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Sample records for academic hospital patients

  1. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  2. Trends in Clinically Significant Pain Prevalence Among Hospitalized Cancer Patients at an Academic Hospital in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei-Yun; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Shang-Liang; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Chun-Sung; Wang, Kwua-Yun; Liang, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clinically significant pain (CSP) is one of the most common complaints among cancer patients during repeated hospitalizations, and the prevalence ranges from 24% to 86%. This study aimed to characterize the trends in CSP among cancer patients and examine the differences in the prevalence of CSP across repeated hospitalizations. A hospital-based, retrospective cohort study was conducted at an academic hospital. Patient-reported pain intensity was assessed and recorded in a nursing information system. We examined the differences in the prevalence of worst pain intensity (WPI) and last evaluated pain intensity (LPI) of ≥4 or ≥7 points among cancer inpatients from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. Linear mixed models were used to determine the significant difference in the WPI and LPI (≥4 or ≥7 points) at each hospitalization. We examined 88,133 pain scores from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization among cancer patients. The prevalence of the 4 CSP types showed a trend toward a reduction from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. There was a robust reduction in the CSP prevalence from the 1st to the 5th hospitalization, except in the case of LPI ≥ 7 points. The prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points was significantly higher (0.240-fold increase) during the 1st hospitalization than during the 5th hospitalization. For the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th hospitalizations, there was a significantly higher prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points compared with the 5th hospitalization. We also observed significant reductions in the prevalence of a WPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 4th hospitalizations, an LPI ≥ 4 points during the 1st to the 3rd hospitalizations, and an LPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 2nd hospitalization. Although the prevalence of the 4 CSP types decreased gradually, it is impossible to state the causative factors on the basis of this observational and descriptive study. The next step will examine the factors that determine the CSP prevalence among

  3. Trends in Clinically Significant Pain Prevalence Among Hospitalized Cancer Patients at an Academic Hospital in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Yun; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Shang-Liang; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Chun-Sung; Wang, Kwua-Yun; Liang, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Clinically significant pain (CSP) is one of the most common complaints among cancer patients during repeated hospitalizations, and the prevalence ranges from 24% to 86%. This study aimed to characterize the trends in CSP among cancer patients and examine the differences in the prevalence of CSP across repeated hospitalizations. A hospital-based, retrospective cohort study was conducted at an academic hospital. Patient-reported pain intensity was assessed and recorded in a nursing information system. We examined the differences in the prevalence of worst pain intensity (WPI) and last evaluated pain intensity (LPI) of ≥ 4 or ≥ 7 points among cancer inpatients from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. Linear mixed models were used to determine the significant difference in the WPI and LPI (≥ 4 or ≥ 7 points) at each hospitalization. We examined 88,133 pain scores from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization among cancer patients. The prevalence of the 4 CSP types showed a trend toward a reduction from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. There was a robust reduction in the CSP prevalence from the 1st to the 5th hospitalization, except in the case of LPI ≥ 7 points. The prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points was significantly higher (0.240-fold increase) during the 1st hospitalization than during the 5th hospitalization. For the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th hospitalizations, there was a significantly higher prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points compared with the 5th hospitalization. We also observed significant reductions in the prevalence of a WPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 4th hospitalizations, an LPI ≥ 4 points during the 1st to the 3rd hospitalizations, and an LPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 2nd hospitalization. Although the prevalence of the 4 CSP types decreased gradually, it is impossible to state the causative factors on the basis of this observational and descriptive study. The next step will examine the factors that determine the CSP prevalence among cancer

  4. Hospitalized but not Admitted: Characteristics of Patients with “Observation Status” at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Ann M.; Graf, Ben; Gangireddy, Sreedevi; Hoffman, Robert; Ehlenbach, Mary; Heidke, Cynthia; Fields, Sheilah; Liegel, Barbara; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)defines observation status for hospitalized patients as a “well-defined set of specific, clinically appropriate services,” usually lasting <24 hours, and that in “only rare and exceptional cases” should last > 48 hours. Although an increasing proportion of observation care occurs on hospital wards, studies of patients with observation status have focused on the efficiency of dedicated units. Objective To describe inpatient and observation care. Design and Setting Descriptive study of all inpatient and observation stays between July 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, a 566 bed tertiary academic medical center. Participants All patients with observation or inpatient stays during the study period. Main Outcome and Measures Patient demographics, length of stay, difference between cost and reimbursement per stay, and percent of patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities. Results Of 43,853 stays, 4,578 (10.4%) were observation, with 1,141 distinct diagnosis codes. Average observation length of stay was 33.3 hours, with 44.4% of stays <24 hours, and 16.5% >48 hours. Observation care had a negative margin per stay (-$331); the inpatient margin per stay was positive (+$2,163). Adult General Medicine patients accounted for 2,404 (52.5%) of all observation stays; 25.4% of the 9,453 Adult General Medicine stays were observation. The mean length of stay for general medicine observation patients was 41.1 hours, with 32.6% of stays < 24 hours, and 26.4% >48 hours. As compared to observation patients on other clinical services, Adult General Medicine had the highest percent >65 years (40.9%), highest percent female (57.9%), highest percent discharged to skilled nursing facilities (11.6%) and the most negative margin per stay (-$1,378). Conclusions and Relevance In an academic medical center, observation status for hospitalized patients differed markedly

  5. Becoming a leader in patient satisfaction: changing the culture of care in an academic community hospital.

    PubMed

    Deitrick, Lynn M; Capuano, Terry A; Paxton, Stuart S; Stern, Glenn; Dunleavy, Jack; Miller, William L

    2006-01-01

    In the context of the current health care payer system, quality of care standards, financial incentives and consumer choice are not well aligned, yet competition for increased admissions has become a matter of survival. Satisfaction and loyalty are two constructs that are the most meaningful measures in the context of sustaining and increasing admissions. Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network (LVHHN) launched an ambitious patient satisfaction improvement initiative in 2001. LVHHN augmented existing patient service excellence programs with an ethnographic study of a representative unit. Interview and observational data were analyzed using NVivo software. These results (four distilled domains of patient experience) can then be used to identify key components of the care environment that made meaningful differences in the perceptions of patients and their satisfaction. A designated interdepartmental task force can then develop interventions from those learnings, track outcomes through the Press Ganey scores, and ultimately yield increased admissions through unit-specific process change across the hospital. Admissions for fiscal year 2001 to fiscal year 2003 increased from 5,817 to 7,795 patients. The clear value and return on this initiative for our organization included a 34% increase in patient admissions over a four-year period. Improvements in both patient satisfaction and loyalty were demonstrated by a 24% increase for the question, "Likelihood of your recommending this hospital to others" as measured by the Press Ganey Inpatient survey. This initiative demonstrates the successful application of qualitative methods in a clinical microsystem to better understand patient perceptions that determine their satisfaction with medical care. PMID:18681198

  6. Prophylactic Antibiotic Management of Surgical Patients Noted as "Allergic" to Penicillin at Two Academic Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Richard H; Jacques, Paul St; Wanderer, Jonathan P; Bombulie, Mark R; Agarwalla, Niraj

    2016-05-01

    We studied prophylactic antibiotics administered at 2 academic medical centers during a 6-year period where a cephalosporin was indicated but an "allergy" to penicillin was noted. Another drug (typically vancomycin or clindamycin) was substituted approximately 80% of the time; this occurred frequently even when symptoms unrelated to acute hypersensitivity were listed. In >50% of cases, the reaction was either omitted or vague (e.g., simply "rash"). Given the estimated 1% cross-reactivity between penicillins and cephalosporins with similar R1 side chains, many of these patients could have received either the prescribed cephalosporin or another cephalosporin with a different R1 side chain. PMID:26556109

  7. The characteristics of HIV and AIDS patients with deep vein thrombosis at Dr. George Mukhari Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mabuza, Honey L.; Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is 10 times more prevalent in HIV and AIDS patients than in the general population and is more common in patients with severe immune suppression (CD4 < 200 cells/mL). Opportunistic infections render HIV and AIDS patients susceptible to a hypercoaguable state, including lower protein S levels. Aim and setting To present the profile of HIV and AIDS patients who developed DVT in the primary care wards of Dr. George Mukhari Academic Hospital (DGMAH), Garankuwa. Methods Cross-sectional study of clinical records of admitted HIV and AIDS patients without DVT to the primary care wards, DGMAH, from 01 February 2010 to 31 January 2011. Results Two hundred and twenty-nine patients were admitted and 17 (7.4%) developed DVT. Of those that developed DVT, eight (47%) had infection with tuberculosis (TB), four (24%) had pneumonia and four (24%) had gastroenteritis. The risk of developing DVT was 8/94 (8.5%) in those with TB, 4/53 (7.5%) in those with gastroenteritis and 4/75 (5.3%) in those with pneumonia. The mean duration of stay was 14.1 days in those with DVT versus 4.0 days in those without. Conclusion HIV (and AIDS) is a hypercoaguable state and the risk of DVT is relatively high in patients with opportunistic infections. HIV and AIDS patients who are admitted to hospital with opportunistic infections may benefit from anti-thrombotic prophylaxis and further studies are needed to evaluate this. PMID:26245588

  8. Pattern of Frequent But Nontargeted Pharmacologic Thromboprophylaxis for Hospitalized Patients With Cancer at Academic Medical Centers: A Prospective, Cross-Sectional, Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Zwicker, Jeffrey I.; Rojan, Adam; Campigotto, Federico; Rehman, Nadia; Funches, Renee; Connolly, Gregory; Webster, Jonathan; Aggarwal, Anita; Mobarek, Dalia; Faselis, Charles; Neuberg, Donna; Rickles, Frederick R.; Wun, Ted; Streiff, Michael B.; Khorana, Alok A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hospitalized patients with cancer are considered to be at high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Despite strong recommendations in numerous clinical practice guidelines, retrospective studies have shown that pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis is underutilized in hospitalized patients with cancer. Patients and Methods We conducted a prospective, cross-sectional study of hospitalized patients with cancer at five academic hospitals to determine prescription rates of thromboprophylaxis and factors influencing its use during hospitalization. Results A total of 775 patients with cancer were enrolled across five academic medical centers. Two hundred forty-seven patients (31.9%) had relative contraindications to pharmacologic prophylaxis. Accounting for contraindications to anticoagulation, the overall rate of pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis was 74.2% (95% CI, 70.4% to 78.0%; 392 of 528 patients). Among the patients with cancer without contraindications for anticoagulation, individuals hospitalized with nonhematologic malignancies were significantly more likely to receive pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis than those with hematologic malignancies (odds ratio [OR], 2.34; 95% CI, 1.43 to 3.82; P = .007). Patients with cancer admitted for cancer therapy were significantly less likely to receive pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis than those admitted for other reasons (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.22 to 0.61; P < .001). Sixty-three percent of patients with cancer classified as low risk, as determined by the Padua Scoring System, received anticoagulant thromboprophylaxis. Among the 136 patients who did not receive anticoagulation, 58.8% were considered to be high risk by the Padua Scoring System. Conclusion We conclude that pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis is frequently administered to hospitalized patients with cancer but that nearly one third of patients are considered to have relative contraindications for prophylactic anticoagulation. Pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis in

  9. Leveraging on information technology to enhance patient care: a doctor's perspective of implementation in a Singapore academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Ong, B K C

    2002-11-01

    Information technology (IT) can improve the safety of patient care by minimising prescribing errors and organising patient-specific information from diverse databases. Apart from legibility, prescribing safety is enhanced as online access to databases carrying patient drug history, scientific drug information and guideline reference, and patient-specific information is available to the physician. Such specific information includes discharge summaries, surgical procedure summaries, laboratory data and investigation reports. In addition, decision support and prompts can be built in to catch errant orders. For such system implementations to work, the IT backbone must be fast, reliable and simple to use. End-user involvement and ownership of all aspects of development are key to a usable system. However, the hospital leadership must also have the will to mandate and support these development efforts. With such support, the design and implementation team can then map out a strategy where the greatest impact is achieved in both safety and enhanced information flow. The system should not be considered a finished work, but a continual work in progress. The National University Hospital's continuously updated Computerised Patient Support System (CPSS) is an example of an IT system designed to manage information and facilitate prescribing. It is a client-server based, one-point ordering and information access portal for doctors that has widespread adoption for drug prescription at outpatient and discharge medication usage areas. This system has built in safety prompts and rudimentary decision support. It has also become the choice means of accessing patient-related databases that impact on diagnoses and management. PMID:12520822

  10. Replacing the academic medical center's teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Reves, J G; Smith, Stuart; Greenberg, Ray; Johnson, Donald

    2005-11-01

    Addressing the need for updated teaching hospital facilities is one of the most significant issues that an academic medical center faces. The authors describe the process they underwent in deciding to build a new facility at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). Initial issues included whether or not the teaching hospital would continue to play a role in clinical education and whether to replace or renovate the existing facility. Once the decision to build was reached, MUSC had to choose between an on-campus or distant site for the new hospital and determine what the function of the old hospital would be. The authors examine these questions and discuss the factors involved in different stages of decision making, in order to provide the academic medicine community guidance in negotiating similar situations. Open communication within MUSC and with the greater community was a key component of the success of the enterprise to date. The authors argue that decisions concerning site, size, and focus of the hospital must be made by developing university-wide and community consensus among many different constituencies. The most important elements in the success at MUSC were having unified leadership, incorporating constituent input, engaging an external consultant, remaining unfazed by unanticipated challenges, and adhering to a realistic, aggressive timetable. The authors share their strategies for identifying and successfully managing these complex and potentially divisive aspects of building a new teaching hospital. PMID:16249296

  11. Academic health center hospitals: alternative responses to financial stress.

    PubMed

    Jones, K R; Sloate, S G

    1987-01-01

    Academic health center hospitals face challenges to their survival in an increasingly competitive, challenging, and entrepreneurial environment. University hospitals face a number of major stresses and are responding in various ways to ensure their financial viability. PMID:3305420

  12. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... but can also be caused by fungi. Hospital construction. Hospital staff do everything they can to prevent ... patients staying at hospitals where there is ongoing construction or renovation. 5 This is thought to be ...

  13. [Approach to academic detailing as a hospital pharmacist].

    PubMed

    Nishikori, Atsumi

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, a new medical fee system was introduced for the clinical activities of hospital pharmacists responsible for in-patient pharmacotherapy monitoring in medical institutions in Japan. The new medical system demands greater efforts to provide the most suitable and safest medicine for each patient. By applying the concept of academic detailing to clinical pharmacists' roles in hospitals, I present drug use evaluation in three disease states (peptic ulcer, insomnia, and osteoporosis). To analyze these from multiple aspects, we not only need knowledge of drug monographs (clinical and adverse drug effects), but also the ability to evaluate a patient's adherence and cost-effectiveness. If we combine the idea of academic detailing with a clinical pharmacist's role, it is necessary to strengthen drug information skills, such as guideline or literature search skills and journal evaluation. Simultaneously, it is important to introduce new pharmaceutical education curriculums regarding evidence-based medicine (EBM), pharmacoeconomics, and professional communication in order to explore pharmacists' roles in the future. PMID:24584015

  14. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  15. Hospital Patients Are Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caffarella, Rosemary S.

    Patient education is recognized by health care providers and patients themselves as an important component of adequate health care for hospital patients. Through this informational process, patients receive information about specific health problems, learn the necessary competencies to deal with them, and develop accepting attitudes toward the…

  16. Roles and methods of performance evaluation of hospital academic leadership.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Yuan, Huikang; Li, Yang; Zhao, Xia; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly advancing implementation of public hospital reform urgently requires the identification and classification of a pool of exceptional medical specialists, corresponding with incentives to attract and retain them, providing a nucleus of distinguished expertise to ensure public hospital preeminence. This paper examines the significance of academic leadership, from a strategic management perspective, including various tools, methods and mechanisms used in the theory and practice of performance evaluation, and employed in the selection, training and appointment of academic leaders. Objective methods of assessing leadership performance are also provided for reference. PMID:27061556

  17. Hospital Libraries in Patient's Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iroka, Luke A.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the positive effects of patient education, including the physician patient relationship, improvements in health status, and cost effectiveness. The status of hospital libraries in Nigeria is described, and suggestions for the implementation of patient education programs are made. (5 references) (CLB)

  18. Hospitalizations of Adults with Intellectual Disability in Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ailey, Sarah H.; Johnson, Tricia; Fogg, Louis; Friese, Tanya R.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) represent a small but important group of hospitalized patients who often have complex health care needs. Individuals with ID experience high rates of hospitalization for ambulatory-sensitive conditions and high rates of hospitalizations in general, even when in formal community care systems; however,…

  19. Patient Debt Management and Student Academic Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Cheryl A.; Olswang, Steven G.

    1989-01-01

    A survey of patient debt management policies of dental programs is reported. The translation of a student's successful performance in a clinic setting to an academic failure based on a patient's failure to pay for services is not legally defendable. Fee collection should not be tied to student academic progress. (Author/MLW)

  20. Bed bathing patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Downey, Lindsey; Lloyd, Hilary

    There are a number of circumstances that may affect an individual's ability to maintain personal hygiene. Hospitalised patients, and in particular those who are bedridden, may become dependent on nursing staff to carry out their hygiene needs. Assisting patients to maintain personal hygiene is a fundamental aspect of nursing care. However, it is a task often delegated to junior or newly qualified staff. This article focuses on the principles of bed bathing patients in hospital, correct procedure and the importance of maintaining patient dignity and respect in clinical practice. PMID:18543852

  1. Hospital treatment of HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Ola, Samuel Olawale

    2006-12-01

    Treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in Nigeria has progressed from the stage of inactivity, unconcern, abandonment and neglect to the present stage of holistic care involving treatment of the infection with Highly Active Anti Retroviral Agents, complications of the disease and side effects of antiretroviral therapy as well as that of human behavioural responses towards the disease with hope and promising outcome. The goal of the treatment is to prolong the patient's life while maintaining the best possible quality of health and life. It is now a continuum of care between the hospital and the different sectors of the community. Hospital treatment of patients with HIV-AIDS is complex and yet a simple task if there is healthy interaction of the patients and health care providers in a milieu of well equipped hospital setting with available treatment facilities for proper management of diseases. Similarly, for the care to achieve its goal, it requires a joint participation of the community and the commitment of the government not only on curtailment of the reservoir of HIV infection by antiretroviral therapy but total eradication of diseases, poverty and ignorance in all its entirety. PMID:18050774

  2. Integrating COPD into Patient-Centered Hospital Readmissions Reduction Programs

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Gussin, Hélène A.; Prieto-Centurion, Valentin; Sullivan, Jamie L.; Zaidi, Farhan; Thomashow, Byron M.

    2015-01-01

    About 1 in 5 patients hospitalized for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the United States are readmitted within 30 days. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has recently expanded its Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program to financially penalize hospitals with higher than expected all-cause 30-day readmission rates following a hospitalization for COPD exacerbation. In October 2013, the COPD Foundation convened a multi-stakeholder National COPD Readmissions Summit to summarize our understanding of how to reduce hospital readmissions in patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbations. Over 225 individuals participated in the Summit, including patients, clinicians, health service researchers, policy makers and representatives of academic health care centers, industry, and payers. Summit participants recommend that programs to reduce hospital readmissions: 1) Include specific recommendations about how to promote COPD self-management skills training for patients and their caregivers; 2) Adequately address co-existing disorders common to COPD in care plans during and after hospitalizations; 3) Include an evaluation of adverse events when implementing strategies to reduce hospital readmissions; and 4) Develop a strategy (e.g., a learning collaboratory) to connect groups who are engaged in developing, testing, and implementing programs to reduce hospital readmissions for COPD and other conditions. PMID:25927076

  3. Changing environment and the academic medical center: the Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    PubMed

    Heyssel, R M

    1989-01-01

    Academic medical centers need strong patient bases and strong financial bases to educate and to support research. After careful delineation of its mission with regard to patient care, research, and education, the Johns Hopkins Hospital expanded its health care delivery capabilities and strengthened its position in the health care marketplace by acquisitions of and mergers with other hospitals and a health maintenance organization in the Baltimore area. The resulting conglomerate, operating under the direction of a holding company, the Johns Hopkins Health System, has achieved its goals of expanding patient care capabilities, broadening the patient base, and enlarging the asset base and cash flow. Half the medical residents at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine receive training at nontraditional sites, and further expansion of teaching activities is being explored. Potential roles of traditional and nontraditional teachers in these activities are discussed. PMID:2914070

  4. From a project to transformation: how "going against the flow" led to improved access and patient flow in an academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Alikhan, L Miin; Howard, Robert J; Bowry, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A results-driven approach to optimizing patient flow, grounded on quality improvement, change management and organizational learning principles, is described. Tactics included collaborative governance, performance management, rapid process improvements and implementation toolkits. Results included an 83.1% decrease in emergent volumes waiting for greater than 24 hours and a 49.1% improvement in emergency department length of stay for admitted patients. There were no adverse outcomes on other key indicators. Sustainability remains the challenge but early results are encouraging. PMID:19999372

  5. Integration of an academic medical center and a community hospital: the Brigham and Women's/Faulkner hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Andrew J; Otten, Jeffrey R; Goldszer, Robert C; Hanson, Margaret; Trull, David J; Paulus, Kenneth; Brown, Monte; Dzau, Victor; Brennan, Troyen A

    2005-03-01

    Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), a major academic tertiary medical center, and Faulkner Hospital (Faulkner), a nearby community teaching hospital, both in the Boston, Massachusetts area, have established a close affiliation relationship under a common corporate parent that achieves a variety of synergistic benefits. Formed under the pressures of limited capacity at BWH and excess capacity at Faulkner, and the need for lower-cost clinical space in an era of provider risk-sharing, BWH and Faulkner entered into a comprehensive affiliation agreement. Over the past seven years, the relationship has enhanced overall volume, broadened training programs, lowered the cost of resources for secondary care, and improved financial performance for both institutions. The lessons of this relationship, both in terms of success factors and ongoing challenges for the hospitals, medical staffs, and a large multispecialty referring physician group, are reviewed. The key factors for success of the relationship have been integration of training programs and some clinical services, provision of complementary clinical capabilities, geographic proximity, clear role definition of each institution, commitment and flexibility of leadership and medical staff, active and responsive communication, and the support of a large referring physician group that embraced the affiliation concept. Principal challenges have been maintaining the community hospital's cost structure, addressing cultural differences, avoiding competition among professional staff, anticipating the pace of patient migration, choosing a name for the new affiliation, and adapting to a changing payer environment. PMID:15734807

  6. Hospital Closure and Insights into Patient Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Garg, N.; Husk, G.; Nguyen, T.; Onyile, A.; Echezona, S.; Kuperman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hospital closures are becoming increasingly common in the United States. Patients who received care at the closing hospitals must travel to different, often farther hospitals for care, and nearby remaining hospitals may have difficulty coping with a sudden influx of patients. Objectives Our objectives are to analyze the dispersion patterns of patients from a closing hospital and to correlate that with distance from the closing hospital for three specific visit types: emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory. Methods In this study, we used data from a health information exchange to track patients from Saint Vincent’s Medical Center, a hospital in New York City that closed in 2010, to determine where they received emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory care following the closure. Results We found that patients went to the next nearest hospital for their emergency and inpatient care, but ambulatory encounters did not correlate with distance. Discussion It is likely that patients followed their ambulatory providers as they transitioned to another hospital system. Additional work should be done to determine predictors of impact on nearby hospitals when another hospital in the community closes in order to better prepare for patient dispersion. PMID:25848422

  7. Treating drug-dependent patients in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Skene, Loane; Keays, David; Gardner, Bruce

    2002-08-01

    Are hospital staff legally permitted to test drug-dependent patients for drugs or infectious disease without the patient's consent in order to treat the patient or to protect themselves or other patients? What should staff do with "suspicious" items in the patient's possession (drugs, credit cards in different names, firearms)? Can drug-dependent patients lawfully use illicit drugs in hospital? Who should supply and administer them? PMID:12242876

  8. Patient Engagement in Hospital Fall Prevention.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Injurious falls are the most prevalent in-hospital adverse event, and hospitalized patients are at a greater risk of falling than the general population. Patient engagement in hospital fall prevention could be a possible approach to reducing falls and fall-related injuries. To engage patients, bedside nursing staff must first understand the concept of patient centeredness and then incorporate patient centeredness in clinical practice. Clinicians should move from being experts to being enablers. To conceptualize the knowledge gaps identified, a conceptual model was developed to guide future research and quality improvement efforts in hospital settings. This model could be used as a guide to advance nursing leadership in hospital fall prevention via promoting patient engagement (e.g., developing patient-centered fall prevention interventions with patients' input). PMID:26845821

  9. [GPs' self-perception of their own role compared with hospital, ambulatory, academic, and health organisation physicians].

    PubMed

    Daghio, Maria Monica; Gaglianò, Giuseppe; Bevini, Massimo; Cadioli, Tiziano; Delvecchio, Carlo; Guidetti, Patrizia; Lorenzetti, Manuela; Fattori, Giuseppe; Ciardullo, Anna Vittoria

    2005-05-01

    Aim of the present study was to explore how the 76 general practitioners (GPs) - serving Carpi district (90,000 residents) - value their own role compared with the hospital, ambulatory, academic, and health organisation physicians'. GPs had a positive self-image only in comparison with health organisation doctors (7 vs 7 grades). GPs disappointed with themselves when comparing their role with ambulatory (-1.6 grades), academic (-1.9 grades) and hospital doctors (-2.2 grades). Secondarily, GPs perceived patients' valuing their professional role mostly 'subordinate' to the other physicians', except health organisation colleagues'. PMID:15977651

  10. Implementing Patient Safety Initiatives in Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira; Tupper, Judith; Coburn, Andrew; Wakefield, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Implementation of patient safety initiatives can be costly in time and energy. Because of small volumes and limited resources, rural hospitals often are not included in nationally driven patient safety initiatives. This article describes the Tennessee Rural Hospital Patient Safety Demonstration project, whose goal was to strengthen capacity for…

  11. Impact of obesity on hospital complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Alexopoulos, Anastasia-Stefania; Fayfman, Maya; Zhao, Liping; Weaver, Jeff; Buehler, Lauren; Smiley, Dawn; Pasquel, Francisco J; Vellanki, Priyathama; Haw, J Sonya; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity is associated with increased risk of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular mortality. Several studies have reported increased length of hospital stay and complications; however, there are also reports of obesity having a protective effect on health, a phenomenon coined the ‘obesity paradox’. We aimed to investigate the impact of overweight and obesity on complications and mortality in hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia and diabetes. Research design and methods This retrospective analysis was conducted on 29 623 patients admitted to two academic hospitals in Atlanta, Georgia, between January 2012 and December 2013. Patients were subdivided by body mass index into underweight (body mass index <18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5–24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25–29.9 kg/m2) and obese (>30 kg/m2). Hyperglycemia was defined as a blood glucose >10 mmol/L during hospitalization. Hospital complications included a composite of pneumonia, acute myocardial infarction, respiratory failure, acute kidney injury, bacteremia and death. Results A total of 4.2% were underweight, 29.6% had normal weight, 30.2% were overweight, and 36% were obese. 27.2% of patients had diabetes and 72.8% did not have diabetes (of which 75% had hyperglycemia and 25% had normoglycemia during hospitalization). A J-shaped curve with higher rates of complications was observed in underweight patients in all glycemic groups; however, there was no significant difference in the rate of complications among normal weight, overweight, or obese patients, with and without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Conclusions Underweight is an independent predictor for hospital complications. In contrast, increasing body mass index was not associated with higher morbidity or mortality, regardless of glycemic status. There was no evidence of an obesity paradox among inpatients with diabetes and hyperglycemia. PMID:27486518

  12. Hospital and patient characteristics of uncompensated hospital care: policy implications.

    PubMed

    Saywell, R M; Zollinger, T W; Chu, D K; MacBeth, C A; Sechrist, M E

    1989-01-01

    For this study, a sample of 1,689 patients classified as "charity" and "bad debt" cases in 1986 were identified from 27 general acute care hospitals and one tertiary hospital in Indiana. Half of the hospitals were in rural areas and 57 percent were small (less than 150 beds). Most of the patients (87.2 percent) incurred uncompensated amounts under $2,500, and 40 percent of the cases were below $500. About 72 percent of the patients with uncompensated care were from the same county as the location of the hospital (range from 30.9% to 100.0%). The majority of the cases (79.4 percent) with over $5,000 in uncompensated care were treated in urban hospitals. The average age of these patients was 27.2 years. Fifty-four percent of the patients were single, 60.7 percent were female, and nearly all (83.0 percent) were discharged to home care. Only 44.6 percent of the patients with uncompensated care had no insurance; 46.8 percent had some form of commercial insurance which covered part of the charges for care. The most common diagnosis for these patients was pregnancy and childbirth (22.8 percent), with injury and poisoning second (10.7 percent). The cases with $5,000 or more in bad debt (about 4 percent of the cases) account for 28.3 percent of the total uncollected amount. Bad debt represents a cost of doing business. Any national effort to contain health care costs must address this problem. PMID:2738351

  13. Achieving better in-hospital and after-hospital care of patients with acute cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Denaro, Charles P; Bennett, Cameron J; Hickey, Annabel C; Mudge, Alison M; Flores, Judy L; Sanders, Daniela C J; Thiele, Justine M; Wenck, Beres; Bennett, John W; Jones, Mark A

    2004-05-17

    In patients hospitalised with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and congestive heart failure (CHF), evidence suggests opportunities for improving in-hospital and after-hospital care, patient self-care, and hospital-community integration. A multidisciplinary quality improvement program was designed and instigated in Brisbane in October 2000 involving 250 clinicians at three teaching hospitals, 1080 general practitioners (GPs) from five Divisions of General Practice, 1594 patients with ACS and 904 patients with CHF. Quality improvement interventions were implemented over 17 months after a 6-month baseline period and included: clinical decision support (clinical practice guidelines, reminders, checklists, clinical pathways); educational interventions (seminars, academic detailing); regular performance feedback; patient self-management strategies; and hospital-community integration (discharge referral summaries; community pharmacist liaison; patient prompts to attend GPs). Using a before-after study design to assess program impact, significantly more program patients compared with historical controls received: ACS: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and lipid-lowering agents at discharge, aspirin and beta-blockers at 3 months after discharge, inpatient cardiac counselling, and referral to outpatient cardiac rehabilitation. CHF: Assessment for reversible precipitants, use of prophylaxis for deep-venous thrombosis, beta-blockers at discharge, ACE inhibitors at 6 months after discharge, imaging of left ventricular function, and optimal management of blood pressure levels. Risk-adjusted mortality rates at 6 and 12 months decreased, respectively, from 9.8% to 7.4% (P = 0.06) and from 13.4% to 10.1% (P = 0.06) for patients with ACS and from 22.8% to 15.2% (P < 0.001) and from 32.8% to 22.4% (P = 0.005) for patients with CHF. Quality improvement programs that feature multifaceted interventions across the continuum of care can change clinical culture, optimise care

  14. Hospitalization for Hypoglycemia in Japanese Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sako, Akahito; Yasunaga, Hideo; Matsui, Hiroki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Goto, Atsushi; Yanai, Hidekatsu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to elucidate the epidemiology, patient demographics, and clinical outcomes of hospitalization for hypoglycemia in diabetic patients using a Japanese large-scale database. We conducted a retrospective study using a national inpatient database of acute care hospitals in Japan. Diabetic patients ages ≥15 years with hypoglycemia as a main diagnosis for hospitalization were eligible. We estimated the annual number of hospitalizations in Japan and compared the annual admission rate by age and treatment groups. We also analyzed the association between patient characteristics and in-hospital mortality. Among 22.7 million discharge records from July 2008 and March 2013, a total of 25,071 patients were eligible. The mean age was 73.4 years, and the mean body mass index (BMI) was 22.3 kg/m2. The estimated annual hospitalization for hypoglycemia in Japan was ∼20,000. Annual admission rates for hypoglycemia per 1000 diabetic patients and 1000 diabetic patients receiving insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents were 2.1 and 4.1, respectively. Patients <40 years and >70 years old were at a higher risk of hospitalization. In-hospital mortality was 3.8%, and risk factors associated with poor survival were male sex, older age, lower bed capacity, community hospital, low BMI, coma at admission, and higher Charlson Comorbidity Index. To prevent severe hypoglycemia that leads to death and complications, individualized and careful glycemic control are important, especially in very old or young patients and in those with comorbid conditions or low BMI. PMID:26107672

  15. Physician clinical alignment and integration: a community-academic hospital approach.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Weiss, Sandra Jarva; Nester, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    An overwhelming need for change in the U.S. healthcare delivery system, coupled with the need to improve clinical and financial outcomes, has prompted hospitals to direct renewed efforts toward achieving high quality and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, with the dawn of accountable care organizations and increasing focus on patient expectations, hospitals have begun to seek physician partners through clinical alignment. Contrary to the unsuccessful alignment strategies of the 1990s, today's efforts are more mutually beneficial, driven by the need to achieve better care coordination, increased access to infrastructure, improved quality, and lower costs. In this article, we describe a large, academic, tertiary care hospital's approach to developing and implementing alignment and integration models with its collaboration-ready physicians and physician groups. We developed four models--short of physicians' employment with the organization--tailored to meet the needs of both the physician group and the hospital: (1) medical directorship (group physicians are appointed to serve as medical directors of a clinical area), (2) professional services agreement (specific clinical services, such as overnight admissions help, are contracted), (3) co-management services agreement (one specialty group co-manages all services within the specialty service lines), and (4) lease arrangement (closest in scope to employment, in which the hospital pays all expenses and receives all revenue). Successful hospital-physician alignment requires careful planning and the early engagement of legal counsel to ensure compliance with federal statutes. Establishing an integrated system with mutually identified goals better positions hospitals to deliver cost-effective and high-quality care under the new paradigm of healthcare reform. PMID:24988674

  16. Patient (customer) expectations in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Sedat; Acuner, Taner; Yilmaz, Gökhan

    2007-06-01

    The expectations of patient are one of the determining factors of healthcare service. The purpose of this study is to measure the Patients' Expectations, based on Patient's Rights. This study was done with Likert-Survey in Trabzon population. The analyses showed that the level of the expectations of the patient was high on the factor of receiving information and at an acceptable level on the other factors. Statistical meaningfulness was determined between age, sex, education, health insurance, and the income of the family and the expectations of the patients (p<0.05). According to this study, the current legal regulations have higher standards than the expectations of the patients. The reason that the satisfaction of the patients high level is interpreted due to the fact that the level of the expectation is low. It is suggested that the educational and public awareness studies on the patients' rights must be done in order to increase the expectations of the patients. PMID:17028043

  17. A Hospital-based Patient Legal Clinic.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Liz; Shahkhan, Hana; Loff, Bebe

    2016-03-01

    The HeLP Patient Legal Clinic has provided free legal advice to public hospital patients with health-related problems since March 2014. This article reports on the findings of a study of the first six months of HeLP's operation. The study adopted qualitative methods informed by grounded theory and sought to understand patient and social worker experiences of HeLP. Interviews were conducted with 13 patients and 10 next of kin. Focus group discussions were carried out with 19 social workers who referred patients to HeLP. Locating the legal service in the hospital's social work department enabled and expedited access to legal advice; a team-based approach to patient problems emerged that enhanced patient outcomes; and provision of legal advice relieved the anxiety experienced by patients, allowing them to focus better on their health concern. PMID:27323643

  18. Cost-Analysis of Seven Nosocomial Outbreaks in an Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dik, Jan-Willem H.; Dinkelacker, Ariane G.; Vemer, Pepijn; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; Lokate, Mariëtte; Sinha, Bhanu; Friedrich, Alex W.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Nosocomial outbreaks, especially with (multi-)resistant microorganisms, are a major problem for health care institutions. They can cause morbidity and mortality for patients and controlling these costs substantial amounts of funds and resources. However, how much is unclear. This study sets out to provide a comparable overview of the costs of multiple outbreaks in a single academic hospital in the Netherlands. Methods Based on interviews with the involved staff, multiple databases and stored records from the Infection Prevention Division all actions undertaken, extra staff employment, use of resources, bed-occupancy rates, and other miscellaneous cost drivers during different outbreaks were scored and quantified into Euros. This led to total costs per outbreak and an estimated average cost per positive patient per outbreak day. Results Seven outbreaks that occurred between 2012 and 2014 in the hospital were evaluated. Total costs for the hospital ranged between €10,778 and €356,754. Costs per positive patient per outbreak day, ranged between €10 and €1,369 (95% CI: €49-€1,042), with a mean of €546 and a median of €519. Majority of the costs (50%) were made because of closed beds. Conclusions This analysis is the first to give a comparable overview of various outbreaks, caused by different microorganisms, in the same hospital and all analyzed with the same method. It shows a large variation within the average costs due to different factors (e.g. closure of wards, type of ward). All outbreaks however cost considerable amounts of efforts and money (up to €356,754), including missed revenue and control measures. PMID:26863145

  19. Magnet Hospitals: Higher Rates of Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah A

    2014-06-10

    Patient satisfaction with care is an important indicator of quality of care. As of 2013-2014, 30% of the Value-Based Purchasing score Medicare is using to determine hospital reimbursement is based on patient reports of care. This study determined whether significant relationships exists between Magnet (N = 160), Magnet-in-progress (N = 99), and non-Magnet hospital (N = 1,742) status and the highest ratings on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey questions related to patient satisfaction with care. This study was a secondary analysis of data collected and compiled from three sources (the American Hospital Association, American Nurses Credentialing Center, and HCAHPS databases). Analysis revealed that Magnet and Magnet-in-progress hospitals have significantly (p < .007) higher scores than non-Magnet hospitals on six of the seven questions regarding patient-reported satisfaction with care. The implications of these results for nursing are discussed. PMID:24915864

  20. Epidemiology of hospitalized burns patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chien, Wu-Chien; Pai, Lu; Lin, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Heng-Chang

    2003-09-01

    Previous studies based on either single hospital data or sampling of specific groups of hospitalized burns victims in Taiwan have provided only minimal epidemiological information. The study is designed to provide additional data on the epidemiology of hospitalized burns patients in Taiwan. Data were obtained from the Burn Injury Information System (BIIS), which brings together information supplied by 34 contracted hospitals. The study time course spanned a 2-year period from July 1997 to June 1999. Patient characteristics (age, sex, education level, etc.), causes and severity of injuries, and medical care measures were explored. A total of 4741 patients were registered with BIIS over the study period. The majority of hospitalized patients (67%) were male. The age distribution of burns patients showed peaks occurring at the age groups of 0-5 and 35-44 years. Over the time course of a day, burn injuries occurred more frequently from 10:00 to 12:00 h and 16:00 to 18:00 h. Injuries suspected as the result of suicide, homicide or child abuse accounted for 4.8% of hospitalized cases. More than 48% of the burns occurred in the home. The leading type of burn injury was scalding, followed by naked flame, explosion, electrical burns, and chemical burns due to caustic or corrosive substances. The mean percent total body surface area (%TBSA) for adults was 19%, and for young children was 12%. The average length of hospital stay was 18 days. In conclusion, children under 5 years and adults between 35 and 44 years of age are two high-risk groups for burn injuries. Corresponding to meal preparation time, hot substances such as boiling water, hot soup, etc. are the most common agents responsible for scalds. Prevention programs for reducing the risk of burn injuries during cooking and eating are required, especially for parents with young children. PMID:12927984

  1. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved. PMID:25419410

  2. Unplanned Readmissions after Hospitalization for Severe Sepsis at Academic Medical Center-Affiliated Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, John P.; Hohmann, Samuel F.; Wang, Henry E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In the United States (US), national efforts to reduce hospital readmissions have been enacted, including the application of substantial insurance reimbursement penalties for hospitals with elevated rates. Readmissions after severe sepsis remain under-studied and could possibly signify lapses in care and missed opportunities for intervention. We sought to characterize 7- and 30-day readmission rates following hospital admission for severe sepsis as well as institutional variations in readmission. DESIGN Retrospective analysis of 345,657 severe sepsis discharges from University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) hospitals in 2012. SETTING US PATIENTS We applied the commonly cited method described by Angus, et al. for identification of severe sepsis, including only discharges with sepsis present on admission. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS We identified unplanned, all-cause readmissions within 7- and 30-days of discharge using claims-based algorithms. Using mixed effects logistic regression, we determined factors associated with 30-day readmission. We used risk-standardized readmission rates (RSRRs) to assess institutional variations. Among 216,328 eligible severe sepsis discharges, there were 14,932 readmissions within 7 days (6.9%; 95% CI 6.8–7.0) and 43,092 within 30 days (19.9%; 95% CI 19.8–20.1). Among those readmitted within 30 days, 66.9% had an infection and 40.3% had severe sepsis on readmission. Patient severity, length of stay, and specific diagnoses were associated with increased odds of 30-day readmission. Observed institutional 7-day readmission rates ranged from 0–12.3%, 30-day rates from 3.6–29.1%, and 30-day RSRRs from 14.1–31.1%. Greater institutional volume, teaching status, trauma services, location in the Northeast and lower ICU rates were associated with poor RSRR performance. CONCLUSIONS Severe sepsis readmission places a substantial burden on the healthcare system, with one-in-fifteen and one-in-five severe sepsis discharges

  3. Measuring patient-perceived hospital service quality: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Pai, Yogesh P; Chary, Satyanarayana T

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Although measuring healthcare service quality is not a new phenomenon, the instruments used to measure are timeworn. With the shift in focus to patient centric processes in hospitals and recognizing healthcare to be different compared to other services, service quality measurement needs to be tuned specifically to healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to design a conceptual framework for measuring patient perceived hospital service quality (HSQ), based on existing service quality literature. Design/methodology/approach - Using HSQ theories, expanding existing healthcare service models and literature, a conceptual framework is proposed to measure HSQ. The paper outlines patient perceived service quality dimensions. Findings - An instrument for measuring HSQ dimensions is developed and compared with other service quality measuring instruments. The latest dimensions are in line with previous studies, but a relationship dimension is added. Practical implications - The framework empowers managers to assess healthcare quality in corporate, public and teaching hospitals. Originality/value - The paper helps academics and practitioners to assess HSQ from a patient perspective. PMID:27120508

  4. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients’ expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved. PMID:25419410

  5. Screening for Depression in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    ESMAEELI, Mohammad-Reza; ERFANI SAYAR, Reza; SAGHEBI, Ali; ELMI, Saghi; RAHMANI, Shagheyegh; ELMI, Sam; RABBANI JAVADI, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Objective In chronically ill children who are hospitalized, many mood changes occur. For example, in children with cancer or renal failure, prolonged hospitalization and chemotherapy can lead to depression. With the improved survival of childhood malignancies, the effect of treatment on child’s psychosocial well-being becomes increasingly relevant. In this study, we examined the prevalence of depression in hospitalized children with chronic and acute conditions in Dr Sheikh Pediatrics Hospital in Mashhad. Materials & Methods After receiving the approval from the Ethics Committee of Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, we did this cross-sectional descriptive study, from April to June 2012 in Dr Sheikh Pediatric Hospital in Mashhad. Ninety children, between 8 to 16 years, were screened for depression. The sampling method was census. Children with a history of depressive or other mental disorders were excluded. Three groups of children (children with chronic renal disease, malignancy, and acute disease) were evaluated for depression using standard Children Depression Inventory Questionnaire (CDI). Two specifically trained nurses filled out the questionnaires at patients’ bedside under the supervision of a psychiatrist. Depression scores were then analyzed by SPSS software. Results Of 90 children, 43(47.7%) were male and 47(52.2%) were female. The Children’s mean age was 11±2.3 years, and the mean length of hospitalization was 8±5.3 days. Depression was detected in various degrees in 63% of patients (N=57), and 36.6% of children (N=32) had no symptoms of depression. Severe depression was not seen in any of the patients with acute illness. More than half of patients with cancer and chronic kidney disease had moderate to severe depression. There was a significant statistical relationship between the duration of illness and severity of depression. There was also a significant correlation between severity of depression and frequency of hospitalization. Children

  6. [A paradigm change in German academic medicine. Merger and privatization as exemplified with the university hospitals in Marburg and Giessen].

    PubMed

    Maisch, Bernhard

    2005-03-01

    1. The intended fusion of the university hospitals Marburg and Giessen in the state of Hessia is "a marriage under pressure with uncalculated risk" (Spiegel 2005). In the present political and financial situation it hardly appears to be avoidable. From the point of the view of the faculty of medicine in Marburg it is difficult to understand, that the profits of this well guided university hospital with a positive yearly budget should go to the neighboring university hospital which still had a fair amount of deficit spending in the last years.2. Both medical faculties suffer from a very low budget from the state of Hessia for research and teaching. Giessen much more than Marburg, have a substantial need for investments in buildings and infrastructure. Both institutions have a similar need for investments in costly medical apparatuses. This is a problem, which many university hospitals face nowadays.3. The intended privatisation of one or both university hospitals will need sound answers to several fundamental questions and problems:a) A privatisation potentially endangers the freedom of research and teaching garanteed by the German constitution. A private company will undoubtedly influence by active or missing additional support the direction of research in the respective academic institution. An example is the priorisation of clinical in contrast to basic research.b) With the privatisation practical absurdities in the separation of research and teaching on one side and hospital care on the other will become obvious with respect to the status of the academic employees, the obligatory taxation (16%) when a transfer of labor from one institution to the other is taken into account. The use of rooms for seminars, lectures and bedside with a double function for both teaching, research and hospital care has to be clarified with a convincing solution in everyday practice.c) The potential additional acquisition of patients, which has been advocated by the Hessian state

  7. Differences among hospitals in Medicare patient mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Chassin, M R; Park, R E; Lohr, K N; Keesey, J; Brook, R H

    1989-01-01

    Using hospital discharge abstract data for fiscal year 1984 for all acute care hospitals treating Medicare patients (age greater than or equal to 65), we measured four mortality rates: inpatient deaths, deaths within 30 days after discharge, and deaths within two fixed periods following admission (30 days, and the 95th percentile length of stay for each condition). The metric of interest was the probability that a hospital would have as many deaths as it did (taking age, race, and sex into account). Differences among hospitals in inpatient death rates were large and significant (p less than .05) for 22 of 48 specific conditions studied and for all conditions together; among these 22 "high-variation" conditions, medical conditions accounted for far more deaths than did surgical conditions. We compared pairs of conditions in terms of hospital rankings by probability of observed numbers of inpatient deaths; we found relatively low correlations (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.3 or lower) for most comparisons except between a few surgical conditions. When we compared different pairs of the four death measures on their rankings of hospitals by probabilities of the observed numbers of deaths, the correlations were moderate to high (Spearman correlation coefficients of 0.54 to 0.99). Hospitals with low probabilities of the number of observed deaths were not distributed randomly geographically; a small number of states had significantly more than their share of these hospitals (p less than .01). Information from hospital discharge abstract data is insufficient to determine the extent to which differences in severity of illness or quality of care account for this marked variability, so data on hospital death rates cannot now be used to draw inferences about quality of care. The magnitude of variability in death rates and the geographic clustering of facilities with low probabilities, however, both argue for further study of hospital death rates. These data may prove

  8. Hospital dental practice in special patients

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Espín-Gálvez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Dental patients with special needs are people with different systemic diseases, multiple disorders or severe physical and/or mental disabilities. A Medline search was made, yielding a total of 29 articles that served as the basis for this study, which offers a brief description of the dental intervention protocols in medically compromised patients. Dental treatment in patients with special needs, whether presenting medical problems or disabilities, is sometimes complex. For this reason the hospital should be regarded as the ideal setting for the care of these individuals. Before starting any dental intervention, a correct patient evaluation is needed, based on a correct anamnesis, medical records and interconsultation reports, and with due assessment of the medical risks involved. The hospital setting offers the advantage of access to electronic medical records and to data referred to any complementary tests that may have been made, and we moreover have the possibility of performing treatments under general anesthesia. In this context, ambulatory major surgery is the best approach when considering general anesthesia in patients of this kind. Key words:Hospital dentistry, special patients, medically compromised patients. PMID:24121921

  9. [Respect of patient's dignity in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Duguet, A-M

    2010-12-01

    Every code of ethics of health professionals in France considers the respect of dignity as a fundamental duty. The French 2002 Law on patient rights says that the person has the right to respect of dignity and of private life. After a presentation of the articles of ethics codes regarding dignity, this paper presents recommendations to deliver medical care in situations where dignity might be endangered such as for patients hospitalized in psychiatric services without consent, or for medical examination of prisoners or medical care to vulnerable patients unable to express their will, especially in palliative care or at the end of life. Respect of dignity after death is illustrated by the reflection conducted by the Espace Ethique de l'AP-HP (Paris area hospitals) and in the Chart of the mortuary yard. A survey of the patients' letters of complaint received by the emergency service of the Toulouse University Hospital showed that, in five years, there were 188 letters and 18 pointed out infringements to the dignity of the person. The health professional team is now aware of this obligation, and in the accreditation of the hospitals, the respect of dignity is one of the indicators of the quality of medical care. PMID:21766725

  10. Are housestaff identifying malnourished hospitalized medicine patients?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael A; Duerksen, Donald R; Rahman, Adam

    2014-10-01

    Clinical nutrition and nutritional assessment are often a neglected component of medical school curriculums despite the high prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients. This study found that medical housestaff performed nutritional assessments in only 4% of admitted patients despite a high rate of malnutrition (57%). Survey results show housestaff lack knowledge in the area of malnutrition. Medical schools and training programs must place greater emphasis of providing qualified physician nutrition specialists to implement effective nutrition instruction. PMID:25061765

  11. Prevention of Pulmonary Emboli in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    The risk of pulmonary infarction in any hospitalized population is high. To decrease this dreaded complication, the high risk population must be identified. These are chiefly elderly patients with a history of previous DVTP, cancer, cardiac disease, trauma to a lower limb or a history of recent surgery. All methods of reducing venous stasis should be used, and most of these patients should be treated prophylactically with subcutaneous heparin. PMID:21283325

  12. Managing patients for zoonotic disease in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Clifford; Corning, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Zoonoses involve infections and infestations transmissible from animals to humans. Zoonoses are a major global threat. Exposure to zoonotic pathogens exists in various settings including encroachment on nature; foreign travel; pet keeping; bushmeat consumption; attendance at zoological parks, petting zoos, school ‘animal contact experiences’, wildlife markets, circuses, and domesticated and exotic animal farms. Under-ascertainment is believed to be common and the frequency of some zoonotic disease appears to be increasing. Zoonoses include direct, indirect and aerosolized transmission. Improved awareness of zoonoses in the hospital environment may be important to the growing need for prevention and control. We reviewed relevant literature for the years 2000 to present and identified a significant need for the promotion of awareness and management of zoonoses in the hospital environment. This article provides a new decision-tree, as well as staff and patient guidance on the prevention and control of zoonoses associated with hospitals. PMID:24040497

  13. Financial burden of emergency preparedness on an urban, academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Petinaux, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed the direct human resource costs of a hospital's emergency preparedness planning (in 2005) by surveying participants retrospectively. Forty participants (74% of the identified population) were surveyed. Using the self-reported hourly salary of the participant, a direct salary cost was calculated for each participant. The population was 40% male and 60% female; 65% had a graduate degree or higher; 65% were administrators; 35% were clinicians; and 50% reported that their job description included a reference to emergency planning activities. All participants spent a combined total of 3,654.25 hours on emergency preparedness activities, including 20.1% on personal education/training; 11.6% on educating other people; 39.3% on paperwork or equipment maintenance; 22.2% on attendance at meetings; 5.6% on drill participation; and <1% on other activities. Considering the participants' hourly salary, direct personal costs spent on emergency preparedness activities at the institution totaled US$232,417.Ten percent, all of whom were physicians, reported no compensation for their emergency preparedness efforts at the hospital level. As much as these results illustrate the strong commitment of the institution to its community, they represent a heavy burden in light of the often unfunded mandate of emergency preparedness planning that a hospital may incur. Such responsibility is carried to some extent by all hospitals. PMID:20066636

  14. Patient falls in hospitals: an increasing problem.

    PubMed

    Weil, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Despite six decades of worldwide efforts that include publishing virtually hundreds of related epidemiological-type studies, there has been an increase (estimated to be 46% per 1000 patient days from 1954-6 to 2006-10) in the number of patient falls in hospitals and other health care facilities. These still occur most frequently near the bedside or in the bathroom, among mentally confused or physically impaired patients, and often involve those with greater comorbidity. The reasons that hospitals during the past half century have demonstrated a significant increase in patient falls per discharge or per patient days are numerous, are not completely surprising, and are certainly interrelated: improved accident reporting systems; on the average older, more impaired, more acutely ill, and more heavily sedated patients; and, less time spent by nursing personnel at the bedside. Most safety committees are not as effective as they should be, since they have difficulty in implementing a long-term, aggressive, facility-wide prevention program. Within that context, it may be worthwhile to discuss the advantages of nursing leadership rather than a representative of the facility's management staff to chair these safety committees. PMID:26304626

  15. The Effect on Academic Health Centers of Tertiary Care in Community Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, David A.; Rosenfeld, Lisa A.

    1984-01-01

    The growing cost of medical education and the provision of care to the indigent can be endangered by the dilution of revenue sources traditionally available to the academic health centers but which are being taken over by suburban hospitals. (Author/MLW)

  16. Cultural Diversity in the Curriculum: Perceptions and Attitudes of Irish Hospitality and Tourism Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Frances; Hearns, Niamh; Baum, Tom; Murray, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Academics are facing significant challenges in preparing indigenous students for employment in the multicultural working environment of hospitality and tourism organisations. In dealing with the impact of the new skills and flexibilities demanded by increasing globalisation, the indigenous workforce needs to possess a multicultural perspective and…

  17. A detailed description and assessment of outcomes of patients with hospital recorded QTc prolongation.

    PubMed

    Laksman, Zachary; Momciu, Bogdan; Seong, You Won; Burrows, Patricia; Conacher, Susan; Manlucu, Jaimie; Leong-Sit, Peter; Gula, Lorne J; Skanes, Allan C; Yee, Raymond; Klein, George J; Krahn, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Corrected QT (QTc) interval prolongation has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality in many clinical settings and is a common finding in hospitalized patients. The causes and outcomes of patients with extreme QTc interval prolongation during a hospital admission are poorly described. The aim of this study was to prospectively identify patients with automated readings of QTc intervals >550 ms at 1 academic tertiary hospital. One hundred seventy-two patients with dramatic QTc interval prolongation (574 ± 53 ms) were identified (mean age 67.6 ± 15.1 years, 48% women). Most patients had underlying heart disease (60%), predominantly ischemic cardiomyopathy (43%). At lease 1 credible and presumed reversible cause associated with QTc interval prolongation was identified in 98% of patients. The most common culprits were QTc interval-prolonging medications, which were deemed most responsible in 48% of patients, with 25% of these patients taking ≥2 offending drugs. Two patients were diagnosed with congenital long-QT syndrome. Patients with electrocardiograms available before and after hospital admission demonstrated significantly lower preadmission and postdischarge QTc intervals compared with the QTc intervals recorded in the hospital. In conclusion, in-hospital mortality was high in the study population (29%), with only 4% of patients experiencing arrhythmic deaths, all of which were attributed to secondary causes. PMID:25665761

  18. The Effect of Availability of Manpower on Trauma Resuscitation Times in a Tertiary Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Nathaniel Xin Ern; Koh, Zhi Xiong; Nadkarni, Nivedita; Singaram, Kanageswari; Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Background For trauma patients, delays to assessment, resuscitation, and definitive care affect outcomes. We studied the effects of resuscitation area occupancy and trauma team size on trauma team resuscitation speed in an observational study at a tertiary academic institution in Singapore. Methods From January 2014 to January 2015, resuscitation videos of trauma team activated patients with an Injury Severity Score of 9 or more were extracted for review within 14 days by independent reviewers. Exclusion criteria were patients dead on arrival, inter-hospital transfers, and up-triaged patients. Data captured included manpower availability (trauma team size and resuscitation area occupancy), assessment (airway, breathing, circulation, logroll), interventions (vascular access, imaging), and process-of-care time intervals (time to assessment/intervention/adjuncts, time to imaging, and total time in the emergency department). Clinical data were obtained by chart review and from the trauma registry. Results Videos of 70 patients were reviewed over a 13-month period. The median time spent in the emergency department was 154.9 minutes (IQR 130.7–207.5) and the median resuscitation team size was 7, with larger team sizes correlating with faster process-of-care time intervals: time to airway assessment (p = 0.08) and time to disposition (p = 0.04). The mean resuscitation area occupancy rate (RAOR) was 1.89±2.49, and the RAOR was positively correlated with time spent in the emergency department (p = 0.009). Conclusion Our results suggest that adequate staffing for trauma teams and resuscitation room occupancy are correlated with faster trauma resuscitation and reduced time spent in the emergency department. PMID:27136299

  19. Patient Safety Outcomes in Small Urban and Small Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vartak, Smruti; Ward, Marcia M.; Vaughn, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess patient safety outcomes in small urban and small rural hospitals and to examine the relationship of hospital and patient factors to patient safety outcomes. Methods: The Nationwide Inpatient Sample and American Hospital Association annual survey data were used for analyses. To increase comparability, the study sample was…

  20. Changing Environment and the Academic Medical Center: The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyssel, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Johns Hopkins Hospital expanded its health care delivery capabilities and strengthened its position in the marketplace by acquisitions of and mergers with other hospitals and a health maintenance organization. The resulting conglomerate has achieved its goals of expanding patient care, broadening the patient base, and enlarging the asset base and…

  1. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  2. How one teaching hospital system and one medical school are jointly affirming their academic mission.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, M; Rabkin, M T; Tosteson, D C

    1997-06-01

    The economic forces that are reshaping the practice of medicine and the funding of medical research will have great impact on clinical education and research in teaching hospitals and their associated medical schools. Changes in the setting of and approach to medical education will need to be made in order to continue to train physicians at the same high level as in the past and to maintain the productivity of our national biomedical research enterprise and its contributions to health. Academic leaders, such as department chiefs who have clinical service responsibilities, are finding it more and more difficult to manage simultaneously the demands of the clinical business, education, and research. In an effort to organize a teaching hospital and a medical school in a manner that would position them to maintain more effectively their common academic mission front and center with the clinical business, Harvard Medical School and the Beth Israel Hospital created a joint venture in 1996. The new nonprofit Institute for Education and Research has education and research as its top (and only) mission. It is designed to provide additional and specific academic leadership and to enable the joint venture to undertake strategic planning for the academic mission. In addition to the challenges it faces from changes in the external environment, the Institute for Education and Research will need to establish a new pattern of interactions internally within the parent institutions. Collaborations with department chairs and faculty are an essential ingredient for its success. It is hoped that this structure will prove to be a useful template for organizing other medical school-hospital collaborations on behalf of the academic mission. PMID:9200578

  3. Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    BERTI-COUTO, Soraya de Azambuja; COUTO-SOUZA, Paulo Henrique; JACOBS, Reinhilde; NACKAERTS, Olivia; RUBIRA-BULLEN, Izabel Regina Fischer; WESTPHALEN, Fernando Henrique; MOYSÉS, Samuel Jorge; IGNÁCIO, Sérgio Aparecido; da COSTA, Maitê Barroso; TOLAZZI, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical criteria for the diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients. Material and Methods A clinical study was carried out on 145 subjects (48 males; 97 females; aged 20 to 90 years). Each subject was clinically examined, in the morning and in the afternoon, along 1 day. A focused anamnesis allowed identifying symptoms of hyposalivation, like xerostomia complaints (considered as a reference symptom), chewing difficulty, dysphagia and increased frequency of liquid intake. Afterwards, dryness of the mucosa of the cheecks and floor of the mouth, as well as salivary secretion during parotid gland stimulation were assessed during oral examination. Results Results obtained with Chi-square tests showed that 71 patients (48.9%) presented xerostomia complaints, with a significant correlation with all hyposalivation symptoms (p<0.05). Furthermore, xerostomia was also significantly correlated with all data obtained during oral examination in both periods of evaluation (p<0.05). Conclusion Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients is feasible and can provide an immediate and appropriate therapy avoiding further problems and improving their quality of life. PMID:22666830

  4. The Evolution of the Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario Statement of Principles--A Successful Harmonization Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Katie; Lampson, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    To improve efficiency, consistency and transparency in clinical trial contract negotiations with industry sponsors, a Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) committee facilitated the development of standard principles for member hospitals to follow during contract negotiation. Hospitals were encouraged to provide a link to the CAHO…

  5. Hospital Choice of Rural Medicare Beneficiaries: Patient, Hospital Attributes, and the Patient–Physician Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Wan-Tzu Connie; Porell, Frank W; Adams, E Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine how patient and hospital attributes and the patient–physician relationship influence hospital choice of rural Medicare beneficiaries. Data Sources Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS), Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) Provider of Services (POS) file, American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey, and Medicare Hospital Service Area (HSA) files for 1994 and 1995. Study Design The study sample consisted of 1,702 hospitalizations of rural Medicare beneficiaries. McFadden's conditional logit model was used to analyze hospital choices of rural Medicare beneficiaries. The model included independent variables to control for patients' and hospitals' attributes and the distance to hospital alternatives. Principal Findings The empirical results show strong preferences of aged patients for closer hospitals and those of greater scale and service capacity. Patients with complex acute medical conditions and those with more resources were more likely to bypass their closest rural hospitals. Beneficiaries were more likely to bypass their closest rural hospital if they had no regular physician, had a shorter patient–physician tie, were dissatisfied with the availability of health care, and had a longer travel time to their physician's office. Conclusions The significant influences of patients' socioeconomic, health, and functional status, their satisfaction with and access to primary care, and their strong preferences for certain hospital attributes should inform federal program initiatives about the likely impacts of policy changes on hospital bypassing behavior. PMID:15533193

  6. Rural Hospital Patient Safety Systems Implementation in Two States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Daniel R.; Hewett, John E.; Ge, Bin; Schubert, Shari

    2007-01-01

    Context and Purpose: With heightened attention to medical errors and patient safety, we surveyed Utah and Missouri hospitals to assess the "state of the art" in patient safety systems and identify changes over time. This study examines differences between urban and rural hospitals. Methods: Survey of all acute care hospitals in Utah and Missouri…

  7. The patients' library movement: an overview of early efforts in the United States to establish organized libraries for hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Panella, N M

    1996-01-01

    The patients' library movement in the United States, a dynamic, cohesive drive begun and sustained by librarians and physicians, strove to promote placement of organized libraries for patients in hospitals. It took shape in the early years of this century, evolving from its proponents' deeply held conviction that books and reading foster the rehabilitation of sick people. The American Library Association's World War I service to hospitalized military personnel dramatically reinforced the conviction; the post-World War I institution of public library extension services to general hospitals explicitly reflected it. Enormous energy was infused into the patients' library movement. Throughout the first half of this century, there were sustained efforts not only to establish organized libraries for hospitalized people but also to expand and systematically study bibliotherapy and to shape patients' librarianship as a professional specialty. The movement's achievements include the establishment of patients' library committees within national and international associations; impetus for development of academic programs to train patients' librarians; and publication, from 1944 through 1970, of successive sets of standards for hospital patients' libraries. The first of these remain the first standards written and issued by a professional library association for a hospital library. PMID:8938330

  8. Integrated Patient Education on U.S. Hospital Web Sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edgar; Wu, Kerong; Edwards, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    Based on a census of the 2015 Most Wired Hospitals, this content analysis aimed to find out how patient education has been integrated on these best IT hospitals' Web sites to serve the purposes of marketing and meeting online visitors' needs. This study will help hospitals to understand where the weaknesses are in their interactive patient education implementation and come up with a smart integration strategy. The study found that 70% of these hospitals had adopted interactive patient education contents, 76.6% of such contents were from a third-party developer, and only 20% of the hospitals linked their patient education contents to one or more of the hospital's resources while 26% cross-references such contents. The authors concluded that more hospitals should take advantage of modern information communication technology to cross-reference their patient education contents and to integrate such contents into their overall online marketing strategy to benefit patients and themselves. PMID:27139406

  9. Highlighting Hospital and Patient Concerns this Election Year.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Campaign 2016 is in full swing, and the American Hospital Association is seizing the opportunity to make sure the concerns of patients and hospitals are heard. On the front burner: escalating drug prices. PMID:27180391

  10. Flu Shot Safe for Surgery Patients in Hospital: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157754.html Flu Shot Safe for Surgery Patients in Hospital: Study ... increased risk for complications if they receive a flu shot in the hospital, a new study suggests. ...

  11. Academic health center teaching hospitals in transition: a perspective from the field.

    PubMed

    Cyphert, S T; Colloton, J W; Levey, S

    1997-01-01

    A study of 11 Academic Health Center Teaching Hospitals (ATHs) in 11 states found that cost reduction programs, internal reorganizations, reengineering, benchmarking, and broadened entrepreneurial activity were prominent among the strategic initiatives reported in dealing with an increasingly turbulent environment. Although none of the ATHs had experienced negative net margins, we conclude that today's competitive healthcare system requires ATHs be reimbursed separately for their educational and other societally related costs to assist them in competing on a level playing fields. PMID:9543922

  12. Positioning academic medical centers and teaching hospitals to thrive in the next decade.

    PubMed

    Morris, D E

    1985-06-01

    Market share for academic medical centers and teaching hospitals will decline over the next five years necessitating new strategies to ensure growth and profitability. These types of institutions are, however, in a strong position to compete and gain market share locally by building a defensible competitive advantage. This article offers three avenues for increasing market share: networking, brand name product differentiation, and business diversification. PMID:10271804

  13. Physicians' Patient Load per DRG, the Consumption of Hospital Resources, and the Incentives of the DRG Prospective Payment System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Eric; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The relationship between numbers (high or low) of patients per diagnosis-related group (DRG) treated by individual physicians and hospital resource consumption of the patients at a large academic medical center was studied for the period 1985-87. The findings, although a result of many varied factors, suggest a relationship between the two…

  14. Nursing diagnoses, interventions, and patient outcomes for hospitalized older adults with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Head, Barbara J; Scherb, Cindy A; Reed, David; Conley, Deborah Marks; Weinberg, Barbara; Kozel, Marie; Gillette, Susan; Clarke, Mary; Moorhead, Sue

    2011-04-01

    A study was conducted by academic and community hospital partners with clinical information systems that included the standardized nursing language classifications of the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association International (NANDA-I), Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC), and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC). The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of NANDA-I, NIC, and NOC (NNN) terms documented for older adults with pneumonia who were discharged from three hospitals during a 1-year period. NNN terms were ranked according to frequency for each hospital, and then the rankings were compared with previous studies. Similarity was greater across hospitals in rankings of NANDA-I and NOC terms than in rankings of NIC terms. NANDA-I and NIC terms are influenced by reimbursement and regulatory factors as well as patient condition. The 10 most frequent NNN terms for each hospital accounted only for a small to moderate percentage of the terms selected. PMID:21544937

  15. Homocysteine and disability in hospitalized geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Marengoni, Alessandra; Cossi, Stefania; De Martinis, Monica; Calabrese, Paolo A; Orini, Stefania; Grassi, Vittorio

    2004-08-01

    Elevated total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations have been found to be associated with cardiovascular disease and dementia in old age. The present study was performed to identify the prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) and to analyze the association between tHcy concentration and sociodemographic characteristics, nutritional parameters, and cognitive and functional status in this sample of hospitalized geriatric patients. A total of 214 patients (77% females) 65+ years old admitted into an acute care geriatric ward of an internal medical department in the Northern Italy were studied. tHcy concentration was measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-F). Information about nutrition (body mass index [BMI], serum albumin, cholesterol, and transferrin) was collected on admission. Functional status was investigated with the Basic Activities of Daily Living scale (ADL) and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale (IADL); cognitive and affective status were assessed by the Mini-Mental State Evaluation (MMSE) and the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). The mean tHcy concentration was 18.4 +/- 13.1 micromol/L; 74.2% of males and 68.9% of females had HHcy (> 12 micromol/L). Sixty-four percent of patients with normal serum vitamin B12 and folate concentrations had HHcy. Elevated tHcy concentrations were associated with older age, male gender, increasing serum creatinine, lower MMSE score, and disability. The mean tHcy concentration depended on the occurrence of different diseases. Patients affected by atherosclerotic diseases, such as ischemic heart diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, and dementia had higher mean tHcy concentration than those without diagnosed vascular diseases. In multivariate analysis, vitamin B12, folate, serum albumin, creatinine, and disability emerged as factors associated with tHcy, adjusted for age, gender, education, MMSE score, and atherosclerotic diseases. Our results suggest that the

  16. A Comparative Study of Terminally Ill Hospice and Hospital Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labus, Janet G.; Dambrot, Faye H.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated differences between 28 hospice and 28 hospital patients who died. Comparison found that hospice patients were younger, had more people living in the home, and had shorter disease history. Age, number of people living in the home, and primary cancer site significantly discriminated between hospice and hospital patients and predicted…

  17. Exploring improvements in patient logistics in Dutch hospitals with a survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Research showed that promising approaches such as benchmarking, operations research, lean management and six sigma, could be adopted to improve patient logistics in healthcare. To our knowledge, little research has been conducted to obtain an overview on the use, combination and effects of approaches to improve patient logistics in hospitals. We therefore examined the approaches and tools used to improve patient logistics in Dutch hospitals, the reported effects of these approaches on performance, the applied support structure and the methods used to evaluate the effects. Methods A survey among experts on patient logistics in 94 Dutch hospitals. The survey data were analysed using cross tables. Results Forty-eight percent of all hospitals participated. Ninety-eight percent reported to have used multiple approaches, 39% of them used five or more approaches. Care pathways were the preferred approach by 43% of the hospitals, followed by business process re-engineering and lean six sigma (both 13%). Flowcharts were the most commonly used tool, they were used on a regular basis by 94% of the hospitals. Less than 10% of the hospitals used data envelopment analysis and critical path analysis on a regular basis. Most hospitals (68%) relied on external support for process analyses and education on patient logistics, only 24% had permanent internal training programs on patient logistics. Approximately 50% of the hospitals that evaluated the effects of approaches on efficiency, throughput times and financial results, reported that they had accomplished their goals. Goal accomplishment in general hospitals ranged from 63% to 67%, in academic teaching hospitals from 0% to 50%, and in teaching hospitals from 25% to 44%. More than 86% performed an evaluation, 53% performed a post-intervention measurement. Conclusions Patient logistics appeared to be a rather new subject as most hospitals had not selected a single approach, they relied on external support and they did

  18. Shallow medication extraction from hospital patient records.

    PubMed

    Boytcheva, Svetla

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents methods for shallow Information Extraction (IE) from the free text zones of hospital Patient Records (PRs) in Bulgarian language in the Patient Safety through Intelligent Procedures in medication (PSIP) project. We extract automatically information about drug names, dosage, modes and frequency and assign the corresponding ATC code to each medication event. Using various modules for rule-based text analysis, our IE components in PSIP perform a significant amount of symbolic computations. We try to address negative statements, elliptical constructions, typical conjunctive phrases, and simple inferences concerning temporal constraints and finally aim at the assignment of the drug ACT code to the extracted medication events, which additionally complicates the extraction algorithm. The prototype of the system was used for experiments with a training corpus containing 1,300 PRs and the evaluation results are obtained using a test corpus containing 6,200 PRs. The extraction accuracy (f-score) for drug names is 98.42% and for dose 93.85%. PMID:21685617

  19. Patient-specific academic detailing for smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Margaret; Gagnon, Antony; Levine, Mitchell; Thabane, Lehana; Rodriguez, Christine; Dolovich, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe and to determine the feasibility of a patient-specific academic detailing (PAD) smoking cessation (SC) program in a primary care setting. Design Descriptive cohort feasibility study. Setting Hamilton, Ont. Participants Pharmacists, physicians, nurse practitioners, and their patients. Interventions Integrated pharmacists received basic academic detailing training and education on SC and then delivered PAD to prescribers using structured verbal education and written materials. Data were collected using structured forms. Main outcome measures Five main feasibility criteria were generated based on Canadian academic detailing programs: PAD coordinator time to train pharmacists less than 40 hours; median time of SC education per pharmacist less than 20 hours; median time per PAD session less than 60 minutes for initial visit; percentage of prescribers receiving PAD within 3 months greater than 50%; and number of new SC referrals to pharmacists at 6 months more than 10 patients per 1.0 full-time equivalent (FTE) pharmacist (total of approximately 30 patients). Results Eight pharmacists (5.8 FTE) received basic academic detailing training and education on SC PAD. Forty-eight physicians and 9 nurse practitioners consented to participate in the study. The mean PAD coordinator training time was 29.1 hours. The median time for SC education was 3.1 hours. The median times for PAD sessions were 15 and 25 minutes for an initial visit and follow-up visit, respectively. The numbers of prescribers who had received PAD at 3 and 6 months were 50 of 64 (78.1%) and 57 of 64 (89.1%), respectively. The numbers of new SC referrals at 3 and 6 months were 11 patients per FTE pharmacist (total of 66 patients) and 34 patients per FTE pharmacist (total of 200 patients), respectively. Conclusion This study met the predetermined feasibility criteria with respect to the management, resources, process, and scientific components. Further study is warranted to determine

  20. Hot bitumen burns: 92 hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Baruchin, A M; Schraf, S; Rosenberg, L; Sagi, A A

    1997-08-01

    Bitumen burns while comprising a small percentage of all types of burns are troublesome. They affect persons engaged in gainful employment which the burns then curtail, as well as requiring special attention because the substance adheres to the skin and is therefore difficult to remove. Ninety-two consecutive patients with such burns who were admitted as in-patients over a 10-year period (1985-1995) have been reviewed. Most of the burns occurred on a worksite and involved active young persons (mean age 29.6 years) the mean size of the burn was 3.87 per cent TBSA, mainly affecting the upper extremities and hands. Mean hospitalization time was 10.6 days. Bitumen burns are fully predictable and can easily be prevented by avoiding unsafe practice and/or equipment. Bitumen is a general term for petroleum-derived substances ranging from true petroleum through so-called mineral tars, to asphalt. Asphalt (Asphaltum) is a semi-solid mixture of several hydrocarbons probably formed by the evaporation of the lighter or more volatile constituents. It is amorphous of low specific gravity, 1-2, with a black or brownish black colour and pitchy lustre. At room temperature it is solid becoming molten and spreadable when heated to 93 degrees C and over. Roofing tars and asphalts are usually heated to temperatures of 232 degrees C to achieve desirable viscosities (e.g. for spraying), whereas lower temperatures are required for the manageable form to pave roads. Notable localities for asphaltum are the island of Trinidad and the Dead Sea region where lake asphaltums were long known to the ancient. Ironically, none of the 92 patients who were treated for bitumen injuries in the 'Soroka' (Beer-Sheba, Israel) and 'Barzilai' (Ashkelon, Israel) Medical Centres (80 and 150 km from the lake respectively) had anything to do with the Dead Sea area. PMID:9426915

  1. [Frequency of drug adverse reactions among hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    González Martínez, L

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the frequency of adverse reactions to drugs in a sample of hospitalized patients in the internal medicine ward seen during a year's term. Of 61 medical charts, we found 8 patients with adverse reactions to drugs during their hospital stay and another 4 patients hospitalized due to adverse reactions to drugs. The majority of the adverse reactions were of moderate degree (75%) and were related to drugs of cardiovascular action (58%). The frequency of reactions in hospitalized patients (13%) is comparable with the results obtained from other hospitals. Yet, the real magnitude of the problem is probably greater since the source of information (hospital charts) the totality of the clinical manifestations are not registered. PMID:8581452

  2. The Inequality of Patient Profile Information in Japanese Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yukio; Ishida, Haku; Kimura, Ezen; Gochi, Akira; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Shimai, Ken-Ichiro; Nakajima, Noriaki; Tanaka, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Kiyomu; Oohara, Michihiro; Sonoda, Takeharu; Takai, Kohei

    2016-01-01

    A model dataset of patient profile information was created based on the items used at five Japanese university hospitals, the patient information data elements in Health Level 7 (HL7) v2.5, and the standard datasets for medical information exchange used in Japan. In order to check the validity of the model dataset, a cross-sectional survey was performed. A preliminary analysis of 20 Japanese hospitals found that most items were implemented at some hospitals, but the number of items implemented at many hospitals was rather small. This result strongly shows the necessity for a standardized dataset of patient profile information. PMID:27577415

  3. Evaluation of Patient Safety Indicators in Semnan City Hospitals by Using the Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative (PSFHI)

    PubMed Central

    Babamohamadi, Hassan; Nemati, Roghayeh Khabiri; Nobahar, Monir; Keighobady, Seifullah; Ghazavi, Soheila; Izadi-Sabet, Farideh; Najafpour, Zhila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, patient safety issue is among one of the main concerns of the hospital policy worldwide. This study aimed to evaluate the patient safety status in hospitals affiliated to Semnan city, using the WHO model for Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiatives (PSFHI) in summer 2014. Methods: That was a cross sectional descriptive study that addressed patient safety, which explained the current status of safety in the Semnan hospitals using by instrument of Patient safety friendly initiative standards (PSFHI). Data was collected from 5 hospitals in Semnan city during four weeks in May 2014. Results: The finding of 5 areas examined showed that some components in critical standards had disadvantages. Critical standards of hospitals including areas of leadership and administration, patient and public involvement and safe evidence-based clinical practice, safe environment with and lifetime education in a safe and secure environment were analyzed. The domain of patient and public involvement obtained the lowest mean score and the domain of safe environment obtained the highest mean score in the surveyed hospitals. Conclusion: All the surveyed hospitals had a poor condition regarding standards based on patient safety. Further, the identified weak points are almost the same in the hospitals. Therefore, In order to achieve a good level of all aspects of the protocol, the goals should be considered in the level of strategic planning at hospitals. An effective execution of patient safety creatively may depend on the legal infrastructure and enforcement of standards by hospital management, organizational liability to expectation of patients, safety culture in hospitals. PMID:27045391

  4. Loyalty of hospital patients: a vital marketing objective.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1987-01-01

    Hospitals must strive for patient loyalty as a top priority objective in their marketing strategies. Loyal patients are sources of repeat business, potential users of new services, and positive spokespersons in word-of-mouth advertising. PMID:3583719

  5. A small grant funding program to promote innovation at an academic research hospital.

    PubMed

    Orrell, Kelsey; Yankanah, Rosanna; Heon, Elise; Wright, James G

    2015-10-01

    Innovation is important for the improvement of health care. A small grant innovation funding program was implemented by the Hospital for Sick Children(SickKids) for the Perioperative Services group, awarding relatively small funds (approximately $10 000) in order to stimulate innovation. Of 48 applications,26 (54.2%) different innovation projects were funded for a total allocation of $227 870. This program demonstrated the ability of small grants to stimulate many applications with novel ideas, a wide range of innovations and reasonable academic productivity. PMID:26384144

  6. A small grant funding program to promote innovation at an academic research hospital

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, Kelsey; Yankanah, Rosanna; Heon, Elise; Wright, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Innovation is important for the improvement of health care. A small grant innovation funding program was implemented by the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) for the Perioperative Services group, awarding relatively small funds (approximately $10 000) in order to stimulate innovation. Of 48 applications, 26 (54.2%) different innovation projects were funded for a total allocation of $227 870. This program demonstrated the ability of small grants to stimulate many applications with novel ideas, a wide range of innovations and reasonable academic productivity. PMID:26384144

  7. The effect of hospital volume on the in-hospital complication rate in knee replacement patients.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, E C; Garfinkel, S A; McQuay, L J; Heck, D A; Wright, J G; Dittus, R; Lubitz, R M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of hospital volume on in-hospital surgical outcomes for knee replacement using six years of Medicare claims data. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: The data include inpatient claims for a 100 percent sample of Medicare patients who underwent primary knee replacement during 1985-1990. We supplemented these data with information from HCFA's denominator files, the Area Resource File, and the American Hospital Association survey files. STUDY DESIGN: We estimated the probability that a patient has an in-hospital complication in the initial hospitalization for the first primary knee replacement, using a Logit model, for three definitions of complication. The models controlled for hospital volume, other hospital characteristics, patient demographics, and patient health status. We tested for the endogeneity of hospital volume. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: A panel of two orthopaedic surgeons and two internists reviewed diagnosis codes to determine whether a complication was likely, possible, or due to anemia. After removing the few observations with bad or missing data, the final population has 295,473 observations. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The probability of a likely in-hospital complication declines rapidly from 53 through 107 operations per year, then levels off. Statistical tests imply that hospital volume is exogenous in this patient-level data. Complication rates increased steadily through the study period. Although obesity appeared to lower the probability of a complication, a counterintuitive result, further investigation revealed this to be an artifact of the claims data limit of listing no more than five diagnoses. Controlling for this restriction reversed the effect of obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Rather than uncontrolled expansion of knee surgery to small hospitals, decentralization to regional centers where at least about 50, and preferably about 100, operations per year are assured appears to be the optimal policy to reduce in-hospital

  8. HOSPITAL VARIATION IN SPHINCTER PRESERVATION FOR ELDERLY RECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of rectal cancer in elderly patients. Methods Using SEER-Medicare linked data, we identified 4,959 stage I–III rectal cancer patients over age 65 diagnosed from 2000–2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. Results The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly rectal cancer patients. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which, combined, explained 31% of procedure variation. Conclusions Receipt of local excision is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. PMID:24750983

  9. Identification of the decision maker for a patient's hospital choice: who decides which hospital?

    PubMed

    Sloane, G; Tidwell, P; Horsfield, M

    1999-01-01

    If marketers wish to communicate the positive characteristics of purchasing the private hospital experience, the marketers need to be able to identify which of the participants in the purchasing process is acting in the role of decision maker. Research was undertaken of doctors in the rural setting. Potential respondents were selected from Orange to Broken Hill; from Coonabarabran to Young. Two private hospitals are known to be located within this region--one in Orange and one in Dubbo. In most cases, patients in the rural setting are having the final say as to which hospital to attend. They are filling the role of decision maker. The factors that potential patients are considering in their decision include the services provided by the hospital--specifically factors relating to accommodation, services and cost. These observations are those as interpreted by the doctors who see these patients. Based on the findings of the survey a number of recommendations have been made: (1) Any marketing communication by hospitals should target primarily patients and then doctors. (2) Further research should be undertaken to attempt to accurately determine what characteristics are considered when patients and doctors refer to hospital services. (3) Research should be undertaken to determine the identity of all parties involved in the purchasing decision process. (4) Further research should be undertaken of the general population to determine what factors relating to a hospital are considered when making the hospital purchasing decision. (5) Further in depth analysis should be conducted with the raw data. PMID:10623196

  10. [Management of the patient with COPD: home case or hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Aubert, John-David

    2013-05-01

    Acute exacerbation of COPD is one of the most common causes of hospital admission in patients affected with this disease. In most cases, consideration of differential diagnoses and assessment of important comorbidities will allow to make the decision whether or not the patient needs to be hospitalized. A decision to hospitalize will be based on specific symptoms and signs, as well on the patient's history. Contrary to bronchial asthma, a systematic action plan strategy is lacking for COPD. However, a disease management plan involving all the health care providers may have the potential to improve the patient's well being and to decrease costs related to these exacerbations. PMID:23644245

  11. Migration of patients between five urban teaching hospitals in Chicago.

    PubMed

    Galanter, William L; Applebaum, Andrew; Boddipalli, Viveka; Kho, Abel; Lin, Michael; Meltzer, David; Roberts, Anna; Trick, Bill; Walton, Surrey M; Lambert, Bruce L

    2013-04-01

    To quantify the extent of patient sharing and inpatient care fragmentation among patients discharged from a cohort of Chicago hospitals. Admission and discharge dates and patient ZIP codes from 5 hospitals over 2 years were matched with an encryption algorithm. Admission to more than one hospital was considered fragmented care. The association between fragmentation and socio-economic variables using ZIP-code data from the 2000 US Census was measured. Using validation from one hospital, patient matching using encrypted identifiers had a sensitivity of 99.3 % and specificity of 100 %. The cohort contained 228,151 unique patients and 334,828 admissions. Roughly 2 % of the patients received fragmented care, accounting for 5.8 % of admissions and 6.4 % of hospital days. In 3 of 5 hospitals, and overall, the length of stay of patients with fragmented care was longer than those without. Fragmentation varied by hospital and was associated with the proportion of non-Caucasian persons, the proportion of residents whose income fell in the lowest quartile, and the proportion of residents with more children being raised by mothers alone in the zip code of the patient. Patients receiving fragmented care accounted for 6.4 % of hospital days. This percentage is a low estimate for our region, since not all regional hospitals participated, but high enough to suggest value in creating Health Information Exchange. Fragmentation varied by hospital, per capita income, race and proportion of single mother homes. This secure methodology and fragmentation analysis may prove useful for future analyses. PMID:23381645

  12. Diabetes hinders community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Boavida, J M; Raposo, J F; Froes, F; Nunes, B; Ribeiro, R T; Penha-Gonçalves, C

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and its impact on hospital length of stay and in-hospital mortality. Research design and methods We carried out a retrospective, nationwide register analysis of CAP in adult patients admitted to Portuguese hospitals between 2009 and 2012. Anonymous data from 157 291 adult patients with CAP were extracted from the National Hospital Discharge Database and we performed a DM-conditioned analysis stratified by age, sex and year of hospitalization. Results The 74 175 CAP episodes that matched the inclusion criteria showed a high burden of DM that tended to increase over time, from 23.7% in 2009 to 28.1% in 2012. Interestingly, patients with CAP had high DM prevalence in the context of the national DM prevalence. Episodes of CAP in patients with DM had on average 0.8 days longer hospital stay as compared to patients without DM (p<0.0001), totaling a surplus of 15 370 days of stay attributable to DM in 19 212 admissions. In-hospital mortality was also significantly higher in patients with CAP who have DM (15.2%) versus those who have DM (13.5%) (p=0.002). Conclusions Our analysis revealed that DM prevalence was significantly increased within CAP hospital admissions, reinforcing other studies’ findings that suggest that DM is a risk factor for CAP. Since patients with CAP who have DM have longer hospitalization time and higher mortality rates, these results hold informative value for patient guidance and healthcare strategies. PMID:27252873

  13. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A.; Pfaff, Holger; DerSarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect of such strategies on a range of patient-reported experience measures. Materials and Methods We employed a cross-sectional, multi-level study design randomly recruiting hospitals from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey between May 2011 and January 2012. Each hospital contributed patient level data for four conditions/pathways: acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries. The outcome variables in this study were a set of patient-reported experience measures including a generic 6-item measure of patient experience (NORPEQ), a 3-item measure of patient-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure) and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management functions and patient-centered care strategies. We used directed acyclic graphs to detail and guide the modeling of the complex relationships between predictor variables and outcome variables, and fitted multivariable linear mixed models with random intercept by hospital, and adjusted for fixed effects at the country level, hospital level and patient level. Results Overall, 74 hospitals and 276 hospital departments contributed data on 6,536 patients to this study (acute

  14. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  15. Pediatric Patients' Malnutrition and Its Relation to Hospitalization Times and Causes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimarey, Luis M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Relates the nutritional status of 1,378 hospitalized pediatric patients to length of hospitalization and definitive hospitalization diagnosis. Findings indicated the length of hospitalization time increased markedly with malnutrition, especially for patients with diarrhea. (BJD)

  16. Prevention of Venous Thromboembolism in Hospitalized Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    This is a literature review of the frequency of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized patients with cancer and of the available evidence supporting the use of thromboprophylaxis. Patients with cancer are at particularly high risk of venous thromboembolism and account for almost 20% of patients in the population. Hospitalization is an important risk factor in patients with cancer, with rates reported between 0.6% and 7.8%. The incidence has been increasing over the past decade. Three randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses indicate that prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin, heparin, or fondaparinux significantly reduces the rate of venous thromboembolism in hospitalized medical patients who are at high risk. Patients with cancer were included in these studies, but prospective trials specifically focused on patients with cancer are not available. Evidence indicates that appropriate thromboprophylaxis is provided to a minority of hospitalized patients with cancer and that targeted educational efforts and computerized prompt systems can increase appropriate use. Guidelines developed by both oncology and thrombosis organizations support the use of thromboprophylaxis in hospitalized patients with cancer. In conclusion, most patients hospitalized with cancer are at high risk of venous thromboembolism, and thromboprophylaxis should be provided in the absence of active bleeding or a high bleeding risk. PMID:19704060

  17. Translational science and the hidden research system in universities and academic hospitals: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lander, Bryn; Atkinson-Grosjean, Janet

    2011-02-01

    Innovation systems (IS) and science policy scholarship predominantly focus on linkages between universities and industry, and the commercial translation of academic discoveries. Overlooked in such analyses are important connections between universities and academic hospitals, and the non-commercial aspects of translational science. The two types of institutions tend to be collapsed into a single entity-'the university'-and relational flows are lost. Yet the distinctions and flows between the two are crucial elements of translational science and the biomedical innovation system. This paper explores what has been called the 'hidden research system' that connects hospitals, universities, and their resources, with the clinical and scientific actors who make the linkages possible. Then, using a novel conceptual model of translational science, we examine the individual interactions and dynamics involved in a particular example of the biomedical innovation system at work: the diagnosis of IRAK-4 deficiency, a rare immunological disorder, and the translational flows that result. Contra to conventional IS analyses, we are able to point to the strong role of public-sector institutions, and the weak role of the private-sector, in the translational processes described here. Our research was conducted within a Canadian network of scientists and clinician-scientists studying the pathogenomics of immunological disorders and innate immunity. PMID:21168250

  18. Health care financing policy for hospitalized pulmonary medicine patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, E; Barrau, L; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1989-01-01

    Several federal bodies provide ongoing analyses of the Medicare DRG prospective hospital payment system. Many states are using DRG prospective "all payor systems" for hospital reimbursement (based on the federal model). In All Payor Systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; New York State has been All Payor since 1/1/88. This study simulated DRG All Payor methods on a large sample (n = 1,662) of pulmonary medicine patients for a two-year period using both federal and New York DRG reimbursement now in effect at our hospital. Medicare patients had (on average) a longer hospital length of stay and total hospital cost compared to patients from Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial payors. Medicare patients also had a greater severity of illness compared to patients from Blue Cross Medicaid or other payors. All payors, however, (Medicaid, Blue Cross, Medicare and commercial insurers) generated significant financial risk under the DRG All Payor scheme. These data suggest that federal, state, and private payors may be underreimbursing for the care of the hospitalized pulmonary medicine patients using the DRG prospective hospital payment scheme. Health care financing policy, as demonstrated in this study, may limit both the access and quality of care for many pulmonary medicine patients in the future. PMID:2491799

  19. A Qualitative Analysis of Implementation of Antimicrobial Stewardship at 3 Academic Hospitals: Understanding the Key Influences on Success

    PubMed Central

    Jeffs, Lianne; Thampi, Nisha; Maione, Maria; Steinberg, Marilyn; Morris, Andrew M; Bell, Chaim M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inappropriate use of antimicrobials is linked to the development and spread of drug-resistant pathogens and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, lengths of hospital stay, and health care costs. “Antimicrobial stewardship” is the umbrella term for an evidence-based knowledge translation strategy involving comprehensive quality improvement activities to optimize the use of antimicrobials, improve patient outcomes, reduce the development of antimicrobial resistance and hospital-acquired infections such as Clostridium difficile, and decrease health care costs. Objective: To assess the perceptions and experiences of antimicrobial stewardship program leaders in terms of clinicians’ attitudes toward and behaviours related to antimicrobial prescribing. Methods: In this qualitative study, semistructured interviews were conducted with 6 antimicrobial stewards (2 physicians and 4 pharmacists) at 3 academic hospitals between June and August 2013. Results: The following 3 key themes emerged from the interviews: getting the right people on board, building collegial relationships, and rapidly establishing a track record. The study results elucidated the role and mechanisms that the program leader and other antimicrobial stewards used to influence other clinicians to engage in effective utilization of antimicrobials. The results also highlighted the methods employed by members of the antimicrobial stewardship team to tailor their strategies to the local context and to stakeholders of participating units; to gain credibility by demonstrating the impact of the antimicrobial stewardship program on clinical outcomes and cost; and to engage senior leaders to endorse and invest in the antimicrobial stewardship program, thereby adding to the antimicrobial stewards’ credibility and their ability to influence the uptake of effective antimicrobial use. Conclusions: Collectively, these results offer insight into processes and mechanisms of influence employed

  20. Delirium in Prolonged Hospitalized Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Saadat, Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged hospitalization in the intensive care unit (ICU) can impose long-term psychological effects on patients. One of the most significant psychological effects from prolonged hospitalization is delirium. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prolonged hospitalization of patients and subsequent delirium in the intensive care unit. Patients and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted in the General Intensive Care Unit of the Shariati Hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, from the beginning of 2013 to 2014. All prolonged hospitalized patients and their families were eligible participants. From the 34 eligible patients and 63 family members, the final numbers of actual patients and family members were 9 and 16, respectively. Several semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face with patients and their families in a private room and data were gathered. Results: Two main themes from two different perspectives emerged, 'patients' perspectives' (experiences during ICU hospitalization) and 'family members' perspectives' (supportive-communicational experiences). The main results of this study focused on delirium, Patients' findings were described as pleasant and unpleasant, factual and delusional experiences. Conclusions: Family members are valuable components in the therapeutic process of delirium. Effective use of family members in the delirium caring process can be considered to be one of the key non-medical nursing components in the therapeutic process. PMID:26290854

  1. Health care financing policy for hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Munoz, E; Chalfin, D; Goldstein, J; Lackner, R; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1989-03-01

    Prospective hospital payment systems using the federal Medicare DRG payment model are changing hospital reimbursement. Currently, many states have adopted diagnosis related group (DRG) prospective "all payer systems" using the federal model. All payer systems, whereby Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode, prevent cost shifting between payers. New York state has used an all payer system since Jan 1, 1988. This study simulated DRG all payer methods for a large sample (N = 16,084) of pediatric patients for a three-year period using the New York DRG all payer reimbursement system now in effect. Medicaid pediatric patients had (adjusted for DRG weight index) a longer hospital stay and greater total hospital cost compared with pediatric patients from Blue Cross and other commercial payers. Medicaid pediatric patients also had a greater severity of illness compared with patients from Blue Cross and other payers. Pediatric patients in all payment groups (ie, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial insurers) generated financial risk under the DRG all payer scheme. Medicaid pediatric patients generated the greatest financial risk, however. These data suggest that state and private payers may be under-reimbursing for the care of the hospitalized pediatric patient using the DRG prospective hospital payment scheme. Health care financing policy for pediatric patients may limit both access and quality of care. PMID:2492754

  2. Effect of hospital referral networks on patient readmissions.

    PubMed

    Mascia, Daniele; Angeli, Federica; Di Vincenzo, Fausto

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that referral networks encompass important mechanisms of coordination and integration among hospitals, which enhance numerous organizational-level benefits, such as productivity, efficiency, and quality of care. The present study advances previous research by demonstrating how hospital referral networks influence patient readmissions. Data include 360,697 hospitalization events within a regional community of hospitals in the Italian National Health Service. Multilevel hierarchical regression analysis tests the impacts of referral networks' structural characteristics on patient hospital readmissions. The results demonstrate that organizational centrality in the overall referral network and ego-network density have opposing effects on the likelihood of readmission events within hospitals; greater centrality is negatively associated with readmissions, whereas greater ego-network density increases the likelihood of readmission events. Our findings support the (re)organization of healthcare systems and provide important indications for policymakers and practitioners. PMID:25795994

  3. Building patient-centeredness: hospital design as an interpretive act.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Hospital designs reflect the sociocultural, economic, professional, and aesthetic priorities prevalent at a given time. As such, hospital buildings concretize assumptions about illness, care and healing, patienthood, and medical providers' roles. Trends in hospital design have been attributed to the increasing influence of consumerism on healthcare, the influx of business-oriented managers, and technological changes. This paper describes the impact of the concept of patient-centeredness on the design of a new hospital in the USA. Data come from 35 interviews with planners, administrators, and designers of the new hospital, as well as from public documents about the hospital design. Thematic content analysis was used to identify salient design principles and intents. For these designers, administrators, and planners, an interpretation of patient-centeredness served as a heuristic, guiding the most basic decisions about space, people, and processes in the hospital. I detail the particular interpretation of patient-centeredness used to build and manage the new hospital space and the roles and responsibilities of providers working within it. Three strategies were central to the implementation of patient-centeredness: an onstage/offstage layout; a concierge approach to patients; and the scripting of communication. I discuss that this interpretation of patient-centeredness may challenge medical professionals' roles, may construct medical care as a product that should sate the patient's desire, and may distance patients from the realities of medical care. By describing the ways in which hospital designs reflect and reinforce contemporary concepts of patienthood and caring, this paper raises questions about the implementation of patient-centeredness that deserve further empirical study by medical social scientists. PMID:22703887

  4. Academic hospital staff compliance with a fecal immunochemical test-based colorectal cancer screening program

    PubMed Central

    Vlachonikolou, Georgia; Gkolfakis, Paraskevas; Sioulas, Athanasios D; Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Melissaratou, Anastasia; Moustafa, Giannis-Aimant; Xanthopoulou, Eleni; Tsilimidos, Gerasimos; Tsironi, Ioanna; Filippidis, Paraskevas; Malli, Chrysoula; Dimitriadis, George D; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    AIM To measure the compliance of an Academic Hospital staff with a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program using fecal immunochemical test (FIT). METHODS All employees of “Attikon” University General Hospital aged over 50 years were thoroughly informed by a team of physicians and medical students about the study aims and they were invited to undergo CRC screening using two rounds of FIT (DyoniFOB® Combo H, DyonMed SA, Athens, Greece). The tests were provided for free and subjects tested positive were subsequently referred for colonoscopy. One year after completing the two rounds, participants were asked to be re-screened by means of the same test. RESULTS Among our target population consisted of 211 employees, 59 (27.9%) consented to participate, but only 41 (19.4%) and 24 (11.4%) completed the first and the second FIT round, respectively. Female gender was significantly associated with higher initial participation (P = 0.005) and test completion - first and second round - (P = 0.004 and P = 0.05) rates, respectively. Physician’s (13.5% vs 70.2%, P < 0.0001) participation and test completion rates (7.5% vs 57.6%, P < 0.0001 for the first and 2.3% vs 34%, P < 0.0001 for the second round) were significantly lower compared to those of the administrative/technical staff. Similarly, nurses participated (25.8% vs 70.2%, P = 0.0002) and completed the first test round (19.3% vs 57.6%, P = 0.004) in a significant lower rate than the administrative/technical staff. One test proved false positive. No participant repeated the test one year later. CONCLUSION Despite the well-organized, guided and supervised provision of the service, the compliance of the Academic Hospital personnel with a FIT-based CRC screening program was suboptimal, especially among physicians. PMID:27574556

  5. Patient Characteristics Predicting Readmission Among Individuals Hospitalized for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Melissa; Murtaugh, Christopher M.; Shah, Shivani; Barrón-Vaya, Yolanda; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Peng, Timothy R.; Zhu, Carolyn W.; Feldman, Penny H.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is difficult to manage and increasingly common with many individuals experiencing frequent hospitalizations. Little is known about patient factors consistently associated with hospital readmission. A literature review was conducted to identify heart failure patient characteristics, measured before discharge, that contribute to variation in hospital readmission rates. Database searches yielded 950 potential articles, of which 34 studies met inclusion criteria. Patient characteristics generally have a very modest effect on all-cause or heart failure–related readmission within 7 to 180 days of index hospital discharge. A range of cardiac diseases and other comorbidities only minimally increase readmission rates. No single patient characteristic stands out as a key contributor across multiple studies underscoring the challenge of developing successful interventions to reduce readmissions. Interventions may need to be general in design with the specific intervention depending on each patient's unique clinical profile. PMID:26180045

  6. Hypoalbuminaemia in haemodialysis patients at Parirenyatwa group of hospitals and Chitungwiza central hospital

    PubMed Central

    Machingura, Pasipanodya Ian; Mahiya, Needmore Muchadura; Chikwasha, Vasco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Haemodialysis is one of the widely used methods in end stage renal disease. However it has a negative impact on the quality of life of the renal patients. Hypoalbuminaemia occur in haemodialysis patients and it correlates strongly with mortality and morbidity. We sought out to determine the prevalence of hypoalbuminaemia among haemodialysis patients at Parirenyatwa group of hospitals and Chitungwiza central hospital. Methods A questionnaire was administered on haemodialysis patients at Parirenyatwa Group of Hospitals and Chitungwiza Central Hospital who consented to participate in the study. Pre dialysis serum samples collected from the patients were used for albumin analysis. The serum from the patients was analysed for serum albumin levels using the Mindray BS120 chemistry analyser using the bromocresol green method. Results A total of 60 patients were recruited from the two hospitals. The Mean albumin concentration for the entire group was 33.6g/L SD (6.1 g/L). The mean albumin in males was 33.6 g/L, SD (5.9) and in female 33.6, SD (6.6 g/L) and this was not statistically significantly different (p = 0.988). The prevalence of hypoalbuminaemia was 76.7%. Conclusion Hypoalbuminaemia in 76.7% of haemodialysis patients studied is a cause of concern thus monitoring of haemodialysis patients albumin is necessary since its decreased levels has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality. PMID:26491522

  7. Characteristics, Treatment Practices, and In-Hospital Outcomes of Older Patients Hospitalized With Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han-Yang; McManus, David D.; Saczynski, Jane S.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Gore, Joel M.; Yarzebski, Jorge; Goldberg, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives The objectives of our study were to examine overall, and decade-long trends(1999-2009),patient characteristics, treatment practices, and hospital outcomes among patients≥65 years hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and describe how these factors varied in the youngest, middle, and oldest-old patients. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Population-based Worcester Heart Attack Study. Measurements We conducted analyses examining the socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, cardiac treatments, and hospital outcomesof olderpatients in 3age strata (65-74, 75-84, and ≥85 years). Participants The study sample consisted of 3,851 patientsaged ≥65 yearshospitalized with AMI during 6 biennial years between 1999and 2009;32% were aged 65-74 years, 43% were aged 75-84 years, and 25% were ≥85 years. Results Advancing age was inversely associated with receipt of evidence-based cardiac therapies. After multivariable adjustment, the odds of dying during hospitalization was1.46times higher in patients aged 75-84 years, and 1.78times higher in those aged ≥85 years, compared with those aged 65-74 years. The oldest-old patients had an approximate 25% decreased odds of a prolonged hospital stay (>3 days) compared with those aged 65-74 years. Decade-long trends in our principal study outcomes were also examined.Although the oldest-old patients hospitalized for AMIwere at the greatest risk for dying among olderpatients, we observed persistent age-related differences in hospital treatment practices.Similar results were observed after excluding patients with a DNR order in their medical records. Conclusion While there are persistent disparities in care and outcomes of older patients hospitalized with AMI, additional studies are needed to delineate the extent to which less aggressive care reflects patient preferences and appropriate implementation of palliative care approaches. PMID:25116983

  8. Assessment of patient safety culture in Saudi Arabian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Alahmadi, H A

    2010-10-01

    Context Healthcare organisations in Saudi Arabia are striving to improve patient safety and quality of care through implementation of safety systems and creating a culture of safety. Objective The purpose of this study to evaluate the extent to which the culture supports patient safety at Saudi hospitals. Data Collection A survey questionnaire was distributed hospital-wide in 13 general hospitals in Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia, to 223 health professionals including nurses, technicians, managers and medical staff. Measurement The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was used to identify dimensions of patient safety culture. Results Overall Patient Safety Grade was rated as excellent or very good by 60% of respondents, acceptable by 33% and failing or poor by 7%. More than half of respondents thought that managers overlook safety problems that happen over and over. Areas of strength for most hospitals were organisational learning/continuous improvement, teamwork within units, feedback and communication about errors. Areas with potential for improvement for most hospitals were under-reporting of events, non-punitive response to error, staffing, teamwork across hospital units. Conclusion Leadership is a critical element to the effectiveness of patient safety initiatives. Response to errors is an important determinant of safety culture in healthcare organisations. In order for healthcare organisations to create a culture of safety and improvement, they must eliminate fear of blame and create a climate of open communication and continuous learning. PMID:20430929

  9. Health care financing policy for hospitalized nephrology patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, E; Barrau, L; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1988-12-01

    The Medicare diagnosis-related group (DRG) prospective payment system is now entering its 6th year, with no reported major adverse effects on the health status of the American people. Currently 13 states are using DRG prospective "all-payer systems" for hospital reimbursement; other state may adopt DRG all payer systems. In DRG all-payer systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; New York state has been all-payer since January 1, 1988. This study simulated DRG all-payer methods on a large sample (n = 558) of adult nephrology patients for a 2-year period using both federal and New York DRG reimbursements now in effect. Both Medicare and Medicaid patients had (on average) longer hospital lengths of stay and higher total hospital costs compared with patients from Blue Cross and other commercial payers. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had greater severity of illness than patients from Blue Cross or other payers. However, all payers (ie, Medicaid, Blue Cross, Medicare, and commercial insurers) generated significant financial risk under our DRG all-payer scheme. These data suggest that federal, state, and private payers may be underreimbursing for the care of hospitalized nephrology patients using the DRG prospective hospital payment scheme. As DRG payment rates are further reduced compared with the real hospital costs of treating patients, both the access to and the quality of care for many nephrology patients may be jeopardized. PMID:3143261

  10. Using standardized patients to evaluate hospital-based intervention outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Guan, Jihui

    2014-01-01

    Background The standardized patient approach has proved to be an effective training tool for medical educators. This article explains the process of employing standardized patients in an HIV stigma reduction intervention in healthcare settings in China. Methods The study was conducted in 40 hospitals in two provinces of China. One year after the stigma reduction intervention, standardized patients made unannounced visits to participating hospitals, randomly approached service providers on duty and presented symptoms related to HIV and disclosed HIV-positive test results. After each visit, the standardized patients evaluated their providers’ attitudes and behaviours using a structured checklist. Standardized patients also took open-ended observation notes about their experience and the evaluation process. Results Seven standardized patients conducted a total of 217 assessments (108 from 20 hospitals in the intervention condition; 109 from 20 hospitals in the control condition). Based on a comparative analysis, the intervention hospitals received a better rating than the control hospitals in terms of general impression and universal precaution compliance as well as a lower score on stigmatizing attitudes and behaviours toward the standardized patients. Conclusion Standardized patients are a useful supplement to traditional self-report assessments, particularly for measuring intervention outcomes that are sensitive or prone to social desirability. PMID:24369433

  11. Yeasts in a hospital for patients with skin diseases

    PubMed Central

    Somerville, Dorothy A.

    1972-01-01

    The incidence and acquisition of Candida albicans and other yeasts in two wards of a skin hospital is described. Carriage rates on the skin in hospital patients is higher than is generally supposed, and cutaneous sites may act as sources of infection with these organisms. PMID:4567312

  12. Turning around patient complaints in a regional hospital.

    PubMed

    Douglas, D; Harrison, R D

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the introduction by a regional general hospital of a different system for handling complaints from patients. It outlines the underlying philosophy of the new system and the experiences of the hospital as the new system matured. The paper provides data for the first six quarters of operation of the system. PMID:10162003

  13. Burnout in Hospital Social Workers Who Work with AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oktay, Julianne S.

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 128 hospital social workers who worked with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. Found that hospital AIDS social workers had slightly higher rates of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization on Maslach Burnout Inventory but also felt substantially higher level of personal accomplishment. Age, autonomy, and belonging to…

  14. Length of stay and hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital by family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chuck K.; Chambers, Catharine; Fang, Dianne; Mazowita, Garey; Hwang, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare length of stay and total hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital under the care of family physicians who were their usual health care providers in the community (group A) and patients admitted to the same inpatient service under the care of family physicians who were not their usual health care providers (group B). Design Retrospective observational study. Setting A large urban hospital in Vancouver, BC. Participants All adult admissions to the family practice inpatient service between April 1, 2006, and June 30, 2008. Main outcome measures Ratio of length of stay to expected length of stay and total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit. Multivariate linear regression was performed to determine the effect of admitting group (group A vs group B) on the natural logarithm transformations of the outcomes. Results The median acute length of stay was 8.0 days (interquartile range [IQR] 4.0 to 13.0 days) for group A admissions and 8.0 days (IQR 4.0 to 15.0 days) for group B admissions. The median (IQR) total hospital costs were $6498 ($4035 to $11 313) for group A admissions and $6798 ($4040 to $12 713) for group B admissions. After adjustment for patient characteristics, patients admitted to hospital under the care of their own family physicians did not significantly differ in terms of acute length of stay to expected length of stay ratio (percent change 0.6%, P = .942) or total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit (percent change −2.0%, P = .722) compared with patients admitted under the care of other family physicians. Conclusion These findings suggest that having networks of family physicians involved in hospital care for patients is not less efficient than having family physicians provide care for their own patients. PMID:22518905

  15. Assessing patient safety culture in hospitals across countries

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, C.; Smits, M.; Sorra, J.; Huang, C.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective It is believed that in order to reduce the number of adverse events, hospitals have to stimulate a more open culture and reflective attitude towards errors and patient safety. The objective is to examine similarities and differences in hospital patient safety culture in three countries: the Netherlands, the USA and Taiwan. Design This is a cross-sectional survey study across three countries. A questionnaire, the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (Hospital SOPS), was disseminated nationwide in the Netherlands, the USA and Taiwan. Setting The study was conducted in 45 hospitals in the Netherlands, 622 in the USA and 74 in Taiwan. Participants A total of 3779 professionals from the participating hospitals in the Netherlands, 196 462 from the USA and 10 146 from Taiwan participated in the study. Main Outcome Measures The main outcome measures of the study were 12 dimensions of patient safety culture, e.g. Teamwork, Organizational learning, Communication openness. Results Most hospitals in all three countries have high scores on teamwork within units. The area with a high potential for improvement in all three countries is Handoffs and transitions. Differences between countries exist on the following dimensions: Non-punitive response to error, Feedback and communication about error, Communication openness, Management support for patient safety and Organizational learning—continuous improvement. On the whole, US respondents were more positive about the safety culture in their hospitals than Dutch and Taiwanese respondents. Nevertheless, there are even larger differences between hospitals within a country. Conclusions Comparison of patient safety culture data has shown similarities and differences within and between countries. All three countries can improve areas of their patient safety culture. Countries can identify and share best practices and learn from each other. PMID:23571748

  16. Surgonomics. Health care financing policy for hospitalized otolaryngology patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, E; Zahtz, G; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1988-11-01

    The Medicare diagnosis related group (DRG) prospective payment model is changing hospital payment. Currently many states are using DRG prospective "All Payor Systems" for hospital reimbursement. In All Payor Systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; New York State has been All Payor since Jan 1, 1988. This study simulated DRG All Payor methods on a large sample (N = 1074) of adult otolaryngology patients for a two-year period using both federal and New York DRG reimbursement now in effect. Both Medicare and Medicaid patients had (on average) a longer hospital stay and total hospital cost compared with patients from Blue Cross and other commercial payors. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had a greater severity of illness compared with patients from Blue Cross or other payors. All payors (ie, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and commercial insurers), except Medicare, generated financial risk under the DRG All Payor scheme. These data suggest that state and private payors may be underreimbursing for the care of the hospitalized otolaryngology patient using the DRG prospective hospital payment scheme. Health care financing policy described in this study may limit both the access and/or the quality of care for many otolaryngology patients in the future. PMID:3139014

  17. Funds for treatment of hospitalized patients: evidence from Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Begum, Farhana; Alam, Shahinul; Hossain, Akmal

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to explore sources of funds for health expenditure of patients if they are hospitalized. We have included 379 patients of 3 private and 7 public hospitals to estimate total expenditure. Of them, 229 (60.4%) were from public and 150 (39.6%) from private hospitals. Mean expenditure was Tk 60,613.3 and 8,262.7, and duration of hospital stay was 10.7 and 11.8 days in private and public hospitals respectively. More than half (55%) of the patients from middle class were treated in private hospitals. Of them, 278 (74.0%) were funded by themselves, 48 (12.8%) by loan with interest rate of 100% to 180%, 23 (6.1%) by loan without interest, 17 (4.5%) by losing their fixed asset, and 4 (1.1%) by begging in the street. Most of the patients did bear expenditure by themselves, followed by loan with high interest rate. 'Distress' selling of property was also a source. Middle-class patients could be comfortable with expenditure if they were in public hospitals. PMID:25395909

  18. Funds for Treatment of Hospitalized Patients: Evidence from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Farhana; Hossain, Akmal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was designed to explore sources of funds for health expenditure of patients if they are hospitalized. We have included 379 patients of 3 private and 7 public hospitals to estimate total expenditure. Of them, 229 (60.4%) were from public and 150 (39.6%) from private hospitals. Mean expenditure was Tk 60,613.3 and 8,262.7, and duration of hospital stay was 10.7 and 11.8 days in private and public hospitals respectively. More than half (55%) of the patients from middle class were treated in private hospitals. Of them, 278 (74.0%) were funded by themselves, 48 (12.8%) by loan with interest rate of 100% to 180%, 23 (6.1%) by loan without interest, 17 (4.5%) by losing their fixed asset, and 4 (1.1%) by begging in the street. Most of the patients did bear expenditure by themselves, followed by loan with high interest rate. ‘Distress’ selling of property was also a source. Middle-class patients could be comfortable with expenditure if they were in public hospitals. PMID:25395909

  19. Ensuring the safe discharge of older patients from hospital.

    PubMed

    Tingle, John

    2016-07-28

    John Tingle, Reader in Health Law at Nottingham Trent University, discusses two reports that consider hospital discharge, the failures that they highlight and recommendations to improve care for older patients. PMID:27467648

  20. Pre-hospital discharge planning: empowering elderly patients through choice.

    PubMed

    Merriman, Mary L

    2008-01-01

    Reductions in the length of stay for acute hospitalization have occurred as a result of Medicare cost containment strategies during the past 20 years. Thus, innovative approaches to the treatment of patients in the acute care hospital setting are necessary, particularly in the practice of discharge planning. The medical literature typically identifies the first day of admission as the time to begin discharge planning in order to minimize the patient's length of stay in the acute care hospital. This strategy has its limitations as elderly patients are often confused by unfamiliar surroundings, surgical anesthesia, postoperative pain, and the rapid pace of hospital recovery typically expected today. Consequently, options for discharge may be limited to the most expedient plan that will ensure safety and continued recovery. This article presents an alternative plan that begins with outpatient education preceding admission and follows the patient throughout the continuum of care including postdischarge. PMID:18316937

  1. Prescribing patterns of target-specific oral anticoagulants: an academic hospital perspective

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Stacy A.; Yarbrough, Peter M.; Rose, Richard S.; Lanspa, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Target-specific oral anticoagulants have been rapidly adopted into clinical practice for stroke prophylaxis and venous thromboembolism treatment, raising concerns about off-label prescribing practices. We conducted a retrospective review of consecutive patients prescribed dabigatran, rivaroxaban or apixaban prior to inpatient hospitalization over an 18-month period to examine the off-label prescribing frequency, contraindications and related complications. Chart review included baseline demographics, hospital admitting service, outpatient prescribing service, renal function, therapeutic indication, echocardiographic findings, contraindications, major bleeding events and vital status. We identified 160 patients who received a target-specific oral anticoagulant prior to hospitalization. Over half (53.1%) of the patients received rivaroxaban, 43.7% received dabigatran and 3.1% received apixaban. Atrial fibrillation (68.1%) and venous thromboembolism treatment (25.6%) were the most common indications. Ninety percent of patients had a U.S. Foods and Drugs Administration (FDA)-approved indication for therapy. Major bleeding events occurred in 4.4% of patients. Cardiology was the most common prescribing and admitting service (43.8 and 31.3%), and more frequently adhered to FDA-approved indications (97 vs. 84%, P = 0.01). There were no significant differences between prescribing services regarding major contraindications (P = 0.14) and major bleeding events (P = 0.77). Off-label prescription rates for target-specific oral anticoagulants were infrequent and not associated with increased adverse events. PMID:26414695

  2. Health care financing policy for hospitalized black patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, E; Johnson, H; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1988-09-01

    The Medicare diagnostic-related group (DRG) prospective payment model is changing hospital payment. Currently many states are using DRG prospective "all payer systems" for hospital reimbursement. In all payer systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross, and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; New York State has had an all payer system since January 1, 1988. This study simulated DRG all payer methods on a large sample (N = 6,134) of adult black medical and surgical patients for a three-year period using both federal and New York DRG reimbursement. Both Medicare and Medicaid patients had, on average, a longer hospital stay and total hospital cost compared with patients covered by Blue Cross and other commercial insurers. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had a greater severity of illness compared with those of Blue Cross and others. All insurers (ie, Medicaid, Blue Cross, Medicare, and commercial) generated substantial financial risk under the DRG all payer scheme. These data suggest that federal, state, and private payers may be under-reimbursing for the care of the hospitalized black patient using the DRG prospective hospital payment scheme. Health care financing policy such as that demonstrated in this study may limit both the access and quality of care for many black patients in the future. PMID:3149307

  3. Patient and medication-related factors associated with hospital-acquired hyponatremia in patients hospitalized from heart failure.

    PubMed

    Saepudin, S; Ball, Patrick A; Morrissey, Hana

    2016-08-01

    Background Hyponatremia has been known as an important predictor of clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). While information on hyponatremia in patients with HF has been available abundantly, information on factors associated with increased risk of developing hospital-acquired hyponatremia (HAH) is still limited. Objective To identify patients and medication-related factors associated with HAH in patients hospitalized from HF. Setting Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Methods This is a nested case-control study with patients developing HAH served as case group and each patient in case group was matched by age and gender to three patients in control group. Patients included in this study are patients hospitalized from HF, and coded with I.50 according to ICD-10, during 2011-2013 at Fatmawati Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia. Information retrieved from patients' medical records included demographic profiles, vital signs and symptoms at admission, past medical history, medication during hospitalization and clinical chemistry laboratory records. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to find out patient and treatment-related factors associated with the development of HAH. Main outcome measures Patients and medication related factors having significant association with HAH. Results Four hundreds sixty-four patients were included in this study and 45 of them (9.7 %) met criteria of developing HAH so then, accordingly, 135 patients were selected as controls. 36 patient- and 22 treatment-related factors were analyzed in univariate logistic regression resulted in 20 factors having p value <0.2 and were included in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Final factors showing significant association with HAH are presence of ascites at admission (odds ratio = 4.7; 95 % confidence interval 1.9-11.5) and administration of amiodarone (3.2; 1.3-7.4) and heparin (3.1; 1.2-7.3) during hospital stay. Conclusion Presence of ascites at

  4. Recognition and Management of Perioperative Stroke in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Vlisides, Phillip E; Mashour, George A; Didier, Thomas J; Shanks, Amy M; Weightman, Adam; Gelb, Adrian W; Moore, Laurel E

    2016-08-01

    We sought to characterize stroke management and outcomes in a postoperative population. By using the electronic medical records, we identified 39 patients suffering perioperative stroke after noncardiac and nonneurosurgical procedures for whom documentation of management and outcomes was available. Thirty-three strokes occurred during admission, whereas 6 occurred after discharge and were recognized upon return to the hospital. Perioperative stroke was associated with delayed recognition, infrequent intervention, and significant rates of morbidity and mortality, suggesting the need for improved screening and more rapid treatment. There may be disparities in care and outcomes between in-hospital and out-of hospital stroke patients, though further study is warranted. PMID:27490452

  5. Substance use treatment barriers for patients with frequent hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Raven, Maria C; Carrier, Emily R; Lee, Joshua; Billings, John C; Marr, Mollie; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2010-01-01

    Substance use (SU) disorders adversely impact health status and contribute to inappropriate health services use. This qualitative study sought to determine SU-related factors contributing to repeated hospitalizations and to identify opportunities for preventive interventions. Fifty Medicaid-insured inpatients identified by a validated statistical algorithm as being at high-risk for frequent hospitalizations were interviewed at an urban public hospital. Patient drug/alcohol history, experiences with medical, psychiatric and addiction treatment, and social factors contributing to readmission were evaluated. Three themes related to SU and frequent hospitalizations emerged: (a) barriers during hospitalization to planning long-term treatment and follow-up, (b) use of the hospital as a temporary solution to housing/family problems, and (c) unsuccessful SU aftercare following discharge. These data indicate that homelessness, brief lengths of stay complicating discharge planning, patient ambivalence regarding long-term treatment, and inadequate detox-to-rehab transfer resources compromise substance-using patients' likelihood of avoiding repeat hospitalization. Intervention targets included supportive housing, detox-to-rehab transportation, and postdischarge patient support. PMID:19540700

  6. Applying Classification Trees to Hospital Administrative Data to Identify Patients with Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Juned; Ruhnke, Gregory W.; Flores, Andrea; Prochaska, Micah T.; Paesch, Elizabeth; Meltzer, David O.; Whelan, Chad T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is a common cause of acute hospitalization. Currently, there is no accepted standard for identifying patients with LGIB in hospital administrative data. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a set of classification algorithms that use hospital administrative data to identify LGIB. Methods Our sample consists of patients admitted between July 1, 2001 and June 30, 2003 (derivation cohort) and July 1, 2003 and June 30, 2005 (validation cohort) to the general medicine inpatient service of the University of Chicago Hospital, a large urban academic medical center. Confirmed cases of LGIB in both cohorts were determined by reviewing the charts of those patients who had at least 1 of 36 principal or secondary International Classification of Diseases, Ninth revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis codes associated with LGIB. Classification trees were used on the data of the derivation cohort to develop a set of decision rules for identifying patients with LGIB. These rules were then applied to the validation cohort to assess their performance. Results Three classification algorithms were identified and validated: a high specificity rule with 80.1% sensitivity and 95.8% specificity, a rule that balances sensitivity and specificity (87.8% sensitivity, 90.9% specificity), and a high sensitivity rule with 100% sensitivity and 91.0% specificity. Conclusion These classification algorithms can be used in future studies to evaluate resource utilization and assess outcomes associated with LGIB without the use of chart review. PMID:26406318

  7. Mobility decline in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Fábio Santos; Paim, Daniel de Macedo; Brito, Juliana de Oliveira; Barros, Idiel de Araujo; Nogueira, Thiago Barbosa; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Pires, Thiago Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variation in mobility during hospitalization in an intensive care unit and its association with hospital mortality. Methods This prospective study was conducted in an intensive care unit. The inclusion criteria included patients admitted with an independence score of ≥ 4 for both bed-chair transfer and locomotion, with the score based on the Functional Independence Measure. Patients with cardiac arrest and/or those who died during hospitalization were excluded. To measure the loss of mobility, the value obtained at discharge was calculated and subtracted from the value obtained on admission, which was then divided by the admission score and recorded as a percentage. Results The comparison of these two variables indicated that the loss of mobility during hospitalization was 14.3% (p < 0.001). Loss of mobility was greater in patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours in the intensive care unit (p < 0.02) and in patients who used vasopressor drugs (p = 0.041). However, the comparison between subjects aged 60 years or older and those younger than 60 years indicated no significant differences in the loss of mobility (p = 0.332), reason for hospitalization (p = 0.265), SAPS 3 score (p = 0.224), use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.117), or hospital mortality (p = 0.063). Conclusion There was loss of mobility during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. This loss was greater in patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours and in those who used vasopressors; however, the causal and prognostic factors associated with this decline need to be elucidated. PMID:27410406

  8. The Overlap Syndrome of Depression and Delirium in Older Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Givens, Jane L.; Jones, Richard N.; Inouye, Sharon K.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To measure the prevalence, predictors and post-hospitalization outcomes associated with the overlap syndrome of coexisting depression and incident delirium in older hospitalized patients. Design Secondary analysis of prospective cohort data from the control group of the Delirium Prevention Trial. Setting General medical service of an academic medical center. Follow-up interviews at one month and one year post-hospital discharge. Participants Four hundred and fifty nine patients aged 70 and over who were not delirious at hospital admission. Measurements Depressive symptoms assessed at hospital admission using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (cutoff score of 6 used to define depression), daily assessments of incident delirium from admission to discharge using the Confusion Assessment Method. Activities of daily living at admission and one month post-discharge. New nursing home placement and mortality determined at one year. Results Of 459 participants, 23 (5%) had the overlap syndrome, 39 (9%) delirium alone, 121 (26%) depression alone and 276 (60%) neither condition. In adjusted analysis, patients with the overlap syndrome had higher odds of new nursing home placement or death at one year (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 5.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.57– 18.38) and one month functional decline (AOR 3.30, 95% CI = 1.14–9.56) compared to patients with neither condition. Conclusion The overlap syndrome of depression and delirium is associated with significant risk of functional decline, institutionalization and death. Efforts to identify, prevent and treat this condition may reduce the risk of adverse outcomes in older hospitalized patients. PMID:19558475

  9. Patient safety initiatives in Germany: The hospital perspective.

    PubMed

    Voit, Doris

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety has become a major focus in German socio-political awareness over the past decade. Efforts to improve patient safety have been increased nationwide and involve all stakeholders in the German health care system. The government aims to improve the quality of health care services both in the hospital and in the ambulatory care sector with a quality campaign. On one hand it strengthens patients' power and participation in decision-making and on the other hand it stresses the need for health care providers themselves to enhance patient safety and to ensure the nationwide provision of excellent health care, whereby hospitals play a vital role in providing a comprehensive system of locally available clinical treatment. This article focuses particularly on the numerous mandatory and voluntary initiatives provided by hospitals with respect to quality of care and patient safety, however further information about the context can be found in the online version cited in the footnote below. PMID:25985558

  10. Glycemic control and diabetes management in hospitalized patients in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of tight blood glucose control among outpatients with diabetes mellitus is well established, however, the management of diabetes in the hospital setting is generally considered secondary in importance. This study sought to assess glycemic control and diabetes management in adult patients admitted to hospitals in Brazil. Methods A cross-sectional and nationwide survey was conducted from July 2010 to January 2012. Eligible cases were 18 years of age or older, had a diagnosis of diabetes and a hospitalization length of stay ≥72 hours. Socio-demographic information, hospitalization details, and data on diabetes diagnosis, management and treatment were collected for all patients by chart review. Information on all blood glucose (BG) readings for a maximum of 20 consecutive days of hospitalization was recorded for each patient. Results Overall, 2,399 patients were surveyed in 24 hospitals located in 13 cities from all five Brazilian regions. The prevalence of patients presenting hyperglycemic (BG >180 mg/dL) or hypoglycemic (BG <70 mg/dL) events was 89.4% and 30.9% in patients in general wards, and 88.2% and 27.7% in those in Intensive Care Units (ICUs), respectively. In addition, a BG measure >180 mg/dL was recorded in two-thirds of the patient-days. A high proportion of patients were treated with sliding-scale insulin regimen alone in the general wards (52.0%) and in the ICUs (69.2%), and only 35.7% and 3.9% received appropriate insulin therapy in general wards (basal + bolus insulin) and in ICUs (continuous IV insulin), respectively. Conclusions Inpatient glycemic control and diabetes management needs improvement. Opportunities to improve care in Brazilian hospitals include expanded use of intravenous insulin and subcutaneous basal-bolus insulin protocols, avoiding use of sliding-scale insulin alone, increased frequency of blood glucose monitoring, and institution wide quality improvement efforts targeting both physician and nursing

  11. Service quality of private hospitals: The Iranian Patients' perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Highly competitive market in the private hospital industry has caused increasing pressure on them to provide services with higher quality. The aim of this study was to determine the different dimensions of the service quality in the private hospitals of Iran and evaluating the service quality from the patients' perspective. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2010 in Tehran, Iran. The study sample was composed of 983 patients randomly selected from 8 private general hospitals. The study questionnaire was the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of 21 items in service quality dimensions. Results The result of factor analysis revealed 3 factors, explaining 69% of the total variance. The total mean score of patients' expectation and perception was 4.91(SD = 0.2) and 4.02(SD = 0.6), respectively. The highest expectation and perception related to the tangibles dimension and the lowest expectation and perception related to the empathy dimension. The differences between perception and expectation were significant (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference between the expectations scores based on gender, education level, and previous hospitalization in that same hospital. Also, there was a significant difference between the perception scores based on insurance coverage, average length of stay, and patients' health conditions on discharge. Conclusion The results showed that SERVQUAL is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to monitor and measure the quality of the services in private hospitals of Iran. Our findings clarified the importance of creating a strong relationship between patients and the hospital practitioners/personnel and the need for hospital staff to be responsive, credible, and empathetic when dealing with patients. PMID:22299830

  12. Informed consent from patients participating in medical education: a survey from a university hospital in Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Medical students at the University of the West Indies receive clinical training by passing through a series of hospital rotations at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI). Many of these patients are unaware that medical students may be involved in their care. We performed this study to determine patient awareness and their willingness to participate in research and teaching activities. Findings All consecutive patients admitted to the UHWI between May 1, 2006 and May 29, 2006 who required elective or emergency surgical procedures were prospectively identified These patients were interviewed using a standardised pre-tested questionnaire about their knowledge and willingness to have medical students participate in the delivery of their hospital care. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 12.0. There were 83 (39.5%) males and 127 (60.5%) females interviewed. The patients were unaware of the grade of the medical professional performing their interview/examination at admission in 157 (74.8%) cases or the grade of medical professional performing their operations in 101 (48.1%) cases. Only 14 (6.7%) patients were specifically asked to allow medical students to be present during their clinical evaluation and care. When specifically asked, 1 patient declined. Had they been asked, 196 (93.3%) patients would have voluntarily allowed medical student involvement. Only 90 (42.9%) patients were made aware that they were admitted to an academic centre with research interests. Only 6 (6.7%) patients declined. Had they been asked, 84 (93.3%) patients would be willing to participate in teaching or research projects. Conclusions As medical educators, we are responsible to adhere to ethical and legal guidelines when we interact with patients. It is apparent that there is urgent need for policy development at the UWI to guide clinicians and students on their interactions with patients. PMID:20003471

  13. Software engineering in medical informatics: the academic hospital as learning environment.

    PubMed

    Prins, H; Cornet, R; van den Berg, F M; van der Togt, R; Abu-Hanna, A

    2002-01-01

    In 2001, the revised course Software Engineering has been implemented in the Medical Informatics curriculum at the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam. This 13 weeks, full-time course consists of three parts: internship, theory and project. All parts are provided in problem-oriented manner with special attention for relevant skills such as project management, documentation and presentation. During the internship, students observe how health care professionals at several hospital wards work and how information supply is organized. In the theory part, students study concepts and methods of software engineering by means of case descriptions and self-directed learning. During the project, they apply their acquired knowledge to an observed, clinical information problem and complete several stages of the software engineering process. Evaluation by inquiry showed that, compared to other courses, students spent more time, and distributed their time more evenly, during the whole period of the course. In conjunction with theory, a combination of internship and project in a hospital seems to provide a surplus value compared to a practical in a computer laboratory. The integration of software theory, clinical practice and problem-based approach, contributed to the enthusiastic, intensive and realistic way students learned in this important topic that might be chosen as a future profession. PMID:15460769

  14. Prevalence and Predictive Value of Dyspnea Ratings in Hospitalized Patients: Pilot Studies

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Jennifer P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Dyspnea (breathing discomfort) can be as powerfully aversive as pain, yet is not routinely assessed and documented in the clinical environment. Routine identification and documentation of dyspnea is the first step to improved symptom management and it may also identify patients at risk of negative clinical outcomes. Objective To estimate the prevalence of dyspnea and of dyspnea-associated risk among hospitalized patients. Design Two pilot prospective cohort studies. Setting Single academic medical center. Patients Consecutive patients admitted to four inpatient units: cardiology, hematology/oncology, medicine, and bariatric surgery. Measurements In Study 1, nurses documented current and recent patient-reported dyspnea at the time of the Initial Patient Assessment in 581 inpatients. In Study 2, nurses documented current dyspnea at least once every nursing shift in 367 patients. We describe the prevalence of burdensome dyspnea, and compare it to pain. We also compared dyspnea ratings with a composite of adverse outcomes: 1) receipt of care from the hospital’s rapid response system, 2) transfer to the intensive care unit, or 3) death in hospital. We defined burdensome dyspnea as a rating of 4 or more on a 10-point scale. Results Prevalence of burdensome current dyspnea upon admission (Study 1) was 13% (77 of 581, 95% CI 11%-16%). Prevalence of burdensome dyspnea at some time during the hospitalization (Study 2) was 16% (57 of 367, 95% CI 12%-20%). Dyspnea was associated with higher odds of a negative outcome. Conclusions In two pilot studies, we identified a significant symptom burden of dyspnea in hospitalized patients. Patients reporting dyspnea may benefit from a more careful focus on symptom management and may represent a population at greater risk for negative outcomes. PMID:27070144

  15. Attitudes of patients and staff towards tobacco smoking in hospital.

    PubMed

    Zołnierczuk-Kieliszek, Dorota; Wachowska-Gil, Karolina

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to establish the frequency and intensity of smoking by the patients and hospital staff and to define the attitudes of the polled persons towards smoking tobacco on the premises of the hospital and their opinions about the limitations in force. The examination in the form of a distributed questionnaire, comprised 101 patients and 127 staff members of Henryk Klimontowicz Specialist Hospital in Gorlice (province of Małopolska /Little Poland/). Both mobile and bed-ridden patients participated in the study. The personnel was represented by physicians, nurses, ward attendants, psychologists, secretaries, Medical University students doing their apprenticeships on the premises of the hospital, employees of technical and administrative departments. The study was carried out by means of a diagnostic sounding with the use of a distributed questionnaire technique in the period from September 2002 to July 2003. The questionnaire contained 38 questions, including closed, open, half-open and multiple-choice questions. In our poll we used the Fagerstrom test, which determined the type of addiction to smoking tobacco (physical or psychological), and which was completed by tobacco-smokers. The statistical analysis was carried out by means of the Chi2 test for independence, assuming the significance level of 0.05. The obtained results were analyzed according to the sex of the polled persons and their functions in the premises of the hospital (patient, staff member). The results of the obtained analysis show that 13.9% of the polled patients of the Specialist Hospital in Gorlice smoked cigarettes every day. The percentage of everyday smokers among the staff of this hospital was significantly higher and equalled 18.1%. Half of the polled persons were exposed to passive smoking on the premises of the hospital, the staff more than the patients. The patients supported the restrictions concerning smoking on the premises of the hospital to a greater extent than

  16. Out-of-Hospital Endotracheal Intubation Experience and Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Henry E.; Balasubramani, G. K.; Cook, Lawrence J.; Lave, Judith R.; Yealy, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    Study objective Previous studies suggest improved patient outcomes for providers who perform high volumes of complex medical procedures. Out-of-hospital tracheal intubation is a difficult procedure. We seek to determine the association between rescuer procedural experience and patient survival after out-of-hospital tracheal intubation. Methods We analyzed probabilistically linked Pennsylvania statewide emergency medicine services, hospital discharge, and death data of patients receiving out-of-hospital tracheal intubation. We defined tracheal intubation experience as cumulative tracheal intubation during 2000 to 2005; low=1 to 10 tracheal intubations, medium=11 to 25 tracheal intubations, high=26 to 50 tracheal intubations, and very high=greater than 50 tracheal intubations. We identified survival on hospital discharge of patients intubated during 2003 to 2005. Using generalized estimating equations, we evaluated the association between patient survival and out-of-hospital rescuer cumulative tracheal intubation experience, adjusted for clinical covariates. Results During 2003 to 2005, 4,846 rescuers performed tracheal intubation. These individuals performed tracheal intubation on 33,117 patients during 2003 to 2005 and 62,586 patients during 2000 to 2005. Among 21,753 cardiac arrests, adjusted odds of survival was higher for patients intubated by rescuers with very high tracheal intubation experience; adjusted odds ratio (OR) versus low tracheal intubation experience: very high 1.48 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15 to 1.89), high 1.13 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.31), and medium 1.02 (95% CI 0.91 to 1.15). Among 8,162 medical nonarrests, adjusted odds of survival were higher for patients intubated by rescuers with high and very high tracheal intubation experience; adjusted OR versus low tracheal intubation experience: very high 1.55 (95% CI 1.08 to 2.22), high 1.29 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.59), and medium 1.16 (95% CI 0.97 to 1.38). Among 3,202 trauma nonarrests, survival was not

  17. Management of Hyperglycemia and Enteral Nutrition in the Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Cynthia Ann; Wien, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    There has been increased attention on the importance of identifying and distinguishing the differences between stress-induced hyperglycemia (SH), newly diagnosed hyperglycemia (NDH), and hyperglycemia in persons with established diabetes mellitus (DM). Inpatient blood glucose control is now being recognized as not only a cost issue for hospitals but also a concern for patient safety and care. The reasons for the increased incidence of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients include preexisting DM, undiagnosed DM or prediabetes, SH, and medication-induced hyperglycemia with resulting transient blood glucose variability. It is clear that identifying and documenting hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with and without a previous diagnosis of DM and initiating prompt insulin treatment are important. Agreement on the optimum treatment goals for hyperglycemia remains quite controversial, and the benefits of intensive glucose management may be lost at the cost of hypoglycemia in intensive care unit patients. Nutrition support in the form of enteral nutrition (EN) increases the risk of hyperglycemia in both critical and non-critically ill hospitalized patients. Reasons for beginning a tube feeding are the same whether a person has NDH or DM. What differs is how to incorporate EN into the established insulin management protocols. The risk for hyperglycemia with the addition of EN is even higher in those without a previous diagnosis of DM. This review discusses the incidence of hyperglycemia, the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia, factors contributing to hyperglycemia in the hospitalized patient, glycemic management goals, current glycemic management recommendations, and considerations for EN formula selection, administration, and treatment. PMID:26084507

  18. Delivered dialysis dose is suboptimal in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Obialo, C I; Hernandez, B; Carter, D

    1998-01-01

    Underdialyzed patients have high hospitalization and mortality rates. It is unclear if such patients receive adequate dialysis during hospitalization. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated single treatment delivered dialysis dose during hospitalization and compared this to the dosage received at the free-standing outpatient clinics in the same patients. Eighty-four patients (54% male) aged 23-63 years (means +/- SD 55.5 +/- 14.6) who have been on dialysis for at least 3 months were evaluated. Hypertension and diabetes were the most common diagnoses, while thrombosed graft or fistula accounted for 40% of admissions. The mean dialysis treatment time (Td) was 30 min longer in the outpatient (OP) setting than the hospital (H): 3.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.1 +/- 0.2 h (p < 0.0001). Attained blood flow (QB) was 15% greater in the OP than H: 394 +/- 40 vs. 331 +/- 54 ml/min (p < 0.0001). The Kt/V was analyzed in 49 of 84 patients; the OP Kt/V was 20% greater than the H Kt/V: 1.38 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.11 +/- 0.1 (p < 0.0001). A further breakdown of H Kt/V according to access and membrane types showed that patients with functional grafts/fistula had a higher Kt/V than those with temporary accesses 1.14 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.07 +/- 0.1 (p = 0.01). We conclude that hospitalized patients receive suboptimal dialysis dose, this could have a negative impact on survival if hospitalization is recurrent and prolonged. Kinetic modeling should be routinely performed in such patients and Td should be increased in patients with temporary accesses. PMID:9845829

  19. Improving the provision of meals in hospital. The patients' viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Johns, Nick; Hartwell, Heather; Morgan, Michael

    2010-02-01

    This study examines the provision of hospital meals from the patients' viewpoint, with the aim of improving hospital food service. Patients were approached in early 2008 in a National Health Service hospital in the South of England and invited to comment on the good and bad aspects of eating in hospital. Comments were collected in an abbreviated "key word" format which incurred the minimum of bias and allowed emergent themes to be analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Seven main themes emerged, of which "food" and "choice" were mentioned most frequently, but had a low ratio (1.8 and 1.7, respectively) of approving over disapproving comments. The next most mentioned theme, "service staff", showed the highest approving/disapproving ratio (4.8) overall. Less frequent themes were: "meals and lifestyle", "timing and routine", "service quality" and "food quantity". These data, together with qualitative analysis of the responses showed patients' views of hospital food to be positive, on the whole meeting or surpassing their expectations. However, these expectations were low, the experience of eating in hospital contrasted unfavourably with home, and the meals were at best a distraction from the rigours of hospital treatment. Service staff were positively regarded because they offered an important opportunity for "normal" discourse with a non-medical person. On the basis of the findings, changes are recommended in the management of service staff, menus, food presentation, nutritional intake and patients' lifestyle. Of these, the first is likely to have most impact on the experience and viewpoint of hospital patients. PMID:19857535

  20. Predictors of Hospitalization in Patients with Syncope Assisted in Specialized Cardiology Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Leonardo Marques; Dutra, João Pedro Passos; Mantovani, Augusto; de Lima, Gustavo Glotz; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz

    2013-01-01

    Background Risk stratification of a syncopal episode is necessary to better differentiate patients needing hospitalization of those who can be safely sent home from the emergency department. Currently there are no strict guidelines from our Brazilian medical societies to guide the cardiologist that evaluate patients in an emergency setting. Objectives To analyze the criteria adopted for defining the need for hospitalization and compare them with the predictors of high risk for adverse outcome defined by the OESIL score that is already validated in the medical literature for assessing syncope. Methods A cross-sectional study of patients diagnosed with syncope during emergency department evaluation at our institution in the year 2011. Results Of the 46,476 emergency visits made in that year, 216 were due to syncope. Of the 216 patients analyzed, 39% were hospitalized. The variables associated with the need of hospital admission were - having health care insurance, previous known cardiovascular disease, no history of prior stroke, previous syncope and abnormal electrocardiograms during the presentation. Patients classified in OESIL scores of 0-1 had a greater chance of emergency discharge; 2-3 scores showed greater association with the need of hospitalization. A score ≥ 2 OESIL provided an odds ratio 7.8 times higher for hospitalization compared to score 0 (p <0.001, 95% CI:4,03-15,11). In approximately 39% no etiological cause for syncope was found and in 18% cardiac cause was identified. Conclusions Factors such as cardiovascular disease, prior history of syncope, health insurance, no previous stroke and abnormal electrocardiograms, were the criteria used by doctors to indicate hospital admission. There was a good correlation between the clinical judgment and the OESIL criteria for high risk described in literature. PMID:24145390

  1. Simulation of “a week care unit” organization in an academic hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnaeve, G.; Beguin, C.; Chevalier, P.; Philippe, M.

    2015-05-01

    Poor bed allocation to each specialty might lead to a surplus of available beds during weekends. The introduction of a “week unit” that is only available during working days may improve the efficiency of bed allocation by uniting the patient flow of two regular units, before converting the regular beds of one unit into week beds. In order to test the possible introduction of this system in three services of the Saint-Luc hospital, we created a simulation model that considers new allocation rules to direct the patients into the right unit.

  2. What do patients value in the hospital meal experience?

    PubMed

    Hartwell, Heather J; Shepherd, Paula A; Edwards, John S A; Johns, Nick

    2016-01-01

    A number of previous studies have reported on the aspects of hospital food service that patients value, but usually as a secondary finding, and not generally based upon patient-centred approaches. This study employed a questionnaire produced ab initio from interviews with patients and hospital staff, the data from which were subjected to factor and cluster analysis, in order to identify and prioritise the factors that contribute to the meal experience empirically. The most important factors, food and service were as identified by other authors. In decreasing order of importance were social, personal and situational factors. The results confirm that improving the quality of the food and the efficiency with which it reaches the patients remain the most important objectives of hospital food service. PMID:26408943

  3. Hospital Slang for Patients: Crocks, Gomers, Gorks, and Others.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, David Paul

    1983-01-01

    Slang terms for hospital patients fall into four categories, three characterizing types of patients who claim more attention for their conditions than is warranted, and one made up of positive or neutral descriptive terms. The slang serves social as well as expressive functions, promoting group rapport while maintaining individual distance. (MSE)

  4. Managing diabetes in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Shridhar N; Tanenberg, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Because few randomized trials have been done, little is known about appropriate glycemic control in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. These patients are at high risk of hypoglycemia. It is prudent to monitor glucose closely, set less-stringent blood sugar goals, avoid oral antidiabetic agents, and possibly reduce insulin dosage. PMID:27055204

  5. Creating the Exceptional Patient Experience in One Academic Health System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian S; Miller, Thomas; Daniels, Chrissy; Paine, Marilynn; Gresh, Brian; Betz, A Lorris

    2016-03-01

    Whether patient satisfaction scores can act as a catalyst for improving health care is highly debated. Some argue that pursuing patient satisfaction is overemphasized and potentially at odds with providing good care because it leads providers to overtest and overtreat patients and to bend to unreasonable patient demands, all to improve their ratings. Others cite studies showing that high patient satisfaction scores correlate with improved health outcomes. Ideally, assessing patient satisfaction metrics will encourage empathy, communication, trust, and shared decision making in the health care delivery process. From the patient's perspective, sharing such metrics motivates physicians to provide patient-centered care and meets their need for easily accessible information about their providers. In this article, the authors describe a seven-year initiative, which began in 2008, to change the culture of the University of Utah Health Care system to deliver a consistently exceptional patient experience. Five factors affected the health system's ability to provide such care: (1) a lack of good decision-making processes, (2) a lack of accountability, (3) the wrong attitude, (4) a lack of patient focus, and (5) mission conflict. Working groups designed initiatives at all levels of the health system to address these issues. What began as a patient satisfaction initiative evolved into a model for physician engagement, values-based employment practices, enhanced professionalism and communication, reduced variability in performance, and improved alignment of the mission and vision across hospital and faculty group practice teams. PMID:26606723

  6. Comparative analysis of acute toxic poisoning in 2003 and 2011: analysis of 3 academic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hak-Soo; Kim, Jung-Youn; Choi, Sung-Hyuk; Yoon, Young-Hoon; Moon, Sung-Woo; Hong, Yun-Sik; Lee, Sung-Woo

    2013-10-01

    Social factors may affect the available sources of toxic substances and causes of poisoning; and these factors may change over time. Additionally, understanding the characteristics of patients with acute toxic poisoning is important for treating such patients. Therefore, this study investigated the characteristics of patients with toxic poisoning. Patients visiting one of 3 hospitals in 2003 and 2011 were included in this study. Data on all patients who were admitted to the emergency departments with acute toxic poisoning were retrospectively obtained from medical records. Total 939 patients were analyzed. The average age of patients was 40.0 ± 20 yr, and 335 (36.9%) patients were men. Among the elements that did not change over time were the facts that suicide was the most common cause, that alcohol consumption was involved in roughly 1 of 4 cases, and that there were more women than men. Furthermore, acetaminophen and doxylamine remained the most common poisoning agents. In conclusion, the average patient age and psychotic drug poisoning has increased over time, and the use of lavage treatment has decreased. PMID:24133344

  7. Association between hospital case volume and mortality in non-elderly pneumonia patients stratified by severity: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The characteristics and aetiology of pneumonia in the non-elderly population is distinct from that in the elderly population. While a few studies have reported an inverse association between hospital case volume and clinical outcome in elderly pneumonia patients, the evidence is lacking in a younger population. In addition, the relationship between volume and outcome may be different in severe pneumonia cases than in mild cases. In this context, we tested two hypotheses: 1) non-elderly pneumonia patients treated at hospitals with larger case volume have better clinical outcome compared with those treated at lower case volume hospitals; 2) the volume-outcome relationship differs by the severity of the pneumonia. Methods We conducted the study using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination database. Patients aged 18–64 years discharged from the participating hospitals between July to December 2010 were included. The hospitals were categorized into four groups (very-low, low, medium, high) based on volume quartiles. The association between hospital case volume and in-hospital mortality was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression with generalized estimating equations adjusting for pneumonia severity, patient demographics and comorbidity score, and hospital academic status. We further analyzed the relationship by modified A-DROP pneumonia severity score calculated using the four severity indices: dehydration, low oxygen saturation, orientation disturbance, and decreased systolic blood pressure. Results We identified 8,293 cases of pneumonia at 896 hospitals across Japan, with 273 in-hospital deaths (3.3%). In the overall population, no significant association between hospital volume and in-hospital mortality was observed. However, when stratified by pneumonia severity score, higher hospital volume was associated with lower in-hospital mortality at the intermediate severity level (modified A-DROP score = 2) (odds ratio (OR) of very low vs

  8. Creating the Exceptional Patient Experience in One Academic Health System

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas; Daniels, Chrissy; Paine, Marilynn; Gresh, Brian; Betz, A. Lorris

    2016-01-01

    Whether patient satisfaction scores can act as a catalyst for improving health care is highly debated. Some argue that pursuing patient satisfaction is overemphasized and potentially at odds with providing good care because it leads providers to overtest and overtreat patients and to bend to unreasonable patient demands, all to improve their ratings. Others cite studies showing that high patient satisfaction scores correlate with improved health outcomes. Ideally, assessing patient satisfaction metrics will encourage empathy, communication, trust, and shared decision making in the health care delivery process. From the patient’s perspective, sharing such metrics motivates physicians to provide patient-centered care and meets their need for easily accessible information about their providers. In this article, the authors describe a seven-year initiative, which began in 2008, to change the culture of the University of Utah Health Care system to deliver a consistently exceptional patient experience. Five factors affected the health system’s ability to provide such care: (1) a lack of good decision-making processes, (2) a lack of accountability, (3) the wrong attitude, (4) a lack of patient focus, and (5) mission conflict. Working groups designed initiatives at all levels of the health system to address these issues. What began as a patient satisfaction initiative evolved into a model for physician engagement, values-based employment practices, enhanced professionalism and communication, reduced variability in performance, and improved alignment of the mission and vision across hospital and faculty group practice teams. PMID:26606723

  9. HIV quality of care assessment at an academic hospital: outcomes and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Christine A; Neeman, Naama; Davis, Roger B; Schulze, Joanne; Libman, Howard; Markson, Larry; Aronson, Mark; Bell, Sigall K

    2012-01-01

    Rapid changes in HIV treatment guidelines and antiretroviral therapy drug safety data add to the increasing complexity of caring for HIV-infected patients and amplify the need for continuous quality monitoring. The authors created an electronic HIV database of 642 patients who received care in the infectious disease (ID) and general medicine clinics in their academic center to monitor HIV clinical performance indicators. The main outcome measures of the study include process measures, including a description of how the database was constructed, and clinical outcomes, including HIV-specific quality improvement (QI) measures and primary care (PC) measures. Performance on HIV-specific QI measures was very high, but drug toxicity monitoring and PC-specific QI performance were deficient, particularly among ID specialists. Establishment of HIV QI data benchmarks as well as standards for how data will be measured and collected are needed and are the logical counterpart to treatment guidelines. PMID:22326983

  10. Mental hospital depopulation in Canada: patient perspectives.

    PubMed

    Herman, N J; Smith, C M

    1989-06-01

    This paper reviews briefly the history of mental health depopulation in Canada over the past 30 years. The term "deinstitutionalization" is often used but is unsatisfactory. Using an exploratory, qualitative, methodological approach, data were collected on the problems encountered by a disproportionate, stratified random sample of 139 formerly institutionalized patients living in various geographical locales in Eastern Canada. Adopting a symbolic interactionist theoretical approach, this study, in an effort to fill a neglect in the literature, attempted to discover what the everyday world(s) of Canadian ex-mental patients was really like. Problems encountered related to stigma, poor housing, lack of back living skills, poverty, unemployment and aftercare. Quotations from patients are provided to illustrate such themes. The findings are discussed. PMID:2548698

  11. Innovations in Calculating Precise Nutrient Intake of Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Sheila Cox; Bopp, Melinda M; Weaver, Dennis L; Sullivan, Dennis H

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a detailed assessment of a hospitalized patient's nutrient intake is often critically important to ensuring the patient's successful recovery. However, this process is often laborious and prone to error. Inaccurate nutrient intake assessments result in the inability of the healthcare team to recognize patients with developing nutritional deficits that contribute to delayed recovery and prolonged lengths of stay. This paper describes an innovative, easy to use system designed to increase the precision of calorie count reports by using a combination of photography, direct observation, and a specially developed computer program. Although the system was designed specifically for use in a Department of Veterans Affairs Hospital, it has the potential to be adapted for use in other hospital environments. PMID:27384584

  12. Myocardial Revascularization in Dyalitic Patients: In-Hospital Period Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Matheus; Hossne, Nelson Américo; Branco, João Nelson Rodrigues; Vargas, Guilherme Flora; da Fonseca, José Honório de Almeida Palma; Pestana, José Osmar Medina de Abreu; Juliano, Yara; Buffolo, Enio

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary artery bypass grafting currently is the best treatment for dialytic patients with multivessel coronary disease, but hospital morbidity and mortality related to procedure is still high. Objective Evaluate results and in-hospital outcomes of coronary artery bypass grafting in dialytic patients. Methods Retrospective unicentric study including 50 consecutive and not selected dialytic patients, who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting in a tertiary university hospital from 2007 to 2012. Results High prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors was observed (100% hypertensive, 68% diabetic and 40% dyslipidemic). There was no intra-operative death and 60% of the procedures were performed off-pump. There were seven (14%) in-hospital deaths. Postoperative infection, previous heart failure, cardiopulmonary bypass, abnormal ventricular function and surgical re-exploration were associated with increased mortality. Conclusion Coronary artery bypass grafting is feasible to dialytic patients although high in-hospital morbidity and mortality. It is necessary better understanding about metabolic aspects to plan adequate interventions. PMID:24270865

  13. Patient- and Hospital-Level Determinants of Rehabilitation for In-Patient Stroke Care

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsung-Tai; Chen, Chia-Pei; Kuang, Shao-Hua; Wang, Vinchi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During acute stroke care, rehabilitation usage may be influenced by patient- and hospital-related factors. We would like to identify patient- and hospital-level determinants of population-level inpatient rehabilitation usage associated with acute stroke care. From data obtained from the claim information from the National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) in Taiwan (2009–2011), we enrolled 82,886 stroke patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction from 207 hospitals. A generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) analyses with patient-level factors specified as random effects were conducted (for cross-level interactions). The rate of rehabilitation usage was 51% during acute stroke care. The hospital-related factors accounted for a significant amount of variability (intraclass correlation, 50%). Hospital type was the only significant hospital-level variable and can explain the large amount of variability (58%). Patients treated in smaller hospitals experienced few benefits of rehabilitation services, and those with surgery in a smaller hospital used fewer rehabilitation services. All patient-level variables were significant. With GLMM analyses, we identified the hospital type and its cross-level interaction, and explained a large portion of variability in rehabilitation for stroke patients in Taiwan. PMID:27175671

  14. Changing Patient Classification System for Hospital Reimbursement in Romania

    PubMed Central

    Radu, Ciprian-Paul; Chiriac, Delia Nona; Vladescu, Cristian

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effects of the change in the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system on patient morbidity and hospital financial performance in the Romanian public health care system. Methods Three variables were assessed before and after the classification switch in July 2007: clinical outcomes, the case mix index, and hospital budgets, using the database of the National School of Public Health and Health Services Management, which contains data regularly received from hospitals reimbursed through the Romanian DRG scheme (291 in 2009). Results The lack of a Romanian system for the calculation of cost-weights imposed the necessity to use an imported system, which was criticized by some clinicians for not accurately reflecting resource consumption in Romanian hospitals. The new DRG classification system allowed a more accurate clinical classification. However, it also exposed a lack of physicians’ knowledge on diagnosing and coding procedures, which led to incorrect coding. Consequently, the reported hospital morbidity changed after the DRG switch, reflecting an increase in the national case mix index of 25% in 2009 (compared with 2007). Since hospitals received the same reimbursement over the first two years after the classification switch, the new DRG system led them sometimes to change patients' diagnoses in order to receive more funding. Conclusion Lack of oversight of hospital coding and reporting to the national reimbursement scheme allowed the increase in the case mix index. The complexity of the new classification system requires more resources (human and financial), better monitoring and evaluation, and improved legislation in order to achieve better hospital resource allocation and more efficient patient care. PMID:20564769

  15. Severity of Anemia Predicts Hospital Length of Stay but Not Readmission in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garlo, Katherine; Williams, Deanna; Lucas, Lee; Wong, Rocket; Botler, Joel; Abramson, Stuart; Parker, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of severe anemia to hospital readmission and length of stay (LOS) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3–5. Compared with the general population, patients with moderate CKD have a higher hospital readmission rate and LOS. Anemia in patients with moderate CKD is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The influence of anemia on hospital outcomes in patients with moderate CKD has not been characterized. We conducted a retrospective cohort study at Maine Medical Center, a 606-bed academic tertiary care hospital. Patients with CKD stages 3–5 and not on dialysis admitted during February 2013 to January 2014 were eligible. Patients with end stage renal disease on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, kidney transplant, acute kidney injury, gastrointestinal bleeding, active malignancy, pregnancy, and surgery were excluded. The cohort was split into severe anemia (hemoglobin ≤9 g/dL) versus a comparison group (hemoglobin >9 g/dL), and examined for differences in 30-day hospital readmission and LOS. In this study, the data of 1141 patients were included, out of which 156 (13.7%) had severe anemia (mean hemoglobin 8.1 g/dL, SD 0.8). Severe anemia was associated with increased hospital LOS (mean 6.4 (SD 6.0) days vs mean 4.5 (SD 4.0) days, P < 0.001). The difference was 1.7 day longer (95% CI 0.94, 2.45). There was no difference in readmission rate (mean 11.5% vs 10.2%, P = 0.7). Patients with moderate CKD and severe anemia are at risk for increased hospital LOS. Interventions targeting this high-risk population, including outpatient management of anemia, may benefit patient care and save costs through improved hospital outcomes. PMID:26107682

  16. Patient Preferences for Hospital Quality: Case Study of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jouyani, Yasser; Bahrampour, Mina; Barouni, Mohsen; Dehnavieh, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the importance and uniqueness of the characteristics of the health sector, one of the most important priorities of the Ministry of Health is measuring the efficiency and quality of services which are provided for the people who refer to the health sectors. In all health systems, responding to the needs and wishes of patients is a crucial priority. Objectives The main purpose of this study is to prioritize the features of the services from the perspective of patients, by applying the Logit model. Materials and Methods This study is a descriptive cross-sectional study and in terms of results it can be classified to an applied study. Data were collected by a questionnaire filled by 330 patients in Imam Khomeini hospital, and for estimating the utility function the software STATA version 10 was applied. In this study the preferences of patients who admitted to hospitals were identified by calculating the marginal utility of the characteristics, where we also used Marginal Rate substitutions (MRS). Results Determination of the marginal utility characteristics shows that the first priority in receiving hospital services is the type of examination, and the last priority in the cleaning service of the sections and restrooms . Waiting time between hospital arrivals and admission has a negative sign which indicates a negative impact on patient preference. Conclusions The results of this study are consistent with studies by Kara Hanson and Barbara Mc Clean, where in their study they also showed that by the patient’s perspective, hospital examination is the most important quality characteristic (coefficient = 2.78). In other words, the ultimate purpose of the hospital visit is the quality of service and examination, where many patients are willing to wait longer or pay higher costs to get the best services. PMID:24616790

  17. ACG Clinical Guideline: Nutrition Therapy in the Adult Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    McClave, Stephen A; DiBaise, John K; Mullin, Gerard E; Martindale, Robert G

    2016-03-01

    The value of nutrition therapy for the adult hospitalized patient is derived from the outcome benefits achieved by the delivery of early enteral feeding. Nutritional assessment should identify those patients at high nutritional risk, determined by both disease severity and nutritional status. For such patients if they are unable to maintain volitional intake, enteral access should be attained and enteral nutrition (EN) initiated within 24-48 h of admission. Orogastric or nasogastric feeding is most appropriate when starting EN, switching to post-pyloric or deep jejunal feeding only in those patients who are intolerant of gastric feeds or at high risk for aspiration. Percutaneous access should be used for those patients anticipated to require EN for >4 weeks. Patients receiving EN should be monitored for risk of aspiration, tolerance, and adequacy of feeding (determined by percent of goal calories and protein delivered). Intentional permissive underfeeding (and even trophic feeding) is appropriate temporarily for certain subsets of hospitalized patients. Although a standard polymeric formula should be used routinely in most patients, an immune-modulating formula (with arginine and fish oil) should be reserved for patients who have had major surgery in a surgical ICU setting. Adequacy of nutrition therapy is enhanced by establishing nurse-driven enteral feeding protocols, increasing delivery by volume-based or top-down feeding strategies, minimizing interruptions, and eliminating the practice of gastric residual volumes. Parenteral nutrition should be used in patients at high nutritional risk when EN is not feasible or after the first week of hospitalization if EN is not sufficient. Because of their knowledge base and skill set, the gastroenterologist endoscopist is an asset to the Nutrition Support Team and should participate in providing optimal nutrition therapy to the hospitalized adult patient. PMID:26952578

  18. Physician Alerts to Prevent Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gregory; Rosenbaum, Erin J.; Pendergast, William; Jacobson, Joseph O.; Pendleton, Robert C.; McLaren, Gordon D.; Elliott, C. Gregory; Stevens, Scott M.; Patton, William F.; Dabbagh, Ousama; Paterno, Marilyn D.; Catapane, Elaine; Li, Zhongzhen; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis remains underutilized among hospitalized patients. We designed and carried out a large multicenter randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that an alert from a hospital staff member to the Attending Physician will reduce the rate of symptomatic VTE among high-risk patients not receiving prophylaxis. Methods and Results We enrolled patients using a validated point score system to detect hospitalized patients at high risk for symptomatic VTE who were not receiving prophylaxis. 2,493 patients (82% on Medical Services) from 25 study sites were randomized to the intervention group (n=1,238), in which the responsible physician was alerted by another hospital staff member, versus the control group (n=1,255), in which no alert was issued. The primary end point was symptomatic, objectively confirmed VTE within 90 days. Patients whose physicians were alerted were more than twice as likely to receive VTE prophylaxis as controls (46.0% versus 20.6%, p<0.0001). The symptomatic VTE rate was lower in the intervention group (2.7% versus 3.4%; hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.50 to 1.25), but the difference did not achieve statistical significance. The rate of major bleeding at 30 days in the alert group was similar to the control group (2.1% versus 2.3%, p=0.68). Conclusions A strategy of direct staff member to physician notification increases prophylaxis utilization and leads toward reducing the rate of symptomatic VTE in hospitalized patients. However, VTE prophylaxis continues to be underutilized even after physician notification, especially among Medical Service patients. PMID:19364975

  19. Across US Hospitals, Black Patients Report Comparable Or Better Experiences Than White Patients.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, José F; Zheng, Jie; Orav, E John; Jha, Ashish K

    2016-08-01

    Patient-reported experience is a critical part of measuring health care quality. There are limited data on racial differences in patient experience. Using patient-level data for 2009-10 from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS), we compared blacks' and whites' responses on measures of overall hospital rating, communication, clinical processes, and hospital environment. In unadjusted results, there were no substantive differences between blacks' and whites' ratings of hospitals. Blacks were less likely to recommend hospitals but reported more positive experiences, compared to whites. Higher educational attainment and self-reported worse health status were associated with more negative evaluations in both races. Additionally, blacks rated minority-serving hospitals worse than other hospitals on all HCAHPS measures. Taken together, there were surprisingly few meaningful differences in patient experience between blacks and whites across US hospitals. Although blacks tend to receive care at worse-performing hospitals, compared to whites, within any given hospital black patients tend to report better experience than whites do. PMID:27503962

  20. STRESS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS--THE EFFECT OF PROLONGED HOSPITALIZATION.

    PubMed

    Mîndru, Dana Elena; Stănescu, Ralnca Stefania; Mioara, Calipsoana Matei; Duceac, Letiţia Doina; Rugina, Aurica; Temneanu, Oana Raluca; Ungureanu, Monica; Florescu, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Long-term hospitalization emotionally impacts any patient, especially children, and is defined as a long period of time during which the patient is hospitalized and experiences isolation from his or her family, friends and home. Stressful situations trigger a nonspecific response that involves multiple physiological mechanisms. Currently, because of the complexity of these mechanisms, there are no laboratory markers that allow the quantification of the stress intensity felt by the patient. Laboratory determinations currently used in evaluating the response to stress are neuroendocrine, immunological and metabolic. The neuroendocrine system is the first to respond to stressful events. Stress stimulates the hypothalamus, leading to the release of CRH, which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce ACTH. Chronic stress directs the synthesis towards cortisol, which may lead to hypo secretion of the other adrenal steroid hormones. The hospital and the disease are stressors for children and caregivers, since stress can interfere with the normal development of young patients, affecting them in the long term. Admitting a child to hospital means interrupting his or her normal daily life and changing the environment that is familiar to him or her. Therefore, the involvement of the family doctor is very important, as many conditions can be solved by visiting his or her office and thus eliminating the need for hospitalization in a pediatric hospital. If, however, the nature of the condition requires that the child should be seen by a pediatrician, the period of hospitalization should not be much extended so as to prevent the appearance of other possible problems that might influence the child's state. PMID:27483728

  1. Researching hospital patient data to enhance operational management.

    PubMed

    Heslop, Liz; Gardner, Brendon; Athan, Dean; Diers, Donna; Taylor, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    For the purposes of funding and policy development, the Victorian Department of Human Services expects Victorian health care institutions to capture patient data at all levels. These data can be extracted from hospital information systems and potentially offer a business role within a health service organisation. However, there are many issues to be addressed at the organisational level in order that operational directors can be enabled to use hospital data to solve health service operational problems. In this paper, we discuss some of those considerations and give practical examples of how patient data can be used for research and management purposes. PMID:19468148

  2. Acute Splenic Infarction at an Academic General Hospital Over 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ami, Schattner; Meital, Adi; Ella, Kitroser; Abraham, Klepfish

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Few case series provide a current, comprehensive, and detailed description of splenic infarction (SI), an uncommon condition. Retrospective chart review complemented by imaging evaluation and patient follow-up. All adult patients with a confirmed diagnosis of acute SI discharged over 10 years from a single academic center were studied. A systematic literature review was done to compile a complete list of SI etiologies. SI was found in 32 patients, 0.016% of admissions. Ages ranged from 18 to 86 (median 64) years. Cardiogenic emboli were the predominant etiology (20/32, 62.5%) and atrial fibrillation was frequent. Other patients had autoimmune disease (12.5%), associated infection (12.5%), or hematological malignancy (6%). Nine of the patients (28%) had been previously healthy or with no recognized morbidity predisposing to SI. In 5 of 9 hitherto silent antiphospholipid syndrome or mitral valve disease had been identified. Two remained cryptogenic. Most patients presented with abdominal pain (84%), often felt in the left upper quadrant or epigastrium. Associated symptoms, leukocytosis or increased serum lactate dehydrogenase occurred inconsistently (∼25% each). Chest X-ray showed suggestive Lt. supra-diaphragmatic findings in 22%. Thus, the typical predisposing factors and/or clinical presentation should suggest SI to the clinician and be followed by early imaging by computed tomography (CT), highly useful also in atypical presentations. Complications were rare and patients were discharged after 6.5 days (median) on anticoagulant treatment. The systematic literature review revealed an extensive list of conditions underlying SI. In some, SI may be the first and presenting manifestation. SI is a rare event but should be considered in predisposed patients or those with any combination of suggestive clinical features, especially abdominal pain CT evaluation is diagnostic and the outcome is good. PMID:26356690

  3. Acute Splenic Infarction at an Academic General Hospital Over 10 Years: Presentation, Etiology, and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Schattner, Ami; Ami, Schattner; Adi, Meital; Meital, Adi; Kitroser, Ella; Ella, Kitroser; Klepfish, Abraham; Abraham, Klepfish

    2015-09-01

    Few case series provide a current, comprehensive, and detailed description of splenic infarction (SI), an uncommon condition.Retrospective chart review complemented by imaging evaluation and patient follow-up.All adult patients with a confirmed diagnosis of acute SI discharged over 10 years from a single academic center were studied. A systematic literature review was done to compile a complete list of SI etiologies.SI was found in 32 patients, 0.016% of admissions. Ages ranged from 18 to 86 (median 64) years. Cardiogenic emboli were the predominant etiology (20/32, 62.5%) and atrial fibrillation was frequent. Other patients had autoimmune disease (12.5%), associated infection (12.5%), or hematological malignancy (6%). Nine of the patients (28%) had been previously healthy or with no recognized morbidity predisposing to SI. In 5 of 9 hitherto silent antiphospholipid syndrome or mitral valve disease had been identified. Two remained cryptogenic. Most patients presented with abdominal pain (84%), often felt in the left upper quadrant or epigastrium. Associated symptoms, leukocytosis or increased serum lactate dehydrogenase occurred inconsistently (∼25% each). Chest X-ray showed suggestive Lt. supra-diaphragmatic findings in 22%. Thus, the typical predisposing factors and/or clinical presentation should suggest SI to the clinician and be followed by early imaging by computed tomography (CT), highly useful also in atypical presentations. Complications were rare and patients were discharged after 6.5 days (median) on anticoagulant treatment. The systematic literature review revealed an extensive list of conditions underlying SI. In some, SI may be the first and presenting manifestation.SI is a rare event but should be considered in predisposed patients or those with any combination of suggestive clinical features, especially abdominal pain CT evaluation is diagnostic and the outcome is good. PMID:26356690

  4. Sexual activity among patients in psychiatric hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Warner, James; Pitts, Nicola; Crawford, Mike J; Serfaty, Marc; Prabhakaran, Pramod; Amin, Rizkar

    2004-10-01

    In psychiatric hospitals, sexual activity between patients raises special difficulties regarding consent. We undertook a questionnaire survey of inpatients in the mental health units of three hospitals to identify the nature and frequency of sexual activity. A contemporaneous staff questionnaire was used in an attempt to validate the patient reports. Of the 100 patients who participated (response rate 60%), 30 reported engaging in some form of sexual activity including 10 who had sexual intercourse. All sexual intercourse was consensual, but only 2 respondents used condoms. Staff questionnaires suggested levels of sexual activity congruent with patient reports. This survey underlines the conflict between an individual's right to sexual expression and the need to protect vulnerable patients. PMID:15459258

  5. Some problems in the hospital management of criminal mental patients.

    PubMed

    Buchan, T

    1976-07-24

    In view of impending new legislation in Rhodesia, a survey of 256 criminal mental patients admitted to Ingutsheni Hospital was undertaken. These patients were all treated by the author and were admitted during the 5-year period 1 January 1970-31 December 1974. Among these patients there were 113 schizophrenics (44%) and 57 epileptics (22%); these proportions are not significantly different from those previously found among civil patients. The outcome was that 86 patients (33, 6%) were discharged to stand trial, 107 (41, 8%) were discharged in terms of a recommendation by the Mental Hospital Board and 57 (22, 3%) were returned to prison. Recommendations are made for the provision of a new forensic psychiatric unit, and some of its functions are discussed. PMID:968672

  6. Patients' experiences in hospital following a liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nåden, Dagfinn; Bjørk, Ida Torunn

    2012-03-01

    Research is scarce regarding patients' experiences, feelings and thoughts the first 4 weeks after liver transplantation. Most research involving patients with a liver transplant are conducted several months, or even years, after the transplantation. The aim of this study is to present results from research interviews that took place post-transplant while patients still were in hospital. The design is explorative and hermeneutic. Fifteen patients were interviewed 3-5 weeks after transplantation. The results are presented in the following themes: (i) general contentment with the hospital stay, (ii) physical discomfort, (iii) dreams, nightmares and hallucinations, (iv) Comedowns experienced during rejection of the transplant and (v) Other psychological/mental reactions. A major result from our study is patients' own descriptions of comedowns experienced during rejection of the transplant, and the seemingly little consolation and support the patients received. Another major result is patients' own descriptions of dreams, nightmares and hallucinations, which are not fully described from the patients' own perspective while still in hospital. PMID:21812799

  7. A survey on postanesthetic patient satisfaction in a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Adel Ali; Alomar, Yasser Mohammed; Mohammed, Ghali Abdulrahman; Al-Fozan, Mazen Saud; Al-Harbi, Mohammed Saleh; Alrobai, Khalid Abduraziz; Zahoor, Haroon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Patient satisfaction after anesthesia is an important outcome of hospital care. The aim is to evaluate the postoperative patient satisfaction during the patient stay at King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Patients and Methods: Three hundred and fifty-three patients who underwent surgery under general/regional anesthesia were surveyed. They were interviewed face to face on the first postoperative day. We recorded pain and pain controls in addition to some common complication of anesthesia like nausea and vomiting (postoperative nausea and vomiting) as a parameter to assess the rate of patient's satisfaction. Results: The overall level of satisfaction was high (95.2%); 17 (4.8%) patients were dissatisfied with their anesthetic care. There was a strong relation between patient dissatisfaction and: (i) Patients with poor postoperative pain control 13 (12.4%), (ii) patients with moderate nausea 8 (11.1%) and (iii) patients with static and dynamic severe pain 6 (21.4). Several factors were associated with dissatisfaction can be prevented, or better treated. Conclusion: We concluded that the patient satisfaction was high. Postoperative visit should be routinely performed in order to assess the quality and severity of postoperative pain, nausea and vomiting and the other side-effects postoperatively. PMID:26240551

  8. Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE), improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Methods: Acting like “well-oiled machines,” multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include “staff” from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses’ aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others). Their enhanced teamwork counters the “silo effect” by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality) while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Results: Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of “teamwork” for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs), hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and most critically, operating rooms (ORs). Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS), and yielded greater patient “staff” satisfaction. Conclusion: Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a “team sport.” The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE) and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers’ performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their “well-oiled machines” enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling “staff” to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction. PMID:25289149

  9. Patient expectations of fair complaint handling in hospitals: empirical data

    PubMed Central

    Friele, Roland D; Sluijs, Emmy M

    2006-01-01

    Background A common finding in several studies is patients' dissatisfaction with complaint handling in health care. The reasons why are for the greater part unknown. The key to an answer may be found in a better understanding of patients' expectations. We investigated patients' expectations of complaint handling in hospitals. Methods Subjects were patients who had lodged a complaint at the complaint committees of 74 hospitals in the Netherlands. A total of 424 patients (response 75%) completed a written questionnaire at the start of the complaint procedures. Derived from justice theory, we asked what they expected from fair procedures, fair communication and fair outcome of complaint handling. Results The predominant reason for complainants to lodge a complaint was to prevent the incident from happening again. Complainants expected fair procedures from the complaint committee, in particular an impartial position. This was most important to 87% of the complainants. They also expected to be treated respectfully. Furthermore, they expected the hospital and the professional involved to respond to their complaint. A change in hospital performances was the most wanted outcome of complaint handling, according to 79% of the complainants. They also expected disclosure from the professionals. Professionals should admit a mistake when it had occurred. More complainants (65%) considered it most important to get an explanation than an apology (41%). Only 32% of complainants expected the professional to make an effort to restore the doctor-patient relationship. A minority of complainants (7%) wanted financial compensation. Conclusion Nearly all complainants want to prevent the incident from happening again, not out of pure altruism, but in order to restore their sense of justice. We conclude that complaint handling that does not allow for change is unlikely to meet patients' expectations. Secondly, complaint handling should not be left exclusively to complaint committees, the

  10. Sex differences in hospital readmission among colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J. R.; Fernandez, E.; Moreno, V.; Ribes, J.; Peris, M.; Navarro, M.; Cambray, M.; Borras, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: While several studies have analysed sex and socioeconomic differences in cancer incidence and mortality, sex differences in oncological health care have been seldom considered. Objective: To investigate sex based inequalities in hospital readmission among patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Hospital Universitary in L'Hospitalet (Barcelona, Spain). Participants: Four hundred and three patients diagnosed with colorectal between January 1996 and December 1998 were actively followed up until 2002. Main outcome measurements and methods: Hospital readmission times related to colorectal cancer after surgical procedure. Cox proportional model with random effect (frailty) was used to estimate hazard rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals of readmission time for covariates analysed. Results: Crude hazard rate ratio of hospital readmission in men was 1.61 (95% CI 1.21 to 2.15). When other significant determinants of readmission were controlled for (including Dukes's stage, mortality, and Charlson's index) a significant risk of readmission was still present for men (hazard rate ratio: 1.52, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.96). Conclusions: In the case of colorectal cancer, women are less likely than men to be readmitted to the hospital, even after controlling for tumour characteristics, mortality, and comorbidity. New studies should investigate the role of other non-clinical variable such as differences in help seeking behaviours or structural or personal sex bias in the attention given to patients. PMID:15911648

  11. Quality of sleep for hospitalized patients in Rasoul-Akram hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Makvandi, Alena; Pazouki, Abdolreza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sleep disturbances have negative effects on medical conditions, mental health and cognitive performance. It was shown that about 60% of inpatients suffer from sleep problems. The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between sleep quality and other factors in the inpatients of Rasoul-e-Akram hospital. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, all the hospitalized patients in twelve wards of Rasoul-e-Akram hospital during September 2012, were examined. Sleeping habits of 209 inpatients of different wards were assessed through the Persian version of Pittsburgh Sleep Questionnaire (PSQI). A self-designed 18- question questionnaire was conducted for all patients in order to assess their attitude to interior and atmosphere of wards. Content validity and test retest reliability were evaluated. The pain level was also measured by the visual analog scale (VAS) and scores analyzed by the statistical methods of frequency, percentage, chi-square and logistic regression. Results: The mean of the total scores in PSQI was 8.8±4.8 and 70.8% of the patients were 'poor sleepers' (global PSQI> 5). Age and gender had no effect on the PSQI total score, but the number of roommates, type of the ward, hospitalization period, presence and severity of pain, taking sleep medication and attitude toward the overall atmosphere and interior of wards have caused deviation in scores. Conclusion: Sleep problems are quite frequent in medical inpatients. Pain management and modification of the ward interior and atmosphere can impact inpatients sleep quality. PMID:25405138

  12. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  13. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  14. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  15. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  16. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  17. Intelligent Transmission of Patient Sensor Data in Wireless Hospital Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bragg, Danielle; Yun, Mira; Bragg, Haya; Choi, Hyeong-Ah

    2012-01-01

    Medical data sensors on patients in hospitals produce an increasingly large volume of increasingly diverse real-time data. Because scheduling the transmission of this data through wireless hospital networks becomes a crucial problem, we propose a Reinforcement Learning-based queue management and scheduling scheme. In this scheme, we use a game-theoretical approach where patients compete for transmission resources by assigning different utility values to data packets. These utility functions are largely based on data criticality and deadline, which together determine the data’s scheduling priority. Simulation results demonstrate the high performance of this scheme in comparison to a datatype-based scheme, with the drop rate of critical data as a performance measure. We also show how patients can optimize their policies based on the utility functions of competing patients. PMID:23304390

  18. Violent Behavior among hospitalized medical and surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Ochitill, H N; Krieger, M

    1982-02-01

    To characterize violent behavior in hospitalized medical and surgical patients, we reviewed documented violent incidents at the San Francisco General Hospital during a two-year period. Twenty-nine incidents of verbal and physical violence occurred. One patient was gravely ill and three were delirious. All the incidents were associated with increased levels of tension and loss of impulse control. In most cases, contention with the staff regarding pain medication or ward regulations was a precipitating event. Of the 28 patients with mental disorders, 19 were substance abusers, six had organic brain syndrome, tw had neurosis, and one had schizophrenia. The findings suggest that physicians should be more sensitive to patient characteristics and to the situational characteristics of the violent incident. Explicit measures that anticipate and reduce violent behavior are reviewed. PMID:7058353

  19. Underreporting of Behavioral Problems in Older Hospitalized Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Helen D.; O'Hara, Ruth; Mumenthaler, Martin S.; Cassidy, Erin L.; Buffum, Martha; Kim, Janise M.; Danielsen, Claire E.; Noda, Art; Kraemer, Helena C.; Sheikh, Javaid I.

    2005-01-01

    This descriptive study examined reports of behavioral problems among older patients hospitalized in acute care medical settings. Greater numbers of behavioral problems were reported by nursing staff on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire than were documented in medical charts over the same time period. Such underreporting may have…

  20. Upward trend in dengue incidence among hospitalized patients, United States.

    PubMed

    Streit, Judy A; Yang, Ming; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Polgreen, Philip M

    2011-05-01

    International travel and a global expansion of dengue fever have the potential to increase the incidence of dengue in the United States. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of trends in dengue among hospitalized patients by using the National Inpatient Sample (2000-2007); the number of cases more than tripled (p<0.0001). PMID:21529411

  1. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    PubMed

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective. PMID:26790241

  2. STAAR: improving the reliability of care coordination and reducing hospital readmissions in an academic medical centre

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jocelyn Alexandria; Carr, Laura S; Collins, Jacqueline; Doyle Petrongolo, Joanne; Hall, Kathryn; Murray, Jane; Smith, Jessica; Tata, Lee Ann

    2015-01-01

    Setting Massachusetts General Hospital embarked on a 4-year project to reduce readmissions in a high volume general medicine unit (November 2009 to September 2013). Objective To reduce 30-day readmissions to 10% through improved care coordination. Design As a before–after study, a total of 7586 patients admitted to the medicine unit during the intervention period included 2620 inpatients meeting high risk for readmission criteria. Of those, 2620 patients received nursing interventions and 539 patients received pharmacy interventions. Intervention The introduction of a Discharge Nurse (D/C RN) for patient/family coaching and a Transitional Care Pharmacist (TC PharmD) for predischarge medication reconciliation and postdischarge patient phone calls. Other interventions included modifications to multidisciplinary care rounds and electronic medication reconciliation. Main outcome measure All-cause 30-day readmission rates. Results Readmission rates decreased by 30% (21% preintervention to 14.5% postintervention) (p<0.05). From July 2010 to December 2011, rates of readmission among high-risk patients who received the D/C RN intervention with or without the TC PharmD medication reconciliation/education intervention decreased to 15.9% (p=0.59). From January to June 2010, rates of readmission among high-risk patients who received the TC PharmD postdischarge calls decreased to 12.9% (p=0.55). From June 2010 to December 2011, readmission rates for patients on the medical unit that did not receive the designated D/C RN or TC PharmD interventions decreased to 15.8% (p=0.61) and 16.2% (0.31), respectively. Conclusions A multidisciplinary approach to improving care coordination reduced avoidable readmissions both among those who received interventions and those who did not. This further demonstrated the importance of multidisciplinary collaboration. PMID:26246901

  3. A Patient-specific Approach to Hospital Cost Accounting

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Larry K.; Reuter, Louis F.

    1973-01-01

    The hospital facilities and manpower used for the various procedures of a delivery suite are identified and measured as the basis for determining individual patient costs. The method of measuring staff and facility requirements, including the “cost of readiness” and the cost of inherent inefficiencies, generates detailed information that can be used in determining utilization ranges for budgeting decisions, for planning space needs, for personnel scheduling, and for patient billing. PMID:4269322

  4. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient’s trust is the service quality. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient’s trust. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. Results: The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P < 0.001) were the strongest factors in predicting patient’s trust, but the quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. Conclusions: The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient’s trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff. PMID:25763258

  5. Falls risk assessment in older patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Matarese, Maria; Ivziku, Dhurata

    2016-07-27

    Falls are the most frequent adverse event reported in hospitals, usually affecting older patients. All hospitals in NHS organisations develop risk prevention policies that include falls risk assessment. Falls risk assessment involves the use of risk screening tools, aimed at identifying patients at increased risk of falls, and risk assessment tools, which identify a patient's risk factors for falls. Various risk screening tools have been used in clinical practice, but no single tool is able to identify all patients at risk of falls or to accurately exclude all those who are not at risk of falls. Guidelines recommend that patients aged 65 years and over who are admitted to hospital should be considered at high risk of falls and that a multifactorial falls risk assessment should be performed. Therefore, falls risk assessment tools should be used to identify the risk factors for each inpatient aged 65 years or over, in order to determine the most appropriate care plan for falls prevention and to maximise patient mobility and independence. PMID:27461329

  6. The BMET (biomedical equipment technician) career: academic curricula, hospital needs, & employee perceptions.

    PubMed

    Majercik, S M

    1991-01-01

    Research conducted over a two-year (1988-1989) period compared the concepts of job performance of Biomedical Equipment Technicians (BMETs) with the job descriptions and academic requirements of healthcare organizations and the current academic curricula used to teach biomedical equipment technology. This study indicated that, while the BMETs and healthcare organizations held similar views of job performance requirements, there was disparity concerning the BMET's academic requirements as viewed by healthcare organizations when compared to the BMET's perception of academic preparedness. There was an even greater disparity between those perceptions and requirements when compared to the academic programs currently in place. PMID:10115433

  7. Medicines availability at a Swaziland hospital and impact on patients

    PubMed Central

    Suleman, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Background The burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in low- and middle-income countries is increasing. Where patients are expected to make increased out-of-pocket payments this can lead to treatment interruptions or non-adherence. Swaziland is no exception in this regard. Aim The aim of the study was to investigate the availability of medicines for NCDs in a hospital and the impact of out-of-pocket spending by patients for medicines not available at the hospital. Setting The study was conducted at Raleigh Fitkin Memorial Hospital in Manzini, Swaziland. Methods Exit interviews to assess availability of a selected basket of medicines were conducted with 300 patients diagnosed with diabetes, hypertension or asthma. The stock status record of a basket of medicines for these conditions in 2012 was assessed at the Central Medical Stores. Results were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 20.0. Results Most of the patients (n = 213; 71%) confirmed not receiving all of their prescribed medicines at each visit to the hospital in the past six months. On average patients spent 10–50 times more on their medicines at private pharmacies compared to user fees in the health facility. Stock-outs at the Central Medical Stores ranging from 30 days to over 180 days were recorded during the course of the assessment period (12 months), and were found to contribute to inconsistent availability of medicines in the health facility. Conclusion Out-of-pocket expenditure is common for patients with chronic conditions using this health facility, which suggests the possibility of patients defaulting on treatment due to lack of affordability.

  8. Family Involvement in the Care of Hospitalized Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Gholizadeh, Leila; Mohammadi, Eesa; Yazdi, Khadijeh

    2015-09-01

    Family participation in caregiving to elderly inpatients is likely to improve the quality of care to older patients. This qualitative design study applied semi-structured interviews to elicit experiences from nurses, families, and patients on the notion of family participation in the care of elderly patients in two general teaching hospitals in Iran. Data were gathered using individual interviews, field notes, and participant observations. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. The following main themes emerged through the data analysis process: (a) safety and quality in patient care and (b) unplanned and unstructured patient care participation. The study concludes that family involvement in caregiving to elderly patients is important, yet the participation should be based upon a planned and structured framework to ensure a safe and satisfying experience for patients, families, and health care team. PMID:24652880

  9. Cognitive Status in Patients Hospitalized with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Seth N.; Hajduk, Alexandra M.; McManus, David D.; Darling, Chad E.; Gurwitz, Jerry H.; Spencer, Frederick A.; Goldberg, Robert J.; Saczynski, Jane S.

    2015-01-01

    Structured Abstract Background Cognitive impairment is highly prevalent in patients with heart failure and is associated with adverse outcomes. However, whether specific cognitive abilities (e.g., memory versus executive function) are impaired in heart failure has not been fully examined. We investigated the prevalence of impairment in three cognitive domains in patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) and the associations of impairment with demographic and clinical characteristics. Methods The sample included 744 patients hospitalized with ADHF (mean age = 72 years, 46% female) at 5 medical centers. Impairment was assessed in three cognitive domains (memory, processing speed, executive function) using standardized measures. Demographic and clinical characteristics were obtained from a structured interview and medical record review. Results A total of 593 of 744 (80%) patients were impaired in at least one cognitive domain; 32%, 31%, and 17% of patients were impaired in one, two, or all three cognitive domains, respectively. Patients impaired in more than one cognitive domain were significantly older, had less formal education, and had more non-cardiac comorbidities (all p’s < 0.05). In multivariable adjusted analyses, patients with older age and lower education had higher odds of impairment in two or more cognitive domains. Depressed patients had twice the odds of being impaired in all three cognitive domains (OR = 1.98, 95% CI: 1.08, 3.64). Conclusion Impairments in executive function, processing speed and memory are common among patients hospitalized for ADHF. Recognition of these prevalent cognitive deficits is critical for the clinical management of these high risk patients. PMID:25458656

  10. Patient Cost-Sharing and Hospitalization Offsets in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Amitabh; Gruber, Jonathan; McKnight, Robin

    2010-01-01

    In the Medicare program, increases in cost sharing by a supplemental insurer can exert financial externalities. We study a policy change that raised patient cost sharing for the supplemental insurer for retired public employees in California. We find that physician visits and prescription drug usage have elasticities that are similar to those of the RAND Health Insurance Experiment (HIE). Unlike the HIE, however, we find substantial “offset” effects in terms of increased hospital utilization. The savings from increased cost sharing accrue mostly to the supplemental insurer, while the costs of increased hospitalization accrue mostly to Medicare. PMID:21103385

  11. Clostridium difficile infections among Jordanian adult hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Nasereddin, Lina M; Bakri, Fares G; Shehabi, Asem A

    2009-12-01

    This prospective study investigated the important epidemiologic aspects of Clostridium difficile infections (CDIs) among Jordanian adult hospitalized patients. A total of 300 stool specimens were investigated using culture and polymerase chain reaction methods for detection of C difficile, its toxins, and fluoroquinolone resistance. C difficile-positive cultures were found in 13.7% of the patients, and 73% of the isolates carried tcdA and/or tcdB toxin genes, and all C difficile isolates were negative for binary toxin. The isolates showed moderate level of resistance to both ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, whereas metronidazole and vancomycin were highly susceptible. This study indicates the need for early detection of CDIs and prevention of its severe disease in hospitalized patients. PMID:19712999

  12. Predictors of medication errors among elderly hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Picone, Debra Matsen; Titler, Marita G; Dochterman, Joanne; Shever, Leah; Kim, Taikyoung; Abramowitz, Paul; Kanak, Mary; Qin, Rui

    2008-01-01

    Medication errors are a serious safety concern and most errors are preventable. A retrospective study design was employed to describe medication errors experienced during 10187 hospitalizations of elderly patients admitted to a Midwest teaching hospital between July 1, 1998 and December 31, 2001 and to determine the factors predictive of medication errors. The model considered patient characteristics, clinical conditions, interventions, and nursing unit characteristics. The dependent variable, medication error, was measured using a voluntary incident reporting system. There were 861 medication errors; 96% may have been preventable. Most errors were omissions errors (48.8%) and the source was administration (54%) or transcription errors (38%). Variables associated with a medication error included unique number of medications (polypharmacy), patient gender and race, RN staffing changes, medical and nursing interventions, and specific pharmacological agents. Further validation of this explanatory model and focused interventions may help decrease the incidence of medication errors. PMID:18305099

  13. Development of an assistive patient mobile system for hospital environments.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy Hoang; Nguyen, Tuan Nghia; Clout, Raymont; Gibson, Alexander; Nguyen, Hung T

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an assistive patient mobile system for hospital environments, which focuses on transferring the patient without nursing help. The system is a combination of an advanced hospital bed and an autonomous navigating robot. This intelligent bed can track the robot and routinely navigates and communicates with the bed. The work centralizes in building a structure, hardware design and robot detection and tracking algorithms by using laser range finder. The assistive patient mobile system has been tested and the real experiments are shown with a high performance of reliability and practicality. The accuracy of the method proposed in this paper is 91% for the targeted testing object with the error rate of classification by 6%. Additionally, a comparison between our method and a related one is also described including the comparison of results. PMID:24110232

  14. Implementation of patient safety rounds in a children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Yee, Patricia L; Edwards, Melanie L; Dixon, Jennifer; Gleason, Nancy S

    2009-01-01

    Many healthcare organizations have implemented patient safety initiatives aimed at creating a safer healthcare environment. At North Carolina Children's Hospital at University of North Carolina Hospitals, patient safety rounds were established in the fall of 2005. Rounds are held weekly and involve all members of the healthcare team. Senior leadership actively participates and helps staff seek out solutions for the identified issues. Within the first year of operation, 191 issues were identified, of which 58% were resolved. Rounds continue to occur and have expanded over to the Women's services. Other initiatives such as Just Culture and Six Sigma have been established and help further cultivate a climate that strives toward optimizing patient safety. PMID:19092523

  15. Improving outpatient access and patient experiences in academic ambulatory care.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Sarah; Calderon, Sherry; Casella, Joanne; Wood, Elizabeth; Carvelli-Sheehan, Jayne; Zeidel, Mark L

    2012-02-01

    Effective scheduling of and ready access to doctor appointments affect ambulatory patient care quality, but these are often sacrificed by patients seeking care from physicians at academic medical centers. At one center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, the authors developed interventions to improve the scheduling of appointments and to reduce the access time between telephone call and first offered appointment. Improvements to scheduling included no redirection to voicemail, prompt telephone pickup, courteous service, complete registration, and effective scheduling. Reduced access time meant being offered an appointment with a physician in the appropriate specialty within three working days of the telephone call. Scheduling and access were assessed using monthly "mystery shopper" calls. Mystery shoppers collected data using standardized forms, rated the quality of service, and transcribed their interactions with schedulers. Monthly results were tabulated and discussed with clinical leaders; leaders and frontline staff then developed solutions to detected problems. Eighteen months after the beginning of the intervention (in June 2007), which is ongoing, schedulers had gone from using 60% of their registration skills to over 90%, customer service scores had risen from 2.6 to 4.9 (on a 5-point scale), and average access time had fallen from 12 days to 6 days. The program costs $50,000 per year and has been associated with a 35% increase in ambulatory volume across three years. The authors conclude that academic medical centers can markedly improve the scheduling process and access to care and that these improvements may result in increased ambulatory care volume. PMID:22193182

  16. The role of palliative chemotherapy in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley–Price, P.; Ali, M.; Balchin, K.; Spencer, J.; Fitzgibbon, E.; Cripps, C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospitalized patients with advanced cancer often have a poor performance status, which is considered a relative contraindication to cytotoxic chemotherapy. We investigated outcomes in hospitalized solid tumour oncology patients who received palliative chemotherapy (pct). Methods With ethics approval, we performed a single-institution chart review of all patients hospitalized on our oncology unit who received pct between April 2008 and January 2010. Patient demographics, reasons for admission, cancer type, prior therapy, and administered chemotherapy were recorded. The primary endpoint was median survival from date of inpatient chemotherapy until death or last known follow up. We also investigated place of discharge and whether patients received additional therapy. Results During the study period, 199 inpatients received pct. Median age was 61 years; 59% of the patients were women. Most had been admitted with dyspnea (31%) or pain (29%) as the dominant symptom. Common cancers represented were breast (23%), small-cell lung cancer (sclc, 22%), non-small-cell lung cancer (nsclc, 16%), and colorectal cancer (9%). Most patients (67%) were receiving first-line chemotherapy. Median overall survival duration was 4.5 months, and the 6-month survival rate was 41%. The longest and shortest survivals were seen in the sclc and nsclc groups (7.3 and 2.5 months respectively). Factors significantly associated with shorter survival were baseline hypoalbuminemia and therapy beyond the first line. In this cohort, 77% of patients were discharged home, and 72% received further chemotherapy. Conclusions Despite a short median survival, many patients are well enough to be discharged home and to receive further chemotherapy. The development of risk models to predict a higher chance of efficacy will have practical clinical utility. PMID:25089101

  17. Blood Transfusion Reactions in Elderly Patients Hospitalized in a Multilevel Geriatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lubart, E.; Segal, R.; Tryhub, N.; Sigler, E.; Leibovitz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives. Blood transfusion is a critical issue for patients with chronic diseases such as heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and malignancy. However, side effects are not rare. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the frequency of adverse blood transfusion reactions in hospitalized elderly patients during a one-year period. Design/Setting/Participants. Blood transfusion reactions such as fever, chills, dyspnea, and others following blood transfusions in hospitalized geriatric patients during one-year period were examined. Results. 382 blood units (242 patients) were administered during the study period. In 40 (11%) cases, blood transfusion reactions occurred. Fever was the most common reaction in 29 cases (72%), four (10%) had shortness of breath, and 3 (8%) had vomiting and chills each. There were no lethal cases in the 24-hour period following blood transfusions. Conclusion. A relatively low rate of adverse blood transfusion reactions occurred in our geriatric patients. We may speculate that this is related to underreporting of minor symptoms due to the high percentage of demented patients in this population. PMID:24804100

  18. Innovations in Calculating Precise Nutrient Intake of Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Sheila Cox; Bopp, Melinda M.; Weaver, Dennis L.; Sullivan, Dennis H.

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining a detailed assessment of a hospitalized patient’s nutrient intake is often critically important to ensuring the patient’s successful recovery. However, this process is often laborious and prone to error. Inaccurate nutrient intake assessments result in the inability of the healthcare team to recognize patients with developing nutritional deficits that contribute to delayed recovery and prolonged lengths of stay. This paper describes an innovative, easy to use system designed to increase the precision of calorie count reports by using a combination of photography, direct observation, and a specially developed computer program. Although the system was designed specifically for use in a Department of Veterans Affairs Hospital, it has the potential to be adapted for use in other hospital environments. PMID:27384584

  19. Hospitals In ‘Magnet’ Program Show Better Patient Outcomes On Mortality Measures Compared To Non-‘Magnet’ Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Friese, Christopher R.; Xia, Rong; Ghaferi, Amir A.; Birkmeyer, John D.; Banerjee, Mousumi

    2015-01-01

    Hospital executives pursue external recognition to improve market share and demonstrate institutional commitment to quality of care. The Magnet Recognition Program of the American Nurses Credentialing Center identifies hospitals that epitomize nursing excellence, but it is not clear that receiving Magnet recognition improves patient outcomes. Using Medicare data on patients hospitalized for coronary artery bypass graft surgery, colectomy, or lower extremity bypass in 1998–2010, we compared rates of risk-adjusted thirty-day mortality and failure to rescue (death after a postoperative complication) between Magnet hospitals and non-Magnet hospitals matched on hospital characteristics. Surgical patients treated in Magnet hospitals, compared to those treated in non-Magnet hospitals, were 7.7 percent less likely to die within thirty days and 8.6 percent less likely to die after a postoperative complication. Across the thirteen–year study period, patient outcomes were significantly better in Magnet hospitals than in non-Magnet hospitals. However, outcomes did not improve for hospitals after they received Magnet recognition, which suggests that the Magnet program recognizes existing excellence and does not lead to additional improvements in surgical outcomes. PMID:26056204

  20. Impact of Insurance and Hospital Ownership on Hospital Length of Stay Among Patients With Ambulatory Care–Sensitive Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mainous, Arch G.; Diaz, Vanessa A.; Everett, Charles J.; Knoll, Michele E.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Some studies suggest proprietary (for-profit) hospitals are maximizing financial margins from patient care by limiting therapies or decreasing length of stay for uninsured patients. This study examines the role of insurance related to length of stay once the patient is in the hospital and risk for mortality, particularly in a for-profit environment. METHODS We undertook an analysis of hospitalizations in the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) of the 5-year period of 2003 to 2007 for patients aged 18 to 64 years (unweighted n = 849,866; weighted n = 90 million). The analysis included those who were hospitalized with both ambulatory care–sensitive conditions (ACSCs), hospitalizations considered to be preventable, and non-ACSCs. We analyzed the transformed mean length of stay between individuals who had Medicaid or all other insurance types while hospitalized and those who were hospitalized without insurance. This analysis was stratified by hospital ownership. We also examined the relationship between in-hospital mortality and insurance status. RESULTS After controlling for comorbidities; age, sex, and race/ethnicity; and hospitalizations with either an ACSC or non-ACSC diagnosis, patients without insurance tended to have a significantly shorter length of stay. Across all hospital types, the mean length of stay for ACSCs was significantly shorter for individuals without insurance (2.77 days) than for those with either private insurance (2.89 days, P = .04) or Medicaid (3.19, P <.01). Among hospitalizations for ACSCs, inhospital mortality rate for individuals with either private insurance or Medicaid was not significantly different from the mortality rate for those without insurance. CONCLUSIONS Patients without insurance have shorter lengths of stay for both ACSCs and non-ACSCs. Future research should examine whether patients without insurance are being discharged prematurely. PMID:22084259

  1. AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN ACUTE STROKE HOSPITAL PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Kes, Vanja Bašić; Jurašić, Miljenka-Jelena; Zavoreo, Iris; Lisak, Marijana; Jelec, Vjekoslav; Matovina, Lucija Zadro

    2016-03-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death and the most important cause of adult disability worldwide and in Croatia. In the past, stroke was almost exclusively considered to be a disease of the elderly; however, today the age limit has considerably lowered towards younger age. The aim of this study was to determine age and gender impact on stroke patients in a Croatian urban area during one-year survey. The study included all acute stroke patients admitted to our Department in 2004. A compiled stroke questionnaire was fulfilled during hospitalization by medical personnel on the following items: stroke risk factors including lifestyle habits (smoking and alcohol), pre-stroke physical ability evaluation, stroke evolution data, laboratory and computed tomography findings, outcome data and post-stroke disability assessment. Appropriate statistical analysis of numerical and categorical data was performed at the level of p < 0.05. Analysis was performed on 396 patients, 24 of them from the younger adult stroke group. Older stroke patients had worse disability at hospital discharge and women had worse disabilities at both stroke onset and hospital discharge, probably due to older age at stroke onset. Younger patients recovered better, while older patients had to seek secondary medical facilities more often, as expected. The most important in-hospital laboratory findings in young stroke patients were elevated lipid levels, while older patients had elevated serum glucose and C-reactive protein. Stroke onset in younger patients most often presented with sudden onset headache; additionally, onset seizure was observed more frequently than expected. Stroke risk factor analysis showed that women were more prone to hypertension, chronic heart failure and atrial fibrillation, whereas men had carotid disease more frequently, were more often smokers and had higher alcohol intake. Additionally, age analysis showed that heart conditions and smoking were more prevalent among older

  2. What Can Hospitalized Patients Tell Us About Adverse Events? Learning from Patient-Reported Incidents

    PubMed Central

    Weingart, Saul N; Pagovich, Odelya; Sands, Daniel Z; Li, Joseph M; Aronson, Mark D; Davis, Roger B; Bates, David W; Phillips, Russell S

    2005-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about how well hospitalized patients can identify errors or injuries in their care. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to elicit incident reports from hospital inpatients in order to identify and characterize adverse events and near-miss errors. Subjects We conducted a prospective cohort study of 228 adult inpatients on a medicine unit of a Boston teaching hospital. Methods Investigators reviewed medical records and interviewed patients during the hospitalization and by telephone 10 days after discharge about “problems,”“mistakes,” and “injuries” that occurred. Physician investigators classified patients' reports. We calculated event rates and used multivariable Poisson regression models to examine the factors associated with patient-reported events. Results Of 264 eligible patients, 228 (86%) agreed to participate and completed 528 interviews. Seventeen patients (8%) experienced 20 adverse events; 1 was serious. Eight patients (4%) experienced 13 near misses; 5 were serious or life threatening. Eleven (55%) of 20 adverse events and 4 (31%) of 13 near misses were documented in the medical record, but none were found in the hospital incident reporting system. Patients with 3 or more drug allergies were more likely to report errors compared with patients without drug allergies (incidence rate ratio 4.7, 95% CI 1.7, 13.4). Conclusion Inpatients can identify adverse events affecting their care. Many patient-identified events are not captured by the hospital incident reporting system or recorded in the medical record. Engaging hospitalized patients as partners in identifying medical errors and injuries is a potentially promising approach for enhancing patient safety. PMID:16117751

  3. Strategies for cutting hospital beds: the impact on patient service.

    PubMed Central

    Green, L V; Nguyen, V

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop insights on the impact of size, average length of stay, variability, and organization of clinical services on the relationship between occupancy rates and delays for beds. DATA SOURCES: The primary data source was Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Secondary data were obtained from the United Hospital Fund of New York reflecting data from about 150 hospitals. STUDY DESIGN: Data from Beth Israel Deaconess on discharges and length of stay were analyzed and fit into appropriate queueing models to generate tables and graphs illustrating the relationship between the variables mentioned above and the relationship between occupancy levels and delays. In addition, specific issues of current concern to hospital administrators were analyzed, including the impact of consolidation of clinical services and utilizing hospital beds uniformly across seven days a week rather than five. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using target occupancy levels as the primary determinant of bed capacity is inadequate and may lead to excessive delays for beds. Also, attempts to reduce hospital beds by consolidation of different clinical services into single nursing units may be counterproductive. CONCLUSIONS: More sophisticated methodologies are needed to support decisions that involve bed capacity and organization in order to understand the impact on patient service. Images Figure 2 PMID:11409821

  4. Comparing Academic Library Spending with Public Libraries, Public K-12 Schools, Higher Education Public Institutions, and Public Hospitals between 1998-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regazzi, John J.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the overall spending trends and patterns of growth of Academic Libraries with Public Libraries, K-12 schools, higher education institutions, and hospitals in the period of 1998 to 2008. Academic Libraries, while showing a growth of 13% over inflation for the period, far underperformed the growth of the other public institutions…

  5. Is Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests Worse During Days of National Academic Meetings in Japan? A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Hatakeyama, Toshihiro; Shimamoto, Tomonari; Izawa, Junichi; Nishiyama, Chika; Iwami, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Background Outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) might be worse during academic meetings because many medical professionals attend them. Methods This nationwide population-based observation of all consecutively enrolled Japanese adult OHCA patients with resuscitation attempts from 2005 to 2012. The primary outcome was 1-month survival with a neurologically favorable outcome. Calendar days at three national meetings (Japanese Society of Intensive Care Medicine, Japanese Association for Acute Medicine, and Japanese Circulation Society) were obtained for each year during the study period, because medical professionals who belong to these academic societies play an important role in treating OHCA patients after hospital admission, and we identified two groups: the exposure group included OHCAs that occurred on meeting days, and the control group included OHCAs that occurred on the same days of the week 1 week before and after meetings. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for confounding variables. Results A total of 20 143 OHCAs that occurred during meeting days and 38 860 OHCAs that occurred during non-meeting days were eligible for our analyses. The proportion of patients with favorable neurologic outcomes after whole arrests did not differ during meeting and non-meeting days (1.6% [324/20 143] vs 1.5% [596/38 855]; adjusted odds ratio 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.88–1.19). Regarding bystander-witnessed ventricular fibrillation arrests of cardiac origin, the proportion of patients with favorable neurologic outcomes also did not differ between the groups. Conclusions In this population, there were no significant differences in outcomes after OHCAs that occurred during national meetings of professional organizations related to OHCA care and those that occurred during non-meeting days. PMID:26639754

  6. [Adverse events in patients from a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Arriaga-Dávila, José de Jesús; Domínguez-Serrano, María Isabel; Guzmán-Bihouet, Beatriz Filomena; Navarrete-Navarro, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Background: detection of adverse events is part of the safety management in hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of adverse events that occurred in a pediatric hospital. Methods: cross-sectional study of the adverse events occurred in a pediatric hospital from 2007 to 2009. Factors associated with their developmental causes were identified. The statistical analysis was descriptive and bivariate, with contingency tables to estimate the relationship between those factors. A p value = 0.05 was considered significant. Results: a total of 177 adverse events were registered. When they began, human factor occurred in 23 cases (13 %, OR = 1.41, p = 0.001), organizational factor was present in 71 cases (40 %, OR = 1.91, p = 0.236) and technical factor in 46 cases (26 %, OR = 0.87, p = 0.01). Blows or bruises from falls as a result of adverse events occurred in 71 cases (40 %, 95 % CI = 64-78). Conclusions: we found 1.84 events per 100 hospital discharges during the study period. The fall of patients ranked first of the adverse events identified. PMID:24290022

  7. A Regional Assessment of Medicaid Access to Outpatient Orthopaedic Care: The Influence of Population Density and Proximity to Academic Medical Centers on Patient Access

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Brendan M.; Draeger, Reid W.; Olsson, Erik C.; Spang, Jeffrey T.; Lin, Feng-Chang; Kamath, Ganesh V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Access to care is limited for patients with Medicaid with many conditions, but data investigating this relationship in the orthopaedic literature are limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between health insurance status and access to care for a diverse group of adult orthopaedic patients, specifically if access to orthopaedic care is influenced by population density or distance from academic teaching hospitals. Methods: Two hundred and three orthopaedic practices within the state of North Carolina were randomly selected and were contacted on two different occasions separated by three weeks. An appointment was requested for a fictitious adult orthopaedic patient with a potential surgical problem. Injury scenarios included patients with acute rotator cuff tears, zone-II flexor tendon lacerations, and acute lumbar disc herniations. Insurance status was reported as Medicaid at the time of the first request and private insurance at the time of the second request. County population density and the distance from each practice to the nearest academic hospital were recorded. Results: Of the 203 practices, 119 (59%) offered the patient with Medicaid an appointment within two weeks, and 160 (79%) offered the patient with private insurance an appointment within this time period (p < 0.001). Practices in rural counties were more likely to offer patients with Medicaid an appointment as compared with practices in urban counties (odds ratio, 2.25 [95% confidence interval, 1.16 to 4.34]; p = 0.016). Practices more than sixty miles from academic hospitals were more likely to accept patients with Medicaid than practices closer to academic hospitals (odds ratio, 3.35 [95% confidence interval, 1.44 to 7.83]; p = 0.005). Conclusions: Access to orthopaedic care was significantly decreased for patients with Medicaid. Practices in less populous areas were more likely to offer an appointment to patients with Medicaid than practices in more

  8. Real Money: Complications and Hospital Costs in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hemmila, Mark R.; Jakubus, Jill L.; Maggio, Paul M.; Wahl, Wendy L.; Dimick, Justin B.; Campbell, Darrell A.; Taheri, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Major postoperative complications are associated with a substantial increase in hospital costs. Trauma patients are known to have a higher rate of complications than the general surgery population. We sought to utilize the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) methodology to evaluate hospital costs, length of stay, and payment associated with complications in trauma patients. Study Design Using NSQIP principles, patient data were collected on 512 adult patients admitted to the trauma service for > 24 hours at a Level 1 trauma center (2004–2005). Patients were placed in one of three groups: no complications (none), ≥ 1 minor complication (minor, e.g., urinary tract infection), or ≥ 1 major complication (major, e.g., pneumonia). Total hospital charges, costs, payment, and length of stay associated with each complication group were determined from a cost accounting database. Multiple regression was used to determine the costs of each type of complication after adjusting for differences in age, gender, new injury severity score (nISS), Glasgow coma scale score (GCS), maximum head abbreviated injury scale (AIS), and first emergency department systolic blood pressure. Results 330 (64%) patients had no complications, 53 (10%) had ≥ 1 minor complication, and 129 (25%) had ≥ 1 major complication. Median hospital charges increased from $33,833 (none) to $81,936 (minor) and $150,885 (major). The mean contribution to margin per day was similar for the no complication and minor complication groups ($994 vs $1,115, p=0.7). Despite higher costs, the patients in the major complication group generated a higher mean contribution to margin per day when compared to the no complication group ($2,168, p<0.001). The attributable increase in median total hospital costs when adjusted for confounding variables was $19,915 for the minor complication group (p<0.001), and $40,555 for the major complication group (p<0.001). Conclusion Understanding the costs

  9. Factors and Models Associated with the amount of Hospital Care Services as Demanded by Hospitalized Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    van Oostveen, Catharina J.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Huis in het Veld, Judith G.; Bakker, Piet J.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospitals are constantly being challenged to provide high-quality care despite ageing populations, diminishing resources, and budgetary restraints. While the costs of care depend on the patients' needs, it is not clear which patient characteristics are associated with the demand for care and inherent costs. The aim of this study was to ascertain which patient-related characteristics or models can predict the need for medical and nursing care in general hospital settings. Methods We systematically searched MEDLINE, Embase, Business Source Premier and CINAHL. Pre-defined eligibility criteria were used to detect studies that explored patient characteristics and health status parameters associated to the use of hospital care services for hospitalized patients. Two reviewers independently assessed study relevance, quality with the STROBE instrument, and performed data analysis. Results From 2,168 potentially relevant articles, 17 met our eligibility criteria. These showed a large variety of factors associated with the use of hospital care services; models were found in only three studies. Age, gender, medical and nursing diagnoses, severity of illness, patient acuity, comorbidity, and complications were the characteristics found the most. Patient acuity and medical and nursing diagnoses were the most influencing characteristics. Models including medical or nursing diagnoses and patient acuity explain the variance in the use of hospital care services for at least 56.2%, and up to 78.7% when organizational factors were added. Conclusions A larger variety of factors were found to be associated with the use of hospital care services. Models that explain the extent to which hospital care services are used should contain patient characteristics, including patient acuity, medical or nursing diagnoses, and organizational and staffing characteristics, e.g., hospital size, organization of care, and the size and skill mix of staff. This would enable healthcare managers

  10. Inter-hospital and intra-hospital patient transfer: Recent concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Ashish; Singh, Jasveer

    2016-01-01

    The intra- and inter-hospital patient transfer is an important aspect of patient care which is often undertaken to improve upon the existing management of the patient. It may involve transfer of patient within the same facility for any diagnostic procedure or transfer to another facility with more advanced care. The main aim in all such transfers is maintaining the continuity of medical care. As the transfer of sick patient may induce various physiological alterations which may adversely affect the prognosis of the patient, it should be initiated systematically and according to the evidence-based guidelines. The key elements of safe transfer involve decision to transfer and communication, pre-transfer stabilisation and preparation, choosing the appropriate mode of transfer, i.e., land transport or air transport, personnel accompanying the patient, equipment and monitoring required during the transfer, and finally, the documentation and handover of the patient at the receiving facility. These key elements should be followed in each transfer to prevent any adverse events which may severely affect the patient prognosis. The existing international guidelines are evidence based from various professional bodies in developed countries. However, in developing countries like India, with limited infrastructure, these guidelines can be modified accordingly. The most important aspect is implementation of these guidelines in Indian scenario with periodical quality assessments to improve the standard of care. PMID:27512159

  11. Inter-hospital and intra-hospital patient transfer: Recent concepts.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Ashish; Singh, Jasveer

    2016-07-01

    The intra- and inter-hospital patient transfer is an important aspect of patient care which is often undertaken to improve upon the existing management of the patient. It may involve transfer of patient within the same facility for any diagnostic procedure or transfer to another facility with more advanced care. The main aim in all such transfers is maintaining the continuity of medical care. As the transfer of sick patient may induce various physiological alterations which may adversely affect the prognosis of the patient, it should be initiated systematically and according to the evidence-based guidelines. The key elements of safe transfer involve decision to transfer and communication, pre-transfer stabilisation and preparation, choosing the appropriate mode of transfer, i.e., land transport or air transport, personnel accompanying the patient, equipment and monitoring required during the transfer, and finally, the documentation and handover of the patient at the receiving facility. These key elements should be followed in each transfer to prevent any adverse events which may severely affect the patient prognosis. The existing international guidelines are evidence based from various professional bodies in developed countries. However, in developing countries like India, with limited infrastructure, these guidelines can be modified accordingly. The most important aspect is implementation of these guidelines in Indian scenario with periodical quality assessments to improve the standard of care. PMID:27512159

  12. Behavioral adjustment of psychiatric hospital patients and helping behavior.

    PubMed

    Tipton, R M; Bland, R E

    1975-03-01

    This study investigated the relationship between behavioral adjustment of mental hospital patients and helping behavior in two distinctly different controlled situations. Forty hospitalized male patients between the ages of 20 and 45 were assigned to two groups of equal size according to ratings they received on the MACC Behavioral Adjustment Scale. Each subject was exposed to two separate and independent experimental situations calling for helping behavior. Helping in the first situation was defined as offering a confederate the use of an extra pencil, while in the second it was defined as offering to help a confederate in the hallway to pick up a box of pencils that had just been dropped. The results of both experiments confirmed the hypothesis that persons suffering more severe levels of disturbance and maladjustment perform significantly fewer helpful acts. Results were discussed in terms of empathy, self-concern, and response cost. Also some implications for treatment were discussed. PMID:1159641

  13. Acoustical criteria for hospital patient rooms: Resolving competing requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Bennett M.

    2003-10-01

    The acoustical criteria for patient rooms in hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation facilities may be based on several needs. One important requirement is that noise levels in the room be conducive to restful sleep. Also, caregivers must have easy auditory and visual access to the patients, and be able to hear vital sign monitor alarms. This often means that patient rooms are located near central nurse stations and that patient room doors are left open. Further, the recently published federal privacy standards developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HSS) under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) require that ``appropriate physical safeguards'' be put in place to protect the confidentiality of patient health information. The simultaneous and competing requirements for speech privacy, caregiver access, and good sleeping conditions present a serious acoustical challenge to health care facility designers. Specific facility design issues and potential solution strategies are presented.

  14. Disclosing discourses: biomedical and hospitality discourses in patient education materials.

    PubMed

    Öresland, Stina; Friberg, Febe; Määttä, Sylvia; Öhlen, Joakim

    2015-09-01

    Patient education materials have the potential to strengthen the health literacy of patients. Previous studies indicate that readability and suitability may be improved. The aim of this study was to explore and analyze discourses inherent in patient education materials since analysis of discourses could illuminate values and norms inherent in them. Clinics in Sweden that provided colorectal cancer surgery allowed access to written information and 'welcome letters' sent to patients. The material was analysed by means of discourse analysis, embedded in Derrida's approach of deconstruction. The analysis revealed a biomedical discourse and a hospitality discourse. In the biomedical discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as the messenger of medical information while that of the patients as the carrier of diagnoses and recipients of biomedical information. In the hospitality discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as hosts who invite and welcome the patients as guests. The study highlights the need to eliminate paternalism and fosters a critical reflective stance among professionals regarding power and paternalism inherent in health care communication. PMID:25847051

  15. Classification of mistakes in patient care in a Nigerian hospital.

    PubMed

    Iyayi, Festus

    2009-12-01

    Recent discussions on improving health outcomes in the hospital setting have emphasized the importance of classification of mistakes in health care institutions These discussions indicate that the existence of a shared classificatory scheme among members of the health team indicates that errors in patient care are recognised as significant events that require systematic action as opposed to defensive, one-dimensional behaviours within the health institution. In Nigeria discussions of errors in patient care are rare in the literature. Discussions of the classification of errors in patient care are even more rare. This study represents a first attempt to deal with this significant problem and examines whether and how mistakes in patient care are classified across five professional health groups in one of Nigeria's largest tertiary health care institutions. The study shows that there are wide variations within and between professional health groups in the classification of errors in patient care. The implications of the absence of a classificatory scheme for errors in patient care for service improvement and organisational learning in the hospital environment are discussed. PMID:20803915

  16. Risk Factors for Inpatient Hospital Admission in Pediatric Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to determine the risk factors for inpatient admission of pediatric burn patients. Materials & methods This cross-sectional study uses data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (HCUP KID) for the years of 2003, 2006, 2009, and 2012 to estimate the risk factors for inpatient admission for pediatric patients who sustained a burn injury. Patients who sustained a burn between the ages of 1 and 18 years were included. Results A total of 43,453 patients met inclusion criteria. Of those, 42.3% were Caucasian, 20.1% were African American, and 19.3% were Hispanic. Males comprised 63.5% of the studied population. The month of July was associated with a 31.8% increased chance (p=.011) of being admitted to hospital for a pediatric burn. It was found that patients being admitted had a 32.2% increased chance (p=.002) of a fluid and electrolyte abnormality and a 61.0% increased chance (p=.027) of drug abuse.  Conclusions Pediatric burn patients are more likely to be admitted to the hospital having a fluid and electrolyte abnormality, having a drug abuse status, and/or during the month of July. PMID:27335714

  17. Preparation book for hospitalized pediatric patients: content and design.

    PubMed

    Gross, P R

    1989-01-01

    In the past 25 years, research has indicated the need for increased education and emotional support for pediatric patients in order to lessen their stress during hospitalization. A preparatory coloring book can help meet this need by providing factual information and by allowing emotional expression. A review of the literature identifies the major fears that should be addressed and gives guidelines for effectively producing such a book. PMID:2473062

  18. Auditing the nutrition content of patient charts: one hospital's perspective.

    PubMed

    Skopelianos, S

    1993-01-01

    Chart audits are traditionally based on patient charts categorized by disease. An alternate approach, using categorization by four types of nutrition care intervention, has been developed by University Hospital. This paper describes the process followed, criteria developed and the results of two complete chart audits. It was shown that nutrition profile forms improved documentation. Overall norms increased significantly from 81.5% to 90% (p < .05). Discussion centres on the evolutionary process from quality assurance to continuous quality improvement. PMID:10128409

  19. Quality of care in African-American patients admitted for congestive heart failure at a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Ilksoy, Nurcan; Moore, Renee H; Easley, Kirk; Jacobson, Terry A

    2006-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that the quality of congestive heart failure (CHF) treatment for hospitalized patients varies. The goal of this study was to evaluate the compliance of physicians at a large, inner-city teaching hospital with current evidence-based guidelines. A retrospective review of the medical records of 104 patients admitted with CHF was conducted. Quality-of-care indicators were assessed, including the use of echocardiograms, the administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta blockers to appropriate patients, and lifestyle and medication counseling at discharge. The assessment of left ventricular (LV) function was documented in 96.1% of patients (n = 100). A total of 65 patients (92.8%) with systolic dysfunction were considered to be ideal candidates for ACE inhibitor therapy. Of these 65 patients, 58 (89.2%) were discharged on ACE inhibitors. Of 41 patients with LV systolic dysfunction who were considered to be ideal candidates for beta-blocker therapy, only 10 (24.4%) were discharged on beta-blocker therapy. Of all patients with CHF, 50% received discharge counseling on medication compliance, 48% received counseling on a low-salt diet, and only 9% were told to monitor daily weight. This study shows that in a major academic teaching hospital, there is a need for improvement in the use of beta-blocker therapy as well as greater emphasis on patient education strategies regarding diet, medication adherence, and monitoring daily weight. PMID:16490439

  20. Engaging hospitalized patients in clinical care: Study protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Prey, Jennifer; Ryan, Beatriz; Alarcon, Irma; Qian, Min; Bakken, Suzanne; Feiner, Steven; Hripcsak, George; Polubriaginof, Fernanda; Restaino, Susan; Schnall, Rebecca; Strong, Philip; Vawdrey, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients who are better informed and more engaged in their health care have higher satisfaction with health care and better health outcomes. While patient engagement has been a focus in the outpatient setting, strategies to engage inpatients in their care have not been well studied. We are undertaking a study to assess how patients’ information needs during hospitalization can be addressed with health information technologies. To achieve this aim, we developed a personalized inpatient portal that allows patients to see who is on their care team, monitor their vital signs, review medications being administered, review current and historical lab and test results, confirm allergies, document pain scores and send questions and comments to inpatient care providers. The purpose of this paper is to describe the protocol for the study. Methods/design This pragmatic randomized controlled trial will enroll 426 inpatient cardiology patients at an urban academic medical center into one of three arms receiving: 1) usual care, 2) iPad with general internet access, or 3) iPad with access to the personalized inpatient portal. The primary outcome of this trial is patient engagement, which is measured through the Patient Activation Measure. To assess scalability and potential reach of the intervention, we are partnering with a West Coast community hospital to deploy the patient engagement technology in their environment with an additional 160 participants. Conclusion This study employs a pragmatic randomized control trial design to test whether a personalized inpatient portal will improve patient engagement. If the study is successful, continuing advances in mobile computing technology should make these types of interventions available in a variety of clinical care delivery settings. PMID:26795675

  1. New York's role as a center for health care: an analysis of nonresident patients served by New York City hospitals.

    PubMed

    Finkler, S; Knickman, J; Krasner, M; Szapiro, N

    1986-10-01

    Patients who reside outside of New York City have long been an important segment of the patient population at New York City hospitals. Each year, as far back as systematic data are available, approximately 10 percent of all patients at New York City hospitals have been non residents. Increasing competition and changing reimbursement policies compel hospitals in New York City to assess their role in caring for these patients and its economic implications. This report provides a comprehensive assessment of the characteristics of nonresident patients and their significance to the city's hospitals. Using data from all New York City hospitals, the report analyzes the demographics, insurance coverage, and case-mix characteristics of nonresident and resident patients. And, using more detailed data from New York University Medical Center and Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, it addresses the financial and reimbursement policy questions posed by the care of nonresident patients. The key findings of the report are as follows: A total of 115,307 nonresidents were hospitalized in New York City in 1982; this figure represents 10.4 percent of all patients in city hospitals. Over 80 percent of nonresident patients come from 14 counties surrounding New York City. Nonresident patients are a crucial component of the patient population at six hospitals that are the principal affiliates of a medical school and the six specialty hospitals. At academic health centers, nonresidents represent 25 percent of all inpatients; at the specialty hospitals, they represent 36 percent. Manhattan hospitals account for 69 percent of all nonresident discharges in the city. Outside of Manhattan, only Montefiore Medical Center and Long Island Jewish Medical Center have substantial numbers of nonresident patients. Among nonresident patients, 75 percent of admissions are scheduled in advance and 72 percent of hospital stays are for surgical procedures. In contrast, among resident patients, only 50

  2. Establishing a Personal Health Record System in an Academic Hospital: One Year's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Hyun Jung; Jung, Se Young; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung; Baek, Hyunyoung; Lee, Kiheon; Bae, Woo Kyung; Han, Jong-Soo; Kim, Sarah; Park, Hwayeon

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal health records (PHRs) are web based tools that help people to access and manage their personalized medical information. Although needs for PHR are increasing, current serviced PHRs are unsatisfactory and researches on them remain limited. The purpose of this study is to show the process of developing Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH)'s own PHR system and to analyze consumer's use pattern after providing PHR service. Methods Task force team was organized to decide service range and set the program. They made the system available on both mobile application and internet web page. The study enrolled PHR consumers who assessed PHR system between June 2013 and June 2014. We analyzed the total number of users on a monthly basis and the using pattern according to each component. Results The PHR service named Health4U has been provided from June 2013. Every patient who visited SNUBH could register Health4U service and view their medical data. The PHR user has been increasing, especially they tend to approach via one way of either web page or mobile application. The most frequently used service is to check laboratory test result. Conclusion For paradigm shift toward patient-centered care, there is a growing interest in PHR. This study about experience of establishing and servicing the Health4U would contribute to development of interconnected PHR. PMID:26019761

  3. Interdisciplinary expert consultation via a teleradiology platform--influence on therapeutic decision-making and patient referral rates to an academic tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Helck, A; Matzko, M; Trumm, C G; Grosse, C; Piltz, S; Reiser, M; Ertl-Wagner, B

    2009-12-01

    In addition to teleradiological reporting as a nighthawking or a regular service, teleradiological communication can be used for interdisciplinary expert consultation. We intended to evaluate an interdisciplinary consultation system based on a teleradiology platform with regard to its impact on therapeutic decision-making, directed patient referrals to an academic tertiary care center and the economic benefit for the hospital providing the service. Therefore, consultations from five secondary care centers and consecutive admissions to an academic tertiary care center were prospectively evaluated over a time period of six months. A total of 69 interdisciplinary expert consultations were performed. In 54 % of the cases the patients were consecutively referred to the university hospital for further treatment. In all acutely life-threatening emergencies (n = 9), fast and focused treatment by referral to the academic tertiary care center was achieved (average time to treat 130 min). The admissions to the academic tertiary care center led to improved utilization of its facilities with additional revenue of more than 1,000000 euro p. a. An interdisciplinary expert consultation via a teleradiology platform enables fast and efficient expert care with improved and accelerated patient management and improved utilization of the service providing hospital. PMID:19859862

  4. Antifungal agent utilization evaluation in hospitalized neutropenic cancer patients at a large teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Vazin, Afsaneh; Davarpanah, Mohammad Ali; Ghalesoltani, Setareh

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate pattern of using of three antifungal drugs: fluconazole, amphotericin B and voriconazole, at the hematology–oncology and bone marrow transplant wards of one large teaching hospital. In a prospective cross-sectional study, we evaluated the appropriateness of using antifungal drugs in patients, using Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. All the data were recorded daily by a pharmacist in a form designed by a clinical pharmacist and infectious diseases specialist, for antifungals usage, administration, and monitoring. During the study, 116 patients were enrolled. Indications of prescribing amphotericin B, fluconazole, and voriconazole were appropriate according to guidelines in 83.4%, 80.6%, and 76.9% respectively. The duration of treatments were appropriate according to guidelines in 75%, 64.5%, and 71.1% respectively. The dose of voriconazole was appropriate according to guidelines in 46.2% of patients. None of the patients received salt loading before administration of amphotericin B. The most considerable problems with the mentioned antifungals were about the indications and duration of treatment. In addition, prehydration for amphotericin B and dosage of voriconazole were not completely compatible with the mentioned guidelines. A suitable combination of controlling the use of antifungals and educational programs could be essential for improving the general process of using antifungal drugs at our hospital. PMID:26064070

  5. Thermal comfort of patients in hospital ward areas.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R. M.; Rae, A.

    1977-01-01

    The patient is identified as being of prime importance for comfort standards in hospital ward areas, other ward users being expected to adjust their dress to suit the conditions necessary for patients comfort. A study to identify the optimum steady state conditions for patients comfort is then described. Although this study raises some doubts as to the applicability of the standard thermal comfort assessment techniques to ward areas, it is felt that its results give a good indication of the steady-state conditions preferred by the patients. These were an air temperature of between 21-5 degrees and 22 degrees C and a relative humidity of between 30% and 70%, where the air velocity was less than 0-1 m/s and the mean radiant temperature was close to air temperature. PMID:264497

  6. Respect in the care of older patients in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Koskenniemi, Jaana; Leino-Kilpi, Helena; Suhonen, Riitta

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the experiences of older patients and their next of kin with regards to respect in the care given in an acute hospital. The data were collected using tape-recorded interviews (10 patients and 10 next of kin) and analysed via inductive content analysis. Based on the analysis, the concept of respect can be defined by the actions taken by nurses (polite behaviour, the patience to listen, reassurance, response to information needs, assistance in basic needs, provision of pain relief, response to wishes and time management) and next of kin (support, assistance and advocacy) and by factors related to the environment (appreciation of older people in society, management of health-care organizations, the nursing culture, the flow of information and patient placement). The information will be used to develop an instrument for assessing how well respect is maintained in the care of older patients. PMID:23131699

  7. Are religiously affiliated hospitals more than just nonprofits? A study on stereotypical patient perceptions and preferences.

    PubMed

    Seemann, Ann-Kathrin; Drevs, Florian; Gebele, Christoph; Tscheulin, Dieter K

    2015-06-01

    Recent research on patients' perceptions of different hospitals predominantly concentrates on whether hospitals are nonprofit or for-profit. Nonprofit hospitals can be subdivided into hospitals that are affiliated with a religious denomination and those that are not. Referring to the stereotypic content model, this study analyzes patients' perceptions of religious hospitals based on the factors of warmth, competence, trustworthiness and Christianity. Using a survey of German citizens (N = 300) with a one-factorial between-subject design (for-profit vs. nonprofit vs. religious nonprofit), we found that religious affiliation increases the perceptions of hospitals' trustworthiness and attractiveness. The study indicated that patients' perceptions of nonprofit hospitals with a religious affiliation differ from patients' beliefs about nonprofit hospitals without a religious affiliation, implying that research into ownership-related differences must account for hospital subtypes. Furthermore, religious hospitals that communicate their ownership status may have competitive advantages over those with a different ownership status. PMID:24846304

  8. Socioeconomic analysis of patient-centric networks: effects of patients and hospitals' characteristics and network structure on hospitalization costs.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Alireza; Uddin, Shahadat; Hossain, Liaquat

    2012-06-01

    Improving operations and delivery of cost-effective healthcare services is considered to be an important area of investigation due to the challenges in allocation of resources in meeting the increasing cost of health care for the twenty-first century. To date, appropriate mechanisms for systematic evaluation of hospital operations and its impact of the delivery of cost-effective healthcare services are lacking. This is, perhaps, the first study, which focuses on using large insurance claims data to develop a social network-based model for exploring the effect of patient-doctor tie strength and patient socio-demographic factors for exploring the social structure of operations and delivery of cost-effective healthcare services. We suggest that delivery of cost-effective healthcare services and operation is embedded within the social structure of hospitals. By exploring the mode of hospital operations in terms of their patient-centric care network, we are able to develop a better understanding of the operation and delivery of cost-effective healthcare services. PMID:21347691

  9. Missed Opportunities to Diagnose Tuberculosis Are Common Among Hospitalized Patients and Patients Seen in Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron C.; Polgreen, Linnea A.; Cavanaugh, Joseph E.; Hornick, Douglas B.; Polgreen, Philip M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Delayed diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) may lead to worse outcomes and additional TB exposures. Methods. To estimate the potential number of misdiagnosed TB cases, we linked all hospital and emergency department (ED) visits in California′s Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) databases (2005–2011). We defined a potential misdiagnosis as a visit with a new, primary diagnosis of TB preceded by a recent respiratory-related hospitalization or ED visit. Next, we calculated the prevalence of potential missed TB diagnoses for different time windows. We also computed odds ratios (OR) comparing the likelihood of a previous respiratory diagnosis in patients with and without a TB diagnosis, controlling for patient and hospital characteristics. Finally, we determined the correlation between a hospital′s TB volume and the prevalence of potential TB misdiagnoses. Results. Within 30 days before an initial TB diagnosis, 15.9% of patients (25.7% for 90 days) had a respiratory-related hospitalization or ED visit. Also, within 30 days, prior respiratory-related visits were more common in patients with TB than other patients (OR = 3.83; P < .01), controlling for patient and hospital characteristics. Respiratory diagnosis-related visits were increasingly common until approximately 90 days before the TB diagnosis. Finally, potential misdiagnoses were more common in hospitals with fewer TB cases (ρ = −0.845; P < .01). Conclusions. Missed opportunities to diagnose TB are common and correlate inversely with the number of TB cases diagnosed at a hospital. Thus, as TB becomes infrequent, delayed diagnoses may increase, initiating outbreaks in communities and hospitals. PMID:26705537

  10. Validating administrative data for the detection of adverse events in older hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy; Bowles, Susan K; Giffin, Lorri

    2014-01-01

    Older hospitalized patients are at risk of experiencing adverse events including, but not limited to, hospital-acquired pressure ulcers, fall-related injuries, and adverse drug events. A significant challenge in monitoring and managing adverse events is lack of readily accessible information on their occurrence. Purpose The objective of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to validate diagnostic codes for pressure ulcers, fall-related injuries, and adverse drug events found in routinely collected administrative hospitalization data. Methods All patients 65 years of age or older discharged between April 1, 2009 and March 31, 2011 from a provincial academic health sciences center in Canada were eligible for inclusion in the validation study. For each of the three types of adverse events, a random sample of 50 patients whose records were positive and 50 patients whose records were not positive for an adverse event was sought for review in the validation study (n=300 records in total). A structured health record review was performed independently by two health care providers with experience in geriatrics, both of whom were unaware of the patient’s status with respect to adverse event coding. A physician reviewed 40 records (20 reviewed by each health care provider) to establish interrater agreement. Results A total of 39 pressure ulcers, 56 fall-related injuries, and 69 adverse drug events were identified through health record review. Of these, 34 pressure ulcers, 54 fall-related injuries, and 47 adverse drug events were also identified in administrative data. Overall, the diagnostic codes for adverse events had a sensitivity and specificity exceeding 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.56–0.99) and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.72–0.99), respectively. Conclusion It is feasible and valid to identify pressure ulcers, fall-related injuries, and adverse drug events in older hospitalized patients using routinely collected administrative hospitalization data. The

  11. The Oregon Health and Science University-Oregon State Hospital Collaboration: Reflections on an Evolving Public-Academic Partnership.

    PubMed

    Chien, Joseph; Novosad, David; Mobbs, Karl E

    2016-03-01

    This column describes the conceptualization and implementation of an innovative collaboration between Oregon State Hospital and Oregon Health and Science University that was created to address understaffing and improve the quality of care. The hospital created a forensic evaluation rotation to address the growing population of forensic patients, which created a valuable recruiting tool for the hospital. One of the authors, a recent recruit, provides a first-person account of his experience working within the collaboration. The model could be emulated by other public-sector facilities facing similar challenges with psychiatrist recruitment and retention. PMID:26695498

  12. Monetary Resident Incentives: Effect on Patient Satisfaction in an Academic Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Langdorf, Mark I.; Kazzi, A. Antoine; Marwah, Rakesh S.; Bauche, John

    2005-01-01

    Patient satisfaction most be a priority in emergency departments (EDs). The care provided by residents forms much of the patient contact in academic EDs. Objective: To determine if monetary incentives for emergency medicine (EM) residents improve patient satisfaction scores on a mailed survey. Methods: The incentive program ran for nine months, 1999–2000. Press-Ganey surveys responses from ED patients in 456 hospitals; 124 form a peer group of larger, teaching hospitals. Questions relate to: 1) waiting time, 2) taking the problem seriously, 3) treatment information, 4) home care concerns, 5) doctor’s courtesy, and 6) concern with comfort. A 5-point Likert scale ranges from “very poor” (0 points) to “very good” (100). Raw score is the weighted mean, converted to a percentile vs. the peer group. Incentives were three-fold: a year-end event for the EM residents if 80th percentile results were achieved; individual incentives for educational materials of $50/resident (50th percentile), $100 (60th), $150 (70th), or $200 (80th); discount cards for the hospital’s espresso cart. These were distributed by 11 EM faculty (six cards/month) as rewards for outstanding interactions. Program cost was <$8,000, from patient-care revenue. Faculty had similar direct incentives, but nursing and staff incentives were ill defined and indirect. Results: Raw scores ranged from 66.1 (waiting time) to 84.3 (doctor’s courtesy) (n=509 or ∼7.2% of ED volume). Corresponding percentiles were 20th–43rd (mean=31st). We found no difference between the overall scores after the incentives, but three of the six questions showed improvement, with one, “doctors’ courtesy,” reaching 53rd percentile. The faculty funded the 50th percentile reward. Conclusions: Incentives are a novel idea to improve patient satisfaction, but did not foster overall Press-Ganey score improvement. We did find a trend toward improvement for doctor-patient interaction scores. Confounding variables, such

  13. Preliminary Investigation of Economics Issues in Hospitalized Patients with Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Tolou-Ghamari, Zahra; Shaygannejad, Vahid; Khorvash, Fariborz

    2013-01-01

    Background: The study of economics is important in Iranian stroke patients, because it is one of the costly diseases that could be linked to disability, mortality, and morbidity. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate total treatment costs of hospitalized patients with stroke. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 24 patients conducted to Isfahan Neurosciences Research Centre was carried out between April 1, 2012 and September 31, 2012. Demographic (sex, age) and economic variables (Raise tariffs, accumulated surplus, the total amount, of patients’, patients’ paid, and home insurance contribution) were extracted from the patients’ profiles. All information recorded and processed using Excel. Results: The mean age of patients was 71 years (ranged; 40-93 years old). Preliminary analysis of available costs issues could be described as: Raise tariffs (mean: 3500256 Rial, ranged: 504460-9775455 Rial), accumulated surplus (mean: 565578 Rial, ranged: 56700-2343664 Rial), the total amount (mean: 4045556 Rial, ranged: 715460-12219119 Rial), of patients’ (mean: 756037 Rial, ranged: 0-8365447 Rial), patients’ paid (mean: 1307762 Rial, ranged: 45300-9193000 Rial), and home insurance contribution (mean: 3070713 Rial, ranged 0-8887907 Rial). Conclusions: The cost disparity within this study after stroke could be mainly connected to variations in duration of hospital stay. Inspecting agenda towards this direction could reduce the economic cost of stroke significantly. Therefore, further assessment correlated to attain strategies in order to reduce costs associated to patients’ paid and home insurance contribution could be much more advantageous. PMID:23776748

  14. Failure of physician documentation of sleep complaints in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, H H; Riemer, A; Santiago, S M; Stein, M; Goldman, M D; Williams, A J

    1998-01-01

    Sleep disorders are acknowledged to be common but remain underrecognized by the medical community, often attributed to the failure to question patients about their sleep quality. We examined the prevalence of sleep complaints (insomnia or excessive daytime sleepiness) in a group of general medical patients by administering a questionnaire to hospitalized patients in a Veterans Affairs tertiary care medical center. A total of 222 consecutive adults (215 men, 60 +/- 14 years; body mass index, 24.8 +/- 5.6) completed the questionnaire. Of these, 105 patients (47%) had either insomnia, excessive daytime somnolence, or both; 63 (28%) had excessive daytime somnolence, which was severe in 27 (12%). Of 75 patients (34%) who had insomnia, a third were taking hypnotic medication. Forty patients (18%) had snoring, which was associated with excessive daytime somnolence in 36, whereas 46 patients (21%) had either restless legs or a combination of leg jerks and leg kicking or twitching during sleep, associated with a sleep complaint (insomnia in 32). The medical records were subsequently reviewed to assess the admitting physicians' recognition of these symptoms. No record included mention of any patient symptom related to sleep. We conclude that symptoms related to sleep, some of which may be clinically important, are common, and that none of these complaints appear to be recognized by the physicians of record. PMID:9771152

  15. Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-05-01

    Patient falls within hospitals have been identified as serious but largely preventable incidents, particularly among older adult patients. Previous literature has explored intrinsic factors associated with patient falls, but literature identifying possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls is lacking. This study seeks to identify patient motions and activities along with associated environmental design factors in a patient bathroom and clinician zone setting that may lead to falls. A motion capture experiment was conducted in a laboratory setting on 27 subjects over the age of seventy using scripted tasks and mockups of the bathroom and clinician zone of a patient room. Data were post-processed using Cortex and Visual3D software. A potential fall was characterized by a set of criteria based on the jerk of the upper body׳s center of mass (COM). Results suggest that only motion-related factors, particularly turning, pushing, pulling, and grabbing, contribute most significantly to potential falls in the patient bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute significantly in the clinician zone. Future work includes identifying and changing precise environmental design factors associated with these motions for an updated patient room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup. PMID:26920507

  16. Population Dynamics of Patients with Bacterial Resistance in Hospital Environment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Leilei; Pan, Qiuhui; Gao, Xubin; He, Mingfeng

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, the increase of antibiotic resistance has become a major concern worldwide. The researchers found that superbugs with new type of resistance genes (NDM-1) have two aspects of transmission characteristics; the first is that the antibiotic resistance genes can horizontally transfer among bacteria, and the other is that the superbugs can spread between humans through direct contact. Based on these two transmission mechanisms, we study the dynamics of population in hospital environment where superbugs exist. In this paper, we build three mathematic models to illustrate the dynamics of patients with bacterial resistance in hospital environment. The models are analyzed using stability theory of differential equations. Positive equilibrium points of the system are investigated and their stability analysis is carried out. Moreover, the numerical simulation of the proposed model is also performed which supports the theoretical findings. PMID:26904150

  17. Population Dynamics of Patients with Bacterial Resistance in Hospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Leilei; Pan, Qiuhui; Gao, Xubin; He, Mingfeng

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, the increase of antibiotic resistance has become a major concern worldwide. The researchers found that superbugs with new type of resistance genes (NDM-1) have two aspects of transmission characteristics; the first is that the antibiotic resistance genes can horizontally transfer among bacteria, and the other is that the superbugs can spread between humans through direct contact. Based on these two transmission mechanisms, we study the dynamics of population in hospital environment where superbugs exist. In this paper, we build three mathematic models to illustrate the dynamics of patients with bacterial resistance in hospital environment. The models are analyzed using stability theory of differential equations. Positive equilibrium points of the system are investigated and their stability analysis is carried out. Moreover, the numerical simulation of the proposed model is also performed which supports the theoretical findings. PMID:26904150

  18. A growing opportunity: Community gardens affiliated with US hospitals and academic health centers

    PubMed Central

    George, Daniel R.; Rovniak, Liza S.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Hanson, Ryan; Sciamanna, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community gardens can reduce public health disparities through promoting physical activity and healthy eating, growing food for underserved populations, and accelerating healing from injury or disease. Despite their potential to contribute to comprehensive patient care, no prior studies have investigated the prevalence of community gardens affiliated with US healthcare institutions, and the demographic characteristics of communities served by these gardens. Methods In 2013, national community garden databases, scientific abstracts, and public search engines (e.g., Google Scholar) were used to identify gardens. Outcomes included the prevalence of hospital-based community gardens by US regions, and demographic characteristics (age, race/ethnicity, education, household income, and obesity rates) of communities served by gardens. Results There were 110 healthcare-based gardens, with 39 in the Midwest, 25 in the South, 24 in the Northeast, and 22 in the West. Compared to US population averages, communities served by healthcare-based gardens had similar demographic characteristics, but significantly lower rates of obesity (27% versus 34%, P < .001). Conclusions Healthcare-based gardens are located in regions that are demographically representative of the US population, and are associated with lower rates of obesity in communities they serve. PMID:25599017

  19. Role of relatives of ethnic minority patients in patient safety in hospital care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    van Rosse, Floor; Suurmond, Jeanine; Wagner, Cordula; de Bruijne, Martine; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2016-01-01

    Objective Relatives of ethnic minority patients often play an important role in the care process during hospitalisation. Our objective was to analyse the role of these relatives in relation to the safety of patients during hospital care. Setting Four large urban hospitals with an ethnic diverse patient population. Participants On hospital admission of ethnic minority patients, 20 cases were purposively sampled in which relatives were observed to play a role in the care process. Outcome measures We used documents (patient records) and added eight cases with qualitative interviews with healthcare providers, patients and/or their relatives to investigate the relation between the role of relatives and patient safety. An inductive approach followed by selective coding was used to analyse the data. Results Besides giving social support, family members took on themselves the role of the interpreter, the role of substitutes of the patient and the role of care provider. The taking over of these roles can have positive and negative effects on patient safety. Conclusions When family members take over various roles during hospitalisation of a relative, this can lead to a safety risk and a safety protection for the patient involved. Although healthcare providers should not hand over their responsibilities to the relatives of patients, optimising collaboration with relatives who are willing to take part in the care process may improve patient safety. PMID:27056588

  20. Intravenous heparin dosing strategy in hospitalized patients with atrial dysrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Roswell, Robert O; Greet, Brian; Shah, Sunny; Bernard, Samuel; Milin, Alexandra; Lobach, Iryna; Guo, Yu; Radford, Martha J; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2016-08-01

    Patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) have an elevated stroke risk that is 2-7 times greater than in those without AF. Intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH) is commonly used for hospitalized patients with atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter (AFL) to prevent stroke. Dosing strategies exist for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with acute coronary syndromes and venous thromboembolic diseases, but there are no data to guide providers on a dosing strategy for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with AF/AFL. 996 hospitalized patients with AF/AFL on UFH were evaluated. Bolus dosing and initial infusion rates of UFH were recorded along with rates of stroke, thromboemobolic events, and bleeding events as defined by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis criteria. Among 226 patients included in the analysis, 76 bleeding events occurred. Using linear regression analysis, initial rates of heparin infusion ranging from 9.7 to 11.8 units/kilogram/hour (U/kg/h) resulted in activated partial thromboplastin times that were within therapeutic range. The median initial infusion rate in patients with bleeding was 13.3 U/kg/h, while in those without bleeding it was 11.4 U/kg/h; p = 0.012. An initial infusion rate >11.0 U/kg/h yielded an OR 1.95 (1.06-3.59); p = 0.03 for any bleeding event. Using IV heparin boluses neither increased the probability of attaining a therapeutic aPTT (56.1 vs 56.3 %; p = 0.99) nor did it significantly increase bleeding events in the study (35.7 vs 31.3 %; p = 0.48). The results suggest that higher initial rates of heparin are associated with increased bleeding risk. From this dataset, initial heparin infusion rates of 9.7-11.0 U/kg/h without a bolus can result in therapeutic levels of anticoagulation in hospitalized patients with AF/AFL without increasing the risk of bleeding. PMID:26951166

  1. Patient Bypass Behavior and Critical Access Hospitals: Implications for Patient Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jiexin (Jason); Bellamy, Gail R.; McCormick, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the extent of bypass for inpatient care among patients living in Critical Access Hospital (CAH) service areas, and to determine factors associated with bypass, the reasons for bypass, and what CAHs can do to retain patients locally. Methods: Six hundred and forty-seven subjects, aged 18 years and older, who had been admitted to…

  2. Commentary: Change we must: putting patients first with the institute model of academic health center organization.

    PubMed

    Young, James B; Cosgrove, Delos M

    2012-05-01

    In the traditional department-based organizational structure of an academic health center, patients can be neglected as a result of fragmented systems of care. Specialty-driven, provider-oriented, economically influenced organizations dominated by research and education missions might, paradoxically, promote too little concern for the patient. All three components (education, research, and patient care) of academic health centers' tripartite mission are sacred, but times have changed. Academic health centers must rethink their traditional approach to achieving their mission. The authors describe the evolution at the Cleveland Clinic of a unique, institute-based reorganization that is focused on integrated disease- and organ-system-based patient care, research, and education. The authors argue that this model better focuses on the patient as well as on the institution's academic charge. It is a concept that should be more widely adopted with deference to individual institutional culture and history. PMID:22531586

  3. Hospitalized patients with COPD: analysis of prior treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Giacomelli, Irai Luis; Steidle, Leila John Marques; Moreira, Frederico Fernandes; Meyer, Igor Varela; Souza, Ricardo Goetten; Pincelli, Mariângela Pimentel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Although COPD is a prevalent disease, it is undertreated, and there are no available data regarding previous treatment of COPD in Brazil. This study aimed to determine the appropriateness of maintenance treatment in COPD patients prior to their hospitalization and to identify variables associated with inappropriate treatment. Methods: This was an observational, cross-sectional, analytical study involving 50 inpatients with COPD at two hospitals in the city of Florianópolis, Brazil. The patients completed a questionnaire on parameters related to the maintenance treatment of COPD. Non-pharmacological management and pharmacological treatment were assessed based on the recommendations made by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) in 2011 and by the Brazilian National Ministry of Health in the chronic respiratory diseases section of its Caderno de Atenção Básica (CAB, Primary Care Guidebook). Results: In most of the patients, the COPD was classified as being severe or very severe. Regarding non-pharmacological management, 33% of the patients were smokers, only 32% had been advised to receive the flu vaccine, 28% had received pneumococcal vaccine, and only 6.5% of the patients in the B, C, and D categories received pulmonary rehabilitation. Regarding GOLD and CAB recommendations, pharmacological treatment was inappropriate in 50% and 74% of the patients, respectively. Based on GOLD recommendations, 38% were undertreated. A low level of education, low income, not receiving oxygen therapy, and not receiving the flu vaccine were associated with inappropriate treatment. Conclusions: The application of various non-pharmacological management recommendations was unsatisfactory. Regarding the GOLD recommendations, the high rate of inappropriate maintenance treatment was mainly due to undertreatment. In Brazil, even in severe COPD cases, optimizing treatment to achieve greater benefits continues to be a challenge. PMID:25029645

  4. Delirium and other clinical factors with Clostridium difficile infection that predict mortality in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Archbald-Pannone, Laurie R.; McMurry, Timothy L.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Warren, Cirle A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) severity has increased, especially among hospitalized elderly. We evaluated clinical factors to predict mortality following CDI. Methods We collected data from inpatients diagnosed with CDI at US academic medical center (HSR-IRB# 13630). We evaluated age, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), admission from a long-term care facility (LTCF), intensive care unit (ICU) at time of diagnosis, white blood cell count (WBC), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), low body mass index (BMI), and delirium as possible predictors. A parsimonious predictive model was chosen using Akaike information criterion (AIC) and a best subsets model selection algorithm. Area under the ROC curve was used to assess the model’s comparative; with AIC as selection criterion for all subsets to measure fit and control for over-fitting. Results From 362 subjects, the selected model included CCI, WBC, BUN, ICU, and delirium. The logistic regression coefficients were converted to a points scale and calibrated so that each unit on the CCI contributed 2 points, ICU contributed 5, unit of WBC (natural log scale) contributed 3, unit of BUN contributed 5, and delirium contributed 11. Discussion Our model shows substantial ability to predict short term mortality in patients hospitalized with CDI. Conclusion Patients who were diagnosed in the ICU and developed delirium are at highest risk for dying within 30 days of CDI diagnosis. PMID:25920706

  5. Metabolic syndrome in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mekov, Evgeni; Slavova, Yanina; Tsakova, Adelina; Genova, Marianka; Kostadinov, Dimitar; Minchev, Delcho; Marinova, Dora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The metabolic syndrome (MS) affects 21-53% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with a higher prevalence in the early stages of COPD, with results being highly variable between studies. MS may also affect natural course of COPD-number of exacerbations, quality of life and lung function. Aim. To examine the prevalence of MS and its correlation with comorbidities and COPD characteristics in patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation. Material and methods. 152 patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation were studied for presence of MS. All of them were also assessed for vitamin D status and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM). Data were gathered for smoking status and exacerbations during the last year. All patients completed CAT (COPD assessment test) and mMRC (Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea scale) questionnaires and underwent spirometry. Duration of current hospital stay was recorded. Results. 25% of patients have MS. 23.1% of the male and 29.5% of the female patients have MS (p > 0.05). The prevalence of MS in this study is significantly lower when compared to a national representative study (44.6% in subjects over 45 years). 69.1% of all patients and 97.4% from MS patients have arterial hypertension. The presence of MS is associated with significantly worse cough and sleep (1st and 7th CAT questions; p = 0.002 and p = 0.001 respectively) and higher total CAT score (p = 0.017). Average BMI is 27.31. None of the patients have MS and BMI <25. There is a correlation between the presence of MS and DM (p = 0.008) and with the number of exacerbations in the last year (p = 0.015). There is no correlation between the presence of MS and the pulmonary function. Conclusion. This study among hospitalized COPD patients finds comparable but relatively low prevalence of MS (25%) compared to previously published data (21-53%) and lower prevalence compared to general population (44.6%). MS may impact quality of life and the number of

  6. Metabolic syndrome in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Slavova, Yanina; Tsakova, Adelina; Genova, Marianka; Kostadinov, Dimitar; Minchev, Delcho; Marinova, Dora

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The metabolic syndrome (MS) affects 21–53% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with a higher prevalence in the early stages of COPD, with results being highly variable between studies. MS may also affect natural course of COPD—number of exacerbations, quality of life and lung function. Aim. To examine the prevalence of MS and its correlation with comorbidities and COPD characteristics in patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation. Material and methods. 152 patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation were studied for presence of MS. All of them were also assessed for vitamin D status and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM). Data were gathered for smoking status and exacerbations during the last year. All patients completed CAT (COPD assessment test) and mMRC (Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea scale) questionnaires and underwent spirometry. Duration of current hospital stay was recorded. Results. 25% of patients have MS. 23.1% of the male and 29.5% of the female patients have MS (p > 0.05). The prevalence of MS in this study is significantly lower when compared to a national representative study (44.6% in subjects over 45 years). 69.1% of all patients and 97.4% from MS patients have arterial hypertension. The presence of MS is associated with significantly worse cough and sleep (1st and 7th CAT questions; p = 0.002 and p = 0.001 respectively) and higher total CAT score (p = 0.017). Average BMI is 27.31. None of the patients have MS and BMI <25. There is a correlation between the presence of MS and DM (p = 0.008) and with the number of exacerbations in the last year (p = 0.015). There is no correlation between the presence of MS and the pulmonary function. Conclusion. This study among hospitalized COPD patients finds comparable but relatively low prevalence of MS (25%) compared to previously published data (21–53%) and lower prevalence compared to general population (44.6%). MS may impact quality of life and the

  7. Using case-mix information in strategic hospital marketing. Deriving market research from patient data.

    PubMed

    Little, A

    1992-01-01

    Hospital survival requires adaptation, adaptation requires understanding, and understanding requires information. These are the basic equations behind hospital strategic marketing, and one of the answers may lie in hospitals' own patient-data systems. Marketers' and administrators' enlightened application of case-mix information could become one more hospital survival tool. PMID:10118573

  8. Nutritional care in hospitalized patients with chronic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Dep K; Selvanderan, Shane P; Harley, Hugh AJ; Holloway, Richard H; Nguyen, Nam Q

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the practice of nutritional assessment and management of hospitalised patients with cirrhosis and the impact of malnutrition on their clinical outcome. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study on patients with liver cirrhosis consecutively admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Royal Adelaide Hospital over 24 mo. Details were gathered related to the patients’ demographics, disease severity, nutritional status and assessment, biochemistry and clinical outcomes. Nutritional status was assessed by a dietician and determined by subjective global assessment. Estimated energy and protein requirements were calculated by Simple Ratio Method. Intake was estimated from dietary history and/or food charts, and represented as a percentage of estimated daily requirements. Median duration of follow up was 14.9 (0-41.4) mo. RESULTS: Of the 231 cirrhotic patients (167 male, age: 56.3 ± 0.9 years, 9% Child-Pugh A, 42% Child-Pugh B and 49% Child-Pugh C), 131 (57%) had formal nutritional assessment during their admission and 74 (56%) were judged to have malnutrition. In-hospital caloric (15.6 ± 1.2 kcal/kg vs 23.7 ± 2.3 kcal/kg, P = 0.0003) and protein intake (0.65 ± 0.06 g/kg vs 1.01 ± 0.07 g/kg, P = 0.0003) was significantly reduced in patients with malnutrition. Of the malnourished cohort, 12 (16%) received enteral nutrition during hospitalisation and only 6 (8%) received ongoing dietetic review and assessment following discharge from hospital. The overall mortality was 51%, and was higher in patients with malnutrition compared to those without (HR = 5.29, 95%CI: 2.31-12.1; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Malnutrition is common in hospitalised patients with cirrhosis and is associated with higher mortality. Formal nutritional assessment, however, is inadequate. This highlights the need for meticulous nutritional evaluation and management in these patients. PMID:26668507

  9. Disaster preparedness: hospital decontamination and the pediatric patient--guidelines for hospitals and emergency planners.

    PubMed

    Freyberg, Christopher W; Arquilla, Bonnie; Fertel, Baruch S; Tunik, Michael G; Cooper, Arthur; Heon, Dennis; Kohlhoff, Stephan A; Uraneck, Katherine I; Foltin, George L

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, attention has been given to disaster preparedness for first responders and first receivers (hospitals). One such focus involves the decontamination of individuals who have fallen victim to a chemical agent from an attack or an accident involving hazardous materials. Children often are overlooked in disaster planning. Children are vulnerable and have specific medical and psychological requirements. There is a need to develop specific protocols to address pediatric patients who require decontamination at the entrance of hospital emergency departments. Currently, there are no published resources that meet this need. An expert panel convened by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene developed policies and procedures for the decontamination of pediatric patients. The panel was comprised of experts from a variety of medical and psychosocial areas. Using an iterative process, the panel created guidelines that were approved by the stakeholders and are presented in this paper. These guidelines must be utilized, studied, and modified to increase the likelihood that they will work during an emergency situation. PMID:18557297

  10. "Evil reports" for "ignorant minds"? Patient experience and public confidence in the emerging modern hospital: Vancouver General Hospital, 1912.

    PubMed

    Gagan, D; Gagan, R

    2001-01-01

    The process whereby the 19th-century Canadian charity hospital for the sick poor was transformed into a centre for scientific health care for the whole community was well in hand by World War I. To fund this transition, and to cope with the subsequent unrelieved demand from all social classes for accessibility to hospitalization, hospitals instituted differentiated services, offering premium care and privacy to paying patients whose fees, in turn, sustained a more economical level of open ward maintenance for indigent patients. As the record of a 1912 public investigation into patient grievances and complaints against the Vancouver General Hospital reveals, the commodification of hospital-based health care reproduced in the hospital environment the social attitudes, controls, and structures of the wider community. This development appeared to contradict the hospitals promise of undifferentiated, scientifically-mediated, medical efficiency and efficacy for all, and its reputation as a humane and caring institution. Notwithstanding the inquiry's conclusion that these grievances were "evil reports" designed to appeal to "ignorant minds," they reveal a patient population of already informed consumers ready, willing and able to discriminate between the promise and the reality of hospital-centred health care for all. PMID:14518465

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of enterococci isolated from hospitalized patients.

    PubMed Central

    Venditti, M; Tarasi, A; Gelfusa, V; Nicastri, E; Penni, A; Martino, P

    1993-01-01

    One hundred and one isolates of Enterococcus species isolated recently from hospitalized patients were evaluated in vitro for antibiotic susceptibility. Teicoplanin and mideplanin were the most active agents, followed by ramoplanin, vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, ampicillin, and imipenem. High-level resistance to gentamicin (MIC > 500 micrograms/ml) and/or streptomycin (MIC > 2,000 micrograms/ml) was found in 60 isolates. High-level resistance to ampicillin (MIC > or = 16 micrograms/ml) was found in 17 isolates. MBC studies revealed that ramoplanin possesses significant bactericidal activity. PMID:8517714

  12. Brucellosis among Hospitalized Febrile Patients in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Bouley, Andrew J.; Biggs, Holly M.; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Bartlett, John A.; Afwamba, Isaac A.; Maro, Venance P.; Kinabo, Grace D.; Saganda, Wilbrod; Cleaveland, Sarah; Crump, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Acute and convalescent serum samples were collected from febrile inpatients identified at two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed brucellosis was defined as a positive blood culture or a ≥ 4-fold increase in microagglutination test titer, and probable brucellosis was defined as a single reciprocal titer ≥ 160. Among 870 participants enrolled in the study, 455 (52.3%) had paired sera available. Of these, 16 (3.5%) met criteria for confirmed brucellosis. Of 830 participants with ≥ 1 serum sample, 4 (0.5%) met criteria for probable brucellosis. Brucellosis was associated with increased median age (P = 0.024), leukopenia (odds ratio [OR] 7.8, P = 0.005), thrombocytopenia (OR 3.9, P = 0.018), and evidence of other zoonoses (OR 3.2, P = 0.026). Brucellosis was never diagnosed clinically, and although all participants with brucellosis received antibacterials or antimalarials in the hospital, no participant received standard brucellosis treatment. Brucellosis is an underdiagnosed and untreated cause of febrile disease among hospitalized adult and pediatric patients in northern Tanzania. PMID:23091197

  13. Brucellosis among hospitalized febrile patients in northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Bouley, Andrew J; Biggs, Holly M; Stoddard, Robyn A; Morrissey, Anne B; Bartlett, John A; Afwamba, Isaac A; Maro, Venance P; Kinabo, Grace D; Saganda, Wilbrod; Cleaveland, Sarah; Crump, John A

    2012-12-01

    Acute and convalescent serum samples were collected from febrile inpatients identified at two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed brucellosis was defined as a positive blood culture or a ≥ 4-fold increase in microagglutination test titer, and probable brucellosis was defined as a single reciprocal titer ≥ 160. Among 870 participants enrolled in the study, 455 (52.3%) had paired sera available. Of these, 16 (3.5%) met criteria for confirmed brucellosis. Of 830 participants with ≥ 1 serum sample, 4 (0.5%) met criteria for probable brucellosis. Brucellosis was associated with increased median age (P = 0.024), leukopenia (odds ratio [OR] 7.8, P = 0.005), thrombocytopenia (OR 3.9, P = 0.018), and evidence of other zoonoses (OR 3.2, P = 0.026). Brucellosis was never diagnosed clinically, and although all participants with brucellosis received antibacterials or antimalarials in the hospital, no participant received standard brucellosis treatment. Brucellosis is an underdiagnosed and untreated cause of febrile disease among hospitalized adult and pediatric patients in northern Tanzania. PMID:23091197

  14. Informal patient payments in maternity hospitals in Kiev, Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Stepurko, Tetiana; Pavlova, Milena; Levenets, Olena; Gryga, Irena; Groot, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Maternity care in Ukraine is a government priority. However, it has not undergone substantial changes since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Similar to the entire health care sector in Ukraine, maternity care suffers from inefficient funding, which results in low quality and poor access to services. The objective of this paper is to explore the practice of informal payments for maternity care in Ukraine, specifically in cases of childbirth in Kiev maternity hospitals. The paper provides an ethnographic study on the consumers' and providers' experiences with informal payments. The results suggest that informal payments for childbirth are an established practice in Kiev maternity hospitals. The bargaining process between the pregnant woman (incl. her partner) and the obstetrician is an important part of the predelivery arrangement, including the informal payment. To deal with informal payments in Kiev maternity hospitals, there is a need for the following: (i) regulation of the "quasi-official" patient payments at the health care facility level; and (ii) improvement of professional ethics through staff training. These strategies should be coupled with improved governance of the health care sector in general, and maternity care in particular in order to attain international quality standards and adequate access to facilities. PMID:23239082

  15. Are urban safety-net hospitals losing low-risk Medicaid maternity patients?

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, D J; Hadley, J; Freeman, V G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine data on Medicaid and self-pay/charity maternity cases to address four questions: (1) Did safety-net hospitals' share of Medicaid patients decline while their shares of self-pay/charity-care patients increased from 1991 to 1994? (2) Did Medicaid patients' propensity to use safety-net hospitals decline during 1991-94? (3) Did self-pay/charity patients' propensity to use safety-net hospitals increase during 1991-94? (4) Did the change in Medicaid patients' use of safety-net hospitals differ for low- and high-risk patients? STUDY DESIGN: We use hospital discharge data to estimate logistic regression models of hospital choice for low-risk and high-risk Medicaid and self-pay/charity maternity patients for 25 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in five states for the years 1991 and 1994. We define low-risk patients as discharges without comorbidities and high-risk patients as discharges with comorbidities that may substantially increase hospital costs, length of stay, or morbidity. The five states are California, Florida, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York. The MSAs in the analysis are those with at least one safety-net hospital and a population of 500,000 or more. This study also uses data from the 1990 Census and AHA Annual Survey of Hospitals. The regression analysis estimates the change between 1991 and 1994 in the relative odds of a Medicaid or self-pay/charity patient using a safety-net hospital. We explore whether this change in the relative odds is related to the risk status of the patient. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The findings suggest that competition for Medicaid patients increased from 1991 to 1994. Over time, safety-net hospitals lost low-risk maternity Medicaid patients while services to high-risk maternity Medicaid patients and self-pay/charity maternity patients remained concentrated in safety-net hospitals. IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY: Safety-net hospitals use Medicaid patient revenues and public subsidies that are based on Medicaid

  16. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units. PMID:26560255

  17. Using inpatient hospital discharge data to monitor patient safety events.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jennifer A; Pandian, Ravi S; Mao, Lu; Michael, Yvonne L

    2013-01-01

    The development of systematic and sustainable surveillance systems is necessary for the creation of patient safety prevention programs and the evaluation of improvement resulting from innovations. To that end, inpatient hospital discharges collected by the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council were used to investigate patient safety events (PSEs) in Pennsylvania in 2006. PSEs were identified using external cause of injury codes (E-codes) in combination with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's patient safety indicators (PSIs). Encounters with and without PSEs were compared with regard to patient age, sex, race, length of stay, and cost. Approximately 9% of all Pennsylvania inpatient discharges had a PSE in 2006. Patients with a PSE were on average older, male, and white. The average length of stay for a PSE was 3 days longer and $35 000 more expensive than a non-PSE encounter. It was concluded that E-codes and PSIs were useful tools for the surveillance of PSEs in Pennsylvania, and that administrative data from healthcare organizations provide a consistent source of standardized data related to patient encounters, creating an opportunity to describe PSEs at the population level. PMID:23609974

  18. Risk Factors for 30-Day Hospital Readmission among General Surgery Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kassin, Michael T; Owen, Rachel M; Perez, Sebastian; Leeds, Ira; Cox, James C; Schnier, Kurt; Sadiraj, Vjollca; Sweeney, John F

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission within 30-days of an index hospitalization is receiving increased scrutiny as a marker of poor quality patient care. This study identifies factors associated with 30-day readmission following General Surgery procedures. Study Design Using standard National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (NSQIP) protocol, preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative outcomes were collected on patients undergoing inpatient General Surgery procedures at a single academic center between 2009 and 2011. Data were merged with our institutional clinical data warehouse to identify unplanned 30-day readmissions. Demographics, comorbidities, type of procedure, postoperative complications, and ICD-9 coding data were reviewed for patients who were readmitted. Univariate and multivariate analysis was utilized to identify risk factors associated with 30-day readmission. Results 1442 General Surgery patients were reviewed. 163 (11.3%) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge. The most common reasons for readmission were gastrointestinal complaint/complication (27.6%), surgical infection (22.1%), and failure to thrive/malnutrition (10.4%). Comorbidities associated with risk of readmission included disseminated cancer, dyspnea, and preoperative open wound (p<0.05 for all variables). Surgical procedures associated with higher rates of readmission included pancreatectomy, colectomy, and liver resection. Postoperative occurrences leading to increased risk of readmission were blood transfusion, postoperative pulmonary complication, wound complication, sepsis/shock, urinary tract infection, and vascular complications. Multivariable analysis demonstrates that the most significant independent risk factor for readmission is the occurrence of any postoperative complication (OR 4.20, 95% CI 2.89–6.13). Conclusions Risk factors for readmission after General Surgery procedures are multi-factorial; however, postoperative complications appear to drive readmissions in

  19. Complications Requiring Hospital Admission and Causes of In-Hospital Death over Time in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Cirrhosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Yeon; Kim, Chang Wook; Choi, Jong Young; Lee, Chang Don; Lee, Sae Hwan; Kim, Moon Young; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Woo, Hyun Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Data on the epidemiology of alcoholic cirrhosis, especially in Asian countries, are limited. We compared the temporal evolution of patterns of alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis over the last decade. Methods We retrospectively examined the inpatient datasets of five referral centers during 2002 and 2011. The study included patients who were admitted due to specific complications of liver cirrhosis. We compared the causes of hospital admissions and in-hospital deaths between patients with alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis. Results Among the included 2,799 hospitalizations (2,165 patients), 1,496 (1,143 patients) were from 2002, and 1,303 (1,022 patients) were from 2011. Over time, there was a reduction in the rate of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) as a cause of hospitalization and an increase in the rate of hepatocellular carcinoma. Deaths that were attributable to HE or spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) significantly decreased, whereas those due to hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) significantly increased over time in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. However, in patients with nonalcoholic cirrhosis, hepatic failure and HRS remained the principal causes of in-hospital death during both time periods. Conclusions The major causes of in-hospital deaths have evolved from acute cirrhotic complications, including HE or SBP to HRS in alcoholic cirrhosis, whereas those have remained unchanged in nonalcoholic cirrhosis during the last decade. PMID:26087788

  20. Identifying and communicating the contributions of library and information services in hospitals and academic health sciences centers

    PubMed Central

    Abels, Eileen G.; Cogdill, Keith W.; Zach, Lisl

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This article introduces a systematic approach to identifying and communicating the value of library and information services (LIS) from the perspective of their contributions to achieving organizational goals. Methods: The contributions of library and information services (CLIS) approach for identifying and communicating the value of LIS draws on findings from a multimethod study of hospitals and academic health sciences centers. Results: The CLIS approach is based on the concept that an individual unit's value to an organization can be demonstrated by identifying and measuring its contributions to organizational goals. The CLIS approach involves seven steps: (1) selecting appropriate organizational goals that are meaningful in a specific setting; (2) linking LIS contributions to organizational goals; (3) obtaining data from users on the correspondence between LIS contributions and LIS services; (4) selecting measures for LIS services; (5) collecting and analyzing data for the selected measures; (6) planning and sustaining communication with administrators about LIS contributions; and (7) evaluating findings and revising selected goals, contributions, and services as necessary. Conclusions: The taxonomy of LIS contributions and the CLIS approach emerged from research conducted in hospitals and academic health sciences centers and reflect the mission and goals common in these organizations. However, both the taxonomy and the CLIS approach may be adapted for communicating the value of LIS in other settings. PMID:14762462

  1. Measuring patient-perceived quality of care in US hospitals using Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Jared B; Brownstein, John S; Tuli, Gaurav; Nsoesie, Elaine O; McIver, David J; Rozenblum, Ronen; Wright, Adam; Bourgeois, Florence T; Greaves, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients routinely use Twitter to share feedback about their experience receiving healthcare. Identifying and analysing the content of posts sent to hospitals may provide a novel real-time measure of quality, supplementing traditional, survey-based approaches. Objective To assess the use of Twitter as a supplemental data stream for measuring patient-perceived quality of care in US hospitals and compare patient sentiments about hospitals with established quality measures. Design 404 065 tweets directed to 2349 US hospitals over a 1-year period were classified as having to do with patient experience using a machine learning approach. Sentiment was calculated for these tweets using natural language processing. 11 602 tweets were manually categorised into patient experience topics. Finally, hospitals with ≥50 patient experience tweets were surveyed to understand how they use Twitter to interact with patients. Key results Roughly half of the hospitals in the US have a presence on Twitter. Of the tweets directed toward these hospitals, 34 725 (9.4%) were related to patient experience and covered diverse topics. Analyses limited to hospitals with ≥50 patient experience tweets revealed that they were more active on Twitter, more likely to be below the national median of Medicare patients (p<0.001) and above the national median for nurse/patient ratio (p=0.006), and to be a non-profit hospital (p<0.001). After adjusting for hospital characteristics, we found that Twitter sentiment was not associated with Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) ratings (but having a Twitter account was), although there was a weak association with 30-day hospital readmission rates (p=0.003). Conclusions Tweets describing patient experiences in hospitals cover a wide range of patient care aspects and can be identified using automated approaches. These tweets represent a potentially untapped indicator of quality and may be valuable to

  2. Treating Long-Stay Patients in Acute Hospital Beds: An Economic Diagnosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hochstein, Alan

    1985-01-01

    A study of 105 medical files from three Montreal hospitals suggests that long-stay patients are inactive users of many hospital services; estimated reduction in cost per day for these patients due to their earlier discharge is only about 24-30 percent of the hospital's per diem.

  3. Patient Hand Hygiene at Home Predicts Their Hand Hygiene Practices in the Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Anna; Sethi, Ajay; Shulkin, Emily; Caniza, Rachell; Zerbel, Sara; Safdar, Nasia

    2014-01-01

    We examine factors associated with hand hygiene practices of hospital patients. Hygiene decreased compared to at home, and home practices were strongly associated with hospital practices. Understanding and leveraging the intrinsic value some patients associate with hand hygiene may be important for improving overall hospital hygiene and decreasing healthcare-associated infections. PMID:24709731

  4. Intestinal helminths of hospital patients in Kavango territory, Namibia.

    PubMed

    Evans, A C; Joubert, J J

    1989-01-01

    In-patient and out-patient faeces examination reports from the State Hospital in Rundu, Kavango territory, Namibia, gave some idea of the prevalence of helminthic infections. 4174 specimens were examined over a 29-month period. Hookworm (6.8%) and Strongyloides (2.7%) were the most common infections, followed by Hymenolepis nana (1%), Schistosoma mansoni (1%) and Taenia sp. (0.9%). S. mansoni was more common in males than females, hookworm more common in females than males, and H. nana was most common in the pre-school group. Promiscuous defaecation on the banks of the Okavango river provides ideal situations for the development and transmission of hookworm and Strongyloides, while fishing and other activities enhance the transmission of S. mansoni infections. Larva migrans, probably due to Ancyclostoma braziliense or A. caninum, is common in the area. Studies involving schoolchildren would provide more accurate assessment of the prevalences of the various helminths. PMID:2617631

  5. A tale of two cultures: examining patient-centered care in a forensic mental health hospital

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, James D.; Nijdam-Jones, Alicia; Brink, Johann

    2012-01-01

    Several questions remain unanswered regarding the extent to which the principles and practices of patient-centered care are achievable in the context of a forensic mental health hospital. This study examined patient-centered care from the perspectives of patients and providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patient-centered care was assessed using several measures of complementary constructs. Interviews were conducted with 30 patients and surveys were completed by 28 service providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patients and providers shared similar views of the therapeutic milieu and recovery orientation of services; however, providers were more likely to perceive the hospital as being potentially unsafe. Overall, the findings indicated that characteristics of patient-centered care may be found within a forensic mental health hospital. The principles of patient-centered care can be integrated into service delivery in forensic mental health hospitals, though special attention to providers’ perceptions of safety is needed. PMID:22815648

  6. Every penny counts: interest-free loan programs could benefit both hospitals and patients.

    PubMed

    Hinderks, Jackie; Wreede, Amanda

    2015-11-01

    Patients' average deductibles have more than quadrupled, and their out-of-pocket costs are much higher now than even a decade ago. The higher a hospital bill, the less likely a patient is to pay. Zero-interest loan programs encourage patients to pay, helping both patient and hospital stay afloat. PMID:26685438

  7. Technology advances in hospital practices: robotics in treatment of patients.

    PubMed

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is widely considered as the treatment of choice for acute cholecystitis. The safety of the procedure and its minimal invasiveness made it a valid treatment option for a patient not responding to antibiotic therapy. Our research shows that patients positively assess this treatment method, but the world's tendency is to turn to a more sophisticated method utilizing robot-assisted surgery as a gold standard. Providing patient with minimally invasive surgical procedures that utilize the state-of-the-art equipment like the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System underscores the commitment to high-quality patient care while enhancing patient safety. The advantages include minimal invasive scarring, less pain and bleeding, faster recovery time, and shorter hospital stay. The move toward less invasive and less morbid procedures and a need to re-create the true open surgical experience have paved the way for the development and application of robotic and computer-assisted systems in surgery in Poland as well as the rest of the world. PMID:25782187

  8. Health Literacy, Education Levels, and Patient Portal Usage During Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sharon E.; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kripalani, Sunil; Goggins, Kathryn M.; Jackson, Gretchen Purcell

    2015-01-01

    Patient portal adoption has rapidly increased, and portal usage has been associated with patients’ sociodemographics, health literacy, and education. Research on patient portals has primarily focused on the outpatient setting. We explored whether health literacy and education were associated with portal usage in an inpatient population. Among 60,159 admissions in 2012–2013, 23.3% of patients reported limited health literacy; 50.4% reported some post-secondary education; 34.4% were registered for the portal; and 23.4% of registered patients used the portal during hospitalization. Probability of registration and inpatient portal use increased with educational attainment. Health literacy was associated with registration but not inpatient use. Among admissions with inpatient use, educational attainment was associated with viewing health record data, and health literacy was associated use of appointment and health education tools. The inpatient setting may provide an opportunity to overcome barriers to patient portal adoption and reduce disparities in use of health information technologies. PMID:26958286

  9. Over-testing for heparin induced thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Shruti; Kohli, Ruhail; McCrae, Keith

    2015-07-01

    Heparin induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a pro-thrombotic and potentially fatal complication of heparin therapy. Its diagnosis rests on high clinical probability and the laboratory demonstration of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies. The high prevalence of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients and the high sensitivity but low specificity of immunoassays for HIT antibodies can lead to over-testing and over-diagnosis. We conducted a study to review HIT screening practices in a tertiary care setting. We reviewed 63 consecutive patients undergoing testing for anti-PF4/heparin antibodies over 3 months. Pre-test probability for HIT was calculated using the 4T score. Sixty three patients underwent testing for anti-PF4/heparin antibodies. Twenty one had been admitted for cardiovascular surgery, 5 for other surgery and 35 for non-surgical indications. Twenty nine patients (46 %) had low pre- test probability, twenty three (36.5 %) had intermediate probability, and eleven (17.4 %) had high pre-test probability of having HIT. Anti-PF4/heparin ELISA was positive in 8 of 63 patients. SRA was ordered for 16 patients and was positive in 5. Only five patients were diagnosed and treated for HIT. Over-testing for HIT is highly prevalent in a tertiary care setting. This increases cost and exposes patients to expensive anti-coagulation with its attendant risk of hemorrhage. The 4Ts score has been shown to have high sensitivity and may be used to rule out HIT in most situations, although its utility depends on subjective analysis. Consistently applying this in practice could minimize over-testing and facilitate safer, cost-effective care. PMID:25127902

  10. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN DIABETIC PATIENTS IN SOHAG UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS, EGYPT.

    PubMed

    Elnadi, Nada A; Hassanien, Hassan A; Ahmad, Amal M; Abd Ellah, Asmaa K

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal parasites usually create benign diseases, though they may induce complications with high morbidity and mortality to the immunocompromised, including diabetic patients. The study detected the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in diabetic patients, comparing to non-diabetic controls and other parameters. A total of 100 fecal samples were collected from diabetic patients at the outpatient clinic of Sohag University Hospitals and another 100 from cross matched controls. The samples were examined macroscopically and microscopically by direct smear and different concentration methods then stained by Modified Ziehl-Neelsen Acid fast stain. Glycated hemoglobin (Hb Alc) was measured to detect DM controlled patients. The data were organized, tabulated, and statistically analyzed. Intestinal parasites were found in 25 (25%) cases out of 100 patients in diabetic group and 7(7%) cases out of 100 controls with high significance (P<0.001)). In the diabetic group, Giardia lamblia was detected in 22 cases (22%) and 5 (5%) among controls, Entamoeba histolytica in 7 cases (7%) and 3 (3%) among controls, Hymenolypis nana in 5 cases (5%) and 3 (3%) among controls, Entamoeba coli in 8 patients (8%), Entamoeba hartmanni in 3 cases (3%), Dientamoeba fragilis in a case (1%), Cryptosporidium parvum in 5 cases (5%) and microsporidia in 3 cases (3%). But, E. coli, E. hartmanni, D. fragilis and C. parvum nor microsporidia were detected in controls. The rate of G. lamblia in DM patients compared to controls was high significant (P<0.001). Hymenolepis nana was 5% (5 cases) in diabetic patients compared to 3% (3 cases) in controls. Residence and sex differences were not significant, while age, >10 years showed the highest prevalence (P< 0.003), type I infection rate was significantly higher than type II (P<0.001). DM control was also significantly affected the infection rates (P<0.007 in type I and P< 0.01 in type II). PMID:26485865

  11. Hyponatremia and in-hospital mortality in patients admitted for heart failure (from the ATTEND registry).

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoki; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Kajimoto, Katsuya; Munakata, Ryo; Minami, Yuichiro; Mizuno, Masayuki; Aokage, Toshiyuki; Asai, Kuniya; Sakata, Yasushi; Yumino, Dai; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Takano, Teruo

    2013-04-01

    Hyponatremia is known to be a poor prognostic factor in patients hospitalized with heart failure (HF), however not well studied in Japan. The aims of this study were to characterize hyponatremic hospitalized patients with HF and to clarify the relations between hyponatremia and detailed in-hospital outcomes in Japan. Among 4,837 hospitalized patients with HF enrolled in the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Syndromes (ATTEND) registry, patient characteristics and in-hospital mortality in those with hyponatremia were examined. Hyponatremia (sodium <135 mEq/L) was observed in 11.6% of patients. Patients with hyponatremia were of similar age, included fewer men, and had a higher proportion of previous hospitalizations for HF compared to those with normonatremia. On admission, lower heart rates and blood pressures and higher brain natriuretic peptide levels were observed in patients with hyponatremia. During hospitalization, inotrope levels and mechanical device use were significantly higher in patients with hyponatremia. Rates of all-cause and cardiac death were significantly higher in patients with hyponatremia, 15.0% and 11.4%, respectively, compared to 5.3% and 3.6%, respectively, in those with normonatremia. In hyponatremic hospitalized patients with HF, cardiac death accounted for 76.2% of all-cause death. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that in Japan hyponatremia in patients hospitalized with HF is relatively common and is associated with a very high in-hospital mortality. PMID:23312128

  12. Assessing Safety Attitudes among Healthcare Providers after a Hospital-Wide High-Risk Patient Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Je, Sang Mo; Kim, Hyun Jong; You, Je Sung; Chung, Sung Phil; Cho, Junho; Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Hahn Shick

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is commonly performed in high-risk, high intensity situations and is therefore a good procedure around which to develop and implement safety culture strategies in the hospital. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a hospital-wide quality improvement program on the management of sudden cardiac arrests by assessing healthcare providers' attitudes towards patient safety. Materials and Methods This study was designed as a prospective cohort study at a single academic medical center. The comprehensive hospital-based safety program included steps to identify areas of hazard, partner units with the Resuscitation Committee, and to conduct a Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). The SAQ evaluated 35 questions in seven domains to assess changes in patient safety culture by comparing the results before and after the hospital-wide high risk patient care improvement program. Results The response rates of the pre- and post-SAQ survey were 489 out of 1121 (43.6%) and 575 out of 1270 (45.3%), respectively. SAQ survey responses revealed significant improvement in all seven domains of the questionnaire (p-values of 0.006 and lower). In a subgroup analysis, doctors and nurses showed improvement in five domains. Both doctors and nurses did not show improvement in the "sharing information" domain. Conclusion A hospital-wide quality improvement program for high-risk, high reliability patient care involving CPR care was shown to be associated with a change in healthcare providers' attitudes towards patient safety. Through an immersive and active program on CPR care, change in healthcare providers' attitudes towards patient safety was initiated. PMID:24532527

  13. Good fortune. Griffin Hospital gets outstanding grades in both employee and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Mycek, S

    2001-07-01

    While the rest of the country suffers a workforce crisis, a Connecticut hospital is turning away applicants. After adopting the Planetree model of care, Griffin Hospital's patient and employee satisfaction rates soared. PMID:11467191

  14. Potentially inappropriate prescriptions in patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Soerensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt; Lisby, Marianne; Mainz, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Background Very little is known about the general appropriateness of prescribing for psychiatric patients. Aims To identify prevalence and types of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) of psychotropic and somatic medications, to assess the severity of potential clinical consequences and to identify possible predictive factors of PIP in a sample of adult psychiatric in-patients. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional design using medication reviews by clinical pharmacologists to identify PIP during a 3-month period. The setting was in-patient units in a psychiatric department of a Danish university hospital during a 3-month period (September 2013-November 2013). Patients medication lists (n = 207) were reviewed at the time of admission and all identified PIPs were assessed for potential consequences by clinical pharmacologists. Results There were 349 PIP identified in 1291 prescriptions. The proportion of patients found to have at least one PIP was 123/207 (59%) and the proportions of patients with at least one PIP assessed to be potentially serious or fatal was 69/207 (33%) and 24/207 (12%), respectively. Interactions between drugs 125/207 (36%) and too high doses of drugs 56/207 (16%) were the most frequent PIP. Predictive factors for PIP were polypharmacy (>5 prescriptions) and having one or more somatic diagnoses. Conclusion PIP is common in psychiatric patients and potentially fatal. Particularly polypharmacy (>5 prescriptions) and concomitant somatic illness were associated with the probability of PIP. Improving the quality of prescribing might benefit from an interprofessional approach and thus better training of physicians and nurses is needed in order to minimize PIP. PMID:26824679

  15. Perspective: a road map for academic departments to promote scholarship in quality improvement and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Neeman, Naama; Sehgal, Niraj L

    2012-02-01

    The fields of quality improvement and patient safety (QI/PS) continue to grow with greater attention and awareness, increased mandates and incentives, and more research. Academic medical centers and their academic departments have a long-standing tradition for innovation and scholarship within a multifaceted mission to provide patient care, educate the next generation, and conduct research. Academic departments are well positioned to lead the science, education, and application of QI/PS efforts nationally. However, meaningful engagement of faculty and trainees to lead this work is a major barrier. Understanding and developing programs that foster QI/PS work while also promoting a scholarly focus can generate the incentives and acknowledgment to help elevate QI/PS into the academic mission. Academic departments should define and articulate a QI/PS strategy, develop individual and departmental capacity to lead scholarly QI/PS programs, streamline and support access to data, share information and improve collaboration, and recognize and elevate academic success in QI/PS. A commitment to these goals can also serve to cultivate important collaborations between academic departments and their respective medical centers, divisions, and training programs. Ultimately, the elevation of QI/PS into the academic mission can improve the quality and safety of our health care delivery systems. PMID:22189889

  16. Do Spanish Hospital Professionals Educate Their Patients About Advance Directives? : A Descriptive Study in a University Hospital in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Pérez, María; Herreros, Benjamín; Martín, M Dolores; Molina, Julia; Kanouzi, Jack; Velasco, María

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown whether hospital-based medical professionals in Spain educate patients about advance directives (ADs). The objective of this research was to determine the frequency of hospital-based physicians' and nurses' engagement in AD discussions in the hospital and which patient populations merit such efforts. A short question-and-answer-based survey of physicians and nurses taking care of inpatients was conducted at a university hospital in Madrid, Spain. In total, 283 surveys were collected from medical professionals, of whom 71 per cent were female, with an average age of thirty-four years. Eighty-four per cent had never educated patients about ADs because of lack of perceived responsibility, time, or general knowledge of ADs. Patient populations that warranted AD discussions included those with terminal illnesses (77 per cent), chronic diseases (61 per cent), and elderly patients (43 per cent). Regarding degree of AD understanding in medical professionals: 57 per cent of medical professionals claimed sufficient general knowledge of ADs, 19 per cent understood particulars regarding AD document creation, and 16 per cent were aware of AD regulatory policies. Engagement in AD discussions was considered important by 83 per cent of medical professionals, with 79 per cent interested in participating in such discussions themselves. The majority of hospital physicians and nurses do not educate their patients about ADs, despite acknowledging their importance. Patient populations of highest priority included those with terminal diseases or chronic illness or who are of advanced age. PMID:26797513

  17. A Most Unusual Patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnke, Gregory W.; Warshaw, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    This year marks 200 years of patient care at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). In celebration of this milestone, a unique Grand Rounds case is presented. A 450-year-old rotund man admitted 60 times presents with a classic triad of periumbilical pain, bilateral plantar burns, and a frozen scalp. Although this triad may at first strike a cord of familiarity among seasoned clinicians, the disease mechanism is truly noteworthy, being clarified only after a detailed occupational history. Ergo, the lessons hark back to the days of yesteryear, when the history and physical served as the cornerstone of Yuletide clinical diagnosis. A discussion of epidemiology and prognosis accompanies a detailed examination of the pathophysiholiday. Although some consider this patient uncouth, as you will see, he is quite a medical sleuth. The long-standing relationship between this patient and the MGH prompted his family to write a letter of appreciation, which will remind the reader of the meaning that our care brings to patients and their families. Harvey Cushing, who completed his internship at the MGH in 1895, professed “A physician is obligated to consider more than a diseased organ, more even than the whole man—he must view the man in his world.” We hope this unusual Grand Rounds case intrigues you as it reminds you of Cushing’s lesson and wishes you a joyous holiday season. PMID:22107737

  18. Predicting Patients' Expectations of Hospital Chaplains: A Multisite Survey

    PubMed Central

    Piderman, Katherine M.; Marek, Dean V.; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Johnson, Mary E.; Buryska, James F.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; O'Bryan, Floyd G.; Hansen, Patrick D.; Howick, Priscilla H.; Durland, Heidi L.; Lackore, Kandace A.; Lovejoy, Laura A.; Mueller, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify patient expectations regarding chaplain visitation, characteristics of patients who want to be visited by a chaplain, and what patients deem important when a chaplain visits. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Three weeks after discharge, 4500 eligible medical and surgical patients from hospitals in Minnesota, Arizona, and Florida were surveyed by mail to collect demographic information and expectations regarding chaplain visitation. The survey was conducted during the following time periods: Minnesota participants, April 6 until April 25, 2006; Arizona participants, October 16, 2008, until January 13, 2009; Florida participants, October 16, 2008, until January 20, 2009. Categorical variables were summarized with frequencies or percentages. Associations between responses and site were examined using χ2 tests. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the likelihood of wanting chaplain visitation on the basis of patient demographics and perceived importance of reasons for chaplain visitation. RESULTS: About one-third of those surveyed responded from each site. Most were male, married, aged 56 years or older, and Protestant or Catholic. Of the respondents, nearly 70% reported wanting chaplain visitation, 43% were visited, and 81% indicated that visitation was important. The strongest predictor of wanting chaplain visitation was denomination vs no indicated religious affiliation (Catholic: odds ratio [OR], 8.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.49-14.64; P<.001; evangelical Protestant: OR, 4.95; 95% CI, 2.74-8.91; P<.001; mainline Protestant: OR, 4.34; 95% CI, 2.58-7.29; P<.001). Being female was a weak predictor (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.05-2.09; P=.03), as was site. Among the reasons given by respondents for wanting chaplain visitation, the most important were that chaplains served as reminders of God's care and presence (OR, 4.37; 95% CI, 2.58-7.40; P<.001) and that they provided prayer or scripture reading (OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.53-4.20; P<.001

  19. Measuring patient safety culture in Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patient safety is a critical component to the quality of health care. As health care organizations endeavour to improve their quality of care, there is a growing recognition of the importance of establishing a culture of patient safety. In this research, the authors use the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) questionnaire to assess the culture of patient safety in Taiwan and attempt to provide an explanation for some of the phenomena that are unique in Taiwan. Methods The authors used HSOPSC to measure the 12 dimensions of the patient safety culture from 42 hospitals in Taiwan. The survey received 788 respondents including physicians, nurses, and non-clinical staff. This study used SPSS 15.0 for Windows and Amos 7 software tools to perform the statistical analysis on the survey data, including descriptive statistics and confirmatory factor analysis of the structural equation model. Results The overall average positive response rate for the 12 patient safety culture dimensions of the HSOPSC survey was 64%, slightly higher than the average positive response rate for the AHRQ data (61%). The results showed that hospital staff in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture in their organization. The dimension that received the highest positive response rate was "Teamwork within units", similar to the results reported in the US. The dimension with the lowest percentage of positive responses was "Staffing". Statistical analysis showed discrepancies between Taiwan and the US in three dimensions, including "Feedback and communication about error", "Communication openness", and "Frequency of event reporting". Conclusions The HSOPSC measurement provides evidence for assessing patient safety culture in Taiwan. The results show that in general, hospital staffs in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture within their organization. The existence of discrepancies between the US data and the Taiwanese data suggest that cultural

  20. Hospital Collaboration with Emergency Medical Services in the Care of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Perspectives from Key Hospital Staff

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Adam B.; Spatz, Erica S.; Cherlin, Emily J.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that active collaboration between hospitals and emergency medical services (EMS) is significantly associated with lower acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality rates; however, the nature of such collaborations is not well understood. We sought to characterize views of key hospital staff regarding collaboration with EMS in the care of patients hospitalized with AMI. Methods We performed an exploratory analysis of qualitative data previously collected from site visits and in-depth interviews with 11 US hospitals that ranked in the top or bottom 5% of performance on 30-day risk-standardized AMI mortality rates (RSMRs) using Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data from 2005–2007. We selected all codes from the first analysis in which EMS was most likely to have been discussed. A multidisciplinary team analyzed the data using the constant comparative method to generate recurrent themes. Results Both higher and lower performing hospitals reported that EMS is critical to the provision of timely care for patients with AMI. However, close, collaborative relationships with EMS were more apparent in the higher performing hospitals. Higher performing hospitals demonstrated specific investment in and attention to EMS through: 1) respect for EMS as valued professionals and colleagues; 2) strong communication and coordination with EMS; and 3) active engagement of EMS in hospital AMI quality improvement efforts. Conclusion Hospital staff from higher performing hospitals described broad, multifaceted strategies to support collaboration with EMS in providing AMI care. The association of these strategies with hospital performance should be tested quantitatively in a larger, representative study. PMID:23146627

  1. Making background work visible: opportunities to address patient information needs in the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Logan; Mishra, Sonali R.; Pollack, Ari; Aaronson, Barry; Pratt, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing use of patient-facing technologies such as patient portals to address information needs for outpatients, we understand little about how patients manage information and use information technologies in an inpatient context. Based on hospital observations and responses to an online questionnaire from previously hospitalized patients and caregivers, we describe information workspace that patients have available to them in the hospital and the information items that patients and caregivers rate as important and difficult to access or manage while hospitalized. We found that patients and caregivers desired information—such as the plan of care and the schedule of activities—that is difficult to access as needed in a hospital setting. Within this study, we describe the various tools and approaches that patients and caregivers use to help monitor their care as well as illuminate gaps in information needs not typically captured by traditional patient portals. PMID:26958295

  2. Quality Improvement Initiative Reduces Serious Safety Events in Pediatric Hospital Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Organization (PSO) Program Quality Measure Tools & Resources Tools & Resources Value Surveys on Patient Safety Culture Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture Nursing Home Survey ...

  3. Insulin Therapy for the Management of Hyperglycemia in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Marie E.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2013-01-01

    It has long been established that hyperglycemia with or without a prior diagnosis of diabetes increases both mortality and disease-specific morbidity in hospitalized patients1–4 and that goal-directed insulin therapy can improve outcomes.5–9 During the past decade, since the widespread institutional adoption of intensified insulin protocols after the publication of a landmark trial,5,10 the pendulum in the inpatient diabetes literature has swung away from achieving intensive glucose control and toward more moderate and individualized glycemic targets.11,12 This change in clinical practice is the result of several factors, including challenges faced by hospitals to coordinate glycemic control across all levels of care,13,14 publication of negative prospective trials,15,16 revised recommendations from professional organizations,17,18 and increasing evidence on the deleterious effect of hypoglycemia.19–22 This article reviews the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia during illness, the mechanisms for increased complications and mortality due to hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, beneficial mechanistic effects of insulin therapy and provides updated recommendations for the inpatient management of diabetes in the critical care setting and in the general medicine and surgical settings.23,24 PMID:22575413

  4. Patients in a globalized world: keeping hospitals in perspective.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Carolyn

    2003-01-01

    The challenge of globalization could be the burning platform on which Canadian health providers finally learn that there is more to gain from collaboration than competition. Change in this globalized world cannot mean morphing into (publicly funded) entrepreneurial organizations and competing among other Canadian institutions prospecting for their global market share. Hospitals must understand that if they are firstly integrated into a proper, seamless healthcare system, they could then have extraordinary power in a globalized world. The VISA model should be examined as an example of the collaboration and co-operation that has allowed thousands of highly competitive financial institutions to come together with a common governance structure and an IT system that benefits everyone. VISA is doing very well in a globalized world. Perhaps it is because of our hospital-centric approach to acute care that we have continued to view healthcare as simple or merely complicated instead of as a complex, adaptive system. Only by focusing on creating a (real) healthcare system here in Canada with the patient in the centre will we be able to ensure that Canadians will receive the benefits of globalization and that Canada will, as Commissioner Romanow said in his report, (take an international leadership role in sharing its expertise and helping developing countries improve their healthcare systems and the health of their people.) PMID:14660885

  5. Shaping Patient Education in Rural Hospitals: Learning from the Experiences of Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheckel, Martha; Hedrick-Erickson, Jennifer; Teunis, Jamie; Deutsch, Ashley; Roers, Anna; Willging, Anne; Pittman, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Patient education is a crucial aspect of nursing practice, but much of the research about it is quantitative and has been conducted in urban medical centers. These urban-based studies have limited utility for nurses working in rural hospitals where the populations they serve often have unique and challenging health contexts and cultures. Since…

  6. Predictive validity of the Nursing Severity Index in patients with musculoskeletal disease. Nurses of University Hospitals of Cleveland.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, G E; Halloran, E J; Kiley, M; Landefeld, C S

    1995-02-01

    Prior studies have not examined the validity of severity of illness instruments in patients at low risk for mortality. We, therefore, examined the predictive validity of a newly developed instrument, the Nursing Severity Index in 5347 adult medical and surgical patients with musculoskeletal diagnoses admitted to an academic medical center in 1985-88. The Index is based on aggregating 34 clinical observations which were recorded by primary nurses during patient care; observations reflect biologic, functional, cognitive and psychosocial abnormalities. Other data, including patient demographic data and outcomes were obtained from hospital data bases. We found that, among all study patients, admission Nursing Severity Index scores were highly related (p < 0.001) to in-hospital death rates-which were 0, 0.4, 0.8, 2.6, 6.7 and 23.5% in six hierarchical strata defined by the Index-and to nursing home discharge rates. In multivariate analyses, adjusting for diagnosis and other important covariates, each strata was associated with a 2.5-fold increased risk of mortality and a 1.6-fold increased risk of nursing home discharge. In addition, the Nursing Severity Index was an independent predictor (p < 0.001) of hospital charges and length of stay. We conclude that the Nursing Severity Index assesses multiple dimensions of illness, can be easily recorded during routine patient care, and accurately predicts hospital outcomes in an important 'low risk' group of patients. The validity of the Nursing Severity Index in other clinical subgroups should be further studied. PMID:7869064

  7. Prediction of Clinical Deterioration in Hospitalized Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Using a Neural Network Model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Scott B.; Wong, Deborah J. L.; Correa, Aditi; Li, Ning; Deng, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical deterioration (ICU transfer and cardiac arrest) occurs during approximately 5–10% of hospital admissions. Existing prediction models have a high false positive rate, leading to multiple false alarms and alarm fatigue. We used routine vital signs and laboratory values obtained from the electronic medical record (EMR) along with a machine learning algorithm called a neural network to develop a prediction model that would increase the predictive accuracy and decrease false alarm rates. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting The hematologic malignancy unit in an academic medical center in the United States. Patient Population Adult patients admitted to the hematologic malignancy unit from 2009 to 2010. Intervention None. Measurements and Main Results Vital signs and laboratory values were obtained from the electronic medical record system and then used as predictors (features). A neural network was used to build a model to predict clinical deterioration events (ICU transfer and cardiac arrest). The performance of the neural network model was compared to the VitalPac Early Warning Score (ViEWS). Five hundred sixty five consecutive total admissions were available with 43 admissions resulting in clinical deterioration. Using simulation, the neural network outperformed the ViEWS model with a positive predictive value of 82% compared to 24%, respectively. Conclusion We developed and tested a neural network-based prediction model for clinical deterioration in patients hospitalized in the hematologic malignancy unit. Our neural network model outperformed an existing model, substantially increasing the positive predictive value, allowing the clinician to be confident in the alarm raised. This system can be readily implemented in a real-time fashion in existing EMR systems. PMID:27532679

  8. Not all total joint replacement patients are created equal: preoperative factors and length of stay in hospital

    PubMed Central

    Winemaker, Mitch; Petruccelli, Danielle; Kabali, Conrad; de Beer, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Background We conducted a cross-sectional study of primary total joint replacement (TJR) patients to determine predictors for prolonged length of stay (LOS) in hospital to identify patient characteristics that may inform resource allocation, accounting for patient complexity. Methods Preoperative demographics, medical comorbidities and acute hospital LOS from a consecutive series of primary TJR patients from an academic arthroplasty centre were abstracted. We categorized patients as LOS of 3 or fewer days, 4 days, or 5 or more days to align results with varying LOS benchmarks. To identify predictors for LOS, we used a generalized logistic regression model fitted on an LOS ternary outcome, using LOS of 3 or fewer days as a reference category. Results The sample included 1459 patients: 61.7% total knee and 38.3% total hip. Male sex was predictive of an LOS of 3 or fewer days (4 d: odds ratio [OR] 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.364–0.631; ≥ 5 d: OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.435–0.758), as was current smoking status (4 d: OR 0.425, 95% CI 0.274–0.659; ≥ 5 d: OR 0.489, 95% CI 0.314–0.762). Strong predictors of prolonged LOS included total hip versus total knee arthroplasty, age 75 years or older, American Society of Anesthesiologists classification of 3 and 4 and number of cardiovascular comorbidities. Conclusion Not all patients undergoing TJR are equal. The goal should be individual patient-focused care rather than a predetermined LOS that is not achievable for all patients. Hospital resource planning must account for patient complexity when planning future bed management. PMID:25799128

  9. Neuropsychological, Academic, and Adaptive Functioning in Children Who Survive In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Robin D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study of 25 children, ages 2-15, who survived a cardiac arrest while hospitalized, found that a majority of subjects exhibited low-average to deficient levels of performance on neuropsychologic, achievement, and adaptive behavior measures. Duration of cardiac arrest and a medical risk score were significantly correlated with decreased…

  10. Severity of Anemia Predicts Hospital Length of Stay but Not Readmission in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Garlo, Katherine; Williams, Deanna; Lucas, Lee; Wong, Rocket; Botler, Joel; Abramson, Stuart; Parker, Mark G

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of severe anemia to hospital readmission and length of stay (LOS) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3-5. Compared with the general population, patients with moderate CKD have a higher hospital readmission rate and LOS. Anemia in patients with moderate CKD is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The influence of anemia on hospital outcomes in patients with moderate CKD has not been characterized.We conducted a retrospective cohort study at Maine Medical Center, a 606-bed academic tertiary care hospital. Patients with CKD stages 3-5 and not on dialysis admitted during February 2013 to January 2014 were eligible. Patients with end stage renal disease on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, kidney transplant, acute kidney injury, gastrointestinal bleeding, active malignancy, pregnancy, and surgery were excluded. The cohort was split into severe anemia (hemoglobin ≤9  g/dL) versus a comparison group (hemoglobin >9 g /dL), and examined for differences in 30-day hospital readmission and LOS.In this study, the data of 1141 patients were included, out of which 156 (13.7%) had severe anemia (mean hemoglobin 8.1 g/dL, SD 0.8). Severe anemia was associated with increased hospital LOS (mean 6.4 (SD 6.0) days vs mean 4.5 (SD 4.0) days, P < 0.001). The difference was 1.7 day longer (95% CI 0.94, 2.45). There was no difference in readmission rate (mean 11.5% vs 10.2%, P = 0.7).Patients with moderate CKD and severe anemia are at risk for increased hospital LOS. Interventions targeting this high-risk population, including outpatient management of anemia, may benefit patient care and save costs through improved hospital outcomes. PMID:26107682

  11. Predictors of Patient Satisfaction with Tertiary Hospitals in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Hye-Sook; Peck, Eun Hee; Moon, Hee Soo; Yeom, Hye-A

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the general and system-related predictors of outpatient satisfaction with tertiary health care institutions in Korea. A cross-sectional descriptive study design was employed. The subjects were 1,194 outpatients recruited from 29 outpatient clinics of a university medical center in Korea. Measurements included 5 outpatient service domains (i.e., doctor service, nurse service, technician service, convenience, and physical environment of facility) and patient satisfaction. Of the five domains, nurse service was the domain with the highest mean score (M = 4.21) and convenience was the domain with the lowest mean score (M = 3.77). The most significant predictor of patient satisfaction was the constructs of convenience (β = 0.21). The results of this study suggest that the concept of patient satisfaction with health care institutions in modern hospitals reflects an integrative process that includes not only the concerned health care personnel but also improved convenience such as user-friendly reservation system and comfortable waiting areas. PMID:25722886

  12. Diagnostic value of procalcitonin in acutely hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Steichen, O; Bouvard, E; Grateau, G; Bailleul, S; Capeau, J; Lefèvre, G

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate procalcitonin as an adjunct to diagnose bacterial infections in older patients. One hundred seventy-two patients admitted to an acute-care geriatric unit during a 6-month period were prospectively included, 39 of them with an invasive bacterial infection. The best cut-off value to rule in a bacterial infection was 0.51 microg/l with sensitivity 64% and specificity 94%. The best cut-off value to rule out a bacterial infection was 0.08 microg/l with sensitivity 97% and specificity 20%. Procalcitonin was inconclusive (between 0.08 and 0.51 microg/l) for 112 admissions. Procalcitonin over 0.51 microg/l was useless 22 times out of 33 (infection already ruled in on clinical grounds) and misleading in eight of the 11 remaining cases (no infection). Procalcitonin below 0.08 microg/l was useless 23 times out of 27 (infection already ruled out on clinical grounds) and misleading in one of the four remaining cases (infection). Despite a good overall diagnostic accuracy, the clinical usefulness of PCT to diagnose invasive bacterial infections in elderly patients hospitalized in an acute geriatric ward appears to be very limited. PMID:19727867

  13. Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients Hospitalized Following Pulmonary Aspiration

    PubMed Central

    Festic, Emir; Park, Pauline K.; Raghavendran, Krishnan; Dabbagh, Ousama; Adesanya, Adebola; Gajic, Ognjen; Bartz, Raquel R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary aspiration is an important recognized cause of ARDS. Better characterization of patients who aspirate may allow identification of potential risks for aspiration that could be used in future studies to mitigate the occurrence of aspiration and its devastating complications. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of the Lung Injury Prediction Score cohort to better characterize patients with aspiration, including their potential risk factors and related outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 5,584 subjects at risk for ARDS and who required hospitalization, 212 (3.8%) presented with aspiration. Subjects who aspirated were likely to be male (66% vs 56%, P < .007), slightly older (59 years vs 57 years), white (73% vs 61%, P = .0004), admitted from a nursing home (15% vs 5.9%, P < .0001), have a history of alcohol abuse (21% vs 8%, P < .0001), and have lower Glasgow Coma Scale (median, 13 vs 15; P < .0001). Aspiration subjects were sicker (higher APACHE [Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation] II score), required more mechanical ventilation (54% vs 32%, P < .0001), developed more moderate to severe ARDS (12% vs 3.8%, P < .0001), and were twofold more likely to die in-hospital, even after adjustment for severity of illness (OR = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2-3.6). Neither obesity nor gastroesophageal reflux was associated with aspiration. CONCLUSIONS: Aspiration was more common in men with alcohol abuse history and a lower Glasgow Coma Scale who were admitted from a nursing home. It is independently associated with a significant increase in the risk for ARDS as well as morbidity and mortality. Findings from this study may facilitate the design of future clinical studies of aspiration-induced lung injury. PMID:24811480

  14. Safe medication management and use of narcotics in a Joint Commission International-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xu; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Xia, Ping; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Safe medication management and use of high-alert narcotics should arouse concern. Risk management experiences in this respect in a large-scale Joint Commission International (JCI)-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People's Republic of China during 2011-2015, focusing on organizational, educational, motivational, and information technological measures in storage, prescribing, preparing, dispensing, administration, and monitoring of medication are summarized. The intensity of use of meperidine in hospitalized patients in 2015 was one-fourth that in 2011. A 100% implementation rate of standard storage of narcotics has been achieved in the hospital since December 2012. A "Plan, Do, Check, Act" cycle was efficient because the ratio of number of inappropriate narcotics prescriptions to total number of narcotics prescriptions for inpatients decreased from August 2014 to December 2014 (28.22% versus 2.96%, P=0.0000), and it was controlled below 6% from then on. During the journey to good pain management ward accreditation by the Ministry of Health, People's Republic of China, (April 2012-October 2012), the medical oncology ward successfully demonstrated an increase in the pain screening rate at admission from 43.5% to 100%, cancer pain control rate from 85% to 96%, and degree of satisfaction toward pain nursing from 95.4% to 100% (all P-values <0.05). Oral morphine equivalent dosage in the good pain management ward increased from 2.3 mg/patient before June 2012 to 54.74 mg/patient in 2014. From 2011 to 2015, the oral morphine equivalent dose per discharged patient increased from 8.52 mg/person to 20.36 mg/person. A 100% implementation rate of independent double-check prior to narcotics dosing has been achieved since January 2013. From 2014 to 2015, the ratio of number of narcotics-related medication errors to number of discharged patients significantly decreased (6.95% versus 0.99%, P=0.0000). Taken together, continuous quality improvements have been

  15. Safe medication management and use of narcotics in a Joint Commission International-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xu; Zhu, Ling-ling; Pan, Sheng-dong; Xia, Ping; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Safe medication management and use of high-alert narcotics should arouse concern. Risk management experiences in this respect in a large-scale Joint Commission International (JCI)-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People’s Republic of China during 2011–2015, focusing on organizational, educational, motivational, and information technological measures in storage, prescribing, preparing, dispensing, administration, and monitoring of medication are summarized. The intensity of use of meperidine in hospitalized patients in 2015 was one-fourth that in 2011. A 100% implementation rate of standard storage of narcotics has been achieved in the hospital since December 2012. A “Plan, Do, Check, Act” cycle was efficient because the ratio of number of inappropriate narcotics prescriptions to total number of narcotics prescriptions for inpatients decreased from August 2014 to December 2014 (28.22% versus 2.96%, P=0.0000), and it was controlled below 6% from then on. During the journey to good pain management ward accreditation by the Ministry of Health, People’s Republic of China, (April 2012–October 2012), the medical oncology ward successfully demonstrated an increase in the pain screening rate at admission from 43.5% to 100%, cancer pain control rate from 85% to 96%, and degree of satisfaction toward pain nursing from 95.4% to 100% (all P-values <0.05). Oral morphine equivalent dosage in the good pain management ward increased from 2.3 mg/patient before June 2012 to 54.74 mg/patient in 2014. From 2011 to 2015, the oral morphine equivalent dose per discharged patient increased from 8.52 mg/person to 20.36 mg/person. A 100% implementation rate of independent double-check prior to narcotics dosing has been achieved since January 2013. From 2014 to 2015, the ratio of number of narcotics-related medication errors to number of discharged patients significantly decreased (6.95% versus 0.99%, P=0.0000). Taken together, continuous quality improvements

  16. Anti-Smoking Practice in Hospitals: An Intercept Survey among Patients in Hubei Province, China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Dunjin; Yan, Yaqiong; Yu, Huihong; Xia, Qinghua; Yang, Niannian; Zhang, Zhifeng; Zhu, Zhaoyang; Li, Fang; Gong, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine whether, in the opinion of patients selected in 13 hospitals of Hubei province, China, hospitals are smoke free. Patients were also asked whether their physicians had inquired about their smoking status. Design/methodology/approach: Patients were recruited through an intercept method (i.e. stopped by the…

  17. SOCIALIZATION OF THE YOUNGER PSYCHIATRIC PATIENT--THE COMMUNITY AND THE HOSPITAL-A DUAL RESPONSIBILITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GIORDANO, JOSEPH; AND OTHERS

    TO ASSIST YOUNG, MENTAL PATIENTS IN OVERCOMING SOME OF THEIR SOCIAL DEFICITS, TWO RESOCIALIZATION PROJECTS (PRE- AND POST-DISCHARGE) WERE INITIATED TO MOVE THE PATIENT FROM A MENTAL HOSPITAL SETTING INTO THE LARGER COMMUNITY, WITH A COMMUNITY CENTER AS THE LEARNING GROUND. CAREFULLY SELECTED PATIENTS FROM THE HOSPITAL WERE GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO…

  18. Role of blood gas analysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Lee, You Jin; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine the relationship between acid–base findings, such as pH, pCO2, and serum lactate levels, obtained immediately after starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). A prospective observational study of adult, nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients was conducted at an urban academic teaching institution between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2015. Arterial blood sample for acid–base data was taken from all OHCA patients on arrival to the emergency department. Of 224 OHCA patients, 88 patients with unavailable blood samples or delayed blood sampling or ROSC within 4 minutes were excluded, leaving 136 patients for analysis. The pH in the ROSC group was significantly higher than in the non-ROSC group (6.96 vs. 6.85; P = 0.009). pCO2 and lactate levels in the ROSC group were significantly lower than those in the non-ROSC group (74.0 vs. 89.5 mmHg, P < 0.009; 11.6 vs. 13.6 mmol/L, P = 0.044, respectively). In a multivariate regression analysis, pCO2 was the only independent biochemical predictor for sustained ROSC (OR 0.979; 95% CI 0.960–0.997; P = 0.025) and pCO2 of <75 mmHg was 3.3 times more likely to achieve ROSC (OR 0.302; 95% CI 0.146–0.627; P = 0.001). pCO2 levels obtained during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ER arrival was associated with ROSC in OHCA patients. It might be a potentially marker for reflecting the status of the ischemic insult. These preliminary results need to be confirmed in a larger population. PMID:27336894

  19. Triumph of hope over experience: learning from interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admissions identified through an Academic Health and Social Care Network

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Internationally health services are facing increasing demands due to new and more expensive health technologies and treatments, coupled with the needs of an ageing population. Reducing avoidable use of expensive secondary care services, especially high cost admissions where no procedure is carried out, has become a focus for the commissioners of healthcare. Method We set out to identify, evaluate and share learning about interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admission across a regional Academic Health and Social Care Network (AHSN). We conducted a service evaluation identifying initiatives that had taken place across the AHSN. This comprised a literature review, case studies, and two workshops. Results We identified three types of intervention: pre-hospital; within the emergency department (ED); and post-admission evaluation of appropriateness. Pre-hospital interventions included the use of predictive modelling tools (PARR – Patients at risk of readmission and ACG – Adjusted Clinical Groups) sometimes supported by community matrons or virtual wards. GP-advisers and outreach nurses were employed within the ED. The principal post-hoc interventions were the audit of records in primary care or the application of the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) within the admission ward. Overall there was a shortage of independent evaluation and limited evidence that each intervention had an impact on rates of admission. Conclusions Despite the frequency and cost of emergency admission there has been little independent evaluation of interventions to reduce avoidable admission. Commissioners of healthcare should consider interventions at all stages of the admission pathway, including regular audit, to ensure admission thresholds don’t change. PMID:22682525

  20. Implementing Patient-Oriented Discharge Summaries (PODS): A Multisite Pilot Across Early Adopter Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Goldberg, Shoshana; Okrainec, Karen; Damba, Cynthia; Huynh, Tai; Lau, Davina; Maxwell, Joanne; McGuire, Ryan; Yang, Lily; Abrams, Howard B

    2016-01-01

    Communication gaps when patients transition from hospital to either home or community can be problematic. Partnership between Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network (TC LHIN) and OpenLab addressed this through the Patient-Oriented Discharge Summaries (PODS) project. From January through March 2015, eight hospital departments across Toronto came together to implement the PODS, a tool previously developed through a co-design process involving patients, caregivers and providers. This paper presents data on how the hospitals came together and the impact of PODS on the patient and provider experience across these hospitals and discusses it implications. PMID:27133607

  1. Multilevel psychometric properties of the AHRQ hospital survey on patient safety culture

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was designed to assess staff views on patient safety culture in hospital settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the multilevel psychometric properties of the survey. Methods Survey data from 331 U.S. hospitals with 2,267 hospital units and 50,513 respondents were analyzed to examine the psychometric properties of the survey's items and composites. Item factor loadings, intraclass correlations (ICCs), design effects, internal consistency reliabilities, and multilevel confirmatory factor analyses (MCFA) were examined as well as intercorrelations among the survey's composites. Results Psychometric analyses confirmed the multilevel nature of the data at the individual, unit and hospital levels of analysis. Results provided overall evidence supporting the 12 dimensions and 42 items included in the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture as having acceptable psychometric properties at all levels of analysis, with a few exceptions. The Staffing composite fell slightly below cutoffs in a number of areas, but is conceptually important given its impact on patient safety. In addition, one hospital-level model fit indicator for the Supervisor/Manager Expectations & Actions Promoting Patient Safety composite was low (CFI = .82), but all other psychometrics for this scale were good. Average dimension intercorrelations were moderate at .42 at the individual level, .50 at the unit level, and .56 at the hospital level. Conclusions Psychometric analyses conducted on a very large database of hospitals provided overall support for the patient safety culture dimensions and items included in the AHRQ Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The survey's items and dimensions overall are psychometrically sound at the individual, unit, and hospital levels of analysis and can be used by researchers and hospitals interested in assessing patient safety culture

  2. Application of WHO model for evaluating Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiatives (PSFHI) in an Eye hospital in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Soltanzadeh, Parinaz; Salimi, Mohammad; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Moghri, Javad; Ravangard, Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Background: Patient safety is one of the major issues concerning the medical community and the World Health Organization (WHO) in most countries. This study aimed to evaluate the patient safety status in an Eye Hospital in Tehran, using the WHO model for Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiatives (PSFHI) in 2012. Methods: This Cross-Sectional study was done in an Eye Hospital in Tehran. Measurement tool was a checklist related to the PSFHI, including 140 standards in three groups of critical, core and developmental. It was covering five domains of: a) Leadership and management, b) Patient and public involvement, c) Safe evidence-based clinical practices, d) Safe environment, and e) Lifelong learning. Results: Compliance with critical, core and developmental standards were 77.78%, 75.29%, and 21.42% respectively. The Rates of Meeting Standards in the leadership and management, patient and public involvement, safe evidence-based clinical practices, secure environment and for lifelong learning were 66.89%, 42.85%, 75.68%, 73.68%, and 63.63% respectively. Conclusions: The PSFHI standards play important role in improving patient safety using leadership, safety practices and creating good working conditions and environment for the staff. So focus on these standards is essential in improving the patient safety in hospitals in Iran. PMID:26120394

  3. Survey: Hospitalization Access for Patients of Migrant Health Centers and Combined Migrant and Community Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David R.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study of migrant health centers' access to hospitals uncovered financial barriers to private hospital care when the patient was indigent or without health insurance. This may be exacerbated as private hospitals expand in states with many migrants. Cooperative efforts between public and private institutions are in order. (VM)

  4. Understanding The Role Played By Medicare's Patient Experience Points System In Hospital Reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Marc N; Beckett, Megan K; Lehrman, William G; Cleary, Paul; Cohea, Christopher W; Giordano, Laura A; Goldstein, Elizabeth H; Damberg, Cheryl L

    2016-09-01

    In 2015 the Medicare Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) program paid hospitals $1.4 billion in performance-based incentives; 30 percent of a hospital's VBP Total Performance Score was based on performance on Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) measures of the patient experience of care. Hospitals receive patient experience points based on three components: achievement, improvement, and consistency. For 2015 we examined how the three components affected reimbursement for 3,152 hospitals, including their impact on low-performing and high-minority hospitals. Achievement accounted for 96 percent of the differences among hospitals in total HCAHPS points. Although achievement had the biggest influence on payments, payments related to improvement and consistency were more beneficial for low-performing hospitals that disproportionately served minority patients. The findings highlight the important inducement that paying for improvement provides to initially low-performing hospitals to improve care and the role this incentive structure plays in minimizing resource redistributions away from hospitals serving minority populations. Additional emphasis on improvement points could benefit hospitals serving disadvantaged patients. PMID:27605650

  5. Vitamin D Deficiency and Insufficiency in Hospitalized COPD Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mekov, Evgeni; Slavova, Yanina; Tsakova, Adelina; Genova, Marianka; Kostadinov, Dimitar; Minchev, Delcho; Marinova, Dora; Tafradjiiska, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction 31–77% of patients with COPD have vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency, with results being highly variable between studies. Vitamin D may also correlate with disease characteristics. Aim To find out the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation and a risk factors for lower vitamin D levels among comorbidities and COPD characteristics. Methods 152 patients were studied for vitamin D serum levels (25(OH)D). All of them were also assessed for diabetes mellitus (DM) and metabolic syndrome (MS). Data were gathered also for smoking status and exacerbations in last year. All patients completed CAT and mMRC questionnaires and underwent spirometry. Results A total of 83,6% of patients have reduced levels of vitamin D. 42,8% (65/152) have vitamin D insufficiency (defined as 25–50 nmol/L) and 40,8% (62/152) have vitamin D deficiency (<25 nmol/L). The mean level of 25(OH)D for all patients is 31,97 nmol/L (95%CI 29,12–34,68). Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are more prevalent in females vs. males (97,7 vs 77,8%; p = 0.003). The prevalence and severity of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency in this study is significantly higher when compared to an unselected Bulgarian population (prevalence 75,8%; mean level 38,75 nmol/L). Vitamin D levels correlate with quality of life (measured by the mMRC scale) and lung function (FVC, FEV1, FEV6, FEF2575, FEV3, but not with FEV1/FVC ratio and PEF), it does not correlate with the presence of arterial hypertension, DM, MS and number of moderate, severe and total exacerbations. Vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for longer hospital stay. Conclusions The patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation are a risk group for vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency, which is associated with worse disease characteristics. PMID:26047485

  6. Facilitators and Threats to the Patient Dignity in Hospitalized Patients with Heart Diseases: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Rabori, Roghayeh Mehdipour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient’s dignity is an important issue which is highlighted in nursing It is an issue that is highly dependent on context and culture. Heart disease is the most common disease in Iran and the world. Identification of facilitator and threatening patient dignity in heart patients is vital. This study aimed to explore facilitator and threatening patient dignity in hospitalized patients with heart disease. Methods: This qualitative content analysis study was performed in 2014 in Kerman, Iran. 20 patients admitted to coronary care units and 5 personnel were selected using purposeful sampling in semi-structured and in depth interviews. Researchers also used documentation and field notes until data saturation. Qualitative data analysis was done constantly and simultaneously with data collection Results: Three central themes emerged: a) Care context which includes human environment and physical environment, b) Holistic safe care including meeting the needs of patients both in the hospital and after discharge, c) Creating a sense of security and an effective relationship between patient and nurse, including a respectful relationship and account the family in health team. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that care context is important for patient dignity as well as physical environment and safe holistic care. PMID:26793729

  7. The Influence of Hospital Market Competition on Patient Mortality and Total Performance Score.

    PubMed

    Haley, Donald Robert; Zhao, Mei; Spaulding, Aaron; Hamadi, Hanadi; Xu, Jing; Yeomans, Katelyn

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 launch of Medicare Value-Based Purchasing has become the platform for payment reform. It is a mechanism by which buyers of health care services hold providers accountable for high-quality and cost-effective care. The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between quality of hospital care and hospital competition using the quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior. The quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior was used as the conceptual framework for this study. Data from the American Hospital Association database, the Hospital Compare database, and the Area Health Resources Files database were used. Multivariate regression analysis was used to examine the effect of hospital competition on patient mortality. Hospital market competition was significantly and negatively related to the 3 mortality rates. Consistent with the literature, hospitals located in more competitive markets had lower mortality rates for patients with acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. The results suggest that hospitals may be more readily to compete on quality of care and patient outcomes. The findings are important because policies that seek to control and negatively influence a competitive hospital environment, such as Certificate of Need legislation, may negatively affect patient mortality rates. Therefore, policymakers should encourage the development of policies that facilitate a more competitive and transparent health care marketplace to potentially and significantly improve patient mortality. PMID:27455368

  8. Quality Assessment of Diabetes Online Patient Education Materials from Academic Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorcely, Brenda; Agarwal, Nitin; Raghuwanshi, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the readability of type 2 diabetes online patient education materials from academic institutions in the northeast USA and the American Diabetes Association. Many US residents utilise the Internet to obtain health information. Studies have shown that online patient education materials…

  9. Patient Perceptions of Provider and Hospital Factors Associated With New Medication Communication.

    PubMed

    Bartlett Ellis, Rebecca J; Bakoyannis, Giorgos; Haase, Joan E; Boyer, Kiersten; Carpenter, Janet S

    2016-09-01

    This research examined provider and hospital factors associated with patients' perceptions of how often explanations of new medications were "always" given to them, using Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores. HCAHPS results were obtained for October 2012 to September 2013, from 3,420 hospitals and combined with a Magnet-designated hospital listing. Multiple regression examined correlates of new medication communication, including health care provider factors (perceptions of nurse and physician communication) and health care system factors (magnet designation, hospital ownership, hospital type, availability of emergency services, and survey numbers). Nurse and physician communication was strongly associated with new medication communication (r = .819, p < .001; r = .722, p < .001, respectively). Multivariable correlates included nurse communication (p < .001), physician communication (p < .001), hospital ownership, availability of emergency services, and survey numbers. There was a significant relationship between patients' perceptions of nurse and physician communication and the explanations they had received about their new medications during hospitalization. PMID:27106879

  10. Does Hospital Competition Save Lives? Evidence from the English NHS Patient Choice Reforms*

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Zack; Gibbons, Stephen; Jones, Simon; McGuire, Alistair

    2011-01-01

    Recent substantive reforms to the English National Health Service expanded patient choice and encouraged hospitals to compete within a market with fixed prices. This study investigates whether these reforms led to improvements in hospital quality. We use a difference-in-difference-style estimator to test whether hospital quality (measured using mortality from acute myocardial infarction) improved more quickly in more competitive markets after these reforms came into force in 2006. We find that after the reforms were implemented, mortality fell (i.e. quality improved) for patients living in more competitive markets. Our results suggest that hospital competition can lead to improvements in hospital quality. PMID:25821239

  11. Implementation of an Acute Care Surgery Service in a Community Hospital: Impact on Hospital Efficiency and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A service led by acute care surgeons managing trauma, critically ill surgical, and emergency general surgery patients via an acute care surgery model of patient care improves hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at university-affiliated hospitals and American College of Surgeons-verified trauma centers. Our goal was to determine whether an acute care surgeon led service, entitled the Surgical Trauma and Acute Resuscitative Service (STARS) that implemented an acute care surgery model of patient care, could improve hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at a community hospital. A total of 492 patient charts were reviewed, which included 230 before the implementation of the STARS [pre-STARS (control)] and 262 after the implementation of the STARS [post-STARS (study)]. Demographics included age, gender, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score, and medical comorbidities. Efficiency data included length of stay in emergency department (ED-LOS), length of stay in surgical intensive care unit (SICU-LOS), and length of stay in hospital (H-LOS), and total in hospital charges. Average age was 64.1 + 16.4 years, 255 males (51.83%) and 237 females (48.17%). Average Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score was 11.9 + 5.8. No significant differences in demographics were observed. Average decreases in ED-LOS (9.7 + 9.6 hours, pre-STARS versus 6.6 + 4.5 hours, post-STARS), SICU-LOS (5.3 + 9.6 days, pre-STARS versus 3.5 + 4.8 days, post-STARS), H-LOS (12.4 + 12.7 days, pre-STARS versus 11.4 + 11.3 days, post-STARS), and total in hospital charges ($419,602.6 + $519,523.0 pre-STARS to $374,816.7 + $411,935.8 post-STARS) post-STARS. Regression analysis revealed decreased ED-LOS-2.9 hours [P = 0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI): -7.0, 1.2], SICU-LOS-6.3 days (P < 0.001; 95% CI: -9.3, -3.2), H-LOS-7.6 days (P = 0.001; 95% CI: -12.1, -3.1), and 3.4 times greater odds of survival (P = 0.04; 95% CI: 1.1, 10.7) post-STARS. In conclusion, implementation of

  12. Implementing Routine Health Literacy Assessment in Hospital and Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cawthon, Courtney; Mion, Lorraine C.; Willens, David E.; Roumie, Christianne L.; Kripalani, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with inadequate health literacy often have poorer health outcomes and increased utilization and costs, compared to those with adequate health literacy skills. The Institute of Medicine has recommended that health literacy assessment be incorporated into health care information systems, which would facilitate large-scale studies of the effects of health literacy, as well as evaluation of system interventions to improve care by addressing health literacy. As part of the Health Literacy Screening (HEALS) study, a brief health literacy screen (BHLS) was incorporated into the electronic health record (EHR) at a large academic medical center. Methods Changes were implemented to the nursing intake documentation across all adult hospital units, the emergency department, and three primary care practices. The change involved replacing previous education screening items with the BHLS. Implementation was based on a quality improvement framework, with a focus on acceptability, adoption, appropriateness, feasibility, fidelity and sustainability. Support was gained from nursing leadership, education and training was provided, a documentation change was rolled out, feedback was obtained, and uptake of the new health literacy screening items was monitored. Results Between November 2010 and April 2012, there were 55,611 adult inpatient admissions, and from November 2010 to September 2011, 23,186 adult patients made 39,595 clinic visits to the three primary care practices. The completion (uptake) rate in the hospital for November 2010 through April 2012 was 91.8%. For outpatient clinics, the completion rate between November 2010 and October 2011 was 66.6%. Conclusions Although challenges exist, it is feasible to incorporate health literacy screening into clinical assessment and EHR documentation. Next steps are to evaluate the association of health literacy with processes and outcomes of care across inpatient and outpatient populations. PMID:24716329

  13. Patient- and Hospital-Level Determinants of Rehabilitation for In-Patient Stroke Care: An Observation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsung-Tai; Chen, Chia-Pei; Kuang, Shao-Hua; Wang, Vinchi

    2016-05-01

    During acute stroke care, rehabilitation usage may be influenced by patient- and hospital-related factors. We would like to identify patient- and hospital-level determinants of population-level inpatient rehabilitation usage associated with acute stroke care.From data obtained from the claim information from the National Health Insurance Administration (NHIA) in Taiwan (2009-2011), we enrolled 82,886 stroke patients with intracerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction from 207 hospitals. A generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) analyses with patient-level factors specified as random effects were conducted (for cross-level interactions).The rate of rehabilitation usage was 51% during acute stroke care. The hospital-related factors accounted for a significant amount of variability (intraclass correlation, 50%). Hospital type was the only significant hospital-level variable and can explain the large amount of variability (58%). Patients treated in smaller hospitals experienced few benefits of rehabilitation services, and those with surgery in a smaller hospital used fewer rehabilitation services. All patient-level variables were significant.With GLMM analyses, we identified the hospital type and its cross-level interaction, and explained a large portion of variability in rehabilitation for stroke patients in Taiwan. PMID:27175671

  14. Hospitalized Patients' Perceptions of Resident Fatigue, Duty Hours, and Continuity of Care

    PubMed Central

    Drolet, Brian C.; Hyman, Charles H.; Ghaderi, Kimeya F.; Rodriguez-Srednicki, Joshua; Thompson, Jordan M.; Fischer, Staci A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Physicians' perceptions of duty hour regulations have been closely examined, yet patient opinions have been largely unstudied to date. Objective We studied patient perceptions of residency duty hours, fatigue, and continuity of care following implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education 2011 Common Program Requirements. Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered between June and August 2013 to inpatients at a large academic medical center and an affiliated community hospital. Adult inpatients on teaching medical and surgical services were eligible for inclusion in the study. Results Survey response rate was 71.3% (513 of 720). Most respondents (57.1%, 293 of 513) believed residents should not be assigned to shifts longer than 12 hours, and nearly half (49.7%, 255 of 513) wanted to be notified if a resident caring for them had worked longer than 12 hours. Most patients (63.2%, 324 of 513) believed medical errors commonly occurred because of fatigue, and fewer (37.4%, 192 of 513; odds ratio, 0.56; P < .01) believed medical errors commonly occurred as a result of transfers of care. Given the choice between a familiar physician who “may be tired from a long shift” or a “fresh” physician who had received sign-out, more patients chose the fresh but unfamiliar physician (57.1% [293 of 513] versus 42.7% [219 of 513], P < .01). Conclusions In a survey about physician attributes relevant to medical errors and patient safety, adult inpatients in a large and diverse sample reported greater concern about fatigue and working hours than about continuity of care. PMID:26140114

  15. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Susan J.; Rispel, Laetitia C.; Penn-Kekana, Loveday

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. Objective This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. Methods During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals (six public, three private) in two South African provinces. In each hospital, one of each of the medical, surgical, paediatric, and maternity units was selected (n=36). Following informed consent, each unit manager was observed for a period of 2 hours on the survey day and the activities recorded on a minute-by-minute basis. The activities were entered into Microsoft Excel, coded into categories, and analysed according to the time spent on activities in each category. The observation data were complemented by semi-structured interviews with the unit managers who were asked to recall their activities on the day preceding the interview. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results The study found that nursing unit managers spent 25.8% of their time on direct patient care, 16% on hospital administration, 14% on patient administration, 3.6% on education, 13.4% on support and communication, 3.9% on managing stock and equipment, 11.5% on staff management, and 11.8% on miscellaneous activities. There were also numerous interruptions and distractions. The semi-structured interviews revealed concordance between unit managers’ recall of the time spent on patient care, but a marked inflation of their perceived time spent on hospital administration. Conclusion The creation of an enabling practice environment, supportive executive management, and continuing professional development are needed to enable nursing managers to lead the provision of consistent and high

  16. Comparative Investigation of Health Literacy Level of Cardiovascular Patients Hospitalized in Private and Educational Hospitals of Kerman City, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Malekzadeh, Sajedeh; Azami, Mohammad; Mirzaei, Moghadameh; Motamedi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: literacy involves a complex set of abilities to understand and use symbolic systems of a culture for personal development and social development in a diverse set of skills required as an adult to exercise behavior are considered in society Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate Comparative investigation of health literacy level of cardiovascular patients hospitalized in private and public educational hospitals of Kerman city Methods: This study used survey methods, analytical and cross-sectional manner. Data was collected through questionnaires distributed among 200 patients of cardiovascular-hospitalization took place in the city of Kerman. To analyze the data in the description of the mean, standard deviation and frequency distribution tables and the level of analysis to determine the relationship between gender and marital status of health literacy test or nonparametric test Mann-Whitney T-Test and, for the relationship between group employment and residence, a one-way analysis of variance or Kruskal-Wallis test, to evaluate the relationship between age and income, Pearson and Spearman correlation to investigate the relationship between level of education and health literacy of SPPS software version 21 was used. Results: The results showed that 10% of patients at educational hospitals in Kerman adequate health literacy, and 48% of patients in private hospitals had adequate health literacy. As a result, there is a significant difference of health literacy between the two types of hospital (p-value <0/0001). Conclusions: The results showed that most patients had inadequate and border health literacy have been. Health plans, preparation of simple educational system and understanding, spending more time and have a discussion with the lower speed In connection with the patient’s doctor and medical staff, Including ways to help patients with low health literacy and improve their health literacy is. PMID:27041812

  17. Adverse Drug Reactions: A Retrospective Review of Hospitalized Patients at a State Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Iuppa, Courtney A.; Nelson, Leigh Anne; Elliott, Ellie; Sommi, Roger W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of information regarding adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in psychiatric patients. Information on common and preventable ADRs (pADRs) in psychiatric patients will allow for targeted improvement projects. Objective: To characterize reported ADRs and pharmacist interventions to prevent ADRs in an extended-care state psychiatric hospital. Methods: Four years of ADR reports were assessed for probability, reaction severity, pharmacological class of medication involved, preventability, change in therapy, and transfers to a medical facility. The pharmacist intervention database was queried for interventions classified as “prevention of ADR.” The interventions were assessed for type of medication and recommendation acceptance. Results: Medication classes responsible for ADRs included mood stabilizers (30%), typical antipsychotics (25%), atypical antipsychotics (25%), and antidepressants (8%). Nine percent resulted in transfer to a medical facility. Of all ADRs, 34.4% were pADRs; mood stabilizers (41%) and atypical antipsychotics (27%) were the most common pADRs. The most common causes of pADRs were supratherapeutic serum concentrations, drug-drug interactions, and history of reaction. There were 87 pharmacist interventions that were classified as “prevention of ADR,” and the acceptance rate of pharmacists’ recommendations was 96.5%. Mood stabilizers (20%), atypical antipsychotics (17%), and typical antipsychotics (11%) were commonly associated with prevented ADRs. Lithium accounted for 13.8% of prevented ADRs; these ADRs were most often due to a drug–drug interaction with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Conclusions: ADRs were most commonly associated with mood stabilizers and antipsychotics, and pADRs were common. There is an opportunity to provide education to medical staff on therapeutic drug monitoring and drug–drug interactions for these classes, particularly lithium. PMID:24474834

  18. Sociological evaluation of patients with lung cancer--revision study in hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Graça; Costa, David; Rocha, Lúcia; Monteiro, Ada; Mendes, Elisabete

    2005-01-01

    Lung cancer was a rare disease until the middle of the XX century, a time when it became one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality in the actual world. Nowadays, it is esteemed that one million people all over the world die every year due to lung cancer, which means that a life is lost each 30 seconds. The quality of life of this patients decreases inevitably, being frequent hospital readmission due to the lack of conditions to lead a normal and painless life. The aim of this study was to evaluate physical and cognitive incapacity and the social needs of patients with lung cancer in the outpatient department of Hospital de S. João--Porto. Our study includes 68 patients, predominantly married male, with average age of 63, retired, ex-smokers. Moreover, they had high physical dependence degrees and the most frequent social need was the attribution of the "complemento por dependência". In this type of patients, the family has a very important role on which the treatment is concerned, as well as to the level of the personal adjustment of the patient to his disease. Its social workers job to play a mediating role between the patients and their relatives and the several institutions which can give better responses to the needs of this sort of patients. PMID:16027947

  19. What Do Patients Want? Survey of Patient Desires for Education in an Urban University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Seibert, Thomas; Veazey, Kathryn; Leccese, Paul; Druck, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study examines the emergency department (ED) waiting room (WR) population’s knowledge about the ED process and hospital function and explores the types of educational materials that might appeal to patients and their companions in an ED waiting room. Our goal was to identify potential high-impact opportunities for patient education. Methods A 32-question survey about demographics, usage of primary care physicians (PCP), understanding of the ED and triage process, desire to know about delays, health education and understanding of teaching hospitals was offered to all qualified individuals. Results Five hundred and forty-four surveys were returned. Fifty-five percent reported having a PCP, of which 53% (29% of all WR patients) called a PCP prior to coming to the ED. It was found that 51.2% can define triage; 51% as an acuity assessment and 17% as a vital signs check. Sixty-nine percent knew why patients were seen according to triage priority. Seventy-two percent wanted to know about delays, yet only 25% wanted to know others’ wait times. People wanted updates every 41 minutes and only three percent wanted a physician to do this. Forty-one percent wanted information on how the ED functions, 60% via handouts and 43% via video. Information on updates and common medical emergencies is significantly more important than material on common illnesses, finding a PCP, or ED function (p<0.05). Median estimated time for medical workup ranged from 35 minutes for radiographs, to one hour for lab results, computed tomography, specialist consult, and admission. Sixty-nine percent knew the definition of a teaching hospital and of those, 87% knew they were at a teaching hospital. Subgroup analysis between racial groups showed significantly reduced knowledge of the definitions of triage and teaching hospitals and significantly increased desire for information on ED function in minority groups (p<0.05). Conclusion The major findings in this study were that many

  20. Bringing the Hospital to the Patient: First Treatment of Stroke Patients at the Emergency Site

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Silke; Kostpopoulos, Panagiotis; Haass, Anton; Helwig, Stefan; Keller, Isabel; Licina, Tamara; Schlechtriemen, Thomas; Roth, Christian; Papanagiotou, Panagiotis; Zimmer, Anna; Vierra, Julio; Körner, Heiko; Schmidt, Kathrin; Romann, Marie-Sophie; Alexandrou, Maria; Yilmaz, Umut; Grunwald, Iris; Kubulus, Darius; Lesmeister, Martin; Ziegeler, Stephan; Pattar, Alexander; Golinski, Martin; Liu, Yang; Volk, Thomas; Bertsch, Thomas; Reith, Wolfgang; Fassbender, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Background Early treatment with rt-PA is critical for favorable outcome of acute stroke. However, only a very small proportion of stroke patients receive this treatment, as most arrive at hospital too late to be eligible for rt-PA therapy. Methods and Findings We developed a “Mobile Stroke Unit”, consisting of an ambulance equipped with computed tomography, a point-of-care laboratory system for complete stroke laboratory work-up, and telemedicine capabilities for contact with hospital experts, to achieve delivery of etiology-specific and guideline-adherent stroke treatment at the site of the emergency, well before arrival at the hospital. In a departure from current practice, stroke patients could be differentially treated according to their ischemic or hemorrhagic etiology even in the prehospital phase of stroke management. Immediate diagnosis of cerebral ischemia and exclusion of thrombolysis contraindications enabled us to perform prehospital rt-PA thrombolysis as bridging to later intra-arterial recanalization in one patient. In a complementary patient with cerebral hemorrhage, prehospital diagnosis allowed immediate initiation of hemorrhage-specific blood pressure management and telemedicine consultation regarding surgery. Call-to-therapy-decision times were 35 minutes. Conclusion This preliminary study proves the feasibility of guideline-adherent, etiology-specific and causal treatment of acute stroke directly at the emergency site. PMID:21060800

  1. The Effects of Hospital-Level Factors on Patients' Ratings of Physician Communication.

    PubMed

    Al-Amin, Mona; Makarem, Suzanne C

    2016-01-01

    The quality of physician-patient communication influences patient health outcomes and satisfaction with healthcare delivery. Yet, little is known about contextual factors that influence physicians' communication with their patients. The main purpose of this article is to examine organizational-level factors that influence patient perceptions of physician communication in inpatient settings. We used the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey and American Hospital Association data to determine patients' ratings of physician communication at the hospital level, and to collect information about hospital-level factors that can potentially influence physician communication. Our sample consisted of 2,756 hospitals. We ran a regression analysis to determine the predictors of poor physician communication, measured as the percentage of patients in a hospital who reported that physicians sometimes or never communicated well. In our sample of hospitals, this percentage ranged between 0% and 21%, with 25% of hospitals receiving poor ratings from more than 6% of patients. Three organizational factors had statistically significant negative associations with physician communication: for-profit ownership, hospital size, and hospitalists providing care in the hospital, On the other hand, the number of full-time-equivalent physicians and dentists per 10,000 inpatient days, physician ownership of the hospital, Medicare share of inpatient days, and public ownership were positively associated with patients' ratings of physician communication. Physician staffing levels are an understudied area in healthcare research. Our findings indicate that physician staffing levels affect the quality of physician communication with patients. Moreover, for-profit and larger hospitals should invest more in physician communication given the role that HCAHPS plays in value-based purchasing. PMID:26904776

  2. Alternate Level of Care Patients in Hospitals: What Does Dementia Have To Do With This?

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Rose; Jarrett, Pamela; Stewart, Connie; Nicholson, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients in acute care hospitals no longer in need of acute care are called Alternate Level of Care (ALC) patients. This is growing and common all across Canada. A better understanding of this patient population would help to address this problem. Methods A chart review was conducted in two hospitals in New Brunswick. All patients designated as ALC on July 1, 2009 had their charts reviewed. Results Thirty-three per cent of the hospital beds were occupied with ALC patients; 63% had a diagnosis of dementia. The mean length of stay was 379.6 days. Eighty-six per cent were awaiting a long-term care bed in the community. Most patients experienced functional decline during their hospitalization. One year prior to admission, 61% had not been admitted to hospital and 59.2% had had at least one visit to the emergency room. Conclusions The majority of the ALC patients in hospital have a diagnosis of dementia and have been waiting in hospital for over one year for a long-term care bed in the community. Many participants were recipients of maximum home care in the community, suggesting home maker services alone may not be adequate for some community-dwelling older adults. Early diagnosis of dementia, coupled with appropriate care in the community, may help to curtail the number of patients with dementia who end up in hospital as ALC patients. PMID:25232367

  3. Clinical characteristics of Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea in a university hospital in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, F. F.; Wu, S.; Klena, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify clinical characteristics of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) in patients with antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD). A prospective study was conducted among patients hospitalized in Fudan University Hospital Huashan from August 1, 2012 to July 31, 2013. Toxigenic C. difficile isolates were characterized by PCR ribotyping and multilocus sequence typing. AAD developed in 1.0 % (206/20437) of the antibiotic-treated hospitalized patients and toxigenic C. difficile was isolated from 30.6 % (63/206) of patients with AAD. The frequency of AAD was highest in the intensive care unit (10.7 %); however the proportion of CDI in AAD was highest in the Geriatric Unit (38 %). AAD ranged in severity from mild to moderate. One case with pseudomembranous colitis was identified. Use of carbapenems was found to significantly increase the risk of CDI (OR, 2.31; 95 % CI, 1.22–4.38; p= 0.011). Patient demographics, presumed risk factors, clinical manifestations and laboratory findings revealed no significant difference between patients with CDI and non-C. difficile AAD. Over 90 % of the patients with CDI or non-C. difficile AAD were cured. Two patients had CDI recurrence. Ribotype H was the dominant (18.8 %) genotype, followed by ribotype 012 and ribotype 017. C. difficile plays a significant role in AAD in our setting in China. Because the severity of diarrhea ranges from mild to moderate, it is difficult for Chinese clinicians to identify CDI from AAD patients, therefore CDI should be included in the routine differential diagnoses for hospitalized patients presenting with AAD. PMID:24820293

  4. Residential therapy. Hospitals take on finding housing for homeless patients, hoping to reduce readmissions, lower costs.

    PubMed

    Evans, Melanie

    2012-09-24

    As they grapple with containing the cost of caring for patients who frequently return to the ER or hospital for care, some hospitals are trying a new route: housing. In San Francisco, plans are under way to house 50 homeless patients. "Hospitalization is a failure of the medical system. It means that the condition has gotten so out of control that someone is at risk of life or limb," says Dr. Kelly Pfeifer, left, of the San Francisco Health Plan. PMID:23163192

  5. Georgia hospital hit by F3 tornado--all patients evacuated through the ED.

    PubMed

    2007-04-01

    When an F3 tornado severely damaged a hospital in Americus, GA, all patients had to be evacuated through the emergency department. Fifty-three patients were evacuated by area ambulances and a school bus to other hospitals in the region. The hospital advises others to have an internal evacuation plan as well as two-way radios, a megaphone to direct staff and volunteers, and additional security. A temporary treatment area was set up at a local church. PMID:17438990

  6. Promoting quality and patient safety via the new integrated hospital accreditation programme.

    PubMed

    Dror, Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    Hospital accreditation should act as a strategic asset hospitals have in promoting quality and patient safety, not just a mere "ticket to trade". The newly US government-approved DNV NIAHO offers healthcare provider organizations a new alternative to hospital accreditation that combines CMS's Conditions of Participation (CoP) with the proven success of the ISO 9001 quality management standard, to promote sustainable quality and patient safety improvement. PMID:20614684

  7. Can Hospital Cultural Competency Reduce Disparities in Patient Experiences with Care?

    PubMed Central

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Elliott, Marc N.; Pradhan, Rohit; Schiller, Cameron; Hall, Allyson; Hays, Ron D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultural competency has been espoused as an organizational strategy to reduce health disparities in care. Objective To examine the relationship between hospital cultural competency and inpatient experiences with care. Research Design The first model predicted Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores from hospital random effects, plus fixed effects for hospital cultural competency, individual race/ethnicity/language, and case-mix variables. The second model tested if the association between a hospital’s cultural competency and HCAHPS scores differed for minority and non-Hispanic white patients. Subjects The National CAHPS® Benchmarking Database’s (NCBD) HCAHPS Surveys and the Cultural Competency Assessment Tool of Hospitals (CCATH) Surveys for California hospitals were merged, resulting in 66 hospitals and 19,583 HCAHPS respondents in 2006. Measures Dependent variables include ten HCAHPS measures: six composites (communication with doctors, communication with nurses, staff responsiveness, pain control, communication about medications, and discharge information), two individual items (cleanliness, and quietness of patient rooms), and two global items (overall hospital rating, and whether patient would recommend hospital). Results Hospitals with greater cultural competency have better HCAHPS scores for doctor communication, hospital rating, and hospital recommendation. Furthermore, HCAHPS scores for minorities were higher at hospitals with greater cultural competency on four other dimensions: nurse communication, staff responsiveness, quiet room, and pain control. Conclusions Greater hospital cultural competency may improve overall patient experiences, but may particularly benefit minorities in their interactions with nurses and hospital staff. Such effort may not only serve longstanding goals of reducing racial/ethnic disparities in inpatient experience, but may also contribute to general quality improvement

  8. Epidemiology of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Diabetic Foot Infections in a Large Academic Hospital: Implications for Antimicrobial Stewardship

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Robert J.; Hand, Elizabeth O.; Howell, Crystal K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Diabetic foot infections (DFIs) are the leading cause of non-traumatic lower extremity amputations in the United States. Antimicrobials active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are recommended in patients with associated risk factors; however, limited data exist to support these recommendations. Due to the changing epidemiology of MRSA, and the consequences of unnecessary antibiotic therapy, guidance regarding the necessity of empirical MRSA coverage in DFIs is needed. We sought to 1) describe the prevalence of MRSA DFIs at our institution and compare to the proportion of patients who receive MRSA antibiotic coverage and 2) identify risk factors for MRSA DFI. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of all adult, culture-positive DFI patients managed at University Hospital, San Antonio, TX between January 1, 2010 and September 1, 2014. Patient eligibility included a principal ICD-9-CM discharge diagnosis code for foot infection and a secondary diagnosis of diabetes. The primary outcome was MRSA identified in the wound culture. Independent variables assessed included patient demographics, comorbidities, prior hospitalization, DFI therapies, prior antibiotics, prior MRSA infection, and laboratory values. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for MRSA DFI. Results Overall, 318 patients met inclusion criteria. Patients were predominantly Hispanic (79%) and male (69%). Common comorbidities included hypertension (76%), dyslipidemia (52%), and obesity (49%). S. aureus was present in 46% of culture-positive DFIs (MRSA, 15%). A total of 273 patients (86%) received MRSA antibiotic coverage, resulting in 71% unnecessary use. Male gender (OR 3.09, 95% CI 1.37–7.99) and bone involvement (OR 1.93, 1.00–3.78) were found to be independent risk factors for MRSA DFI. Conclusions Although MRSA was the causative pathogen in a small number of DFI, antibiotic coverage targeted against MRSA was unnecessarily

  9. Stroke Patients Communicating Their Healthcare Needs in Hospital: A Study within the ICF Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has identified that many patients admitted into acute hospital stroke units have communication-related impairments such as hearing, vision, speech, language and/or cognitive communicative impairment. However, no research has identified how many patients in acute hospital stroke units have difficulty actually…

  10. The Emergence of Suicidal Ideation during the Post-Hospital Treatment of Depressed Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Andover, Margaret S.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2008-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on the emergence of suicidal ideation in recently hospitalized patients undergoing treatment for depression. As part of a larger clinical trial, patients (N = 103) with major depression without suicidal ideation at hospital discharge were followed for up to 6 months while receiving study-related outpatient…

  11. An evidence-based strategy for transitioning patients from the hospital to the community.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Improving transitional care from hospital to home requires comprehensive and highly coordinated intervention during the immediate days following discharge. The Hospital to Home Program addresses both medical and social needs, prevents unnecessary readmissions, promotes improvements in patient perceptions of physical and mental health, and results in excellent patient satisfaction. PMID:22619855

  12. Long-term effects of tolvaptan in patients requiring recurrent hospitalization for heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Hayato; Ajioka, Masayoshi; Ishii, Hideki; Okumura, Takahiro; Murase, Yosuke; Osanai, Hiroyuki; Nakasima, Yoshihito; Asano, Hiroshi; Sakai, Kazuyoshi; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although reports suggest that tolvaptan does not reduce survival or subsequent hospitalization rates in heart failure patients, its continuous use has shown good outcomes in some patients who cannot be effectively managed with high doses of loop diuretics. Therefore, we investigated the association of patient characteristics and continued tolvaptan use in heart failure patients with changes in the frequency and annual duration of patient hospitalization due to heart failure. We carefully reviewed the medical records of patients hospitalized due to heart failure who began tolvaptan therapy and continued with outpatient treatment between December 2010 and November 2013 (tolvaptan group); patients hospitalized for heart failure between May 2008 and March 2009 served as controls. We set the reference dates as the start of tolvaptan therapy (tolvaptan group) or as the date of admission (control group). The changes in hospitalization frequency and total hospitalization time due to heart failure, before and after the reference dates, were not significantly different between the tolvaptan and control groups. In the tolvaptan group, a high estimated glomerular filtration rate was a predictor of decreased hospitalization. Continuous tolvaptan use did not decrease hospitalization duration in all heart failure patients, but good renal function was predictive of a good response. PMID:26412881

  13. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  14. Hospitalizations in patients with atrial fibrillation: an analysis from ROCKET AF

    PubMed Central

    DeVore, Adam D.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Becker, Richard C.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Breithardt, Guenter; Hacke, Werner; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Singer, Daniel E.; Fox, Keith A. A.; Patel, Manesh R.; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The high costs associated with treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) are primarily due to hospital care, but there are limited data to understand the reasons for and predictors of hospitalization in patients with AF. Methods and results The ROCKET AF trial compared rivaroxaban with warfarin for stroke prophylaxis in AF. We described the frequency of and reasons for hospitalization during study follow-up and utilized Cox proportional hazards models to assess for baseline characteristics associated with all-cause hospitalization. Of 14 171 patients, 14% were hospitalized at least once. Of 2614 total hospitalizations, 41% were cardiovascular including 4% for AF; of the remaining, 12% were for bleeding. Compared with patients not hospitalized, hospitalized patients were older (74 vs. 72 years), and more frequently had diabetes (46 vs. 39%), prior MI (23 vs. 16%), and paroxysmal AF (19 vs. 17%), but less frequently had prior transient ischaemic attack/stroke (49 vs. 56%). After multivariable adjustment, lung disease [hazard ratio (HR) 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29–1.66], diabetes [1.22, (1.11–1.34)], prior MI [1.27, (1.13–1.42)], and renal dysfunction [HR 1.07 per 5 unit GFR < 65 mL/min, (1.04–1.10)] were associated with increased hospitalization risk. Treatment assignment was not associated with differential rates of hospitalization. Conclusion Nearly 1 in 7 of the moderate-to-high-risk patients with AF enrolled in this trial was hospitalized within 2 years, and both AF and bleeding were rare causes of hospitalization. Further research is needed to determine whether care pathways directed at comorbid conditions among AF patients could reduce the need for and costs associated with hospitalization. PMID:27174904

  15. Hourly rounding is key contributor to patient-centered care at high-performing hospitals.

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    According to new findings, hospitals with the highest HCAHPS scores suggest that hourly rounding on patients is one of the best ways to elevate the patient experience. In a survey of top-performing hospitals, 83% reported they employed the practice of regular nurse rounding on patients, and 62% employed leadership rounding. When rounding on patients, experts suggest nurses should always consider pain, the plan of care, and duration, or "PPD". PMID:26447259

  16. Should the "in situ" simulation become the new way in Belgium? Experience of an academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Pospiech, A; Lois, F; Van Dyck, M; Kahn, D; De Kock, M

    2013-01-01

    The place of simulation in medical education, particularly in anesthesia, appears to be more and more evident. However, the history of simulation in Belgium showed that the associated costs remain a barrier. The use of 'in situ' simulation, defined as the practice of simulation in the usual workplace, could solve the problem of providing access to this educational tool. Indeed, it allows reducing equipment and manpower costs: the needed equipment comes from the hospital, and supervision and organization are provided by staff members. It also provides access to simulation for a larger number of individuals on site. The environment is more realistic because the participants operate in their usual workplace, with their customary equipment and team. Furthermore, 'in situ' simulation allows participation of the paramedical staff. This allows developing skills related to teamwork and communication. Despite those numerous advantages, several difficulties persist. The associated logistic and organizational constraints can be cumbersome. PMID:24605415

  17. Etiological pattern of demented patients attending in a tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Islam, M N; Khan, R K; Rahman, M M; Hayee, M A; Jahan, M E; Bhuiya, M M

    2013-07-01

    This is a cross sectional study where 125 demented patients were enrolled who attended in neurology department of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) Hospital. The purpose of the study was to find out the etiology of dementia. Dementia was diagnosed by the criteria indicated by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV and confirmed by Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) score. Diagnosis of specific type of dementia was made on the basis of established criteria. The most common etiological factor was post stroke dementia (PSDE) (36%) followed by Alzheimer's disease (AD) (14.4%), multi infarct dementia (MID) (8%), Mixed AD and PSDE (6.4%), vitamin B₁₂ deficiency (4.8%) etc. Vascular dementia is the most common etiological factor. Next to this is the Alzheimer disease. This study will provide baseline information regarding the types of dementia occurring in Bangladeshi population and will be the basis of planning health program and data for future research. PMID:23982539

  18. Partners in Care: Design Considerations for Caregivers and Patients During a Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew D.; Mishra, Sonali R.; Kendall, Logan; Haldar, Shefali; Pollack, Ari H.; Pratt, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Informal caregivers, such as close friends and family, play an important role in a hospital patient’s care. Although CSCW researchers have shown the potential for social computing technologies to help patients and their caregivers manage chronic conditions and support health behavior change, few studies focus on caregivers’ role during a multi-day hospital stay. To explore this space, we conducted an interview and observation study of patients and caregivers in the inpatient setting. In this paper, we describe how caregivers and patients coordinate and collaborate to manage patients’ care and wellbeing during a hospital stay. We define and describe five roles caregivers adopt: companion, assistant, representative, navigator, and planner, and show how patients and caregivers negotiate these roles and responsibilities throughout a hospital stay. Finally, we identify key design considerations for technology to support patients and caregivers during a hospital stay. PMID:27148596

  19. Measuring the Burden of Hospitalization in Patients with Parkinson´s Disease in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Pascual-Garcia, Raquel; San-Roman-Montero, Jesus; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Castrodeza-Sanz, Javier; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This epidemiological survey estimates the hospitalization burden related to Parkinson´s Disease in Spain. Methods This observational retrospective survey was performed by reviewing data from the National Surveillance System for Hospital Data, which includes more than 98% of Spanish hospitals. All hospitalizations of patients with Parkinson´s disease that were reported from 1997–2012 were analyzed. Codes were selected using the 9th International Classification of Diseases: ICD-9-CM: 332.0. Results A total of 438,513 hospital discharges of patients with Parkinson´s Disease were reported during the study period. The annual hospitalization rate was 64.2 cases per 100,000. The average length of hospital stay was 10 days. The trend for the annual hospitalization rate differed significantly depending on whether Parkinson´s disease was the main cause of hospitalization (n = 23,086, 1.14% annual increase) or was not the main cause of hospitalization (n = 415,427, 15.37% annual increase). The overall case-fatality rate among hospitalized patients was 10%. The case fatality rate among patient´s hospitalized with Parkinson´s disease as the main cause of hospitalization was 2.5%. The hospitalization rate and case-fatality rate significantly increased with age. The primary causes of hospitalization when Parkinson´s disease was not coded as the main cause of hospitalization were as follows: respiratory system diseases (24%), circulatory system diseases (19%), injuries and poisoning, including fractures (12%), diseases of the digestive system (10%) and neoplasms (5%). The annual average cost for National Health Care System was € 120 M, with a mean hospitalization cost of €4,378. Conclusions Parkinson´s disease poses a significant health threat in Spain, particularly in the elderly. While hospitalizations due to Parkinson´s Disease are relatively stable over time, the number of patients presenting with Parkinson´s disease as an important comorbidity has

  20. Hospital revenue cycle management and payer mix: do Medicare and Medicaid undermine hospitals' ability to generate and collect patient care revenue?

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Simone; Wheeler, John R C

    2010-01-01

    The continuing efforts of government payers to contain hospital costs have raised concerns among hospital managers that serving publicly insured patients may undermine their ability to manage the revenue cycle successfully. This study uses financial information from two sources-Medicare cost reports for all US hospitals for 2002 to 2007 and audited financial statements for all bond-issuing, not-for-profit hospitals for 2000 to 2006 to examine the relationship between hospitals' shares of Medicare and Medicaid patients and the amount of patient care revenue they generate as well as the speed with which they collect their revenue. Hospital-level fixed effects regression analysis finds that hospitals with higher Medicare and Medicaid payer mix collect somewhat higher average patient care revenues than hospitals with more privately insured and self-pay patients. Hospitals with more Medicare patients also collect on this revenue faster; serving more Medicaid patients is not associated with the speed of patient revenue collection. For hospital managers, these findings may represent good news. They suggest that, despite increases in the number of publicly insured patients served, managers have frequently been able to generate adequate amounts of patient revenue and collect it in a timely fashion. PMID:21294440

  1. A special query tool in the hospital information system to recognize patients and to increase patient numbers for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Koca, Mithat; Husmann, Gabriele; Jesgarz, Jürgen; Overath, Martin; Brandts, Christian; Serve, Hubert

    2012-01-01

    A powerful hospital information system (HIS) contains information about diagnostic and disease data of all patients in a hospital. In the university hospital in Frankfurt / Main Germany more than 80% of all wards are completely "paperless". But the identification of patients for clinical trials is very difficult. We developed a special query and reporting tool in the HIS to recognize patients with a specific disease and with basic inclusion and exclusion criteria for a specific clinical trial. With the help of this query tool it is possible to increase significantly the patient numbers for clinical trials in a short period. PMID:22874393

  2. Hospital pharmacy practice in Saudi Arabia: Drug monitoring and patient education in the Riyadh region

    PubMed Central

    Alsultan, Mohammed S.; Mayet, Ahmed Y.; Khurshid, Fowad; Al-jedai, Ahmed H.

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this national survey is to evaluate hospital pharmacy practice in the Riyadh region of Saudi Arabia. The results of the survey pertaining to the monitoring and patient education of the medication use process were presented. Methods We have invited pharmacy directors from all 48 hospitals in the Riyadh region to participate in a modified-American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) survey questionnaire. The survey was conducted using similar methods to those of the ASHP surveys. Results The response rate was 60.4% (29/48). Most hospitals (23, 79%) had pharmacists regularly monitor medication therapy for patients. Of these hospitals, 61% had pharmacists monitoring medication therapy daily for less than 26% of patients, 17% monitored 26–50% of patients and 22% monitored more than half of patients daily. In 41% of hospitals, pharmacists routinely monitored serum medication concentrations or their surrogate markers; 27% gave pharmacists the authority to order initial serum medication concentrations, and 40% allowed pharmacists to adjust dosages. Pharmacists routinely documented their medication therapy monitoring activities in 52% of hospitals. Overall, 74% of hospitals had an adverse drug event (ADE) reporting system, 59% had a multidisciplinary committee responsible for reviewing ADEs, and 63% had a medication safety committee. Complete electronic medical record (EMR) systems were available in 15% of hospitals and 81% had a partial EMR system. The primary responsibility for performing patient medication education lays with nursing (37%), pharmacy (37%), or was a shared responsibility (26%). In 44% of hospitals, pharmacists provided medication education to half or more inpatients and in a third of hospitals, pharmacists gave medication education to 26% or more of patients at discharge. Conclusion Hospital pharmacists in the Riyadh region are actively engaged in monitoring medication therapy and providing patient medication education

  3. Changes in Patient and Nurse Outcomes Associated with Magnet Hospital Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kutney-Lee, Ann; Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski; Sloane, Douglas M.; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Quinn, Lisa W.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Research has documented an association between Magnet hospitals and better outcomes for nurses and patients. However, little longitudinal evidence exists to support a causal link between Magnet recognition and outcomes. Objective To compare changes over time in surgical patient outcomes, nurse-reported quality, and nurse outcomes in a sample of hospitals that attained Magnet recognition between 1999 and 2007 with hospitals that remained non-Magnet. Research Design Retrospective, two-stage panel design using four secondary data sources. Subjects 136 Pennsylvania hospitals (11 “emerging” Magnets and 125 non-Magnets) Measures American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet recognition; risk-adjusted rates of surgical 30-day mortality and failure-to-rescue, nurse-reported quality measures, and nurse outcomes; the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index Methods Fixed effects difference models were used to compare changes in outcomes between emerging Magnet hospitals and hospitals that remained non-Magnet. Results Emerging Magnet hospitals demonstrated markedly greater improvements in their work environments than other hospitals. On average, the changes in 30-day surgical mortality and failure-to-rescue rates over the study period were more pronounced in emerging Magnet hospitals than in non-Magnet hospitals, by 2.4 fewer deaths per 1000 patients (p<.01) and 6.1 fewer deaths per 1000 patients (p=0.02), respectively. Similar differences in the changes for emerging Magnet hospitals and non-Magnet hospitals were observed in nurse-reported quality of care and nurse outcomes. Conclusions In general, Magnet recognition is associated with significant improvements over time in the quality of the work environment, and in patient and nurse outcomes that exceed those of non-Magnet hospitals. PMID:25906016

  4. Predictors of patient satisfaction with inpatient hospital pain management across the United States: A national study.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Daniel C; Shen, Megan Johnson; Holcombe, Randall F

    2016-07-01

    Satisfactory pain management of hospitalized patients remains a national unmet need for the United States. Although prior research indicates that inpatient pain management may be improving nationally, not all populations of patients rate pain management as equally satisfactory. County-level predictors, such as demographics and population density, and hospital-level predictors (eg, hospital-bed number), are understudied determinants of pain management patient satisfaction. We created a multivariate regression model of pain management patient satisfaction scores as indicated by Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey results based on county and hospital level predictors. Number of hospital beds (β = -0.16), percent foreign-born (β = -0.16), and population density (β = -0.08) most strongly predicted unfavorable ratings, whereas African American (β = 0.23), white (β= 0.23), and younger population (β = 0.08) most strongly predicted favorable ratings. Greater attention should be placed on pain management in larger hospitals that serve foreign-born patients in population-dense areas. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:498-501. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. PMID:26970075

  5. A study assessing patient satisfaction in a tertiary care hospital in India: the changing healthcare scenario.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Aashima; Garg, Shalini; Pareek, Udai

    2009-06-01

    The healthcare service scenario in India is expected to evolve into a more developed stage. More emphasis has been given on patient satisfaction as this is an important consideration for the assessment of the hospital services. The concept of patient satisfaction is also rapidly changing and the hospitals are using variety of techniques to improve patient care and organizational efficiency. Patient satisfaction questionnaire is a validated instrument to assess the level of the satisfaction of adult patients. The questionnaire was administered on those patients who were admitted in hospital for at least three days. In our study 88% patients were satisfied with treatment and medical care they had received. About 86% patients found that the hospital services were excellent. However, it is felt that patient values and culture should be explored for further improving patient doctor communication. There is hence a scope for improvement in meeting patient's needs and preferences and rendering hospital services. This can be achieved by some feedback system which could be available to the patients and later worked upon by the management, to improve the patient care by bridging the gap between senior management and patients. PMID:22010498

  6. [Hospital at home: assessment of early discharge in terms of patients mortality and satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Damiani, G; Pinnarelli, L; Ricciardi, G

    2006-01-01

    New organizational models are essentials for European Hospitals because of restraining budget and ageing of population. Hospital at home is an alternative to inpatient care, effective both in clinical and economic ground. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of Hospital at Home in terms of decreased mortality and patient satisfaction. We carried out a meta-analysis of the literature about hospital at home interventions. We searched Medline (to December 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (to October 2002) and other bibliographical databases, with a supplementary handsearching of literature. We used the following keywords: hospital at home, home hospitalization, mortality, patient satisfaction, cost, acute hospital care, conventional hospitalization. We included studies respecting the following criteria: analytical or experimental studies aimed at compare early discharge to hospital at home and continued care in an acute hospital. Review Manager 4.2 software was used to collect data and perform statistical analysis. We found 2420 articles searching for the chosen keywords. Twelve studies (2048 patients) were included for death outcome and six studies (1382 patients) were included for satisfaction outcome. The selected studies indicated a greater effect size of patient satisfaction in home patients than hospitalized ones (Odds Ratio: 1.58 95% CI: 1.25, 2.00) and showed no difference in terms of mortality (Risk Difference: -0.01 95% CI: -0.03, 0.02). Our results underline the effectiveness of this organizational model, as an alternative to continued care in an acute hospital. Further useful considerations could be drawn by economic evaluation studies carried out on field. PMID:16649506

  7. Length of hospital stay is shorter in South Asian patients with acute pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie F; Gollop, Nicholas D; Uppal, Hardeep; Chandran, Suresh; Potluri, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common diagnosis in UK hospitals and confers a significant hospital stay (LOS). There is very little evidence concerning ethnic variations on LOS in patients with PE. We sought to investigate ethnic variations in LOS in a large sample of 3440 patients with PE from 2000 to 2013 across seven hospitals in the north west of UK. We found that South Asian patients have significantly lower LOS compared with Caucasian patients. We discuss possible reasons for, and implications of, this finding.

  8. Managing hospitalized hemodialysis patients: A guide for the non-nephrologist.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Fahad; Wong, Leslie P

    2015-01-01

    In-hospital care of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, on hemodialysis, is different from the general population in various aspects. Non-nephrologists do not typically receive specialized training to take care of these patients. However, in most circumstances, they serve as the primary attending for these patients in the hospital setting. There is paucity of the literature guiding non-nephrologists on this important issue. This article highlights the key management aspects of in-hospital care of these patients that all the non-nephrologists should know. PMID:26414595

  9. Hyponatremia in patients hospitalized with heart failure: a condition often overlooked in low-income settings

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khalid; Workicho, Abdulhalik; Gudina, Esayas Kebede

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte abnormality in patients with heart failure (HF). It is independently associated with increased short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. The main objective of this study was to assess patterns of hyponatremia and its association with discharge outcomes in patients with HF admitted to a teaching hospital in Ethiopia. Patients and methods This is a descriptive, prospective, hospital-based cohort study of patients with HF admitted to Jimma University Hospital, Ethiopia, between November 1, 2013 and July 31, 2014. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information on sociodemographic characteristics, clinical profile at admission, and outcomes at discharge. Plasma sodium concentration was analyzed at admission for all patients. The relationship between hyponatremia at admission and in-hospital mortality, as well as length of hospital stay, was assessed using both bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regressions. The level of statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results Of 152 participants admitted with HF, 44 (28.9%) had hyponatremia, which is defined as serum sodium level <135 mmol/L. Patients on salt restriction, on chronic diuretic treatment (furosemide and spironolactone), and with impaired renal function at admission were found to be highly affected. Hyponatremia was found to be associated with increased in-hospital mortality (P=0.008) and longer hospital stay (16.6 vs 12 days, P<0.001). Patients with hyponatremia also had lower blood pressure and poor functional status at discharge. Conclusion This study demonstrates that hyponatremia is highly prevalent in patients hospitalized with HF and is associated with increased in-hospital mortality and longer hospital stay. Thus, great emphasis should be given to identify high-risk patients, and prevention and early detection of hyponatremia to prevent its deleterious effects. Large-scale national studies are also needed to complement our

  10. Nutritional risk, malnutrition and nutritional support among hospitalized patients in orthopedics/spinal surgery of a Hohhot teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nannan; Dong, Yalin; Huo, Ting; Shao, Yanqing; Xing, Wenhua; Li, Shuwen

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of nutritional status (the prevalence of nutritional risk, malnutrition, overweight and obesity) and the nutritional support of the hospitalized patients from admission to discharge or over a two-week period in orthopedics/ spinal surgery of a teaching hospital in Hohhot were investigated. 432 patients from two wards of the orthopedics/spinal surgery from Jan to Dec 2013, the traditional spinal surgery and the minimally invasive spinal surgery, were selected and detected in this study. The Nutritional Risk Score 2002 (NRS 2002) was used to determine the patients' nutritional status within 48 h after admission and during their hospitalization. The overall prevalence of nutritional risk, malnutrition, overweight and obesity at admission was 11.6%, 12.7%, 35.9% and 7.41%, respectively. Overall, there were 88.0% of the patients who were at nutritional risk received nutritional support, while 14.1% of non-risk patients received a redundant nutritional support. The overall prevalence of nutritional risk changed from 11.6% at admission to 19.4% upon discharge (p<0.05), and the prevalence of malnutrition changed from 12.7% to 20.6% (p<0.05). The prevalence of overweight and obesity, which changed from 35.9% to 31.0% and from 7.41% to 5.79% respectively, didn't experience statistically significant evolution. NRS 2002 was a feasible nutritional risk screening tool for patients in spinal surgery of orthopedics department. Patients' prevalence of nutritional risk and malnutrition increased significantly in spinal surgery of this hospital. Some inappropriate uses of nutritional support were observed in orthopedics/spinal surgery, and nutritional support guidelines or protocols should be promoted by a professional committee. PMID:27222410

  11. California's Hospital Fair Pricing Act reduced the prices actually paid by uninsured patients.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ge

    2015-01-01

    California's Hospital Fair Pricing Act, passed in 2006, aims to protect uninsured patients from paying hospital gross charges: the full, undiscounted prices based on each hospital's chargemaster. In this study I examined how the law affects the net price actually paid by uninsured patients--a question critical for evaluating the law's impact. I found that from 2004 to 2012 the net price actually paid by uninsured patients shrank from 6 percent higher than Medicare prices to 68 percent lower than Medicare prices; the adjusted collection ratio, essentially the amount the hospital actually collected for every dollar in gross price charged, for uninsured patients dropped from 32 percent to 11 percent; and although hospitals have been increasingly less able to generate revenues from uninsured patients, they have raised the proportion of services provided to them in relation to total services provided to all patients. The substantial protection provided to uninsured patients by the California Hospital Fair Pricing Act has important implications for federal and state policy makers seeking to achieve a similar goal. States or Congress could legislate criteria determining the eligibility for discounted charges, mandate a lower price ceiling, and regulate for-profit hospitals in regard to uninsured patients. PMID:25561645

  12. Lived experiences and challenges of older surgical patients during hospitalization for cancer: an ethnographic fieldwork.

    PubMed

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Høybye, Mette Terp

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the lived experiences of older surgical patients' (aged 74 years and older) experienced challenges during a brief admission to hospital. Age, gender, polypharmacy, and the severity of illness are also factors known to affect the hospitalization process. For an ethnographic study using participant observation and interviews, surgical cancer patients (n = 9, aged 74 years and older) were recruited during admission to a Danish teaching hospital. Using ethnographic strategies of participant observation and interviews, each patient was followed through the course of 1 day during their stay at the hospital. Interviews were carried out with all patients during this time. Three areas of concern were identified as prominent in the patients' experiences and challenges during their short hospital stay: teeth and oral cavity, eating in a hospital setting, and medication during hospitalization. Short-term hospitalization requires focused collaboration between staff and patient concerning individual challenges from their teeth and oral cavity as support of nutritional needs during surgical treatment for cancer. PMID:24559546

  13. Strengthening physician relationships. Improving service to medical practices helps hospitals meet patients' needs.

    PubMed

    Rezac, P J

    1991-03-01

    In 1983 Sacred Heart Hospital, Yankton, SD, launched a medical staff-based marketing plan. Initial research focused on discovering service-area referring physicians' perceptions and level of utilization of Sacred Heart and its medical staff. The plan's ultimate goal was to strengthen relationships with referring physicians and thus improve the hospital's ability to deliver high-quality healthcare to those in its service area. Physicians were asked to indicate how important certain attributes were in choosing a medical specialist and a referral hospital. Among the attributes they most often cited as "very important" in choice of a specialist were specialist's reputation, patient's previous satisfaction, communication with a referring physician, and patient's preference. For choosing a referral hospital the most frequently cited attributes were availability of latest technology and equipment, hospital's reputation, patient's previous satisfaction, and patient's preference. The study also gathered information on physicians' utilization of and satisfaction with a variety of Sacred Heart services. As a result of the study, the hospital implemented a seven-part strategy to increase referring physicians' satisfaction with and utilization of the hospital and its medical staff. A follow-up study five years later revealed a 6.7 percent increase in the number of service-area physicians who referred patients to Sacred Heart and a 14.2 percent increase in the number of physicians who were "very satisfied" with the hospital's services. The consumer study revealed that high-quality professional services and highly personalized services were very important to patients. PMID:10109226

  14. Effects of medication adherence on hospitalizations and healthcare costs in patients with schizophrenia in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Dilokthornsakul, Piyameth; Thoopputra, Thitaporn; Patanaprateep, Oraluck; Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to determine the impacts of medication adherence on hospitalization and direct healthcare cost in patients with schizophrenia in Thailand. Methods: A retrospective study was undertaken. Patients with schizophrenia aged 18–65 years who visited a University hospital and received antipsychotics from April 2011 to October 2011 were included. Propensity score–adjusted logistic regression was used to determine the impacts of medication adherence on schizophrenia-related and all-cause hospitalizations. Results: A total of 582 patients were included. Three out of 224 patients (1.3%) were hospitalized with schizophrenia in optimal adherence group, while 10 of 140 (7.1%) were hospitalized in under-adherence group, and 7 of 218 (3.2%) were hospitalized in over-adherence group. Based on propensity score–adjusted multivariate logistic regression, the adjusted odds ratio was 5.86 (95% confidence interval = 1.53–22.50) for schizophrenia-related hospitalization and 8.04 (95% confidence interval = 2.20–29.40) for all-cause hospitalization. The average annual direct healthcare costs in patients with optimal adherence, under-adherence, and over-adherence were US$371 ± US$836, US$386 ± US$734, and US$508 ± US$2168, respectively. Conclusion: An initiation of interventions to maintain optimal adherence in patients with schizophrenia would significantly impact the healthcare system. PMID:27026801

  15. Monitoring and root cause analysis of clinical biochemistry turn around time at an academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Kiran P; Trivedi, Amit P; Patel, Dharmik; Gami, Bhakti; Haridas, N

    2014-10-01

    Quality can be defined as the ability of a product or service to satisfy the needs and expectations of the customer. Laboratories are more focusing on technical and analytical quality for reliability and accuracy of test results. Patients and clinicians however are interested in rapid, reliable and efficient service from laboratory. Turn around time (TAT), the timeliness with which laboratory personnel deliver test results, is one of the most noticeable signs of laboratory service and is often used as a key performance indicator of laboratory performance. This study is aims to provide clue for laboratory TAT monitoring and root cause analysis. In a 2 year period a total of 75,499 specimens of outdoor patient department were monitor, of this a total of 4,142 specimens exceeded TAT. With consistent efforts to monitor, root cause analysis and corrective measures, we are able to decreased the specimens exceeding TAT from 7-8 to 3.7 %. Though it is difficult task to monitor TAT with the help of laboratory information system, real time documentation and authentic data retrievable, along with identification of causes for delays and its remedial measures, improve laboratory TAT and thus patient satisfaction. PMID:25298634

  16. Epidemiology of pericardial effusions at a large academic hospital in South Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, H.; Burgess, L. J.; Doubell, A. F.

    2005-01-01

    The aim was to establish the prevalence of large pericardial effusions in the Western Cape Province of South Africa, and to determine the incidence of various types of effusions. A total of 233 patients presented with large pericardial effusions. Each patient underwent tests for HIV, sputum smear and culture, blood culture, blood biochemistry and serological testing. Tuberculous pericardial effusions were diagnosed according to pre-determined criteria. Eighty-four patients (36.1%) were found to be HIV positive; 81 of these (96.4 %) had tuberculous pericarditis. More than 65% of the study population was aged between 15 and 39 years. The prevalence of HIV amongst unemployed individuals was 49.0% compared to 30.0% amongst employed individuals. Tuberculous pericarditis was the most common cause of pericardial effusions (69.5%, n=162). It was concluded that tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of pericarditis in this province of South Africa. The prevalence of TB confounded by HIV co-infection is steadily increasing, burdening the health-care facilities. PMID:15962545

  17. Epidemiology of pericardial effusions at a large academic hospital in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Reuter, H; Burgess, L J; Doubell, A F

    2005-06-01

    The aim was to establish the prevalence of large pericardial effusions in the Western Cape Province of South Africa, and to determine the incidence of various types of effusions. A total of 233 patients presented with large pericardial effusions. Each patient underwent tests for HIV, sputum smear and culture, blood culture, blood biochemistry and serological testing. Tuberculous pericardial effusions were diagnosed according to pre-determined criteria. Eighty-four patients (36.1%) were found to be HIV positive; 81 of these (96.4 %) had tuberculous pericarditis. More than 65% of the study population was aged between 15 and 39 years. The prevalence of HIV amongst unemployed individuals was 49.0% compared to 30.0% amongst employed individuals. Tuberculous pericarditis was the most common cause of pericardial effusions (69.5%, n=162). It was concluded that tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of pericarditis in this province of South Africa. The prevalence of TB confounded by HIV co-infection is steadily increasing, burdening the health-care facilities. PMID:15962545

  18. Clinical Audit of COPD Patients Requiring Hospital Admissions in Spain: AUDIPOC Study

    PubMed Central

    Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; López-Campos, Jose Luis; Álvarez-Martínez, Carlos J.; Castro-Acosta, Ady; Agüero, Ramón; Hueto, Javier; Hernández-Hernández, Jesús; Barrón, Manuel; Abraira, Victor; Forte, Anabel; Sanchez Nieto, Juan Miguel; Lopez-Gabaldón, Encarnación; Cosío, Borja G.; Agustí, Alvar

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds AUDIPOC is a nationwide clinical audit that describes the characteristics, interventions and outcomes of patients admitted to Spanish hospitals because of an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (ECOPD), assessing the compliance of these parameters with current international guidelines. The present study describes hospital resources, hospital factors related to case recruitment variability, patients’ characteristics, and adherence to guidelines. Methodology/Principal Findings An organisational database was completed by all participant hospitals recording resources and organisation. Over an 8-week period 11,564 consecutive ECOPD admissions to 129 Spanish hospitals covering 70% of the Spanish population were prospectively identified. At hospital discharge, 5,178 patients (45% of eligible) were finally included, and thus constituted the audited population. Audited patients were reassessed 90 days after admission for survival and readmission rates. A wide variability was observed in relation to most variables, hospital adherence to guidelines, and readmissions and death. Median inpatient mortality was 5% (across-hospital range 0–35%). Among discharged patients, 37% required readmission (0–62%) and 6.5% died (0–35%). The overall mortality rate was 11.6% (0–50%). Hospital size and complexity and aspects related to hospital COPD awareness were significantly associated with case recruitment. Clinical management most often complied with diagnosis and treatment recommendations but rarely (<50%) addressed guidance on healthy life-styles. Conclusions/Significance The AUDIPOC study highlights the large across-hospital variability in resources and organization of hospitals, patient characteristics, process of care, and outcomes. The study also identifies resources and organizational characteristics associated with the admission of COPD cases, as well as aspects of daily clinical care amenable to improvement. PMID:22911875

  19. Atrial fibrillation is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Wu, Chi-Shun; Su, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose In-hospital mortality rate of acute ischemic stroke patients remains between 3% and 18%. For improving the quality of stroke care, we investigated the factors that contribute to the risk of in-hospital mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Materials and methods Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011, 2,556 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit were included in this study. Factors such as demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and complications related to in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Of the 2,556 ischemic stroke patients, 157 received thrombolytic therapy. Eighty of the 2,556 patients (3.1%) died during hospitalization. Of the 157 patients who received thrombolytic therapy, 14 (8.9%) died during hospitalization. History of atrial fibrillation (AF, P<0.01) and stroke severity (P<0.01) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality. AF, stroke severity, cardioembolism stroke, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Herniation and sepsis were the most common complications of stroke that were attributed to in-hospital mortality. Approximately 70% of in-hospital mortality was related to stroke severity (total middle cerebral artery occlusion with herniation, basilar artery occlusion, and hemorrhagic transformation). The other 30% of in-hospital mortality was related to sepsis, heart disease, and other complications. Conclusion AF is associated with higher in-hospital mortality rate than in patients without AF. For improving outcome of stroke patients, we also need to focus to reduce serious neurological or medical complications. PMID:27418830

  20. Pay for Performance: Are Hospitals Becoming More Efficient in Improving Their Patient Experience?

    PubMed

    Stanowski, Anthony Charles; Simpson, Kit; White, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) changed the way hospitals interact with patients when it implemented a pay-for-performance (P4P) system. Under this system, a financial reward or penalty is based in part on measures of patient experience. The program seeks to reward healthcare providers who expand their focus from solely delivering a highly technical set of services that improves the patient's health to creating an atmosphere that makes hospitalization more humane and respectful of patients' values and preferences. Refocusing priorities requires capital investment in more "patient-friendly" facilities or funding staff training programs. This study seeks to determine whether a relationship exists between inpatient costs and the score for "overall rating of hospital" (ORH) on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) hospital version survey. Second, if a relationship exists, the study examines how that relationship changed during the time of CMS' implementation of its P4P program. The study's findings suggest that higher-cost hospitals have higher levels of positive patient experiences, after controlling for other variables. Importantly, the research findings indicate that hospitals are becoming more efficient in delivering care associated with higher levels of patient experience, coinciding with implementation of the P4P program. PMID:26364350

  1. Accounting For Patients' Socioeconomic Status Does Not Change Hospital Readmission Rates.

    PubMed

    Bernheim, Susannah M; Parzynski, Craig S; Horwitz, Leora; Lin, Zhenqiu; Araas, Michael J; Ross, Joseph S; Drye, Elizabeth E; Suter, Lisa G; Normand, Sharon-Lise T; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2016-08-01

    There is an active public debate about whether patients' socioeconomic status should be included in the readmission measures used to determine penalties in Medicare's Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP). Using the current Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services methodology, we compared risk-standardized readmission rates for hospitals caring for high and low proportions of patients of low socioeconomic status (as defined by their Medicaid status or neighborhood income). We then calculated risk-standardized readmission rates after additionally adjusting for patients' socioeconomic status. Our results demonstrate that hospitals caring for large proportions of patients of low socioeconomic status have readmission rates similar to those of other hospitals. Moreover, readmission rates calculated with and without adjustment for patients' socioeconomic status are highly correlated. Readmission rates of hospitals caring for patients of low socioeconomic status changed by approximately 0.1 percent with adjustment for patients' socioeconomic status, and only 3-4 percent fewer such hospitals reached the threshold for payment penalty in Medicare's HRRP. Overall, adjustment for socioeconomic status does not change hospital results in meaningful ways. PMID:27503972

  2. Hospital Preparations for Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Patients and Experience Gained from Admission of an Ebola Patient

    PubMed Central

    Minderhoud, A.L.C. (Ben); Wind, Jelte D.D.; Leenen, Luke P.H.; Hoepelman, Andy I.M.; Ellerbroek, Pauline M.

    2016-01-01

    The Major Incident Hospital of the University Medical Centre of Utrecht has a longstanding history of preparing for the management of highly pathogenic and infectious organisms. An assessment of the hospital’s preparations for an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever and its experience during admission of a patient with Ebola virus disease showed that the use of the buddy system, frequent training, and information sessions for staff and their relatives greatly increased the sense of safety and motivation among staff. Differing procedures among ambulance services limited the number of services used for transporting patients. Waste management was the greatest concern, and destruction of waste had to be outsourced. The admission of an Ebola patient proceeded without incident but led to considerable demands on staff. The maximum time allowed for wearing personal protective equipment was 45 minutes to ensure safety, and an additional 20 minutes was needed for recovery. PMID:26812146

  3. Adverse drug reactions related to hospital admission in Slovak elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Wawruch, Martin; Zikavska, Martina; Wsolova, Ladislava; Kuzelova, Magdalena; Kahayova, Katarina; Strateny, Kamil; Kristova, Viera

    2009-01-01

    The aims of the present study were: to evaluate the prevalence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) leading to hospitalization in elderly patients; to analyze the drugs which have been identified as having causal relationship with ADRs and to identify risk factors which predispose the patient to such ADRs. The study has been performed in 600 patients aged> or =65 years, hospitalized in a general hospital between 1 December 2003 and 31 March 2005. The ADRs recorded in patient's documentation as one of the reasons for hospital admission were evaluated. ADRs leading to hospital admission were recorded in 47 (7.8%) patients. ADRs in 43 patients represented A-type ADRs which are preventable. The most frequent ADRs were cardiovascular disorders. According to the results of multivariate analysis ischemic heart disease (odds ratio (OR)=4.50; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.36-14.88), depression (OR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.08-5.77) and heart failure (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.13-3.81) were the most important patient-related characteristics predicting ADRs leading to hospitalization. The majority of ADRs in elderly patients could be avoided. Regular re-evaluation of the medication as well as taking into account the specific features of elderly patients represent the most important tools for ADR prevention. PMID:18313773

  4. Single and shared accommodation for young patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Helen

    2010-10-01

    This study explores the suitability of 100 per cent single room occupancy for children and young people admitted to hospital in terms of their safety, socialisation and development, and demands on the workforce. A literature search, a sabbatical at Boston Children's Hospital in the United States by the author and surveys of health professionals, children and young people have shown that shared rooms should remain available. PMID:21066944

  5. Hospitalization in older patients due to adverse drug reactions -the need for a prediction tool.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran Nair, Nibu; Chalmers, Leanne; Peterson, Gregory M; Bereznicki, Bonnie J; Castelino, Ronald L; Bereznicki, Luke R

    2016-01-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) represent a major burden on society, resulting in significant morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Older patients living in the community are particularly susceptible to ADRs, and are at an increased risk of ADR-related hospitalization. This review summarizes the available evidence on ADR-related hospital admission in older patients living in the community, with a particular focus on risk factors for ADRs leading to hospital admission and the need for a prediction tool for risk of ADR-related hospitalization in these individuals. The reported proportion of hospital admissions due to ADRs has ranged from 6% to 12% of all admissions in older patients. The main risk factors or predictors for ADR-related admissions were advanced age, polypharmacy, comorbidity, and potentially inappropriate medications. There is a clear need to design intervention strategies to prevent ADR-related hospitalization in older patients. To ensure the cost-effectiveness of such strategies, it would be necessary to target them to those older individuals who are at highest risk of ADR-related hospitalization. Currently, there are no validated tools to assess the risk of ADRs in primary care. There is a clear need to investigate the utility of tools to identify high-risk patients to target appropriate interventions toward prevention of ADR-related hospital admissions. PMID:27194906

  6. Effects of auditing patient safety in hospital care: design of a mixed-method evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Auditing of patient safety aims at early detection of risks of adverse events and is intended to encourage the continuous improvement of patient safety. The auditing should be an independent, objective assurance and consulting system. Auditing helps an organisation accomplish its objectives by bringing a systematic, disciplined approach to evaluating and improving the effectiveness of risk management, control, and governance. Audits are broadly conducted in hospitals, but little is known about their effects on the behaviour of healthcare professionals and patient safety outcomes. This study was initiated to evaluate the effects of patient safety auditing in hospital care and to explore the processes and mechanisms underlying these effects. Methods and design Our study aims to evaluate an audit system to monitor and improve patient safety in a hospital setting. We are using a mixed-method evaluation with a before-and-after study design in eight departments of one university hospital in the period October 2011–July 2014. We measure several outcomes 3 months before the audit and 15 months after the audit. The primary outcomes are adverse events and complications. The secondary outcomes are experiences of patients, the standardised mortality ratio, prolonged hospital stay, patient safety culture, and team climate. We use medical record reviews, questionnaires, hospital administrative data, and observations to assess the outcomes. A process evaluation will be used to find out which components of internal auditing determine the effects. Discussion We report a study protocol of an effect and process evaluation to determine whether auditing improves patient safety in hospital care. Because auditing is a complex intervention targeted on several levels, we are using a combination of methods to collect qualitative and quantitative data about patient safety at the patient, professional, and department levels. This study is relevant for hospitals that want to

  7. Medicaid patients at high risk for frequent hospital admission: real-time identification and remediable risks.

    PubMed

    Raven, Maria C; Billings, John C; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Manheimer, Eric D; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2009-03-01

    Patients with frequent hospitalizations generate a disproportionate share of hospital visits and costs. Accurate determination of patients who might benefit from interventions is challenging: most patients with frequent admissions in 1 year would not continue to have them in the next. Our objective was to employ a validated regression algorithm to case-find Medicaid patients at high-risk for hospitalization in the next 12 months and identify intervention-amenable characteristics to reduce hospitalization risk. We obtained encounter data for 36,457 Medicaid patients with any visit to an urban public hospital from 2001 to 2006 and generated an algorithm-based score for hospitalization risk in the subsequent 12 months for each patient (0 = lowest, 100 = highest). To determine medical and social contributors to the current admission, we conducted in-depth interviews with high-risk hospitalized patients (scores >50) and analyzed associated Medicaid claims data. An algorithm-based risk score >50 was attained in 2,618 (7.2%) patients. The algorithm's positive predictive value was equal to 0.67. During the study period, 139 high-risk patients were admitted: 60 met inclusion criteria and 50 were interviewed. Fifty-six percent cited the Emergency Department as their usual source of care or had none. Sixty-eight percent had >1 chronic medical conditions, and 42% were admitted for conditions related to substance use. Sixty percent were homeless or precariously housed. Mean Medicaid expenditures for the interviewed patients were $39,188 and $84,040 per patient for the years immediately prior to and following study participation, respectively. Findings including high rates of substance use, homelessness, social isolation, and lack of a medical home will inform the design of interventions to improve community-based care and reduce hospitalizations and associated costs. PMID:19082899

  8. External Evaluation of Four Hospitals According to Patient-centred Care Standards

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli, Nahid; Abbasi, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hospital accreditation is a multi-factorial issue. The aim of the current study was to accredit social security organization and university hospitals (that certificated by ISO 9001-2008) in Isfahan, the second largest city of Iran, based on Joint Commission International (JCI) accreditation standards. Methods: Accreditation of four hospitals was evaluated and compared in a cross-sectional study. Seven checklists were driven from patient-centered JCI accreditation standards to cover indices of access of patients to care and continuity of care (ACC), patients and families rights (PFR), patients and families education (PFE), assessment of patients (AOP), care of patients (COP), analgesic and surgical care (ASC), and medication management and use (MMU). They were filled out by seven inspectors. The findings were analyzed by SPSS 14 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Results: Beheshti and Zahra hospitals demonstrated the lowest and the highest mean levels preparation, respectively (60 vs. 68.5 percent, respectively). Also, Beheshti hospital revealed the lowest prepared levels in AOP, ASC, MMU and PFE among all evaluated hospitals; the corresponding mean amounts of preparation were 68, 82.5, 56 and 42 percent, respectively. Whereas Zahra hospital showed the highest prepared levels in AOP, COP, MMU and PFE among all evaluated hospitals; the mean amounts of preparation were 82, 61.5, 84 and 57 percent, respectively. No significant difference was found among the four hospitals in any of the seven indices. Discussion: The four evaluated hospitals were not fully prepared to present the best possible patient-centered care system. PMID:24167387

  9. High and varying prices for privately insured patients underscore hospital market power.

    PubMed

    White, Chapin; Bond, Amelia M; Reschovsky, James D

    2013-09-01

    Across 13 selected U.S. metropolitan areas, hospital prices for privately insured patients are much higher than Medicare payment rates and vary widely across and within markets, according to a study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) based on claims data for about 590,000 active and retired nonelderly autoworkers and their dependents. Across the 13 communities, aver­age hospital prices for privately insured patients are about one-and-a-half times Medicare rates for inpatient care and two times what Medicare pays for outpa­tient care. Within individual communities, prices vary widely, with the highest-priced hospital typically paid 60 percent more for inpatient services than the lowest-priced hospital. The price gap within markets is even greater for hospital outpatient care, with the highest-priced hospital typically paid nearly double the lowest-priced hospital. In contrast to the wide variation in hospital prices for pri­vately insured patients across and within markets, prices for primary care physi­cian services generally are close to Medicare rates and vary little within markets. Prices for specialist physician services, however, are higher relative to Medicare and vary more across and within markets. Of the 13 markets, five are in Michigan, which has an unusually concentrated private insurance market, with one insurer commanding a 70-percent market share. Despite the presence of a dominant insurer, almost all Michigan hospi­tals command prices that are higher than Medicare, and some hospitals com­mand prices that are twice what Medicare pays. In the eight markets outside of Michigan, private insurers generally pay even higher hospital prices, with even wider gaps between high- and low-priced hospitals. The variation in hospital and specialist physician prices within communities underscores that some hospitals and physicians have significant market power to command high prices, even in markets with a dominant insurer. PMID:24073466

  10. One-stop shop for care. Hospital ERs seeing increase in patients, capital.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth; Selvam, Ashok

    2013-05-27

    Hospital emergency room departments are increasingly becoming a portal for patients to get care quickly. And hospitals are responding by transforming their operations. When Dr. Rich Zane, left, arrived last year as chair of the University of Colorado Hospital's emergency medicine department, the Aurora facility's ER was operating under "a process that's predicated on 1960s medicine and we're practicing it in 2013," he says. PMID:23951587

  11. Hospital Patterns of Use of Positive Inotropic Agents in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Partovian, Chohreh; Gleim, Scott R.; Mody, Purav S.; Li, Shu-Xia; Wang, Haiyan; Strait, Kelly M.; Allen, Larry A.; Lagu, Tara C.; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine hospital variation in the use of positive inotropic agents in patients with heart failure. Background Clinical guidelines recommend targeted use of positive inotropic agents in highly selected patients, but data are limited and the recommendations are not specific. Methods We analyzed data from 376 hospitals including 189,948 hospitalizations for heart failure during 2009–10. We used hierarchical logistic regression models to estimate hospital-level risk-standardized rates of inotrope use and risk-standardized in-hospital mortality rates. Results The risk-standardized rates of inotrope use ranged across hospitals from 0.9% to 44.6% (median: 6.3%, inter-quartile range: 4.3% to 9.2%). We identified various hospital patterns based on the type of agents: dobutamine-predominant (29% of hospitals), dopamine-predominant (25%), milrinone-predominant (1%), mixed dobutamine/dopamine pattern (32%), and mixed pattern including all 3 agents (13%). When studying the factors associated with inter-hospital variation, the best model performance was with the HGLM models that adjusted for patient case mix and an individual hospital effect (ROCs from 0.77 to 0.88). The intra-class correlation coefficients of the HGLMs (0.113 for any inotrope) indicated that a noteworthy proportion of the observed variation was related to an “individual institutional effect.” Hospital rates or patterns of use were not associated with differences in length of stay or risk-standardized mortality rates. Conclusions We found marked differences in the use of inotropic agents for heart failure patients among a diverse group of hospitals. This variability, occurring in the context of little clinical evidence, indicates an urgent need to define the appropriate use of these medications. PMID:22981548

  12. Effectiveness of Remote Patient Monitoring After Discharge of Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure: The Better Effectiveness After Transition–Heart Failure (BEAT-HF) Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Michael K.; Romano, Patrick S.; Edgington, Sarah; Aronow, Harriet U.; Auerbach, Andrew D.; Black, Jeanne T.; De Marco, Teresa; Escarce, Jose J.; Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Hanna, Barbara; Ganiats, Theodore G.; Greenberg, Barry H.; Greenfield, Sheldon; Kaplan, Sherrie H.; Kimchi, Asher; Liu, Honghu; Lombardo, Dawn; Mangione, Carol M.; Sadeghi, Bahman; Sadeghi, Banafsheh; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Tong, Kathleen; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2016-01-01

    Importance It remains unclear whether telemonitoring approaches provide benefits for patients with heart failure (HF) after hospitalization. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a care transition intervention using remote patient monitoring in reducing 180-day all-cause readmissions among a broad population of older adults hospitalized with HF. Design, Setting, and Participants We randomized 1437 patients hospitalized for HF between October 12, 2011, and September 30, 2013, to the intervention arm (715 patients) or to the usual care arm (722 patients) of the Better Effectiveness After Transition–Heart Failure (BEAT-HF) study and observed them for 180 days. The dates of our study analysis were March 30, 2014, to October 1, 2015. The setting was 6 academic medical centers in California. Participants were hospitalized individuals 50 years or older who received active treatment for decompensated HF. Interventions The intervention combined health coaching telephone calls and telemonitoring. Telemonitoring used electronic equipment that collected daily information about blood pressure, heart rate, symptoms, and weight. Centralized registered nurses conducted telemonitoring reviews, protocolized actions, and telephone calls. Main outcomes and measures The primary outcome was readmission for any cause within 180 days after discharge. Secondary outcomes were all-cause readmission within 30 days, all-cause mortality at 30 and 180 days, and quality of life at 30 and 180 days. Results Among 1437 participants, the median age was 73 years. Overall, 46.2% (664 of 1437) were female, and 22.0% (316 of 1437) were African American. The intervention and usual care groups did not differ significantly in readmissions for any cause 180 days after discharge, which occurred in 50.8% (363 of 715) and 49.2% (355 of 722) of patients, respectively (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.88-1.20; P = .74). In secondary analyses, there were no significant differences in 30-day

  13. Income levels of bad-debt and free-care patients in Massachusetts hospitals.

    PubMed

    Weissman, J S; Dryfoos, P; London, K

    1999-01-01

    This study disputes the common notion that many hospitalized patients whose expenses are written off to bad debt are able to pay their bills. By matching 1996 state tax returns to more than 350,000 bad-debt and free-care claims at seven Massachusetts hospitals, we found that most patients involved had incomes below the federal poverty level and thus were presumably eligible for either public programs or hospital-based free care. This suggests that hospitals and public officials need to investigate further why low-income, uninsured patients are not receiving benefits for which they are eligible. Our results also suggest that measurements of indigent care levels in hospitals for purposes of research or regulation should include some portion of bad debt. PMID:10425853

  14. Hospital utilization patterns and costs for adult sickle cell patients in Illinois.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, K; Karrison, T; Koshy, M; Patel, A; Friedmann, P; Cassel, C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine population size, demographic characteristics, hospital utilization patterns, the specialties of physicians providing care, and costs for hospitalized adult sickle cell patients in Illinois. METHODS: A statewide, administrative dataset for the two-year period from january 1992 through December 1993 was analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: There were 8403 admissions among 1189 individual sickle cell patients for the two-year period. Eighty-five percent of patients resided in the Chicago metropolitan area. The median age of the 1189 patients was 29; two-thirds had Medicaid or Medicare coverage. Emergency departments were the primary source of admissions (85.7%). The most common admitting diagnosis was painful crisis (97.4%), and average length of stay was four days. The median number of admissions per patient was three; most patients (85%) used only one or two hospitals. A small group used more than four hospitals and accounted for 23% of statewide admissions. Primary care physicians cared for most patients, and total hospitalization charges were more than $59 million. CONCLUSIONS: In Illinois the adult sickle cell population is concentrated in major urban centers, primarily the Chicago metropolitan area. These patients accounted for approximately 8400 admissions and more than $59 million in hospital charges during the two-year study period. A small group of patients used multiple hospitals and accounted for more than 23% of total hospitalization charges. This study shows the necessity of and provides a useful framework for developing targeted programs for adult sickle cell patients as well as for training physicians to efficiently provide comprehensive health care services for this population. PMID:9018288

  15. What really matters? A multi-view perspective of one patient's hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kelly J; Duff, Jed; Walker, Kim

    2014-11-28

    Abstract Background: 'Patient experience' is both recognised and solicited as a means of assessing healthcare delivery and a method for gauging patient centredness. Research comparing healthcare recipient and provider perceptions regarding the same episode of care is lacking. Aim: To identify what mattered to a patient and family member (healthcare recipients) during the patient's hospital experience and to examine the healthcare provider's awareness of what mattered. Methods: A qualitative descriptive investigation was undertaken using semi-structured interviews designed to compare multiple perceptions of one patient's hospital experience. Interviews were undertaken with the patient, family member, and healthcare providers. A definition of hospital experience was sought from each participant. Additional phrases as presented by the patient and family member were coded and grouped into categories and then salient themes. Phrases as presented by the healthcare providers were coded, and then allocated to the previously identified themes. Findings: One patient, his wife and seven healthcare providers (doctors (2), registered nurses (4) and a patient care orderly (1)) were interviewed. Definitions of 'hospital experience' differ between participants. Recipients include pre and post hospital admission periods, whereas providers limit hospital experience to admission. Three salient themes emerged from recipient data suggesting; medication management, physical comfort and emotional security are what mattered to the recipients. Awareness was dependent upon theme and differed between the providers. Conclusion: Hospital experience as a term is poorly defined, and definitions differ between recipients and providers of care. Healthcare providers are not always aware of what matters to the patient and family during their hospital admission. PMID:25429826

  16. The delay to thrombolysis: an analysis of patient and hospital characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, J M; Diodati, J G; Bogaty, P; Théroux, P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the various components of the delay to thrombolytic treatment for patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) and to identify the hospital and patient characteristics related to these delays. DESIGN: Cohort analysis from a hospital registry of patients receiving thrombolytic treatment. SETTING: Forty acute care hospitals in Quebec. SUBJECTS: All 1357 patients who received thrombolysis between January 1995 and May 1996. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Time from onset of symptoms to arrival at hospital and the various components of the in-hospital delay. RESULTS: The median delay before presentation to hospital was 98 (interquartile range [IR] 56 to 180) minutes and was longer for women (p < 0.001), patients over 65 years of age (p < 0.001) and patients with diabetes mellitus (p < 0.01). The median time from arrival at hospital to thrombolysis was 59 (IR 41 to 89) minutes, the medical decision-making component taking a median of 12 (IR 4 to 27) minutes. Women (p < 0.005), older patients (p < 0.001) and patients with a past history of MI (p < 0.001) had increased in-hospital delays to thrombolysis. Delays were longer in community hospitals (p < 0.05) and low-volume centres (p < 0.01) and when a cardiologist made the decision to administer thrombolysis (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that increased age (odds ratio 1.5, 95% confidence interval 1.3 to 1.7, p < 0.001) and having the medical decision made by a cardiologist (odds ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.6 to 2.0, p < 0.001) were independently associated with an increased risk of being in the upper median of in-hospital delays. CONCLUSIONS: Despite certain improvements, there remain substantial delays between symptom onset and the administration of thrombolysis for patients with acute MI. A large part of the delay is due to the hesitation of patients (particularly women, older patients and patients with diabetes) to seek medical attention. Although the median time for medical decision

  17. Nutritional Status of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Admitted in Hospital With Acute Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Barkha; Kant, Surya; Mishra, Rachna; Verma, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are frequently hospitalized with an acute exacerbation. Patients with COPD often lose weight. Consequently, deterioration in nutritional status (loss of lean body mass) is a likely repercussion of acute exacerbation in hospitalized COPD patients. The study was carried out to assess the nutritional status of COPD patients with acute exacerbation, during the period of hospital admission, and to evaluate the relationships between the nutritional indices and the pulmonary function parameters. Methods A cross sectional observation study constituting 83 COPD patients consecutively hospitalized with acute exacerbation on accrual during a period of one year. Lung function was measured by routine spirometry. Nutritional status was assessed by the measurement of anthropometric parameters. Hospital outcome was also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0 Independent t-tests and Pearsons correlation coefficient was used. Results Mean body weight was 50.03 ± 9.23 kg. Subjects had approximately 5 kg weight loss in previous six months. All the subjects had low BMI (19.38 ± 3.10) and MUAC (21.18 ± 2.31) that was significantly below the predicted levels. The correlation between body weight and FEV1/FVC% was good (r = 0.648, p = 0.003). BMI was negatively correlated (r = - 0.0103, p= 0.03) with duration of hospital stay. Conclusions The high prevalence of malnutrition among hospitalized COPD patients with acute exacerbation is related to their lung function and hospital outcome such as duration of hospital stay. Keywords Nutritional status; COPD; Acute exacerbation; Hospitalization PMID:21811522

  18. Survival of 1476 patients initially resuscitated from out of hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed Central

    Cobbe, S. M.; Dalziel, K.; Ford, I.; Marsden, A. K.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the short and long term outcome of patients admitted to hospital after initially successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest out of hospital. DESIGN--Review of ambulance and hospital records. Follow up of mortality by "flagging" with the registrar general. Cox proportional hazards analysis of predictors of mortality in patients discharged alive from hospital. SETTING--Scottish Ambulance Service and acute hospitals throughout Scotland. SUBJECTS--1476 patients admitted to a hospital ward, of whom 680 (46%) were discharged alive. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Survival to hospital discharge, neurological status at discharge, time to death, and cause of death after discharge. RESULTS--The median duration of hospital stay was 10 days (interquartile range 8-15) in patients discharged alive and 1 (1-4) day in those dying in hospital. Neurological status at discharge in survivors was normal or mildly impaired in 605 (89%), moderately impaired in 58 (8.5%), and severely impaired in 13 (2%); one patient was comatose. Direct discharge to home occurred in 622 (91%) cases. The 680 discharged survivors were followed up for a median of 25 (range 0-68) months. There were 176 deaths, of which 81 were sudden cardiac deaths, 55 were non-sudden cardiac deaths, and 40 were due to other causes. The product limit estimate of 4 year survival after discharge was 68%. The independent predictors of mortality on follow up were increased age, treatment for heart failure, and cardiac arrest not due to definite myocardial infarction. CONCLUSION--About 40% of initial survivors of resuscitation out of hospital are discharged home without major neurological disability. Patients at high risk of subsequent cardiac death can be identified and may benefit from further cardiological evaluation. PMID:8664715

  19. Library Services to Hospital Patients and Handicapped Readers Section. Libraries Serving the General Public Division. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on library services to hospital personnel, hospital patients, and housebound or handicapped persons, which were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference, include: (1) "Education and Training for Health Care Librarianship," in which Antonia J. Bunch (United Kingdom) discusses the scope of and…

  20. HIV patients in the HCUP database: a study of hospital utilization and costs.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Fred J

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the utilization of hospital care by HIV patients in all hospitals in eight states (California, Colorado, Florida, Kansas, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina), and examines the cost of hospital care for HIV patients in six of these states (California, Colorado, Kansas, New Jersey, New York, and South Carolina). The eight states in the sample account for more than 52% of all persons living with AIDS in the United States; the six states account for 39%. The unit of observation in both studies is a hospital admission by a patient with HIV. Hospital data were obtained from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), State Inpatient Database (SID), which is maintained by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The HCUP contains hospital discharge data and is a federal/state/industry partnership to build a multistate health care data system. Using multivariate analytic techniques and data from 2000, results indicate that cost and length of a hospital stay vary significantly across states after accounting for a patient's gender, insurance type, race, age, and number of diagnoses, as well as the teaching status and ownership category of the hospital. PMID:15224963

  1. Identifying risk of hospital readmission among Medicare aged patients: an approach using routinely collected data.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Adria E; Enguídanos, Susan; Wilber, Kathleen H

    2012-01-01

    Readmission provisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of March 2010 have created urgent fiscal accountability requirements for hospitals, dependent upon a better understanding of their specific populations, along with development of mechanisms to easily identify these at-risk patients. Readmissions are disruptive and costly to both patients and the health care system. Effectively addressing hospital readmissions among Medicare aged patients offers promising targets for resources aimed at improved quality of care for older patients. Routinely collected data, accessible via electronic medical records, were examined using logistic models of sociodemographic, clinical, and utilization factors to identify predictors among patients who required rehospitalization within 30 days. Specific comorbidities and discharge care orders in this urban, nonprofit hospital had significantly greater odds of predicting a Medicare aged patient's risk of readmission within 30 days. PMID:22656916

  2. Condition concern: an innovative response system for enhancing hospitalized patient care and safety.

    PubMed

    Baird, Sylvia K; Turbin, Lynn Bobel

    2011-01-01

    Patient safety is rapidly becoming everyone's responsibility. Bedside clinicians, physicians, and ancillary and administrative staff are well aware of their roles in patient safety, but patients and their families are becoming increasingly knowledgeable about potential safety issues related to hospitalization. This article describes how a Midwestern regional health care system enhances safety for its hospitalized patients through a program called "Condition Concern," designed to provide patients and their families/friends with a quick, convenient method for reporting unattended care concerns. The program's structure is described along with postimplementation findings to date. PMID:21233769

  3. Analysis Treatment Guideline versus Clinical Practice Protocol in Patients Hospitalized due to Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Alessandra da Graça; Makdisse, Marcia; Katz, Marcelo; Santana, Thamires Campos; Yokota, Paula Kiyomi Onaga; Galvão, Tatiana de Fatima Gonçalves; Bacal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of guidelines for treatment of heart failure (HF), only a few studies have assessed how hospitals adhere to the recommended therapies. Objectives Compare the rates of adherence to the prescription of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ACEI/ARB) at hospital discharge, which is considered a quality indicator by the Joint Commission International, and to the prescription of beta-blockers at hospital discharge, which is recommended by national and international guidelines, in a hospital with a case management program to supervise the implementation of a clinical practice protocol (HCP) and another hospital that follows treatment guidelines (HCG). Methods Prospective observational study that evaluated patients consecutively admitted to both hospitals due to decompensated HF between August 1st, 2006, and December 31st, 2008. We used as comparing parameters the prescription rates of beta-blockers and ACEI/ARB at hospital discharge and in-hospital mortality. Results We analyzed 1,052 patients (30% female, mean age 70.6 ± 14.1 years), 381 (36%) of whom were seen at HCG and 781 (64%) at HCP. The prescription rates of beta-blockers at discharge at HCG and HCP were both 69% (p = 0.458), whereas those of ACEI/ARB were 83% and 86%, respectively (p = 0.162). In-hospital mortality rates were 16.5% at HCP and 27.8% at HCG (p < 0.001). Conclusion There was no difference in prescription rates of beta-blocker and ACEI/ARB at hospital discharge between the institutions, but HCP had lower in-hospital mortality. This difference in mortality may be attributed to different clinical characteristics of the patients in both hospitals. PMID:26815461

  4. Outcomes of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Maintenance Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Fahad; Adil, Malik M; Malik, Ahmed A; Schold, Jesse D; Holley, Jean L

    2015-12-01

    Outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in hospitalized patients with ESRD requiring maintenance dialysis are unknown. Outcomes of in-hospital CPR in these patients were compared with outcomes in the general population using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS; 2005-2011). The study population included all adults (≥ 18 years old) from the general population and those with a history of ESRD. Baseline characteristics, in-hospital complications, and discharge outcomes were compared between the two groups. The effects of in-hospital CPR on mortality, length of stay, hospitalization charges, and discharge destination were analyzed. Yearly national trends in survival, discharge to home, and length of stay were also examined using the Cochran-Armitage trend test. During the study period, 56,069 patients with ESRD underwent in-hospital CPR compared with 323,620 patients from the general population. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality rates were higher in patients with ESRD (73.9% versus 71.8%, P<0.001) on univariate analysis. After adjusting for age, gender, and potential confounders, patients with ESRD had higher odds of mortality (odds ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 1.3; P<0.001). Survival after CPR improved in the year 2011 compared with 2005 (31% versus 21%, P<0.001). Multivariate analysis also revealed that a greater proportion of patients with ESRD who survived were discharged to skilled nursing facilities. In conclusion, outcomes after in-hospital CPR are improving in patients with ESRD but remain worse than outcomes in the general population. Patients with ESRD who survive are more likely to be discharged to nursing homes. PMID:25908784

  5. The effective distribution system for the concentration of patients to extra-large hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Du Pyo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In Korean society, extra-large hospitals are congested with the majority of patients. Because of the congestions, the urgent patients need to wait anywhere from as short as a month to around three months. These concentrations of the patients on the extra-large hospitals causes not only the economic problem in terms of loss of opportunity cost and resources of other medium and large hospitals but also the fear and the consequential stress of the patients and the families of the patients who are waiting for the surgeries. The phenomenon of the concentrations derived due to the insufficient information to the medical consumers. If the information on medical treatment services such as surgery schedule is provided before the selection of hospital, we expect that the selection of hospital for the patients and their family will differ, resulting in redistribution of concentration phenomenon. In this paper, we propose and verify the effective distribution system for the concentration on the extra-large hospitals. Methods Web simulation survey was conducted. A total 100 respondents were divided into 4 groups of 25 respondents and the different information was provided to each group. Results Through multiple comparisons among groups, only group which was provided with both information about 'the difference of surgical results' and 'the waiting time for surgery', had difference in significance. Conclusion By providing two sets of information to patients, reckless selection of extra-large hospitals can be spread to more appropriate hospitals and therefore achieve effective distribution of the population concentration on extra-large hospital. PMID:22066063

  6. Implementation of an off-label recombinant factor VIIa protocol for patients with critical bleeding at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Bain, Jonathan; Lewis, Daniel; Bernard, Andrew; Hatton, Kevin; Reda, Hassan; Flynn, Jeremy

    2014-11-01

    To describe the development of a pharmacy driven off-label recombinant factor seven (rFVIIa) protocol by a multi-disciplinary team for critical bleeding. A multi-disciplinary team made up of members from several critical care and surgical departments within the hospital were formed and charged with developing a standardized approach to how rFVIIa would be used for critical bleeding in an academic medical center. Groups represented on the multi-disciplinary team included clinical pharmacy, emergency medicine, pulmonary, hematology, cardiothoracic surgery, trauma, neurosurgery, and vascular surgery physicians. A pharmacist driven off-label rFVIIa protocol was developed and implemented for the use in those patients with critical bleeding. The protocol was based on the available literature and local expert opinion. Through the use of this protocol a significantly smaller average dose of rFVIIa is now being used when compared to those patients treated prior to the new protocol (47.5 vs. 62.2 mcg/kg, p = 0.036) while all-cause mortality was not significantly altered (35 vs. 48.8%, p = 0.057). An effective and safe pharmacy driven protocol was implemented by a multi-disciplinary team for rFVIIa as seen by providing a significantly lower average dose of rFVIIa while not sacrificing for overall patient mortality. PMID:24980752

  7. Understanding patient-to-worker violence in hospitals: a qualitative analysis of documented incident reports

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Hamblin, Lydia; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Upfal, Mark J.; Ager, Joel; Luborsky, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Aim To explore catalysts to, and circumstances surrounding, patient-to-worker violent incidents recorded by employees in a hospital system database. Background Violence by patients towards healthcare workers (Type II workplace violence) is a significant occupational hazard in hospitals worldwide. Studies to date have failed to investigate its root causes due to a lack of empirical research based on documented episodes of patient violence. Design Qualitative content analysis. Methods Content analysis was conducted on the total sample of 214 Type II incidents documented in 2011 by employees of an American hospital system with a centralized reporting system. Findings The majority of incidents were reported by nurses (39·8%), security staff (15·9%) and nurse assistants (14·4%). Three distinct themes were identified from the analysis: Patient Behaviour, Patient Care and Situational Events. Specific causes of violence related to Patient Behaviour were cognitive impairment and demanding to leave. Catalysts related to patient care were the use of needles, patient pain/discomfort and physical transfers of patients. Situational factors included the use/presence of restraints; transitions in the care process; intervening to protect patients and/or staff; and redirecting patients. Conclusions Identifying catalysts and situations involved in patient violence in hospitals informs administrators about potential targets for intervention. Hospital staff can be trained to recognize these specific risk factors for patient violence and can be educated in how to best mitigate or prevent the most common forms of violent behaviour. A social–ecological model can be adapted to the hospital setting as a framework for prevention of patient violence towards staff. PMID:25091833

  8. Revolving-door patients in a public psychiatric hospital in Israel: cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Oyffe, Igor; Kurs, Rena; Gelkopf, Marc; Melamed, Yuval; Bleich, Avi

    2009-12-01

    AIM. To study social, demographic, clinical, and forensic profiles of frequently re-hospitalized (revolving-door) psychiatric patients. METHODS. The study included all patients (n=183) who were admitted to our hospital 3 or more times during a 2-year period from 1999 through 2000. We compared these patients to 2 control groups of patients who were admitted to our hospital in the same period. For comparison of forensic data, we compared them with all non revolving-door patients (n=1056) registered in the computerized hospital database and for comparison of medical and clinical data we compared them with a random sample of non revolving-door patients (n=98). The sample was sufficiently large to yield high statistical power (above 98%). We collected data on the legal status of the hospitalizations (voluntary or involuntary) and social, demographic, clinical, and forensic information from the forensic and medical records of revolving-door and non revolving-door patients. RESULTS. In the period 1999-2000, 183 revolving-door patients accounted for 771 (37.8%, 4.2 admissions per patient) and 1056 non revolving-door patients accounted for 1264 (62.5%, 1.2 admissions per patient) of the 2035 admissions to our hospital. Involuntary hospitalizations accounted for 23.9% of revolving-door and 76.0% of non revolving-door admissions. Revolving-door patients had significantly shorter mean interval between hospitalizations, showed less violence, and were usually discharged contrary to medical advice. We found no differences in sex, marital status, age, ethnicity, diagnoses, illegal drug and alcohol use, or previous suicide-attempts between the groups. CONCLUSIONS. Revolving-door patients are not necessarily hospitalized for longer time periods and do not have more involuntarily admissions. The main difference between revolving-door and non revolving-door patients is greater self-management of the hospitalization process by shortening the time between voluntary re-admission and

  9. Surgonomics as a health care financing policy for hospitalized surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, E; Goldstein, J; Benacquista, T; Mulloy, K; Wise, L

    1989-05-01

    The Medicare system of prospective payment to hospitals based on diagnostic related groups (DRG) has been severely criticized at a number of levels. Many states are using DRG prospective "All Payor Systems" for reimbursement to hospitals with the federal DRG system as a model. In All Payor Systems, Medicare, Medicaid, Blue Cross and other commercial insurers pay by the DRG mode; the state of New York has been All Payor since 1 January 1988. This study simulated DRG All Payor methods on a large sample (N = 17,560) of surgical patients for a two year period, using both federal and New York DRG reimbursement methods currently in effect. Both Medicare and Medicaid patients had, on average, a longer length of stay in the hospital and higher total cost of hospitalization compared with patients from Blue Cross and other commercial payors. Medicare and Medicaid patients also had a greater severity of illness compared with patients from Blue Cross or other payors. All except commercial insurors (that is, Medicaid, Blue Cross and Medicare) had greater financial risk under the DRG All Payor scheme. Results from our study suggest that federal, state and private payors may not be adequately reimbursing health care providers for the care of the hospitalized surgical patient under the DRG prospective scheme of hospital payment. It appears that the financing policy for health care, especially at the federal and state level, could limit both the access and quality of care for surgical patients. PMID:2496483

  10. Hospitalization of patients with anorexia nervosa: a therapeutic proposal.

    PubMed

    Matusevich, D; García, A; Gutt, S; de la Parra, I; Finkelsztein, C

    2002-09-01

    Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that primarily affects young women and has a high morbidity and mortality rate. Hospitalization effectively overcomes the acute phase, prevents progression to chronicity and promotes lasting changes. Our aim is to establish a prior therapeutic contract and systematize hospitalization in three stages comprising: clinical and nutritional approaches, individual and group psychotherapy, family therapy, occupational therapy, body therapy and pharmacotherapy. Because of the multiple determination of anorexia nervosa and the risk involved, treatment must be carried out by a multidisciplinary team. PMID:12452251

  11. Increased HIV testing among hospitalized patients who declined testing in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Felsen, Uriel R; Cunningham, Chinazo O; Zingman, Barry S

    2016-05-01

    Health-care systems have serial encounters with many of the same patients across care settings; however, few studies have examined the role of reoffering HIV testing after a patient declines. We assessed whether an intervention to increase HIV testing among hospitalized patients was associated with increased testing among those who declined a test while in the Emergency Department (ED). We studied 8-week periods pre- and post-implementation of an electronic medical record (EMR)-based intervention to increase HIV testing among hospitalized patients. We included all patients 21-64 years old who had no prior HIV test, declined HIV testing in the ED, and were subsequently hospitalized. We used logistic regression to test for an association between time of hospital admission (pre- vs. post-intervention) and whether an HIV test was performed prior to discharge. Pre- and post-implementation, 220 and 218 patients who declined HIV testing in the ED were hospitalized, respectively. There were no significant demographic or clinical differences among patients pre- and post-implementation. Pre- and post-implementation, the median proportion of patients tested weekly was 6.7% (IQR 6.5%, 10.0%) and 41.4% (IQR 33.3%, 41.9%), respectively (aOR 6.2: 95%CI: 3.6, 10.6). HIV testing increased among hospitalized patients who declined a test in the ED after implementation of an EMR-based intervention. Almost half of the patients who declined testing in the ED ultimately underwent testing after it was reoffered during hospitalization, suggesting that the decision to undergo HIV testing is a dynamic process. Leveraging EMR resources may be an effective tool for expanding HIV testing, and testing should be reoffered to patients who previously declined. PMID:26654431

  12. Pre- and inter-hospital transport of severely head-injured patients in rural Northern Norway.

    PubMed

    Sollid, Snorre; Munch-Ellingsen, Jens; Gilbert, Mads; Ingebrigtsen, Tor

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the time consumed during the pre- and inter-hospital transport of severely head injured patients in Northern Norway. All patients (n = 85) operated for an intracranial mass lesions within 48 h after injury during the 10-year period 1986-1995 were included in this retrospective analysis. Ambulance records, transfer notes, and hospital records were reviewed. The transport of patients was classified as either direct from the trauma scene to the University Hospital (direct admission group) or as an inter-hospital transfer (transfer group). Forty-seven (55%) patients were in the direct admission group, and 38 (45%) were transferred through another hospital. The majority of patients (81%) were transported by air ambulance. Median time from injury to arrival in the emergency room was 5 (1-44) h. Time necessary for transport was significantly (p < 0.001) shorter in the direct admission group (median 3 h) compared to the transfer group (median 8 h). The inter-hospital transfer time was < or = 3 h in 17%. Clearly, the advanced air ambulance service in Northern Norway makes rapid inter-hospital transfer possible despite extremely long geographical distances. Our findings indicate that this possibility is not always utilized. PMID:12820685

  13. Patient satisfaction questionnaire and quality achievement in hospital care: the case of a Greek public university hospital.

    PubMed

    Matis, Georgios K; Birbilis, Theodossios A; Chrysou, Olga I

    2009-11-01

    The scope of this research has been to investigate the satisfaction of Greek patients hospitalized in a tertiary care university public hospital in Alexandroupolis, Greece, in order to improve medical, nursing and organizational/administrative services. It is a cross-sectional study involving 200 patients hospitalized for at least 24 h. We administered a satisfaction questionnaire previously approved by the Greek Health Ministry. Four aspects of satisfaction were employed (medical, hotel facilities/organizational, nursing, global). Using principal component analysis, summated scales were formed and tested for internal consistency with the aid of Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The non-parametric Spearman rank correlation coefficient was also used. The results reveal a relatively high degree of global satisfaction (75.125%), yet satisfaction is higher for the medical (89.721%) and nursing (86.432%) services. Moreover, satisfaction derived from the hotel facilities and the general organization was found to be more limited (76.536%). Statistically significant differences in participant satisfaction were observed (depending on age, gender, citizenship, education, number of previous admissions and self-assessment of health status at the first and last day of patients' stay) for the medical, nursing and hotel facilities/organizational dimension, but not for global satisfaction. The present study confirms the results of previously published Greek surveys. PMID:19875841

  14. Graphical electrocardiogram waveforms as part of an integrated hospital system's patient record.

    PubMed Central

    Enison, E. J.; Dayhoff, R.; Fletcher, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has an ongoing project to integrate diagnostic images into its existing text-based hospital information system. High-quality images from cardiology, pulmonary medicine, gastroenterology, endoscopy, pathology, radiology, hematology and nuclear medicine can be displayed for clinicians quickly and conveniently on workstations throughout the hospital. As a part of this endeavor, diagnostic-quality computer generated 12-lead electrocardiograms, including both median and rhythm data, can be viewed as a part of the on-line patient record of an integrated hospital information system. Now computer generated graphics can be included in the longitudinal patient record. Incorporating generated graphics and images into a text based patient record is another step towards the next generation of integrated hospital information system with multimedia patient records. PMID:8130498

  15. Costs and outcomes associated with hospitalized cancer patients with neutropenic complications: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    SCHILLING, M. BLANE; PARKS, CONNIE; DEETER, ROBERT G.

    2011-01-01

    The average total hospitalization costs for adult cancer patients with neutropenic complications were quantified and the average length of hospital stay (LOS), all-cause mortality during hospitalization and reimbursement rates were determined. This observational retrospective cohort study identified adult patients with cancer who were hospitalized from January 2005 through June 2008 using a large private US health care database (>342 inpatient facilities). ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes identified patients by cancer type and who had neutropenic complications. The utilization and accounting systems of the hospitals were used to calculate mean (±95% confidence interval) hospitalization costs and LOS and percent all-cause mortality and reimbursement. Costs were adjusted to 2009 US dollars. There were 3,814 patients who had cancer and neutropenia, 1,809 (47.4%) also had an infection or fever and 1,188 (31.1%) had infection. Mean hospitalization costs were $18,042 (95% CI 16,997–19,087) for patients with neutropenia, $22,839 (95% CI 21,006–24,672) for patients with neutropenia plus infection or fever and $27,587 (95% CI 24,927–30,247) for patients with neutropenia plus infection. Mean LOS were 9 days (95% CI 8.7–9.3), 10.7 days (95% CI 10.2–11.2) and 12.6 days (95% CI 11.9–13.3), respectively. Mortality followed a similar trend; 8.3, 13.7 and 19.4%, respectively. By cancer type, hematologic malignancies had the highest average hospitalization costs and longest mean LOS of $52,579 (95% CI 42,183–62,975) and 20.3 days (95% CI 17.4–23.2), and a high mortality rate of 20.0%, while primary breast cancer patients had the lowest cost of $8,413 (95% CI 6,103–10,723), shortest LOS of 5.5 days (95% CI 4.2–6.8) and lowest mortality (0%). Mean reimbursement rates were 100.0, 101.5 and 95.4% for patients with neutropenia, neutropenia plus infection or fever and neutropenia plus infection, respectively. Hospitalized cancer patients with neutropenic complications had a

  16. Assaultive Behavior in State Psychiatric Hospitals: Differences Between Forensic and Nonforensic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhorst, Donald M.; Scott, Lisa Parker

    2004-01-01

    Forensic patients are occupying an increasingly large number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals. The presence of these mentally ill offenders has raised concerns about the risk they present to nonforensic patients. This study compared the rate of assaults and factors associated with assaultive behavior among 308 nonforensic patients and two…

  17. Site selection in global clinical trials in patients hospitalized for heart failure: perceived problems and potential solutions.

    PubMed

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greene, Stephen J; Mentz, Robert J; Adams, Kirkwood F; Anker, Stefan D; Arnold, Malcolm; Baschiera, Fabio; Cleland, John G F; Cotter, Gadi; Fonarow, Gregg C; Giordano, Christopher; Metra, Marco; Misselwitz, Frank; Mühlhofer, Eva; Nodari, Savina; Frank Peacock, W; Pieske, Burkert M; Sabbah, Hani N; Sato, Naoki; Shah, Monica R; Stockbridge, Norman L; Teerlink, John R; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Zalewski, Andrew; Zannad, Faiez; Butler, Javed

    2014-03-01

    There are over 1 million hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) annually in the United States alone, and a similar number has been reported in Europe. Recent clinical trials investigating novel therapies in patients with hospitalized HF (HHF) have been negative, and the post-discharge event rate remains unacceptably high. The lack of success with HHF trials stem from problems with understanding the study drug, matching the drug to the appropriate HF subgroup, and study execution. Related to the concept of study execution is the importance of including appropriate study sites in HHF trials. Often overlooked issues include consideration of the geographic region and the number of patients enrolled at each study center. Marked differences in baseline patient co-morbidities, serum biomarkers, treatment utilization and outcomes have been demonstrated across geographic regions. Furthermore, patients from sites with low recruitment may have worse outcomes compared to sites with higher enrollment patterns. Consequently, sites with poor trial enrollment may influence key patient end points and likely do not justify the costs of site training and maintenance. Accordingly, there is an unmet need to develop strategies to identify the right study sites that have acceptable patient quantity and quality. Potential approaches include, but are not limited to, establishing a pre-trial registry, developing site performance metrics, identifying a local regionally involved leader and bolstering recruitment incentives. This manuscript summarizes the roundtable discussion hosted by the Food and Drug Administration between members of academia, the National Institutes of Health, industry partners, contract research organizations and academic research organizations on the importance of selecting optimal sites for successful trials in HHF. PMID:23099992

  18. Site selection in global clinical trials in patients hospitalized for heart failure: perceived problems and potential solutions

    PubMed Central

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greene, Stephen J.; Mentz, Robert J.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Anker, Stefan D.; Arnold, Malcolm; Baschiera, Fabio; Cleland, John G. F.; Cotter, Gadi; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Giordano, Christopher; Metra, Marco; Misselwitz, Frank; Mühlhofer, Eva; Nodari, Savina; Peacock, W. Frank; Pieske, Burkert M.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Sato, Naoki; Shah, Monica R.; Stockbridge, Norman L.; Teerlink, John R.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Zalewski, Andrew; Zannad, Faiez; Butler, Javed

    2014-01-01

    There are over 1 million hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) annually in the United States alone, and a similar number has been reported in Europe. Recent clinical trials investigating novel therapies in patients with hospitalized HF (HHF) have been negative, and the post-discharge event rate remains unacceptably high. The lack of success with HHF trials stem from problems with understanding the study drug, matching the drug to the appropriate HF subgroup, and study execution. Related to the concept of study execution is the importance of including appropriate study sites in HHF trials. Often overlooked issues include consideration of the geographic region and the number of patients enrolled at each study center. Marked differences in baseline patient co-morbidities, serum biomarkers, treatment utilization and outcomes have been demonstrated across geographic regions. Furthermore, patients from sites with low recruitment may have worse outcomes compared to sites with higher enrollment patterns. Consequently, sites with poor trial enrollment may influence key patient end points and likely do not justify the costs of site training and maintenance. Accordingly, there is an unmet need to develop strategies to identify the right study sites that have acceptable patient quantity and quality. Potential approaches include, but are not limited to, establishing a pre-trial registry, developing site performance metrics, identifying a local regionally involved leader and bolstering recruitment incentives. This manuscript summarizes the roundtable discussion hosted by the Food and Drug Administration between members of academia, the National Institutes of Health, industry partners, contract research organizations and academic research organizations on the importance of selecting optimal sites for successful trials in HHF. PMID:23099992

  19. Association Between Opioid Abuse/Dependence and Outcomes in Hospitalized Heart Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tanush; Mujib, Marjan; Agarwal, Pallak; Prakash, Priya; Garg, Anjali; Sharma, Nisha; Aronow, Wilbert S; Nabors, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Opioid use is associated with unintentional and intentional overdose and is one of the leading causes of emergency room visits and accidental deaths. However, the association between opioid abuse/dependence and outcomes in hospitalized patients has not been well studied. Congestive heart failure (HF) is the fourth most common cause of hospitalization in the United States. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of opioid abuse/dependence on outcomes in patients hospitalized with HF. We queried the 2002-2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases to identify all patients aged 18 years and older admitted with the primary diagnosis of HF. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to compare the frequency of hospital-acquired conditions (HACs) and in-hospital mortality between patients with and without a history of opioid abuse/dependence. Of 9,993,240 patients with HF, 29,014 had a history of opioid abuse or dependence. Opioid abusers/dependents were likely to be younger men of poor socioeconomic background with self pay or Medicaid as their primary payer. They had a lower prevalence of dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, prior myocardial infarction, and peripheral vascular disease (P < 0.001 for all). They were more likely to be smokers and have chronic pulmonary disease, depression, liver disease, and obesity (P < 0.001 for all). Patients with a history of opioid abuse/dependence had lower incidence of HACs (14.8% vs. 16.5%, adjusted odds ratio: 0.71, P < 0.001) and lower in-hospital mortality (1.3% vs. 3.6%, adjusted odds ratio: 0.64, P < 0.001) as compared with patients without prior opioid abuse/dependence. In conclusion, among adult patients aged 18 years and older hospitalized with HF, opioid abuse/dependence was associated with lower frequency of HACs and lower in-hospital mortality. PMID:25611362

  20. Increased hospitalizations and death in patients with ESRD secondary to lupus

    PubMed Central

    Sule, S; Fivush, B; Neu, A; Furth, S

    2016-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that can affect almost any organ system, including the kidneys. Using a large national dataset, our goal was to compare the morbidity as measured by hospitalization and mortality rates between hemodialysis patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to SLE to those with ESRD due to other causes. Methods The risk of hospitalization was calculated by Poisson regression with clustering for repeated measures using the United States Renal Data System (USRDS) Hospitalization Analytic File in strata of pediatric and adult patients. Cox proportional hazard ratio was used to assess the mortality risk in hospitalized patients. Subjects were censored at transplantation or end of follow-up. Results Adult patients with ESRD secondary to SLE were hospitalized more frequently than other adults (incidence rate ratio (IRR): 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.15–1.77) and had a higher risk of death (hazard ratio (HR): 1.89, 95% CI: 1.66–2.5). Mortality was higher in hospitalized pediatric patients with SLE compared to pediatric patients with other causes of ESRD (HR: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.75–2.31) and adults with SLE (HR: 2.05, 95% CI: 1.79–2.34). Conclusion Our study demonstrates that there is a trend toward increased hospitalization rates in pediatric and adult patients with SLE. Among these hospitalized patients with SLE, there is an increased risk of death due to cardiovascular disease. PMID:22736748

  1. Improving the Advance Directive Request and Retrieval Process in Critical Access Hospitals: Honoring the Patient's Wishes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Faith M; Sabin, Tawnie L; Torma, Linda M

    2016-01-01

    The Patient Self-Determination Act was created to enhance awareness and use of advance directives. Several states also have created registries where the advance directives can be easily retrieved when needed. Quick retrieval is especially important in critical access hospitals where patients are often transferred to other facilities. This article describes an innovative project designed to improve the advance directives request and retrieval process on admission to a critical access hospital. PMID:26681498

  2. Introducing Physical Education to Hospital Learning--Can Patients Participate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Issaka, Ayuba; Hopkins, Liza

    2015-01-01

    Children and young people with chronic health conditions are at greater risk of school absence and poorer educational achievement than their healthy peers. A range of strategies are implemented in home, school and hospital settings to improve the connection of these children and young people to their educational pathways, yet gaps in provision…

  3. Good's Syndrome Patients Hospitalized for Infections: A Single-Center Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuefeng; Shi, Juhong; Wang, Mengzhao; Xu, Kaifeng; Xiao, Yi

    2015-11-01

    Good's syndrome (GS) is a rare combination of thymoma and hypogammaglobulinemia, resulting in immunodeficiency. Patients with GS are highly susceptible to bacterial infection, particularly encapsulated bacterial infection in upper and lower respiratory tracts. Good's syndrome patients with moderate-to- severe infection are often hospitalized. Clinical features of GS patients remain to be characterized.Patients with the discharge diagnosis of GS and simultaneous infection from Peking Union Medical College Hospital between January 2001 and July 2015 were retrospectively analyzed.Among 14 hospitalized GS patients, 12 of them were admitted for severe infections. Mean patient age was 56.7 + 10.1 years. Average concentrations of serum IgG, IgA, and IgM were 2.3 + 1.9 g/L, 0.28 + 0.28 g/L, and 0.06 + 0.07 g/L, respectively. Respiratory and intestinal tracts were the most common sites for infection, which occurred in 7 and 4 patients, respectively. Pathogens identified in 10 patients included cytomegalovirus in 5 patients, Pneumocystis jirovecii, Clostridium difficile in 2 patients, Klebsiella pneumonia in 2 patients, and Streptococcus pneumonia and Hemophilus influenza in 1 patient. Ten patients were treated with antibiotics and immunoglobulin replacement. Only 1 patient who was on immunosuppressant therapy died from P. jirovecii pneumonia.Infection was the most frequent cause for hospitalization of GS patients. Both respiratory and intestinal tracts were the most common sites of infection. Cytomegalovirus and P. jirovecii represented 2 common opportunistic pathogens isolated from hospitalized GS patients with infections. PMID:26632723

  4. Rehospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits after Hospital Discharge in Patients Receiving Maintenance Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Harel, Ziv; Wald, Ron; McArthur, Eric; Chertow, Glenn M; Harel, Shai; Gruneir, Andrea; Fischer, Hadas D; Garg, Amit X; Perl, Jeffrey; Nash, Danielle M; Silver, Samuel; Bell, Chaim M

    2015-12-01

    Clinical outcomes after a hospital discharge are poorly defined for patients receiving maintenance in-center (outpatient) hemodialysis. To describe the proportion and characteristics of these patients who are rehospitalized, visit an emergency department, or die within 30 days after discharge from an acute hospitalization, we conducted a population-based study of all adult patients receiving maintenance in-center hemodialysis who were discharged between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2011, from 157 acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. For patients with more than one hospitalization, we randomly selected a single hospitalization as the index hospitalization. Of the 11,177 patients included in the final cohort, 1926 (17%) were rehospitalized, 2971 (27%) were treated in the emergency department, and 840 (7.5%) died within 30 days of discharge. Complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus were the most common reason for rehospitalization, whereas heart failure was the most common reason for an emergency department visit. In multivariable analysis using a cause-specific Cox proportional hazards model, the following characteristics were associated with 30-day rehospitalization: older age, the number of hospital admissions in the preceding 6 months, the number of emergency department visits in the preceding 6 months, higher Charlson comorbidity index score, and the receipt of mechanical ventilation during the index hospitalization. Thus, a large proportion of patients receiving maintenance in-center hemodialysis will be readmitted or visit an emergency room within 30 days of an acute hospitalization. A focus on improving care transitions from the inpatient setting to the outpatient dialysis unit may improve outcomes and reduce healthcare costs. PMID:25855772

  5. Identifying Patients in the Acute Psychiatric Hospital Who May Benefit From a Palliative Care Approach.

    PubMed

    Burton, M Caroline; Warren, Mark; Cha, Stephen S; Stevens, Maria; Blommer, Megan; Kung, Simon; Lapid, Maria I

    2016-04-01

    Identifying patients who will benefit from a palliative care approach is the first critical step in integrating palliative with curative therapy. Criteria are established that identify hospitalized medical patients who are near end of life, yet there are no criteria with respect to hospitalized patients with psychiatric disorders. The records of 276 consecutive patients admitted to a dedicated inpatient psychiatric unit were reviewed to identify prognostic criteria predictive of mortality. Mortality predictors were 2 or more admissions in the past year (P = .0114) and older age (P = .0006). Twenty-two percent of patients met National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization noncancer criteria for dementia. Palliative care intervention should be considered when treating inpatients with psychiatric disorders, especially older patients who have a previous hospitalization or history of dementia. PMID:25318929

  6. Clinical assessment of the oral cavity of patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit of an emergency hospital

    PubMed Central

    da Cruz, Maristela Kapitski; de Morais, Teresa Márcia Nascimento; Trevisani, Deny Munari

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the oral health status of patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit. Methods Clinical assessment of the oral cavity was performed in 35 patients at two time-points (up to 48 hours after admission and 72 hours after the first assessment) and recorded in data collection forms. The following data were collected: plaque index, condition of the mucosa, presence or absence of dental prosthesis, number of teeth present, and tongue coating index. Results The prevalence of nosocomial infection was 22% (eight patients), with 50% respiratory tract infections. All patients exhibited oral biofilm, and 20 (57%) showed biofilm visible to the naked eye; tongue coating was present on more than two thirds of the tongue in 24 patients (69%) and was thick in most cases. A significant increase in plaque index (p=0.007) occurred after 72 hours, although the tongue coating index was p<0.001 regarding the area and p=0.5 regarding the thickness. Conclusion The plaque and tongue coating indices increased with the length of hospital stay at the intensive care unit. PMID:25607267

  7. Reduction of assaultive behavior following anger treatment of forensic hospital patients with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Novaco, Raymond W; Taylor, John L

    2015-02-01

    Anger is related to violence prior to hospitalization, during hospitalization, and after discharge. Meta-analyses have established treatment efficacy in reducing anger, but few studies have addressed whether reduced anger leads to lowered aggressive behavior. This study concerns individually-delivered anger treatment, specialized for offenders with intellectual disabilities, delivered twice weekly for 18 sessions to 50 forensic hospital patients. Assessments involved patient self-report of anger, staff ratings of anger and aggression, and case records of assaultive incidents. Physical assault data were obtained from records 12 months pre-treatment and 12 months post-treatment. Significant reductions in assaults following treatment were found by GEE analyses, controlling for age, gender, length of stay, IQ, and pre-hospital violence. Following treatment, physical attacks reduced by more than half, dropping from approximately 3.5 attacks per patient 6 months prior to treatment, versus approximately 1 attack per patient in the 6-12 month interval post-treatment. In hierarchical regressions, controlling for IQ, reduction in physical assaults was associated with pre-to post-treatment change in anger level. These findings buttress the efficacy of anger treatment for patients having histories of violence and have significance for patient mental health, hospital staff well-being, therapeutic milieu, hospital management, and service delivery costs. PMID:25569340

  8. Incidence of Potential Drug-Drug Interaction and Related Factors in Hospitalized Neurological Patients in two Iranian Teaching Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Namazi, Soha; Pourhatami, Shiva; Borhani-Haghighi, Afshin; Roosta, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Reciprocal drug interactions are among the most common causes of adverse drug reactions. We investigated the incidence and related risk factors associated with mutual drug interactions in relation to prescriptions written in the neurology wards of two major teaching hospitals in Shiraz, southern Iran. Methods: Data was collected from hand-written prescriptions on a daily basis. Mutual drug interactions were identified using Lexi-Comp 2012 version 1.9.1. Type D and X drug interactions were considered as potential drug-drug interactions. The potential risk factors associated with drug-drug interactions included the patient’s age and gender, number of medications and orders, length of hospitalization and the type of neurological disorder. To determine potential drug-drug interactions, relevant interventions were suggested to the physicians or nurses and the outcome of the interventions were documented. Results: The study comprised 589 patients, of which 53% were males and 47% females, with a mean age of 56.65±18.19 SD years. A total of 4942 drug orders and 3784 medications were prescribed among which 4539 drug-drug interactions were detected, including 4118 type C, 403 type D, and 18 type X. Using a logistic regression model, the number of medications, length of hospitalization and non-vascular type of the neurological disorder were found to be significantly associated with potential drug-drug interactions. From the total interventions, 74.24% were accepted by physicians and nurses. Conclusion: Potentially hazardous reciprocal drug interactions are common among patients in neurology wards. Clinical pharmacists can play a critical role in the prevention of drug-drug interactions in hospitalized patients. PMID:25429173

  9. Compliance and Effectiveness of Smoking Cessation Program Started on Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Gun Hee; Yi, Sung Won; Park, Eal Whan; Choi, Eun Young

    2016-01-01

    Background Varenicline is now very useful medication for cessation; however, there is only little result of researches with varenicline for cessation of hospitalized patients. This research attempted to analyze the cessation effect of medication and compliance of hospitalized patients. Methods This research included data for 52 patients who were prescribed varenicline among 280 patients who were consulted for cessation during their admission period. This research checked whether smoking was stopped or not after six months and analyzed their compliance, the factors for succeeding in smoking cessation. Results One hundred and ninety hospitalized patients participated in smoking cessation counseling among 280 patients who included consultation from their admission departments. And varenicline was prescribed for only 80 patients after counseling. Nineteen smokers were successful in smoking cessation among 52 final participants representing the rating of success of 36.5%. The linkage between compliance of varenicline and rate of smoking successful has no statistical significance. The factors for succeeding in smoking of hospitalized patients are admission departments, diseases, and economic states. Conclusion Smoking cessation program has low inpatient compliance. Cooperation of each departments is very important for better compliance. Success rate of cessation was relatively high (36.5%). Cessation attempt during hospitalization is very effective strategy. PMID:27274385

  10. Organizational Effects on Patient Satisfaction in Hospital Medical-Surgical Units

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Cynthia Thornton; Mark, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between hospital context, nursing unit structure, and patient characteristics and patients’ satisfaction with nursing care in hospitals. Background Although patient satisfaction has been widely researched, our understanding of the relationship between hospital context and nursing unit structure and their impact on patient satisfaction is limited. Methods The data source for this study was the Outcomes Research in Nursing Administration Project, a multi-site organizational study to investigate relationships among nurse staffing, organizational context and structure and patient outcomes. The sample for this study was 2720 patients and 3718 RNs in 286 medical-surgical units in 146 hospitals. Results Greater availability of nursing unit support services and higher levels of work engagement were associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction. Older age, better health status and better symptom management were also associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction. Conclusions Organizational factors in hospitals and nursing units, particularly support services on the nursing unit and mechanisms that foster nurses’ work engagement and effective symptom management, are important influences on patient satisfaction. PMID:19423987

  11. Predictive Factors for Hospitalization of Patients with Heat Illness in Yamaguchi, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Todani, Masaki; Oda, Yasutaka; Kaneko, Tadashi; Kaneda, Kotaro; Fujita, Motoki; Miyauchi, Takashi; Tsuruta, Ryosuke

    2015-09-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the predictive factors for the hospitalization of patients who presented with mild to moderate heat illness at an emergency department. We conducted a retrospective survey of hospitals with an emergency department in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. The survey questionnaire entries included patient age, sex, use of an ambulance, vital signs, blood examination conducted at the emergency department, the length of hospitalization, and outcome. We analyzed the predictive factors for hospitalization in patients with heat illness. A total of 127 patients were analyzed. Of these, 49 (37%) were admitted, with 59% discharged on the day following admission. In univariate analysis, the following inpatient characteristics were predictive for hospitalization: old age, low Glasgow Coma Scale score, elevated body temperature, increased serum C-reactive protein, and increased blood urea nitrogen. In logistic regression multivariate analysis, the following were predictive factors for hospitalization: age of ≥ 65 years (odds ratio (OR) 4.91; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.42-17.00), body temperature (OR 1.97; 95% CI 1.14-3.41), Glasgow Coma Scale (OR 0.40; 95% CI 0.16-0.98), and creatinine (OR 2.92; 95% CI 1.23-6.94). The results suggest that the elderly with hyperthermia, disturbance of consciousness, and elevated serum creatinine have an increased risk for hospitalization with heat illness. PMID:26393633

  12. Comparisons of Hospitalization Rates Among Younger Atrial Fibrillation Patients Receiving Different Antiarrhythmic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Allen LaPointe, Nancy M.; Dai, David; Thomas, Laine; Piccini, Jonathan P.; Peterson, Eric D.; Al-Khatib, Sana M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs) are used to reduce the frequency, severity, and duration of atrial fibrillation (AF) events, which should reduce hospitalizations; however, little is known about the associations between different AADs and hospitalization—particularly among younger AF patients without structural heart disease. Methods and Results Using MarketScan® claims data, we identified AF patients without coronary artery disease (CAD) or heart failure who received their first AAD prescription (amiodarone, sotalol, dronedarone, or Class Ic) within 14 days post-first AF encounter. The primary outcome was time from first AAD prescription to AF hospitalization and secondary outcomes included time to cardiovascular and all-cause hospitalizations. We used inverse probability-weighted estimators to adjust for differences in treatment allocation in the Cox proportional hazards model for each outcome. Among 8562 AF patients with a median age of 56 years (IQR 49,61), risk of AF hospitalization was greater with dronedarone than Class Ic (HR 1.59; 95% CI 1.13–2.24), amiodarone (HR 2.63;1.77–3.89), and sotalol (HR 1.72;1.17–2.54), but lower with amiodarone versus Class Ic (HR 0.68;0.57–0.80) and sotalol (HR 0.63;0.53–0.75). Risk of cardiovascular hospitalization was lower with amiodarone than Class Ic (HR 0.80;0.70–0.92), but not non-AF cardiovascular hospitalization (HR 1.26;1.01–1.57). There was no difference in all-cause hospitalization between amiodarone, Class Ic, and sotalol. Conclusions Differences in hospitalization rates were found between AADs in younger AF patients without structural heart disease. Amiodarone had the lowest risk of AF hospitalization and dronedarone had the greatest risk. Additional research is needed to better understand associations between AADs and hospitalization risk. PMID:25829248

  13. Prevalence and Characteristics of Body Dysmorphic Disorder Among Patients in a Partial Hospital Program.

    PubMed

    Bjornsson, Andri; Magnusdottir, Soffia; Wessman, Inga; Beard, Courtney; Lee, Josephine; Hearon, Bridget A; Björgvinsson, Thröstur

    2016-07-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a common disorder that is usually associated with impaired functioning and high levels of suicidality. The current study is the first to assess prevalence of BDD among patients in a partial hospital program and compare patients with and without BDD on demographic and clinical variables. Participants were 207 patients with a variety of Axis I diagnoses. Prevalence of current BDD was 7.2%, and a diagnosis of BDD did not predict worse treatment outcome in the program. Patients with current BDD were more likely to be female and younger and have more comorbid diagnoses than patients without current BDD. No other significant differences were found at baseline between patients with and without current BDD. Results indicate that BDD is relatively common among patients in partial hospital programs and that such programs may be as beneficial to patients with BDD as to other patients. PMID:27362701

  14. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital in such patients. This is important in order to minimize unnecessary diagnostic workup and provide adequate treatment and safe hospital stay for these patients. PMID:27433362

  15. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Goel, Noopur; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital in such patients. This is important in order to minimize unnecessary diagnostic workup and provide adequate treatment and safe hospital stay for these patients. PMID:27433362

  16. Cognitive Adaptation Training Provided to Chronically Hospitalized Patients with Schizophrenia in The Netherlands: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Quee, Piotr J.; Schneider, Harald; van Slogteren, Saskia; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Velligan, Dawn I.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive adaptation training (CAT) improves functional outcome in outpatients with schizophrenia living in the United States of America. The efficacy of CAT has never been demonstrated for patients living in a residential facility. We describe how CAT was delivered to two chronically hospitalized patients with schizophrenia living in The Netherlands. CAT was delivered for 8 months, and consisted of weekly home visits by a psychiatric nurse. Both patients improved on measures of functional outcome used in the US studies. These results indicate that CAT may improve outcomes, even in patients that have been hospitalized for several years. PMID:23082269

  17. Hospital discharge of elderly patients to primary health care, with and without an intermediate care hospital – a qualitative study of health professionals' experiences

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Unni; Steinsbekk, Aslak; Jenssen, Svanhild; Johnsen, Roar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intermediate care is an organisational approach to improve the coordination of health care services between health care levels. In Central Norway an intermediate care hospital was established in a municipality to improve discharge from a general hospital to primary health care. The aim of this study was to investigate how health professionals experienced hospital discharge of elderly patients to primary health care with and without an intermediate care hospital. Methods A qualitative study with data collected through semi-structured focus groups and individual interviews. Results Discharge via the intermediate care hospital was contrasted favourably compared to discharge directly from hospital to primary health care. Although increased capacity to receive patients from hospital and prepare them for discharge to primary health care was viewed as a benefit, professionals still requested better communication with the preceding care level concerning further treatment and care for the elderly patients. Conclusions The intermediate care hospital reduced the coordination challenges during discharge of elderly patients from hospital to primary health care. Nevertheless, the intermediate care was experienced more like an extension of hospital than an included part of primary health care and did not meet the need for communication across care levels. PMID:24868194

  18. Nosocomial Transmission of C. difficile in English Hospitals from Patients with Symptomatic Infection

    PubMed Central

    van Kleef, Esther; Gasparrini, Antonio; Guy, Rebecca; Cookson, Barry; Hope, Russell; Jit, Mark; Robotham, Julie V.; Deeny, Sarah R.; Edmunds, W. John

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that less than one-quarter of patients with symptomatic nosocomial Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are linked to other in-patients. However, this evidence was limited to one geographic area. We aimed to investigate the level of symptomatic CDI transmission in hospitals located across England from 2008 to 2012. Methods A generalized additive mixed-effects Poisson model was fitted to English hospital-surveillance data. After adjusting for seasonal fluctuations and between-hospital variation in reported CDI over time, possible clustering (transmission between symptomatic in-patients) of CDI cases was identified. We hypothesised that a temporal proximity would be reflected in the degree of correlation between in-hospital CDI cases per week. This correlation was modelled through a latent autoregressive structure of order 1 (AR(1)). Findings Forty-six hospitals (33 general, seven specialist, and six teaching hospitals) located in all English regions met our criteria. In total, 12,717 CDI cases were identified; seventy-five per cent of these occurred >48 hours after admission. There were slight increases in reports during winter months. We found a low, but statistically significant, correlation between successive weekly CDI case incidences (phi = 0.029, 95%CI: 0.009–0.049). This correlation was five times stronger in a subgroup analysis restricted to teaching hospitals (phi = 0.104, 95%CI: 0.048–0.159). Conclusions The results suggest that symptomatic patient-to-patient transmission has been a source of CDI-acquisition in English hospitals in recent years, and that this might be a more important transmission route in teaching hospitals. Nonetheless, the weak correlation indicates that, in line with recent evidence, symptomatic cases might not be the primary source of nosocomial CDI in England. PMID:24932484

  19. Initiation or maintenance of beta-blocker therapy in patients hospitalized for acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Passos, Luiz Carlos; Oliveira, Márcio Galvão; Duraes, Andre Rodrigues; Trindade, Thiago Moreira; Barbosa, Andréa Cristina Costa

    2016-08-01

    Background Beta-blockers have been recommended for patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction for their long-term benefits. However, the tolerance to betablockers in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure should be evaluated. Objective To estimate the proportion of patients hospitalized with acute heart failure who can tolerate these agents in clinical practice and compare the clinical outcomes of patients who can and cannot tolerate treatment with beta-blockers. Setting Two reference hospitals in cardiology. Methods Retrospective cohort study of consecutive patients hospitalized for acute heart failure between September 2008 and May 2012. Population-based sample. During the study period, 325 patients were admitted consecutively, including 194 individuals with an acute heart failure diagnosis and systolic left ventricular dysfunction and ejection fraction ≤45 %, who were candidates for the initiation or continuation of beta-blockers. Main outcome measure The percentage of patients intolerant to beta-blockers and the clinical characteristics of patients. Results On admission, 61.8 % of patients were already using beta-blockers, and 73.2 % were using beta-blockers on discharge. During hospitalization, 85 % of patients used these agents for some period. The main reasons for not using betablockers were low cardiac output syndrome (24.4 %), bradycardia (24.4 %), severe hypotension or shock (17.8 %), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (13.3 %). Patients who were intolerant or did not use a beta-blocker had a longer hospital stay (18.3 vs. 11.0 days; p < .001), greater use of vasoactive drugs (41.5 vs. 16.3 %; p < .001, CI 1.80-7.35), sepsis and septic shock (RR = 3.02; CI 95 % 1.59-5.75), and higher mortality rate during hospitalization (22.6 vs. 2.9 %; p < .001; CI 3.05-32.26). Conclusion Beta-blockers could be used in 73.2 % of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure. Patients who can not tolerate BB presented

  20. Medical students' and doctors' attitudes towards older patients and their care in hospital settings: a conceptualisation

    PubMed Central

    Samra, Rajvinder; Griffiths, Amanda; Cox, Tom; Conroy, Simon; Gordon, Adam; Gladman, John R. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: despite assertions in reports from governmental and charitable bodies that negative staff attitudes towards older patients may contribute to inequitable healthcare provision for older patients when compared with younger patients (those aged under 65 years), the research literature does not describe these attitudes in any detail. Objective: this study explored and conceptualised attitudes towards older patients using in-depth interviews. Methods: twenty-five semi-structured interviews with medical students and hospital-based doctors in a UK acute teaching hospital were conducted. Participants were asked about their beliefs, emotions and behavioural tendencies towards older patients, in line with the psychological literature on the definition of attitudes (affective, cognitive and behavioural information). Data were analysed thematically. Results: attitudes towards older patients and their care could be conceptualised under the headings: (i) beliefs about older patients; (ii) older patients' unique needs and the skills required to care for them and (iii) emotions and satisfaction with caring for older patients. Conclusions: our findings outlined common beliefs and stereotypes specific to older patients, as opposed to older people in general. Older patients had unique needs concerning their healthcare. Participants typically described negative emotions about caring for older patients, but the sources of dissatisfaction largely related to the organisational setting and system in which the care is delivered to these patients. This study marks one of the first in-depth attempts to explore attitudes towards older patients in UK hospital settings. PMID:26185282

  1. Strengthening the evidence-policy interface for patient safety: enhancing global health through hospital partnerships

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Strengthening the evidence-policy interface is a well-recognized health system challenge in both the developed and developing world. Brokerage inherent in hospital-to-hospital partnerships can boost relationships between “evidence” and “policy” communities and move developing countries towards evidence based patient safety policy. In particular, we use the experience of a global hospital partnership programme focused on patient safety in the African Region to explore how hospital partnerships can be instrumental in advancing responsive decision-making, and the translation of patient safety evidence into health policy and planning. A co-developed approach to evidence-policy strengthening with seven components is described, with reflections from early implementation. This rapidly expanding field of enquiry is ripe for shared learning across continents, in keeping with the principles and spirit of health systems development in a globalized world. PMID:24131652

  2. Patient goal setting as a method for program improvement/development in partial hospitalization programs.

    PubMed

    Gates, A

    1991-12-01

    Data were collected from a study of 49 patients in 1990 and 106 patients in 1991 admitted into Country View Treatment Center and Green Country Counseling Center. Country View is a 30-bed chemical dependency residential center operating under St. John Medical Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Green Country is an evening partial hospital chemical dependency program operating under St. John Medical Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, The tools used in this study were the Country View Patient Self-Reporting Questionnaire, the global Rating Scale, and the Model of Recovering Alcoholics Behavior Stages and Goal Setting (Wing, 1990). These assessments were specifically designed to measure the patient's perceptions of goal setting and the patient's perspective on treatment outcome. The study outcome resulted in program improvement (Green Country evening partial hospital program) and the development of the Country View Substance Abuse Intermediate Link (SAIL) Program (day partial hospital). PMID:10170967

  3. Analyzing patient's waiting time in emergency & trauma department in public hospital - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslan, Shazwa; Tahir, Herniza Md; Nordin, Noraimi Azlin Mohd; Zaharudin, Zati Aqmar

    2014-09-01

    Emergency and Trauma Department (ETD) is an important element for a hospital. It provides medical service, which operates 24 hours a day in most hospitals. However overcrowding is not exclusion for ETD. Overflowing occurs due to affordable services provided by public hospitals, since it is funded by the government. It is reported that a patient attending ETD must be treated within 90 minutes, in accordance to achieve the Key Performance Indicator (KPI). However, due to overcrowd situations, most patients have to wait longer than the KPI standard. In this paper, patient's average waiting time is analyzed. Using Chi-Square Test of Goodness, patient's inter arrival per hour is also investigated. As conclusion, Monday until Wednesday was identified as the days that exceed the KPI standard while Chi-Square Test of Goodness showed that the patient's inter arrival is independent and random.

  4. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  5. Factors affecting decision-making of patients choosing acupuncture in a public hospital

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Thean Howe Bryan; Kong, Keng He; Low, Yin Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background With increasing evidence to support its practice, acupuncture has been integrated within many hospitals around the world. The purpose of this study is to understand the factors affecting decision making of patients as they select acupuncture treatment for their medical conditions and symptoms within a public hospital. Methods A qualitative study consisting of in depth interviews with 14 patients was conducted. All patients attended an acupuncture clinic within a public hospital. Data collected was analysed via thematic analysis. Results Four main factor groups affecting decision making of patients were identified- factors affecting the level and value of patient-centric care, the confidence and trust patients place within the acupuncture service, the presence of collaborative efforts between acupuncturists and Western medicine practitioners, and the knowledge, culture and belief society has regarding the role of acupuncture and Western medicine. All participants interviewed had more than one factor group present as enablers toward their eventual selection of acupuncture for ailment management. It was also noted that although the majority of participants had sufficient knowledge regarding acupuncture, there were a select few who had misperceptions or no knowledge regarding certain aspects of acupuncture. Conclusions There may be certain patterns in the way patients choose to utilise acupuncture services in public hospitals. Further studies should also be carried out in other public hospitals to analyse the factor groups identified further. PMID:26697443

  6. Drug-Drug Interaction Associated with Mold-Active Triazoles among Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Andes, David; Azie, Nkechi; Yang, Hongbo; Harrington, Rachel; Kelley, Caroline; Tan, Ruo-Ding; Wu, Eric Q; Franks, Billy; Kristy, Rita; Lee, Edward; Khandelwal, Nikhil; Spalding, James

    2016-06-01

    The majority of hospitalized patients receiving mold-active triazoles are at risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Efforts are needed to increase awareness of DDIs that pose a serious risk of adverse events. Triazoles remain the most commonly utilized antifungals. Recent developments have included the mold-active triazoles (MATs) itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, which are first-line agents for the treatment of filamentous fungal infections but have the potential for DDIs. This objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of triazole DDIs. Hospitalized U.S. adults with MAT use were identified in the Cerner HealthFacts database, which contained data from over 150 hospitals (2005 to 2013). The severities of DDIs with MATs were categorized, using drug labels and the drug information from the Drugdex system (Thompson Micromedex), into four groups (contraindicated, major, moderate, and minor severity). DDIs of minor severity were not counted. A DDI event was considered to have occurred if the following two conditions were met: (i) the patient used at least one drug with a classification of at least a moderate interaction with the MAT during the hospitalization and (ii) there was a period of overlap between the administration of the MAT and that of the interacting drug of at least 1 day. A total of 6,962 hospitalizations with MAT use were identified. Among them, 88% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use, 86% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 93% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use included the use of a concomitant interacting drug. A total of 68% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 34% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 20% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the use of at least one drug with a DDI of contraindicated severity. A total of 83% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 61% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 82% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the

  7. Multi-View Interaction Modelling of human collaboration processes: a business process study of head and neck cancer care in a Dutch academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Stuit, Marco; Wortmann, Hans; Szirbik, Nick; Roodenburg, Jan

    2011-12-01

    In the healthcare domain, human collaboration processes (HCPs), which consist of interactions between healthcare workers from different (para)medical disciplines and departments, are of growing importance as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly integrated. Existing workflow-based process modelling tools for healthcare process management, which are the most commonly applied, are not suited for healthcare HCPs mainly due to their focus on the definition of task sequences instead of the graphical description of human interactions. This paper uses a case study of a healthcare HCP at a Dutch academic hospital to evaluate a novel interaction-centric process modelling method. The HCP under study is the care pathway performed by the head and neck oncology team. The evaluation results show that the method brings innovative, effective, and useful features. First, it collects and formalizes the tacit domain knowledge of the interviewed healthcare workers in individual interaction diagrams. Second, the method automatically integrates these local diagrams into a single global interaction diagram that reflects the consolidated domain knowledge. Third, the case study illustrates how the method utilizes a graphical modelling language for effective tree-based description of interactions, their composition and routing relations, and their roles. A process analysis of the global interaction diagram is shown to identify HCP improvement opportunities. The proposed interaction-centric method has wider applicability since interactions are the core of most multidisciplinary patient-care processes. A discussion argues that, although (multidisciplinary) collaboration is in many cases not optimal in the healthcare domain, it is increasingly considered a necessity to improve integration, continuity, and quality of care. The proposed method is helpful to describe, analyze, and improve the functioning of healthcare collaboration. PMID:21867775

  8. Medical complications of intra-hospital patient transports: implications for architectural design and research.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Roger S; Zhu, Xuemei

    2007-01-01

    Literature on healthcare architecture and evidence-based design has rarely considered explicitly that patient outcomes may be worsened by intra-hospital transport (IHT), which is defined as transport of patients within the hospital. The article focuses on the effects of IHTs on patient complications and outcomes, and the implications of such impacts for designing safer, better hospitals. A review of 22 scientific studies indicates that IHTs are subject to a wide range of complications, many of which occur frequently and have distinctly detrimental effects on patient stability and outcomes. The research suggests that higher patient acuity and longer transport durations are associated with more frequent and serious IHT-related complications and outcome effects. It appears no rigorous research has compared different hospital designs and layouts with respect to having possibly differential effects on transport-related complications and worsened outcomes. Nonetheless, certain design implications can be extracted from the existing research literature, including the importance of minimizing transport delays due to restricted space and congestion, and creating layouts that shorten IHT times for high-acuity patients. Limited evidence raises the possibility that elevator-dependent vertical building layouts may increase susceptibility to transport delays that worsen complications. The strong evidence indicating that IHTs trigger complications and worsen outcomes suggests a powerful justification for adopting acuity-adaptable rooms and care models that substantially reduce transports. A program of studies is outlined to address gaps in knowledge.Key WordsPatient transports, transports within hospitals, patient safety, evidence-based design, hospital design, healthcare architecture, intra-hospital transport complications, acuity-adaptable care, elevators, outcomes. PMID:21157716

  9. Study of patients absconding behavior in a general hospital at southern region of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khammarnia, Mohammad; Kassani, Aziz; Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza; Sadeghi, Ahmad; Karimi Jaberi, Zahra; Kavosi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients’ escape from hospital imposes a significant cost to patients as well as the health system. Besides, for these patients, exposure to adverse events (such as suicide, self-harm, violence and harm to hospital reputation) are more likely to occur compared to others. The present study aimed to determine the characteristics of the absconding patients in a general hospital through a case-control design in Shiraz, Iran. Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 413 absconded patients as case and 413 patients as control in a large general hospital in Shiraz, southern Iran. In this study, data on the case and control patients was collected from the medical records using a standard checklist in the period of 2011–3. Then, the data were analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistics, through SPSS 16. Results: The finding showed that 413 patients absconded (0.50%) and mean of age in case group was 40.98 ± 16.31 years. In univariate analysis, variables of gender [Odds Ratio (OR)= 2], ward (OR= 1.22), insurance status (OR= 0.41), job status (OR= 0.34) and residence expenditure were significant. However, in multivariate analysis significant variables were age (ORadj= 0.13), gender (ORadj= 2.15), self-employment/unemployed (ORadj= 0.47), emergency/admission (ORadj= 2.14), internal/admission (ORadj= 3.16), insurance status (ORadj= 4.49) and residence expenditure (ORadj= 1.15). Conclusion: Characteristics such as middle age, male gender, no insurance coverage, inability to afford hospital expenditures and admission in emergency department make patients more likely abscond from the hospital. Therefore, it may be necessary to focus efforts on high-risk groups and increase insurance coverage in the country to prevent absconding from hospital. PMID:25774367

  10. Lower 30-day readmission rates with roflumilast treatment among patients hospitalized for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Alex Z; Sun, Shawn X; Huang, Xingyue; Amin, Alpesh N

    2015-01-01

    Background Few data exist related to the impact of roflumilast on health care utilization. This retrospective study estimated 30-day hospital readmission rates between patients who did and did not use roflumilast among those with COPD hospitalizations. Methods Data were from MarketScan, a large US commercial health insurance claims database. Patients aged ≥40 years with at least one hospitalization for COPD between 2010 and 2011 were included. The roflumilast group included patients who used roflumilast within 14 days after the first hospitalization (index), while the comparison group (non-roflumilast) included patients who did not use roflumilast during the study period. Continuous enrollment for at least 6 months before and 30 days after the index date was required. The 30-day hospitalization rate was calculated after the index hospitalization. Conditional logistic regression with propensity score 1:3 matching was employed to assess the difference in 30-day hospital readmission rates between the roflumilast and non-roflumilast groups, adjusting for baseline characteristics, comorbidity, health care utilization, and COPD medication use within 14 days after the index date. Results A total of 15,755 COPD patients met the selection criteria, ie, 366 (2.3%) in the roflumilast group and 15,389 (97.7%) in the non-roflumilast group. The mean (± standard deviation) age was 71±12.5 years and 52% were female. After propensity score matching, all-cause 30-day hospitalization rates were 6.9% and 11.1% in the roflumilast and non-roflumilast groups, respectively. COPD-related 30-day hospitalization rates were 6.3% and 9.2% in the roflumilast and non-roflumilast groups, respectively. Conditional logistic regression identified a significantly lower likelihood of all-cause 30-day readmission (odds ratio 0.59, 95% confidence interval 0.37–0.93, P=0.023) for roflumilast patients relative to non-roflumilast patients. Conclusion This study showed, in a real-world setting, that

  11. Patients' experiences with quality of hospital care: the Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Stubbe, JH; Brouwer, W; Delnoij, DMJ

    2007-01-01

    Background Patients' feedback is of great importance in health care policy decisions. The Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire (CQI Cataract) was used to measure patients' experiences with quality of care after a cataract operation. This study aims to evaluate the reliability and the dimensional structure of this questionnaire and assesses its ability to measure differences between hospitals in patients' experiences with quality of care. Methods Survey data of 4,635 respondents were available. An exploratory factor analysis was performed to evaluate the construct validity of the questionnaire and item-correlations and inter-factor correlations were calculated. Secondly, Cronbach's alpha coefficients were calculated to assess the internal consistency of the scales. Thirdly, to evaluate the ability of the questionnaire to discriminate between hospitals, multilevel analyses were performed with patients hierarchically nested within hospitals. Results Exploratory factor analysis resulted in 14 quality of care items subdivided over three factors (i.e. communication with ophthalmologist, communication with nurses, and communication about medication). Cronbach's alpha coefficients of 0.89, 0.76 and 0.79 indicated good internal consistency. Multilevel analyses showed that the questionnaire was able to measure differences in patients' experiences with hospital care regarding communication with ophthalmologist and communication about medication. In addition, there was variation between hospitals regarding ophthalmologist ratings, hospital ratings and one dichotomous information item. Conclusion These findings suggest that the CQI Cataract is a reliable and valid instrument. This instrument can be used to measure patients' experiences with three domains of hospital care after a cataract operation and is able to assess differences in evaluated care between hospitals. PMID:17877840

  12. The incidence, risk factors and characteristics of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qixia; Li, Xiaohua; Qu, Xiaolong; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Liyan; Su, Chunyin; Guo, Xiujun; Chen, Yuejuan; Zhu, Yajun; Jia, Jing; Bo, Suping; Liu, Li; Zhang, Rui; Xu, Ling; Wu, Leyan; Wang, Hai; Wang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are very common in hospital patients. Though many studies have been reported in many countries, the large-scale benchmarking prevalence of pressure ulcers in China is not available. The aim of this study is to quantify the prevalence of pressure ulcers and the incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers and analyze risk factors in hospitalized patients in China. A multi-central cross-sectional survey was conducted in one university hospital and 11 general hospitals in China. The Minimum Data Set (MDS) recommended by European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EUPAP) was used to collect information of inpatients. All patients stayed in hospital more than 24 hours and older than 18 years signed consent form and were included. Data from 39952 out of 40415 (98.85%) inpatients were analyzed. Of the 39952 patients, 631 patients (including 1024 locations) had pressure ulcers. The prevalence rate of pressure ulcers in 12 hospitals was 1.58% (0.94-2.97%). The incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) was 0.63% (0.20-1.20%). The most common locations developed pressure ulcers were sacrum, heels, and iliac crests. The common stages of pressure ulcers were stage I and II. Patients in Intensive Care Unit, Geriatric and Neurological Department were easier to develop pressure ulcers. The prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers in China was lower than that reported in European and other countries. The stages of pressure ulcers in China were different than that reported in European countries. Our study provides with a baseline value for intensive research on pressure ulcer in China. PMID:24966973

  13. Redistribution of Emergency Department Patients After Disaster-Related Closures of a Public Versus Private Hospital in New York City.

    PubMed

    Lee, David C; Smith, Silas W; Carr, Brendan G; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Polsky, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Sudden hospital closures displace patients from usual sources of care and force them to access facilities that lack their prior medical records. For patients with complex needs and for nearby hospitals already strained by high volume, disaster-related hospital closures induce a public health emergency. Our objective was to analyze responses of patients from public versus private emergency departments after closure of their usual hospital after Hurricane Sandy. Using a statewide database of emergency visits, we followed patients with an established pattern of accessing 1 of 2 hospitals that closed after Hurricane Sandy: Bellevue Hospital Center and NYU Langone Medical Center. We determined how these patients redistributed for emergency care after the storm. We found that proximity strongly predicted patient redistribution to nearby open hospitals. However, for patients from the closed public hospital, this redistribution was also influenced by hospital ownership, because patients redistributed to other public hospitals at rates higher than expected by proximity alone. This differential response to hospital closures demonstrates significant differences in how public and private patients respond to changes in health care access during disasters. Public health response must consider these differences to meet the needs of all patients affected by disasters and other public health emergencies. PMID:25777992

  14. A system model of work flow in the patient room of hospital emergency department.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junwen; Li, Jingshan; Howard, Patricia K

    2013-12-01

    Modeling and analysis of patient flow in hospital emergency department (ED) is of significant importance. In a hospital ED, the patients spend most of their time in the patient room and most of the care delivery services are carried out during this time period. In this paper, we propose a system model to study patient (or work) flow in the patient room of an ED when the resources are partially available. A closed and re-entrant process model is developed to characterize the care service activities in the patient room with limited resources of doctors, nurses, and diagnosis tests. Analytical calculation of patient's length of stay in the patient room is derived, and monotonic properties with respect to care service parameters are investigated. PMID:23589322

  15. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  16. Readmission of older patients after hospital discharge for hip fracture: a multilevel approach

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Fátima de Lima; da Cunha, Geraldo Marcelo; Leite, Iúri da Costa; Pinheiro, Rejane Sobrino; Valente, Joaquim Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To identify individual and hospital characteristics associated with the risk of readmission in older inpatients for proximal femoral fracture in the period of 90 days after discharge. METHODS Deaths and readmissions were obtained by a linkage of databases of the Hospital Information System of the Unified Health System and the System of Information on Mortality of the city of Rio de Janeiro from 2008 to 2011. The population of 3,405 individuals aged 60 or older, with non-elective hospitalization for proximal femoral fracture was followed for 90 days after discharge. Cox multilevel model was used for discharge time until readmission, and the characteristics of the patients were used on the first level and the characteristics of the hospitals on the second level. RESULTS The risk of readmission was higher for men (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.37; 95%CI 1.08–1.73), individuals more than 79 years old (HR = 1.45; 95%CI 1.06–1.98), patients who were hospitalized for more than two weeks (HR = 1.33; 95%CI 1.06-1.67), and for those who underwent arthroplasty when compared with the ones who underwent osteosynthesis (HR = 0.57; 95%CI 0.41–0.79). Besides, patients admitted to state hospitals had lower risk for readmission when compared with inpatients in municipal (HR = 1.71; 95%CI 1.09–2.68) and federal hospitals (HR = 1.81; 95%CI 1.00–3.27). The random effect of the hospitals in the adjusted model remained statistically significant (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Hospitals have complex structures that reflect in the quality of care. Thus, we propose that future studies may include these complexities and the severity of the patients in the analysis of the data, also considering the correlation between readmission and mortality to reduce biases. PMID:27143616

  17. Readmission of older patients after hospital discharge for hip fracture: a multilevel approach.

    PubMed

    Paula, Fátima de Lima; da Cunha, Geraldo Marcelo; Leite, Iúri da Costa; Pinheiro, Rejane Sobrino; Valente, Joaquim Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify individual and hospital characteristics associated with the risk of readmission in older inpatients for proximal femoral fracture in the period of 90 days after discharge. METHODS Deaths and readmissions were obtained by a linkage of databases of the Hospital Information System of the Unified Health System and the System of Information on Mortality of the city of Rio de Janeiro from 2008 to 2011. The population of 3,405 individuals aged 60 or older, with non-elective hospitalization for proximal femoral fracture was followed for 90 days after discharge. Cox multilevel model was used for discharge time until readmission, and the characteristics of the patients were used on the first level and the characteristics of the hospitals on the second level. RESULTS The risk of readmission was higher for men (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.37; 95%CI 1.08-1.73), individuals more than 79 years old (HR = 1.45; 95%CI 1.06-1.98), patients who were hospitalized for more than two weeks (HR = 1.33; 95%CI 1.06-1.67), and for those who underwent arthroplasty when compared with the ones who underwent osteosynthesis (HR = 0.57; 95%CI 0.41-0.79). Besides, patients admitted to state hospitals had lower risk for readmission when compared with inpatients in municipal (HR = 1.71; 95%CI 1.09-2.68) and federal hospitals (HR = 1.81; 95%CI 1.00-3.27). The random effect of the hospitals in the adjusted model remained statistically significant (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Hospitals have complex structures that reflect in the quality of care. Thus, we propose that future studies may include these complexities and the severity of the patients in the analysis of the data, also considering the correlation between readmission and mortality to reduce biases. PMID:27143616

  18. An Administrative Claims Model for Profiling Hospital 30-Day Mortality Rates for Pneumonia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bratzler, Dale W.; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.; Wang, Yun; O'Donnell, Walter J.; Metersky, Mark; Han, Lein F.; Rapp, Michael T.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Outcome measures for patients hospitalized with pneumonia may complement process measures in characterizing quality of care. We sought to develop and validate a hierarchical regression model using Medicare claims data that produces hospital-level, risk-standardized 30-day mortality rates useful for public reporting for patients hospitalized with pneumonia. Methodology/Principal Findings Retrospective study of fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries age 66 years and older with a principal discharge diagnosis of pneumonia. Candidate risk-adjustment variables included patient demographics, administrative diagnosis codes from the index hospitalization, and all inpatient and outpatient encounters from the year before admission. The model derivation cohort included 224,608 pneumonia cases admitted to 4,664 hospitals in 2000, and validation cohorts included cases from each of years 1998–2003. We compared model-derived state-level standardized mortality estimates with medical record-derived state-level standardized mortality estimates using data from the Medicare National Pneumonia Project on 50,858 patients hospitalized from 1998–2001. The final model included 31 variables and had an area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve of 0.72. In each administrative claims validation cohort, model fit was similar to the derivation cohort. The distribution of standardized mortality rates among hospitals ranged from 13.0% to 23.7%, with 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of 16.5%, 17.4%, and 18.3%, respectively. Comparing model-derived risk-standardized state mortality rates with medical record-derived estimates, the correlation coefficient was 0.86 (Standard Error = 0.032). Conclusions/Significance An administrative claims-based model for profiling hospitals for pneumonia mortality performs consistently over several years and produces hospital estimates close to those using a medical record model. PMID:21532758

  19. A systematic review of hospitalization resulting from medicine-related problems in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamid, Abdullah; Ghaleb, Maisoon; Aljadhey, Hisham; Aslanpour, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    Aims Medicine-related problems (MRPs) represent a major issue leading to hospitalization, especially in adult and elderly patients. The aims of this review are to investigate the prevalence, causes and major risk factors for MRPs leading to hospitalization in adult patients and to identify the main medicine classes involved. Methods Studies were identified through electronic searches of Medline, Embase, Scopus and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts between January 2000 and May 2013. A systematic review was conducted of both retrospective and prospective studies. Studies included were those involving hospitalization resulting from MRPs in adults (≥18 years old), whereas studies excluded were those investigating drug misuse and abuse and studies investigating MRPs in hospitalized patients. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 20. Results Forty-five studies were identified, including 21 that investigated hospitalization resulting from adverse drug reactions, six studies that investigated hospitalization due to adverse drug events and 18 studies that investigated hospitalization due to MRPs. The median prevalence rates of hospitalization resulting from adverse drug reactions, adverse drug events and MRPs were 7% (interquartile range, 2.4–14.9%), 4.6% (interquartile range, 2.85–16.6%) and 12.1% (interquartile range, 6.43–22.2%), respectively. The major causes contributing to MRPs were adverse drug reactions and noncompliance. In addition, the major risk factors associated with MRPs were old age, polypharmacy and comorbidities. Moreover, the main classes of medicines implicated were medicines used to treat cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Conclusions Hospitalization due to MRPs had a high prevalence, in the range of 4.6–12.1%. Most MRPs encountered were prevalent among adult patients taking medicines for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. PMID:24283967

  20. Trauma in elderly patients evaluated in a hospital emergency department in Konya, Turkey: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Hasan; Bayir, Aysegul; Ak, Ahmet; Akinci, Murat; Tufekci, Necmettin; Degirmenci, Selim; Azap, Melih

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Trauma is a common cause of admission to the hospital emergency department. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cause of admission, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients aged ≥65 years admitted to an emergency department in Turkey because of blunt trauma. Materials and methods Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 568 patients (314 women and 254 men) aged ≥65 years who were admitted to an emergency department of a tertiary care hospital. Results Trauma was caused by low-energy fall in 379 patients (67%), traffic accident in 79 patients (14%), high-energy fall in 69 patients (12%), and other causes in 41 patients (7%). The most frequent sites of injury were the lower extremity, thorax, upper extremity, and head. The femur was the most frequent fracture site. After evaluation in the emergency department, 377 patients (66%) were hospitalized. There were 31 patients (5%) who died. Risk of hospitalization after trauma was significantly associated with trauma to the lower extremity, thorax, and spine; fractures of the femur and rib; and intracranial injury. Conclusion Emergency department admission after trauma in patients aged ≥65 years is common after low-energy falls, and most injuries occur to the extremities. It is important to focus on prevention of falls to decrease the frequency of trauma in the elderly. PMID:24376346

  1. Hydroxyurea decreases hospitalizations in pediatric patients with Hb SC and Hb SB+ thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Lebensburger, Jeffrey D; Patel, Rakeshkumar J; Palabindela, Prasannalaxmi; Bemrich-Stolz, Christina J; Howard, Thomas H; Hilliard, Lee M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Patients with hemoglobin SC (Hb SC) and hemoglobin SB+ (Hb SB+) thalassemia suffer from frequent hospitalizations yet strong evidence of a clinical benefit of hydroxyurea (HU) in this population is lacking. Patients with recurrent hospitalizations for pain crisis are offered HU at our institution based on small cohort data and anecdotal benefit. This study identifies outcomes from a large cohort of patients with Hb SC and SB+ thalassemia who were treated with HU for 2 years. Materials and methods A retrospective review was conducted of 32 patients with Hb SC and SB+ thalassemia who were treated with HU. We reviewed the number, and reasons for hospitalization in the 2 years prior to, and 2 years post-HU treatment as well as laboratory changes from baseline, over 1 year. Results Patients with Hb SC and SB+ thalassemia started on HU for frequent pain, had a significant reduction in hospitalizations over 2 years as compared to the 2 years prior to HU initiation (mean total hospitalizations/year: pre-HU: 1.6 vs post-HU 0.4 hospitalizations, P<0.001; mean pain hospitalizations/year: pre-HU 1.5 vs post-HU 0.3 hospitalizations, P<0.001). Patients demonstrated hematologic changes including an increase in percent fetal hemoglobin (%HbF) pre–post HU (4.5% to 7.7%, P=0.002), mean corpuscular volume (74 to 86 fL, P<0,0001), and decrease in absolute neutrophil count (5.0 to 3.2×109/L, P=0.007). Patients with higher doses of HU demonstrated the greatest reduction in hospitalizations but this was unrelated to absolute neutrophil count. Conclusion This cohort of patients with Hb SC and SB+ thalassemia provides additional support for using HU in patients with recurrent hospitalizations for pain. A large randomized multicenter trial of HU to reduce pain admissions should be conducted to confirm these data and provide much needed evidence based recommendations for this population. PMID:26719735

  2. Care-seeking behaviour and diagnostic processes for symptomatic giardiasis in children attending an academic paediatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Escobedo, Angel A; Almirall, Pedro; Ávila, Ivonne; Salazar, Yohana; Alfonso, Maydel

    2014-01-01

    Giardiasis is one of the commonest intestinal parasitic infections in Cuba. In order to determine care-seeking behaviour and diagnostic processes in paediatric in-patients with giardiasis, structured questionnaires were administered by interview mothers of children with giardiasis during January to December 2010. During the study period, 97 children were diagnosed with giardiasis, of whom 86 (88.6%) caregivers were interviewed. The median number of days from symptoms onset to the first presentation in a health unit was 2 days (range: 0–15 days). The pattern of care-seeking behaviour was variable; 41 (47.7%) of children initially visited the emergency unit in a paediatric hospital. Sixty-six children had, at least, one further contact for help before diagnosis of giardiasis was made (range: 1–5 contacts) and of the 128 contact visits, 94 (73.4%) were also targeted more to hospitals. There was a median time of 6 days between the first presentation to a health unit until diagnosis, which was mainly made by microscopic examination of duodenal aspiration. Among factors investigated in mothers, only knowing other person with giardiasis had significant association with their ability to suspect giardiasis [odds ratio (OR): 29.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.71–239.4, P = 0.001]. Requesting a faecal specimen or ordering duodenal aspiration for microscopic examination during the first visit appeared associated with correct diagnosis (OR: 3.84, 95% CI: 1.57–9.40, P = 0.003). Efforts should be made to increase doctors’ awareness of- and diagnostic skills for childhood giardiasis. At the same time, it is necessary to improve caregivers’ awareness about giardiasis. PMID:25253040

  3. Care-seeking behaviour and diagnostic processes for symptomatic giardiasis in children attending an academic paediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, Angel A; Almirall, Pedro; Ávila, Ivonne; Salazar, Yohana; Alfonso, Maydel

    2014-09-01

    Giardiasis is one of the commonest intestinal parasitic infections in Cuba. In order to determine care-seeking behaviour and diagnostic processes in paediatric in-patients with giardiasis, structured questionnaires were administered by interview mothers of children with giardiasis during January to December 2010. During the study period, 97 children were diagnosed with giardiasis, of whom 86 (88·6%) caregivers were interviewed. The median number of days from symptoms onset to the first presentation in a health unit was 2 days (range: 0-15 days). The pattern of care-seeking behaviour was variable; 41 (47·7%) of children initially visited the emergency unit in a paediatric hospital. Sixty-six children had, at least, one further contact for help before diagnosis of giardiasis was made (range: 1-5 contacts) and of the 128 contact visits, 94 (73·4%) were also targeted more to hospitals. There was a median time of 6 days between the first presentation to a health unit until diagnosis, which was mainly made by microscopic examination of duodenal aspiration. Among factors investigated in mothers, only knowing other person with giardiasis had significant association with their ability to suspect giardiasis [odds ratio (OR): 29·8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3·71-239·4, P = 0·001]. Requesting a faecal specimen or ordering duodenal aspiration for microscopic examination during the first visit appeared associated with correct diagnosis (OR: 3·84, 95% CI: 1·57-9·40, P = 0·003). Efforts should be made to increase doctors' awareness of- and diagnostic skills for childhood giardiasis. At the same time, it is necessary to improve caregivers' awareness about giardiasis. PMID:25253040

  4. Complaints handling in hospitals: an empirical study of discrepancies between patients' expectations and their experiences

    PubMed Central

    Friele, Roland D; Sluijs, Emmy M; Legemaate, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Background Many patients are dissatisfied with the way in which their complaints about health care are dealt with. This study tested the assumption that this dissatisfaction consists – in part at least – of unmet expectations. Methods Subjects were 279 patients who lodged a complaint with the complaints committees of 74 hospitals in the Netherlands. They completed two questionnaires; one on their expectations at the start of the complaints handling process, and one on their experiences after the complaints procedure (pre-post design; response 50%). Dependent variables are patients' satisfaction and their feeling that justice was done; independent variables are the association between patients' expectations and their experiences. Results Only 31% of the patients felt they had received justice from the complaints process. Two thirds of the patients were satisfied with the conduct of the complaints committee, but fewer were satisfied with the conduct of the hospital or the medical professional (29% and 18%). Large discrepancies between expectations and experiences were found in the case of doctors not admitting errors when errors had been made, and of hospital managements not providing information on corrective measures that were taken. Discrepancies collectively explained 51% of patients' dissatisfaction with the committee and one third of patients' dissatisfaction with the hospital and the professional. The feeling that justice was done was influenced by the decision on the complaint (well-founded or not), but also by the satisfaction with the conduct of the committee, the hospital management and the professional involved. Conclusion It is disappointing to observe that less than one third of the patients felt that justice had been done through the complaints handling process. This study shows that the feeling that justice had been done is not only influenced by the judgement of the complaints committee, but also by the response of the professional. Furthermore

  5. Predictive factors for hospitalization of nonurgent patients in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chip-Jin; Liao, Pei-Ju; Chang, Yu-Che; Kuan, Jen-Tze; Chen, Jih-Chang; Hsu, Kuang-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonurgent emergency department (ED) patients are a controversial issue in the era of ED overcrowding. However, a substantial number of post-ED hospitalizations were found, which prompted for investigation and strategy management. The objective of this study is to identify risk factors for predicting the subsequent hospitalization of nonurgent emergency patients. This was a retrospective study of a database of adult nontrauma ED visits in a medical center for a period of 12 months from January 2013 to December 2013. Patient triages as either Taiwan Triage and Acuity Scale (TTAS) level 4 or 5 were considered “nonurgent.” Basic demographic data, primary and secondary diagnoses, clinical parameters including blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, and chief complaint category in TTAS were analyzed to determine if correlation exists between potential predictors and hospitalization in nonurgent patients. A total of 16,499 nonurgent patients were included for study. The overall hospitalization rate was 12.47 % (2058/16,499). In the multiple logistic regression model, patients with characteristics of males (odds ratio, OR = 1.37), age more than 65 years old (OR = 1.56), arrival by ambulance (OR = 2.40), heart rate more than 100/min (OR = 1.47), fever (OR = 2.73), and presented with skin swelling/redness (OR = 4.64) were predictors for hospitalization. The area under receiver-operator calibration curve (AUROC) for the prediction model was 0.70. Nonurgent patients might still be admitted for further care especially in male, the elderly, with more secondary diagnoses, abnormal vital signs, and presented with dermatologic complaints. Using the TTAS acuity level to identify patients for diversion away from the ED is unsafe and will lead to inappropriate refusal of care for many patients requiring hospital treatment. PMID:27368040

  6. Predictive factors for hospitalization of nonurgent patients in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chip-Jin; Liao, Pei-Ju; Chang, Yu-Che; Kuan, Jen-Tze; Chen, Jih-Chang; Hsu, Kuang-Hung

    2016-06-01

    Nonurgent emergency department (ED) patients are a controversial issue in the era of ED overcrowding. However, a substantial number of post-ED hospitalizations were found, which prompted for investigation and strategy management. The objective of this study is to identify risk factors for predicting the subsequent hospitalization of nonurgent emergency patients. This was a retrospective study of a database of adult nontrauma ED visits in a medical center for a period of 12 months from January 2013 to December 2013. Patient triages as either Taiwan Triage and Acuity Scale (TTAS) level 4 or 5 were considered "nonurgent." Basic demographic data, primary and secondary diagnoses, clinical parameters including blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, and chief complaint category in TTAS were analyzed to determine if correlation exists between potential predictors and hospitalization in nonurgent patients.A total of 16,499 nonurgent patients were included for study. The overall hospitalization rate was 12.47 % (2058/16,499). In the multiple logistic regression model, patients with characteristics of males (odds ratio, OR = 1.37), age more than 65 years old (OR = 1.56), arrival by ambulance (OR = 2.40), heart rate more than 100/min (OR = 1.47), fever (OR = 2.73), and presented with skin swelling/redness (OR = 4.64) were predictors for hospitalization. The area under receiver-operator calibration curve (AUROC) for the prediction model was 0.70. Nonurgent patients might still be admitted for further care especially in male, the elderly, with more secondary diagnoses, abnormal vital signs, and presented with dermatologic complaints. Using the TTAS acuity level to identify patients for diversion away from the ED is unsafe and will lead to inappropriate refusal of care for many patients requiring hospital treatment. PMID:27368040

  7. Predicting red blood cell transfusion in hospitalized patients: role of hemoglobin level, comorbidities, and illness severity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trial evidence supports a restrictive strategy of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, but significant variation in clinical transfusion practice persists. Patient characteristics other than hemoglobin levels may influence the decision to transfuse RBCs and explain some of this variation. Our objective was to evaluate the role of patient comorbidities and severity of illness in predicting inpatient red blood cell transfusion events. Methods We developed a predictive model of inpatient RBC transfusion using comprehensive electronic medical record (EMR) data from 21 hospitals over a four year period (2008-2011). Using a retrospective cohort study design, we modeled predictors of transfusion events within 24 hours of hospital admission and throughout the entire hospitalization. Model predictors included administrative data (age, sex, comorbid conditions, admission type, and admission diagnosis), admission hemoglobin, severity of illness, prior inpatient RBC transfusion, admission ward, and hospital. Results The study cohort included 275,874 patients who experienced 444,969 hospitalizations. The 24 hour and overall inpatient RBC transfusion rates were 7.2% and 13.9%, respectively. A predictive model for transfusion within 24 hours of hospital admission had a C-statistic of 0.928 and pseudo-R2 of 0.542; corresponding values for the model examining transfusion through the entire hospitalization were 0.872 and 0.437. Inclusion of the admission hemoglobin resulted in the greatest improvement in model performance relative to patient comorbidities and severity of illness. Conclusions Data from electronic medical records at the time of admission predicts with very high likelihood the incidence of red blood transfusion events in the first 24 hours and throughout hospitalization. Patient comorbidities and severity of illness on admission play a small role in predicting the likelihood of RBC transfusion relative to the admission hemoglobin. PMID

  8. A New Injury Severity Score for Predicting the Length of Hospital Stay in Multiple Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Oveis; Tabibzadeh Dezfuli, Seyed Ashkan; Namazi, Seyed Shojaeddin; Dehghan Khalili, Maryam; Saeedi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals under 40 and is the third main cause for death throughout the world. Objectives: This study was designed to compare our modified injury scoring systems with the current injury severity score (ISS) from the viewpoint of its predictive value to estimate the duration of hospitalization in trauma patients. Patients and Methods: This analytical cross-sectional study was performed at the general referral trauma center of Bandar-Abbas in southern Iran from March 2009 to March 2010. The study population consisted of all the trauma patients referred to the emergency department (ED). Demographic data, type and severity of injury, duration of admission, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), and revised trauma score (RTS) were recorded. The injury severity score (ISS) and NISS were calculated. The length of hospital stay was recorded during the patients follow-up and compared with ISS, NISS and modified injury scoring systems. Results: Five hundred eleven patients (446 males (87.3%) and 65 females (12.7%)) were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 22 ± 4.2 for males and 29.15 ± 3.8 for females. The modified NISS had a relatively strong correlation with the length of hospitalization (r = 0.79). The formula below explains the length of hospitalization according to MNISS score. Duration of hospitalization was 0.415 + (2.991) MNISS. Duration of hospitalization had a strong correlation with MISS (r = 0.805, R2: 0.65). Duration of hospitalization was 0.113 + (7.915) MISS. Conclusions: This new suggested scale shows a better value to predict patients’ length of hospital stay compared to ISS and NISS. However, future studies with larger sample sizes and more confounding factors such as prehospital procedures, intubation and other procedures during admission, should be designed to examine these scoring systems and confirm the results of our study. PMID:27218048

  9. Predictors of fifty days in-hospital mortality in decompensated cirrhosis patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Bal, Chinmaya Kumar; Daman, Ripu; Bhatia, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the predictors of 50 d in-hospital mortality in decompensated cirrhosis patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). METHODS: Two hundred and eighteen patients admitted to an intensive care unit in a tertiary care hospital between June 2013 and June 2014 with the diagnosis of SBP (during hospitalization) and cirrhosis were retrospectively analysed. SBP was diagnosed by abdominal paracentesis in the presence of polymorphonuclear cell count ≥ 250 cells/mm3 in the peritoneal fluid. Student’s t test, multivariate logistic regression, cox proportional hazard ratio (HR), receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis were utilized for statistical analysis. Predictive abilities of several variables identified by multivariate analysis were compared using the area under ROC curve. P < 0.05 were considered statistical significant. RESULTS: The 50 d in-hospital mortality rate attributable to SBP is 43.11% (n = 94). Median survival duration for those who died was 9 d. In univariate analysis acute kidney injury (AKI), hepatic encephalopathy, septic shock, serum bilirubin, international normalized ratio, aspartate transaminase, and model for end-stage liver disease - sodium (MELD-Na) were significantly associated with in - hospital mortality in patients with SBP (P ≤ 0.001). Multivariate cox proportional regression analysis showed AKI (HR = 2.16, 95%CI: 1.36-3.42, P = 0.001) septic shock (HR = 1.73, 95%CI: 1.05-2.83, P = 0.029) MELD-Na (HR = 1.06, 95%CI: 1.02-1.09, P ≤ 0.001) was significantly associated with 50 d in-hospital mortality. The prognostic accuracy for AKI, MELD-Na and septic shock was 77%, 74% and 71% respectively associated with 50 d in-hospital mortality in SBP patients. CONCLUSION: AKI, MELD-Na and septic shock were predictors of 50 d in-hospital mortality in decompensated cirrhosis patients with SBP. PMID:27134704

  10. Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a report of seven patients from King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kawkitinarong, Kamon; Sittipunt, Chanchai; Wongtim, Somkiat; Udompanich, Visit

    2005-09-01

    From 1983 to 2001, 7 patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis were admitted to the King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital. Presenting symptoms varied from asymptomatic (1 patient), progressive dyspnea on exertion (4 patients) to respiratory failure (2 patients). Other symptoms included dry cough and weight loss. Gradual onset of dyspnea could be observed by average time to hospital (7 months). Early worsening of dyspnea and high-grade fever suggested a possibility of superimposed infection. Chest radiographs revealed symmetrical infiltration without lobar predominance. 4 of 7 patients were misdiagnosed as pulmonary tuberculosis before diagnosis of PAP was made. Diagnosis was made by bronchoscopic examination with typical lavage fluid or pathological results; only one case need open lung biopsy. 6 of 7 patients required lung lavage to relieve dyspneic symptoms. Coinfection with Nocardia and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was found in one patient. Prognosis was good but recurrence was common. PMID:16623047

  11. Evaluating denture cleanliness of patients in a regional dental hospital.

    PubMed

    Mylonas, P; Attrill, D C; Walmsley, A D

    2016-08-12

    Aims To evaluate the quality of clinical record keeping and determine quality of denture cleanliness; record baseline denture cleanliness for 60 patients; introduce denture hygiene instruction (DHI); and then re-assess the patients for improvement and enhanced record keeping.Methods Analysis of patients' denture hygiene instruction record keeping (n = 60) was undertaken retrospectively. The Denture Cleanliness Index (DCI) was utilised to assess denture cleanliness (best score 0, worst score 4). Baseline DCI scores were taken and individual DHI was delivered. After one month, patients were reviewed and scored, with record keeping quality analysed.Results At baseline, 11.7% (n = 7) of patients had DCI scores of ≤2, improving to 93.8% (n = 45) after one month, demonstrating short-term improvement in denture cleanliness. Only 63% (n = 38) of patients had evidence of a record of DHI within their notes at baseline, improving to 100% at recall.Conclusions New patient information leaflet and clinical guidelines on denture hygiene have been written and implemented. The results of this study suggest that this may be a relatively straightforward method to achieve a short-term improvement in denture cleanliness. The implementation of a DCI score is helpful in allowing patients to improve denture hygiene and its wider use is supported. PMID:27514347

  12. Postinduction Supportive Care of Pediatric Acute Myelocytic Leukemia: Should Patients be Kept in the Hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Susumu; Khan, Isra'a; Mushtaq, Rao; Carson, Dawn; Saah, Elna; Onwuzurike, Nkechi

    2014-01-01

    Children with AML become profoundly neutropenic while they undergo remission induction chemotherapy. It is unknown whether these children should be kept in the hospital while they are severely neutropenic to prevent life-threatening complications associated with neutropenia and reduce fatality. We at our institution routinely discharge patients after completing remission induction chemotherapy in the presence of profound neutropenia, unless it is clinically contraindicated. We reviewed all AML patients who were consecutively treated at our hospital from 1989 to 2011. Thirteen patients were electively discharged after completion of induction I chemotherapy. Of the 13, 4 died due to relapse or complications of stem cell transplants (not due to neutropenia related complications). Another eight are long term survivors. In this very small series, discharge from the hospital even though patients were severely neutropenic did not adversely affect the survival. PMID:25349742

  13. Patient-focused care pays hospital-wide dividends. Interview by Donald E. L. Johnson..

    PubMed

    Bernd, D L

    1992-12-01

    By decentralizing ancillary services, streamlining processes and cross training professional and paraprofessional employees, hospitals can improve patient satisfaction and staff efficiency, says David L. Bernd, executive vice president and chief operating officer of Sentara Health Systems, Norfolk, Virginia, in the following interview with Donald E. L. Johnson, editor and publisher of Health Care Strategic Management. But hospitals should not convert to patient-focused care primarily to cut costs, he warned. Cost savings could result, but only on a hospital-wide basis, as a result of new efficiencies and reduced lengths-of-stay. At the unit level, costs are likely to go up as ancillary services are moved to patient-focused units and more resources are devoted directly at each patient. PMID:10123251

  14. Techniques to improve patient safety in hospitals: what nurse administrators need to know.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Mary J

    2014-10-01

    Nurse administrators are challenged to determine the best use of limited resources to support organizational patient safety improvement efforts. This article reviews the literature on techniques to reduce errors and improve patient safety in hospitals with a focus on team training initiatives. Implications for nurse administrators are discussed. PMID:25279512

  15. Postoperative hospital course of patients with history of severe psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S; McCartney, J R; Saravay, S M; Katz, E

    1987-09-01

    The postoperative hospital course of 54 patients with a past history of psychiatric illness was studied through chart review. Both chronic schizophrenics and chronic depressives tolerated surgical procedures well, without any unusual difficulties or exacerbation of psychiatric illness. They represented no management problems. Patients with acute, severe upset in the preoperative period (regardless of diagnosis) presented most of the management problems postoperatively. PMID:3678811