patients to a few large prestigious hospitals as well as the inefficiencies resulting from a colossal single-payer system should also be pointed out. PMID:22661868

  6. Light and Shadows of the Korean Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This article reviewed achievements and challenges of the National Health Insurance of the Republic of Korea and shared thoughts on its future directions. Starting with large workplaces of 500 or more employees in 1977, Korea's National Health Insurance successfully achieved universal coverage within just 12 yr in 1989. This amazing pace of growth was possible due to a positive combination of strong political will and rapid economic growth. Key features of Korea's experience in achieving universal coverage include 1) gradual expansion of coverage, 2) careful consideration to maintain sound insurance finances, and 3) introducing multiple health insurance societies (multiple payer system) at the initial stage. Introduction of the health insurance has dramatically improved Korea's health indicators and has fueled the rapid growth of basic medical infrastructure including medical institutions and professionals. On the other hand, the successful expansion was not free from side-effects. Although coverage has gradually expanded, benefits are still relatively low. The current situation warrants concern because coverage expansion is driven by welfare populism asserted by irresponsible political slogans and lacks a social consensus on basic principles and philosophy regarding the expansion. Concentration of patients to a few large prestigious hospitals as well as the inefficiencies resulting from a colossal single-payer system should also be pointed out. PMID:22661868

  7. A cloud-based X73 ubiquitous mobile healthcare system: design and implementation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhanlin; Ganchev, Ivan; O'Droma, Máirtín; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Xueji

    2014-01-01

    Based on the user-centric paradigm for next generation networks, this paper describes a ubiquitous mobile healthcare (uHealth) system based on the ISO/IEEE 11073 personal health data (PHD) standards (X73) and cloud computing techniques. A number of design issues associated with the system implementation are outlined. The system includes a middleware on the user side, providing a plug-and-play environment for heterogeneous wireless sensors and mobile terminals utilizing different communication protocols and a distributed "big data" processing subsystem in the cloud. The design and implementation of this system are envisaged as an efficient solution for the next generation of uHealth systems.

  8. A cloud-based X73 ubiquitous mobile healthcare system: design and implementation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhanlin; Ganchev, Ivan; O'Droma, Máirtín; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Xueji

    2014-01-01

    Based on the user-centric paradigm for next generation networks, this paper describes a ubiquitous mobile healthcare (uHealth) system based on the ISO/IEEE 11073 personal health data (PHD) standards (X73) and cloud computing techniques. A number of design issues associated with the system implementation are outlined. The system includes a middleware on the user side, providing a plug-and-play environment for heterogeneous wireless sensors and mobile terminals utilizing different communication protocols and a distributed "big data" processing subsystem in the cloud. The design and implementation of this system are envisaged as an efficient solution for the next generation of uHealth systems. PMID:24737958

  9. Variation in costs of cone beam CT examinations among healthcare systems

    PubMed Central

    Christell, H; Birch, S; Hedesiu, M; Horner, K; Ivanauskaité, D; Nackaerts, O; Rohlin, M; Lindh, C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To analyse the costs of cone beam CT (CBCT) in different healthcare systems for patients with different clinical conditions. Methods Costs were calculated for CBCT performed in Cluj (Romania), Leuven (Belgium), Malmö (Sweden) and Vilnius (Lithuania) on patients with (i) a maxillary canine with eruption disturbance, (ii) an area with tooth loss prior to implant treatment or (iii) a lower wisdom tooth planned for removal. The costs were calculated using an approach based on the identification, measurement and valuation of all resources used in the delivery of the service that combined direct costs (capital equipment, accommodation, labour) with indirect costs (patients' and accompanying persons' time, “out of pocket” costs for examination fee and visits). Results The estimates for direct and indirect costs varied among the healthcare systems, being highest in Malmö and lowest in Leuven. Variation in direct costs was mainly owing to different capital costs for the CBCT equipment arising from differences in purchase prices (range €148 000–227 000). Variation in indirect costs were mainly owing to examination fees (range €0–102.02). Conclusions Cost analysis provides an important input for economic evaluations of diagnostic methods in different healthcare systems and for planning of service delivery. Additionally, it enables decision-makers to separate variations in costs between systems into those due to external influences and those due to policy decisions. A cost evaluation of a dental radiographic method cannot be generalized from one healthcare system to another, but must take into account these specific circumstances. PMID:22499131

  10. Organization ethics or compliance: which will articulate values for the United States' healthcare system?

    PubMed

    Mills, A E; Spencer, E M

    2001-12-01

    programs may ultimately undermine the goals of an organization ethics program. Nevertheless, it is important to realize that the legal compliance of an HCO, like its compliance to high standards of ethics, are considerations that determine the ethical climate of an organization. In the absence of a consensus concerning the values that should inform the larger healthcare system, it may be the only consideration that all healthcare organization stakeholders can agree upon, and so may represent the only stable and consistent platform ethically to evaluate the activities of the healthcare organization at the present time. This can be the basis for each HCO to develop its values-oriented ethical program which will define and support the organization's ethical climate for the organization, its staff, its patients, and its community.

  11. Healthcare under the Panchayati Raj Institutions (PRIs) in a decentralised health system.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Virendra; Jayanta Mishra, Anindya

    2016-05-01

    Purpose This paper aims to explore the challenges and benefits arising from the involvement of Panchayati Raj Institutions (PRIs) in the provisioning of primary healthcare in a decentralised health system of India. Design/methodology/approach A qualitative study design was used in this study. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews from 89 respondents selected from nine primary health centres across the district. A thematic analytical framework approach was used to analyse the data. Findings The research results indicate that there are several challenges resulting from PRIs involvement, including prioritisation of service providers and users, coercive unethical work and lack of communication. However, there are some benefits associated with the involvement of the PRIs in service provisioning, including improved availability and regularity of healthcare providers at the health centres. Research limitations/implications The implications of the findings suggest that the PRIs play an important role in healthcare provisioning; however, their involvement is ineffective due to their partial capabilities and approach, which creates a non-conducive environment. Practical implications Health issues are among the most important human concerns, and recognising and addressing the grassroot challenges help to locate, and overcome the challenges that hinder the smooth healthcare provisioning process. Originality/value National Rural Health Mission has recognised the PRIs as a platform to promote decentralised health planning and for achieving its goals in India. The PRIs are significantly involved in planning, monitoring and provisioning of primary healthcare services at grassroot level. This paper addresses the challenges and benefits that emerged due to their involvement. PMID:27198704

  12. Is variation management included in regional healthcare governance systems? Some proposals from Italy.

    PubMed

    Nuti, Sabina; Seghieri, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    The Italian National Health System, which follows a Beveridge model, provides universal healthcare coverage through general taxation. Universal coverage provides uniform healthcare access to citizens and is the characteristic usually considered the added value of a welfare system financed by tax revenues. Nonetheless, wide differences in practice patterns, health outcomes and regional usages of resources that cannot be justified by differences in patient needs have been demonstrated to exist. Beginning with the experience of the health care system of the Tuscany region (Italy), this study describes the first steps of a long-term approach to proactively address the issue of geographic variation in healthcare. In particular, the study highlights how the unwarranted variation management has been addressed in a region with a high degree of managerial control over the delivery of health care and a consolidated performance evaluation system, by first, considering it a high priority objective and then by actively integrating it into the regional planning and control mechanism. The implications of this study can be useful to policy makers, professionals and managers, and will contribute to the understanding of how the management of variation can be implemented with performance measurements and financial incentives. PMID:24050981

  13. Real-time locating systems (RTLS) in healthcare: a condensed primer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Real-time locating systems (RTLS, also known as real-time location systems) have become an important component of many existing ubiquitous location aware systems. While GPS (global positioning system) has been quite successful as an outdoor real-time locating solution, it fails to repeat this success indoors. A number of RTLS technologies have been used to solve indoor tracking problems. The ability to accurately track the location of assets and individuals indoors has many applications in healthcare. This paper provides a condensed primer of RTLS in healthcare, briefly covering the many options and technologies that are involved, as well as the various possible applications of RTLS in healthcare facilities and their potential benefits, including capital expenditure reduction and workflow and patient throughput improvements. The key to a successful RTLS deployment lies in picking the right RTLS option(s) and solution(s) for the application(s) or problem(s) at hand. Where this application-technology match has not been carefully thought of, any technology will be doomed to failure or to achieving less than optimal results. PMID:22741760

  14. Perceptions of dental students regarding dentistry, the job market and the public healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Costa, Simone de Melo; Silveira, Marise Fagundes; Durães, Sarah Jane Alves; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães de; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti

    2012-05-01

    The scope was to analyze the perceptions of dentistry students at the State University of Montes Claros, Brazil, regarding dentistry, the job market and the public healthcare system. For this, a triangulation method was employed, using a self-administered questionnaire and interviews. The quantitative data were submitted to univariate and multivariate analysis, using Poisson regression, where p<0.05. Content analysis was used for the qualitative data. The majority reported expecting to obtain work in the public healthcare system, stated that the dentistry course prepares students for this market as the curriculum integrates both teaching and service, reported being in favor of greater experience in the public healthcare system and said they would not take classes in Public Health if they were optional. Contact with the social context through teaching/service integration in the advanced semesters of the dentistry course appears to contribute to the development of new professional skills for working in the public sector. However, the students' perceptions revealed contradictions, considering the low value they attributed to the classes on Public Health and their perception of the public system as a residual job option.

  15. A telemedicine system for wireless home healthcare based on Bluetooth and the Internet.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoming; Fei, Ding-Yu; Doarn, Charles R; Harnett, Brett; Merrell, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    The VitalPoll Telemedicine System (VTS) was designed and developed for wireless home healthcare. The aims of this study were: to design the architecture and communication methods for a telemedicine system; to implement a physiologic routing hub to collect data from different medical devices and sensors; and to evaluate the feasibility of this system for applications in wireless home healthcare. The VTS was built using Bluetooth wireless and Internet technologies with client/server architecture. Several medical devices, which acquire vital signs, such as real-time electrocardiogram signals, heart rate, body temperature, and activity (physical motion), were integrated into the VTS. Medical information and data were transmitted over short-range interface (USB, RS232), wireless communication, and the Internet. The medical results were stored in a database and presented using a web browser. The patient's vital signals can be collected, transmitted, and displayed in real time by the VTS. The experiments verified no data loss during Bluetooth and Internet communication. Bluetooth and the Internet provide enough bandwidth channels to tranmit these vital signs. The experimental results show that VTS may be suitable for a practical telemedicine system in home healthcare.

  16. A systems-based partnership learning model for strengthening primary healthcare

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Strengthening primary healthcare systems is vital to improving health outcomes and reducing inequity. However, there are few tools and models available in published literature showing how primary care system strengthening can be achieved on a large scale. Challenges to strengthening primary healthcare (PHC) systems include the dispersion, diversity and relative independence of primary care providers; the scope and complexity of PHC; limited infrastructure available to support population health approaches; and the generally poor and fragmented state of PHC information systems. Drawing on concepts of comprehensive PHC, integrated quality improvement (IQI) methods, system-based research networks, and system-based participatory action research, we describe a learning model for strengthening PHC that addresses these challenges. We describe the evolution of this model within the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary healthcare context, successes and challenges in its application, and key issues for further research. Discussion IQI approaches combined with system-based participatory action research and system-based research networks offer potential to support program implementation and ongoing learning across a wide scope of primary healthcare practice and on a large scale. The Partnership Learning Model (PLM) can be seen as an integrated model for large-scale knowledge translation across the scope of priority aspects of PHC. With appropriate engagement of relevant stakeholders, the model may be applicable to a wide range of settings. In IQI, and in the PLM specifically, there is a clear role for research in contributing to refining and evaluating existing tools and processes, and in developing and trialling innovations. Achieving an appropriate balance between funding IQI activity as part of routine service delivery and funding IQI related research will be vital to developing and sustaining this type of PLM. Summary This paper draws together

  17. Implementation of a patient-centred and physician-oriented healthcare information system.

    PubMed

    Young, S T; Chang, J S

    1997-01-01

    Integration of information has enabled expeditious operation in air transfer, banking, shopping, and stock brokerage, but not in healthcare. Existing health information systems (HIS) are concerned too much with departmental performance and charge billing, and neglect the end users--the patients and the physicians. The resultant HIS then has divergent operation to antagonize the physicians, and has fragmented data to the disadvantage of patients. Recognizing the problems and the trend of HIS, this study proposed and implemented a patient-centred and physician-oriented HIS in a Urology clinic. The proposed HIS had patient care as its core, and accurately coded the patient's diagnoses and therapy information. It also offered a friendly environment and complete function for the physician to administrate medical records and to provide healthcare services. The HIS had client/server structure and an open system to protect the hardware investment and the software implementation. It will be the key to success in complete hospital environments. PMID:9364429

  18. Influence of immigration on prematurity in the context of a free healthcare system with universal coverage.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Ernesto; Mercedes Rizo-Baeza, María; Palazón-Bru, Antonio; Aguilar-Cordero, María José; Francisco Gil-Guillén, Vicente

    2015-05-22

    We assessed the risk of preterm birth according to the mother's place of origin in the context of a free and universal healthcare system. We analysed 75,292 newborn infants born between 2008-2011 in Alicante (Spain). The outcomes were: 1) very preterm (gestational age ≤ 32 weeks) and 2) moderate-to-late preterm (gestational age 33-37 weeks). Other variables: infant's gender, maternal age and origin. We estimated adjusted odds ratios to analyse the relationship between the outcomes and the other variables. The distribution of the gestational age groups in our sample was: very preterm, 812; moderate-to-late preterm, 5,295; full-term, 69,997. There were no statistically significant differences between the mother's place of origin and the outcomes in this free universal healthcare system, which is experiencing the recent phenomenon of immigration. This equality should be maintained throughout the time the immigrants remain in the country.

  19. An Ethical Analysis of Performance-Based Supplementary Payment in Turkey's Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Kadioglu, Funda Gulay

    2016-07-01

    In 2003 Turkey introduced the Health Transition Program to develop easily accessible, high-quality, and effective healthcare services for the population. This program, like other health reforms, has three primary goals: to improve health status, to enhance financial protection, and to ensure patients' satisfaction. Although there is considerable literature on the anticipated positive results of such health reforms, little evidence exists on their current effectiveness. One of the main initiatives of this health reform is a performance-based supplementary payment system, an additional payment healthcare professionals receive each month in addition to their regular salaries. This system may cause some ethical problems. Physicians have an ethical duty to provide high-quality care to each patient; however, pay-for-performance and other programs that create strong incentives for high-quality care set up a potential conflict between this duty and the competing interest of complying with a performance measure. PMID:27348833

  20. Embedded sensor systems for health - providing the tools in future healthcare.

    PubMed

    Lindén, Maria; Björkman, Mats

    2014-01-01

    Wearable, embedded sensor systems for health applications are foreseen to be enablers in the future healthcare. They will provide ubiquitous monitoring of multiple parameters without restricting the person to stay at home or in the hospital. By following trend changes in the health status, early deteriorations will be detected and treatment can start earlier. Also health prevention will be supported. Such future healthcare requires technology development, including miniaturized sensors, smart textiles and wireless communication. The tremendous amount of data generated by these systems calls for both signal processing and decision support to guarantee the quality of data and avoid overflow of information. Safe and secure communications have to protect the integrity of the persons monitored. PMID:24851983

  1. Knowledge Discovery from Massive Healthcare Claims Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Schryver, Jack C

    2013-01-01

    The role of big data in addressing the needs of the present healthcare system in US and rest of the world has been echoed by government, private, and academic sectors. There has been a growing emphasis to explore the promise of big data analytics in tapping the potential of the massive healthcare data emanating from private and government health insurance providers. While the domain implications of such collaboration are well known, this type of data has been explored to a limited extent in the data mining community. The objective of this paper is two fold: first, we introduce the emerging domain of big"healthcare claims data to the KDD community, and second, we describe the success and challenges that we encountered in analyzing this data using state of art analytics for massive data. Specically, we translate the problem of analyzing healthcare data into some of the most well-known analysis problems in the data mining community, social network analysis, text mining, and temporal analysis and higher order feature construction, and describe how advances within each of these areas can be leveraged to understand the domain of healthcare. Each case study illustrates a unique intersection of data mining and healthcare with a common objective of improving the cost-care ratio by mining for opportunities to improve healthcare operations and reducing hat seems to fall under fraud, waste,and abuse.

  2. Pathways towards chronic care-focused healthcare systems: evidence from Spain.

    PubMed

    García-Goñi, Manuel; Hernández-Quevedo, Cristina; Nuño-Solinís, Roberto; Paolucci, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    Increasing healthcare expenditure is a matter of concern in many countries, particularly in relation to the underlying drivers of such escalation that include ageing, medical innovation, and changes in the burden of disease, such as the growing prevalence of chronic diseases. Most healthcare systems in developed countries have been designed to 'cure' acute episodes, rather than to 'manage' chronic conditions, and therefore they are not suitably or efficiently organized to respond to the changing needs and preferences of users. New models of chronic care provision have been developed to respond to the changing burden of disease and there is already considerable practical experience in several different countries showing their advantages but also the difficulties associated with their implementation. In this paper, we focus on the Spanish experience in terms of policy changes and pilot studies focused on testing the feasibility of moving towards chronic care models. In particular, we discuss a framework that identifies and analyses ten key prerequisites to achieving high performing chronic care-based healthcare systems and apply it to the current Spanish National Health System (NHS). We find that the design of the Spanish NHS already meets some of these pre-requisites. However, other features are still in their early stages of development or are being applied only in limited geographical and clinical contexts. We outline the policies that are being implemented and the pathway that the Spanish NHS is taking to address the crucial challenge of the transition towards an optimal health system focused on chronic care. Given the current evidence and trends, we expect that the pathway for developing a chronicity strategy being followed by the Spanish NHS will significantly transform its current healthcare delivery model in the next few years.

  3. Quality of healthcare related software applications--setting up an accreditation system in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Lakner, G; Balkányi, L; Surján, G; Kovács, J

    1997-01-01

    Meeting expectations of high quality health care, the safe and secure operation of medical information systems is a "must". However for healthcare software nationwide quality control systems are not widely used. A quality control project of health care applications in Hungary has been launched in 1996 by the Hungarian Society of Healthcare Informatics (MEIT) and Medico-Biological Section of Johann Neumann Society of Computing (NJSZT) by establishing a joint Healthcare Informatics Applications Accreditation Board (Board ESAB). The Board developed an evaluation methodology and a legal procedure to test health care software application modules. The evaluation method is based on international standards as ISO-9126 and on emerging European standards of CEN/TC 251. First rounds of accreditation already proved that there is a need among providers and users for the accreditation process. The authors hope that establishing an accreditation system will lead to a more balanced health care software market where users have an opportunity to inform themselves by the opinion of independent experts on the product they intend to purchase.

  4. Creation of a RFID based real time tracking (R-RTT) system for small healthcare clinics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph C; Collins, Thomas J

    2012-12-01

    A well-managed healthcare system improves the quality of the patient experience. However, many small healthcare clinics have suboptimal systems for scheduling and locating patients and medical staff, delaying the relay of information and creating poor resource and room utilization. This paper proposes a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-based Real-Time Tracking (R-RTT) System for optimizing small healthcare facility operations, enabling further optimization of throughput time, room utilization, and patient flow. In the proposed scenario, RFID readers were equipped in strategic locations throughout the facility. Patients and medical staff were issued personalized RFID tags. When they pass through the reader's interrogation zone, it reads their RFID tag and sends the information to a central computer equipped with software capable of filtering the RFID data into useable information. A Visual Basic Application (VBA) program uses the information received from the ID tags to display the location of the patients and staff as they move throughout the facility. This increases their visibility within the facility by allowing medical staff to determine where their colleagues and patients are at all times. The VBA program was also able to record the data in order to track the time each stage of the appointment process takes to complete. The recorded time data can be broken into processes, making it easier to determine if it adds value. This data can then be transformed into a value stream map for further analysis and improvement.

  5. [ZHU Lian's New Acupuncture Academic System and acupuncture science initialization].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujian; Zhang, Lijian

    2015-11-01

    Acupuncture scientization was a consensus of most of acupuncture scholars who had long-term perspectives in the 20th century, among them Ms. ZHULian was the important one. Ms. ZHU Lian built a systemic new acupuncture" academic structure in practice and theory aspects. At the same time, as the main architect of Institute of Acupuncture-moxibustion of China Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ms. ZHU Lian was the first one who began to carry out the acupuncture clinical trail and laboratory experiment in modern way, which meant "acupuncture therapy" was transformed into "acupuncture science" by Ms. ZHULian's endeavor.

  6. Fraud Detection in Healthcare

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Schryver, Jack C; Sukumar, Sreenivas R

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the problem of fraud detection in healthcare in this chapter. Given the recent scrutiny of the ineciencies in the US healthcare system, identifying fraud has been on the forefront of the eorts towards reducing the healthcare costs. In this chapter we will focus on understanding the issue of healthcare fraud in detail, and review methods that have been proposed in the literature to combat this issue using data driven approach.

  7. Review and analysis of quality healthcare system enhancement in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kurji, Zohra; Premani, Zahra Shaheen; Mithani, Yasmin

    2015-07-01

    Quality has multidimensional perspectives. It is a continuous and dynamic process. A systematic search of national and international literature was conducted from peer-reviewed databases MEDLINE, CINAHL and PubMed during January to July 2012. There are many frameworks to assess and measure quality. All frameworks give some levels in which quality could be assessed. Therefore, multiple frameworks should be used for measuring quality based on the situation and environment. Measuring quality is very important for primary healthcare programme, especially for developing countries because if we will not do quality assessment, our resources will not be utilised effectively and people may divert to curative services. Thus, in developing countries where healthcare system needs to optimise resources for increased population coverage and scale up the care, quality approaches can suggest workable solutions to using resources appropriately. PMID:26160090

  8. Process techniques for human thoracic electrical bio-impedance signal in remote healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Muhammad Zia Ur; Mirza, Shafi Shahsavar

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of thoracic electrical bio-impedance (TEB) facilitates heart stroke volume in sudden cardiac arrest. This Letter proposes several efficient and computationally simplified adaptive algorithms to display high-resolution TEB component. In a clinical environment, TEB signal encounters with various physiological and non-physiological phenomenon, which masks the tiny features that are important in identifying the intensity of the stroke. Moreover, computational complexity is an important parameter in a modern wearable healthcare monitoring tool. Hence, in this Letter, the authors propose a new signal conditioning technique for TEB enhancement in remote healthcare systems. For this, the authors have chosen higher order adaptive filter as a basic element in the process of TEB. To improve filtering capability, convergence speed, to reduce computational complexity of the signal conditioning technique, the authors apply data normalisation and clipping the data regressor. The proposed implementations are tested on real TEB signals. Finally, simulation results confirm that proposed regressor clipped normalised higher order filter is suitable for a practical healthcare system. PMID:27382481

  9. RFID sensor-tags feeding a context-aware rule-based healthcare monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Catarinucci, Luca; Colella, Riccardo; Esposito, Alessandra; Tarricone, Luciano; Zappatore, Marco

    2012-12-01

    Along with the growing of the aging population and the necessity of efficient wellness systems, there is a mounting demand for new technological solutions able to support remote and proactive healthcare. An answer to this need could be provided by the joint use of the emerging Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technologies and advanced software choices. This paper presents a proposal for a context-aware infrastructure for ubiquitous and pervasive monitoring of heterogeneous healthcare-related scenarios, fed by RFID-based wireless sensors nodes. The software framework is based on a general purpose architecture exploiting three key implementation choices: ontology representation, multi-agent paradigm and rule-based logic. From the hardware point of view, the sensing and gathering of context-data is demanded to a new Enhanced RFID Sensor-Tag. This new device, de facto, makes possible the easy integration between RFID and generic sensors, guaranteeing flexibility and preserving the benefits in terms of simplicity of use and low cost of UHF RFID technology. The system is very efficient and versatile and its customization to new scenarios requires a very reduced effort, substantially limited to the update/extension of the ontology codification. Its effectiveness is demonstrated by reporting both customization effort and performance results obtained from validation in two different healthcare monitoring contexts.

  10. Smart healthcare textile sensor system for unhindered-pervasive health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Pratyush; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Oh, Sechang; Kwon, Hyeokjun; Mathur, Gyanesh N.; Varadan, Vijay K.; Agarwal, M. P.

    2012-04-01

    Simultaneous monitoring of physiological parameters- multi-lead Electrocardiograph (ECG), Heart rate variability, and blood pressure- is imperative to all forms of medical treatments. Using an array of signal recording devices imply that the patient will have to be confined to a bed. Textiles offer durable platform for embedded sensor and communication systems. The smart healthcare textile, presented here, is a mobile system for remote/wireless data recording and conditioning. The wireless textile system has been designed to monitor a patient in a non-obstructive way. It has a potential for facilitating point of care medicine and streamlining ambulatory medicine. The sensor systems were designed and fabricated with textile based components for easy integration on textile platform. An innovative plethysmographic blood pressure monitoring system was designed and tested as an alternative to inflatable blood pressure sphygmomanometer. Flexible dry electrodes technology was implemented for ECG. The sensor systems were tested and conditioned to daily activities of patients, which is not permissible with halter type systems. The signal quality was assessed for it applicability to medical diagnosis. The results were used to corroborate smart textile sensor system's ability to function as a point of care system that can provide quality healthcare.

  11. The Smart Floor: How a Public-Private Partnership co-developed a heterogeneous healthcare technology system.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Søsser; Lindegaard, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Currently, a wide variety of healthcare technologies are being implemented in private homes, hospitals, nursing homes, etc. with the triple aim of improving people's health, improving the quality of care, and reducing costs related to healthcare services. In this chapter, we discuss how different actors in a public-private partnership co-developed a heterogeneous system around the Smart Floor to ensure that both new healthcare practices and residents' routines were inscribed into the new healthcare technology. We argue that implementing the Smart Floor was not just a question of buying a technology and integrating it during construction-it required co-development with the healthcare staff. The floor is more than a technology placed under the floor surface in a resident's apartment; rather, it is a heterogeneous network of human and non-human actors communicating with each other. In this chapter, we illustrate how the heterogeneous technological system was co-developed and redesigned during knowledge sharing processes with companies, lead-users, and healthcare staff. We also discuss how care practices have changed as a result of the Smart Floor system. In particular, healthcare staff members no longer feel a need to disturb elderly residents with routine in-person checks. Domesticating the technologies for different groups of actors required not only coordinating communication among sensors, the interface, the portable nurse call (smartphones), and alarms, but also accepting the use of surveillance technology. PMID:26249197

  12. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care.

    PubMed

    Gvozdanović, Darko; Koncar, Miroslav; Kojundzić, Vinko; Jezidzić, Hrvoje

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on the enterprise information systems that will aim to support end-to-end business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: (1) to provide efficient healthcare-related data management in support of decision-making processes; (2) to support a continuous process of healthcare resource spending optimisation. The first project is the Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS) on the primary care level; this encompasses the integration of all primary point-of-care facilities and subjects with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Croatian National Institute of Public Health. In years to come, IHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of health care (that is, hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories) into a single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of Croatian public healthcare system strategy aims and goals, and focuses on properties and characteristics of the primary care project implementation that started in 2003; it achieved a major milestone in early 2007 - the official grand opening of the project with 350 GPs already fully connected to the integrated healthcare information infrastructure based on the IHCIS solution.

  13. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care.

    PubMed

    Gvozdanović, Darko; Koncar, Miroslav; Kojundzić, Vinko; Jezidzić, Hrvoje

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on the enterprise information systems that will aim to support end-to-end business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: (1) to provide efficient healthcare-related data management in support of decision-making processes; (2) to support a continuous process of healthcare resource spending optimisation. The first project is the Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS) on the primary care level; this encompasses the integration of all primary point-of-care facilities and subjects with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Croatian National Institute of Public Health. In years to come, IHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of health care (that is, hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories) into a single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of Croatian public healthcare system strategy aims and goals, and focuses on properties and characteristics of the primary care project implementation that started in 2003; it achieved a major milestone in early 2007 - the official grand opening of the project with 350 GPs already fully connected to the integrated healthcare information infrastructure based on the IHCIS solution. PMID:18005567

  14. Design and implementation of a smart card based healthcare information system.

    PubMed

    Kardas, Geylani; Tunali, E Turhan

    2006-01-01

    Smart cards are used in information technologies as portable integrated devices with data storage and data processing capabilities. As in other fields, smart card use in health systems became popular due to their increased capacity and performance. Their efficient use with easy and fast data access facilities leads to implementation particularly widespread in security systems. In this paper, a smart card based healthcare information system is developed. The system uses smart card for personal identification and transfer of health data and provides data communication via a distributed protocol which is particularly developed for this study. Two smart card software modules are implemented that run on patient and healthcare professional smart cards, respectively. In addition to personal information, general health information about the patient is also loaded to patient smart card. Health care providers use their own smart cards to be authenticated on the system and to access data on patient cards. Encryption keys and digital signature keys stored on smart cards of the system are used for secure and authenticated data communication between clients and database servers over distributed object protocol. System is developed on Java platform by using object oriented architecture and design patterns.

  15. Systems approach to address incivility and disruptive behaviors in health-care organizations.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Elizabeth; Kusy, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    In response to the growing evidence that disruptive behaviors within health-care teams constitute a major threat to the quality of care, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organization (JCAHO; Joint Commission Resources, 2008) has a new leadership standard that addresses disruptive and inappropriate behaviors effective January 1, 2009. For professionals who work in human resources and organization development, these standards represent a clarion call to design and implement evidence-based interventions to create health-care communities of respectful engagement that have zero tolerance for disruptive, uncivil, and intimidating behaviors by any professional. In this chapter, we will build an evidence-based argument that sustainable change must include organizational, team, and individual strategies across all professionals in the organization. We will then describe an intervention model--Toxic Organization Change System--that has emerged from our own research on toxic behaviors in the workplace (Kusy & Holloway, 2009) and provide examples of specific strategies that we have used to prevent and ameliorate toxic cultures.

  16. Analysing the impact of health-care system change in the EU member states--Germany.

    PubMed

    Wörz, Markus; Busse, Reinhard

    2005-09-01

    The core of the German health-care system is the statutory health insurance (SHI). Coverage of the SHI has remained fairly constant at about 90% whereas the rest of the population is insured for the most part with private health insurance. The primary goal of health-care reforms since the 1990s has been to contain the expenditure of the SHI. The primary measures to do this have been the introduction of budgets and a shift of expenditure towards private households mainly in the form of benefit exclusions and increased co-payments. So far these measures did not have a negative effect on broad outcome measures such as life expectancy, which continued to rise, and self-assessed health of the population, which remained stable in the period 1992--2002. Besides cost containment another leitmotif of reform have been attempts to increase competition both between sickness funds and providers of care. These two strands of reforms also affected the incentive structures for both insurers and providers in various ways which this article describes. The immediate future of health-care reform will concern the mode of financing of the SHI which centres on the question if contributions proportional to income shall be maintained or if there shall be a radical shift towards flat-rate health premiums.

  17. Effectiveness of an electronic hand hygiene monitoring system on healthcare workers' compliance to guidelines.

    PubMed

    Al Salman, J M; Hani, S; de Marcellis-Warin, N; Isa, Sister Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Hand hygiene is a growing concern among populations and is a crucial element in ensuring patient safety in a healthcare environment. Numerous management efforts have been conducted in that regard, including education, awareness and observations. To better evaluate the possible impact of technology on a healthcare setting, we observed the impact of a particular niche technology developed as an answer to the growing hand hygiene concerns. A study was conducted at Salmaniya Medical Complex (SMC) in Bahrain on a total of 16 Coronary Care Unit (CCU) beds where the system was installed, and the hand hygiene activity of healthcare workers (HCWs) in this area was monitored for a total period of 28 days. Comments, remarks and suggestions were noted, and improvements were made to the technology during the course of the trial. While resistance to change was significant, overall results were satisfactory. Compliance with hand hygiene techniques went from 38-42% to 60% at the beginning of the trial and then increased to an average of 75% at the end of the 28-day trial. In some cases, compliance peaked at 85% or even at 100%. Our case study demonstrates that technology can be used effectively in promoting and improving hand hygiene compliance in hospitals, which is one way to prevent cross-infections, especially in critical care areas. PMID:25444391

  18. A Survey on Wireless Body Area Networks for eHealthcare Systems in Residential Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ghamari, Mohammad; Janko, Balazs; Sherratt, R. Simon; Harwin, William; Piechockic, Robert; Soltanpur, Cinna

    2016-01-01

    Current progress in wearable and implanted health monitoring technologies has strong potential to alter the future of healthcare services by enabling ubiquitous monitoring of patients. A typical health monitoring system consists of a network of wearable or implanted sensors that constantly monitor physiological parameters. Collected data are relayed using existing wireless communication protocols to a base station for additional processing. This article provides researchers with information to compare the existing low-power communication technologies that can potentially support the rapid development and deployment of WBAN systems, and mainly focuses on remote monitoring of elderly or chronically ill patients in residential environments. PMID:27338377

  19. A Survey on Wireless Body Area Networks for eHealthcare Systems in Residential Environments.

    PubMed

    Ghamari, Mohammad; Janko, Balazs; Sherratt, R Simon; Harwin, William; Piechockic, Robert; Soltanpur, Cinna

    2016-01-01

    Current progress in wearable and implanted health monitoring technologies has strong potential to alter the future of healthcare services by enabling ubiquitous monitoring of patients. A typical health monitoring system consists of a network of wearable or implanted sensors that constantly monitor physiological parameters. Collected data are relayed using existing wireless communication protocols to a base station for additional processing. This article provides researchers with information to compare the existing low-power communication technologies that can potentially support the rapid development and deployment of WBAN systems, and mainly focuses on remote monitoring of elderly or chronically ill patients in residential environments. PMID:27338377

  20. Geographic information system-based healthcare waste management planning for treatment site location and optimal transportation routeing.

    PubMed

    Shanmugasundaram, Jothiganesh; Soulalay, Vongdeuane; Chettiyappan, Visvanathan

    2012-06-01

    In Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), a growth of healthcare centres, and the environmental hazards and public health risks typically accompanying them, increased the need for healthcare waste (HCW) management planning. An effective planning of an HCW management system including components such as the treatment plant siting and an optimized routeing system for collection and transportation of waste is deemed important. National government offices at developing countries often lack the proper tools and methodologies because of the high costs usually associated with them. However, this study attempts to demonstrate the use of an inexpensive GIS modelling tool for healthcare waste management in the country. Two areas were designed for this study on HCW management, including: (a) locating centralized treatment plants and designing optimum travel routes for waste collection from nearby healthcare facilities; and (b) utilizing existing hospital incinerators and designing optimum routes for collecting waste from nearby healthcare facilities. Spatial analysis paved the way to understand the spatial distribution of healthcare wastes and to identify hotspots of higher waste generating locations. Optimal route models were designed for collecting and transporting HCW to treatment plants, which also highlights constraints in collecting and transporting waste for treatment and disposal. The proposed model can be used as a decision support tool for the efficient management of hospital wastes by government healthcare waste management authorities and hospitals.

  1. Measuring the Mental Health-Care System Responsiveness: Results of an Outpatient Survey in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Forouzan, Setareh; Padyab, Mojgan; Rafiey, Hassan; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Dejman, Masoumeh; San Sebastian, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    As explained by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2000, the concept of health system responsiveness is one of the core goals of health systems. Since 2000, further efforts have been made to measure health system responsiveness and the factors affecting responsiveness, yet few studies have applied responsiveness concepts to the evaluation of mental health systems. The present study aims to measure responsiveness and its related domains in the mental health-care system of Tehran. Utilizing the same method used by the WHO for its responsiveness survey, responsiveness for outpatient mental health care was evaluated using a validated Farsi questionnaire. A sample of 500 public mental health service users in Tehran participated and subsequently completed the questionnaire. On average, 47% of participants reported experiencing poor responsiveness. Among responsiveness domains, confidentiality and dignity were the best performing factors while autonomy, access to care, and quality of basic amenities were the worst performing. Respondents who reported their social status as low were more likely to experience poor responsiveness overall. Attention and access to care were responsiveness dimensions that performed poorly but were considered to be highly important by study participants. In summary, the study suggests that measuring responsiveness could provide guidance for further development of mental health-care systems to become more patient orientated and provide patients with more respect. PMID:26858944

  2. Measuring the Mental Health-Care System Responsiveness: Results of an Outpatient Survey in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Forouzan, Setareh; Padyab, Mojgan; Rafiey, Hassan; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Dejman, Masoumeh; San Sebastian, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    As explained by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2000, the concept of health system responsiveness is one of the core goals of health systems. Since 2000, further efforts have been made to measure health system responsiveness and the factors affecting responsiveness, yet few studies have applied responsiveness concepts to the evaluation of mental health systems. The present study aims to measure responsiveness and its related domains in the mental health-care system of Tehran. Utilizing the same method used by the WHO for its responsiveness survey, responsiveness for outpatient mental health care was evaluated using a validated Farsi questionnaire. A sample of 500 public mental health service users in Tehran participated and subsequently completed the questionnaire. On average, 47% of participants reported experiencing poor responsiveness. Among responsiveness domains, confidentiality and dignity were the best performing factors while autonomy, access to care, and quality of basic amenities were the worst performing. Respondents who reported their social status as low were more likely to experience poor responsiveness overall. Attention and access to care were responsiveness dimensions that performed poorly but were considered to be highly important by study participants. In summary, the study suggests that measuring responsiveness could provide guidance for further development of mental health-care systems to become more patient orientated and provide patients with more respect. PMID:26858944

  3. The Royal College of Physicians Simms Lecture, 6 December 2011: clinical research networks and the benefits of intensive healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Selby, Peter; Kaplan, Richard; Cameron, David; Cooper, Matthew; Seymour, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Clinical research contributes to the evidence base for the planning of improved healthcare services and creates an excellent environment for the delivery of healthcare and the recruitment and retention of excellent and well-motivated staff. In this paper, we consider the evidence that a research-intensive healthcare system might yield improved outcomes as a result of the impact of the process of research on the provision of care. We review progress in establishing clinical research networks for cancer and the evidence of the impact of the conduct of clinical cancer research in the National Health Service.

  4. Better be prepared than sorry: what should the New Zealand healthcare system learn from the 2009 Pacific Tsunami?

    PubMed

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan I

    2011-04-29

    On the early hours of the 29 September 2009, an earthquake in the Pacific generated a massive tsunami that caused significant destruction and claimed many lives across several Pacific nations. The disaster initiated an international relief operation from New Zealand (NZ), Australia, and the United States. The NZ healthcare response was adequate given the multiple challenges encountered. This article reviews the challenges faced by NZ healthcare responders to the Pacific Tsunami. Furthermore, it presents the lessons learnt from this operation in order to enhance the NZ healthcare system preparedness to respond to future disasters and mass emergencies nationally and internationally. PMID:21750590

  5. System Integration and Network Planning in the Academic Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Marcia A.; Spackman, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    The transfer of information within the academic health center is complicated by the complex nature of the institution's multi-dimensional role. The diverse functions of patient care, administration, education and research result in a complex web of information exchange which requires an integrated approach to system management. System integration involves a thorough assessment of “end user” needs in terms of hardware and software as well as specification of the communications network architecture. The network will consist of a series of end user nodes which capture, process, archive and display information. This paper will consider some requirements of these nodes, also called intelligent workstations, relating to their management and integration into a total health care network.

  6. Embedding 'speaking up' into systems for safe healthcare product development and marketing surveillance.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brian; Hugman, Bruce; Tobin, Mary; Whalen, Matthew

    2012-04-01

    Robust, active cooperation, and effective, open communication between all stakeholders is essential for ensuring regulatory compliance and healthcare product safety; avoiding the necessity for whistle-blowing; and, most essentially, meeting the transparency requirements of public trust.The focus here is on what can be done within a healthcare product organization (HPO) to achieve actionable, sustainable policies and practices such as leadership, management, and supervision role-modelling of best practice; ongoing process review and improvements in every department; protection of those who report concerns through robust policies endorsed at Board level throughout an organization to eliminate the fear of retaliation; training in open, non-defensive team-working principles; and mediation structure and process for resolution of differences of opinion or interpretation of contradictory and volatile data.Based on analyses of other safety systems, workplace silence and interpersonal breakdowns are warning signs of defective systems underlying poor compliance and compromising safety. Remedying the situation requires attention to the root causes underlying such symptoms of dysfunction, especially the human factor, i.e. those factors that influence human performance. It is essential that leadership and management listen to employees' concerns about systems and processes, assess them impartially and reward contributions that improve safety.Fundamentally, the safety, transparency, and trustworthiness of HPOs, both commercial and regulatory, can be judged by the extent of the freedom of their staff to 'speak up' when the time is right. This, in turn, consolidates the trust of external stakeholders in the safety of a system and its products. The promotion of 'speaking up' in an organization provides an important safeguard against the risk of poor compliance and the undermining of societal confidence in the safety of healthcare products. PMID:22339507

  7. Defining the Domain of Geriatric Medicine in an Urban Public Health System Affiliated with an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Christopher M.; Weiner, Michael; Counsell, Steven R.

    2015-01-01

    The American Geriatrics Society has recommended a reexamination of the roles and deployment of providers with expertise in geriatric medicine. Healthcare systems use a variety of strategies to maximize their geriatric expertise. In general, these health systems tend to focus geriatric medicine resources on a group of older adults that are locally defined as the most in need. This article describes a model of care within an academic urban public health system and describes how local characteristics interact to define the domain of geriatric medicine. This domain is defined using 4 years of data from an electronic medical record combined with data collected from clinical trials. From January 2002 to December 2005, 31,443 adults aged 65 and older were seen at any clinical site within this healthcare system. The mean age was 75 (range 65–105); 61% were women; 35% African American, and 2% Hispanic. The payer mix was 80% Medicare and 17% Medicaid. The local geriatric medicine program includes sites of care in inpatient, ambulatory, nursing home, and home-based settings. By design, this geriatric medicine clinical practice complements the care provided to older adults by the primary care practice. Primary care physicians tend to cede care to geriatric medicine for older adults with advanced disability or geriatric syndromes. This is most apparent for older adults in nursing facilities or those requiring home-based care. There is a dynamic interplay between design features, reputation, and capacity that modulates volume, location, and type of patients seen by geriatrics. PMID:18795983

  8. Healthcare policy tools as determinants of health-system efficiency: evidence from the OECD.

    PubMed

    Wranik, Dominika

    2012-04-01

    This paper assesses which policy-relevant characteristics of a healthcare system contribute to health-system efficiency. Health-system efficiency is measured using the stochastic frontier approach. Characteristics of the health system are included as determinants of efficiency. Data from 21 OECD countries from 1970 to 2008 are analysed. Results indicate that broader health-system structures, such as Beveridgian or Bismarckian financing arrangements or gatekeeping, are not significant determinants of efficiency. Significant contributors to efficiency are policy instruments that directly target patient behaviours, such as insurance coverage and cost sharing, and those that directly target physician behaviours, such as physician payment methods. From the perspective of the policymaker, changes in cost-sharing arrangements or physician remuneration are politically easier to implement than changes to the foundational financing structure of the system.

  9. Addressing healthcare.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2013-02-11

    Though President Barack Obama has rarely made healthcare references in his State of the Union addresses, health policy experts are hoping he changes that strategy this year. "The question is: Will he say anything? You would hope that he would, given that that was the major issue he started his presidency with," says Dr. James Weinstein, left, of the Dartmouth-Hitchcock health system. PMID:23487896

  10. Implications of the EU patients' rights directive in cross-border healthcare on the German sickness fund system.

    PubMed

    Kifmann, Mathias; Wagner, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    We examine the implications of the EU directive on the application of patients' rights in cross-border healthcare on the German sickness fund system. Since Germany implemented most requirements of the directive already in 2004, we first review Germany's experience with EU cross-border healthcare. We then focus on the possible effects of increased EU cross-border healthcare. While this gives patients more choice, the German sickness fund system faces a number of challenges. EU cross-border care may undermine efforts to keep healthcare expenditure under control. Cross-border care can also increase inequality of access. Furthermore, promoting cross-border care can be a means for sickness funds to attract good risks. We discuss these challenges and point out possible policy responses. PMID:24864382

  11. Integrative literature review: a review of literature related to geographical information systems, healthcare access, and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Graves, Barbara Ann

    2008-07-29

    Differences in access to healthcare services and the resulting adverse health outcomes are major public health priorities. The Institute of Medicine and the Department of Health and Human Services have identified the need for strategies to improve access to healthcare services and to support the improvement of health outcomes. The literature documents health disparities associated with healthcare access and health outcomes from a geographic perspective. Place of residence, location of healthcare services, and geography in general are important factors in the analysis of health. Geographical information systems (GISs) are an emerging technology in the analysis of health from a geographical or location context. As a type of information technology, GISs are potentially powerful assessment tools for the investigation of healthcare access, health outcomes, and the possible resulting health disparities. Their ability to integrate health data with mapping functions allows for visualization, exploration, and modeling of health patterns. Application of GIS technology using health data can help in describing and explaining disparities in healthcare access and health outcomes. The studies reviewed demonstrated the use of GISs to investigate various aspects of healthcare access and health outcomes, including environmental variables of Lyme disease, sociodemographic variables and teen pregnancy, geographical disparities in breast cancer mortality by racial groups, PCP and AIDS prevalence, and factors of a leptospirosis disease outbreak. The literature reviewed shows effective integration and analysis of health data using GIS technology.

  12. Development of an ease-of-use remote healthcare system architecture using RFID and networking technologies.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shih-Sung; Hung, Min-Hsiung; Tsai, Chang-Lung; Chou, Li-Ping

    2012-12-01

    The study aims to provide an ease-of-use approach for senior patients to utilize remote healthcare systems. An ease-of-use remote healthcare system (RHS) architecture using RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) and networking technologies is developed. Specifically, the codes in RFID tags are used for authenticating the patients' ID to secure and ease the login process. The patient needs only to take one action, i.e. placing a RFID tag onto the reader, to automatically login and start the RHS and then acquire automatic medical services. An ease-of-use emergency monitoring and reporting mechanism is developed as well to monitor and protect the safety of the senior patients who have to be left alone at home. By just pressing a single button, the RHS can automatically report the patient's emergency information to the clinic side so that the responsible medical personnel can take proper urgent actions for the patient. Besides, Web services technology is used to build the Internet communication scheme of the RHS so that the interoperability and data transmission security between the home server and the clinical server can be enhanced. A prototype RHS is constructed to validate the effectiveness of our designs. Testing results show that the proposed RHS architecture possesses the characteristics of ease to use, simplicity to operate, promptness in login, and no need to preserve identity information. The proposed RHS architecture can effectively increase the willingness of senior patients who act slowly or are unfamiliar with computer operations to use the RHS. The research results can be used as an add-on for developing future remote healthcare systems.

  13. Demonstration of Advanced Technologies for Multi-Load Washers in Hospitality and Healthcare -- Ozone Based Laundry Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Brian K.; Parker, Graham B.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Sullivan, Greg; Goetzler, W.; Sutherland, T. A.; Foley, K. J.

    2014-08-14

    The objective of this demonstration project was to evaluate market-ready retrofit technologies for reducing the energy and water use of multi-load washers in healthcare and hospitality facilities. Specifically, this project evaluated laundry wastewater recycling technology in the hospitality sector and ozone laundry technology in both the healthcare and hospitality sectors. This report documents the demonstration of ozone laundry system installations at the Charleston Place Hotel in Charleston, South Carolina, and the Rogerson House assisted living facility in Boston, Massachusetts.

  14. A Cloud-Based X73 Ubiquitous Mobile Healthcare System: Design and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhanlin; O'Droma, Máirtín; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Xueji

    2014-01-01

    Based on the user-centric paradigm for next generation networks, this paper describes a ubiquitous mobile healthcare (uHealth) system based on the ISO/IEEE 11073 personal health data (PHD) standards (X73) and cloud computing techniques. A number of design issues associated with the system implementation are outlined. The system includes a middleware on the user side, providing a plug-and-play environment for heterogeneous wireless sensors and mobile terminals utilizing different communication protocols and a distributed “big data” processing subsystem in the cloud. The design and implementation of this system are envisaged as an efficient solution for the next generation of uHealth systems. PMID:24737958

  15. The politics of healthcare informatics: knowledge management using an electronic medical record system.

    PubMed

    Bar-Lev, Shirly

    2015-03-01

    The design and implementation of an electronic medical record system pose significant epistemological and practical complexities. Despite optimistic assessments of their potential contribution to the quality of care, their implementation has been problematic, and their actual employment in various clinical settings remains controversial. Little is known about how their use actually mediates knowing. Employing a variety of qualitative research methods, this article attempts an answer by illustrating how omitting, editing and excessive reporting were employed as part of nurses' and physicians' political efforts to shape knowledge production and knowledge sharing in a technologically mediated healthcare setting.

  16. The politics of healthcare informatics: knowledge management using an electronic medical record system.

    PubMed

    Bar-Lev, Shirly

    2015-03-01

    The design and implementation of an electronic medical record system pose significant epistemological and practical complexities. Despite optimistic assessments of their potential contribution to the quality of care, their implementation has been problematic, and their actual employment in various clinical settings remains controversial. Little is known about how their use actually mediates knowing. Employing a variety of qualitative research methods, this article attempts an answer by illustrating how omitting, editing and excessive reporting were employed as part of nurses' and physicians' political efforts to shape knowledge production and knowledge sharing in a technologically mediated healthcare setting. PMID:25581280

  17. The effect of electronic medical record system sophistication on preventive healthcare for women

    PubMed Central

    Tundia, Namita L; Kelton, Christina M L; Cavanaugh, Teresa M; Guo, Jeff J; Hanseman, Dennis J; Heaton, Pamela C

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of electronic medical record (EMR) system sophistication on preventive women's healthcare. Materials and Methods Providers in the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS), 2007–8, were included if they had at least one visit by a woman at least 21 years old. Based on 16 questions from NAMCS, the level of a provider's EMR system sophistication was classified as non-existent, minimal, basic, or fully functional. A two-stage residual-inclusion method was used with ordered probit regression to model the level of EMR system sophistication, and outcome-specific Poisson regressions to predict the number of examinations or tests ordered or performed. Results Across the providers, 29.23%, 49.34%, 15.97%, and 5.46% had no, minimal, basic, and fully functional EMR systems, respectively. The breast examination rate was 20.27%, 34.96%, 37.21%, and 44.98% for providers without or with minimal, basic, and fully functional EMR systems, respectively. For breast examinations, pelvic examinations, Pap tests, chlamydia tests, cholesterol tests, mammograms, and bone mineral density (BMD) tests, an EMR system increased the number of these tests and examinations. Furthermore, the level of sophistication increased the number of breast examinations and Pap, chlamydia, cholesterol, and BMD tests. Discussion The use of advanced EMR systems in obstetrics and gynecology was limited. Given the positive results of this study, specialists in women's health should consider investing in more sophisticated systems. Conclusions The presence of an EMR system has a positive impact on preventive women's healthcare; the more functions that the system has, the greater the number of examinations and tests given or prescribed. PMID:23048007

  18. Development of Effective Academic Affairs Administration System in Thai Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thongnoi, Niratchakorn; Srisa-ard, Boonchom; Sri-ampai, Anan

    2013-01-01

    This research aimed to: 1) study current situations and problems of academic affairs administration system in Primary Schools. 2) develop an effective academic affairs administration system, and 3) evaluate the implementation of the developed system in the primary school, Thailand. Research and Development (R&D) was employed which consisted of…

  19. A network approach for researching political feasibility of healthcare reform: the case of universal healthcare system in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Xu

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluates the political feasibility of healthcare reform taking place in Taiwan in the past decade. Since Taiwan adopted National Health Insurance (NHI) in 1995, it has provided coverage for virtually all of the island's citizens. However, the imbalance between expenditure and revenue has resulted in a cycle of unsustainable spending which has necessitated financial reforms and political confrontations. By applying social network analysis, this paper examines multiple types of ties between policy elites and power distribution that have evolved in crucial policy events of the NHI's financial reforms between 1998 and 2010. Data sources include official documents and 62 social network interviews that were held with government officials and related unofficial policy participants. Blockmodeling and multidimensional scaling (MDS) are used to determine the major participants and network structures in the NHI domain, as well as the influential policy actors, based on information transmission, resource exchange, reputation attribution and action-set coalition networks in Taiwan's current political situation. The results show that although both public actors and all medical associations are the leading actors in the NHI reform, without good communication with societal actors, the promotion of reform proposals ends in failure. As a tool of political feasibility evaluation, social network analysis can map the political conflict between policy stakeholders systematically when policy makers pursue the result of policy adoption. PMID:23026074

  20. Provincial health accounts in Kerman, Iran: an evidence of a “mixed” healthcare financing system

    PubMed Central

    Mehrolhassani, Mohammad Hossein; Jafari, Mohammad; Zeinali, Javad; Ansari, Mina

    2014-01-01

    Background: Provincial Health Accounts (PHA) as a subset of National Health Accounts (NHA) present financial information for health sectors. It leads to a logical decision making for policy-makers in order to achieve health system goals, especially Fair Financial Contribution (FFC). This study aimed to examine Health Accounts in Kerman Province. Methods: The present analytical study was carried out retrospectively between 2008 and 2011. The research population consisted of urban and rural households as well as providers and financial agents in health sectors of Kerman Province. The purposeful sampling included 16 provincial organizations. To complete data, the report on Kerman household expenditure was taken as a data source from the Governor-General’s office. In order to classify the data, the International Classification for Health Accounts (ICHA) method was used, in which data set was adjusted for the province. Results: During the study, the governmental and non-governmental fund shares of the health sector in Kerman were 27.22% and 72.78% respectively. The main portion of financial sources (59.41) was related to private household funds, of which the Out-of-Pocket (OOP) payment mounted to 92.35%. Overall, 54.86% of all financial sources were covered by OOP. The greatest portion of expenditure of Total Healthcare Expenditures (THEs) (65.19%) was related to curative services. Conclusion: The major portion of healthcare expenditures was related to the OOP payment which is compatible with the national average rate in Iran. However, health expenditure per capita, was two and a half times higher than the national average. By emphasizing on Social Determinant of Health (SDH) approach in the Iranian health system, the portion of OOP payment and curative expenditure are expected to be controlled in the medium term. It is suggested that PHA should be examined annually in a more comprehensive manner to monitor initiatives and reforms in healthcare sector. PMID:24639980

  1. Towards safer, better healthcare: harnessing the natural properties of complex sociotechnical systems

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, J; Runciman, W B; Merry, A F

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To sustain an argument that harnessing the natural properties of sociotechnical systems is necessary to promote safer, better healthcare. Methods: Triangulated analyses of discrete literature sources, particularly drawing on those from mathematics, sociology, marketing science and psychology. Results: Progress involves the use of natural networks and exploiting features such as their scale-free and small world nature, as well as characteristics of group dynamics like natural appeal (stickiness) and propagation (tipping points). The agenda for change should be set by prioritising problems in natural categories, addressed by groups who self select on the basis of their natural interest in the areas in question, and who set clinical standards and develop tools, the use of which should be monitored by peers. This approach will facilitate the evidence-based practice that most agree is now overdue, but which has not yet been realised by the application of conventional methods. Conclusion: A key to health system transformation may lie under-recognised under our noses, and involves exploiting the naturally-occurring characteristics of complex systems. Current strategies to address healthcare problems are insufficient. Clinicians work best when their expertise is mobilised, and they flourish in groupings of their own interests and preference. Being invited, empowered and nurtured rather than directed, micro-managed and controlled through a hierarchy is preferable. PMID:19204130

  2. Nanoparticles functionalized with supramolecular host-guest systems for nanomedicine and healthcare.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zilong; Song, Nan; Menz, Ryan; Pingali, Bharadwaj; Yang, Ying-Wei; Zheng, Yuebing

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic macrocyclic host compounds can interact with suitable guest molecules via noncovalent interactions to form functional supramolecular systems. With the synergistic integration of the response of molecules and the unique properties at the nanoscale, nanoparticles functionalized with the host-guest supramolecular systems have shown great potentials for a broad range of applications in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology. In this review article, we focus on the applications of the nanoparticles functionalized with supramolecular host-guest systems in nanomedicine and healthcare, including therapeutic delivery, imaging, sensing and removal of harmful substances. A large number of examples are included to elucidate the working mechanisms, advantages, limitations and future developments of the nanoparticle-supramolecule systems in these applications.

  3. Provision of healthcare in the context of financial crisis: approaches to the Greek health system and international implications.

    PubMed

    Milionis, Charalampos

    2013-01-01

    Both healthcare professionals and the healthcare system must defend each patient's health individually while simultaneously seeking to protect the population's health in general. Nowadays, there is an important increase in the cost of healthcare supply, mainly due to the developments of medical science, the public's expectations and the demographic ageing. Since healthcare resources are not unlimited, it is obvious that immoderate consumption of them by certain patients limits the use of the same funds by others. Therefore, we have to seek an optimal distribution of the existing resources in order to manage a constriction of expenses, especially under the circumstances of the modern economic crisis. The criteria of effectiveness and efficiency should be used. Health policies focus on both the public's behaviour and the rules of medical practice. Under the modern challenges the physician's role is particularly important for the protection of the patient's health and the promotion of public health.

  4. An assessment of PKI and networked electronic patient record system: lessons learned from real patient data exchange at the platform of OCHIS (Osaka Community Healthcare Information System).

    PubMed

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Matsumura, Yasushi; Kuwata, Shigeki; Nakano, Hirohiko; Shanmai, Ji; Qiyan, Zhang; Yufen, Chen; Kusuoka, Hideo; Matsuoka, Masaki

    2004-03-31

    To enhance medical cooperation between the hospitals and clinics around Osaka local area, the healthcare network system, named Osaka Community Healthcare Information System (OCHIS), was established with support of a supplementary budget from the Japanese government in fiscal year 2002. Although the system has been based on healthcare public key infrastructure (PKI), there remain security issues to be solved technically and operationally. An experimental study was conducted to elucidate the central and the local function in terms of a registration authority and a time stamp authority in contract with the Japanese Medical Information Systems Organization (MEDIS) in 2003. This paper describes the experimental design and the results of the study concerning message security.

  5. Perceptions of racism in healthcare among patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Vina, Ernest R; Hausmann, Leslie R M; Utset, Tammy O; Masi, Christopher M; Liang, Kimberly P; Kwoh, C Kent

    2015-01-01

    Background Racial disparities in the clinical outcomes of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) exist. Perceived racial discrimination may contribute to disparities in health. Objectives To determine if perceived racism in healthcare differs by race among patients with SLE and to evaluate its contribution to racial disparities in SLE-related outcomes. Methods 163 African–American (AA) and 180 white (WH) patients with SLE were enrolled. Structured interviews and chart reviews were done to determine perceptions of racism, SLE-related outcomes (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) Damage Index, SLE Disease Activity, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D)), and other variables that may affect perceptions of racism. Serial hierarchical multivariable logistic regression models were conducted. Race-stratified analyses were also performed. Results 56.0% of AA patients compared with 32.8% of WH patients had high perceptions of discrimination in healthcare (p<0.001). This difference remained (OR 4.75 (95% CI 2.41 to 8.68)) after adjustment for background, identity and healthcare experiences. Female gender (p=0.012) and lower trust in physicians (p<0.001) were also associated with high perceived racism. The odds of having greater disease damage (SLICC damage index ≥2) were higher in AA patients than in WH patients (crude OR 1.55 (95% CI 1.01 to 2.38)). The odds of having moderate to severe depression (CES-D ≥17) were also higher in AA patients than in WH patients (crude OR 1.94 (95% CI 1.26 to 2.98)). When adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, racial disparities in disease damage and depression were no longer significant. Among AA patients, higher perceived racism was associated with having moderate to severe depression (adjusted OR 1.23 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.43)) even after adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical variables. Conclusions Perceptions of racism in healthcare were more common in AA patients than in WH

  6. Trends and geographic variation of potentially avoidable hospitalizations in the veterans health-care system.

    PubMed

    Finegan, Michael S; Gao, Jian; Pasquale, Donald; Campbell, James

    2010-05-01

    The rate of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs) has been widely accepted as an indicator of access and quality of primary care. This study aimed to examine the trends and geographic variation of ACSC hospitalizations in US veterans health-care system, to identify factors associated with ACSC hospitalizations and to develop a quality indicator that can monitor access and effectiveness of primary care at hospital level. Using fiscal years 1997-2007 data, we found total ACSC hospitalizations per 1000 ACSC patients decreased by 58%; ACSC hospitalizations as percentage of total hospitalizations decreased 9%. However, significant geographic variations of ACSC hospitalizations remained and we found that adjustment of case-mix or confounding factors was essential in making meaningful comparisons among hospitals in a health-care system. Further, this study also reveals that low-income veterans still had higher ACSC hospitalization rates and patient travel time less than 30 minutes to the nearest VA providers was associated with fewer ACSC hospitalizations, which possess important policy implications. PMID:20424274

  7. Ambulatory Healthcare Utilization in the United States: A System Dynamics Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diaz, Rafael; Behr, Joshua G.; Tulpule, Mandar

    2011-01-01

    Ambulatory health care needs within the United States are served by a wide range of hospitals, clinics, and private practices. The Emergency Department (ED) functions as an important point of supply for ambulatory healthcare services. Growth in our aging populations as well as changes stemming from broader healthcare reform are expected to continue trend in congestion and increasing demand for ED services. While congestion is, in part, a manifestation of unmatched demand, the state of the alignment between the demand for, and supply of, emergency department services affects quality of care and profitability. The central focus of this research is to provide an explanation of the salient factors at play within the dynamic demand-supply tensions within which ambulatory care is provided within an Emergency Department. A System Dynamics (SO) simulation model is used to capture the complexities among the intricate balance and conditional effects at play within the demand-supply emergency department environment. Conceptual clarification of the forces driving the elements within the system , quantifying these elements, and empirically capturing the interaction among these elements provides actionable knowledge for operational and strategic decision-making.

  8. Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) in complex systems: cultural adaptation and safety impacts in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Müller-Leonhardt, Alice; Mitchell, Shannon G; Vogt, Joachim; Schürmann, Tim

    2014-07-01

    In complex systems, such as hospitals or air traffic control operations, critical incidents (CIs) are unavoidable. These incidents can not only become critical for victims but also for professionals working at the "sharp end" who may have to deal with critical incident stress (CIS) reactions that may be severe and impede emotional, physical, cognitive and social functioning. These CIS reactions may occur not only under exceptional conditions but also during every-day work and become an important safety issue. In contrast to air traffic management (ATM) operations in Europe, which have readily adopted critical incident stress management (CISM), most hospitals have not yet implemented comprehensive peer support programs. This survey was conducted in 2010 at the only European general hospital setting which implemented CISM program since 2004. The aim of the article is to describe possible contribution of CISM in hospital settings framed from the perspective of organizational safety and individual health for healthcare professionals. Findings affirm that daily work related incidents also can become critical for healthcare professionals. Program efficiency appears to be influenced by the professional culture, as well as organizational structure and policies. Overall, findings demonstrate that the adaptation of the CISM program in general hospitals takes time but, once established, it may serve as a mechanism for changing professional culture, thereby permitting the framing of even small incidents or near misses as an opportunity to provide valuable feedback to the system.

  9. National Healthcare Delivery Systems Influence Lung Transplant Outcomes for Cystic Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Merlo, C A; Clark, S C; Arnaoutakis, G J; Yonan, N; Thomas, D; Simon, A; Thompson, R; Thomas, H; Orens, J; Shah, A S

    2015-07-01

    Successful lung transplantation (LTx) depends on multiple components of healthcare delivery and performance. Therefore, we conducted an international registry analysis to compare post-LTx outcomes for cystic fibrosis (CF) patients using the UNOS registry in the United States and the National Health Service (NHS) Transplant Registry in the United Kingdom. Patients with CF who underwent lung or heart-lung transplantation in the United States or United Kingdom between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2011 were included. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression evaluated the effect of healthcare system and insurance on mortality after LTx. 2,307 US LTx recipients and 451 individuals in the United Kingdom were included. 894 (38.8%) US LTx recipients had publically funded Medicare/Medicaid insurance. US private insurance and UK patients had improved median predicted survival compared with US Medicare/Medicaid recipients (p < 0.001). In multivariable Cox regression, US Medicare/Medicaid insurance was associated with worse survival after LTx (US private: HR0.78,0.68-0.90,p = 0.001 and UK: HR0.63,0.41-0.97, p = 0.03). This study in CF patients is the largest comparison of LTx in two unique health systems. Both the United States and United Kingdom have similar early survival outcomes, suggesting important dissemination of best practices internationally. However, the performance of US public insurance is significantly worse and may put patients at risk.

  10. A wireless multi-channel bioimpedance measurement system for personalized healthcare and lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Javier; Ausín, José Luis; Lorido, Antonio Manuel; Redondo, Francisco; Duque-Carrillo, Juan Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Miniaturized, noninvasive, wearable sensors constitute a fundamental prerequisite for pervasive, predictive, and preventive healthcare systems. In this sense, this paper presents the design, realization, and evaluation of a wireless multi-channel measurement system based on a cost-effective high-performance integrated circuit for electrical bioimpedance (EBI) measurements in the frequency range from 1 kHz to 1 MHz. The resulting on-chip spectrometer provides high measuring EBI capabilities and together with a low-cost, commercially available radio frequency transceiver device. It provides reliable wireless communication, constitutes the basic node to build EBI wireless sensor networks (EBI-WSNs). The proposed EBI-WSN behaves as a high-performance wireless multi-channel EBI spectrometer, where the number of channels is completely scalable and independently configurable to satisfy specific measurement requirements of each individual. A prototype of the EBI node leads to a very small printed circuit board of approximately 8 cm2 including chip-antenna, which can operate several years on one 3-V coin cell battery and make it suitable for long-term preventive healthcare monitoring. PMID:23739358

  11. A Wearable Healthcare System With a 13.7 μA Noise Tolerant ECG Processor.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Shintaro; Yamashita, Ken; Nakano, Masanao; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Kimura, Hiromitsu; Marumoto, Kyoji; Fuchikami, Takaaki; Fujimori, Yoshikazu; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Shiga, Toshikazu; Yoshimoto, Masahiko

    2015-10-01

    To prevent lifestyle diseases, wearable bio-signal monitoring systems for daily life monitoring have attracted attention. Wearable systems have strict size and weight constraints, which impose significant limitations of the battery capacity and the signal-to-noise ratio of bio-signals. This report describes an electrocardiograph (ECG) processor for use with a wearable healthcare system. It comprises an analog front end, a 12-bit ADC, a robust Instantaneous Heart Rate (IHR) monitor, a 32-bit Cortex-M0 core, and 64 Kbyte Ferroelectric Random Access Memory (FeRAM). The IHR monitor uses a short-term autocorrelation (STAC) algorithm to improve the heart-rate detection accuracy despite its use in noisy conditions. The ECG processor chip consumes 13.7 μA for heart rate logging application.

  12. Bedside rationing by general practitioners: A postal survey in the Danish public healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    Lauridsen, Sigurd MR; Norup, Michael; Rossel, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background It is ethically controversial whether medical doctors are morally permitted to ration the care of their patients at the bedside. To explore whether general practitioners in fact do ration in this manner we conducted a study within primary care in the Danish public healthcare system. The purpose of the study was to measure the extent to which general practitioners (GPs) would be willing to factor in cost-quality trade-offs when prescribing medicine, and to discover whether, and if so to what extent, they believe that patients should be informed about this. Methods Postal survey of 600 randomly selected Danish GPs, of which 330 responded to the questionnaire. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, version 14.0) was used to produce general descriptive statistics. Significance was calculated with the McNemar and the chi-square test. The main outcome measures of the study were twofold: an assessment of the proportion of GPs who, in a mainly hypothetical setting, would consider cost-quality trade-offs relevant to their clinical decision-making given their economic impact on the healthcare system; and a measure of the extent to which they would disclose this information to patients. Results In the hypothetical setting 95% of GPs considered cost-quality trade-offs relevant to their clinical decision-making given the economic impact of such trade-offs on the healthcare system. In all 90% stated that this consideration had been relevant in clinical decision-making within the last month. In the hypothetical setting 55% would inform their patients that they considered a cost-quality trade-off relevant to their clinical decisions given the economic impact of such trade-offs on the healthcare system. The most common reason (68%) given for not wanting to inform patients about this matter was the belief that the information would not prove useful to patients. In the hypothetical setting cost-quality trade-offs were considered relevant significantly more

  13. Healthcare financing in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Kananatu, K

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Malaysian healthcare system and its method of financing. The development of the healthcare delivery system in Malaysia is commendable. However, the strength and weaknesses of the public healthcare system and the financing problems encountered are also discussed. Cost of healthcare and funding of both the public and private sectors were also revealed. One must optimise the advantages of operating a health financing scheme which is affordable and controllable which contribute towards cost-containment and quality assurance. Thus, there is a need for the establishment of a National Healthcare Financing, a mechanism to sustain the healthcare delivery network and operate it as a viable option. A model of the National Health Financing Scheme (NHFS) was proposed.

  14. 34 CFR 200.3 - Designing State Academic Assessment Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 200.1(b); (ii) Be valid, reliable, and of high technical quality; (iii) Express student results in terms of the State's student academic achievement standards; and (iv) Be designed to provide a coherent... accurately the depth and breadth of the State's academic content standards; and (B) Express student...

  15. 34 CFR 200.3 - Designing State Academic Assessment Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 200.1(b); (ii) Be valid, reliable, and of high technical quality; (iii) Express student results in terms of the State's student academic achievement standards; and (iv) Be designed to provide a coherent... accurately the depth and breadth of the State's academic content standards; and (B) Express student...

  16. 34 CFR 200.3 - Designing State Academic Assessment Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 200.1(b); (ii) Be valid, reliable, and of high technical quality; (iii) Express student results in terms of the State's student academic achievement standards; and (iv) Be designed to provide a coherent... accurately the depth and breadth of the State's academic content standards; and (B) Express student...

  17. 34 CFR 200.3 - Designing State Academic Assessment Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 200.1(b); (ii) Be valid, reliable, and of high technical quality; (iii) Express student results in terms of the State's student academic achievement standards; and (iv) Be designed to provide a coherent... accurately the depth and breadth of the State's academic content standards; and (B) Express student...

  18. 34 CFR 200.3 - Designing State Academic Assessment Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 200.1(b); (ii) Be valid, reliable, and of high technical quality; (iii) Express student results in terms of the State's student academic achievement standards; and (iv) Be designed to provide a coherent... accurately the depth and breadth of the State's academic content standards; and (B) Express student...

  19. Impacts of Personal Characteristics on Computer Attitude and Academic Users Information System Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Kee-Sook

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study that evaluated the effects of computer experience, gender, and academic performance on computer attitude and user information system satisfaction in a university setting. Results of an analysis of variance showed that the personal characteristics made a difference in computer attitudes but not in academic computer system user…

  20. A wireless sensor network compatible wearable u-healthcare monitoring system using integrated ECG, accelerometer and SpO2.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wan-Young; Lee, Young-Dong; Jung, Sang-Joong

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a wearable ubiquitous healthcare monitoring system using integrated electrocardiogram (ECG), accelerometer and oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) sensors. In this design, non-intrusive healthcare system was designed based on wireless sensor network (WSN) for wide area coverage with minimum battery power to support RF transmission. We have developed various devices such as wearable ubiquitous sensor network (USN) node, wearable chest sensor belt and wrist pulse oximeter for this system. Low power ECG, accelerometer and SpO(2) sensors board was integrated to the wearable USN node for user's health monitoring. The wearable ubiquitous healthcare monitoring system allows physiological data to be transmitted in wireless sensor network using IEEE 802.15.4 from on-body wearable sensor devices to a base-station which is connected to a server PC. Physiological data can be displayed and stored in the server PC continuously.

  1. Healthcare systems and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) therapies--an international review: access to ESRD treatments.

    PubMed

    Hörl, W H; de Alvaro, F; Williams, P F

    1999-01-01

    Assessment of healthcare technology and economics can be used to assess the access to healthcare, its quality and efficacy as well as its cost and cost efficiency. This report addresses these issues for the provision of care for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. An international comparison of access to ESRD treatment modalities was made with reference to the healthcare provider structure in a range of industrial countries. The countries were grouped into 'public' (Beveridge model), 'mixed' (Bismarck model) and 'private' (Private Insurance model). In 'public' provider countries, 20-52% of dialysis patients are treated with home therapies (haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis), and the number of patients with renal transplants is 45-81% of all ESRD patients. In 'mixed' provider countries, only 9 17% of all dialysis patients are treated with home therapies, and 20-48% of ESRD patients have renal transplants. In 'private' provider countries, 17% of US and 6% Japanese dialysis patients are treated with home therapies. Japan has 0.3% and the US has 26% of ESRD patients who receive renal transplants. It thus seems that provider structure influences access to and choice of ESRD treatment. With a growing elderly population and longer life expectancy, there will be an increased requirement for ESRD treatments in all industrial countries. Equal access to, and quality of ESRD care in the future will require adequate funding and reimbursement strategies in a cost-constrained healthcare environment. growing elderly population, new and innovative healthcare technologies, increasing expectations of the population and the dilemma of economic constraints. Therefore, new disciplines such as health technology assessment and healthcare economics are developing to support the needs of health policy decision makers. Their main objective is to create a balance between the three key factors of a healthcare system: access to healthcare (equity for all), quality of healthcare

  2. Evaluation and implementation of QR Code Identity Tag system for Healthcare in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Vassilya; Bilgin, Sami

    2016-01-01

    For this study, we designed a QR Code Identity Tag system to integrate into the Turkish healthcare system. This system provides QR code-based medical identification alerts and an in-hospital patient identification system. Every member of the medical system is assigned a unique QR Code Tag; to facilitate medical identification alerts, the QR Code Identity Tag can be worn as a bracelet or necklace or carried as an ID card. Patients must always possess the QR Code Identity bracelets within hospital grounds. These QR code bracelets link to the QR Code Identity website, where detailed information is stored; a smartphone or standalone QR code scanner can be used to scan the code. The design of this system allows authorized personnel (e.g., paramedics, firefighters, or police) to access more detailed patient information than the average smartphone user: emergency service professionals are authorized to access patient medical histories to improve the accuracy of medical treatment. In Istanbul, we tested the self-designed system with 174 participants. To analyze the QR Code Identity Tag system's usability, the participants completed the System Usability Scale questionnaire after using the system. PMID:27652030

  3. Evaluation and implementation of QR Code Identity Tag system for Healthcare in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Vassilya; Bilgin, Sami

    2016-01-01

    For this study, we designed a QR Code Identity Tag system to integrate into the Turkish healthcare system. This system provides QR code-based medical identification alerts and an in-hospital patient identification system. Every member of the medical system is assigned a unique QR Code Tag; to facilitate medical identification alerts, the QR Code Identity Tag can be worn as a bracelet or necklace or carried as an ID card. Patients must always possess the QR Code Identity bracelets within hospital grounds. These QR code bracelets link to the QR Code Identity website, where detailed information is stored; a smartphone or standalone QR code scanner can be used to scan the code. The design of this system allows authorized personnel (e.g., paramedics, firefighters, or police) to access more detailed patient information than the average smartphone user: emergency service professionals are authorized to access patient medical histories to improve the accuracy of medical treatment. In Istanbul, we tested the self-designed system with 174 participants. To analyze the QR Code Identity Tag system's usability, the participants completed the System Usability Scale questionnaire after using the system.

  4. Graph Databases for Large-Scale Healthcare Systems: A Framework for Efficient Data Management and Data Services

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Yubin; Shankar, Mallikarjun; Park, Byung H.; Ghosh, Dr. Joydeep

    2014-01-01

    Designing a database system for both efficient data management and data services has been one of the enduring challenges in the healthcare domain. In many healthcare systems, data services and data management are often viewed as two orthogonal tasks; data services refer to retrieval and analytic queries such as search, joins, statistical data extraction, and simple data mining algorithms, while data management refers to building error-tolerant and non-redundant database systems. The gap between service and management has resulted in rigid database systems and schemas that do not support effective analytics. We compose a rich graph structure from an abstracted healthcare RDBMS to illustrate how we can fill this gap in practice. We show how a healthcare graph can be automatically constructed from a normalized relational database using the proposed 3NF Equivalent Graph (3EG) transformation.We discuss a set of real world graph queries such as finding self-referrals, shared providers, and collaborative filtering, and evaluate their performance over a relational database and its 3EG-transformed graph. Experimental results show that the graph representation serves as multiple de-normalized tables, thus reducing complexity in a database and enhancing data accessibility of users. Based on this finding, we propose an ensemble framework of databases for healthcare applications.

  5. Effects of high-involvement work systems on employee satisfaction and service costs in veterans healthcare.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Joel; Scotti, Dennis J; Behson, Scott; Farias, Gerard; Petzel, Robert; Neuman, Joel H; Keashly, Loraleigh

    2003-01-01

    Two strong imperatives for healthcare managers are reducing costs of service and attracting and retaining highly dedicated and competent patient care and support employees. Is there a trade-off or are there organizational practices that can further both objectives at the same time? High-involvement work systems (HIWS) represent a holistic work design that includes interrelated core features such as involvement, empowerment, development, trust, openness, teamwork, and performance-based rewards. HIWS have been linked to higher productivity, quality, employee and customer satisfaction, and market and financial performance in Fortune 1000 firms. Apparently, few prior studies have looked at the impacts of this holistic design within the healthcare sector. This research found that HIWS were associated with both greater employee satisfaction and lower patient service costs in 146 Veterans Health Administration centers, indicating that such practices pay off in both humanistic and financial terms. This suggests that managers implementing HIWS will incur real expenses that are likely to be more than offset by more satisfied employees, less organizational turmoil, and lower service delivery costs, which, in this study, amounted to over $1.2 million in savings for an average VHA facility. PMID:14671948

  6. Leadership and transformational change in healthcare organisations: a qualitative analysis of the North East Transformation System.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Jonathan; Hunter, David J; Small, Adrian; Hicks, Chris; McGovern, Tom; Lugsden, Ed; Whitty, Paula; Steen, Nick; Eccles, Martin Paul

    2013-02-01

    The research project 'An Evaluation of Transformational Change in NHS North East' examines the progress and success of National Health Service (NHS) organisations in north east England in implementing and embedding the North East Transformation System (NETS), a region-wide programme to improve healthcare quality and safety, and to reduce waste, using a combination of Vision, Compact, and Lean-based Method. This paper concentrates on findings concerning the role of leadership in enabling tranformational change, based on semi-structured interviews with a mix of senior NHS managers and quality improvement staff in 14 study sites. Most interviewees felt that implementing the NETS requires committed, stable leadership, attention to team-building across disciplines and leadership development at many levels. We conclude that without senior leader commitment to continuous improvement over a long time scale and serious efforts to distribute leadership tasks to all levels, healthcare organisations are less likely to achieve positive changes in managerial-clinical relations, sustainable improvements to organisational culture and, ultimately, the region-wide step change in quality, safety and efficiency that the NETS was designed to deliver.

  7. Leadership and transformational change in healthcare organisations: a qualitative analysis of the North East Transformation System.

    PubMed

    Erskine, Jonathan; Hunter, David J; Small, Adrian; Hicks, Chris; McGovern, Tom; Lugsden, Ed; Whitty, Paula; Steen, Nick; Eccles, Martin Paul

    2013-02-01

    The research project 'An Evaluation of Transformational Change in NHS North East' examines the progress and success of National Health Service (NHS) organisations in north east England in implementing and embedding the North East Transformation System (NETS), a region-wide programme to improve healthcare quality and safety, and to reduce waste, using a combination of Vision, Compact, and Lean-based Method. This paper concentrates on findings concerning the role of leadership in enabling tranformational change, based on semi-structured interviews with a mix of senior NHS managers and quality improvement staff in 14 study sites. Most interviewees felt that implementing the NETS requires committed, stable leadership, attention to team-building across disciplines and leadership development at many levels. We conclude that without senior leader commitment to continuous improvement over a long time scale and serious efforts to distribute leadership tasks to all levels, healthcare organisations are less likely to achieve positive changes in managerial-clinical relations, sustainable improvements to organisational culture and, ultimately, the region-wide step change in quality, safety and efficiency that the NETS was designed to deliver. PMID:25594999

  8. Effects of high-involvement work systems on employee satisfaction and service costs in veterans healthcare.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Joel; Scotti, Dennis J; Behson, Scott; Farias, Gerard; Petzel, Robert; Neuman, Joel H; Keashly, Loraleigh

    2003-01-01

    Two strong imperatives for healthcare managers are reducing costs of service and attracting and retaining highly dedicated and competent patient care and support employees. Is there a trade-off or are there organizational practices that can further both objectives at the same time? High-involvement work systems (HIWS) represent a holistic work design that includes interrelated core features such as involvement, empowerment, development, trust, openness, teamwork, and performance-based rewards. HIWS have been linked to higher productivity, quality, employee and customer satisfaction, and market and financial performance in Fortune 1000 firms. Apparently, few prior studies have looked at the impacts of this holistic design within the healthcare sector. This research found that HIWS were associated with both greater employee satisfaction and lower patient service costs in 146 Veterans Health Administration centers, indicating that such practices pay off in both humanistic and financial terms. This suggests that managers implementing HIWS will incur real expenses that are likely to be more than offset by more satisfied employees, less organizational turmoil, and lower service delivery costs, which, in this study, amounted to over $1.2 million in savings for an average VHA facility.

  9. Resuscitating an ethical climate in the health system: The role of healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Pillay, P

    2015-04-01

    South Africa boasts a proud tradition of healthcare professionals speaking out against injustice in line with the medical doctrine of beneficence (to do good) and maleficence (do no harm). There are many who play a part in making the health system better, including the state, managers, patients and healthcare workers (HCWs). This article looks at the role of HCWs beyond providing medical care to individual patients. HCWs often face a lack of resources enabling them to adequately provide care and treatment and respond to life- threatening emergencies. As a result, they are forced to make difficult decisions when it comes to allocating those scarce resources. These decisions are not purely fiscal in nature, but also ethical. Deciding who to bump off a theatre list because there is no linen is a choice most HCWs did not imagine they would ever have to make. In order to circumvent a sense of hopelessness, HCWs need to empower and motivate themselves (and others) with knowledge of how to make things better. PMID:26294867

  10. Factors influencing the role of primary care providers as gatekeepers in the Malaysian public healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Ang, K T; Ho, B K; Mimi, O; Salmah, N; Salmiah, M S; Noridah, M S

    2014-01-01

    Primary care providers play an important gatekeeping role in ensuring appropriate referrals to secondary care facilities. This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the level, pattern and rate of referrals from health clinics to hospitals in the public sector, and whether the placement of resident family medicine specialist (FMS) had made a significant difference. The study was carried out between March and April in 2012, involving 28 public primary care clinics. It showed that the average referral rate was 1.56% for clinics with resident FMS and 1.94% for those without resident FMS, but it was not statistically significant. Majority of referred cases were considered appropriate (96.1%). Results of the multivariate analysis showed that no prior consultation with senior healthcare provider and illnesses that were not severe and complex were independently associated with inappropriate referrals. Severity, complexity or uncertain diagnosis of patients' illness or injury significantly contributed to unavoidable referrals. Adequate facilities or having more experienced doctors could have avoided 14.5% of the referrals. The low referral rate and very high level of appropriate referrals could indicate that primary care providers in the public sector played an effective role as gatekeepers in the Malaysian public healthcare system.

  11. Perspectives of young adults with cerebral palsy on transitioning from pediatric to adult healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Larivière-Bastien, Danaë; Bell, Emily; Majnemer, Annette; Shevell, Michael; Racine, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Transition from pediatric to adult healthcare is a well-established challenge for individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders like cerebral palsy. With regard to ethics, some of the key aspects to explore include the following: if and how individuals feel respected during the transition process; if and how their values and preferences are developed and integrated within transition; and if and how young patients are prepared to participate in decision making (to be autonomous) within the transition. We carried out a qualitative study on 14 young adults with cerebral palsy. Some participants reported positive experiences. However, several tension points were identified, including before the transition (eg, transition envisaged with fear and apprehension); during the transition (eg, lack of cooperation or communication between providers in the pediatric and adult healthcare systems); and after the transition (eg, feelings of abandonment). We discuss the clinical influence and ethical significance of better capturing ethical values within the transition process and preparing young individuals to engage in discussions about their health and disease management. PMID:23948690

  12. Efficacy of a New Medical Information system, Ubiquitous Healthcare Service with Voice Inception Technique in Elderly Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Park, Kyeong Seon; Lee, Hyun Ju; Lee, Yun Hee; Bae, Ji Seon; Lee, Young Joon; Choi, Sung Hee; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2015-01-01

    We have demonstrated previously that an individualized health management system using advanced medical information technology, named ubiquitous (u)-healthcare, was helpful in achieving better glycemic control than routine care. Recently, we generated a new u-healthcare system using a voice inception technique for elderly diabetic patients to communicate information about their glucose control, physical activity, and diet more easily. In a randomized clinical trial, 70 diabetic patients aged 60–85 years were assigned randomly to a standard care group or u-healthcare group for 6 months. The primary end points were the changes in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glucose fluctuation assessed by the mean amplitude glycemic excursion (MAGE). Changes in body weight, lifestyle, and knowledge about diabetes were also investigated. After 6 months, the HbA1c levels decreased significantly in the u-healthcare group (from 8.6 ± 1.0% to 7.5 ± 0.6%) compared with the standard care group (from 8.7 ± 0.9% to 8.2 ± 1.1%, P < 0.01). The MAGE decreased more in the u-healthcare group than in the standard care group. Systolic blood pressure and body weight decreased and liver functions improved in the u-healthcare group, but not in the standard care group. The u-healthcare system with voice inception technique was effective in achieving glycemic control without hypoglycemia in elderly diabetic patients (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01891474). PMID:26658492

  13. [Critical research issues in nursing policy and management: a healthcare system perspective].

    PubMed

    Lee, Jwo-Leun; Chen, Wen-Yi; Hung, Chin-Tun; Hsu, Ming-Yi

    2011-06-01

    This study explores critical research issues in nursing policy and management in Taiwan from a healthcare system perspective that considers resources, programmes and organisations, service delivery, policy and management, and economic support. Findings suggest the following: In terms of resources, priority issues include quantity planning, active surveillance, planning methodology, and estimation of work life expectancies for nursing manpower. In terms of programmes ÷ organisations and delivery, priority issues include skill mix, task shifting, nationwide nursing work surveys, and nursing manpower structure and utilization. In terms of policy/management and economic support, priority issues included minimum nursing manpower requirements by law or medical institution standards and the relationship between the social insurance payment system and development of the nursing profession. The last section of this paper makes suggestions on practical ways to improve nursing policy and management research in Taiwan.

  14. Academic-community partnerships for sustainable preparedness and response systems.

    PubMed

    Isakov, Alexander; O'Neal, Patrick; Prescott, John; Stanley, Joan; Herrmann, Jack; Dunlop, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Academic institutions possess tremendous resources that could be important for community disaster response and preparedness activities. In-depth exploration of the role of academic institutions in community disaster response has elicited information about particular academic resources leveraged for and essential to community preparedness and response; factors that contribute to the decision-making process for partner engagement; and facilitators of and barriers to sustainable collaborations from the perspectives of academic institutions, public health and emergency management agencies, and national association and agency leaders. The Academic-Community Partnership Project of the Emory University Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center in collaboration with the Association of Schools of Public Health convened an invitational summit which included leadership from the National Association of County and City Health Officials, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Directors of Public Health Preparedness, Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, CDC Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Association of Schools of Public Health, Association of American Medical Colleges, Association of Academic Health Centers, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and American Association of Poison Control Centers. From this convention, emerged recommendations for building and sustaining academic-public health-community collaborations for preparedness locally and regionally. PMID:25068939

  15. Exploring the drivers of health and healthcare access in Zambian prisons: a health systems approach

    PubMed Central

    Topp, Stephanie M.; Moonga, Clement N.; Luo, Nkandu; Kaingu, Michael; Chileshe, Chisela; Magwende, George; Heymann, S. Jody; Henostroza, German

    2016-01-01

    Background Prison populations in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) experience a high burden of disease and poor access to health care. Although it is generally understood that environmental conditions are dire and contribute to disease spread, evidence of how environmental conditions interact with facility-level social and institutional factors is lacking. This study aimed to unpack the nature of interactions and their influence on health and healthcare access in the Zambian prison setting. Methods We conducted in-depth interviews of a clustered random sample of 79 male prisoners across four prisons, as well as 32 prison officers, policy makers and health care workers. Largely inductive thematic analysis was guided by the concepts of dynamic interaction and emergent behaviour, drawn from the theory of complex adaptive systems. Results A majority of inmates, as well as facility-based officers reported anxiety linked to overcrowding, sanitation, infectious disease transmission, nutrition and coercion. Due in part to differential wealth of inmates and their support networks on entering prison, and in part to the accumulation of authority and material wealth within prison, we found enormous inequity in the standard of living among prisoners at each site. In the context of such inequities, failure of the Zambian prison system to provide basic necessities (including adequate and appropriate forms of nutrition, or access to quality health care) contributed to high rates of inmate-led and officer-led coercion with direct implications for health and access to healthcare. Conclusions This systems-oriented analysis provides a more comprehensive picture of the way resource shortages and human interactions within Zambian prisons interact and affect inmate and officer health. While not a panacea, our findings highlight some strategic entry-points for important upstream and downstream reforms including urgent improvement in the availability of human resources for health; strengthening of

  16. A systematic review of Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE)-based healthcare system redesign for quality of care and patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Anping; Carayon, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare systems need to be redesigned to provide care that is safe, effective and efficient, and meets the multiple needs of patients. This systematic review examines how Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) is applied to redesign healthcare work systems and processes and improve quality and safety of care. We identified twelve projects representing 23 studies and addressing different physical, cognitive and organizational HFE issues in a variety of healthcare systems and care settings. Some evidence exists for the effectiveness of HFE-based healthcare system redesign in improving process and outcome measures of quality and safety of care. We assessed risk of bias in 16 studies reporting the impact of HFE-based healthcare system redesign and found varying quality across studies. Future research should further assess the impact of HFE on quality and safety of care, and clearly define the mechanisms by which HFE-based system redesign can improve quality and safety of care. Practitioner Summary Existing evidence shows that HFE-based healthcare system redesign has the potential to improve quality of care and patient safety. Healthcare organizations need to recognize the importance of HFE-based healthcare system redesign to quality of care and patient safety, and invest resources to integrate HFE in healthcare improvement activities. PMID:25323570

  17. What works and what doesn't work well in the US healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Luft, Harold S

    2006-12-01

    Most observers agree that the US healthcare system is expensive, provides variable quality and leaves many without coverage. The policy challenge is that there is little consensus on how to approach reform. Many proposals assume that systems appearing to work in one nation can be transferred in toto to another or, alternatively, that only minor tweaking of an existing system is possible. The former approach ignores fundamental social, political and legal realities, and the latter ignores the potential for increased benefits. Additionally, many proposals are ideologically driven, focusing on how to finance expanded coverage. Broadening the discussion to examine other components of the system that do not work well may identify sufficient benefits for various stakeholders to engage them in finding more comprehensive solutions that address a range of problems. This paper examines areas in which the US healthcare system performs worse than one would like and areas in which it appears to work well. In the first category is the high proportion of people without coverage, the inefficient and inequitable incentives for the purchase and provision of insurance, the problems in deciding what should be covered, the ineffective payment incentives, administrative costs and complexities, the variable quality and lack of responsiveness to patient preferences, the less than optimal safety, under-valued primary care, provider de-professionalisation, and the costs that appear to be on auto-pilot. In the second category is the rapid and wide-reaching technological innovation, the ready access to care for the insured, and clinical and patient autonomy. Among the things taken as given is our constitutional (rather than parliamentary) political system and underlying public values about the roles of individuals and government. Current players will be active in any debate about reform, so their interests must be addressed. Likewise, certain underlying economic and social drivers of

  18. What works and what doesn't work well in the US healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Luft, Harold S

    2006-12-01

    Most observers agree that the US healthcare system is expensive, provides variable quality and leaves many without coverage. The policy challenge is that there is little consensus on how to approach reform. Many proposals assume that systems appearing to work in one nation can be transferred in toto to another or, alternatively, that only minor tweaking of an existing system is possible. The former approach ignores fundamental social, political and legal realities, and the latter ignores the potential for increased benefits. Additionally, many proposals are ideologically driven, focusing on how to finance expanded coverage. Broadening the discussion to examine other components of the system that do not work well may identify sufficient benefits for various stakeholders to engage them in finding more comprehensive solutions that address a range of problems. This paper examines areas in which the US healthcare system performs worse than one would like and areas in which it appears to work well. In the first category is the high proportion of people without coverage, the inefficient and inequitable incentives for the purchase and provision of insurance, the problems in deciding what should be covered, the ineffective payment incentives, administrative costs and complexities, the variable quality and lack of responsiveness to patient preferences, the less than optimal safety, under-valued primary care, provider de-professionalisation, and the costs that appear to be on auto-pilot. In the second category is the rapid and wide-reaching technological innovation, the ready access to care for the insured, and clinical and patient autonomy. Among the things taken as given is our constitutional (rather than parliamentary) political system and underlying public values about the roles of individuals and government. Current players will be active in any debate about reform, so their interests must be addressed. Likewise, certain underlying economic and social drivers of

  19. [Review: Patient safety as a national health goal: current state and essential fields of action for the German healthcare system].

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Uvo M; Gausmann, Peter; Haindl, Hans; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Lauer, Wolfgang; Lauterberg, Jörg; Skorning, Max; Thürmann, Petra A

    2014-01-01

    For some years patient safety has been an important topic for the design of the healthcare systems in many countries. In Germany we are still in the starting phase of this development. Here, patient safety is not a main focus for research and there is only little funding for these topics. Thus most findings on patient safety have been derived in foreign studies. Slowly, some find their way into the clinical routine in Germany. This paper summarises the state of development of patient safety from a trans-sectoral point of view and outlines essential fields of action for the German healthcare system. PMID:24602522

  20. Introduction of Sap ERP System Into a Heterogeneous Academic Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mornar, Vedran; Fertalj, Krešimir; Kalpić, Damir

    2010-06-01

    Introduction of a complex ERP system like SAP into a heterogeneous academic environment like the University of Zagreb is far from being a trivial task. The University comprises more than 30 constituents, called faculties or academies, geographically dispersed, with long and specific traditions. Financing according to the lump sum principle, enforced in Croatia as a side effect of the in Europe obligatory and omnipresent Bologna process, requires a unified view on the educational institutions in order to provide a more just and appropriate financing scheme than the current one. After the experience with own development to support educational tasks and student administration, for standard financial and administration tasks SAP has been chosen as the most appropriate platform. The developer was selected after public bidding and the authors' institution was chosen for the pilot project. The authors were playing principal roles in the process of successful deployment and still expect to offer their expertise for implementation in the rest of the University. However, serious risks stemming from lack of motivation by some constituents are present.

  1. Healthcare Engineering Defined: A White Paper.

    PubMed

    Chyu, Ming-Chien; Austin, Tony; Calisir, Fethi; Chanjaplammootil, Samuel; Davis, Mark J; Favela, Jesus; Gan, Heng; Gefen, Amit; Haddas, Ram; Hahn-Goldberg, Shoshana; Hornero, Roberto; Huang, Yu-Li; Jensen, Øystein; Jiang, Zhongwei; Katsanis, J S; Lee, Jeong-A; Lewis, Gladius; Lovell, Nigel H; Luebbers, Heinz-Theo; Morales, George G; Matis, Timothy; Matthews, Judith T; Mazur, Lukasz; Ng, Eddie Yin-Kwee; Oommen, K J; Ormand, Kevin; Rohde, Tarald; Sánchez-Morillo, Daniel; Sanz-Calcedo, Justo García; Sawan, Mohamad; Shen, Chwan-Li; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Su, Chao-Ton; Sun, Lilly; Sun, Mingui; Sun, Yi; Tewolde, Senay N; Williams, Eric A; Yan, Chongjun; Zhang, Jiajie; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Engineering has been playing an important role in serving and advancing healthcare. The term "Healthcare Engineering" has been used by professional societies, universities, scientific authors, and the healthcare industry for decades. However, the definition of "Healthcare Engineering" remains ambiguous. The purpose of this position paper is to present a definition of Healthcare Engineering as an academic discipline, an area of research, a field of specialty, and a profession. Healthcare Engineering is defined in terms of what it is, who performs it, where it is performed, and how it is performed, including its purpose, scope, topics, synergy, education/training, contributions, and prospects.

  2. Nested quantization index modulation for reversible watermarking and its application to healthcare information management systems.

    PubMed

    Ko, Lu-Ting; Chen, Jwu-E; Shieh, Yaw-Shih; Hsin, Hsi-Chin; Sung, Tze-Yun

    2012-01-01

    Digital watermarking has attracted lots of researches to healthcare information management systems for access control, patients' data protection, and information retrieval. The well-known quantization index modulation-(QIM-) based watermarking has its limitations as the host image will be destroyed; however, the recovery of medical images is essential to avoid misdiagnosis. In this paper, we propose the nested QIM-based watermarking, which is preferable to the QIM-based watermarking for the medical image applications. As the host image can be exactly reconstructed by the nested QIM-based watermarking. The capacity of the embedded watermark can be increased by taking advantage of the proposed nest structure. The algorithm and mathematical model of the nested QIM-based watermarking including forward and inverse model is presented. Due to algorithms and architectures of forward and inverse nested QIM, the concurrent programs and special processors for the nested QIM-based watermarking are easily implemented.

  3. Nested Quantization Index Modulation for Reversible Watermarking and Its Application to Healthcare Information Management Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Lu-Ting; Chen, Jwu-E.; Shieh, Yaw-Shih; Hsin, Hsi-Chin; Sung, Tze-Yun

    2012-01-01

    Digital watermarking has attracted lots of researches to healthcare information management systems for access control, patients' data protection, and information retrieval. The well-known quantization index modulation-(QIM-) based watermarking has its limitations as the host image will be destroyed; however, the recovery of medical images is essential to avoid misdiagnosis. In this paper, we propose the nested QIM-based watermarking, which is preferable to the QIM-based watermarking for the medical image applications. As the host image can be exactly reconstructed by the nested QIM-based watermarking. The capacity of the embedded watermark can be increased by taking advantage of the proposed nest structure. The algorithm and mathematical model of the nested QIM-based watermarking including forward and inverse model is presented. Due to algorithms and architectures of forward and inverse nested QIM, the concurrent programs and special processors for the nested QIM-based watermarking are easily implemented. PMID:22194776

  4. [The healthcare system for slaves in nineteenth-century Brazil: disease, institutions, and treatment practices].

    PubMed

    Pôrto, Angela

    2006-01-01

    Although the nineteenth century saw numerous attempts to deter the slave trade, it was also the period when Brazil imported the greatest number of slaves in its history. The conditions under which slaves were transported, worked, and lived were largely responsible for their state of health. Yet this topic barely makes an appearance in the field of history, and many disputed points remain to be settled. My research cross-references sources and topics in order to gather data on the hygienic lives of nineteenth-century slaves. By analyzing archival documents from hospitals, notary public offices, and church bodies, iconographic sources, and the medical literature, I have retrieved information that can be used towards writing a history of the healthcare system available to slaves.

  5. The Utilization of a Computer Assisted Guidance System in Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfautz, Charles Van Vleck

    2010-01-01

    Computer assisted guidance systems may adapt well to various models of academic advising, and they have the ability to address the challenge of meeting the diverse advising needs of community college students without sacrificing the integrity of academic advising (Fowkes & McWhirter, 2007). The purpose of this qualitative case study was to assess…

  6. Web-Based Adaptive Testing System (WATS) for Classifying Students Academic Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jaemu; Park, Sanghoon; Kim, Kwangho

    2012-01-01

    Computer Adaptive Testing (CAT) has been highlighted as a promising assessment method to fulfill two testing purposes: estimating student academic ability and classifying student academic level. In this paper, assessment for we introduced the Web-based Adaptive Testing System (WATS) developed to support a cost effective assessment for classifying…

  7. The Construction of the Chinese Academic System: Its History and Present Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Guangcai

    2009-01-01

    The rise and development of China's academic system is a process that started from "passively accepting Western Learning" to today's "catching up with Western Learning and even exceeding it". In the last century, China experienced a turbulent and unstable social environment in which academics and politics have always been intertwined. As a result,…

  8. Academic Building Systems. A Technique to Maximize Control of Construction Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Donald H.

    1972-01-01

    Academic Building Systems (ABS) is an architectural planning and design method which allows the construction owner to respond to the need for less expensive structures, economically adaptable to the changing conditions of the academic world, by providing the owner with the maximum controls over the variable cost factors in educational facility…

  9. Performance Appraisal System Impact on University Academic Staff Job Satisfaction and Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndambakuwa, Yustina; Mufunda, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    The University of Zimbabwe (UZ) introduced a performance appraisal system (PAS) designed to improve performance indicators across the board in Public Service including academic/faculty staff at the University of Zimbabwe as part of a nation wide strategy. The Public service is a body responsible for all civil workers including academic staff,…

  10. The Rhetoric of "Job Market" and the Reality of the Academic Labor System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bousquet, Marc

    2003-01-01

    One way of describing the recent movement of thought about the academic labor system is as a series of waves. A "first wave" of labor consciousness emerged before 1970, propelling the self-organization of the academic work force, especially in public institutions, where more than half the faculty are unionized. This labor awareness was contested…

  11. Maltreatment, Academic Difficulty, and Systems-Involved Youth: Current Evidence and Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Susan; Zibulsky, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    Youth involved in child-serving systems of care (e.g., child welfare and juvenile justice) often exhibit specific academic performance problems. The magnitude of academic risk among these students is a serious concern given that school attachment, performance, and attainment closely relate to indicators of well-being across the lifespan. It is…

  12. Development of a computerised decisions support system for renal risk drugs targeting primary healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Helldén, Anders; Al-Aieshy, Fadiea; Bastholm-Rahmner, Pia; Bergman, Ulf; Gustafsson, Lars L; Höök, Hans; Sjöviker, Susanne; Söderström, Anders; Odar-Cederlöf, Ingegerd

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess general practitioners (GPs) experience from the implementation and use of a renal computerised decision support system (CDSS) for drug dosing, developed for primary healthcare, integrated into the patient’s electronic health record (EHR), and building on estimation of the patient's creatinine clearance (ClCG). Design Qualitative research design by a questionnaire and a focus group discussion. Setting and participants Eight GPs at two primary healthcare centres (PHCs). Interventions The GP at PHC 1, and the project group, developed and tested the technical solution of the CDSS. Proof-of-concept was tested by seven GPs at PHC 2. They also participated in a group discussion and answered a questionnaire. A web window in the EHR gave drug and dosage in relation to ClCG. Each advice was according to three principles: If? Why? Because. Outcome measures (1) The GPs’ experience of ‘easiness to use’ and ‘perceived usefulness’ at PHC 2, based on loggings of use, answers from a questionnaire using a 5-point Likert scale, and answers from a focus group discussion. (2) The number of patients aged 65 years and older with an estimation of ClCG before and after the implementation of the CDSS. Results The GPs found the CDSS fast, simple and easy to use. They appreciated the automatic presentation of the CICG status on opening the medication list, and the ability to actively look up specific drug recommendations in two steps. The CDSS scored high on the Likert scale. All GPs wanted to continue the use of the CDSS and to recommend it to others. The number of patients with an estimated ClCG increased 1.6-fold. Conclusions Acceptance of the simple graphical interface of this push and pull renal CDSS was high among the primary care physicians evaluating this proof of concept. The graphical model should be useful for further development of renal decision support systems. PMID:26150141

  13. "Why Give up Something That Works so Well?": Retirement Expectations among Academic Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Michelle Pannor; Pang, N. Celeste; Williams, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    For individuals with strong work identities, the decision to retire can be particularly challenging. For academic physicians, retirement is an important personal decision that also has far-reaching implications for the healthcare system. This is because academic physicians are responsible for producing the research from which key medical decisions…

  14. Flash crashes, bursts, and black swans: parallels between financial markets and healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    West, Bruce J; Clancy, Thomas R

    2010-11-01

    As systems evolve over time, their natural tendency is to become increasingly more complex. Studies in the field of complex systems have generated new perspectives on management in social organizations such as hospitals. Much of this research appears as a natural extension of the cross-disciplinary field of systems theory. This is the 16th in a series of articles applying complex systems science to the traditional management concepts of planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling. In this article, Dr Clancy, the editor of this column, and co-author, Dr West, discuss how the collapse of global financial markets in 2008 may provide valuable insight into mechanisms of complex system behavior in healthcare. Dr West, a physicist and expert in the field of complex systems and network science, is author of a chapter in the book, On the Edge: Nursing in the Age of Complexity (Lindberg C, Nash S, Linberg C. Bordertown, NJ: Plexus Press; 2008) and his most recent book, Disrupted Networks: From Physics to Climate Change (West BJ, Scafetta N. Singapore: Disrupted Networks, World Scientific Publishing; 2010). PMID:20978411

  15. [The challenge for healthcare systems in the XXI century: how to incorporate the focus of social determinants in healthcare?].

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Cristóbal

    2015-10-20

    During the 20th century, a series of reflections on the role of biomedicine and social factors in the concept of health and disease processes served as a necessary prelude to the conceptual and empirical development of what later became known as the social determinants of health. In relation to this perspective, the question arises: What is the role of modern health systems from the perspective of the social determinants of health? This article presents an alternative view of the role of health systems from the focus of the social determinants of health, raising its importance and influence on the structural level, while addressing its implications as an intermediary determinant of health inequalities.

  16. Assessment and improvement of the Italian healthcare system: first evidence from a pilot national performance evaluation system.

    PubMed

    Nuti, Sabina; Seghieri, Chiara; Vainieri, Milena; Zett, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The Italian National Health System (NHS), established in 1978, follows a model similar to the Beveridge model developed by the British NHS (Beveridge 1942; Musgrove 2000). Like the British NHS, healthcare coverage for the Italian population is provided and financed by the government through taxes. Universal coverage provides uniform healthcare access to citizens and is the characteristic usually considered the added value of a welfare system financed by tax revenues. Nonetheless, in Italy the strong policy of decentralization, which has been taking place since the early 1990s, has gradually shifted powers from the state to the 21 Italian regions. Consequently, the state now retains limited supervisory control and continues to have overall responsibility for the NHS in order to ensure uniform and essential levels of health services across the country. In this context, it has become essential, both for the ministry and for regions, to adopt a common performance evaluation system (PES). This article reports the definition, implementation, and first evidences of a pilot PES at a national level. It shows how this PES can be viewed as a strategic tool supporting the Ministry of Health (MoH) in ensuring uniform levels of care for the population and assisting regional managers to evaluate performance in benchmarking. Finally, lessons for other health systems, based on the Italian experience, are provided. PMID:22724376

  17. Creating a safe, high-quality healthcare system for all: meeting the needs of limited English proficient populations; Comment on "Patient safety and healthcare quality: the case for language access".

    PubMed

    Betancourt, Joseph R; Tan-McGrory, Aswita

    2014-02-01

    The article by Cheri Wilson, "Patient Safety and Healthcare Quality: The Case for Language Access", highlights the challenges of providing Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) to patients with Limited English Proficiency (LEP). As the US pursues high-value, high-performance healthcare, our ability to meet the needs of our most vulnerable will determine whether we succeed or fail in the long run. With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), this is more important than ever before, as it is estimated that the newly insured are more likely to be minority and less likely to speak English than their currently insured counterparts. As such, we must create a safe, high-quality healthcare system for all, especially in this time of incredible healthcare transformation and unprecedented diversity. Improving Patient Safety Systems for Patients With Limited English Proficiency: A Guide for Hospitals provides a blueprint for achieving this goal, and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) is taking action. PMID:24639984

  18. Exploring Healthcare Consumer Acceptance of Personal Health Information Management Technology through Personal Health Record Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Huijuan

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare technologies are evolving from a practitioner-centric model to a patient-centric model due to the increasing need for technology that directly serves healthcare consumers, including healthy people and patients. Personal health information management (PHIM) technology is one of the technologies designed to enhance an individual's ability…

  19. Improvement and modification of the routing system for the health-care waste collection and transportation in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    Alagöz, Aylin Zeren; Kocasoy, Günay

    2008-01-01

    Handling of health-care wastes is among the most important environmental problems in Turkey as it is in the whole world. Approximately 25-30tons of health-care wastes, in addition to the domestic and recyclable wastes, are generated from hospitals, clinics and other small health-care institutions daily on the European and the Asian sides of Istanbul [Kocasoy, G., Topkaya, B., Zeren, B.A., Kiliç, M., et al., 2004. Integrated Health-care Waste Management in Istanbul, Final Report of the LIFE00 TCY/TR/054 Project, Turkish National Committee on Solid Wastes, Istanbul, Turkey; Zeren, B.A., 2004. The Health-care Waste Management of the Hospitals in the European Side of Istanbul, M.S. Thesis, Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey; Kiliç, M., 2004. Determination of the Health-care Waste Handling and Final Disposal of the Infected Waste of Hospital-Medical Centers in the Anatolian Side of Istanbul. M.S. Thesis, Boğaziçi University, Istanbul, Turkey]. Unfortunately, these wastes are not handled, collected or temporarily stored at the institutions properly according to the published Turkish Medical Waste Control Regulation [Ministry of Environment and Forestry, 2005. Medical Waste Control Regulation. Official Gazette No. 25883, Ankara, Turkey]. Besides the inappropriate handling at the institutions, there is no systematic program for the transportation of the health-care wastes to the final disposal sites. The transportation of these wastes is realized by the vehicles of the municipalities in an uncontrolled, very primitive way. As a consequence, these improperly managed health-care wastes cause many risks to the public health and people who handle them. This study has been conducted to develop a health-care waste collection and transportation system for the city of Istanbul, Turkey. Within the scope of the study, the collection of health-care wastes from the temporary storage rooms of the health-care institutions, transportation of these wastes to the final disposal

  20. Improvement and modification of the routing system for the health-care waste collection and transportation in Istanbul

    SciTech Connect

    Alagoez, Aylin Zeren; Kocasoy, Guenay

    2008-07-01

    Handling of health-care wastes is among the most important environmental problems in Turkey as it is in the whole world. Approximately 25-30 tons of health-care wastes, in addition to the domestic and recyclable wastes, are generated from hospitals, clinics and other small health-care institutions daily on the European and the Asian sides of Istanbul [Kocasoy, G., Topkaya, B., Zeren, B.A., Kilic, M., et al., 2004. Integrated Health-care Waste Management in Istanbul, Final Report of the LIFE00 TCY/TR/054 Project, Turkish National Committee on Solid Wastes, Istanbul, Turkey; Zeren, B.A., 2004. The Health-care Waste Management of the Hospitals in the European Side of Istanbul, M.S. Thesis, Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey; Kilic, M., 2004. Determination of the Health-care Waste Handling and Final Disposal of the Infected Waste of Hospital-Medical Centers in the Anatolian Side of Istanbul. M.S. Thesis, Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey]. Unfortunately, these wastes are not handled, collected or temporarily stored at the institutions properly according to the published Turkish Medical Waste Control Regulation [Ministry of Environment and Forestry, 2005. Medical Waste Control Regulation. Official Gazette No. 25883, Ankara, Turkey]. Besides the inappropriate handling at the institutions, there is no systematic program for the transportation of the health-care wastes to the final disposal sites. The transportation of these wastes is realized by the vehicles of the municipalities in an uncontrolled, very primitive way. As a consequence, these improperly managed health-care wastes cause many risks to the public health and people who handle them. This study has been conducted to develop a health-care waste collection and transportation system for the city of Istanbul, Turkey. Within the scope of the study, the collection of health-care wastes from the temporary storage rooms of the health-care institutions, transportation of these wastes to the final disposal areas

  1. Strategic enterprise resource planning in a health-care system using a multicriteria decision-making model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Won; Kwak, N K

    2011-04-01

    This paper deals with strategic enterprise resource planning (ERP) in a health-care system using a multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) model. The model is developed and analyzed on the basis of the data obtained from a leading patient-oriented provider of health-care services in Korea. Goal criteria and priorities are identified and established via the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). Goal programming (GP) is utilized to derive satisfying solutions for designing, evaluating, and implementing an ERP. The model results are evaluated and sensitivity analyses are conducted in an effort to enhance the model applicability. The case study provides management with valuable insights for planning and controlling health-care activities and services. PMID:20703564

  2. From buzzword to business strategy: the case for information and decision support systems in e-healthcare.

    PubMed

    Korukonda, Appa Rao; Korukonda, Saritha

    2006-01-01

    Although electronic healthcare can boast of a remarkable origin in modern-day e-commerce in the form of Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), its mission-critical nature in information-based strategising is yet to be realised. Restricting the scope of e-healthcare management to product advertisements and website management reflects an unfortunate trend of underutilisation of the scope of electronic decision support systems in pricing and other business strategies. This paper aims to illustrate how this trend can be corrected by transforming e-healthcare into a full-fledged business strategy for strategic positioning and corporate profitability. This argument is illustrated with the aid of a business example related to transfer pricing. PMID:18048255

  3. Strategic enterprise resource planning in a health-care system using a multicriteria decision-making model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang Won; Kwak, N K

    2011-04-01

    This paper deals with strategic enterprise resource planning (ERP) in a health-care system using a multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) model. The model is developed and analyzed on the basis of the data obtained from a leading patient-oriented provider of health-care services in Korea. Goal criteria and priorities are identified and established via the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). Goal programming (GP) is utilized to derive satisfying solutions for designing, evaluating, and implementing an ERP. The model results are evaluated and sensitivity analyses are conducted in an effort to enhance the model applicability. The case study provides management with valuable insights for planning and controlling health-care activities and services.

  4. Ayurveda: a historical perspective and principles of the traditional healthcare system in India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, L; Singh, B B; Dagenais, S

    2001-03-01

    Ayurveda, the science of life, is a comprehensive medical system that has been the traditional system of healthcare in India for more than 5000 years. This medical system was well established around 2500 to 600 BC, when it evolved into 2 schools: the School of Physicians and the School of Surgeons, similar to allopathy. Charak Samhita, Susrut Samhita, and Ashtang Hridaya Samhita are the Senior Triad texts, and Madhav Nidan Samhita, Sarangdhar Samhita, and Bhavprakash Samhita are the Junior Triad texts. Around 600 BC. Ayurveda was branched into internal medicine; pediatrics; psychiatry; surgery; eye, ear, nose, and throat; toxicology; geriatrics; and eugenics/aphrodisiacs. The body is composed of 3 body doshas, 3 mental doshas, 7 dhatus, and malas. The harmony among the body doshas of vata (nervous system), pitta (enzymes), and kapha (mucus) and the gunas, or mental doshas (which are human attributes: satogun [godly], rajas [kingly], and tamas [evil]), constitutes health, and their disharmony constitutes disease. The management of illness requires balancing the doshas back into a harmonious state through lifestyle interventions, spiritual nurturing, and treatment with herbo-mineral formulas based on one's mental and bodily constitution. PMID:11253415

  5. Ontology-Driven Knowledge-Based Health-Care System, An Emerging Area - Challenges And Opportunities - Indian Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunitha, A.; Babu, G. Suresh

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies in the decision making efforts in the area of public healthcare systems have been tremendously inspired and influenced by the entry of ontology. Ontology driven systems results in the effective implementation of healthcare strategies for the policy makers. The central source of knowledge is the ontology containing all the relevant domain concepts such as locations, diseases, environments and their domain sensitive inter-relationships which is the prime objective, concern and the motivation behind this paper. The paper further focuses on the development of a semantic knowledge-base for public healthcare system. This paper describes the approach and methodologies in bringing out a novel conceptual theme in establishing a firm linkage between three different ontologies related to diseases, places and environments in one integrated platform. This platform correlates the real-time mechanisms prevailing within the semantic knowledgebase and establishing their inter-relationships for the first time in India. This is hoped to formulate a strong foundation for establishing a much awaited basic need for a meaningful healthcare decision making system in the country. Introduction through a wide range of best practices facilitate the adoption of this approach for better appreciation, understanding and long term outcomes in the area. The methods and approach illustrated in the paper relate to health mapping methods, reusability of health applications, and interoperability issues based on mapping of the data attributes with ontology concepts in generating semantic integrated data driving an inference engine for user-interfaced semantic queries.

  6. Developing a conceptual model for the application of patient and public involvement in the healthcare system in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Azmal, Mohammad; Sari, Ali Akbari; Foroushani, Abbas Rahimi; Ahmadi, Batoul

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Patient and public involvement is engaging patients, providers, community representatives, and the public in healthcare planning and decision-making. The purpose of this study was to develop a model for the application of patient and public involvement in decision making in the Iranian healthcare system. Methods A mixed qualitative-quantitative approach was used to develop a conceptual model. Thirty three key informants were purposely recruited in the qualitative stage, and 420 people (patients and their companions) were included in a protocol study that was implemented in five steps: 1) Identifying antecedents, consequences, and variables associated with the patient and the publics’ involvement in healthcare decision making through a comprehensive literature review; 2) Determining the main variables in the context of Iran’s health system using conceptual framework analysis; 3) Prioritizing and weighting variables by Shannon entropy; 4) designing and validating a tool for patient and public involvement in healthcare decision making; and 5) Providing a conceptual model of patient and the public involvement in planning and developing healthcare using structural equation modeling. We used various software programs, including SPSS (17), Max QDA (10), EXCEL, and LISREL. Content analysis, Shannon entropy, and descriptive and analytic statistics were used to analyze the data. Results In this study, seven antecedents variable, five dimensions of involvement, and six consequences were identified. These variables were used to design a valid tool. A logical model was derived that explained the logical relationships between antecedent and consequent variables and the dimensions of patient and public involvement as well. Conclusion Given the specific context of the political, social, and innovative environments in Iran, it was necessary to design a model that would be compatible with these features. It can improve the quality of care and promote the patient and

  7. Collecting, Integrating, and Disseminating Patient-Reported Outcomes for Research in a Learning Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    Harle, Christopher A.; Lipori, Gloria; Hurley, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Advances in health policy, research, and information technology have converged to increase the electronic collection and use of patient-reported outcomes (PROs). Therefore, it is important to share lessons learned in implementing PROs in research information systems. Case Description: The purpose of this case study is to describe a novel information system for electronic PROs and lessons learned in implementing that system to support research in an academic health center. The system incorporates freely available and commercial software and involves clinical and research workflows that support the collection, transformation, and research use of PRO data. The software and processes that comprise the system serve three main functions, (i) collecting electronic PROs in clinical care, (ii) integrating PRO data with non-patient generated clinical data, and (iii) disseminating data to researchers through the institution’s research informatics infrastructure, including the i2b2 (Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside) system. Strategies: Our successful design and implementation was driven by three overarching strategies. First, we selected and implemented multiple interfaced technologies to support PRO collection, management, and research use. Second, we aimed to use standardized approaches to measuring PROs, sending PROs between systems, and disseminating PROs. Finally, we focused on using technologies and processes that aligned with existing clinical research information management strategies within our organization. Conclusion: These experiences and lessons may help future implementers and researchers enhance the scale and sustainable use of systems for research use of PROs. PMID:27563683

  8. An intelligent healthcare management system: a new approach in work-order prioritization for medical equipment maintenance requests.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Naser; Oweis, Rami; Abu Zraiq, Hamzeh; Abu Sammour, Denis

    2012-04-01

    The effective maintenance management of medical technology influences the quality of care delivered and the profitability of healthcare facilities. Medical equipment maintenance in Jordan lacks an objective prioritization system; consequently, the system is not sensitive to the impact of equipment downtime on patient morbidity and mortality. The current work presents a novel software system (EQUIMEDCOMP) that is designed to achieve valuable improvements in the maintenance management of medical technology. This work-order prioritization model sorts medical maintenance requests by calculating a priority index for each request. Model performance was assessed by utilizing maintenance requests from several Jordanian hospitals. The system proved highly efficient in minimizing equipment downtime based on healthcare delivery capacity, and, consequently, patient outcome. Additionally, a preventive maintenance optimization module and an equipment quality control system are incorporated. The system is, therefore, expected to improve the reliability of medical equipment and significantly improve safety and cost-efficiency. PMID:20703695

  9. Does academic assessment system type affect levels of academic stress in medical students? A cross-sectional study from Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Madiha; Asim, Hamna; Edhi, Ahmed Iqbal; Hashmi, Muhammad Daniyal; Khan, Muhammad Shahjahan; Naz, Farah; Qaiser, Kanza Noor; Qureshi, Sidra Masud; Zahid, Mohammad Faizan; Jehan, Imtiaz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Stress among medical students induced by academic pressures is on the rise among the student population in Pakistan and other parts of the world. Our study examined the relationship between two different systems employed to assess academic performance and the levels of stress among students at two different medical schools in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods A sample consisting of 387 medical students enrolled in pre-clinical years was taken from two universities, one employing the semester examination system with grade point average (GPA) scores (a tiered system) and the other employing an annual examination system with only pass/fail grading. A pre-designed, self-administered questionnaire was distributed. Test anxiety levels were assessed by The Westside Test Anxiety Scale (WTAS). Overall stress was evaluated using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Results There were 82 males and 301 females while four did not respond to the gender question. The mean age of the entire cohort was 19.7±1.0 years. A total of 98 participants were from the pass/fail assessment system while 289 were from the GPA system. There was a higher proportion of females in the GPA system (85% vs. 59%; p<0.01). Students in the pass/fail assessment system had a lower score on the WTAS (2.4±0.8 vs. 2.8±0.7; p=0.01) and the PSS (17.0±6.7 vs. 20.3±6.8; p<0.01), indicating lower levels of test anxiety and overall stress than in students enrolled in the GPA assessment system. More students in the pass/fail system were satisfied with their performance than those in the GPA system. Conclusion Based on the present study, we suggest governing bodies to revise and employ a uniform assessment system for all the medical colleges to improve student academic performance and at the same time reduce stress levels. Our results indicate that the pass/fail assessment system accomplishes these objectives. PMID:26112353

  10. Revitalising primary healthcare requires an equitable global economic system - now more than ever.

    PubMed

    Sanders, David; Baum, Fran E; Benos, Alexis; Legge, David

    2011-08-01

    The promised revitalisation of primary healthcare (PHC) is happening at a time when the contradictions and unfairness of the global economic system have become clear, suggesting that the current system is unsustainable. In the past two decades, one of the most significant impediments to the implementation of comprehensive PHC has been neoliberal economic policies and their imposition globally. This article questions what will be required for PHC to flourish. PHC incorporates five key principles: equitable provision of services, comprehensive care, intersectoral action, community involvement and appropriate technology. This article considers intersectoral action and comprehensiveness and their potential to be implemented in the current global environment. It highlights the constraints to intersectoral action through a case study of nutrition in the context of globalisation of the food chain. It also explores the challenges to implementing a comprehensive approach to health that are posed by neoliberal health sector reforms and donor practices. The paper concludes that even well-designed health systems based on PHC have little influence over the broader economic forces that shape their operation and their ability to improve health. Reforming these economic forces will require greater regulation of the national and global economic environment to emphasise people's health rather than private profit, and action to address climate change. Revitalisation of PHC and progress towards health equity are unlikely without strong regulation of the market. The further development and strengthening of social movements for health will be key to successful advocacy action.

  11. Patients’ perceptions of the triage system in a primary healthcare facility, Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Adeniji, Adeloye Amoo

    2016-01-01

    Background In public healthcare facilities, where the patient numbers and the available resources are often disproportionate, triage is used to prioritise when patients are seen. Patients may not understand the triage process and have strong views on how to improve their experience. Aim This study explored the views of patients who had undergone triage in the emergency centre of a primary care facility. Setting Gugulethu Community Health Centre, Cape Town. Methods A purposive sample consisted of five women (one coded green, three orange, one yellow) and four men (one coded green and three yellow). A semi-structured qualitative interview was conducted in either Xhosa or English and the transcripts analysed using the framework method. Results All of the respondents complained of a lack of information and poor understanding of the triage process. Those coded green experienced the process as biased and unfair and reported that the triage nurse was rude and unprofessional. By contrast, those coded yellow or orange found the triage nurse to be helpful and professional. Most patients turned to support staff (e.g. security staff or cleaners) for assistance in dealing with the triage system. Most patients waited longer than the guidelines recommend and the green-coded patients complained about this issue. Conclusion Patients did not have a good experience of the triage system. Managers of the triage system need to design better strategies to improve patient acceptance and share information. The important role of support staff needs to be recognised and strengthened. PMID:27380788

  12. Performance Evaluation of an Enhanced Uplink 3.5G System for Mobile Healthcare Applications

    PubMed Central

    Komnakos, Dimitris; Vouyioukas, Demosthenes; Maglogiannis, Ilias; Constantinou, Philip

    2008-01-01

    The present paper studies the prospective and the performance of a forthcoming high-speed third generation (3.5G) networking technology, called enhanced uplink, for delivering mobile health (m-health) applications. The performance of 3.5G networks is a critical factor for successful development of m-health services perceived by end users. In this paper, we propose a methodology for performance assessment based on the joint uplink transmission of voice, real-time video, biological data (such as electrocardiogram, vital signals, and heart sounds), and healthcare records file transfer. Various scenarios were concerned in terms of real-time, nonreal-time, and emergency applications in random locations, where no other system but 3.5G is available. The accomplishment of quality of service (QoS) was explored through a step-by-step improvement of enhanced uplink system's parameters, attributing the network system for the best performance in the context of the desired m-health services. PMID:19132096

  13. Welfarism versus 'free enterprise': considerations of power and justice in the Philippine healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Sy, Peter A

    2003-10-01

    The just distribution of benefits and burdens of healthcare, at least in the contemporary Philippine context, is an issue that gravitates towards two opposing doctrines of welfarism and 'free enterprise.' Supported largely by popular opinion, welfarism maintains that social welfare and healthcare are primarily the responsibility of the government. Free enterprise (FE) doctrine, on the other hand, maintains that social welfare is basically a market function and that healthcare should be a private industry that operates under competitive conditions with minimal government control. I will examine the ethical implications of these two doctrines as they inform healthcare programmes by business and government, namely: (a) the Devolution of Health Services and (b) the Philippine Health Maintenance Organization (HMO). I will argue that these doctrines and the health programmes they inform are deficient in following respects: (1) equitable access to healthcare, (2) individual needs for premium healthcare, (3) optimal utilisation of health resources, and (4) the equitable assignment of burdens that healthcare entails. These respects, as considerations of justice, are consistent with an operational definition of 'power' proposed here as 'access to and control of resources.'

  14. Welfarism versus 'free enterprise': considerations of power and justice in the Philippine healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Sy, Peter A

    2003-10-01

    The just distribution of benefits and burdens of healthcare, at least in the contemporary Philippine context, is an issue that gravitates towards two opposing doctrines of welfarism and 'free enterprise.' Supported largely by popular opinion, welfarism maintains that social welfare and healthcare are primarily the responsibility of the government. Free enterprise (FE) doctrine, on the other hand, maintains that social welfare is basically a market function and that healthcare should be a private industry that operates under competitive conditions with minimal government control. I will examine the ethical implications of these two doctrines as they inform healthcare programmes by business and government, namely: (a) the Devolution of Health Services and (b) the Philippine Health Maintenance Organization (HMO). I will argue that these doctrines and the health programmes they inform are deficient in following respects: (1) equitable access to healthcare, (2) individual needs for premium healthcare, (3) optimal utilisation of health resources, and (4) the equitable assignment of burdens that healthcare entails. These respects, as considerations of justice, are consistent with an operational definition of 'power' proposed here as 'access to and control of resources.' PMID:14959725

  15. A Multi-User Remote Academic Laboratory System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrios, Arquimedes; Panche, Stifen; Duque, Mauricio; Grisales, Victor H.; Prieto, Flavio; Villa, Jose L.; Chevrel, Philippe; Canu, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development, implementation and preliminary operation assessment of Multiuser Network Architecture to integrate a number of Remote Academic Laboratories for educational purposes on automatic control. Through the Internet, real processes or physical experiments conducted at the control engineering laboratories of four…

  16. Academic Management and Administration System Reform in Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xianming, Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Reforms in colleges and universities should promote the humanistic character of higher education--rather than simply serve for pure economic production--but also observe the sacred mission of transmitting and creating culture and knowledge, with these two possessing momentous differences. These then demand rationality in academic management to…

  17. Innovation networks for improving access and quality across the healthcare ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Mark; James, Judith A; Lardiere, Michael R; Proser, Michelle; Rhee, Kyu; Sayre, Michael H; Shore, Jay H; Ternullo, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Partnerships between patient communities, healthcare providers, and academic researchers are key to stepping up the pace and public health impact of clinical and translational research supported by the National Institutes of Health. With emphasis shifting toward community engagement and faster translation of research advances into clinical practice, academic researchers have a vital stake in widening the use of health information technology systems and telehealth networks to support collaboration and innovation. However, limited interaction between academic institutions and healthcare providers hinders the ability to form and sustain the integrated networks that are needed to conduct meaningful community-engaged research that improves public health outcomes. Healthcare providers, especially those affiliated with smaller practices, will need sustainable infrastructure and real incentives to utilize such networks, as well as training and additional resources for ongoing technical assistance. PMID:20043702

  18. Implementation and evaluation of an efficient secure computation system using ‘R’ for healthcare statistics

    PubMed Central

    Chida, Koji; Morohashi, Gembu; Fuji, Hitoshi; Magata, Fumihiko; Fujimura, Akiko; Hamada, Koki; Ikarashi, Dai; Yamamoto, Ryuichi

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective While the secondary use of medical data has gained attention, its adoption has been constrained due to protection of patient privacy. Making medical data secure by de-identification can be problematic, especially when the data concerns rare diseases. We require rigorous security management measures. Materials and methods Using secure computation, an approach from cryptography, our system can compute various statistics over encrypted medical records without decrypting them. An issue of secure computation is that the amount of processing time required is immense. We implemented a system that securely computes healthcare statistics from the statistical computing software ‘R’ by effectively combining secret-sharing-based secure computation with original computation. Results Testing confirmed that our system could correctly complete computation of average and unbiased variance of approximately 50 000 records of dummy insurance claim data in a little over a second. Computation including conditional expressions and/or comparison of values, for example, t test and median, could also be correctly completed in several tens of seconds to a few minutes. Discussion If medical records are simply encrypted, the risk of leaks exists because decryption is usually required during statistical analysis. Our system possesses high-level security because medical records remain in encrypted state even during statistical analysis. Also, our system can securely compute some basic statistics with conditional expressions using ‘R’ that works interactively while secure computation protocols generally require a significant amount of processing time. Conclusions We propose a secure statistical analysis system using ‘R’ for medical data that effectively integrates secret-sharing-based secure computation and original computation. PMID:24763677

  19. Quality use of medicine in a developing economy: Measures to overcome challenges in the Malaysian healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    Mohd-Tahir, Nurul-Ain; Paraidathathu, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Malaysia inherits a highly subsidized tax-based public healthcare system complemented by a fee-for-service private sector. Population health in Malaysia has considerably improved since independence using a relatively small amount of gross domestic product (~4%). Brain drain of highly specialized personnel, growth in healthcare spending, demographic and disease pattern changes and increase in patients’ demands and expectations towards better medical care are exerting pressure on the sustainability of the system to continuously provide efficient and effective services at relatively low cost. Malaysia has adopted and implemented some of the quality use of medicine concepts such as National Essential Medicine List, health technology assessment and promotion of generic medicines in their health policy, but so far the results may not be optimal. Activities to further promote these strategies are needed for successful implementation to achieve more positive and sustained beneficial outcomes. Better strategic planning, management and collaboration between various stakeholders, considering the needs and barriers of the strategies, are important to ensure effective implementation of the strategies. More emphasis should be placed upon more equitable and rational distribution of healthcare resources to cater for rapid urbanization. Additionally, a sustainable health financing structure that is more progressive and does not encourage moral hazard should be established. In conclusion, Malaysia has achieved good outcomes in population health with relatively low financial inputs since independence. However, changes in the overall environment have created issues which would threaten the long-term viability of the healthcare system if not tackled properly. The numbers of internationally trialled strategies could be used to deal with these challenges. In addition, coordinated implementation of these strategies and effective engagement and communication between various stakeholders

  20. An Ontology for Telemedicine Systems Resiliency to Technological Context Variations in Pervasive Healthcare

    PubMed Central

    Bults, Richard G. A.; Van Sinderen, Marten J.; Widya, Ing; Hermens, Hermie J.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical data are crucial for any medical case to study and understand a patient’s condition and to give the patient the best possible treatment. Pervasive healthcare systems apply information and communication technology to enable the usage of ubiquitous clinical data by authorized medical persons. However, quality of clinical data in these applications is, to a large extent, determined by the technological context of the patient. A technological context is characterized by potential technological disruptions that affect optimal functioning of technological resources. The clinical data based on input from these technological resources can therefore have quality degradations. If these degradations are not noticed, the use of this clinical data can lead to wrong treatment decisions, which potentially puts the patient’s safety at risk. This paper presents an ontology that specifies the relation among technological context, quality of clinical data, and patient treatment. The presented ontology provides a formal way to represent the knowledge to specify the effect of technological context variations in the clinical data quality and the impact of the clinical data quality on a patient’s treatment. Accordingly, this ontology is the foundation for a quality of data framework that enables the development of telemedicine systems that are capable of adapting the treatment when the quality of the clinical data degrades, and thus guaranteeing patients’ safety even when technological context varies. PMID:27170903

  1. Cloud-based hospital information system as a service for grassroots healthcare institutions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qin; Han, Xiong; Ma, Xi-Kun; Xue, Yi-Feng; Chen, Yi-Jun; Li, Jing-Song

    2014-09-01

    Grassroots healthcare institutions (GHIs) are the smallest administrative levels of medical institutions, where most patients access health services. The latest report from the National Bureau of Statistics of China showed that 96.04 % of 950,297 medical institutions in China were at the grassroots level in 2012, including county-level hospitals, township central hospitals, community health service centers, and rural clinics. In developing countries, these institutions are facing challenges involving a shortage of funds and talent, inconsistent medical standards, inefficient information sharing, and difficulties in management during the adoption of health information technologies (HIT). Because of the necessity and gravity for GHIs, our aim is to provide hospital information services for GHIs using Cloud computing technologies and service modes. In this medical scenario, the computing resources are pooled by means of a Cloud-based Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) to serve multiple GHIs, with different hospital information systems dynamically assigned and reassigned according to demand. This paper is concerned with establishing a Cloud-based Hospital Information Service Center to provide hospital information software as a service (HI-SaaS) with the aim of providing GHIs with an attractive and high-performance medical information service. Compared with individually establishing all hospital information systems, this approach is more cost-effective and affordable for GHIs and does not compromise HIT performance.

  2. Improved Glycemic Control Without Hypoglycemia in Elderly Diabetic Patients Using the Ubiquitous Healthcare Service, a New Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soo; Kang, Seon Mee; Shin, Hayley; Lee, Hak Jong; Won Yoon, Ji; Yu, Sung Hoon; Kim, So-Youn; Yoo, Soo Young; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo; Ryu, Jun Oh; Jang, Hak C.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To improve quality and efficiency of care for elderly patients with type 2 diabetes, we introduced elderly-friendly strategies to the clinical decision support system (CDSS)-based ubiquitous healthcare (u-healthcare) service, which is an individualized health management system using advanced medical information technology. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a 6-month randomized, controlled clinical trial involving 144 patients aged >60 years. Participants were randomly assigned to receive routine care (control, n = 48), to the self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG, n = 47) group, or to the u-healthcare group (n = 49). The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving A1C <7% without hypoglycemia at 6 months. U-healthcare system refers to an individualized medical service in which medical instructions are given through the patient’s mobile phone. Patients receive a glucometer with a public switched telephone network-connected cradle that automatically transfers test results to a hospital-based server. Once the data are transferred to the server, an automated system, the CDSS rule engine, generates and sends patient-specific messages by mobile phone. RESULTS After 6 months of follow-up, the mean A1C level was significantly decreased from 7.8 ± 1.3% to 7.4 ± 1.0% (P < 0.001) in the u-healthcare group and from 7.9 ± 1.0% to 7.7 ± 1.0% (P = 0.020) in the SMBG group, compared with 7.9 ± 0.8% to 7.8 ± 1.0% (P = 0.274) in the control group. The proportion of patients with A1C <7% without hypoglycemia was 30.6% in the u-healthcare group, 23.4% in the SMBG group (23.4%), and 14.0% in the control group (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS The CDSS-based u-healthcare service achieved better glycemic control with less hypoglycemia than SMBG and routine care and may provide effective and safe diabetes management in the elderly diabetic patients. PMID:21270188

  3. Network security vulnerabilities and personal privacy issues in Healthcare Information Systems: a case study in a private hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Namoğlu, Nihan; Ulgen, Yekta

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare industry has become widely dependent on information technology and internet as it moves from paper to electronic records. Healthcare Information System has to provide a high quality service to patients and a productive knowledge share between healthcare staff by means of patient data. With the internet being commonly used across hospitals, healthcare industry got its own share from cyber threats like other industries in the world. The challenge is allowing knowledge transfer to hospital staff while still ensuring compliance with security mandates. Working in collaboration with a private hospital in Turkey; this study aims to reveal the essential elements of a 21st century business continuity plan for hospitals while presenting the security vulnerabilities in the current hospital information systems and personal privacy auditing standards proposed by regulations and laws. We will survey the accreditation criteria in Turkey and counterparts in US and EU. We will also interview with medical staff in the hospital to understand the needs for personal privacy and the technical staff to perceive the technical requirements in terms of network security configuration and deployment. As hospitals are adopting electronic transactions, it should be considered a must to protect these electronic health records in terms of personal privacy aspects. PMID:23823398

  4. Network security vulnerabilities and personal privacy issues in Healthcare Information Systems: a case study in a private hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Namoğlu, Nihan; Ulgen, Yekta

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare industry has become widely dependent on information technology and internet as it moves from paper to electronic records. Healthcare Information System has to provide a high quality service to patients and a productive knowledge share between healthcare staff by means of patient data. With the internet being commonly used across hospitals, healthcare industry got its own share from cyber threats like other industries in the world. The challenge is allowing knowledge transfer to hospital staff while still ensuring compliance with security mandates. Working in collaboration with a private hospital in Turkey; this study aims to reveal the essential elements of a 21st century business continuity plan for hospitals while presenting the security vulnerabilities in the current hospital information systems and personal privacy auditing standards proposed by regulations and laws. We will survey the accreditation criteria in Turkey and counterparts in US and EU. We will also interview with medical staff in the hospital to understand the needs for personal privacy and the technical staff to perceive the technical requirements in terms of network security configuration and deployment. As hospitals are adopting electronic transactions, it should be considered a must to protect these electronic health records in terms of personal privacy aspects.

  5. Misinformation and misbeliefs in the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis fuel mistrust in the healthcare system.

    PubMed Central

    White, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis (TSUS) is an important issue in research, healthcare, ethics and race relations. The assumed consequences of knowledge of this study on the African-American community include mistrust of the healthcare system. In the July 2005 issue of the Journal of the National Medical Association, Brandon, Isaac and LaVeist (the authors), who were at the Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, reported the results of black-white differences in awareness of and knowledge about the TSUS and the effect of that awareness and knowledge on medical mistrust. The study surveyed blacks, whites and others in the Baltimore, MD community about their knowledge of and attitudes about the TSUS. The respondents who were aware of the TSUS were asked survey items to assess specific factual information about the TSUS. The respondents who were not aware of the TSUS were read a brief description of the TSUS taken from the CDC website. Both groups were asked if a similar study was possible today. The authors performed a regression analysis of mistrust of medical care based on race, knowledge of the TSUS and demographic variables. The editorial identified and explained challenges in the article, i.e., challenges in calculations, demographic analysis by race, knowledge of TSUS, cultural sensitivity and methodology. The authors miscalculated the "similar proportions" of blacks and whites who were aware of the TSUS; the recalculated proportions, favoring whites, were different than reported by others. There was no demographic analysis by race in their article--also different than other published reports. Most respondents--blacks and whites--who were aware of the TSUS at baseline answered incorrectly the author-selected questions about the TSUS, particularly the fact-based question of whether the TSUS researchers gave syphilis to the men-not dissimilar to one other report. The source for TSUS information (the CDC

  6. Misinformation and misbeliefs in the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis fuel mistrust in the healthcare system.

    PubMed

    White, Robert M

    2005-11-01

    The Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis (TSUS) is an important issue in research, healthcare, ethics and race relations. The assumed consequences of knowledge of this study on the African-American community include mistrust of the healthcare system. In the July 2005 issue of the Journal of the National Medical Association, Brandon, Isaac and LaVeist (the authors), who were at the Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, reported the results of black-white differences in awareness of and knowledge about the TSUS and the effect of that awareness and knowledge on medical mistrust. The study surveyed blacks, whites and others in the Baltimore, MD community about their knowledge of and attitudes about the TSUS. The respondents who were aware of the TSUS were asked survey items to assess specific factual information about the TSUS. The respondents who were not aware of the TSUS were read a brief description of the TSUS taken from the CDC website. Both groups were asked if a similar study was possible today. The authors performed a regression analysis of mistrust of medical care based on race, knowledge of the TSUS and demographic variables. The editorial identified and explained challenges in the article, i.e., challenges in calculations, demographic analysis by race, knowledge of TSUS, cultural sensitivity and methodology. The authors miscalculated the "similar proportions" of blacks and whites who were aware of the TSUS; the recalculated proportions, favoring whites, were different than reported by others. There was no demographic analysis by race in their article--also different than other published reports. Most respondents--blacks and whites--who were aware of the TSUS at baseline answered incorrectly the author-selected questions about the TSUS, particularly the fact-based question of whether the TSUS researchers gave syphilis to the men-not dissimilar to one other report. The source for TSUS information (the CDC

  7. [What are the health benefits of the most expensive healthcare system in Europe?].

    PubMed

    Mackenbach, Johan P

    2015-01-01

    Since the year 2000, healthcare expenditure in the Netherlands has seen a meteoric rise and as a result the Netherlands now has the highest level of healthcare expenditure (expressed as a percentage of national income) of all European countries. Whether this has led to better population health outcomes is, however, unclear. The only outcome for which there is some evidence is life expectancy at birth, which has probably improved as a result of more and better healthcare. Unfortunately, despite very high levels of healthcare spending, current Dutch life expectancy is not among the best in Europe, partly because of a relatively high prevalence of smoking and insufficient tobacco control measures. More health gains could have been achieved if greater priority had been given to prevention. PMID:26306488

  8. [What are the health benefits of the most expensive healthcare system in Europe?].

    PubMed

    Mackenbach, Johan P

    2015-01-01

    Since the year 2000, healthcare expenditure in the Netherlands has seen a meteoric rise and as a result the Netherlands now has the highest level of healthcare expenditure (expressed as a percentage of national income) of all European countries. Whether this has led to better population health outcomes is, however, unclear. The only outcome for which there is some evidence is life expectancy at birth, which has probably improved as a result of more and better healthcare. Unfortunately, despite very high levels of healthcare spending, current Dutch life expectancy is not among the best in Europe, partly because of a relatively high prevalence of smoking and insufficient tobacco control measures. More health gains could have been achieved if greater priority had been given to prevention.

  9. Integrating Low-Cost Rapid Usability Testing into Agile System Development of Healthcare IT: A Methodological Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    The development of more usable and effective healthcare information systems has become a critical issue. In the software industry methodologies such as agile and iterative development processes have emerged to lead to more effective and usable systems. These approaches highlight focusing on user needs and promoting iterative and flexible development practices. Evaluation and testing of iterative agile development cycles is considered an important part of the agile methodology and iterative processes for system design and re-design. However, the issue of how to effectively integrate usability testing methods into rapid and flexible agile design cycles has remained to be fully explored. In this paper we describe our application of an approach known as low-cost rapid usability testing as it has been applied within agile system development in healthcare. The advantages of the integrative approach are described, along with current methodological considerations. PMID:25991130

  10. Integrating Low-Cost Rapid Usability Testing into Agile System Development of Healthcare IT: A Methodological Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    The development of more usable and effective healthcare information systems has become a critical issue. In the software industry methodologies such as agile and iterative development processes have emerged to lead to more effective and usable systems. These approaches highlight focusing on user needs and promoting iterative and flexible development practices. Evaluation and testing of iterative agile development cycles is considered an important part of the agile methodology and iterative processes for system design and re-design. However, the issue of how to effectively integrate usability testing methods into rapid and flexible agile design cycles has remained to be fully explored. In this paper we describe our application of an approach known as low-cost rapid usability testing as it has been applied within agile system development in healthcare. The advantages of the integrative approach are described, along with current methodological considerations.

  11. Strategies for Leveraging Interoperable Health Information Exchange Systems Among Healthcare Communities.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gregory L; Sensmeier, Joyce; McDonald, Joe; Goossen, William; Alexander, Mary M

    2016-01-01

    The panel will share international Health Information Exchange (HIE) projects to improve quality and lower costs in healthcare communities (i.e. hospitals, clinician practices, and aged care facilities). HIE allows healthcare professionals and patients to appropriately access and securely share a patient's vital medical information electronically within and across organizations. Intended audience: Researchers, consumers, practitioners, vendors, care providers, and policy makers with interests in technology design, development, implementation, and management, particularly focused on HIE. PMID:27332323

  12. Health and health-care systems in southeast Asia: diversity and transitions.

    PubMed

    Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Phua, Kai Hong; Yap, Mui Teng; Pocock, Nicola S; Hashim, Jamal H; Chhem, Rethy; Wilopo, Siswanto Agus; Lopez, Alan D

    2011-01-29

    Southeast Asia is a region of enormous social, economic, and political diversity, both across and within countries, shaped by its history, geography, and position as a major crossroad of trade and the movement of goods and services. These factors have not only contributed to the disparate health status of the region's diverse populations, but also to the diverse nature of its health systems, which are at varying stages of evolution. Rapid but inequitable socioeconomic development, coupled with differing rates of demographic and epidemiological transitions, have accentuated health disparities and posed great public health challenges for national health systems, particularly the control of emerging infectious diseases and the rise of non-communicable diseases within ageing populations. While novel forms of health care are evolving in the region, such as corporatised public health-care systems (government owned, but operating according to corporate principles and with private-sector participation) and financing mechanisms to achieve universal coverage, there are key lessons for health reforms and decentralisation. New challenges have emerged with rising trade in health services, migration of the health workforce, and medical tourism. Juxtaposed between the emerging giant economies of China and India, countries of the region are attempting to forge a common regional identity, despite their diversity, to seek mutually acceptable and effective solutions to key regional health challenges. In this first paper in the Lancet Series on health in southeast Asia, we present an overview of key demographic and epidemiological changes in the region, explore challenges facing health systems, and draw attention to the potential for regional collaboration in health.

  13. Health and health-care systems in southeast Asia: diversity and transitions.

    PubMed

    Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Phua, Kai Hong; Yap, Mui Teng; Pocock, Nicola S; Hashim, Jamal H; Chhem, Rethy; Wilopo, Siswanto Agus; Lopez, Alan D

    2011-01-29

    Southeast Asia is a region of enormous social, economic, and political diversity, both across and within countries, shaped by its history, geography, and position as a major crossroad of trade and the movement of goods and services. These factors have not only contributed to the disparate health status of the region's diverse populations, but also to the diverse nature of its health systems, which are at varying stages of evolution. Rapid but inequitable socioeconomic development, coupled with differing rates of demographic and epidemiological transitions, have accentuated health disparities and posed great public health challenges for national health systems, particularly the control of emerging infectious diseases and the rise of non-communicable diseases within ageing populations. While novel forms of health care are evolving in the region, such as corporatised public health-care systems (government owned, but operating according to corporate principles and with private-sector participation) and financing mechanisms to achieve universal coverage, there are key lessons for health reforms and decentralisation. New challenges have emerged with rising trade in health services, migration of the health workforce, and medical tourism. Juxtaposed between the emerging giant economies of China and India, countries of the region are attempting to forge a common regional identity, despite their diversity, to seek mutually acceptable and effective solutions to key regional health challenges. In this first paper in the Lancet Series on health in southeast Asia, we present an overview of key demographic and epidemiological changes in the region, explore challenges facing health systems, and draw attention to the potential for regional collaboration in health. PMID:21269685

  14. Client-server, distributed database strategies in a health-care record system for a homeless population.

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, H C; Barnett, G O

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To design and develop a computer-based health-care record system to address the needs of the patients and providers of a homeless population. DESIGN: A computer-based health-care record system being developed for Boston's Healthcare for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) uses client-server technology and distributed database strategies to provide a common medical record for this transient population. The differing information requirements of physicians, nurses, and social workers are specifically addressed in the graphic application interface to facilitate an integrated approach to health care. This computer-based record system is designed for remote and portable use to integrate smoothly into the daily practice of providers of care to the homeless. The system uses remote networking technology and regular phone lines to support multiple concurrent users at remote sites of care. RESULTS: A stand-alone, pilot system is in operation at the BHCHP medical respite unit. Information on 129 patient encounters from 37 unique sites has been entered. A full client-server system has been designed. Benchmarks show that while the relative performance of a communication link based upon a phone line is 0.07 to 0.15 that of a local area network, optimization permits adequate response. CONCLUSION: Medical records access in a transient population poses special problems. Use of client-server and distributed database strategies can provide a technical foundation that provides a secure, reliable, and accessible computer-based medical record in this environment. PMID:7719799

  15. P4 medicine: how systems medicine will transform the healthcare sector and society

    PubMed Central

    Glusman, Gustavo; Brogaard, Kristin; Price, Nathan D; Hood, Leroy

    2014-01-01

    Ten years ago, the proposition that healthcare is evolving from reactive disease care to care that is predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory was regarded as highly speculative. Today, the core elements of that vision are widely accepted and have been articulated in a series of recent reports by the US Institute of Medicine. Systems approaches to biology and medicine are now beginning to provide patients, consumers and physicians with personalized information about each individual’s unique health experience of both health and disease at the molecular, cellular and organ levels. This information will make disease care radically more cost effective by personalizing care to each person’s unique biology and by treating the causes rather than the symptoms of disease. It will also provide the basis for concrete action by consumers to improve their health as they observe the impact of lifestyle decisions. Working together in digitally powered familial and affinity networks, consumers will be able to reduce the incidence of the complex chronic diseases that currently account for 75% of disease-care costs in the USA. PMID:25342952

  16. Are new models needed to optimize the utilization of new medicines to sustain healthcare systems?

    PubMed

    Godman, Brian; Malmström, Rickard E; Diogene, Eduardo; Gray, Andy; Jayathissa, Sisira; Timoney, Angela; Acurcio, Francisco; Alkan, Ali; Brzezinska, Anna; Bucsics, Anna; Campbell, Stephen M; Czeczot, Jadwiga; de Bruyn, Winnie; Eriksson, Irene; Yusof, Faridah Aryani Md; Finlayson, Alexander E; Fürst, Jurij; Garuoliene, Kristina; Guerra Júnior, Augusto; Gulbinovič, Jolanta; Jan, Saira; Joppi, Roberta; Kalaba, Marija; Magnisson, Einar; McCullagh, Laura; Miikkulainen, Kaisa; Ofierska-Sujkowska, Gabriela; Pedersen, Hanne Bak; Selke, Gisbert; Sermet, Catherine; Spillane, Susan; Supian, Azuwana; Truter, Ilse; Vlahović-Palčevski, Vera; Vien, Low Ee; Vural, Elif H; Wale, Janet; Władysiuk, Magdałene; Zeng, Wenjie; Gustafsson, Lars L

    2015-01-01

    Medicines have made an appreciable contribution to improving health. However, even high-income countries are struggling to fund new premium-priced medicines. This will grow necessitating the development of new models to optimize their use. The objective is to review case histories among health authorities to improve the utilization and expenditure on new medicines. Subsequently, use these to develop exemplar models and outline their implications. A number of issues and challenges were identified from the case histories. These included the low number of new medicines seen as innovative alongside increasing requested prices for their reimbursement, especially for oncology, orphan diseases, diabetes and HCV. Proposed models center on the three pillars of pre-, peri- and post-launch including critical drug evaluation, as well as multi-criteria models for valuing medicines for orphan diseases alongside potentially capping pharmaceutical expenditure. In conclusion, the proposed models involving all key stakeholder groups are critical for the sustainability of healthcare systems or enhancing universal access. The models should help stimulate debate as well as restore trust between key stakeholder groups.

  17. P4 medicine: how systems medicine will transform the healthcare sector and society.

    PubMed

    Flores, Mauricio; Glusman, Gustavo; Brogaard, Kristin; Price, Nathan D; Hood, Leroy

    2013-01-01

    Ten years ago, the proposition that healthcare is evolving from reactive disease care to care that is predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory was regarded as highly speculative. Today, the core elements of that vision are widely accepted and have been articulated in a series of recent reports by the US Institute of Medicine. Systems approaches to biology and medicine are now beginning to provide patients, consumers and physicians with personalized information about each individual's unique health experience of both health and disease at the molecular, cellular and organ levels. This information will make disease care radically more cost effective by personalizing care to each person's unique biology and by treating the causes rather than the symptoms of disease. It will also provide the basis for concrete action by consumers to improve their health as they observe the impact of lifestyle decisions. Working together in digitally powered familial and affinity networks, consumers will be able to reduce the incidence of the complex chronic diseases that currently account for 75% of disease-care costs in the USA.

  18. Visual saliency models for summarization of diagnostic hysteroscopy videos in healthcare systems.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Khan; Ahmad, Jamil; Sajjad, Muhammad; Baik, Sung Wook

    2016-01-01

    In clinical practice, diagnostic hysteroscopy (DH) videos are recorded in full which are stored in long-term video libraries for later inspection of previous diagnosis, research and training, and as an evidence for patients' complaints. However, a limited number of frames are required for actual diagnosis, which can be extracted using video summarization (VS). Unfortunately, the general-purpose VS methods are not much effective for DH videos due to their significant level of similarity in terms of color and texture, unedited contents, and lack of shot boundaries. Therefore, in this paper, we investigate visual saliency models for effective abstraction of DH videos by extracting the diagnostically important frames. The objective of this study is to analyze the performance of various visual saliency models with consideration of domain knowledge and nominate the best saliency model for DH video summarization in healthcare systems. Our experimental results indicate that a hybrid saliency model, comprising of motion, contrast, texture, and curvature saliency, is the more suitable saliency model for summarization of DH videos in terms of extracted keyframes and accuracy. PMID:27652068

  19. [The pharmaceutical industry and the sustainability of healthcare systems in developed countries and in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Iñesta, Antonio; Oteo, Luis Angel

    2011-06-01

    The global economic crisis and its impact on public finances in most developed countries are giving rise to cost-containment policies in healthcare systems. Prevailing legislation on medication requires the safety, quality, and efficacy of these products. A few countries include efficiency criteria, primarily for new medication that they wish to include in public financing. The appropriate use of generic and "biosimilar medication" is very important for maintaining the financial equilibrium of the Health Services. The problem in Latin America is that not all multisource products are bioequivalent and not all countries have the resources to conduct bioequivalence studies in vivo. The European Medicines Agency in 2005 adopted guidelines on "biosimilar medicines" and thirteen of them were subsequently approved for general release. Benchmarking of this model by other countries would be important. The influence of the pharmaceutical industry on political and administrative areas is enormous and control is necessary. The pharmaceutical companies claim that they act with corporate social responsibility, therefore, they must ensure this responsibility toward society. PMID:21709969

  20. Are new models needed to optimize the utilization of new medicines to sustain healthcare systems?

    PubMed

    Godman, Brian; Malmström, Rickard E; Diogene, Eduardo; Gray, Andy; Jayathissa, Sisira; Timoney, Angela; Acurcio, Francisco; Alkan, Ali; Brzezinska, Anna; Bucsics, Anna; Campbell, Stephen M; Czeczot, Jadwiga; de Bruyn, Winnie; Eriksson, Irene; Yusof, Faridah Aryani Md; Finlayson, Alexander E; Fürst, Jurij; Garuoliene, Kristina; Guerra Júnior, Augusto; Gulbinovič, Jolanta; Jan, Saira; Joppi, Roberta; Kalaba, Marija; Magnisson, Einar; McCullagh, Laura; Miikkulainen, Kaisa; Ofierska-Sujkowska, Gabriela; Pedersen, Hanne Bak; Selke, Gisbert; Sermet, Catherine; Spillane, Susan; Supian, Azuwana; Truter, Ilse; Vlahović-Palčevski, Vera; Vien, Low Ee; Vural, Elif H; Wale, Janet; Władysiuk, Magdałene; Zeng, Wenjie; Gustafsson, Lars L

    2015-01-01

    Medicines have made an appreciable contribution to improving health. However, even high-income countries are struggling to fund new premium-priced medicines. This will grow necessitating the development of new models to optimize their use. The objective is to review case histories among health authorities to improve the utilization and expenditure on new medicines. Subsequently, use these to develop exemplar models and outline their implications. A number of issues and challenges were identified from the case histories. These included the low number of new medicines seen as innovative alongside increasing requested prices for their reimbursement, especially for oncology, orphan diseases, diabetes and HCV. Proposed models center on the three pillars of pre-, peri- and post-launch including critical drug evaluation, as well as multi-criteria models for valuing medicines for orphan diseases alongside potentially capping pharmaceutical expenditure. In conclusion, the proposed models involving all key stakeholder groups are critical for the sustainability of healthcare systems or enhancing universal access. The models should help stimulate debate as well as restore trust between key stakeholder groups. PMID:25487078

  1. [The pharmaceutical industry and the sustainability of healthcare systems in developed countries and in Latin America].

    PubMed

    Iñesta, Antonio; Oteo, Luis Angel

    2011-06-01

    The global economic crisis and its impact on public finances in most developed countries are giving rise to cost-containment policies in healthcare systems. Prevailing legislation on medication requires the safety, quality, and efficacy of these products. A few countries include efficiency criteria, primarily for new medication that they wish to include in public financing. The appropriate use of generic and "biosimilar medication" is very important for maintaining the financial equilibrium of the Health Services. The problem in Latin America is that not all multisource products are bioequivalent and not all countries have the resources to conduct bioequivalence studies in vivo. The European Medicines Agency in 2005 adopted guidelines on "biosimilar medicines" and thirteen of them were subsequently approved for general release. Benchmarking of this model by other countries would be important. The influence of the pharmaceutical industry on political and administrative areas is enormous and control is necessary. The pharmaceutical companies claim that they act with corporate social responsibility, therefore, they must ensure this responsibility toward society.

  2. VehiHealth: An Emergency Routing Protocol for Vehicular Ad Hoc Network to Support Healthcare System.

    PubMed

    Bhoi, S K; Khilar, P M

    2016-03-01

    Survival of a patient depends on effective data communication in healthcare system. In this paper, an emergency routing protocol for Vehicular Ad hoc Network (VANET) is proposed to quickly forward the current patient status information from the ambulance to the hospital to provide pre-medical treatment. As the ambulance takes time to reach the hospital, ambulance doctor can provide sudden treatment to the patient in emergency by sending patient status information to the hospital through the vehicles using vehicular communication. Secondly, the experienced doctors respond to the information by quickly sending a treatment information to the ambulance. In this protocol, data is forwarded through that path which has less link breakage problem between the vehicles. This is done by calculating an intersection value I v a l u e for the neighboring intersections by using the current traffic information. Then the data is forwarded through that intersection which has minimum I v a l u e . Simulation results show VehiHealth performs better than P-GEDIR, GyTAR, A-STAR and GSR routing protocols in terms of average end-to-end delay, number of link breakage, path length, and average response time.

  3. Building an outpatient imaging center: A case study at genesis healthcare system, part 2.

    PubMed

    Yanci, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In the second of 2 parts, this article will focus on process improvement projects utilizing a case study at Genesis HealthCare System located in Zanesville, OH. Operational efficiency is a key step in developing a freestanding diagnostic imaging center. The process improvement projects began with an Expert Improvement Session (EIS) on the scheduling process. An EIS session is a facilitated meeting that can last anywhere from 3 hours to 2 days. Its intention is to take a group of people involved with the problem or operational process and work to understand current failures or breakdowns in the process. Recommendations are jointly developed to overcome any current deficiencies, and a work plan is structured to create ownership over the changes. A total of 11 EIS sessions occurred over the course of this project, covering 5 sections: Scheduling/telephone call process, Pre-registration, Verification/pre-certification, MRI throughput, CT throughput. Following is a single example of a project focused on the process improvement efforts. All of the process improvement projects utilized a quasi methodology of "DMAIC" (Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control). PMID:17172093

  4. A Study on the Secure User Profiling Structure and Procedure for Home Healthcare Systems.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hoon; Song, MoonBae

    2016-01-01

    Despite of various benefits such as a convenience and efficiency, home healthcare systems have some inherent security risks that may cause a serious leak on personal health information. This work presents a Secure User Profiling Structure which has the patient information including their health information. A patient and a hospital keep it at that same time, they share the updated data. While they share the data and communicate, the data can be leaked. To solve the security problems, a secure communication channel with a hash function and an One-Time Password between a client and a hospital should be established and to generate an input value to an OTP, it uses a dual hash-function. This work presents a dual hash function-based approach to generate the One-Time Password ensuring a secure communication channel with the secured key. In result, attackers are unable to decrypt the leaked information because of the secured key; in addition, the proposed method outperforms the existing methods in terms of computation cost. PMID:26573639

  5. Building an outpatient imaging center: a case study at Genesis Healthcare System, part 1.

    PubMed

    Yanci, Jim

    2006-01-01

    In the first of two parts, this article provides an outline of key steps in creating a freestanding diagnostic imaging center (Genesis HealthCare System located in Zanesville, OH) and provides details on a few of the significant processes. The following are highlighted in this article: Overview, market assessment, facility design, and equipment selection. Part 2 will feature operational process improvements. The length of the Genesis project extended to about 18 months due to the added services of urgent care and a community education and meeting facility. The project began in July 2005 and was completed in January 2006 (if the project was focused only on imaging, it could have been complete in about 8 to 10 months, see Figure 1 for a typical summary work task timeline). This multi-service outpatient center, The Genesis Healthplex on Maple, was created in an existing facility that was once a large grocery store. A significant goal that came out of the project was to create the perfect customer experience. The customer is defined as: Patients, patient families, referring physicians and their staff, radiologists, and employees. This was achieved by bringing the 3 entities of people (patient/family, staff, and physicians) working closely together by utilizing well identified processes and employing technology that the market demands. Only when these areas overlap and work together will the perfect customer experience be created. See Figure 2. PMID:17191544

  6. Factors influencing healthcare service quality

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The main purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence healthcare quality in the Iranian context. Methods: Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with 222 healthcare stakeholders including healthcare providers, managers, policy-makers, and payers to identify factors affecting the quality of healthcare services provided in Iranian healthcare organisations. Results: Quality in healthcare is a production of cooperation between the patient and the healthcare provider in a supportive environment. Personal factors of the provider and the patient, and factors pertaining to the healthcare organisation, healthcare system, and the broader environment affect healthcare service quality. Healthcare quality can be improved by supportive visionary leadership, proper planning, education and training, availability of resources, effective management of resources, employees and processes, and collaboration and cooperation among providers. Conclusion: This article contributes to healthcare theory and practice by developing a conceptual framework that provides policy-makers and managers a practical understanding of factors that affect healthcare service quality. PMID:25114946

  7. Multimorbidity and healthcare utilisation among high-cost patients in the US Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Zulman, Donna M; Pal Chee, Christine; Wagner, Todd H; Yoon, Jean; Cohen, Danielle M; Holmes, Tyson H; Ritchie, Christine; Asch, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the relationship between multimorbidity and healthcare utilisation patterns among the highest cost patients in a large, integrated healthcare system. Design In this retrospective cross-sectional study of all patients in the U.S. Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Care System, we aggregated costs of individuals’ outpatient and inpatient care, pharmacy services and VA-sponsored contract care received in 2010. We assessed chronic condition prevalence, multimorbidity as measured by comorbidity count, and multisystem multimorbidity (number of body systems affected by chronic conditions) among the 5% highest cost patients. Using multivariate regression, we examined the association between multimorbidity and healthcare utilisation and costs, adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, homelessness and health insurance status. Setting USA VA Health Care System. Participants 5.2 million VA patients. Measures Annual total costs; absolute and share of costs generated through outpatient, inpatient, pharmacy and VA-sponsored contract care; number of visits to primary, specialty and mental healthcare; number of emergency department visits and hospitalisations. Results The 5% highest cost patients (n=261 699) accounted for 47% of total VA costs. Approximately two-thirds of these patients had chronic conditions affecting ≥3 body systems. Patients with cancer and schizophrenia were less likely to have documented comorbid conditions than other high-cost patients. Multimorbidity was generally associated with greater outpatient and inpatient utilisation. However, increased multisystem multimorbidity was associated with a higher outpatient share of total costs (1.6 percentage points per affected body system, p<0.01) but a lower inpatient share of total costs (−0.6 percentage points per affected body system, p<0.01). Conclusions Multisystem multimorbidity is common among high-cost VA patients. While some patients might benefit from disease

  8. Patients' participation in decision-making in the medical field--'projectification' of patients in a neoliberal framed healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Glasdam, Stinne; Oeye, Christine; Thrysoee, Lars

    2015-10-01

    This article focuses on patients' participation in decision-making in meetings with healthcare professionals in a healthcare system, based on neoliberal regulations and ideas. Drawing on two constructed empirical cases, primarily from the perspective of patients, this article analyses and discusses the clinical practice around decision-making meetings within a Foucauldian perspective. Patients' participation in decision-making can be seen as an offshoot of respect for patient autonomy. A treatment must be chosen, when patients consult physicians. From the perspective of patients, there is a tendency for healthcare professionals to supply the patients with the information that they think are necessary for them to make their own decision. But patients do not always want to be a 'customer' in the healthcare system; they want to be a patient, consulting an expert for help and advice, which creates resistance to some parts of the decision-making process. Both professionals and patients are subject to the structural frame of the medical field, formed of both neoliberal framework and medical logic. The decision-making competence in relation to the choice of treatment is placed away from the professionals and seen as belonging to the patient. A 'projectification' of the patient occurs, whereby the patient becomes responsible for his/her choices in treatment and care and the professionals support him/her with knowledge, preferences, and alternative views, out of which he/she must make his/her own choices, and the responsibility for those choices now and in the future. At the same time, there is a tendency towards de-professionalization. In that light, participation of patients in decision-making can be regarded as a tacit governmentality strategy that shapes the location of responsibility between individual and society, and independent patients and healthcare professionals, despite the basically desirable, appropriate, and necessary idea of involving patients in their own

  9. Strategic management system in a healthcare setting--moving from strategy to results.

    PubMed

    Devitt, Rob; Klassen, Wolf; Martalog, Julian

    2005-01-01

    One of the historical challenges in the healthcare system has been the identification and collection of meaningful data to measure an organization's progress towards the achievement of its strategic goals and the concurrent alignment of internal operating practices with this strategy. Over the last 18 months the Toronto East General Hospital (TEGH) has adopted a strategic management system and organizing framework that has led to a metric-based strategic plan. It has allowed for formal and measurable linkages across a full range of internal business processes, from the annual operating plan to resource allocation decisions, to the balanced scorecard and individual performance evaluations. The Strategic Management System (SMS) aligns organizational planning and performance measurement, facilitates an appropriate balance between organizational priorities and resolving "local" problems, and encourages behaviours that are consistent with the values upon which the organization is built. The TEGH Accountability Framework serves as the foundation for the entire system. A key tool of the system is the rolling three-year strategic plan for the organization that sets out specific annual improvement targets on a number of key strategic measures. Individual program/department plans with corresponding measures ensure that the entire organization is moving forward strategically. Each year, all plans are reviewed, with course adjustments made to reflect changes in the hospital's environment and with re-calibration of performance targets for the next three years to ensure continued improvement and organizational progress. This system has been used through one annual business cycle. Results from the past year show measurable success. The hospital has improved on 12 of the 15 strategic plan metrics, including achieving the targeted 1% operating surplus while operating in an environment of tremendous change and uncertainty. This article describes the strategic management system used

  10. Strategic management system in a healthcare setting--moving from strategy to results.

    PubMed

    Devitt, Rob; Klassen, Wolf; Martalog, Julian

    2005-01-01

    One of the historical challenges in the healthcare system has been the identification and collection of meaningful data to measure an organization's progress towards the achievement of its strategic goals and the concurrent alignment of internal operating practices with this strategy. Over the last 18 months the Toronto East General Hospital (TEGH) has adopted a strategic management system and organizing framework that has led to a metric-based strategic plan. It has allowed for formal and measurable linkages across a full range of internal business processes, from the annual operating plan to resource allocation decisions, to the balanced scorecard and individual performance evaluations. The Strategic Management System (SMS) aligns organizational planning and performance measurement, facilitates an appropriate balance between organizational priorities and resolving "local" problems, and encourages behaviours that are consistent with the values upon which the organization is built. The TEGH Accountability Framework serves as the foundation for the entire system. A key tool of the system is the rolling three-year strategic plan for the organization that sets out specific annual improvement targets on a number of key strategic measures. Individual program/department plans with corresponding measures ensure that the entire organization is moving forward strategically. Each year, all plans are reviewed, with course adjustments made to reflect changes in the hospital's environment and with re-calibration of performance targets for the next three years to ensure continued improvement and organizational progress. This system has been used through one annual business cycle. Results from the past year show measurable success. The hospital has improved on 12 of the 15 strategic plan metrics, including achieving the targeted 1% operating surplus while operating in an environment of tremendous change and uncertainty. This article describes the strategic management system used

  11. An integrated healthcare information system for end-to-end standardized exchange and homogeneous management of digital ECG formats.

    PubMed

    Trigo, Jesús Daniel; Martínez, Ignacio; Alesanco, Alvaro; Kollmann, Alexander; Escayola, Javier; Hayn, Dieter; Schreier, Günter; García, José

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the application of the enterprise information system (EIS) paradigm to standardized cardiovascular condition monitoring. There are many specifications in cardiology, particularly in the ECG standardization arena. The existence of ECG formats, however, does not guarantee the implementation of homogeneous, standardized solutions for ECG management. In fact, hospital management services need to cope with various ECG formats and, moreover, several different visualization applications. This heterogeneity hampers the normalization of integrated, standardized healthcare information systems, hence the need for finding an appropriate combination of ECG formats and a suitable EIS-based software architecture that enables standardized exchange and homogeneous management of ECG formats. Determining such a combination is one objective of this paper. The second aim is to design and develop the integrated healthcare information system that satisfies the requirements posed by the previous determination. The ECG formats selected include ISO/IEEE11073, Standard Communications Protocol for Computer-Assisted Electrocardiography, and an ECG ontology. The EIS-enabling techniques and technologies selected include web services, simple object access protocol, extensible markup language, or business process execution language. Such a selection ensures the standardized exchange of ECGs within, or across, healthcare information systems while providing modularity and accessibility.

  12. Strategic Planning for Information Systems: The Evidence from a Successful Implementation in an Academic Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Richard B.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Demonstrates how an information systems plan can be successfully developed and implemented within an academic setting. Six guidelines for information systems planning are provided; problems are identified and recommendations to address the problems are suggested; and information systems objectives are discussed, including business communications,…

  13. Measuring Academic Progress: The Course-Credit System in American Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the course-credit system in the United States, the standard means of measuring academic work. Discusses how the system is a means of measuring the time spent on study and not the quality of work; since the 19th century, the course-credit system has been the major "currency" in American higher education and has proven quite successful.…

  14. Non-telephone healthcare: the role of 4G and emerging mobile systems for future m-health systems.

    PubMed

    Istepanian, R; Philip, N; Wang, X H; Laxminarayan, S

    2004-01-01

    The next generation of "m-health technologies" is a new and evolving topic in the areas of telemedical and telecare systems. These technologies involve the exploitation of mobile telecommunication and multimedia technologies to provide better access to healthcare personnel on the move, by removing the key disadvantage of trailing wires in current systems. These technologies provide equal access to medical information and expert care by overcoming the boundaries of separation that exist today between different users of such medical information. A great benefit to all users will be a more efficient use of resources and far greater location independence. In this paper we will address some notes and future trends in these emerging areas and their applications for m-health systems. Especially we will discuss the role of 4G and emerging mobile systems for future m-health systems. The new technologies can make the remote medical monitoring, consulting, and health care more flexible and convenient. But, there are challenges for successful wireless telemedicine, which are addressed in this paper. PMID:15747957

  15. Individualized Healthcare Plans (IHP). Position Statement. Revised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that students whose healthcare needs affect or have the potential to affect safe and optimal school attendance and academic performance require the professional school nurse to write an Individualized Healthcare Plan (IHP), in collaboration with the student, family, educators,…

  16. Electronics for better healthcare.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Bernhard; Herzog, Karolin

    2013-06-01

    Microelectronics and microsystem technology have changed our daily lives considerably in the past 50 years. Countless everyday objects contain microelectronic components. In healthcare up to the present, however, it has not been possible to make major alterations in introducing electronics and information technology that would lead to innovative improvements and greater transparency. This paper describes initial steps in diagnostics and oncological therapy including telematic healthcare systems which can, for example, assist patients with cardiovascular diseases and shows, through these areas, how electronics and microsystems technology can contribute to better healthcare.

  17. [Spiritual support in the spirit of current trends in the Israeli healthcare system].

    PubMed

    Ziv, Amitai; Talmi, Rachet; Gary-Cohen, Meirav; Chen, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    This editorial is in response to Bar-Sela, Bentur, Schultz and Corn's article entitled "Spiritual care in hospitals and other healthcare settings in Israel--a profession in the making", published in Harefuah in May 2014. The integration of spiritual support into hospitals marks an interesting trend in light of the current emphases in the Israeli medical system on technological advancement, financial feasibility and quantifiable quality measures. This step is evidence of the importance still attached by policy and decisionmakers to those human aspects of illness and disease, which are difficult to define and measure. "Spiritual Support" is an ancient profession based on the principle, whereby support of the spirit is considered a basic human right, in recognition of the spirit as a source of strength during times of crisis and distress. This service was introduced into the Chaim Sheba Medical Center six years ago for patients with untreatable illnesses, and through identification of commonality between their coping features and those of rehabilitation patients. It was later expanded into the orthopedic and neurological rehabilitation departments. The service is provided on an individual level for the patients and in a group formal for their caregivers. Spiritual support as an integral part of the multi-disciplinary care further ratifies the holistic approach in medical practice, as an everlasting value transcending periodical trends. The conclusion drawn is that technological advancement, the scientific approach, physical-medical treatment, emotional therapy and spiritual support can and should exist side by side to improve the welfare and coping abilities of patients dealing with adverse medical conditions.

  18. CASALUD: an innovative health-care system to control and prevent non-communicable diseases in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Gallardo-Rincón, Héctor; Saucedo-Martinez, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    Mexico and other Latin American countries are currently facing a dramatic increase in the number of adults suffering from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD), which require prolonged, continuous care. This epidemiological shift has created new challenges for health-care systems. Both the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations (UN) have recognised the growing human and economic costs of NCDs and outlined an action plan, recognising that NCDs are preventable, often with common preventable risk factors linked to risky health behaviours. In line with international best practices, Mexico has applied a number of approaches to tackle these diseases. However, challenges remain for the Mexican health-care system, and in planning a strategy for combating and preventing NCDs, it must consider how best to integrate these strategies with existing health-care infrastructure. Shifting the paradigm of care in Mexico from a curative, passive approach to a preventive, proactive model will require an innovative and replicable system that guarantees availability of medicines and services, strengthens human capital through ongoing professional education, expands early and continuous access to care through proactive prevention strategies and incorporates technological innovations in order to do so. Here, we describe CASALUD: an innovative model in health-care that leverages international best practices and uses innovative technology to deliver NCD care, control and prevention. In addition, we describe the lessons learned from the initial implementation of the model for its effective use in Mexico, as well as the plans for wider implementation throughout the country, in partnership with the Mexican Ministry of Health.

  19. Prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis in Poland and costs generated by AS patients in the public healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Śliwczyński, A; Raciborski, F; Kłak, A; Brzozowska, M; Czeleko, T; Kwiatkowska, B; Jędrzejczyk, T; Marczak, M

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the research was to analyse the prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Poland and to assess the costs generated by AS patients in the system of public health care. The database of national payer-National Health Fund (NHF)-has been analysed. For the analysis, the information has been extracted from IT system about each treated patient with ICD-10 = M45 code as main or coexisting diagnosis included in the mandatory reports from entities of public healthcare service. In the years 2008-2013, from 28,800 to 32,800 persons diagnosed with AS as main or coexisting diagnosis have been registered in NHF database. In 2013, the prevalence amounted to 7.48 for 10,000 persons of general population-the highest in Kujawy-Pomerania province (10.92 per 10,000 inhabitants), Silesia (10.04) and Świętokrzyskie province (9.81). In male patients, this coefficient amounted to 8.91 per 10,000 inhabitants, whereas in female-to 6.15. In 2013, the prevalence for men was the highest in the age group of 60-64 years and for women in the group of 65-69 years. The healthcare expenses related to AS financed by the NHF increased from 13,200 million PLN (6.3 million USD) in 2008 to 72,600 million PLN (21,900 million USD) in 2013. The increase in healthcare expenses related to AS patients in the public healthcare system is significant and noticeable. High regional diversity is also a vital issue. It is necessary to carry out further research on the incidence rate of AS in Polish population.

  20. Creating value-focused healthcare delivery systems: Part two--Value-focus traits and characteristics.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, R N

    1997-01-01

    The healthcare arena is undergoing dramatic changes. These changes require new ways of thinking and doing. As Albert Einstein said, "We can't expect to solve problems utilizing the same level of thinking that created the problems in the first place." We must fundamentally change the way we think and do things if we want fundamental change to occur. The creation of value for all participants in the healthcare arena must become a major focus of the industry. As the healthcare industry has undergone fundamental change in the way services are provided and are reimbursed, successful healthcare providers and suppliers will create enhanced value through development and implementation of value-focus traits to include vision creation, leadership/communication, proactivity, anticipation, flexibility, innovation/creativity, knowledge, customized standardization, and service quality/accountability. The last part of this series will present the required administrative and management skills providers should possess and utilize to ensure that value is created in the delivery of care.

  1. Academic Teamwork among Members of the National Researchers System in Tamaulipas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman-Acuña, Teresa; Guzman-Acuña, Josefina; Sánchez-Rodriguez, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the participation of Mexican researchers in the state of Tamaulipas who are members of Mexico's National Researchers System (SNI) and are working in academic groups. The paper also seeks to understand their perceptions in relation to the usefulness of this structured System to their individual research…

  2. Effectiveness of a Local Inter-Loan System for Five Academic Libraries: An Operational Research Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDougall, A. F.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of operational effectiveness in libraries focuses on a modeling approach that was used to compare the effectiveness of a local interlibrary loan system with using a national system, the British Library Document Supply Centre (BLDSC). Cost figures and surveys of five academic libraries are described. (six references) (LRW)

  3. The Impact of Merit-Pay Systems on the Work and Attitudes of Mexican Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galaz-Fontes, Jesús Francisco; Gil-Antón, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The central purpose of this work is to present data that evaluates the impact and perspectives of various merit-pay systems directed at Mexican academics. To this end a brief description is provided of recent Mexican higher education evolution, including that of merit-pay programs. It is proposed that faculty merit-pay systems, in the context of…

  4. The Open Academic Model for the Systems Engineering Graduate Program at Stevens Institute of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasfer, Kahina

    2012-01-01

    The Systems Engineering Program at Stevens Institute of Technology has developed the Open Academic Model (OAM) to guide its strategic planning and operations since its founding in 2001. Guided by OAM, the Stevens Systems Engineering Program (SSEP) has grown from inception in 2001 into one of the largest in the US. The main objectives of the…

  5. Tenure Track Career System as a Strategic Instrument for Academic Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pietilä, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the purposes for which leaders in universities use academic career systems. It focuses on the tenure track system which is new to Finland. Tenure track represents a newly established internal career path in a situation in which Finnish universities' organizational autonomy increased via new legislation from 2010. Drawing…

  6. Healthcare compunetics.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Andy; Laxminarayan, Swamy; Bos, Lodewijk

    2004-01-01

    Changes in life expectancy, healthy life expectancy and health seeking behaviour are having an impact on the demand for care. Such changes could occur across the whole population, or for specific groups. Changes for specific groups will be particularly affected by policy initiatives, while both these and wider changes will be affected by people's levels of engagement with their health and the health service itself. Levels of education, income and media coverage of health issues are also important. These factors could also encourage an increase in people caring for themselves and their families or community. People are now expecting a patient-centred service with safe high quality treatment, comfortable accommodation services, fast access and an integrated joined-up system. The uptake of integrated Information and Communication technologies (ICT) will be crucial. Healthcare Compunetics, the combination of computing and networking customised for medical and care, will provide the common policy and framework for combined multi-disciplinary research, development, implementation and usage. PMID:15747899

  7. Center for Healthcare Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, A.V.

    1994-03-01

    In the U.S., we now spend about 13% of the gross domestic product (CDP) on healthcare. This figure represents nearly $3000 per year per man, woman, and child. Moreover, this expenditure is projected to grow to about 20% of the GDP by the year 2000. Medical research and development accounts for only about 3% of national healthcare spending, and technology development represents only a small fraction of that 3%. New technologies that are far more cost-effective than previous ones - such as minimally invasive surgical procedures, advanced automated diagnostics, and better information systems - could save the nation billions of dollars per year to say nothing of the potential reductions in pain and suffering. A center is described that will coordinate ongoing Laboratory research aimed at developing more cost-effective tools for use by the healthcare community. The new Center for Healthcare Technologies will have many long-term benefits for the region and the nation.

  8. Coproduction of healthcare service.

    PubMed

    Batalden, Maren; Batalden, Paul; Margolis, Peter; Seid, Michael; Armstrong, Gail; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; Hartung, Hans

    2016-07-01

    Efforts to ensure effective participation of patients in healthcare are called by many names-patient centredness, patient engagement, patient experience. Improvement initiatives in this domain often resemble the efforts of manufacturers to engage consumers in designing and marketing products. Services, however, are fundamentally different than products; unlike goods, services are always 'coproduced'. Failure to recognise this unique character of a service and its implications may limit our success in partnering with patients to improve health care. We trace a partial history of the coproduction concept, present a model of healthcare service coproduction and explore its application as a design principle in three healthcare service delivery innovations. We use the principle to examine the roles, relationships and aims of this interdependent work. We explore the principle's implications and challenges for health professional development, for service delivery system design and for understanding and measuring benefit in healthcare services. PMID:26376674

  9. Coproduction of healthcare service

    PubMed Central

    Batalden, Maren; Batalden, Paul; Margolis, Peter; Seid, Michael; Armstrong, Gail; Opipari-Arrigan, Lisa; Hartung, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to ensure effective participation of patients in healthcare are called by many names—patient centredness, patient engagement, patient experience. Improvement initiatives in this domain often resemble the efforts of manufacturers to engage consumers in designing and marketing products. Services, however, are fundamentally different than products; unlike goods, services are always ‘coproduced’. Failure to recognise this unique character of a service and its implications may limit our success in partnering with patients to improve health care. We trace a partial history of the coproduction concept, present a model of healthcare service coproduction and explore its application as a design principle in three healthcare service delivery innovations. We use the principle to examine the roles, relationships and aims of this interdependent work. We explore the principle's implications and challenges for health professional development, for service delivery system design and for understanding and measuring benefit in healthcare services. PMID:26376674

  10. Toward a Learning Health-care System - Knowledge Delivery at the Point of Care Empowered by Big Data and NLP.

    PubMed

    Kaggal, Vinod C; Elayavilli, Ravikumar Komandur; Mehrabi, Saeed; Pankratz, Joshua J; Sohn, Sunghwan; Wang, Yanshan; Li, Dingcheng; Rastegar, Majid Mojarad; Murphy, Sean P; Ross, Jason L; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Buntrock, James D; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    The concept of optimizing health care by understanding and generating knowledge from previous evidence, ie, the Learning Health-care System (LHS), has gained momentum and now has national prominence. Meanwhile, the rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) enables the data collection required to form the basis for facilitating LHS. A prerequisite for using EHR data within the LHS is an infrastructure that enables access to EHR data longitudinally for health-care analytics and real time for knowledge delivery. Additionally, significant clinical information is embedded in the free text, making natural language processing (NLP) an essential component in implementing an LHS. Herein, we share our institutional implementation of a big data-empowered clinical NLP infrastructure, which not only enables health-care analytics but also has real-time NLP processing capability. The infrastructure has been utilized for multiple institutional projects including the MayoExpertAdvisor, an individualized care recommendation solution for clinical care. We compared the advantages of big data over two other environments. Big data infrastructure significantly outperformed other infrastructure in terms of computing speed, demonstrating its value in making the LHS a possibility in the near future.

  11. Toward a Learning Health-care System - Knowledge Delivery at the Point of Care Empowered by Big Data and NLP.

    PubMed

    Kaggal, Vinod C; Elayavilli, Ravikumar Komandur; Mehrabi, Saeed; Pankratz, Joshua J; Sohn, Sunghwan; Wang, Yanshan; Li, Dingcheng; Rastegar, Majid Mojarad; Murphy, Sean P; Ross, Jason L; Chaudhry, Rajeev; Buntrock, James D; Liu, Hongfang

    2016-01-01

    The concept of optimizing health care by understanding and generating knowledge from previous evidence, ie, the Learning Health-care System (LHS), has gained momentum and now has national prominence. Meanwhile, the rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) enables the data collection required to form the basis for facilitating LHS. A prerequisite for using EHR data within the LHS is an infrastructure that enables access to EHR data longitudinally for health-care analytics and real time for knowledge delivery. Additionally, significant clinical information is embedded in the free text, making natural language processing (NLP) an essential component in implementing an LHS. Herein, we share our institutional implementation of a big data-empowered clinical NLP infrastructure, which not only enables health-care analytics but also has real-time NLP processing capability. The infrastructure has been utilized for multiple institutional projects including the MayoExpertAdvisor, an individualized care recommendation solution for clinical care. We compared the advantages of big data over two other environments. Big data infrastructure significantly outperformed other infrastructure in terms of computing speed, demonstrating its value in making the LHS a possibility in the near future. PMID:27385912

  12. New Jersey hospitals renew their identities; part of Meridian Health. Raising awareness of the advantages of a healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2005-01-01

    Meridian Health, Wall, N.J., is a three-hospital system that also includes a network of partner companies. The objectives of this branding campaign were to create a better awareness of the benefits of academic medicine, to close the physician referral loop and to improve internal morale. The objectives were realized by emphasizing the teamwork of the system's doctors and showing their actual faces and voices.

  13. New Jersey hospitals renew their identities; part of Meridian Health. Raising awareness of the advantages of a healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2005-01-01

    Meridian Health, Wall, N.J., is a three-hospital system that also includes a network of partner companies. The objectives of this branding campaign were to create a better awareness of the benefits of academic medicine, to close the physician referral loop and to improve internal morale. The objectives were realized by emphasizing the teamwork of the system's doctors and showing their actual faces and voices. PMID:15739860

  14. Redesigning healthcare systems to meet the health challenges associated with climate change in the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Phua, Kai-Lit

    2015-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, climate change is emerging as a significant threat to the health and well-being of the public through links to the following: extreme weather events, sea level rise, temperature-related illnesses, air pollution patterns, water security, food security, vector-borne infectious diseases, and mental health effects (as a result of extreme weather events and climate change-induced population displacement). This article discusses how national healthcare systems can be redesigned through changes in its components such as human resources, facilities and technology, health information system, and health policy to meet these challenges. PMID:26150369

  15. Redesigning healthcare systems to meet the health challenges associated with climate change in the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Phua, Kai-Lit

    2015-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, climate change is emerging as a significant threat to the health and well-being of the public through links to the following: extreme weather events, sea level rise, temperature-related illnesses, air pollution patterns, water security, food security, vector-borne infectious diseases, and mental health effects (as a result of extreme weather events and climate change-induced population displacement). This article discusses how national healthcare systems can be redesigned through changes in its components such as human resources, facilities and technology, health information system, and health policy to meet these challenges.

  16. Strengthening preventive care programs: a permanent challenge for healthcare systems; lessons from PREVENIMSS México

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    challenges that this healthcare system faces. The unsolved problems such as anemia, and the emerging ones such as overweight, obesity, among others, point out the need to strength preventive care through designing and implementing innovative programs aimed to attain effective coverage for those conditions in which prevention obtains substandard results. PMID:20626913

  17. The assimilation of Western medicine into a semi-nomadic healthcare system: a case study of the Indigenous Aeta Magbukún, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Balilla, Vincent S; McHenry, Julia Anwar; McHenry, Mark P; Parkinson, Riva Marris; Banal, Danilo T

    2014-09-01

    The Aeta Magbukún are a genetically and culturally distinct group of Indigenous people living in an isolated mountain forest in the municipality of Mariveles, in the province of Bataan, Philippines. This research aims to document some healthcare related information of the people, inform future decisions regarding maximising benefits of modern conveniences, and minimise negative consequences on their culture and health. Using an ethnographic approach, data were collated from a community health survey in combination with field notes from three of the co-authors while living with the Aetas. Despite major implications from rapid ecological and cultural changes, traditional ethnomedical systems continue to be revered as an essential healing practice, although they are increasingly used in conjunction with Western medicines and healthcare. At the Aeta village level, the changing socio-political influence among the kagun (traditional healer), the NGOs, and the Municipal Council in terms of healthcare provision is pivotal, as the kagun has chosen to integrate the Western medicine and healthcare services into their traditional healthcare system, without simply rejecting them. In turn, Western-style healthcare interventions have the potential to be carefully managed to integrate traditional Aeta Magbukún socio-political structures, healthcare, and cultural continuity. The cumulative influence of numerous other novel aspects to Aeta life (e.g., permanent housing, a highway through the village, literacy, cash economies, energy-dense foods, communication/entertainment devices, etc.) will place additional pressure on the traditional ethnomedical healthcare system. However, enabling the continuity of access to appropriate healthcare knowledge (both the transfer of knowledge from Western medicine to the Aeta Magbukún, and vice versa) can assist many cultures through the inherent stresses of increasingly rapid acculturation and development.

  18. The assimilation of Western medicine into a semi-nomadic healthcare system: a case study of the Indigenous Aeta Magbukún, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Balilla, Vincent S; McHenry, Julia Anwar; McHenry, Mark P; Parkinson, Riva Marris; Banal, Danilo T

    2014-09-01

    The Aeta Magbukún are a genetically and culturally distinct group of Indigenous people living in an isolated mountain forest in the municipality of Mariveles, in the province of Bataan, Philippines. This research aims to document some healthcare related information of the people, inform future decisions regarding maximising benefits of modern conveniences, and minimise negative consequences on their culture and health. Using an ethnographic approach, data were collated from a community health survey in combination with field notes from three of the co-authors while living with the Aetas. Despite major implications from rapid ecological and cultural changes, traditional ethnomedical systems continue to be revered as an essential healing practice, although they are increasingly used in conjunction with Western medicines and healthcare. At the Aeta village level, the changing socio-political influence among the kagun (traditional healer), the NGOs, and the Municipal Council in terms of healthcare provision is pivotal, as the kagun has chosen to integrate the Western medicine and healthcare services into their traditional healthcare system, without simply rejecting them. In turn, Western-style healthcare interventions have the potential to be carefully managed to integrate traditional Aeta Magbukún socio-political structures, healthcare, and cultural continuity. The cumulative influence of numerous other novel aspects to Aeta life (e.g., permanent housing, a highway through the village, literacy, cash economies, energy-dense foods, communication/entertainment devices, etc.) will place additional pressure on the traditional ethnomedical healthcare system. However, enabling the continuity of access to appropriate healthcare knowledge (both the transfer of knowledge from Western medicine to the Aeta Magbukún, and vice versa) can assist many cultures through the inherent stresses of increasingly rapid acculturation and development. PMID:24643860

  19. Responsibilising managers and clinicians, neglecting system health? What kind of healthcare leadership development do we want?

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Graham P.

    2015-01-01

    Responding to Ruth McDonald’s editorial on the rise of leadership and leadership development programmes in healthcare, this paper offers three arguments. Firstly, care is needed in evaluating impact of leadership development, since achievement of organisational goals is not necessarily an appropriate measure of good leadership. Secondly, the proliferation of styles of leadership might be understood in part as a means of retaining control over public services while distributing responsibility for their success and failure. Thirdly, it makes a plea for the continued utility of good administrative skills for clinicians and managers, which are likely to become all-the-more important given recent developments in healthcare policy and governance. PMID:25584352

  20. Market segmentation for multiple option healthcare delivery systems--an application of cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Jarboe, G R; Gates, R H; McDaniel, C D

    1990-01-01

    Healthcare providers of multiple option plans may be confronted with special market segmentation problems. This study demonstrates how cluster analysis may be used for discovering distinct patterns of preference for multiple option plans. The availability of metric, as opposed to categorical or ordinal, data provides the ability to use sophisticated analysis techniques which may be superior to frequency distributions and cross-tabulations in revealing preference patterns.

  1. Healthcare system resiliency: The case for taking disaster plans further--Part 1.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Michael L; Bone, Eric A; Hiller, Michael

    To establish true healthcare resiliency, and to better position healthcare organisations to provide effective response, continuity, resumption and recovery of fundamental services and operations during serious incidents and disasters, the disaster planning process must evolve into an integrated approach of four contingency planning disciplines that holistically examine the end-to-end, all-hazard response continuum. This process also needs to incorporate and scale multifarious organisational levels and, when required, the health sector. This paper is the first component of two independent, but related, pieces. It will examine the typical state of disaster preparedness and plans in healthcare, examine the worth and value of honing disaster plans, and will introduce two recommended contingency planning disciplines: enterprise risk management and emergency response planning. For each discipline, a case will be made for its inclusion into the overall disaster planning process, including examination of background information, benefits, how it improves disaster planning, and other resources helpful to the reader. The second paper, in afuture issue of the Journal of Business Continuity & Emergency Planning, will introduce business continuity management--including IT disaster recovery--and crisis communications as the third and fourth contingency planning disciplines needed for a fully integrated approach. The opinions expressed in this paper are those of the authors and may not be entirely those of the organisation. PMID:26591930

  2. A Low-Power Bio-Potential Acquisition System with Flexible PDMS Dry Electrodes for Portable Ubiquitous Healthcare Applications

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Yuan; Chang, Chia-Lin; Chang, Chih-Wei; Lai, Shin-Chi; Chien, Tsung-Fu; Huang, Hong-Yi; Chiou, Jin-Chern; Luo, Ching-Hsing

    2013-01-01

    This work describes a bio-potential acquisition system for portable ubiquitous healthcare applications using flexible polydimethylsiloxane dry electrodes (FPDEs) and a low-power recording circuit. This novel FPDE used Au as the skin contact layer, which was made using a CO2 laser and replica method technology. The FPDE was revised from a commercial bio-potential electrode with a conductive snap using dry electrodes rather than wet electrodes that proposed reliable and robust attachment for the purpose of measurement, and attaching velcro made it wearable on the forearm for bio-potential applications. Furthermore, this study proposes a recording device to store bio-potential signal data and provides portability and low-power consumption for the proposed acquisition system. To acquire differential bio-potentials, such as electrocardiogram (ECG) signals, the proposed recording device includes a low-power front-end acquisition chip fabricated using a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process, a commercial microcontroller (MSP430F149), and a secure digital (SD) card for portable healthcare applications. The proposed system can obtain ECG signals efficiently and are comfortable to the skin. The power consumption of the system is about 85 mW for continuous working over a 3 day period with two AA batteries. It can also be used as a compact Holter ECG system. PMID:23459390

  3. Healthcare Software Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jason G.; Pauley, Keith A.

    2006-01-01

    Software assurance is a rigorous, lifecycle phase-independent set of activities which ensure completeness, safety, and reliability of software processes and products. This is accomplished by guaranteeing conformance to all requirements, standards, procedures, and regulations. These assurance processes are even more important when coupled with healthcare software systems, embedded software in medical instrumentation, and other healthcare-oriented life-critical systems. The current Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory requirements and guidance documentation do not address certain aspects of complete software assurance activities. In addition, the FDA’s software oversight processes require enhancement to include increasingly complex healthcare systems such as Hospital Information Systems (HIS). The importance of complete software assurance is introduced, current regulatory requirements and guidance discussed, and the necessity for enhancements to the current processes shall be highlighted. PMID:17238324

  4. Changes in Perceptions and Attitudes of Healthcare Profession Students Pre and Post Academic Course Experience of Team-Based 'Care for the Critically Ill'.

    PubMed

    Clark, Karen; Congdon, Heather Brennan; Macmillan, Kelley; Gonzales, Jeffrey P; Guerra, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the development and outcomes of an interprofessional course "Interprofessional Care of the Critically Ill," involving pharmacy, nursing, social work, and respiratory therapy students from two universities. An institutional review board-approved survey was adapted from the TeamSTEPPS surveys investigating clinical practitioners' attitudes and perceptions regarding teamwork, collaboration, and interprofessional engagement. Items applicable to an academic setting were revised and resulted in a 28-statement survey and comments section. Participation was voluntary, and students were requested to participate in the survey on the first and last day of class. There was a significant increase in the perceived understanding of scope of practice of other disciplines from the beginning to end of class (24.4 to 60%, strongly agreed/agreed). Furthermore, students gained appreciation for the complexities associated with working in an interprofessional team with a significant increase in the percent agreeing and strongly agreeing that working on an interdisciplinary team is challenging (66.7 to 81%). Students and faculty gained a greater understanding and appreciation for other disciplines represented in the class and are therefore better prepared to engage in health care teams upon graduation. IPE should be embedded in curriculums and not just an add-on. PMID:26194965

  5. The Effects of a Virtual Tutee System on Academic Reading Engagement in a College Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Seung Won; Kim, ChanMin

    2016-01-01

    Poor student engagement with academic readings has been frequently reported in college classrooms. As an effort to improve college students' reading engagement, researchers have developed a virtual environment in which students take on the role of tutor and teach a virtual tutee, the virtual tutee system (VTS). This research examined the…

  6. Academic Staff Views of Quality Systems for Teaching and Learning: A Hong Kong Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John; Saram, Don Darshi De

    2005-01-01

    The "Teaching and Learning Quality Process Review" (TLQPR) recently completed in Hong Kong had an emphasis on education quality work. This paper analyses how, from the perspective of academic staff in one university in Hong Kong, the good intentions embedded in that idea are enhanced or subverted by the broader ?quality system setting in which…

  7. Computerized Assessment System for Academic Satisfaction (ASAS) for First-Year University Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medrano, Leonardo Adrian; Liporace, Mercedes Fernandez; Perez, Edgardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computerized tests have become one of the most widely used and efficient educational assessment methods. Increasing efforts to generate computerized assessment systems to identify students at risk for drop out have been recently noted. An important variable influencing student retention is academic satisfaction. Accordingly, the…

  8. An Internet-based Expert System for Selecting an Academic Major: www.MyMajors.com.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grupe, Fritz H.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an Internet-based expert system found at http://www.MyMajors.com which provides advice to high school students or college freshmen who are seeking assistance in selecting a potential major by emulating a professional academic advisor. Highlights include computer-assisted advisement programs; knowledge acquisition; evaluating expert…

  9. Measure for Measure: How Proficiency-Based Accountability Systems Affect Inequality in Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Jennifer; Sohn, Heeju

    2014-01-01

    How do proficiency-based accountability systems affect inequality in academic achievement? This article reconciles mixed findings in the literature by demonstrating that three factors jointly determine accountability's impact. First, by analyzing student-level data from a large urban school district, we find that when educators face…

  10. Geographic Information Systems Librarianship: Suggestions for Entry-Level Academic Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martindale, Jaime

    2004-01-01

    Future Geographic Information Systems (GIS) librarians face a number of challenges that other Library and Information Studies (LIS) graduates may not when preparing for a career in academic librarianship. This article discusses these challenges and offers suggestions to help entry-level GIS librarians begin successful and rewarding careers.

  11. Using Systemic Functional Linguistics in Academic Writing Development: An Example from Film Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, James P.

    2012-01-01

    On film studies courses, students are asked to treat as objects of study the same films which they may more commonly experience as entertainment. To explore the role of academic writing in this, an action research project was carried out on a university film studies course using a systemic functional linguistics approach. This paper presents a key…

  12. A Complex Systems Framework for Research on Leadership and Organizational Dynamics in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilstrap, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a historiographical analysis of major leadership and organizational development theories that have shaped our thinking about how we lead and administrate academic libraries. Drawing from behavioral, cognitive, systems, and complexity theories, this article discusses major theorists and research studies appearing over the past…

  13. A Systemic Functional Contribution to Planning Academic Genre Teaching in a Bilingual Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Commencing study through a foreign language in senior secondary school brings huge challenges because of the cognitive-linguistic demands of academic subjects. This paper argues for the need to blend sociocultural and systemic functional linguistic (SFL) perspectives to address this enormous task. Firstly, readers' attention is drawn to the less…

  14. After the Fall: The Use of Surplus Capacity in an Academic Library Automation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, A. J.

    The possible uses of excess central processing unit capacity in an integrated academic library automation system discussed in this draft proposal include (1) in-house services such as word processing, electronic mail, management decision support using PERT/CPM techniques, and control of physical plant operation; (2) public services such as the…

  15. Facilitating Metacognitive Processes of Academic Genre-Based Writing Using an Online Writing System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Hui-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have investigated how metacognitive processes foster the application of genre knowledge to students' academic writing. This is largely due to its internal and unobservable characteristics. To bridge this gap, an online writing system based on metacognition, involving the stages of planning, monitoring, evaluating, and revising, was…

  16. The Genealogy Project: Tracing Academic Roots in the History and Systems Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, C. James; Dingus, Michelle; Petterson, Stephanie

    2002-01-01

    Describes an assignment in a history and systems of psychology course where students traced the genealogy of psychologists in terms of their academic roots. Explains that the students learned about bibliographic resources during the project. Discusses assignment outcomes as discovered through a student survey. (CMK)

  17. Virtual Tutee System: A Potential Tool for Enhancing Academic Reading Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, SeungWon; Kim, ChanMin

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on evaluation studies of the Virtual Tutee System (VTS) designed to enhance students' engagement in academic reading. The VTS is a web-based peer-tutoring environment in which students teach a virtual tutee about the content in course readings that students have been assigned to learn. With the VTS, students interact with…

  18. Visual query tool for finding patient cohorts from a clinical data warehouse of the partners HealthCare system

    PubMed

    Murphy; Barnett; Chueh

    2000-01-01

    The patient base of the Partners HealthCare System in Boston exceeds 1.8 million. Many of these patients are desirable for participation in research studies. To facilitate their discovery, we developed a data warehouse to contain clinical characteristics of these patients. The data warehouse contains diagnosis and procedures from administrative databases. The patients are indexed across institutions and their demographics provided by an Enterprise Master Patient Indexing service. Characteristics of the diagnoses and procedures such as associated providers, dates of service, inpatient/outpatient status, and other visit-related characteristics are also fed from the administrative systems. The targeted users of this system are research clinician s interested in finding patient cohorts for research studies. Their data requirements were analyzed and have been reported elsewhere. We did not expect the clinicians to become expert users of the system. Tools for querying healthcare data have traditionally been text based, although graphical interfaces have been pursued. In order to support the simple drag and drop visual model, as well as the identification and distribution of the patient data, a three-tier software architecture was developed. The user interface was developed in Visual Basic and distributed as an ActiveX object embedded in an HTML page. The middle layer was developed in Java and Microsoft COM. The queries are represented throughout their lifetime as XML objects, and the Microsoft SQL7 database is queried and managed in standard SQL.

  19. Insights in Public Health: All About the Insurance: The US health-Care System Through a Foreigner's Eyes.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Ruth

    2016-09-01

    Hawai'i had high insurance coverage rates even before the Affordable Health Care Act and continues to have a high percentage of the population with health insurance today. However, high insurance rates can disguise wide variation in what is covered and what it costs. In this essay, an Australian Masters in Public Health student from the University of Hawai'i considers the strengths and weaknesses of insurance coverage in the US health-care system when her friend "Peter" becomes seriously ill. PMID:27688955

  20. Per Pupil Expenditures and Academic Achievement in Georgia School Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Beurden, Krista

    2011-01-01

    Student achievement and public school funding are national concerns. Federal, state, and local funding vary across the nation and within systems in each state. In the past several years, Georgia school systems have faced austerity cuts by the state legislature and governor, and function with less money while trying to improve student achievement…

  1. [Knowledge management and healthcare organizations].

    PubMed

    Favaretti, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    The present scenario is characterized by a high "environmental turbulence". Healthcare professionals and organizations must increase their knowledge, skills and attitudes for choosing wisely. Healthcare organizations are complex adaptive systems which should use integrated governance systems: knowledge management should be a strategic goal. These organizations should become learning organizations: they should build and renovate their knowledge in a systematic, explicit and definite way.

  2. The utilization of mobile devices for telemedicine services in a South African public healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, André; Van Dyk, Liezl

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an understanding in the use of mobile devices in administering telemedicine services within the public health care sector of South Africa. An online questionnaire was developed and distributed amongst medical officers, specialists, students and medical staff of one of the health districts of South Africa. This paper describes the design of the questionnaire as well as the most significant outcomes. Results are presented in terms of reasons why healthcare workers use mobile devices, as well as perceptions in terms of transmission security and quality of transmitted information. PMID:25365668

  3. E-prescription as a tool for improving services and the financial viability of healthcare systems: the case of the Greek national e-prescription system.

    PubMed

    Pangalos, G; Sfyroeras, V; Pagkalos, I

    2014-01-01

    E-prescription systems can help improve patient service, safety and quality of care. They can also help achieve better compliance for the patients and better alignment with the guidelines for the practitioners. The recently implemented national e-prescription system in Greece already covers approximately 85% of all prescriptions prescribed in Greece today (approximately 5.5 million per month). The system has not only contributed already in significant changes towards improving services and better monitoring and planning of public health, but also substantially helped to contain unnecessary expenditure related to medication use and improve transparency and administrative control. Such issues have gained increasing importance not only for Greece but also for many other national healthcare systems that have to cope with the continuous rise of medication expenditure. Our implementation has, therefore, shown that besides their importance for improving services, national e-prescription systems can also provide a valuable tool for better utilisation of resources and for containing unnecessary healthcare costs, thus contributing to the improvement of the financial stability and viability of the overall healthcare system.

  4. E-prescription as a tool for improving services and the financial viability of healthcare systems: the case of the Greek national e-prescription system.

    PubMed

    Pangalos, G; Sfyroeras, V; Pagkalos, I

    2014-01-01

    E-prescription systems can help improve patient service, safety and quality of care. They can also help achieve better compliance for the patients and better alignment with the guidelines for the practitioners. The recently implemented national e-prescription system in Greece already covers approximately 85% of all prescriptions prescribed in Greece today (approximately 5.5 million per month). The system has not only contributed already in significant changes towards improving services and better monitoring and planning of public health, but also substantially helped to contain unnecessary expenditure related to medication use and improve transparency and administrative control. Such issues have gained increasing importance not only for Greece but also for many other national healthcare systems that have to cope with the continuous rise of medication expenditure. Our implementation has, therefore, shown that besides their importance for improving services, national e-prescription systems can also provide a valuable tool for better utilisation of resources and for containing unnecessary healthcare costs, thus contributing to the improvement of the financial stability and viability of the overall healthcare system. PMID:25161106

  5. Healthcare fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Kauk, Justin; Hill, Austin D; Althausen, Peter L

    2014-07-01

    In order for a trauma surgeon to have an intelligent discussion with hospital administrators, healthcare plans, policymakers, or any other physicians, a basic understanding of the fundamentals of healthcare is paramount. It is truly shocking how many surgeons are unable to describe the difference between Medicare and Medicaid or describe how hospitals and physicians get paid. These topics may seem burdensome but they are vital to all business decision making in the healthcare field. The following chapter provides further insight about what we call "the basics" of providing medical care today. Most of the topics presented can be applied to all specialties of medicine. It is broken down into 5 sections. The first section is a brief overview of government programs, their influence on care delivery and reimbursement, and past and future legislation. Section 2 focuses on the compliance, care provision, and privacy statutes that regulate physicians who care for Medicare/Medicaid patient populations. With a better understanding of these obligations, section 3 discusses avenues by which physicians can stay informed of current and pending health policy and provides ways that they can become involved in shaping future legislation. The fourth section changes gears slightly by explaining how the concepts of trade restraint, libel, antitrust legislation, and indemnity relate to physician practice. The fifth, and final, section ties all of components together by describing how physician-hospital alignment can be mutually beneficial in providing patient care under current healthcare policy legislation.

  6. Testing the WHO responsiveness concept in the Iranian mental healthcare system: a qualitative study of service users

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Individuals' experience of interacting with the healthcare system has significant impact on their overall health and well-being. To relate patients' experiences to a common set of standards, the World Health Organization (WHO) developed the concept of health system responsiveness. This study aimed to assess if the WHO responsiveness concept reflected the non-medical expectations of mental healthcare users in Teheran. Methods In this qualitative study, four mixed focus group discussions were formed, comprising 53 mental health service users in Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Content analysis was performed for data analysis. Responses were examined in relation to the eight domains of the WHO's responsiveness model. Results There were many commonalities between the findings of this study and the eight domains of the WHO responsiveness model, although some variations were found. Effective care was a new domain generated from our findings. In addition, the domain of prompt attention was included in two new labelled domains: attention and access to care. Participants could not differentiate autonomy from choice of healthcare provider, believing that free choice is part of autonomy. Therefore these domains were unified under the name of autonomy. The domains of quality of basic amenities, access to social support, dignity and confidentiality were considered to be important for the responsiveness concept. Some differences regarding how these domains should be defined were observed, however. Conclusions The results showed that the concept of responsiveness developed by the WHO is applicable to mental health services in Iran. These findings might help policy-makers' better understanding of what is useful for the improvement of mental health services. PMID:22115499

  7. A comprehensive study of channel estimation for WBAN-based healthcare systems: feasibility of using multiband UWB.

    PubMed

    Islam, S M Riazul; Kwak, Kyung Sup

    2012-06-01

    Wireless personal area network (WPAN) is an emerging in wireless technology for short range indoor and outdoor communication applications. A more specific category of WPAN is the wireless body area network (WBAN) used for health monitoring. On the other hand, multiband orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MB-OFDM) ultra-wideband (UWB) comes with a number of desirable features at the physical layer for wireless communications, for example, very high data rate. One big challenge in adoption of multiband UWB in WBAN is the fact that channel estimation becomes difficult under the constraint of extremely low transmission power. Moreover, the heterogeneous environment of WBAN causes a dense multipath wireless channel. Therefore, effective channel estimation is required in the receiver of WBAN-based healthcare system that uses multiband UWB. In this paper, we first outline the MB-OFDM UWB system. Then, we present an overview of channel estimation techniques proposed/investigated for multiband UWB communications with emphasis on their strengths and weaknesses. Useful suggestions are given to overcome the weaknesses so that these methods can be particularly useful for WBAN channels. Also, we analyze the comparative performances of the techniques using computer simulation in order to find the energy-efficient channel estimation methods for WBAN-based healthcare systems.

  8. National Initiatives to Improve Healthcare Outcomes: A Comparative Study of Health Delivery Systems in Slovakia and the United States.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Robert; Caplanova, Anetta; Novak, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    While the United States and Slovakia offer different healthcare delivery systems, each country faces the same challenges of improving the health status of their populations. The authors explore the impact of their respective systems on the health of their populations and compare the health outcomes of both nations. They point out that socioeconomic factors play a far more important role in determining population health outcomes than do the structures of the systems surrounding the care delivery. The authors illustrate this finding through a comparison of the poverty and education levels of a selected minority group from each country in relation to the health outcomes for each population group. The comparison reveals that education is a more influential determinant in a population's health outcomes, than the improved access to care offered by a universal system. PMID:26684681

  9. Beyond feedback control: the interactive use of performance management systems. Implications for process innovation in Italian healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Demartini, Chiara; Mella, Piero

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows how the use of performance management systems affects managers' perception of satisfaction, the effectiveness of the control system and the performance related to process innovation. An exploratory empirical research has been conducted on 85 managers operating in Italian healthcare organizations. Empirical findings put forward that the interactive--as opposed to diagnostic--use of performance management systems enhances managerial satisfaction with the control system and managerial perception of effectiveness. The present study then showed that it is not the control itself that is an obstacle to innovation in organizations in general (and in health organizations in particular) but the diagnostic use of the control mechanisms, which impedes the interaction between the control personnel and those subject to the control. Finally, this paper addresses managerial implications and further research avenues.

  10. An Academic Multihealth System PGY2 Pediatric Pharmacy Residency Program.

    PubMed

    Klosterman, Theresa; Meyers, Rachel; Siu, Anita; Shah, Pooja; Kimler, Katelin; Sturgill, Marc; Robinson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel multihealth system pediatric pharmacy residency program through the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University. Pediatric clinical pharmacy is a growing field that has seen an increase in demand for practitioners. Practice sites include freestanding children's hospitals, children's hospitals within adult hospitals, and pediatric units within adult hospitals. To accommodate a residency program in a region with no freestanding children's hospital, the pediatric faculty members at the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University developed a multihealth system postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pediatric pharmacy residency program with 6 pediatric faculty members functioning as preceptors at their 5 respective practice sites. The multihealth system setup of the program provides the resident exposure to a multitude of patient populations, pediatric specialties, and pediatric pharmacy practices. In addition, the affiliation with Rutgers University allows an emphasis on academia with opportunities for the resident to lecture in small and large classrooms, facilitate discussion periods, assist with clinical laboratory classes, and precept pharmacy students. The resident has the unique opportunity to develop a research project with a large and diverse patient population owing to the multihealth system rotation sites. A multihealth system PGY2 residency in pediatric pharmacy provides the resident a well-rounded experience in pediatric clinical practice, research, and academia that will enhance the resident's ability to build his or her own pediatric pharmacy practice. PMID:26766936

  11. Physician user satisfaction with an electronic medical records system in primary healthcare centres in Al Ain: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Al Alawi, Shamma; Al Dhaheri, Aysha; Al Baloushi, Durra; Al Dhaheri, Mouza; Prinsloo, Engela A M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore physician satisfaction with an electronic medical records (EMR) system, to identify and explore the main limitations of the system and finally to submit recommendations to address these limitations. Design A descriptive qualitative study that entailed three focus group interviews was performed among physicians using open-ended questions. The interviews were audiotaped, documented and transcribed verbatim. The themes were explored and analysed in different categories. Setting The study was conducted in primary healthcare centres (PHC) in Al Ain, United Arab Emirates (UAE). Participants A total of 23 physicians, all using the same EMR system, attended one of three focus groups held in PHC in Al Ain Medical District. Each focus group consisted of 7–9 physicians working in PHC as family medicine specialists, residents or general practitioners. Primary outcome measure Physician satisfaction with the EMR system. Results Key themes emerged and were categorised as physician-dependent, patient-related and system-related factors. In general, physicians were satisfied with the EMR system in spite of initial difficulties with implementation. Most participants identified that the long time required to do the documentation affected their practice and patient communication. Many physicians expressed satisfaction with the orders and results of laboratory and radiology functions and they emphasised that this was the strongest point in the EMR. They were also satisfied with the electronic prescription function, stating that it reduced errors and saved time. Conclusions Physicians are satisfied with the EMR and have a positive perception regarding the application of the system. Several themes emerged during this study that need to be considered to enhance the EMR system. Further studies need to be conducted among other healthcare practitioners and patients to explore their attitude and perception about the EMR. PMID:25377010

  12. Governance of Academic Planning in Public Higher Education Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmening, Todd R.

    2013-01-01

    The recent interest in harnessing the collective capacity of public institutions of higher education is challenging long-held beliefs about system coordination. Constricted state resources, globalization, market forces, and new technologies suggest that new governance structures are not only a necessity but an opportunity to better connect system…

  13. Systems and Cascades in Cognitive Development and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Marc H.; Hahn, Chun-Shin; Wolke, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    A large-scale ("N" = 552) controlled multivariate prospective 14-year longitudinal study of a developmental cascade embedded in a developmental system showed that information-processing efficiency in infancy (4 months), general mental development in toddlerhood (18 months), behavior difficulties in early childhood (36 months), psychometric…

  14. PAIR UP for primary care excellence: perspectives from a primary healthcare provider in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Singapore is facing an increasing noncommunicable disease burden due to its ageing population. Singapore's primary healthcare services, provided by both polyclinic physicians and private general practitioners, are available to the public at differential fees for service. The resultant disproportionate patient loads lead to dissatisfaction for both healthcare providers and consumers. This article describes the 'PAIR UP' approach as a potential endeavour to facilitate primary care physicians (PCPs) in public and private sectors to collaborate to deliver enhanced primary care in Singapore. PAIR UP is an acronym referring to Policy, Academic development, Integration of healthcare information system, Research in primary care, Utility and safety evaluation, and Practice transformation. The current healthcare landscape is favourable to test out this multipronged approach. PCPs in both sectors can ride on it and work together synergistically to provide quality primary care in Singapore.

  15. Better care for the dying. Hawaii healthcare system develops a manual for end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Kalua, P M; Tan, S Y; Bacon, J G

    1999-01-01

    In early 1996, as it became clear that Americans were becoming increasingly concerned about end-of-life care, the leaders of St. Francis Healthcare System (SFHS), Honolulu, convened a meeting at which local people--community and parish representatives as well as healthcare professionals--discussed the matter. The meeting's participants identified 10 issues as essential in end-of-life care: decision making, pain management and comfort care, pastoral and spiritual care, psychosocial care, hospice and home care, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, futility, withholding and withdrawing treatment, artificial nutrition and hydration, physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia. The participants then divided themselves into 10 teams, each of which spent six months studying one of the identified essential issues. In each case, the team reviewed the relevant SFHS policies and procedures and compared them with national standards. The team also interviewed staff members about the policies and procedures, comparing the written versions with actual practices. Each team then wrote a chapter on its assigned issue, after which a core committee wove the chapters into an end-of-life care manual for SFHS. The manual was published in June 1997. The system's leaders currently use the manual to educate staff members in good end-of-life care. PMID:10351504

  16. Better care for the dying. Hawaii healthcare system develops a manual for end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Kalua, P M; Tan, S Y; Bacon, J G

    1999-01-01

    In early 1996, as it became clear that Americans were becoming increasingly concerned about end-of-life care, the leaders of St. Francis Healthcare System (SFHS), Honolulu, convened a meeting at which local people--community and parish representatives as well as healthcare professionals--discussed the matter. The meeting's participants identified 10 issues as essential in end-of-life care: decision making, pain management and comfort care, pastoral and spiritual care, psychosocial care, hospice and home care, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, futility, withholding and withdrawing treatment, artificial nutrition and hydration, physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia. The participants then divided themselves into 10 teams, each of which spent six months studying one of the identified essential issues. In each case, the team reviewed the relevant SFHS policies and procedures and compared them with national standards. The team also interviewed staff members about the policies and procedures, comparing the written versions with actual practices. Each team then wrote a chapter on its assigned issue, after which a core committee wove the chapters into an end-of-life care manual for SFHS. The manual was published in June 1997. The system's leaders currently use the manual to educate staff members in good end-of-life care.

  17. Creating the Exceptional Patient Experience in One Academic Health System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian S; Miller, Thomas; Daniels, Chrissy; Paine, Marilynn; Gresh, Brian; Betz, A Lorris

    2016-03-01

    Whether patient satisfaction scores can act as a catalyst for improving health care is highly debated. Some argue that pursuing patient satisfaction is overemphasized and potentially at odds with providing good care because it leads providers to overtest and overtreat patients and to bend to unreasonable patient demands, all to improve their ratings. Others cite studies showing that high patient satisfaction scores correlate with improved health outcomes. Ideally, assessing patient satisfaction metrics will encourage empathy, communication, trust, and shared decision making in the health care delivery process. From the patient's perspective, sharing such metrics motivates physicians to provide patient-centered care and meets their need for easily accessible information about their providers. In this article, the authors describe a seven-year initiative, which began in 2008, to change the culture of the University of Utah Health Care system to deliver a consistently exceptional patient experience. Five factors affected the health system's ability to provide such care: (1) a lack of good decision-making processes, (2) a lack of accountability, (3) the wrong attitude, (4) a lack of patient focus, and (5) mission conflict. Working groups designed initiatives at all levels of the health system to address these issues. What began as a patient satisfaction initiative evolved into a model for physician engagement, values-based employment practices, enhanced professionalism and communication, reduced variability in performance, and improved alignment of the mission and vision across hospital and faculty group practice teams. PMID:26606723

  18. Creating the Exceptional Patient Experience in One Academic Health System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian S; Miller, Thomas; Daniels, Chrissy; Paine, Marilynn; Gresh, Brian; Betz, A Lorris

    2016-03-01

    Whether patient satisfaction scores can act as a catalyst for improving health care is highly debated. Some argue that pursuing patient satisfaction is overemphasized and potentially at odds with providing good care because it leads providers to overtest and overtreat patients and to bend to unreasonable patient demands, all to improve their ratings. Others cite studies showing that high patient satisfaction scores correlate with improved health outcomes. Ideally, assessing patient satisfaction metrics will encourage empathy, communication, trust, and shared decision making in the health care delivery process. From the patient's perspective, sharing such metrics motivates physicians to provide patient-centered care and meets their need for easily accessible information about their providers. In this article, the authors describe a seven-year initiative, which began in 2008, to change the culture of the University of Utah Health Care system to deliver a consistently exceptional patient experience. Five factors affected the health system's ability to provide such care: (1) a lack of good decision-making processes, (2) a lack of accountability, (3) the wrong attitude, (4) a lack of patient focus, and (5) mission conflict. Working groups designed initiatives at all levels of the health system to address these issues. What began as a patient satisfaction initiative evolved into a model for physician engagement, values-based employment practices, enhanced professionalism and communication, reduced variability in performance, and improved alignment of the mission and vision across hospital and faculty group practice teams.

  19. Ethical issues in healthcare financing.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, S R; Paul, T J

    2011-07-01

    The four goals of good healthcare are to relieve symptoms, cure disease, prolong life and improve quality of life. Access to healthcare has been a perpetual challenge to healthcare providers who must take into account important factors such as equity, efficiency and effectiveness in designing healthcare systems to meet the four goals of good healthcare. The underlying philosophy may designate health as being a basic human right, an investment, a commodity to be bought and sold, a political demand or an expenditure. The design, policies and operational arrangements will usually reflect which of the above philosophies underpin the healthcare system, and consequently, access. Mechanisms for funding include fee-for-service, cost sharing (insurance, either private or government sponsored) free-of-fee at point of delivery (payments being made through general taxes, health levies, etc) or cost-recovery. For each of these methods of financial access to healthcare services, there are ethical issues which can compromise the four principles of ethical practices in healthcare, viz beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice. In times of economic recession, providing adequate healthcare will require governments, with support from external agencies, to focus on poverty reduction strategies through provision of preventive services such as immunization and nutrition, delivered at primary care facilities. To maximize the effect of such policies, it will be necessary to integrate policies to fashion an intersectoral approach.

  20. Medical knowledge packages and their integration into health-care information systems and the World Wide Web.

    PubMed

    Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Rappelsberger, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Software-based medical knowledge packages (MKPs) are packages of highly structured medical knowledge that can be integrated into various health-care information systems or the World Wide Web. They have been established to provide different forms of clinical decision support such as textual interpretation of combinations of laboratory rest results, generating diagnostic hypotheses as well as confirmed and excluded diagnoses to support differential diagnosis in internal medicine, or for early identification and automatic monitoring of hospital-acquired infections. Technically, an MKP may consist of a number of inter-connected Arden Medical Logic Modules. Several MKPs have been integrated thus far into hospital, laboratory, and departmental information systems. This has resulted in useful and widely accepted software-based clinical decision support for the benefit of the patient, the physician, and the organization funding the health care system.