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Sample records for academic hospital patients

  1. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  2. Trends in Clinically Significant Pain Prevalence Among Hospitalized Cancer Patients at an Academic Hospital in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Yun; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Shang-Liang; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Chun-Sung; Wang, Kwua-Yun; Liang, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Clinically significant pain (CSP) is one of the most common complaints among cancer patients during repeated hospitalizations, and the prevalence ranges from 24% to 86%. This study aimed to characterize the trends in CSP among cancer patients and examine the differences in the prevalence of CSP across repeated hospitalizations. A hospital-based, retrospective cohort study was conducted at an academic hospital. Patient-reported pain intensity was assessed and recorded in a nursing information system. We examined the differences in the prevalence of worst pain intensity (WPI) and last evaluated pain intensity (LPI) of ≥ 4 or ≥ 7 points among cancer inpatients from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. Linear mixed models were used to determine the significant difference in the WPI and LPI (≥ 4 or ≥ 7 points) at each hospitalization. We examined 88,133 pain scores from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization among cancer patients. The prevalence of the 4 CSP types showed a trend toward a reduction from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. There was a robust reduction in the CSP prevalence from the 1st to the 5th hospitalization, except in the case of LPI ≥ 7 points. The prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points was significantly higher (0.240-fold increase) during the 1st hospitalization than during the 5th hospitalization. For the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th hospitalizations, there was a significantly higher prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points compared with the 5th hospitalization. We also observed significant reductions in the prevalence of a WPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 4th hospitalizations, an LPI ≥ 4 points during the 1st to the 3rd hospitalizations, and an LPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 2nd hospitalization. Although the prevalence of the 4 CSP types decreased gradually, it is impossible to state the causative factors on the basis of this observational and descriptive study. The next step will examine the factors that determine the CSP prevalence among cancer

  3. Preparing an Academic Medical Center to Manage Patients Infected With Ebola: Experiences of a University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Carl H; Koenig, Kristi L; Alassaf, Wajdan

    2015-10-01

    As Ebola has spread beyond West Africa, the challenges confronting health care systems with no experience in managing such patients are enormous. Not only is Ebola a significant threat to a population's health, it can infect the medical personnel trying to treat it. As such, it represents a major challenge to those in public health, emergency medical services (EMS), and acute care hospitals. Our academic medical center volunteered to become an Ebola Treatment Center as part of the US effort to manage the threat. We developed detailed policies and procedures for Ebola patient management at our university hospital. Both the EMS system and county public health made significant contributions during the development process. This article shares information about this process and the outcomes to inform other institutions facing similar challenges of preparing for an emerging threat with limited resources. The discussion includes information about management of (1) patients who arrive by ambulance with prior notification, (2) spontaneous walk-in patients, and (3) patients with confirmed Ebola who are interfacility transfers. Hospital management includes information about Ebola screening procedures, personal protective equipment selection and personnel training, erection of a tent outside the main facility, establishing an Ebola treatment unit inside the facility, and infectious waste and equipment management. Finally, several health policy considerations are presented.

  4. Hospitalized but not Admitted: Characteristics of Patients with “Observation Status” at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Ann M.; Graf, Ben; Gangireddy, Sreedevi; Hoffman, Robert; Ehlenbach, Mary; Heidke, Cynthia; Fields, Sheilah; Liegel, Barbara; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)defines observation status for hospitalized patients as a “well-defined set of specific, clinically appropriate services,” usually lasting <24 hours, and that in “only rare and exceptional cases” should last > 48 hours. Although an increasing proportion of observation care occurs on hospital wards, studies of patients with observation status have focused on the efficiency of dedicated units. Objective To describe inpatient and observation care. Design and Setting Descriptive study of all inpatient and observation stays between July 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, a 566 bed tertiary academic medical center. Participants All patients with observation or inpatient stays during the study period. Main Outcome and Measures Patient demographics, length of stay, difference between cost and reimbursement per stay, and percent of patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities. Results Of 43,853 stays, 4,578 (10.4%) were observation, with 1,141 distinct diagnosis codes. Average observation length of stay was 33.3 hours, with 44.4% of stays <24 hours, and 16.5% >48 hours. Observation care had a negative margin per stay (-$331); the inpatient margin per stay was positive (+$2,163). Adult General Medicine patients accounted for 2,404 (52.5%) of all observation stays; 25.4% of the 9,453 Adult General Medicine stays were observation. The mean length of stay for general medicine observation patients was 41.1 hours, with 32.6% of stays < 24 hours, and 26.4% >48 hours. As compared to observation patients on other clinical services, Adult General Medicine had the highest percent >65 years (40.9%), highest percent female (57.9%), highest percent discharged to skilled nursing facilities (11.6%) and the most negative margin per stay (-$1,378). Conclusions and Relevance In an academic medical center, observation status for hospitalized patients differed markedly

  5. A rural cancer outreach program lowers patient care costs and benefits both the rural hospitals and sponsoring academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Desch, C E; Grasso, M A; McCue, M J; Buonaiuto, D; Grasso, K; Johantgen, M K; Shaw, J E; Smith, T J

    1999-01-01

    The Rural Cancer Outreach Program (RCOP) between two rural hospitals and the Medical College of Virginia's Massey Cancer Center (MCC) was developed to bring state-of-the-art cancer care to medically underserved rural patients. The financial impact of the RCOP on both the rural hospitals and the MCC was analyzed. Pre- and post-RCOP financial data were collected on 1,745 cancer patients treated at the participating centers, two rural community hospitals and the MCC. The main outcome measures were costs (estimated reimbursement from all sources), revenues, contribution margins and profit (or loss) of the program. The RCOP may have enhanced access to cancer care for rural patients at less cost to society. The net annual cost per patient fell from $10,233 to $3,862 associated with more use of outpatient services, more efficient use of resources, and the shift to a less expensive locus of care. The cost for each rural patient admitted to the Medical College of Virginia fell by more than 40 percent compared with only an 8 percent decrease for all other cancer patients. The rural hospitals experienced rapid growth of their programs to more than 200 new patients yearly, and the RCOP generated significant profits for them. MCC benefited from increased referrals from RCOP service areas by 330 percent for cancer patients and by 9 percent for non-cancer patients during the same time period. While it did not generate a major profit for the MCC, the RCOP generated enough revenue to cover costs of the program. The RCOP had a positive financial impact on the rural and academic medical center hospitals, provided state-of-the-art care near home for rural patients and was associated with lower overall cancer treatment costs.

  6. Prophylactic Antibiotic Management of Surgical Patients Noted as "Allergic" to Penicillin at Two Academic Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Richard H; Jacques, Paul St; Wanderer, Jonathan P; Bombulie, Mark R; Agarwalla, Niraj

    2016-05-01

    We studied prophylactic antibiotics administered at 2 academic medical centers during a 6-year period where a cephalosporin was indicated but an "allergy" to penicillin was noted. Another drug (typically vancomycin or clindamycin) was substituted approximately 80% of the time; this occurred frequently even when symptoms unrelated to acute hypersensitivity were listed. In >50% of cases, the reaction was either omitted or vague (e.g., simply "rash"). Given the estimated 1% cross-reactivity between penicillins and cephalosporins with similar R1 side chains, many of these patients could have received either the prescribed cephalosporin or another cephalosporin with a different R1 side chain.

  7. Costs and process of in-patient tuberculosis management at a central academic hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Marais, F.; Mehtar, S.; Baltussen, R. M. P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Setting: South Africa reports more cases of tuberculosis (TB) than any other country, but an up-to-date, precise estimate of the costs associated with diagnosing, treating and preventing TB at the in-patient level is not available. Objective: To determine the costs associated with TB management among in-patients and to study the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) at a central academic hospital in Cape Town. Design: Retrospective and partly prospective cost analysis of TB cases diagnosed between May 2008 and October 2009. Results: The average daily in-patient costs were US$238; the average length of stay was 9.7 days. Mean laboratory and medication costs per stay were respectively US$26.82 and US$8.68. PPE use per day cost US$0.99. The average total TB management costs were US$2373 per patient. PPE was not always properly used. Discussion: The costs of in-patient TB management are high compared to community-based treatment; the main reason for the high costs is the high number of in-patient days. An efficiency assessment is needed to reduce costs. Cost reduction per TB case prevented was approximately US$2373 per case. PPE use accounted for the lowest costs. Training is needed to improve PPE use. PMID:26392953

  8. Pain Management Following Major Intracranial Surgery in Pediatric Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study in Three Academic Children’s Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Lynne G.; Buckley, George M.; Kudchadkar, Sapna R.; Ely, Elizabeth; Stebbins, Emily L.; Dube, Christine; Morad, Athir; Jastaniah, Ebaa A.; Sethna, Navil F.; Yaster, Myron

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pain management following major intracranial surgery is often limited by a presumed lack of need and a concern that opioids will adversely affect postoperative outcome and interfere with the neurologic examination. Nevertheless, evidence in adults is accumulating that these patients suffer moderate to severe pain and this pain is often under-treated. The purpose of this prospective, clinical observational cohort study was to assess the incidence of pain, prescribed analgesics, methods of analgesic delivery, and patient/parent satisfaction in pediatric patients undergoing cranial surgery at 3 major university children’s hospitals. Methods After obtaining IRB and parental consent (and when applicable, patient assent), children who underwent cranial surgery for cancer, epilepsy, vascular malformations, and craniofacial reconstruction were studied. Neither intraoperative anesthetic management nor postoperative pain management was standardized, but were based on institutional routine. Patients were evaluated daily by a study investigator and by chart review for pain scores using age appropriate, validated tools (FLACC, Faces Pain Scale-Revised, Wong Baker Faces Scale or Self-Report on a 0–10 scale), for patient/parent satisfaction using a subset of the NRC Picker satisfaction tool and in adolescents a modified QoR-40, and for the frequency, mode of administration, and type of analgesic provided. Finally, the incidence of opioid-induced side effects, specifically nausea, vomiting, pruritus, altered level of consciousness, and need for emergency diagnostic radiologic studies for altered neurologic examination were recorded. Data are provided as mean ± SD. Results Two hundred children (98:102 M:F), averaging 7.8 ± 5.8 years old (range 2 mos to 18.5 yr) and 32.2 ± 23.0 kg (range 4.5 to 111.6 kg) undergoing craniectomy (51), craniotomy (96), and craniofacial reconstruction (53) were studied. Despite considerable variation in mode and route of analgesic

  9. [Approach to academic detailing as a hospital pharmacist].

    PubMed

    Nishikori, Atsumi

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, a new medical fee system was introduced for the clinical activities of hospital pharmacists responsible for in-patient pharmacotherapy monitoring in medical institutions in Japan. The new medical system demands greater efforts to provide the most suitable and safest medicine for each patient. By applying the concept of academic detailing to clinical pharmacists' roles in hospitals, I present drug use evaluation in three disease states (peptic ulcer, insomnia, and osteoporosis). To analyze these from multiple aspects, we not only need knowledge of drug monographs (clinical and adverse drug effects), but also the ability to evaluate a patient's adherence and cost-effectiveness. If we combine the idea of academic detailing with a clinical pharmacist's role, it is necessary to strengthen drug information skills, such as guideline or literature search skills and journal evaluation. Simultaneously, it is important to introduce new pharmaceutical education curriculums regarding evidence-based medicine (EBM), pharmacoeconomics, and professional communication in order to explore pharmacists' roles in the future.

  10. Code R: Redesigning Hospital-wide Peer Review for Academic Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel I; Au, Huy; Fargo, Ramiz; Garrison, Roger C; Thompson, Gary; Yu, Minho; Loo, Lawrence K

    2016-09-01

    In most health care institutions, physician peer review is the primary method for maintaining and measuring physician competency and quality of care issues. However, many teaching hospitals do not have a method of tracking resident trainees' involvement in adverse cases. At the study institution, Code R was introduced as a measure to capture resident trainee involvement in the hospital-wide peer review process. The authors conducted a retrospective review of all peer review cases from January 2008 to December 2011 in an academic medical center and determined the quantity and type of resident errors that occurred compared to attending faculty. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies served as a framework to categorize quality of care errors. The addition of Code R to the peer review process can be readily adopted by other institutions to help improve resident education, facilitate faculty supervision, and potentially improve patient safety.

  11. 'Patient satisfaction' in hospitalized cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Skarstein, Jon; Dahl, Alv A; Laading, Jacob; Fosså, Sophie D

    2002-01-01

    Predictors of 'patient satisfaction' with hospitalization at a specialized cancer hospital in Norway are examined in this study. Two weeks after their last hospitalization, 2021 consecutive cancer patients were invited to rate their satisfaction with hospitalization, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Compliance rate was 72% (n = 1453). Cut-off levels separating dissatisfied from satisfied patients were defined. It was found that 92% of the patients were satisfied with their stay in hospital, independent of cancer type and number of previous admissions. Performance of nurses and physicians, level of information perceived, outcome of health status, reception at the hospital and anxiety independently predicted 'patient satisfaction'. The model explained 35% of the variance with an area under the curve of 0.76 of the Receiver Operator Curve. Cancer patients' satisfaction with their hospital stay was high, and predicted by four independently predictive variables related to the performance of caregivers. These suggest areas for further improvement in the healthcare service.

  12. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  13. Spirituality and health: an exploratory study of hospital patients' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hilbers, Julieanne; Haynes, Abby S; Kivikko, Jennifer G

    2010-03-01

    The relationship between spirituality/religion and health is receiving increasing academic interest, but few studies have explored the experience of Australians. This paper presents data from an exploratory survey of patients and families in a public teaching hospital in Sydney. The findings show that the majority of hospital service users:

  14. Hospitalizations of Adults with Intellectual Disability in Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ailey, Sarah H.; Johnson, Tricia; Fogg, Louis; Friese, Tanya R.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) represent a small but important group of hospitalized patients who often have complex health care needs. Individuals with ID experience high rates of hospitalization for ambulatory-sensitive conditions and high rates of hospitalizations in general, even when in formal community care systems; however,…

  15. Hospital outpatient perceptions of the physical environment of waiting areas: the role of patient characteristics on atmospherics in one academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Yen; Wang, Mu-Chia; Liao, Wei-Tsen; Lu, Jui-Heng; Sun, Pi-hung; Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Breen, Gerald-Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background This study examines hospital outpatient perceptions of the physical environment of the outpatient waiting areas in one medical center. The relationship of patient characteristics and their perceptions and needs for the outpatient waiting areas are also examined. Method The examined medical center consists of five main buildings which house seventeen primary waiting areas for the outpatient clinics of nine medical specialties: 1) Internal Medicine; 2) Surgery; 3) Ophthalmology; 4) Obstetrics-Gynecology and Pediatrics; 5) Chinese Medicine; 6) Otolaryngology; 7) Orthopedics; 8) Family Medicine; and 9) Dermatology. A 15-item structured questionnaire was developed to rate patient satisfaction covering the four dimensions of the physical environments of the outpatient waiting areas: 1) visual environment; 2) hearing environment; 3) body contact environment; and 4) cleanliness. The survey was conducted between November 28, 2005 and December 8, 2005. A total of 680 outpatients responded. Descriptive, univariate, and multiple regression analyses were applied in this study. Results All of the 15 items were ranked as relatively high with a range from 3.362 to 4.010, with a neutral score of 3. Using a principal component analysis' summated scores of four constructed dimensions of patient satisfaction with the physical environments (i.e. visual environment, hearing environment, body contact environment, and cleanliness), multiple regression analyses revealed that patient satisfaction with the physical environment of outpatient waiting areas was associated with gender, age, visiting frequency, and visiting time. Conclusion Patients' socio-demographics and context backgrounds demonstrated to have effects on their satisfaction with the physical environment of outpatient waiting areas. In addition to noticing the overall rankings for less satisfactory items, what should receive further attention is the consideration of the patients' personal characteristics when

  16. Stress factors affecting academic physicians at a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Sara; Eintrei, Christina; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    Research is limited regarding occupational stress in academic physicians; professionals whose work situation includes the three areas of clinical practice, research, and teaching. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge of factors experienced as stressful by academic physicians employed by a university hospital. A questionnaire assessing the frequency and intensity of 36 potentially stressful factors was sent to all 157 academic physicians who were employed at the Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. The response rate was 77%. Both a high frequency and intensity of stress was experienced by 66% of the academic physicians in relation to "time pressure" and by almost 50% in connection with both "find time for research" and having "conflict of interest between different work assignments". Moreover, physicians in the higher age group and those who had attained a higher academic position experienced less stress. The female participants experienced more stress than the males due to gender-related problems and to variables associated with relationships at work. More knowledge is needed to determine the consequences of this finding and to identify coping strategies used for handling such stress.

  17. Academic workforce trends in community hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Britta L.; Schulkin, Jay; Lawrence, Hal C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Obstetrician-gynecologist faculty workforce studies have been limited to faculty at university training programs. Not much is known about the obstetrician-gynecologist faculty workforce at community programs. Method This study assessed the obstetrician-gynecologist faculty workforce in community training programs via administering surveys to the department chairs. The questionnaire assessed number of current faculty by degree, work status (part-time/full-time), rank, and sub-specialty. Out of 125 programs, 65 responded (52% response rate). Results The mean number of full-time faculty per department in community hospitals was 17 faculty. Two-thirds of community department chairs anticipated an increase in full-time faculty and 43% anticipated an increase in part-time faculty. Like university programs, sub-specialists and Professors (compared to generalists and assistant professors) were more likely to be male. Conclusion There are similarities between the community and university faculty workforce, many of the community program faculty are involved in research. Given the evolving clinical, educational, and research demands on community faculty, it is important to continue to monitor and study community program faculty. PMID:23882350

  18. Autopsy of Adult Patients Deceased in an Academic Hospital: Considerations of Doctors and Next-of-Kin in the Consent Process

    PubMed Central

    Weustink, Annick C.; Hunink, M. G. Myriam; Oosterhuis, J. Wolter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hospital autopsies, vanishing worldwide, need to be requested by clinicians and consented to by next-of-kin. The aim of this prospective observational study was to examine how often and why clinicians do not request an autopsy, and for what reasons next-of-kin allow, or refuse it. Methods Clinicians at the Erasmus University Medical Centre were asked to complete a questionnaire when an adult patient had died. Questionnaires on 1000 consecutive naturally deceased adults were collected. If possible, missing data in the questionnaires were retrieved from the electronic patient record. Results Data from 958 (96%) questionnaires was available for analysis. In 167/958 (17·4%) cases clinicians did not request an autopsy, and in 641/791 (81·0%) cases next-of-kin did not give consent. The most important reason for both clinicians (51·5%) and next-of-kin (51·0%) to not request or consent to an autopsy was an assumed known cause of death. Their second reason was that the deceased had gone through a long illness (9·6% and 29·5%). The third reason for next-of-kin was mutilation of the deceased’s body by the autopsy procedure (16·1%). Autopsy rates were highest among patients aged 30–39 years, Europeans, suddenly and/or unexpectedly deceased patients, and tissue and/or organ donors. The intensive care and emergency units achieved the highest autopsy rates, and surgical wards the lowest. Conclusion The main reason for not requesting or allowing an autopsy is the assumption that the cause of death is known. This is a dangerous premise, because it is a self-fulfilling prophecy. Clinicians should be aware, and communicate with the next of kin, that autopsies not infrequently disclose unexpected findings, which might have changed patient management. Mutilation of the deceased’s body seems a minor consideration of next-of-kin, though how it really affects autopsy rates, should be studied by offering minimally or non-invasive autopsy methods. PMID:27736974

  19. Integrating COPD into Patient-Centered Hospital Readmissions Reduction Programs

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Gussin, Hélène A.; Prieto-Centurion, Valentin; Sullivan, Jamie L.; Zaidi, Farhan; Thomashow, Byron M.

    2015-01-01

    About 1 in 5 patients hospitalized for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the United States are readmitted within 30 days. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has recently expanded its Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program to financially penalize hospitals with higher than expected all-cause 30-day readmission rates following a hospitalization for COPD exacerbation. In October 2013, the COPD Foundation convened a multi-stakeholder National COPD Readmissions Summit to summarize our understanding of how to reduce hospital readmissions in patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbations. Over 225 individuals participated in the Summit, including patients, clinicians, health service researchers, policy makers and representatives of academic health care centers, industry, and payers. Summit participants recommend that programs to reduce hospital readmissions: 1) Include specific recommendations about how to promote COPD self-management skills training for patients and their caregivers; 2) Adequately address co-existing disorders common to COPD in care plans during and after hospitalizations; 3) Include an evaluation of adverse events when implementing strategies to reduce hospital readmissions; and 4) Develop a strategy (e.g., a learning collaboratory) to connect groups who are engaged in developing, testing, and implementing programs to reduce hospital readmissions for COPD and other conditions. PMID:25927076

  20. Observations on Hospitalized Dengue Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    DENGUE PATIENTS IN MANILA Carman. R. Min oto* be" S. Siqpo Ommon D. Leus** Curds G. Ibyes* INTRODUCION to the Hospital of Infant Jesus between October...31, 1983 and March 31, 1984: Criteria for the diagnosis of dengue Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) has been recognized infection were based on the...titer of later sample < 1:640. DHF epidemic.4𔃿 Since that time, there have only been a few- was differentiated from dengue fever (DF), and DHF was

  1. [Satisfaction of hospitalized patients in a hospital in Apurimac, Peru].

    PubMed

    Sihuin-Tapia, Elsa Yudy; Gómez-Quispe, Oscar Elisban; Ibáñez-Quispe, Vladimiro

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the satisfaction of hospitalized patients in the Sub-regional Hospital of Andahuaylas, 175 patients were surveyed using the Servqual multidimensional model. The estimate of variables associated with the satisfaction of the hospitalized patients was performed by using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. We found 25.0% satisfaction. Lower levels of satisfaction were associated with having a secondary level education (aOR: 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.64) and with having been hospitalized in the surgery department (aOR 0.14, CI: 95%: 0.04 to 0.53). It was concluded that there was a low level of satisfaction with the quality of care received by hospitalized patients and this was associated with the level of education and type of hospital department.

  2. [GPs' self-perception of their own role compared with hospital, ambulatory, academic, and health organisation physicians].

    PubMed

    Daghio, Maria Monica; Gaglianò, Giuseppe; Bevini, Massimo; Cadioli, Tiziano; Delvecchio, Carlo; Guidetti, Patrizia; Lorenzetti, Manuela; Fattori, Giuseppe; Ciardullo, Anna Vittoria

    2005-05-01

    Aim of the present study was to explore how the 76 general practitioners (GPs) - serving Carpi district (90,000 residents) - value their own role compared with the hospital, ambulatory, academic, and health organisation physicians'. GPs had a positive self-image only in comparison with health organisation doctors (7 vs 7 grades). GPs disappointed with themselves when comparing their role with ambulatory (-1.6 grades), academic (-1.9 grades) and hospital doctors (-2.2 grades). Secondarily, GPs perceived patients' valuing their professional role mostly 'subordinate' to the other physicians', except health organisation colleagues'.

  3. Impact of teaching intensity and academic status on medical resource utilization by teaching hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2012-11-01

    Teaching hospitals require excess medical resources to maintain high-quality care and medical education. To evaluate the appropriateness of such surplus costs, we examined the impact of teaching intensity defined as activities for postgraduate training, and academic status as functions of medical research and undergraduate teaching on medical resource utilization. Administrative data for 47,397 discharges from 40 academic and 12 non-academic teaching hospitals in Japan were collected. Hospitals were classified into three groups according to intern/resident-to-bed (IRB) ratio. Resource utilization of medical services was estimated using fee-for-service charge schedules and normalized with case mix grouping. 15-24% more resource utilization for laboratory examinations, radiological imaging, and medications were observed in hospitals with higher IRB ratios. With multivariate adjustment for case mix and academic status, higher IRB ratios were associated with 10-15% more use of radiological imaging, injections, and medications; up to 5% shorter hospital stays; and not with total resource utilization. Conversely, academic status was associated with 21-33% more laboratory examinations, radiological imaging, and medications; 13% longer hospital stays; and 10% more total resource utilization. While differences in medical resource utilization by teaching intensity may not be associated with indirect educational costs, those by academic status may be. Therefore, academic hospitals may need efficiency improvement and financial compensation.

  4. A Computerized Hospital Patient Information Management System

    PubMed Central

    Wig, Eldon D.

    1982-01-01

    The information processing needs of a hospital are many, with varying degrees of complexity. The prime concern in providing an integrated hospital information management system lies in the ability to process the data relating to the single entity for which every hospital functions - the patient. This paper examines the PRIMIS computer system developed to accommodate hospital needs with respect to a central patient registry, inpatients (i.e., Admission/Transfer/Discharge), and out-patients. Finally, the potential for expansion to permit the incorporation of more hospital functions within PRIMIS is examined.

  5. Hospital Closure and Insights into Patient Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Garg, N.; Husk, G.; Nguyen, T.; Onyile, A.; Echezona, S.; Kuperman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hospital closures are becoming increasingly common in the United States. Patients who received care at the closing hospitals must travel to different, often farther hospitals for care, and nearby remaining hospitals may have difficulty coping with a sudden influx of patients. Objectives Our objectives are to analyze the dispersion patterns of patients from a closing hospital and to correlate that with distance from the closing hospital for three specific visit types: emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory. Methods In this study, we used data from a health information exchange to track patients from Saint Vincent’s Medical Center, a hospital in New York City that closed in 2010, to determine where they received emergency, inpatient, and ambulatory care following the closure. Results We found that patients went to the next nearest hospital for their emergency and inpatient care, but ambulatory encounters did not correlate with distance. Discussion It is likely that patients followed their ambulatory providers as they transitioned to another hospital system. Additional work should be done to determine predictors of impact on nearby hospitals when another hospital in the community closes in order to better prepare for patient dispersion. PMID:25848422

  6. Modifying the Toyota Production System for continuous performance improvement in an academic children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, F Bruder; Hendricks, James; Hagan, Patrick; DelBeccaro, Mark

    2009-08-01

    The Toyota Production System (TPS) has become a successful model for improving efficiency and eliminating errors in manufacturing processes. In an effort to provide patients and families with the highest quality clinical care, our academic children's hospital has modified the techniques of the TPS for a program in continuous performance improvement (CPI) and has expanded its application to educational and research programs. Over a period of years, physicians, nurses, residents, administrators, and hospital staff have become actively engaged in a culture of continuous performance improvement. This article provides background into the methods of CPI and describes examples of how we have applied these methods for improvement in clinical care, resident teaching, and research administration.

  7. Hospital finances and patient safety outcomes.

    PubMed

    Encinosa, William E; Bernard, Didem M

    2005-01-01

    Hospitals recently have experienced greater financial pressures. Whether these financial pressures have led to more patient safety problems is unknown. Using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Data for Florida from 1996 to 2000, this study examines whether financial pressure at hospitals is associated with increases in the rate of patient safety events (e.g., medical errors) for major surgeries. Findings show that patients have significantly higher odds of having adverse patient safety events (nursing-related patient safety events, surgery-related patient safety events, and all likely preventable patient safety events) when hospital profit margins decline over time. The finding that a within-hospital erosion of hospital operating profits increases the rate of adverse patient safety events suggests that any cost-cutting efforts be carefully designed and managed.

  8. Implementing Patient Safety Initiatives in Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira; Tupper, Judith; Coburn, Andrew; Wakefield, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Implementation of patient safety initiatives can be costly in time and energy. Because of small volumes and limited resources, rural hospitals often are not included in nationally driven patient safety initiatives. This article describes the Tennessee Rural Hospital Patient Safety Demonstration project, whose goal was to strengthen capacity for…

  9. [Evaluation of satisfaction of patients hospitalized at the Kairouan Hospital].

    PubMed

    Mtiraoui, Ali; Alouini, Borhane

    2002-03-01

    The patients' satisfaction studies are more and more utilized to underline the health centers' deficiencies and consequently set improvement action plans. Our survey aims to measure inpatients' satisfaction in its different dimensions. A survey centered around a transversal inquiry has been conducted during a period going from February to April 2000 and reached a total number of 817 patients hospitalized in six service units at kairouan hospital. The data has been gathered by structured interviews led by a previously trained social worker. The investigation tool was a standardized questionnaire prepared by a group of experts from WHO in the Oriental Mediterranean region. The main results are as follow: High satisfaction level concerning the global evaluation of the hospital service units was recorded (score = 70%). The patient who are more satisfied are those who have the feeling that their health situation has considerably improved, and who will probably recommend this hospital to their surroundings. Big proportion of the patients (77%) was expecting better services. The main reason behind their unhappiness is the information emanated whether from the nurses or the doctors, the comfort and the cleanness of waiting room, linen, room comfort, food and the emergency. These results showed that the quality of care improvements priorities, according to patient expectations are especially in relation with the quality of information, the relational aspects and the hospital stay conditions.

  10. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  11. Malnutrition among hospitalized patients in King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh.

    PubMed

    Bani, I A; Al-Kanhal, M A

    1998-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the incidence of malnutrition among hospitalized patients. A cross-sectional study of patients were evaluated for findings suggestive of protein calorie malnutrition (PCM). Hundred and sixty patients admitted to the medical and surgical wards over a period of five months were studied. Anthropometrics and biochemical measurements were used. Nutrition status was calculated based on some nutrition parameters weight for height, midarm, circumference, serum albumin and total lymphocyte count. Anthropometric measurements, weight for height and midarm circumference reflected malnutrition (PCM) of 33.8% and 30% respectively. The overall prevalence of obesity was 21%. A higher proportion (23.9%) of medical cases were found to be obese compared to surgical cases (19.7%). If malnutrition can be documented on hospital admission, attempts can be made to reverse malnutrition in the high risk patients.

  12. [Patients' perception about privacy in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Pupulim, Jussara Simone Lenzi; Sawada, Namie Okino

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to describe the hospitalized patient's perception on privacy, using the content analysis. Thirty-four patients, who have been at least three days hospitalized, participated in the study. The analysis of the information was based on the theoretical reference framework of privacy, and evidenced three thematic categories: dignity and respect, autonomy, personal and territorial space. The subjects pointed out behavioral factors, which contribute or not for the protection and maintenance of the privacy in the hospital, highlighting respect as the most important aspect, followed by personal control over situations that violate privacy. Patients believe that privacy is linked to dignity and respect, depends on the demarcation of the personal/territorial space and the autonomy's security; and that these concepts and attitudes are connected and essential to protect privacy in the hospital context.

  13. Process mapping evaluation of medication reconciliation in academic teaching hospitals: a critical step in quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Anne; Bowen, James M; Patel, Harsit; O'Brien, Chris; You, John J; Tahavori, Roshan; Doleweerd, Jeff; Berezny, Tim; Perri, Dan; Nieuwstraten, Carmine; Troyan, Sue; Patel, Ameen

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication reconciliation (MedRec) has been a mandated or recommended activity in Canada, the USA and the UK for nearly 10 years. Accreditation bodies in North America will soon require MedRec for every admission, transfer and discharge of every patient. Studies of MedRec have revealed unintentional discrepancies in prescriptions but no clear evidence that clinically important outcomes are improved, leading to widely variable practices. Our objective was to apply process mapping methodology to MedRec to clarify current processes and resource usage, identify potential efficiencies and gaps in care, and make recommendations for improvement in the light of current literature evidence of effectiveness. Methods Process engineers observed and recorded all MedRec activities at 3 academic teaching hospitals, from initial emergency department triage to patient discharge, for general internal medicine patients. Process maps were validated with frontline staff, then with the study team, managers and patient safety leads to summarise current problems and discuss solutions. Results Across all of the 3 hospitals, 5 general problem themes were identified: lack of use of all available medication sources, duplication of effort creating inefficiency, lack of timeliness of completion of the Best Possible Medication History, lack of standardisation of the MedRec process, and suboptimal communication of MedRec issues between physicians, pharmacists and nurses. Discussion MedRec as practised in this environment requires improvements in quality, timeliness, consistency and dissemination. Further research exploring efficient use of resources, in terms of personnel and costs, is required. PMID:28039294

  14. Wireless technologies and patient safety in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Justin

    2006-06-01

    In the development of policies for wireless technologies, it is important for healthcare organizations to reduce risks to patients from use of wireless devices. Policy should be devised for instructing hospital staff, visitors, and patients, avoiding unwarranted restrictions but not ignoring evidence regarding potential interference problems, and allowing comparison with other clinical facilities of benefits of policy. To inform policy developers and a general audience of hospital personnel, a review was conducted on the safety of wireless devices for communication within hospitals. This review targeted electromagnetic interference effects of devices on medical devices and summarises key recommendations from published reports and international standards. There is consensus that the highest risk of interference occurs with two-way radios used by emergency crews, followed by mobile phones, while radio local area networks produce negligible interference. Wireless technologies are deemed suitable for use throughout hospital areas including intensive care units and operating rooms, given that recommended separation distances from medical equipment are observed.

  15. When a community hospital becomes an academic health centre.

    PubMed

    Topps, Maureen; Strasser, Roger

    2010-01-01

    With the burgeoning role of distributed medical education and the increasing use of community hospitals for training purposes, challenges arise for undergraduate and postgraduate programs expanding beyond traditional tertiary care models. It is of vital importance to encourage community hospitals and clinical faculty to embrace their roles in medical education for the 21st century. With no university hospitals in northern Ontario, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine and its educational partner hospitals identified questions of concern and collaborated to implement changes. Several themes emerged that are of relevance to any medical educational program expanding beyond its present location. Critical areas for attention include the institutional culture; human, physical and financial resources; and support for educational activities. It is important to establish and maintain the groundwork necessary for the development of thriving integrated community-engaged medical education. Done in tandem with advocacy for change in funding models, this will allow movement beyond the current educational environment. The ultimate goal is successful integration of university and accreditation ideals with practical hands-on medical care and education in new environments.

  16. Patient and hospital characteristics associated with average length of stay.

    PubMed

    Shi, L

    1996-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between patient, hospital characteristics, and hospital average length of stay controlling for major disease categories. A constellation of patient and physician factors were found to be significantly associated with average hospital length of stay.

  17. The Trajectory of Dyspnea in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    DiNino, Ernest; Stefan, Mihaela S.; Priya, Aruna; Martin, Benjamin; Pekow, Penelope S.; Lindenauer, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Context The trajectory of dyspnea for patients hospitalized with acute cardiopulmonary disease, who are not terminally ill, is poorly characterized. Objectives To investigate the natural history of dyspnea during hospitalization, and examine the role that admission diagnosis, and patient factors play in altering symptom resolution. Methods Prospective cohort study of patients hospitalized for an acute cardiopulmonary condition at a large tertiary care center. Dyspnea levels and change in dyspnea score were the main outcomes of interest and were assessed at admission, 24 and 48 hours and at discharge using the verbal 0 - 10 numeric scale. Results Among 295 patients enrolled, the median age was 68 years, and the most common admitting diagnoses were heart failure (32%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (39%), and pneumonia (13%). The median dyspnea score at admission was 9 (interquartile range [IQR] 7, 10); decreased to 4 (IQR 2, 7) within the first 24 hours; and subsequently plateaued at 48 hours. At discharge, the median score had decreased to 2.75 (IQR 1, 4). Compared to patients with heart failure, patients with COPD had higher median dyspnea score at baseline and admission, and experienced a slower resolution of dyspnea symptoms. After adjusting for patient characteristics, the change in dyspnea score from admission to discharge was not significantly different between patients hospitalized with congestive heart failure, COPD or pneumonia. Conclusion Most patients admitted with acute cardiopulmonary conditions have severe dyspnea on presentation, and their symptoms improve rapidly after admission. The trajectory of dyspnea is associated with the underlying disease process. These findings may help set expectations for the resolution of dyspnea symptoms in hospitalized patients with acute cardiopulmonary diseases. PMID:26620232

  18. Contribution of patient and hospital characteristics to adverse patient incidents.

    PubMed Central

    Elnicki, R A; Schmitt, J P

    1980-01-01

    The 1974 medical malpractice "crisis" brought about extensive legislation and insurance regulation in the United States. Hospitals in many states are now required to support risk management programs that include investigation and systematic analyses of adverse patient incidents. However, no research supports the hypothesis that systematic analysis of adverse patient incidents can identify contributory factors. In this study, a simple prediction model was used to estimate relationships between adverse incidents and selected patient and environmental characteristics in a large hospital. While some of the incident-characteristic relationships were significant, none of the estimated equations yielded results that could be logically translated into policy recommendations for the hospital. These results point to the need for further research. The benefits that positive research results would have for patients, hospitals, an the bill-paying public are obvious. Additional negative results would suggest that many legislative bodies and regulatory agencies were presumptions in requiring hospitals to conduct analyses of incidents. PMID:7461973

  19. Measuring patient-perceived hospital service quality: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Pai, Yogesh P; Chary, Satyanarayana T

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Although measuring healthcare service quality is not a new phenomenon, the instruments used to measure are timeworn. With the shift in focus to patient centric processes in hospitals and recognizing healthcare to be different compared to other services, service quality measurement needs to be tuned specifically to healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to design a conceptual framework for measuring patient perceived hospital service quality (HSQ), based on existing service quality literature. Design/methodology/approach - Using HSQ theories, expanding existing healthcare service models and literature, a conceptual framework is proposed to measure HSQ. The paper outlines patient perceived service quality dimensions. Findings - An instrument for measuring HSQ dimensions is developed and compared with other service quality measuring instruments. The latest dimensions are in line with previous studies, but a relationship dimension is added. Practical implications - The framework empowers managers to assess healthcare quality in corporate, public and teaching hospitals. Originality/value - The paper helps academics and practitioners to assess HSQ from a patient perspective.

  20. Epidemiology of hospitalized burns patients in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chien, Wu-Chien; Pai, Lu; Lin, Chao-Cheng; Chen, Heng-Chang

    2003-09-01

    Previous studies based on either single hospital data or sampling of specific groups of hospitalized burns victims in Taiwan have provided only minimal epidemiological information. The study is designed to provide additional data on the epidemiology of hospitalized burns patients in Taiwan. Data were obtained from the Burn Injury Information System (BIIS), which brings together information supplied by 34 contracted hospitals. The study time course spanned a 2-year period from July 1997 to June 1999. Patient characteristics (age, sex, education level, etc.), causes and severity of injuries, and medical care measures were explored. A total of 4741 patients were registered with BIIS over the study period. The majority of hospitalized patients (67%) were male. The age distribution of burns patients showed peaks occurring at the age groups of 0-5 and 35-44 years. Over the time course of a day, burn injuries occurred more frequently from 10:00 to 12:00 h and 16:00 to 18:00 h. Injuries suspected as the result of suicide, homicide or child abuse accounted for 4.8% of hospitalized cases. More than 48% of the burns occurred in the home. The leading type of burn injury was scalding, followed by naked flame, explosion, electrical burns, and chemical burns due to caustic or corrosive substances. The mean percent total body surface area (%TBSA) for adults was 19%, and for young children was 12%. The average length of hospital stay was 18 days. In conclusion, children under 5 years and adults between 35 and 44 years of age are two high-risk groups for burn injuries. Corresponding to meal preparation time, hot substances such as boiling water, hot soup, etc. are the most common agents responsible for scalds. Prevention programs for reducing the risk of burn injuries during cooking and eating are required, especially for parents with young children.

  1. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  2. Cultural Diversity in the Curriculum: Perceptions and Attitudes of Irish Hospitality and Tourism Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Frances; Hearns, Niamh; Baum, Tom; Murray, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Academics are facing significant challenges in preparing indigenous students for employment in the multicultural working environment of hospitality and tourism organisations. In dealing with the impact of the new skills and flexibilities demanded by increasing globalisation, the indigenous workforce needs to possess a multicultural perspective and…

  3. Hospital volume, hospital teaching status, patient socioeconomic status, and outcomes in patients hospitalized with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    McCavit, Timothy L.; Lin, Hua; Zhang, Song; Ahn, Chul; Quinn, Charles T.; Flores, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) accounts for ~100,000 hospitalizations in the US annually. Quality of care for hospitalized SCD patients has been insufficiently studied. Therefore, we aimed to examine whether four potential determinants of quality care, [1] hospital volume, [2] hospital teaching status, [3] patient socioeconomic status (SES), and [4] patient insurance status are associated with three quality indicators for patients with SCD: [1] mortality, [2] length of stay (LOS), and [3] hospitalization costs. We conducted an analysis of the 2003–2005 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) datasets. We identified cases using all ICD-9CM codes for SCD. Both overall and SCD-specific hospital volumes were examined. Multivariable analyses included mixed linear models to examine LOS and costs, and logistic regression to examine mortality. About 71,481 SCD discharges occurred from 2003 to 2005. Four hundred and twenty five patients died, yielding a mortality rate of 0.6%. Multivariable analyses revealed that SCD patients admitted to lower SCD-specific volume hospitals had [1] increased adjusted odds of mortality (quintiles 1–4 vs. quintile 5: OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.05, 1.76) and [2] decreased LOS (quintiles 1–4 vs. quintile 5, effect estimate −0.08; 95% CI, −0.12, −0.04). These are the first data describing associations between lower SCD-specific hospital volumes and poorer outcomes. PMID:21442644

  4. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients’ expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved. PMID:25419410

  5. Assigning a team-based pager for on-call physicians reduces paging errors in a large academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Lisa; Chi, Jeffrey; Kulik, Carol; Momeni, Arash; Shelton, Andrew; DePorte, Cynthia; Hopkins, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    As complexity of care of hospitalized patients has increased, the need for communication and collaboration among members of the team caring for the patient has become increasingly important. This often takes the form of a nurse's need to contact a patient's physician to discuss some aspect of care and modify treatment plans. Errors in communication delay care and can pose risk to patients. This report describes the successful implementation of a standardized team-based paging system at an academic center. Results showed a substantial improvement in nurses' perceptions of knowing how to contact the correct physician when discussion of the patient's care is needed. This improvement was found across multiple medical and surgical specialties and was particularly effective for services with the greatest communication problems.

  6. The Effect of Availability of Manpower on Trauma Resuscitation Times in a Tertiary Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Nathaniel Xin Ern; Koh, Zhi Xiong; Nadkarni, Nivedita; Singaram, Kanageswari; Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Background For trauma patients, delays to assessment, resuscitation, and definitive care affect outcomes. We studied the effects of resuscitation area occupancy and trauma team size on trauma team resuscitation speed in an observational study at a tertiary academic institution in Singapore. Methods From January 2014 to January 2015, resuscitation videos of trauma team activated patients with an Injury Severity Score of 9 or more were extracted for review within 14 days by independent reviewers. Exclusion criteria were patients dead on arrival, inter-hospital transfers, and up-triaged patients. Data captured included manpower availability (trauma team size and resuscitation area occupancy), assessment (airway, breathing, circulation, logroll), interventions (vascular access, imaging), and process-of-care time intervals (time to assessment/intervention/adjuncts, time to imaging, and total time in the emergency department). Clinical data were obtained by chart review and from the trauma registry. Results Videos of 70 patients were reviewed over a 13-month period. The median time spent in the emergency department was 154.9 minutes (IQR 130.7–207.5) and the median resuscitation team size was 7, with larger team sizes correlating with faster process-of-care time intervals: time to airway assessment (p = 0.08) and time to disposition (p = 0.04). The mean resuscitation area occupancy rate (RAOR) was 1.89±2.49, and the RAOR was positively correlated with time spent in the emergency department (p = 0.009). Conclusion Our results suggest that adequate staffing for trauma teams and resuscitation room occupancy are correlated with faster trauma resuscitation and reduced time spent in the emergency department. PMID:27136299

  7. Hospital dental practice in special patients

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Espín-Gálvez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Dental patients with special needs are people with different systemic diseases, multiple disorders or severe physical and/or mental disabilities. A Medline search was made, yielding a total of 29 articles that served as the basis for this study, which offers a brief description of the dental intervention protocols in medically compromised patients. Dental treatment in patients with special needs, whether presenting medical problems or disabilities, is sometimes complex. For this reason the hospital should be regarded as the ideal setting for the care of these individuals. Before starting any dental intervention, a correct patient evaluation is needed, based on a correct anamnesis, medical records and interconsultation reports, and with due assessment of the medical risks involved. The hospital setting offers the advantage of access to electronic medical records and to data referred to any complementary tests that may have been made, and we moreover have the possibility of performing treatments under general anesthesia. In this context, ambulatory major surgery is the best approach when considering general anesthesia in patients of this kind. Key words:Hospital dentistry, special patients, medically compromised patients. PMID:24121921

  8. [Infections in hospitalized patients with cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Mathurin, Sebastián; Chapelet, Adrián; Spanevello, Valeria; Sayago, Gabriel; Balparda, Cecilia; Virga, Eliana; Beraudo, Nora; Bartolomeo, Mirta

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the prevalence and the clinical relevance of bacterial and nonbacterial infections in predominantly alcoholic cirrhotic patients, admitted to an intermediate complexity hospital, and we also compared the clinical characteristics, laboratory and evolution of these patients with and without bacterial infection in a prospective study of cohort. A total of 211 consecutive admissions in 132 cirrhotic patients, between April 2004 and July 2007, were included. The mean age was 51.8 (+/-8) years, being 84.8% male. The alcoholic etiology of cirrhosis was present in 95.4%. One hundred and twenty nine episodes of bacterial infections were diagnosed in 99/211 (46.9%) admissions, community-acquired in 79 (61.2%) and hospital-acquired in 50 (38.8%): spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (23.3%); urinary tract infection (21.7%); pneumonia (17.8%); infection of the skin and soft parts (17.1%), sepsis by spontaneous bacteremia (7.7%); other bacterial infections (12.4%). Gram-positive organisms were responsible for 52.2% of total bacterial infections documented cases. There were eight serious cases of tuberculosis, fungal and parasitic infections; the prevalence of tuberculosis was 6% with an annual mortality of 62.5%; 28.1% (9/32) of the coproparasitological examination had Strongyloides stercolaris. The in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients with bacterial infection than in non-infected patients (32.4% vs. 13.2%; p=0.02). The independent factors associated with mortality were bacterial infections, the score of Child-Pügh and creatininemia > 1.5 mg/dl. By the multivariate analysis, leukocytosis and hepatic encephalopathy degree III/IV were independent factors associated to bacterial infection. This study confirms that bacterial and nonbacterial infections are a frequent and severe complication in hospitalized cirrhotic patients, with an increase of in-hospital mortality.

  9. Hospital patient loyalty: causes and correlates.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to test whether factors associated with customer and employee loyalty are linked to hospital loyalty, and to measure the relative strength of the associations between traditional patient satisfaction factors and loyalty as compared to non-traditional factors.

  10. Evaluating an educational approach to improve pain assessment in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Teresa King; Hubbartt, Elizabeth; Carroll, Suzanne A; Hudson-Barr, Diane

    2007-01-01

    Pain assessment is a multifaceted process. A common assumption is that all nurses have the same baseline knowledge about pain, a potentially erroneous assumption that influences clinical practice. Nurses have varied experiences in education and pain management. This article describes a research project conducted by the hospital's clinical nurse specialist group to evaluate the effects of a nursing education program on pain assessment and pain management of hospitalized patients in an 841-bed academic medical center.

  11. Changing Environment and the Academic Medical Center: The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyssel, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Johns Hopkins Hospital expanded its health care delivery capabilities and strengthened its position in the marketplace by acquisitions of and mergers with other hospitals and a health maintenance organization. The resulting conglomerate has achieved its goals of expanding patient care, broadening the patient base, and enlarging the asset base and…

  12. From admission to discharge: patterns of interpreter use among resident physicians caring for hospitalized patients with limited english proficiency.

    PubMed

    Tang, Amy S; Kruger, Jenna F; Quan, Judy; Fernandez, Alicia

    2014-11-01

    Resident physicians' use of professional interpreters drives communication with hospitalized patients with limited English proficiency (LEP). We surveyed residents from three specialties across two hospitals affiliated with one academic medical institution about their communication with their last hospitalized LEP patient. Among 149 respondents (73% response rate), 71% reported using professional interpreters for fewer than 60% of hospital encounters. Most (91%) perceived their quality of communication with hospitalized LEP patients as worse than with English-speaking patients. Professional interpreter use varied substantially by resident and by hospital encounter, with more reporting use of ad hoc interpreters, their own language skills, or not talking to the patient due to time constraints during pre-rounds (39%), team rounds (49%), or check-ins (40%) than during procedural consents (9%) or family meetings (17%). The reported variation suggests targets for quality improvement efforts and the need for clear enforceable guidelines on resident communication with hospitalized LEP patients.

  13. Managing patients for zoonotic disease in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Clifford; Corning, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Zoonoses involve infections and infestations transmissible from animals to humans. Zoonoses are a major global threat. Exposure to zoonotic pathogens exists in various settings including encroachment on nature; foreign travel; pet keeping; bushmeat consumption; attendance at zoological parks, petting zoos, school ‘animal contact experiences’, wildlife markets, circuses, and domesticated and exotic animal farms. Under-ascertainment is believed to be common and the frequency of some zoonotic disease appears to be increasing. Zoonoses include direct, indirect and aerosolized transmission. Improved awareness of zoonoses in the hospital environment may be important to the growing need for prevention and control. We reviewed relevant literature for the years 2000 to present and identified a significant need for the promotion of awareness and management of zoonoses in the hospital environment. This article provides a new decision-tree, as well as staff and patient guidance on the prevention and control of zoonoses associated with hospitals. PMID:24040497

  14. Evaluation of performance of the Medical Research Department in ‘Research naive’ non-academic hospital: An audit

    PubMed Central

    Kuyare, Mukta Sunil; Sarve, Parag Vijayrao; Dalal, Komal S.; Tripathi, Raakhi K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Conducting medical research is not limited to academia and pharmaceutical industry but even multispeciality hospitals need to venture in this area along with patient care. To develop research culture among well-established non-acedemic hospital is always difficult and challenging task. This article attempts to evaluate the performance of the department in ‘Research naïve’ hospital in the last two years and review the strengths and challenges it faced at each step. Methods: This was a retrospective document analysis study evaluating the steps towards setting and sustaining of Medical Research Department of Bhaktivedanta Hospital during the period of January 2013 to June 2015 (30 Months). The authors developed a checklist (along with performance indicators) to assess the Preparatory phase and Activity phase of the research department which were evaluated by Institute Quality Management Team. Each step of both phases was also reviewed in terms of strengths and challenges as perceived by the authors. Results: During 2 year journey of research naïve Hospital, Institute had witnessed Hospital initiated (n=24, 59%) and sponsored projects (n=17, 41%) in all specialties. HRC reviewed (n=2.13) projects per meeting for administrative consideration while IEC reviewed (n=2.15) projects for scientific and ethical review. Challenges during preparatory phases were circumvent by immense cooperation of hospital management for initial investment, sensitization through research workshops for consultants, established procedures and trained support manpower and constant encouragement by research coordinator. Conclusion: Considering evaluation of 41 studies in very first 2 years in ‘Research naive non academic institute demonstrated successful implementation of trio model of Hospital Research Committee for administrative review, IEC for scientific-ethical review, centralized MRD for coordinating all research projects under one roof which may act as role model for

  15. The Evolution of the Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario Statement of Principles--A Successful Harmonization Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Katie; Lampson, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    To improve efficiency, consistency and transparency in clinical trial contract negotiations with industry sponsors, a Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) committee facilitated the development of standard principles for member hospitals to follow during contract negotiation. Hospitals were encouraged to provide a link to the CAHO…

  16. [Bioethics and drug experimentation in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Sinaccio, G; Robert, E; Sinaccio, C; Robert, E

    1993-01-01

    The authors discuss about clinical experimentation with drugs involving hospitalized subjects in consideration of four principles of Bioethics: Autonomy, Beneficence, Non Maleficence and Justice. This article explores also the problems linked to the application of good clinical practice according to the European and Italian recent rules. Human integrity, respect of patient's dignity, informed consent, correct methods, placebo, Ethics committees represent the essential basis for those researchers that intend conduct clinical trials really "with subject and not on the subject".

  17. A detailed description and assessment of outcomes of patients with hospital recorded QTc prolongation.

    PubMed

    Laksman, Zachary; Momciu, Bogdan; Seong, You Won; Burrows, Patricia; Conacher, Susan; Manlucu, Jaimie; Leong-Sit, Peter; Gula, Lorne J; Skanes, Allan C; Yee, Raymond; Klein, George J; Krahn, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Corrected QT (QTc) interval prolongation has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality in many clinical settings and is a common finding in hospitalized patients. The causes and outcomes of patients with extreme QTc interval prolongation during a hospital admission are poorly described. The aim of this study was to prospectively identify patients with automated readings of QTc intervals >550 ms at 1 academic tertiary hospital. One hundred seventy-two patients with dramatic QTc interval prolongation (574 ± 53 ms) were identified (mean age 67.6 ± 15.1 years, 48% women). Most patients had underlying heart disease (60%), predominantly ischemic cardiomyopathy (43%). At lease 1 credible and presumed reversible cause associated with QTc interval prolongation was identified in 98% of patients. The most common culprits were QTc interval-prolonging medications, which were deemed most responsible in 48% of patients, with 25% of these patients taking ≥2 offending drugs. Two patients were diagnosed with congenital long-QT syndrome. Patients with electrocardiograms available before and after hospital admission demonstrated significantly lower preadmission and postdischarge QTc intervals compared with the QTc intervals recorded in the hospital. In conclusion, in-hospital mortality was high in the study population (29%), with only 4% of patients experiencing arrhythmic deaths, all of which were attributed to secondary causes.

  18. Patient education through the Internet: academic and private practice sites.

    PubMed

    Rozental, Tamara D; Bozentka, David J; Beredjiklian, Pedro K

    2004-04-01

    Although Internet use among patients continues to increase, the quality of disseminated information in orthopaedic surgery often is substandard. We reviewed and compared the web sites of academic orthopaedic surgery departments and private practices and rated their informational content with respect to patient education. Only 11.5% of academic sites and 52% of private practice sites list information on common orthopaedic conditions. Of these, less than 1/3 have information on various topics, and few have links to other patient education sites. Private practice web sites make better use of the Internet to provide patients with practical information about their individual practices. Few sites post the date of last update and those that do often have not been updated for more than 6 months. Academic and private practices underutilize the Internet as an educational resource. Orthopaedic surgeons are missing an important opportunity to provide accurate and reliable information to their patients.

  19. [Prevention of fungal infections in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Seeliger, H P; Schröter, G

    1984-06-01

    Hospital acquired infections due to fungi are primarily caused by yeast species of the genus Candida and mould species of the genus Aspergillus. Underlying disease with severely impaired defence mechanisms as well as certain forms of immunosuppressive and aggressive chemotherapy are the most important prerequisites for such secondary fungal infections. Aspergillus spec. usually infect man via exogenous routes, whereas Candida spec. mostly originate from the patient's own microbial flora. Under certain circumstances invasion of tissues follows (endomycosis). Exogenous Candida infections may likewise occur through contaminated hands of personnel and medical devices. The density of yeast cell distribution in hospital wards decreases with the distance from the primary source: the Candida infected human patient. Preventive measures protecting the patient at risk include: Permanent surveillance by routine cultural and serological examinations for the detection of an early infection of the skin, mouth, oesophagus, urinary tract, vagina and the bowel. Monitoring of patients is essential for early detection of dissemination and contributes to the control of fungal decontamination measures. Selective local decontamination is effected by the use of nonabsorbable compounds such as nystatin and amphotericin B in the gastrointestinal tract, and in oral and genital mucous membranes. Oral administration of ketoconazole has also been recommended. For the disinfection of skin appropriate chemicals are available. In the control of the environment of the endangered patient special attention must be paid to meticulous management of catheters. These measures are to be supported by careful disinfection policy concerning the hands of personnel and medical equipment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Patient Safety Outcomes in Small Urban and Small Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vartak, Smruti; Ward, Marcia M.; Vaughn, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess patient safety outcomes in small urban and small rural hospitals and to examine the relationship of hospital and patient factors to patient safety outcomes. Methods: The Nationwide Inpatient Sample and American Hospital Association annual survey data were used for analyses. To increase comparability, the study sample was…

  1. Bedding, not boarding. Psychiatric patients boarded in hospital EDs create crisis for patient care and hospital finances.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth

    2013-11-18

    As the supply of psychiatric beds dwindles, hospitals are devising innovative ways handle psych patients who come through the emergency department. Some collaborate with other hospitals, use separate pysch EDs or refer patients to residential treatment centers.

  2. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  3. Patient management: measuring patients' expectations and perceptions of service quality in a dental training hospital.

    PubMed

    White, J G; Slabber, J; Schreuder, A

    2001-04-01

    The difference between service quality expectations and perceptions (experiences) of patients (customers) attending a dental training hospital was investigated by using a modified version of the Parasuraman SERVQUAL model. A questionnaire comprising 28 service quality-related statements and four open-ended questions was used at the interviews. The study showed that 11.6% of respondents experienced problems with the service. A principal component factor analysis indicated that two of the five dimensions of service quality, namely reliability and assurance, contributed to 59% of service level variance. Female patients showed larger mean differences than male patients. The greater the number of visits to the hospital, the smaller the difference between expectations and perceptions. Patients in the category 36-45 years of age, showed larger mean differences than younger or older patients. Respondents with no academic qualifications had lower expectations of the service, while professional people seemed to have more realistic expectations prior to a visit to the hospital than respondents in the technical/clerical category.

  4. Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    BERTI-COUTO, Soraya de Azambuja; COUTO-SOUZA, Paulo Henrique; JACOBS, Reinhilde; NACKAERTS, Olivia; RUBIRA-BULLEN, Izabel Regina Fischer; WESTPHALEN, Fernando Henrique; MOYSÉS, Samuel Jorge; IGNÁCIO, Sérgio Aparecido; da COSTA, Maitê Barroso; TOLAZZI, Ana Lúcia

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of clinical criteria for the diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients. Material and Methods A clinical study was carried out on 145 subjects (48 males; 97 females; aged 20 to 90 years). Each subject was clinically examined, in the morning and in the afternoon, along 1 day. A focused anamnesis allowed identifying symptoms of hyposalivation, like xerostomia complaints (considered as a reference symptom), chewing difficulty, dysphagia and increased frequency of liquid intake. Afterwards, dryness of the mucosa of the cheecks and floor of the mouth, as well as salivary secretion during parotid gland stimulation were assessed during oral examination. Results Results obtained with Chi-square tests showed that 71 patients (48.9%) presented xerostomia complaints, with a significant correlation with all hyposalivation symptoms (p<0.05). Furthermore, xerostomia was also significantly correlated with all data obtained during oral examination in both periods of evaluation (p<0.05). Conclusion Clinical diagnosis of hyposalivation in hospitalized patients is feasible and can provide an immediate and appropriate therapy avoiding further problems and improving their quality of life. PMID:22666830

  5. [Management of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Gracia-Ramos, Abraham Edgar; Cruz-Domínguez, María Pilar; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo Osiris; Morales-González, José Antonio; Vera-Lastra, Olga Lidia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a global health problem and Mexico rank sixth in prevalence of this entity. In our country, is the leading cause of death and is a major cause of hospital care being responsible for about 1 in 5 discharges. In the hospital setting, it has been observed that hyperglycemia, both diabetic and non-diabetic patients, is associated with an increased risk of complications, disability and death, and that adequate control in the blood glucose level produces a reduction in these complications. With these bases, several associations have recommended the treatment of hospital hyperglycemia through insulin administration, with the therapeutic goal of maintaining a fasting blood glucose level between 100-140 mg/dL and glucose at any time of day less than 180 mg/dL. The insulin application method most recommended consisting in a basal-bolus regimen which has shown efficacy with a low risk of hypoglycemia. The usual practice of the application of insulin through a correction scheme should be abandoned because it is inefficient and involves risks.

  6. Do patients "like" good care? measuring hospital quality via Facebook.

    PubMed

    Timian, Alex; Rupcic, Sonia; Kachnowski, Stan; Luisi, Paloma

    2013-01-01

    With the growth of Facebook, public health researchers are exploring the platform's uses in health care. However, little research has examined the relationship between Facebook and traditional hospital quality measures. The authors conducted an exploratory quantitative analysis of hospitals' Facebook pages to assess whether Facebook "Likes" were associated with hospital quality and patient satisfaction. The 30-day mortality rates and patient recommendation rates were used to quantify hospital quality and patient satisfaction; these variables were correlated with Facebook data for 40 hospitals near New York, NY. The results showed that Facebook "Likes" have a strong negative association with 30-day mortality rates and are positively associated with patient recommendation. These exploratory findings suggest that the number of Facebook "Likes" for a hospital may serve as an indicator of hospital quality and patient satisfaction. These findings have implications for researchers and hospitals looking for a quick and widely available measure of these traditional indicators.

  7. Patient-specific academic detailing for smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Margaret; Gagnon, Antony; Levine, Mitchell; Thabane, Lehana; Rodriguez, Christine; Dolovich, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe and to determine the feasibility of a patient-specific academic detailing (PAD) smoking cessation (SC) program in a primary care setting. Design Descriptive cohort feasibility study. Setting Hamilton, Ont. Participants Pharmacists, physicians, nurse practitioners, and their patients. Interventions Integrated pharmacists received basic academic detailing training and education on SC and then delivered PAD to prescribers using structured verbal education and written materials. Data were collected using structured forms. Main outcome measures Five main feasibility criteria were generated based on Canadian academic detailing programs: PAD coordinator time to train pharmacists less than 40 hours; median time of SC education per pharmacist less than 20 hours; median time per PAD session less than 60 minutes for initial visit; percentage of prescribers receiving PAD within 3 months greater than 50%; and number of new SC referrals to pharmacists at 6 months more than 10 patients per 1.0 full-time equivalent (FTE) pharmacist (total of approximately 30 patients). Results Eight pharmacists (5.8 FTE) received basic academic detailing training and education on SC PAD. Forty-eight physicians and 9 nurse practitioners consented to participate in the study. The mean PAD coordinator training time was 29.1 hours. The median time for SC education was 3.1 hours. The median times for PAD sessions were 15 and 25 minutes for an initial visit and follow-up visit, respectively. The numbers of prescribers who had received PAD at 3 and 6 months were 50 of 64 (78.1%) and 57 of 64 (89.1%), respectively. The numbers of new SC referrals at 3 and 6 months were 11 patients per FTE pharmacist (total of 66 patients) and 34 patients per FTE pharmacist (total of 200 patients), respectively. Conclusion This study met the predetermined feasibility criteria with respect to the management, resources, process, and scientific components. Further study is warranted to determine

  8. Getting published in an academic-community hospital: the success of writing groups.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Deitrick, Lynn; Mahady, Erica T; Moser, Kathleen; Gertner, Eric J; Sabino, Judith N

    2012-01-01

    Expressed barriers to writing for publication include lack of time, competing demands, anxiety about writing and a lack of knowledge about the submission process. These limitations can be magnified for practitioners in non-university environments in which there are fewer incentives or expectations regarding academic publication productivity. However, as members of professional disciplines, practitioners have both the responsibility and, oftentimes, the insights to make valuable contributions to the professional literature. Collaborative writing groups can be a useful intervention to overcome barriers, provide the necessary skills and encouragement as well as produce publications and conference presentations that make worthy additions to the professional body of knowledge. This article discusses the evolution and outcomes of writing groups at Lehigh Valley Health Network and describes how this strategy can be adopted by other academic community hospitals to promote professional development and publication.

  9. Tolerance studies with brotizolam in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    von Delbrück, Orla; Goetzke, Edda; Nagel, Cornelia

    1983-01-01

    1 A long-term study of brotizolam (minimum 4 weeks: maximum 26 weeks) was carried out in hospitalized patients (29 to 95 years) who complained of sleep disturbance. 3.0% of the patients used 0.125 mg, 86.4% used 0.25 mg, and 10.0% used 0.5 mg daily. During the trial there was no evidence of tolerance. 2 There were no symptoms of overdosage, physical and psychological dependency or withdrawal, and there were no interactions with the concurrently prescribed drugs. 3 There were no changes in vital functions, haematology, or in the biochemical investigations of blood or urine which could be attributed to the drug. PMID:6362697

  10. Rural Hospital Patient Safety Systems Implementation in Two States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Daniel R.; Hewett, John E.; Ge, Bin; Schubert, Shari

    2007-01-01

    Context and Purpose: With heightened attention to medical errors and patient safety, we surveyed Utah and Missouri hospitals to assess the "state of the art" in patient safety systems and identify changes over time. This study examines differences between urban and rural hospitals. Methods: Survey of all acute care hospitals in Utah and…

  11. Awareness and practice of patients' rights among hospitalized patients at Wad-Medani Teaching Hospital, Sudan.

    PubMed

    Younis, Abobaker A H; Hassan, Amal H A; Dmyatti, Eylaph M E H; Elmubarak, Mehad A H; Alterife, Rahma A A; Salim, Rawan E O; Mohamed, Samar A B; Ahmed, Wefag S A M

    2017-03-30

    Patients' rights are a fundamental human right and an important part of modern health care practice. This is a cross-sectional descriptive analytic study, conducted amongst 263 patients at Wadi-Medani Teaching Hospital, Sudan, in March-April 2015. Most patients (95.2%) did not know about the Bill of Rights and most of them (92.8%) were not able to mention any of the patients' rights. The most practiced rights were: the right to be asked for permission before examination (88.1%), proper handling (87.8%), safety of the hospital (87%), presence of a third person when examining a female by a male doctor (85.6%), and admission file confidentiality (75.5%). The awareness of Sudan FMOH Patients' Bill of Rights was very low among patients at Wad-Medani Teaching Hospital, yet they showed a high satisfaction rate probably due to their low socioeconomic status, educational level and expectations. Therefore, awareness of patients' rights must be increased.

  12. Guidelines for the Treatment of Smoking in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Ruiz, Carlos A; de Granda Orive, Jose Ignacio; Solano Reina, Segismundo; Riesco Miranda, Juan Antonio; de Higes Martinez, Eva; Pascual Lledó, Jose Francisco; Garcia Rueda, Marcos; Lorza Blasco, Jose Javier; Signes Costa-Miñana, Jaime; Valencia Azcona, Borja; Villar Laguna, Cristina; Cristóbal Fernández, Maribel

    2016-12-22

    Between 15 and 27% of patients admitted to Spanish hospitals are smokers. Hospitalization is an ideal time for a smoker to decide to quit. We performed a MEDLINE search of controlled, randomized or observational studies associated with helping hospitalized patients quit smoking, published between January 1, 2002 and September 30, 2015. On the basis of the results of those studies, we have issued some recommendations for the treatment of smoking in hospitalized patients. The recommendations were drawn up according to the GRADE system. Offering the smoker psychological counselling and prolonging follow-up for at least 4 weeks after discharge is the most effective recommendation for helping hospitalized patients to quit.

  13. A small grant funding program to promote innovation at an academic research hospital.

    PubMed

    Orrell, Kelsey; Yankanah, Rosanna; Heon, Elise; Wright, James G

    2015-10-01

    Innovation is important for the improvement of health care. A small grant innovation funding program was implemented by the Hospital for Sick Children(SickKids) for the Perioperative Services group, awarding relatively small funds (approximately $10 000) in order to stimulate innovation. Of 48 applications,26 (54.2%) different innovation projects were funded for a total allocation of $227 870. This program demonstrated the ability of small grants to stimulate many applications with novel ideas, a wide range of innovations and reasonable academic productivity.

  14. [The Health Technology Assessment Engine of the Academic Hospital of Udine: first appraisal].

    PubMed

    Vidale, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The Health Technology Assessment Engine (HTAE) of the Academic Hospital of Udine aggregates about one hundred of health technology assessment websites. It was born thanks to Google technology in 2008 and after about four years of testing it became public for everybody from the Homepage of the Italian Society of Health Technology Assessment (SIHTA). In this paper the first results obtained with this resource are reported. The role of the scientific librarian is examined not only as a support specialist in bibliographic search but also as a creative expert in managing new technologies for the community.

  15. Highlighting Hospital and Patient Concerns this Election Year.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Campaign 2016 is in full swing, and the American Hospital Association is seizing the opportunity to make sure the concerns of patients and hospitals are heard. On the front burner: escalating drug prices.

  16. Nursing, Pharmacy, and Prescriber Knowledge and Perceptions of High-Alert Medications in a Large, Academic Medical Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Melanie J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-alert medications pose a greater risk of causing significant harm to patients if used in error. The Joint Commission requires that hospitals define institution-specific high-alert medications and implement processes to ensure safe medication use. Method: Nursing, pharmacy, and prescribers were asked to voluntarily complete a 34-question survey to assess their knowledge, experience, and perceptions regarding high-alert medications in an academic hospital. Results: The majority of respondents identified the organization’s high-alert medications, the consequences of an error involving a high-alert medication, and the reversal agent. Most of the risk-reduction strategies within the institution were viewed as being effective by respondents. Forty-five percent of the respondents utilized a high-alert medication in the previous 24 hours. Only 14.2% had experienced an error with a high-alert medication in the previous 12 months, with 46% being near misses. The survey found the 5 rights for medication administration were not being utilized consistently. Respondents indicated that work experience or hospital orientation is the preferred learning experience for high-alert medications. Conclusions: This study assessed all disciplines involved in the medication use process. Perceptions about high-alert medications differ between disciplines. Ongoing discipline-specific education is required to ensure that individuals accept accountability in the medication use process and to close knowledge gaps on high-alert medications and risk-reduction strategies. PMID:26446747

  17. Inpatient Hospitalization of Oncology Patients: Are We Missing an Opportunity for End-of-Life Care?

    PubMed Central

    Rocque, Gabrielle B.; Barnett, Anne E.; Illig, Lisa C.; Eickhoff, Jens C.; Bailey, Howard H.; Campbell, Toby C.; Stewart, James A.; Cleary, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Despite advances in the care of patients with cancer over the last 10 years, cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States. Many patients receive aggressive, in-hospital end-of-life care at high cost. There are few data on outcomes after unplanned hospitalization of patients with metastatic cancer. Methods: In 2000 and 2010, data were collected on admissions, interventions, and survival for patients admitted to an academic inpatient medical oncology service. Results: The 2000 survey included 191 admissions of 151 unique patients. The 2010 survey assessed 149 admissions of 119 patients. Lung, GI, and breast cancers were the most common cancer diagnoses. In the 2010 assessment, pain was the most common chief complaint, accounting for 28%. Although symptoms were the dominant reason for admission in 2010, procedures and imaging were common in both surveys. The median survival of patients after discharge was 4.7 months in 2000 and 3.4 months in 2010. Despite poor survival in this patient population, hospice was recommended in only 23% and 24% of patients in 2000 and 2010, respectively. Seventy percent of patients were discharged home without additional services. Conclusion: On the basis of our data, an unscheduled hospitalization for a patient with advanced cancer strongly predicts a median survival of fewer than 6 months. We believe that hospital admission represents an opportunity to commence and/or consolidate appropriate palliative care services and end-of-life care. PMID:23633971

  18. The contributions of library and information services to hospitals and academic health sciences centers: a preliminary taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Abels, Eileen G.; Cogdill, Keith W.; Zach, Lisl

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: This article presents a taxonomy of the contributions of library and information services (LIS) in hospitals and academic health sciences centers. The taxonomy emerges from a study with three objectives: to articulate the value of LIS for hospitals and academic health sciences centers in terms of contributions to organizational missions and goals, to identify measures and measurable surrogates associated with each LIS contribution, and to document best practices for communicating the value of LIS to institutional administrators. Methods: The preliminary taxonomy of LIS contributions in hospitals and academic health sciences centers is based on a review of the literature, twelve semi-structured interviews with LIS directors and institutional administrators, and a focus group of administrators from five academic, teaching, and nonteaching hospitals. Results: Derived from the balanced scorecard approach, the taxonomy of LIS contributions is organized on the basis of five mission-level concepts and fifteen organizational goals. LIS contributions are included only if they have measurable surrogates. Conclusions: The taxonomy of LIS contributions offers a framework for the collection of both quantitative and qualitative data in support of communicating the value of LIS in hospitals and academic health sciences centers. PMID:12113510

  19. A Comparative Study of Terminally Ill Hospice and Hospital Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labus, Janet G.; Dambrot, Faye H.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated differences between 28 hospice and 28 hospital patients who died. Comparison found that hospice patients were younger, had more people living in the home, and had shorter disease history. Age, number of people living in the home, and primary cancer site significantly discriminated between hospice and hospital patients and predicted…

  20. Exploring improvements in patient logistics in Dutch hospitals with a survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Research showed that promising approaches such as benchmarking, operations research, lean management and six sigma, could be adopted to improve patient logistics in healthcare. To our knowledge, little research has been conducted to obtain an overview on the use, combination and effects of approaches to improve patient logistics in hospitals. We therefore examined the approaches and tools used to improve patient logistics in Dutch hospitals, the reported effects of these approaches on performance, the applied support structure and the methods used to evaluate the effects. Methods A survey among experts on patient logistics in 94 Dutch hospitals. The survey data were analysed using cross tables. Results Forty-eight percent of all hospitals participated. Ninety-eight percent reported to have used multiple approaches, 39% of them used five or more approaches. Care pathways were the preferred approach by 43% of the hospitals, followed by business process re-engineering and lean six sigma (both 13%). Flowcharts were the most commonly used tool, they were used on a regular basis by 94% of the hospitals. Less than 10% of the hospitals used data envelopment analysis and critical path analysis on a regular basis. Most hospitals (68%) relied on external support for process analyses and education on patient logistics, only 24% had permanent internal training programs on patient logistics. Approximately 50% of the hospitals that evaluated the effects of approaches on efficiency, throughput times and financial results, reported that they had accomplished their goals. Goal accomplishment in general hospitals ranged from 63% to 67%, in academic teaching hospitals from 0% to 50%, and in teaching hospitals from 25% to 44%. More than 86% performed an evaluation, 53% performed a post-intervention measurement. Conclusions Patient logistics appeared to be a rather new subject as most hospitals had not selected a single approach, they relied on external support and they did

  1. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  2. Dietary tyramine restriction for hospitalized patients on linezolid: an update.

    PubMed

    Rumore, Martha M; Roth, Marc; Orfanos, Areti

    2010-06-01

    Linezolid is a weak, reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitor. The current practice at most hospitals is to place patients receiving linezolid on a tyramine-restricted diet. This process typically involves both the hospital's pharmacy department and the food and nutrition department. A literature search assessing the interaction between linezolid and tyramine was conducted, and the amount of tyramine in a typical unrestricted diet for a hospitalized patient was reviewed. Although patients receiving linezolid should avoid consuming large amounts of foods containing high concentrations of tyramine, such foods in large amounts are not components of meals for inpatients. Therefore, dietary tyramine restriction in hospitalized patients is not generally required.

  3. [Means of communication for an early detection of diabetic nephropathy among the diabetics followed in the academic hospital of Cotonou].

    PubMed

    Vigan, Jacques; Adja, Éric; Zannou, Judith; Agboton, Bruno L; Kérékou, Célestine A; Amoussou-Guenou, Daniel; Zannou, Marcel D; Djrolo, François

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the level of knowledge and the means of communication for early detection of diabetic nephropathy. This is a prospective study which took place from 6 February to 31 May 2012, in the Academic Clinics of Nephrology-Hemodialysis and the Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases. Included all patients with diabetes mellitus in two sexes, older than fifteen years and hospitalized in one of these two clinicals or received in consultation during the study period. A questionnaire is used for data collection. Statistical analysis was performed by STATA 11(®) in its English version. One hundred and sixty patients were enrolled. More than 4 out of 5 patients had reported knowledge of diabetes mellitus while only 26.67% had acknowledged that manifests itself by high glycemia. More than half of the patients (57.50%) had said that diabetes mellitus can be complicated by renal impairment. Three out of four diabetics (75.63%) didn't know that it is possible to make an early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy. The radio and television broadcasts, and sensitizations during medical consultations represented the best means of communication for early detection of diabetic nephropathy. The combination of several means of communication will raise awareness on early detection of diabetic nephropathy.

  4. Hot bitumen burns: 92 hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Baruchin, A M; Schraf, S; Rosenberg, L; Sagi, A A

    1997-08-01

    Bitumen burns while comprising a small percentage of all types of burns are troublesome. They affect persons engaged in gainful employment which the burns then curtail, as well as requiring special attention because the substance adheres to the skin and is therefore difficult to remove. Ninety-two consecutive patients with such burns who were admitted as in-patients over a 10-year period (1985-1995) have been reviewed. Most of the burns occurred on a worksite and involved active young persons (mean age 29.6 years) the mean size of the burn was 3.87 per cent TBSA, mainly affecting the upper extremities and hands. Mean hospitalization time was 10.6 days. Bitumen burns are fully predictable and can easily be prevented by avoiding unsafe practice and/or equipment. Bitumen is a general term for petroleum-derived substances ranging from true petroleum through so-called mineral tars, to asphalt. Asphalt (Asphaltum) is a semi-solid mixture of several hydrocarbons probably formed by the evaporation of the lighter or more volatile constituents. It is amorphous of low specific gravity, 1-2, with a black or brownish black colour and pitchy lustre. At room temperature it is solid becoming molten and spreadable when heated to 93 degrees C and over. Roofing tars and asphalts are usually heated to temperatures of 232 degrees C to achieve desirable viscosities (e.g. for spraying), whereas lower temperatures are required for the manageable form to pave roads. Notable localities for asphaltum are the island of Trinidad and the Dead Sea region where lake asphaltums were long known to the ancient. Ironically, none of the 92 patients who were treated for bitumen injuries in the 'Soroka' (Beer-Sheba, Israel) and 'Barzilai' (Ashkelon, Israel) Medical Centres (80 and 150 km from the lake respectively) had anything to do with the Dead Sea area.

  5. The microbial etiologies of diarrhea in hospitalized patients from the Puerto Rico Medical Center Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Carrer, Mildred; Vázquez, Guillermo J; Lebrón, Rafael I; Mercado, Xiomara; Martínez, Idalí; Vázquez, Carmen O; Santé, Maria; Robledo, Iraida E

    2005-03-01

    The development of diarrhea in hospitalized patients is a frequently encountered clinical problem, which may be due to infectious or non-infectious causes. The purpose of this study was to identify which common community enteric pathogens, if any, are responsible for diarrheal episodes in hospitalized patients. Stool samples from 76 consecutive, hospitalized patients were analyzed utilizing routine bacterial cultures, smears for identification of ova and parasites and Enzyme-Link Immunoadsorbent Assay (ELISA) for enteric bacteria, parasites and viruses. The results obtained demonstrated that the usual community enteric pathogens were not identified as a major cause of nosocomial diarrhea. In hospital-acquired diarrhea, Clostridium difficile toxins assay was the only clinically significant test in the evaluation of these patients. As a result of this study a guideline for the management of this condition in hospitalized patients is presented.

  6. Connecting hospitalized patients with their families: case series and commentary.

    PubMed

    Parsapour, Kourosh; Kon, Alexander A; Dharmar, Madan; McCarthy, Amy K; Yang, Hsuan-Hui; Smith, Anthony C; Carpenter, Janice; Sadorra, Candace K; Farbstein, Aron D; Hojman, Nayla M; Wold, Gary L; Marcin, James P

    2011-01-01

    The overall aim of this project was to ascertain the utilization of a custom-designed telemedicine service for patients to maintain close contact (via videoconference) with family and friends during hospitalization. We conducted a retrospective chart review of hospitalized patients (primarily children) with extended hospital length of stays. Telecommunication equipment was used to provide videoconference links from the patient's bedside to friends and family in the community. Thirty-six cases were managed during a five-year period (2006 to 2010). The most common reasons for using Family-Link were related to the logistical challenges of traveling to and from the hospital-principally due to distance, time, family commitments, and/or personal cost. We conclude that videoconferencing provides a solution to some barriers that may limit family presence and participation in care for hospitalized patients, and as a patient-centered innovation is likely to enhance patient and family satisfaction.

  7. How will restructuring work in your hospital? The helps and hinderances of a large academic environment.

    PubMed

    Galloway, M G

    1994-01-01

    In summary, academic medical centers face the same issues as their less complex brethren. Sure there are some "downs." The high expectations that the staff bring to their jobs can decrease flexibility in role design, and the increased need to keep professionals together can make the organizational matrix more complex. But there are also some "ups." In many ways their size and specialty focus can help with the difficult decisions in the areas of patient grouping and service delivery approach. Taking advantage of the positives and working to minimize the effect of the negatives can allow even the most complex organization to restructure successfully. Academic medical centers may not be "just right" for restructuring, but they are definitely not "too big."

  8. Giving patients a choice of what to wear in hospital.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Diane

    The number of older people in hospital is increasing in line with an ageing population. In response, specialist teams have been established to review and enhance the provision of all aspects of care for older patients. This article explores how providing a choice of what to wear in hospital can influence the overall well-being of older patients.

  9. Factors contributing to high-cost hospital care for patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Mulpuru, Sunita; McKay, Jennifer; Ronksley, Paul E; Thavorn, Kednapa; Kobewka, Daniel M; Forster, Alan J

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of hospital admission, the fifth leading cause of death in North America, and is estimated to cost $49 billion annually in North America by 2020. The majority of COPD care costs are attributed to hospitalizations; yet, there are limited data to understand the drivers of high costs among hospitalized patients with COPD. In this study, we aimed to determine the patient and hospital-level factors associated with high-cost hospital care, in order to identify potential targets for the reorganization and planning of health services. We conducted a retrospective cohort study at a Canadian academic hospital between September 2010 and 2014, including adult patients with a first-time admission for COPD exacerbation. We calculated total costs, ranked patients by cost quintiles, and collected data on patient characteristics and health service utilization. We used multivariable regression to determine factors associated with highest hospital costs. Among 1,894 patients included in the study, the mean age was 73±12.6 years, median length of stay was 5 (interquartile range 3–9) days, mortality rate was 7.8% (n=147), and 9% (n=170) required intensive care. Hospital spending totaled $19.8 million, with 63% ($12.5 million) spent on 20% of patients. Factors associated with highest costs for COPD care included intensive care unit admission (odds ratio [OR] 32.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] 20.3, 51.7), death in hospital (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.3, 5.2), discharge to long-term care facility (OR 5.7; 95% CI 3.5, 9.2), and use of the alternate level of care designation during hospitalization (OR 23.5; 95% CI 14.1, 39.2). High hospital costs are driven by two distinct groups: patients who require acute medical treatment for severe illness and patients with functional limitation who require assisted living facilities upon discharge. Improving quality of care and reducing cost in this high-needs population require a strong focus

  10. What can we learn from patient dissatisfaction? Analysis of dissatisfying events at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alicia V.; Moriarty, John P.; Borgstrom, Christopher; Horwitz, Leora I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is typically measured by quantitative surveys using predetermined domains. However, dissatisfaction may be a distinct entity from satisfaction, may have different determinants, and may better reflect problems in healthcare delivery. Objective To describe domains of dissatisfaction experienced by patients during hospitalization. Setting United States urban, academic medical center Patients Adults discharged between July 1, 2007 and June 30, 2008 Intervention Post-discharge telephone interview: “If there was one thing we could have done to improve your experience in the hospital what would it have been?” Measurements Standard qualitative analysis of suggestions for improvement. Results We randomly selected 976 of 9764 interviews. A total of 439/976 (45.0%) included at least one suggestion for improvement. We identified six major domains of dissatisfaction: ineptitude (7.68%), disrespect (6.05%), waits (15.78%), ineffective communication (7.38%), lack of environmental control (15.57%) and substandard amenities (6.87%). These domains corresponded to six implicit expectations for quality hospital care: safety, treatment with respect and dignity, minimized wait times, effective communication, control over physical surroundings and high quality amenities. Some of these expectations, such as for safe care, effective communication between providers, and lack of disrespect, may not be adequately captured in existing patient satisfaction assessments. Conclusions The results represent patient-generated priorities for quality improvement in health care. These priorities are not all consistently represented in standard patient satisfaction surveys and quality improvement initiatives. Patient input is critical to assessing the quality of hospital care and to identifying areas for improvement. PMID:21162153

  11. The effect of hospital volume on the in-hospital complication rate in knee replacement patients.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, E C; Garfinkel, S A; McQuay, L J; Heck, D A; Wright, J G; Dittus, R; Lubitz, R M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of hospital volume on in-hospital surgical outcomes for knee replacement using six years of Medicare claims data. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: The data include inpatient claims for a 100 percent sample of Medicare patients who underwent primary knee replacement during 1985-1990. We supplemented these data with information from HCFA's denominator files, the Area Resource File, and the American Hospital Association survey files. STUDY DESIGN: We estimated the probability that a patient has an in-hospital complication in the initial hospitalization for the first primary knee replacement, using a Logit model, for three definitions of complication. The models controlled for hospital volume, other hospital characteristics, patient demographics, and patient health status. We tested for the endogeneity of hospital volume. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: A panel of two orthopaedic surgeons and two internists reviewed diagnosis codes to determine whether a complication was likely, possible, or due to anemia. After removing the few observations with bad or missing data, the final population has 295,473 observations. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The probability of a likely in-hospital complication declines rapidly from 53 through 107 operations per year, then levels off. Statistical tests imply that hospital volume is exogenous in this patient-level data. Complication rates increased steadily through the study period. Although obesity appeared to lower the probability of a complication, a counterintuitive result, further investigation revealed this to be an artifact of the claims data limit of listing no more than five diagnoses. Controlling for this restriction reversed the effect of obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Rather than uncontrolled expansion of knee surgery to small hospitals, decentralization to regional centers where at least about 50, and preferably about 100, operations per year are assured appears to be the optimal policy to reduce in-hospital

  12. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Obese Hospitalized Patients: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sunil; Mather, Paul J.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Kahn, Daron; Shiue, Kristin Y.; Cheema, Mohammed; Malloy, Raymond; Quan, Stuart F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an important health problem associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This condition often is underrecognized in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to conduct a clinical pathway evaluation (CPE) among obese patients admitted to a tertiary care hospital. We also assessed oxygen desaturation index (ODI, measured by overnight pulse oximetry) as a potential low-cost screening tool for identifying OSA. Methods: This was a prospective study of 754 patients admitted to an academic medical center between February 2013 and February 2014. Consecutive obese patients (body mass index ≥ 30) admitted to the hospital (medical services) were screened and evaluated for OSA with the snoring, tiredness during daytime, observed apnea, high blood pressure (STOP) questionnaire. The admitting team was advised to perform follow-up evaluation, including polysomnography, if the test was positive. Results: A total of 636 patients were classified as high risk and 118 as low risk for OSA. Within 4 w of discharge, 149 patients underwent polysomnography, and of these, 87% (129) were shown to have OSA. An optimal screening cutoff point for OSA (apnea-hypopnea index ≥ 10/h) was determined to be ODI ≥ 10/h [Matthews correlation coefficient = 0.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.24–0.47]. Significantly more hospitalized patients were identified and underwent polysomnography compared with the year prior to introduction of the CPE. Conclusions: Our results indicate that the CPE increased the identification of OSA in this population. Furthermore, ODI derived from overnight pulse oximetry may be a cost-effective strategy to screen for OSA in hospitalized patients. Citation: Sharma S, Mather PJ, Efird JT, Kahn D, Shiue KY, Cheema M, Malloy R, Quan SF. Obstructive sleep apnea in obese hospitalized patients: a single center experience. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(7):717–723. PMID:25766715

  13. Identification of the decision maker for a patient's hospital choice: who decides which hospital?

    PubMed

    Sloane, G; Tidwell, P; Horsfield, M

    1999-01-01

    If marketers wish to communicate the positive characteristics of purchasing the private hospital experience, the marketers need to be able to identify which of the participants in the purchasing process is acting in the role of decision maker. Research was undertaken of doctors in the rural setting. Potential respondents were selected from Orange to Broken Hill; from Coonabarabran to Young. Two private hospitals are known to be located within this region--one in Orange and one in Dubbo. In most cases, patients in the rural setting are having the final say as to which hospital to attend. They are filling the role of decision maker. The factors that potential patients are considering in their decision include the services provided by the hospital--specifically factors relating to accommodation, services and cost. These observations are those as interpreted by the doctors who see these patients. Based on the findings of the survey a number of recommendations have been made: (1) Any marketing communication by hospitals should target primarily patients and then doctors. (2) Further research should be undertaken to attempt to accurately determine what characteristics are considered when patients and doctors refer to hospital services. (3) Research should be undertaken to determine the identity of all parties involved in the purchasing decision process. (4) Further research should be undertaken of the general population to determine what factors relating to a hospital are considered when making the hospital purchasing decision. (5) Further in depth analysis should be conducted with the raw data.

  14. [Patient admission: hospitality in the hospital--concept and evaluation].

    PubMed

    Vandenbulcke, C

    1999-06-01

    Welcoming is an everyday act, performed all day long, in different places. But, when it comes to welcoming a patient, it is a matter of health care, for which we are the only responsible. Since this person arrives in a place where his (her) body and mind are going to be ill-treated (s)he will be all the more receptive to his (her) new environment. Faced with feelings of fear, anguish, stress, the patient and ourselves try to establish a relationship made of confidence and a feeling of safety, which are necessary to his (her) integration. This will be achieved by means of verbal and non-verbal communication, by reducing or even getting round the obstacles. By studying this moment, this meeting, with different evaluation tools, I have been able to sort out the strong and weak points of my Institution, in order to propose adequate means of improvements, (creation of a team dynamics on this subject, working out of a definition, evaluation grids and application). The staff will thus be able to readjust his care as well as possible, at the level of the information to be given, and above all the attitude to adopt, in order to improve the quality of welcoming, as, eventually, it is what the patient will keep in mind and what he will use for his evaluation.

  15. [Customer and patient satisfaction. An appropriate management tool in hospitals?].

    PubMed

    Pawils, S; Trojan, A; Nickel, S; Bleich, C

    2012-09-01

    Recently, the concept of patient satisfaction has been established as an essential part of the quality management of hospitals. Despite the concept's lack of theoretical and methodological foundations, patient surveys on subjective hospital experiences contribute immensely to the improvement of hospitals. What needs to be considered critically in this context is the concept of customer satisfaction for patients, the theoretical integration of empirical results, the reduction of false satisfaction indications and the application of risk-adjusted versus naïve benchmarking of data. This paper aims to contribute to the theoretical discussion of the topic and to build a basis for planning methodologically sound patient surveys.

  16. Association of Communication Between Hospital-based Physicians and Primary Care Providers with Patient Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schnipper, Jeffrey L.; Auerbach, Andrew D.; Kaboli, Peter J.; Wetterneck, Tosha B.; Gonzales, David V.; Arora, Vineet M.; Zhang, James X.; Meltzer, David O.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND Patients admitted to general medicine inpatient services are increasingly cared for by hospital-based physicians rather than their primary care providers (PCPs). This separation of hospital and ambulatory care may result in important care discontinuities after discharge. We sought to determine whether communication between hospital-based physicians and PCPs influences patient outcomes. METHODS We approached consecutive patients admitted to general medicine services at six US academic centers from July 2001 to June 2003. A random sample of the PCPs for consented patients was contacted 2 weeks after patient discharge and surveyed about communication with the hospital medical team. Responses were linked with the 30-day composite patient outcomes of mortality, hospital readmission, and emergency department (ED) visits obtained through follow-up telephone survey and National Death Index search. We used hierarchical multi-variable logistic regression to model whether communication with the patient’s PCP was associated with the 30-day composite outcome. RESULTS A total of 1,772 PCPs for 2,336 patients were surveyed with 908 PCPs responses and complete patient follow-up available for 1,078 patients. The PCPs for 834 patients (77%) were aware that their patient had been admitted to the hospital. Of these, direct communication between PCPs and inpatient physicians took place for 194 patients (23%), and a discharge summary was available within 2 weeks of discharge for 347 patients (42%). Within 30 days of discharge, 233 (22%) patients died, were readmitted to the hospital, or visited an ED. In adjusted analyses, no relationship was seen between the composite outcome and direct physician communication (adjusted odds ratio 0.87, 95% confidence interval 0.56 – 1.34), the presence of a discharge summary (0.84, 95% CI 0.57–1.22), or PCP awareness of the index hospitalization (1.08, 95% CI 0.73–1.59). CONCLUSION Analysis of communication between PCPs

  17. Clinical liaison nurse model in a community hospital: a unique academic-practice partnership that strengthens clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Lovecchio, Catherine P; DiMattio, Mary Jane K; Hudacek, Sharon

    2012-11-01

    The necessity to help baccalaureate nursing students transition to clinical practice in a health care environment governed by change has compelled nurse educators to investigate alternative clinical instruction models that nurture academic-practice partnerships and facilitate student clinical learning. This article describes an academic-practice partnership in a community hospital using the Clinical Liaison Nurse (CLN) model as a link between students and clinical faculty and reports results of a quasi-experimental study that compared perceptions of the clinical learning environment between students participating in the CLN model (experimental group) and those in a traditional, instructor-led clinical model (control group). Students assigned to the CLN model had statistically significantly higher individualization, satisfaction, and task orientation scores on the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory. The findings provide evidence that academic-practice partnerships can be successful in community hospital settings and enhance students' perceptions in the clinical learning environment.

  18. Pediatric Patients' Malnutrition and Its Relation to Hospitalization Times and Causes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimarey, Luis M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Relates the nutritional status of 1,378 hospitalized pediatric patients to length of hospitalization and definitive hospitalization diagnosis. Findings indicated the length of hospitalization time increased markedly with malnutrition, especially for patients with diarrhea. (BJD)

  19. Chloride alterations in hospitalized patients: Prevalence and outcome significance

    PubMed Central

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Cheng, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    Serum Cl (sCl) alterations in hospitalized patients have not been comprehensively studied in recent years. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence and outcome significance of (1) sCl alterations on hospital admission, and (2) sCl evolution within the first 48 hr of hospital admission. We conducted a retrospective study of all hospital admissions in the years 2011–2013 at Mayo Clinic Rochester, a 2000-bed tertiary medical center. Outcome measures included hospital mortality, length of hospital stay and discharge disposition. 76,719 unique admissions (≥18 years old) were studied. Based on hospital mortality, sCl in the range of 105–108 mmol/L was found to be optimal. sCl <100 (n = 13,611) and >108 (n = 11,395) mmol/L independently predicted a higher risk of hospital mortality, longer hospital stay and being discharged to a care facility. 13,089 patients (17.1%) had serum anion gap >12 mmol/L; their hospital mortality, when compared to 63,630 patients (82.9%) with anion gap ≤12 mmol/L, was worse. Notably, patients with elevated anion gap displayed a progressively worsening mortality with rising sCl. sCl elevation within 48 hr of admission was associated with a higher proportion of 0.9% saline administration and was an independent predictor for hospital mortality. Moreover, the magnitude of sCl rise was inversely correlated to the days of patient survival. In conclusion, serum Cl alterations on admission predict poor clinical outcomes. Post-admission sCl increase, due to Cl-rich fluid infusion, independently predicts hospital mortality. These results raise a critical question of whether iatrogenic cause of hyperchloremia should be avoided, a question to be addressed by future prospective studies. PMID:28328963

  20. How was your hospital stay? Patients' reports about their care in Canadian hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, C; Gauld, M; Chambers, L; O'Brien, B; Haynes, R B; Labelle, R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To survey adult medical and surgical patients about their concerns and satisfaction with their care in Canadian hospitals. DESIGN: Cross-sectional telephone survey undertaken from June 1991 to May 1992 with a standardized questionnaire. SETTING: Stratified random sample of public acute care hospitals in six provinces; 57 (79%) of the 72 hospitals approached agreed to participate. PATIENTS: Each participating hospital provided the study team with the names of 150 adult medical and surgical patients discharged home in consecutive order. A total of 4599 patients agreed to be interviewed (69% of eligible patients and 89% of patients contacted). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Satisfaction with (a) provider-patient communication (including information given), (b) provider's respect for patient's preferences, (c) attentiveness to patient's physical care needs, (d) education of patient regarding medication and tests, (e) quality of relationship between patient and physician in charge, (f) education of and communication with patient's family regarding care, (g) pain management and (h) hospital discharge planning. RESULTS: Most (61%) of the patients surveyed reported problems with 5 or fewer of the 39 specific care processes asked about in the study. Forty-one percent of the patients reported that they had not been told about the daily hospital routines. About 20% of the patients receiving medications reported that they had not been told about important side effects in a way they could understand; 20% of the patients who underwent tests reported similar problems with communication of the test results. Thirty-six percent of those having tests had not been told how much pain to expect. In discharge planning, the patients complained that they had not been told what danger signals to watch for at home (reported by 39%), when they could resume normal activities (by 32%) and what activities they could or could not do at home (by 29%). Over 90% of the patients reported that they

  1. Multidisciplinary Treatments, Patient Characteristics, Context of Care, and Adverse Incidents in Older, Hospitalized Adults

    PubMed Central

    Shever, Leah L.; Titler, Marita G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors that contribute to adverse incidents by creating a model that included patient characteristics, clinical conditions, nursing unit context of care variables, medical treatments, pharmaceutical treatments, and nursing treatments. Data were abstracted from electronic, administrative, and clinical data repositories. The sample included older adults hospitalized during a four-year period at one, academic medical facility in the Midwestern United States who were at risk for falling. Relational databases were built and a multistep, statistical model building analytic process was used. Total registered nurse (RN) hours per patient day (HPPD) and HPPDs dropping below the nursing unit average were significant explanatory variables for experiencing an adverse incident. The number of medical and pharmaceutical treatments that a patient received during hospitalization as well as many specific nursing treatments (e.g., restraint use, neurological monitoring) were also contributors to experiencing an adverse incident. PMID:22530112

  2. Delirium in Prolonged Hospitalized Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Saadat, Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged hospitalization in the intensive care unit (ICU) can impose long-term psychological effects on patients. One of the most significant psychological effects from prolonged hospitalization is delirium. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prolonged hospitalization of patients and subsequent delirium in the intensive care unit. Patients and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted in the General Intensive Care Unit of the Shariati Hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, from the beginning of 2013 to 2014. All prolonged hospitalized patients and their families were eligible participants. From the 34 eligible patients and 63 family members, the final numbers of actual patients and family members were 9 and 16, respectively. Several semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face with patients and their families in a private room and data were gathered. Results: Two main themes from two different perspectives emerged, 'patients' perspectives' (experiences during ICU hospitalization) and 'family members' perspectives' (supportive-communicational experiences). The main results of this study focused on delirium, Patients' findings were described as pleasant and unpleasant, factual and delusional experiences. Conclusions: Family members are valuable components in the therapeutic process of delirium. Effective use of family members in the delirium caring process can be considered to be one of the key non-medical nursing components in the therapeutic process. PMID:26290854

  3. Building patient-centeredness: hospital design as an interpretive act.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Hospital designs reflect the sociocultural, economic, professional, and aesthetic priorities prevalent at a given time. As such, hospital buildings concretize assumptions about illness, care and healing, patienthood, and medical providers' roles. Trends in hospital design have been attributed to the increasing influence of consumerism on healthcare, the influx of business-oriented managers, and technological changes. This paper describes the impact of the concept of patient-centeredness on the design of a new hospital in the USA. Data come from 35 interviews with planners, administrators, and designers of the new hospital, as well as from public documents about the hospital design. Thematic content analysis was used to identify salient design principles and intents. For these designers, administrators, and planners, an interpretation of patient-centeredness served as a heuristic, guiding the most basic decisions about space, people, and processes in the hospital. I detail the particular interpretation of patient-centeredness used to build and manage the new hospital space and the roles and responsibilities of providers working within it. Three strategies were central to the implementation of patient-centeredness: an onstage/offstage layout; a concierge approach to patients; and the scripting of communication. I discuss that this interpretation of patient-centeredness may challenge medical professionals' roles, may construct medical care as a product that should sate the patient's desire, and may distance patients from the realities of medical care. By describing the ways in which hospital designs reflect and reinforce contemporary concepts of patienthood and caring, this paper raises questions about the implementation of patient-centeredness that deserve further empirical study by medical social scientists.

  4. Audibility of patient clinical alarms to hospital nursing personnel.

    PubMed

    Sobieraj, Josef; Ortega, Claudia; West, Iris; Voepel, Leo; Battle, Steven; Robinson, DaShawn

    2006-04-01

    The audibility of patient clinical alarms to nursing personnel was tested during the first shift on a medical/surgical in-patient ward at William Beaumont Army Medical Center. This study was conducted during normal hospital operations, and we tested the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations 2004 National Patient Safety Goal, Section 6b to determine whether patient alarms could sufficiently compete against environmental background noises. Patient clinical alarms were audible at distances of > or = 95 feet with room doors open but were not sufficiently audible to hospital staff members when room doors were closed or during floor-buffing activities. This study suggests that, under these circumstances, hospitals may not meet Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations 2004 National Patient Safety Goal, Section 6b. Because the audibility of patient clinical alarms directly affects patient safety, satisfaction, and quality of care, we provide recommendations for engineering controls and modifications to work routines.

  5. Supported discharge shortens hospital stay in patients hospitalized because of an exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Sala, E; Alegre, L; Carrera, M; Ibars, M; Orriols, F J; Blanco, M L; Cárceles, F; Bertran, S; Mata, F; Font, I; Agustí, A G

    2001-06-01

    This prospective, controlled, but not formally randomized study investigates the feasibility and efficiency of an alternative to standard hospitalization for patients with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), based upon supported discharge with nurse supervision at home. Over a 12-month period, emergency physicians, not directly involved in the study, admitted 205 patients with exacerbated COPD to the authors' respiratory unit. Patients were included in the supported discharge group (n=105) if they voluntarily chose to participate in the programme and lived in the city of Palma de Mallorca (where adequate home support could be provided). Patients not fulfilling these criteria (mainly residents outside the city) served as controls (n=100). Inpatient treatment was standardized in all patients and included oxygen therapy, bronchodilators, antibiotics and steroids. Both groups were comparable in terms of age (mean +/- SD: 70 +/- 10 versus 65 +/- 11 yr for supported discharge and control group, respectively), severity of airflow obstruction (forced expiratory volume in one second 45 +/- 18% reference versus 46 +/- 19% ref.), comorbidity and socioeconomic status. Length of hospital stay (LOS) in the supported discharge group was shorter (5.9 +/- 2.8 versus 8.0 +/- 5.1 days, p < 0.001). After discharge, a respiratory nurse visited supported discharge patients at home during 7.3 +/- 3.8 days. Only one patient (1%) required hospital readmission during this period of time. The reduced LOS resulted in a lower utilization of hospital beds at any given point in time throughout the study period. Within the framework and potential limitations of this study, the results indicate that the supported discharge programme in Spain: 1) allows a significant reduction in the length of hospital stay of patients hospitalized because of an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; 2) does not result in an inappropriately increased rate of hospital

  6. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in the hospitalized medical patient.

    PubMed

    Jaffer, Amir K; Amin, Alpesh N; Brotman, Daniel J; Deitelzweig, Steven B; McKean, Sylvia C; Spyropoulos, Alex C

    2008-04-01

    Hospitalized acutely ill medical patients are at high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE), and clinical trials clearly demonstrate that pharmacologic prophylaxis of VTE for up to 14 days significantly reduces the incidence of VTE in this population. Guidelines recommend use of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or unfractionated heparin (5,000 U three times daily) for VTE prophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients with risk factors for VTE; in patients with contraindications to anticoagulants, mechanical prophylaxis is recommended. All hospitalized medical patients should be assessed for their risk of VTE at admission and daily thereafter, and those with reduced mobility and one or more other VTE risk factors are candidates for aggressive VTE prophylaxis. Based on results from the recently reported EXCLAIM trial, extended postdischarge prophylaxis with LMWH for 28 days should be considered for hospitalized medical patients with reduced mobility who are older than age 75 or have a cancer diagnosis or a history of VTE.

  7. Using standardized patients to evaluate hospital-based intervention outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Guan, Jihui

    2014-01-01

    Background The standardized patient approach has proved to be an effective training tool for medical educators. This article explains the process of employing standardized patients in an HIV stigma reduction intervention in healthcare settings in China. Methods The study was conducted in 40 hospitals in two provinces of China. One year after the stigma reduction intervention, standardized patients made unannounced visits to participating hospitals, randomly approached service providers on duty and presented symptoms related to HIV and disclosed HIV-positive test results. After each visit, the standardized patients evaluated their providers’ attitudes and behaviours using a structured checklist. Standardized patients also took open-ended observation notes about their experience and the evaluation process. Results Seven standardized patients conducted a total of 217 assessments (108 from 20 hospitals in the intervention condition; 109 from 20 hospitals in the control condition). Based on a comparative analysis, the intervention hospitals received a better rating than the control hospitals in terms of general impression and universal precaution compliance as well as a lower score on stigmatizing attitudes and behaviours toward the standardized patients. Conclusion Standardized patients are a useful supplement to traditional self-report assessments, particularly for measuring intervention outcomes that are sensitive or prone to social desirability. PMID:24369433

  8. Comparative analysis of acute toxic poisoning in 2003 and 2011: analysis of 3 academic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hak-Soo; Kim, Jung-Youn; Choi, Sung-Hyuk; Yoon, Young-Hoon; Moon, Sung-Woo; Hong, Yun-Sik; Lee, Sung-Woo

    2013-10-01

    Social factors may affect the available sources of toxic substances and causes of poisoning; and these factors may change over time. Additionally, understanding the characteristics of patients with acute toxic poisoning is important for treating such patients. Therefore, this study investigated the characteristics of patients with toxic poisoning. Patients visiting one of 3 hospitals in 2003 and 2011 were included in this study. Data on all patients who were admitted to the emergency departments with acute toxic poisoning were retrospectively obtained from medical records. Total 939 patients were analyzed. The average age of patients was 40.0 ± 20 yr, and 335 (36.9%) patients were men. Among the elements that did not change over time were the facts that suicide was the most common cause, that alcohol consumption was involved in roughly 1 of 4 cases, and that there were more women than men. Furthermore, acetaminophen and doxylamine remained the most common poisoning agents. In conclusion, the average patient age and psychotic drug poisoning has increased over time, and the use of lavage treatment has decreased.

  9. Burnout in Hospital Social Workers Who Work with AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oktay, Julianne S.

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 128 hospital social workers who worked with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. Found that hospital AIDS social workers had slightly higher rates of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization on Maslach Burnout Inventory but also felt substantially higher level of personal accomplishment. Age, autonomy, and belonging to…

  10. Creating the Exceptional Patient Experience in One Academic Health System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Vivian S; Miller, Thomas; Daniels, Chrissy; Paine, Marilynn; Gresh, Brian; Betz, A Lorris

    2016-03-01

    Whether patient satisfaction scores can act as a catalyst for improving health care is highly debated. Some argue that pursuing patient satisfaction is overemphasized and potentially at odds with providing good care because it leads providers to overtest and overtreat patients and to bend to unreasonable patient demands, all to improve their ratings. Others cite studies showing that high patient satisfaction scores correlate with improved health outcomes. Ideally, assessing patient satisfaction metrics will encourage empathy, communication, trust, and shared decision making in the health care delivery process. From the patient's perspective, sharing such metrics motivates physicians to provide patient-centered care and meets their need for easily accessible information about their providers. In this article, the authors describe a seven-year initiative, which began in 2008, to change the culture of the University of Utah Health Care system to deliver a consistently exceptional patient experience. Five factors affected the health system's ability to provide such care: (1) a lack of good decision-making processes, (2) a lack of accountability, (3) the wrong attitude, (4) a lack of patient focus, and (5) mission conflict. Working groups designed initiatives at all levels of the health system to address these issues. What began as a patient satisfaction initiative evolved into a model for physician engagement, values-based employment practices, enhanced professionalism and communication, reduced variability in performance, and improved alignment of the mission and vision across hospital and faculty group practice teams.

  11. Fewer Patients Die During Hospital Inspection Weeks: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... 164254.html Fewer Patients Die During Hospital Inspection Weeks: Study Slight differences in death rates were possibly ... likely to die if they are treated during weeks that inspectors are checking on the staff, a ...

  12. Hospital Admissions for Malnutrition and Dehydration in Patients With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katherine A; Burson, Rosanne; Gall, Kristyn; Saunders, Mitzi M

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration and malnutrition are commonly experienced by patients with dementia and can result in hospitalizations and decreased quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe retrospectively, the incidence and correlations of variables that may precede hospitalizations for dehydration/malnutrition in the community-dwelling patient with dementia. Data from the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) Start of Care (SOC) on 44 patients served by a Michigan home care agency were retrieved for analysis. This study did not reveal any single or collection of variables that would predict risk for hospitalization for dehydration/malnutrition. With the lack of specific predictors of hospitalization related to dehydration and malnutrition, clinicians need to place high priority on risk-lowering strategies and preventive education for patients, family, and caregivers.

  13. Management of hospitalized type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Peñalver, Juan José; Martín-Timón, Iciar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in hospitalized patients are associated with adverse outcomes including increased rates of infection, longer hospital length of stay, and even death. Clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus proved that by improving glycemic control, we can reduce all of them. Insulin is the preferred treatment for glycemic control in most cases, but alternative treatment options that can normalize blood glucose levels without hypoglycemia are being sought. Moreover, hospitalized patients are particularly vulnerable to severe, prolonged hypoglycemia since they may be unable to sense or respond to the early warning signs and symptoms of low blood glucose. Finally, nutritional support, corticosteroid therapy, and surgery increase the risk of hyperglycemia that leads to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. We review the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who are admitted to the general medical wards of the hospital for a procedure of intercurrent illness. PMID:28191539

  14. Hospital Protocol RSD/CRPS Patient: Handle with Care!

    MedlinePlus

    Hospital Protocol  RSD/CRPS Patients: Handle With Care! Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) also known as Complex Regional ... taken care of solely through use of the hospital’s pharmacy. Some medications may not be part of ...

  15. Management of hospitalized type 2 diabetes mellitus patients.

    PubMed

    Marín-Peñalver, Juan José; Martín-Timón, Iciar; Del Cañizo-Gómez, Francisco Javier

    2016-12-01

    Both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in hospitalized patients are associated with adverse outcomes including increased rates of infection, longer hospital length of stay, and even death. Clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus proved that by improving glycemic control, we can reduce all of them. Insulin is the preferred treatment for glycemic control in most cases, but alternative treatment options that can normalize blood glucose levels without hypoglycemia are being sought. Moreover, hospitalized patients are particularly vulnerable to severe, prolonged hypoglycemia since they may be unable to sense or respond to the early warning signs and symptoms of low blood glucose. Finally, nutritional support, corticosteroid therapy, and surgery increase the risk of hyperglycemia that leads to an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. We review the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients who are admitted to the general medical wards of the hospital for a procedure of intercurrent illness.

  16. Acute Splenic Infarction at an Academic General Hospital Over 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ami, Schattner; Meital, Adi; Ella, Kitroser; Abraham, Klepfish

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Few case series provide a current, comprehensive, and detailed description of splenic infarction (SI), an uncommon condition. Retrospective chart review complemented by imaging evaluation and patient follow-up. All adult patients with a confirmed diagnosis of acute SI discharged over 10 years from a single academic center were studied. A systematic literature review was done to compile a complete list of SI etiologies. SI was found in 32 patients, 0.016% of admissions. Ages ranged from 18 to 86 (median 64) years. Cardiogenic emboli were the predominant etiology (20/32, 62.5%) and atrial fibrillation was frequent. Other patients had autoimmune disease (12.5%), associated infection (12.5%), or hematological malignancy (6%). Nine of the patients (28%) had been previously healthy or with no recognized morbidity predisposing to SI. In 5 of 9 hitherto silent antiphospholipid syndrome or mitral valve disease had been identified. Two remained cryptogenic. Most patients presented with abdominal pain (84%), often felt in the left upper quadrant or epigastrium. Associated symptoms, leukocytosis or increased serum lactate dehydrogenase occurred inconsistently (∼25% each). Chest X-ray showed suggestive Lt. supra-diaphragmatic findings in 22%. Thus, the typical predisposing factors and/or clinical presentation should suggest SI to the clinician and be followed by early imaging by computed tomography (CT), highly useful also in atypical presentations. Complications were rare and patients were discharged after 6.5 days (median) on anticoagulant treatment. The systematic literature review revealed an extensive list of conditions underlying SI. In some, SI may be the first and presenting manifestation. SI is a rare event but should be considered in predisposed patients or those with any combination of suggestive clinical features, especially abdominal pain CT evaluation is diagnostic and the outcome is good. PMID:26356690

  17. Creating the Exceptional Patient Experience in One Academic Health System

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas; Daniels, Chrissy; Paine, Marilynn; Gresh, Brian; Betz, A. Lorris

    2016-01-01

    Whether patient satisfaction scores can act as a catalyst for improving health care is highly debated. Some argue that pursuing patient satisfaction is overemphasized and potentially at odds with providing good care because it leads providers to overtest and overtreat patients and to bend to unreasonable patient demands, all to improve their ratings. Others cite studies showing that high patient satisfaction scores correlate with improved health outcomes. Ideally, assessing patient satisfaction metrics will encourage empathy, communication, trust, and shared decision making in the health care delivery process. From the patient’s perspective, sharing such metrics motivates physicians to provide patient-centered care and meets their need for easily accessible information about their providers. In this article, the authors describe a seven-year initiative, which began in 2008, to change the culture of the University of Utah Health Care system to deliver a consistently exceptional patient experience. Five factors affected the health system’s ability to provide such care: (1) a lack of good decision-making processes, (2) a lack of accountability, (3) the wrong attitude, (4) a lack of patient focus, and (5) mission conflict. Working groups designed initiatives at all levels of the health system to address these issues. What began as a patient satisfaction initiative evolved into a model for physician engagement, values-based employment practices, enhanced professionalism and communication, reduced variability in performance, and improved alignment of the mission and vision across hospital and faculty group practice teams. PMID:26606723

  18. Clinical Problems in the Hospitalized Parkinson's Disease Patient: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Oliver HH; Winogrodzka, Ania; Weber, Wim EJ

    2011-01-01

    The problems Parkinson's disease (PD) patients encounter when admitted to a hospital, are known to be numerous and serious. These problems have been inventoried through a systematic review of literature on reasons for emergency and hospital admissions in PD patients, problems encountered during hospitalization, and possible solutions for the encountered problems using the Pubmed database. PD patients are hospitalized in frequencies ranging from 7 to 28% per year. PD/parkinsonism patients are approximately one and a half times more frequently and generally 2 to 14 days longer hospitalized than non-PD patients. Acute events occurring during hospitalization were mainly urinary infection, confusion, and pressure ulcers. Medication errors were also frequent adverse events. During and after surgery PD patients had an increased incidence of infections, confusion, falls, and decubitus, and 31% of patients was dissatisfied in the way their PD was managed. There are only two studies on medication continuation during surgery and one analyzing the effect of an early postoperative neurologic consultation, and numerous case reports, and opinionated views and reviews including other substitutes for dopaminergic medication intraoperatively. In conclusion, most studies were retrospective on small numbers of patients. The major clinical problems are injuries, infections, poor control of PD, and complications of PD treatment. There are many (un-researched) proposals for improvement. A substantial number of PD patients' admissions might be prevented. There should be guidelines concerning the hospitalized PD patients, with accent on early neurological consultation and team work between different specialities, and incorporating nonoral dopaminergic replacement therapy when necessary. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society PMID:21284037

  19. Validity of repeating patient origin studies for rural hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Meade, J M

    1976-01-01

    Recent research in southwest Idaho and southeast Oregon indicates that hospital service areas in this rural locality have not changed over time. The 12-county study area includes approximately 42,000 square miles inhabited by only 265,491 people. The focal point of hospital care in this region is Boise, Idaho, with adjacent smaller centers. Data used in the paper came from two sources-a patient-origin study completed in 1968 and a health interview survey completed in 1973. In both studies information was collected on patients' places of residence and where they went to receive hospital care. Because of the 6-year timespan between the studies, it was suspected that there may have been changes in the hospitals' service areas. An examination of some variables that customarily influence hospital service areas, such as number of physicians, number of hospital beds, and size of population, revealed that, despite sizable changes in all these variables, no appreciable changes were noted in the spatial patterns of the hospitals' service areas. This result was unexpected, but it may indicate to others engaged in planning for rural hospitals that updating patient origin studies in their areas may produce only marginal benefits. PMID:815936

  20. Benefit of hindsight: systematic analysis of coronial inquest data to inform patient safety in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pudney, Val; Grech, Carol

    2015-10-12

    Objective The aim of the present study was to explore the potential of coronial inquest data to inform patient safety improvement in hospitals at a system level.Methods A retrospective analysis of 20 years of South Australian (SA) coronial inquest findings was performed using both qualitative content analysis methods and statistical descriptive analyses.Results In all, 113 cases were analysed. More than one-third of deaths (39%) were associated with emergency care. Analysis revealed 11 recurrent themes and two notable contributing factors that highlighted specific areas of concern for SA hospitals over that time period. The most common action recommended by coroners (49.6%; n = 56 cases) was the review or development of policy, protocol, procedure or guidelines designed to improve patient care. In almost one-quarter (24%) of deaths reviewed, coroners alerted health authorities to poor standards of care and/or instructed individual clinicians to review the standard of their clinical practice.Conclusions The analysis provided a retrospective review of coronial inquest data associated with hospital care over a 20-year period. The findings highlight specific areas of concern for patient safety over that time. More broadly, this analysis contributes to an emerging body of evidence in the Australian academic literature that demonstrates the value of systematic analysis of coronial data at a system level to inform patient safety improvement in Australian healthcare.What is known about the topic? Australian coroners have an important role to play in public health and safety. Many areas of social inquiry across Australia use coronial inquest data to identify recurrent hazards and assist in the development of relevant social policy. However, there is very little research reported in the academic literature that associates analyses of coronial data with patient safety improvement in healthcare. Although coronial recommendations made from individual cases of avoidable death

  1. Why are patients with acute stroke admitted to hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, J; Sandercock, P; Warlow, C; Gray, M

    1986-01-01

    Data on 515 consecutive patients registered with the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project were used to compare the characteristics of those patients who were admitted to hospital within one month after their first stroke with those who remained in the community during that time. Twenty eight patients had their stroke while in hospital for other conditions, and of the remaining 487, 266 were admitted. Though patients with a severe neurological deficit were significantly more likely to be admitted, 47 out of 202 such patients were managed in the community. In a substudy of 162 consecutive patients the general practitioners' reasons for either arranging admission to hospital or continuing with community care in the first week after the stroke were ascertained. Sixty patients were admitted. The only reason for admission was diagnostic uncertainty in five cases (though this was a contributing factor in 25) and to provide nursing or general, non-medical care in 25. Patients who lived alone were more likely to be admitted. All 12 patients who presented directly to the casualty department were admitted, though only five had had a severe stroke. A stroke service that provides a facility for rapid outpatient and domiciliary diagnosis as well as a rapidly acting domiciliary nursing team might reduce the number of patients with stroke admitted to hospital without adversely affecting the quality of patient care: this should be properly evaluated. PMID:3085852

  2. Mobility decline in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Fábio Santos; Paim, Daniel de Macedo; Brito, Juliana de Oliveira; Barros, Idiel de Araujo; Nogueira, Thiago Barbosa; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Pires, Thiago Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variation in mobility during hospitalization in an intensive care unit and its association with hospital mortality. Methods This prospective study was conducted in an intensive care unit. The inclusion criteria included patients admitted with an independence score of ≥ 4 for both bed-chair transfer and locomotion, with the score based on the Functional Independence Measure. Patients with cardiac arrest and/or those who died during hospitalization were excluded. To measure the loss of mobility, the value obtained at discharge was calculated and subtracted from the value obtained on admission, which was then divided by the admission score and recorded as a percentage. Results The comparison of these two variables indicated that the loss of mobility during hospitalization was 14.3% (p < 0.001). Loss of mobility was greater in patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours in the intensive care unit (p < 0.02) and in patients who used vasopressor drugs (p = 0.041). However, the comparison between subjects aged 60 years or older and those younger than 60 years indicated no significant differences in the loss of mobility (p = 0.332), reason for hospitalization (p = 0.265), SAPS 3 score (p = 0.224), use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.117), or hospital mortality (p = 0.063). Conclusion There was loss of mobility during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. This loss was greater in patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours and in those who used vasopressors; however, the causal and prognostic factors associated with this decline need to be elucidated. PMID:27410406

  3. Towards a new health care paradigm. Patient-focused care. The case of Kingston Hospital Trust.

    PubMed

    Newman, K

    1997-01-01

    Patient-focused care (PFC) and business process re-engineering (BPR) have been advocated in the academic literature as techniques to improve both quality of service and reduce costs. Seeks to separate and delineate the components of PFC and BPR and, using the case study method, describe the adoption and implementation process of PFC in medicine and maternity by one London NHS Trust Hospital. Reports the impact of this innovation on service delivery, staff reconfiguration and multi-skilling. Identifies preconditions and key success factors and indicates lessons for the future.

  4. Service quality of private hospitals: The Iranian Patients' perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Highly competitive market in the private hospital industry has caused increasing pressure on them to provide services with higher quality. The aim of this study was to determine the different dimensions of the service quality in the private hospitals of Iran and evaluating the service quality from the patients' perspective. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2010 in Tehran, Iran. The study sample was composed of 983 patients randomly selected from 8 private general hospitals. The study questionnaire was the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of 21 items in service quality dimensions. Results The result of factor analysis revealed 3 factors, explaining 69% of the total variance. The total mean score of patients' expectation and perception was 4.91(SD = 0.2) and 4.02(SD = 0.6), respectively. The highest expectation and perception related to the tangibles dimension and the lowest expectation and perception related to the empathy dimension. The differences between perception and expectation were significant (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference between the expectations scores based on gender, education level, and previous hospitalization in that same hospital. Also, there was a significant difference between the perception scores based on insurance coverage, average length of stay, and patients' health conditions on discharge. Conclusion The results showed that SERVQUAL is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to monitor and measure the quality of the services in private hospitals of Iran. Our findings clarified the importance of creating a strong relationship between patients and the hospital practitioners/personnel and the need for hospital staff to be responsive, credible, and empathetic when dealing with patients. PMID:22299830

  5. Giving Doctors' Daily Progress Notes to Hospitalized Patients and Families to Improve Patient Experience.

    PubMed

    Weinert, Craig

    Hospital quality includes excellent physician-patient communication. The objective was to determine effects of distributing physicians' notes to patients. Hospitalized patients or family members on 6 wards at a university hospital received daily a printed copy of their medical team's progress note. Surveys were completed about the benefits and adverse effects of reading the physician notes. In all, 74% to 86% of patients or family members responded favorably that receiving doctors' notes improved understanding of their health condition or gave them more control over their hospital course. Patient concerns about privacy or offense were uncommon, although 16% thought notes were confusing or caused worry. Note distribution had minor effects on physician note writing practice. Having patients and family members read their physicians' progress notes is feasible and enhances patients' understanding of their diagnostic and treatment plan. Notes supplement traditional physician-patient verbal communication practice and have the potential to improve the hospitalized patient experience.

  6. Psychiatric hospitalizations in a cohort of Danish polio patients.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Nete Munk; Rostgaard, Klaus; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Askgaard, Dorthe; Skinhøj, Peter; Aaby, Peter

    2007-02-01

    Although previous polio infection remains a considerable cause of long-term morbidity worldwide, few studies have examined the psychiatric consequences of poliomyelitis. The authors followed 4,660 polio patients hospitalized at the primary infectious disease hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark, between 1922 and 1954 as well as 19,017 age- and gender-matched Danes for psychiatric hospitalizations from January 1, 1977, to December 31, 1993. Incidence rates of all psychiatric disorders combined and of separate diagnostic groups of psychiatric diseases in the two cohorts were compared, yielding the incidence rate ratio, a measure of relative risk. Overall, polio patients had a 40% increased risk of being hospitalized for a psychiatric disorder (incidence rate ratio = 1.43, 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 1.66). Apparently, the overall increased risk of psychiatric hospitalizations could not be confined to specific groups of psychiatric disorders but seemed to be explained by slightly increased risks of several different disorders, especially milder psychiatric disorders. Finally, psychiatric morbidity did not differ between paralytic and nonparalytic polio patients. History of hospitalization for polio might be associated with subsequent risk of hospitalization for psychiatric disorders. The underlying mechanism for this association remains uncertain.

  7. Relationship between Patient Safety and Hospital Surgical Volume

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Downey, John R; McDonald, Kathryn; Morton, John M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between hospital volume and in-hospital adverse events. Data Sources Patient safety indicator (PSI) was used to identify hospital-acquired adverse events in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database in abdominal aortic aneurysm, coronary artery bypass graft, and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass from 2005 to 2008. Study Design In this observational study, volume thresholds were defined by mean year-specific terciles. PSI risk-adjusted rates were analyzed by volume tercile for each procedure. Principal Findings Overall, hospital volume was inversely related to preventable adverse events. High-volume hospitals had significantly lower risk-adjusted PSI rates compared to lower volume hospitals (p < .05). Conclusion These data support the relationship between hospital volume and quality health care delivery in select surgical cases. This study highlights differences between hospital volume and risk-adjusted PSI rates for three common surgical procedures and highlights areas of focus for future studies to identify pathways to reduce hospital-acquired events. PMID:22091561

  8. Malnutrition in pediatric hospital patients: current issues.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Koen F M; Hulst, Jessie M

    2011-02-01

    Malnutrition in hospitalized children is still very prevalent, especially in children with underlying disease and clinical conditions. The purpose of this review is to describe current issues that have to be taken into account when interpreting prevalence data. Weight-for-height and height-for-age standard deviation scores are used for classification for acute and chronic malnutrition, respectively. Body mass index for age can also be used for the definition of acute malnutrition but has a few advantages in the general pediatric population. The new World Health Organization child-growth charts can be used as reference but there is a risk of over- and underestimation of malnutrition rates compared with country-specific growth references. For children with specific medical conditions and syndromes, specific growth references should be used for appropriate interpretation of nutritional status. New screening tools are available to identify children at risk for developing malnutrition during admission. Because of the diversity of medical conditions and syndromes in hospitalized children, assessment of nutritional status and interpretation of anthropometric data need a tailored approach.

  9. Predictors of Prolonged Hospitalization in Patients with Fever

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The study was conducted to analyze the predictors of prolonged hospitalization in patients with fever. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study conducted from July - December 2015 at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Pakistan. Convenience sampling was used to enroll the patients who visited the hospital during the study duration. A sample size of 115 patients was calculated. It included patients who presented with a new onset fever which started in the last month, and the cause of fever was undiagnosed at the time of admission. Critical patients were excluded. Data for more than 30 variables was collected on a pro forma. Univariate regression methods were used to analyze the data in the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), version 23. Results: A total of 115 patients were analyzed. Males constituted 66/115 (57.4%). The mean age for patients was 43.6 years (standard deviation (SD) = 20.2). On admission, low platelet counts (p = 0.001), high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) counts (p = 0.007), a high total leukocyte count (TLC) (p = 0.029), and involvement of nervous (p = 0.021), cardiovascular (p = 0.04), respiratory (p = 0.043), gastroenterological (p = 0.042), hematological (p = 0.028), or urogenital system (p = 0.016) were associated with a longer stay in the hospital. Conclusion: Patients with an undiagnosed and new onset fever will have a longer hospital stay if, on admission, they have low platelet counts, a higher ESR, a high TLC, or involvement of nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, hematological, or urogenital systems. An early identification of risk factors can lead to better treatment and may also lead to a decreased hospital stay. PMID:27774357

  10. A study of patients' expectations and satisfaction in Singapore hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lim, P C; Tang, N K

    2000-01-01

    In today's highly competitive healthcare environment, hospitals increasingly realise the need to focus on service quality as a means to improve their competitive position. Customer-based determinants and perceptions of service quality therefore play an important role when choosing a hospital. This paper attempts to determine the expectations and perceptions of patients through the use of a generic, internationally used market research technique called SERVQUAL. An analysis covering 252 patients revealed that there was an overall service quality gap between patients' expectations and perceptions. Thus, improvements are required across all the six dimensions, namely, tangibility, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy and accessibility and affordability.

  11. What do patients value in the hospital meal experience?

    PubMed

    Hartwell, Heather J; Shepherd, Paula A; Edwards, John S A; Johns, Nick

    2016-01-01

    A number of previous studies have reported on the aspects of hospital food service that patients value, but usually as a secondary finding, and not generally based upon patient-centred approaches. This study employed a questionnaire produced ab initio from interviews with patients and hospital staff, the data from which were subjected to factor and cluster analysis, in order to identify and prioritise the factors that contribute to the meal experience empirically. The most important factors, food and service were as identified by other authors. In decreasing order of importance were social, personal and situational factors. The results confirm that improving the quality of the food and the efficiency with which it reaches the patients remain the most important objectives of hospital food service.

  12. Seamless Care: Safe Patient Transitions From Hospital to Home

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    contributed to unscheduled readmissions. High-risk patient targeting, improved communications (including a greater emphasis on language barriers and...following treatment plans, inability to be present or retain information at discharge, language barriers ) Safe Transitions from Hospital to Home...management, and cultural and language barriers . A summary of patient comments regarding these themes can be found at http://www.patientsafetycenter.com

  13. The Leisure Activities of Mental Patients Prior to Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babow, Irving; Simkin, Sol

    To study the leisure activities, social participation, and organizational participation of mental patients before hospital admission, a three-part research instrument was developed consisting of a structured interview schedule requesting information on the patient's leisure activities, a self-administered questionnaire entitled Survey of Opinions…

  14. [Prevention of tuberculosis in patients in psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Fisher, Iu Ia; Sheĭnman, V L; Gutorova, V A

    1991-01-01

    Mental hospital patients are at high risk of tuberculosis reactivation, especially those with posttuberculous changes in the lungs and progressive severe schizophrenia. Outbreaks of tuberculosis are 2.5 times more frequent in them than in alcohol abusers and other mental patients. In subjects with posttuberculous changes on the lungs preventive chemotherapy can cause a 6-fold decrease in the likelihood of process reactivation.

  15. Real-life patient testimonials, nickname promote Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    As one of the largest hospitals in Philadelphia, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital had a strong academic reputation, but not a warm and friendly one. To increase the utilization of key product lines and raise its profile in the Philadelphia region, the hospital launched an advertising campaign early this year promoting the facility's cancer, neurology, and orthopedic centers.

  16. Comparing Academic Library Spending with Public Libraries, Public K-12 Schools, Higher Education Public Institutions, and Public Hospitals between 1998-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regazzi, John J.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the overall spending trends and patterns of growth of Academic Libraries with Public Libraries, K-12 schools, higher education institutions, and hospitals in the period of 1998 to 2008. Academic Libraries, while showing a growth of 13% over inflation for the period, far underperformed the growth of the other public institutions…

  17. [Characteristics of patient aggression in a psychiatric hospital in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Schuwey-Hayoz, Aline; Needham, Ian

    2006-09-01

    Characteristics of patient aggression in a psychiatric hospital in Switzerland Patient aggression in psychiatry is a prominent problem for all concerned. In this prospective survey we registered and analysed all violent incidents of patients in a cantonal psychiatric hospital in Switzerland in order to determine the characteristics of aggression. The Staff Observation Aggression Scale Revised (SOAS-R) was utilised. During the study period 815 patients were admitted to the hospital. 71 (63.4%) of the 110 violent incidents were perpetrated by male patients. The majority of aggressive incidents were perpetrated in the vicinity of the rooms of the patients and were triggered mainly by the refusal to adhere to the demands of the patient or by patients' use of toxic substances. The most frequent type of aggression was of a verbally aggressive nature and the principal target was nursing personnel who felt threatened in most of the cases. In order to terminate the aggression the most predominant measure was communication with the patient and coercive measures. This study demonstrates clearly that aggression concerns psychiatric nursing personnel and points to the recommendation to reinforce measures of security and to predictive measures to ameliorate the management of aggression.

  18. Appropriateness of hospitalization for CAP-affected pediatric patients: report from a Southern Italy General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Fabio; De Brasi, Daniele; Siani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease, responsible for significant healthcare expenditures, mostly because of hospitalization. Many practice guidelines on CAP have been developed, including admission criteria, but a few on appropriate hospitalization in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate appropriate hospital admission for CAP in a pediatric population. Methods We evaluated appropriate admission to a Pediatric Unit performing a retrospective analysis on CAP admitted pediatric patients from a Southern Italy area. Diagnosis was made based on clinical and radiological signs. Appropriate hospital admission was evaluated following clinical and non-clinical international criteria. Family ability to care children was assessed by evaluating social deprivation status. Results In 2 winter seasons 120 pediatric patients aged 1-129 months were admitted because of CAP. Median age was 28.7 months. Raised body temperature was scored in 68.3% of patients, cough was present in 100% of cases, and abdominal pain was rarely evidenced. Inflammatory indices (ESR and CRP) were found elevated in 33.3% of cases. Anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibodies were found positive in 20.4%. Trans-cutaneous (TC) SaO2 was found lower than 92% in 14.6%. Dyspnoea was present in 43.3%. Dehydration requiring i.v. fluid supplementation was scored in 13.3%. Evaluation of familial ability to care their children revealed that 76% of families (derived from socially depressed areas) were "at social risk", thus not able to appropriately care their children. Furthermore, analysis of CAP patients revealed that "at social risk" people accessed E.D. and were hospitalized more frequently than "not at risk" patients (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% CI: 1,15 to 11,12; p = 0.01), and that admitted "at social risk" people presented without clinical signs of severity (namely dyspnoea, and/or SaO2 ≤ 92%, and/or dehydration) more frequently than "not at risk" population (p = 0.005). Conclusion

  19. Home management of hematological patients requiring hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Isaia, Gianluca; Tibaldi, Vittoria; Astengo, Marco; Ladetto, Marco; Marinello, Renata; Bo, Mario; Michelis, Giuliana; Ruatta, Fiorella; Ricauda, Nicoletta Aimonino

    2010-01-01

    The hospital-at-home service (HHS) could be considered as an alternative to the traditional ward for elderly patients. We aimed at evaluating the home management of elderly people requiring transfusions. The ever-increasing demand on acute hospital services requires alternative methods of delivering all aspects of health care. HHS demonstrated to be as efficacious as a traditional ward for elderly and functionally compromised patients. The method was a retrospective descriptive study enrolling patients needing an hospital admission from 1st January 2007 to 31st December 2007 and reporting an hematological discharge's diagnosis as primary or secondary diagnosis. A total of 54 patients were evaluated in this study. Of them, 34 (62.9%) needed a hemocomponent transfusion for a total volume of 112 blood units and 49 platelet pools. Patients requiring at least one blood or platelet transfusion were more functionally compromised and presented a higher level of acute physiology and chronic health evaluation, compared to the non-transfused ones. The conclusion was that hematological subjects mainly the frail ones and functionally highly compromised with acute illnesses could be treated at home as an alternative of the traditional medical ward. This could be the starting point for future studies that will be able to increase the power of hospital-at-home service for this type of patients.

  20. Physician Alerts to Prevent Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gregory; Rosenbaum, Erin J.; Pendergast, William; Jacobson, Joseph O.; Pendleton, Robert C.; McLaren, Gordon D.; Elliott, C. Gregory; Stevens, Scott M.; Patton, William F.; Dabbagh, Ousama; Paterno, Marilyn D.; Catapane, Elaine; Li, Zhongzhen; Goldhaber, Samuel Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis remains underutilized among hospitalized patients. We designed and carried out a large multicenter randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that an alert from a hospital staff member to the Attending Physician will reduce the rate of symptomatic VTE among high-risk patients not receiving prophylaxis. Methods and Results We enrolled patients using a validated point score system to detect hospitalized patients at high risk for symptomatic VTE who were not receiving prophylaxis. 2,493 patients (82% on Medical Services) from 25 study sites were randomized to the intervention group (n=1,238), in which the responsible physician was alerted by another hospital staff member, versus the control group (n=1,255), in which no alert was issued. The primary end point was symptomatic, objectively confirmed VTE within 90 days. Patients whose physicians were alerted were more than twice as likely to receive VTE prophylaxis as controls (46.0% versus 20.6%, p<0.0001). The symptomatic VTE rate was lower in the intervention group (2.7% versus 3.4%; hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.50 to 1.25), but the difference did not achieve statistical significance. The rate of major bleeding at 30 days in the alert group was similar to the control group (2.1% versus 2.3%, p=0.68). Conclusions A strategy of direct staff member to physician notification increases prophylaxis utilization and leads toward reducing the rate of symptomatic VTE in hospitalized patients. However, VTE prophylaxis continues to be underutilized even after physician notification, especially among Medical Service patients. PMID:19364975

  1. STRESS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS--THE EFFECT OF PROLONGED HOSPITALIZATION.

    PubMed

    Mîndru, Dana Elena; Stănescu, Ralnca Stefania; Mioara, Calipsoana Matei; Duceac, Letiţia Doina; Rugina, Aurica; Temneanu, Oana Raluca; Ungureanu, Monica; Florescu, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Long-term hospitalization emotionally impacts any patient, especially children, and is defined as a long period of time during which the patient is hospitalized and experiences isolation from his or her family, friends and home. Stressful situations trigger a nonspecific response that involves multiple physiological mechanisms. Currently, because of the complexity of these mechanisms, there are no laboratory markers that allow the quantification of the stress intensity felt by the patient. Laboratory determinations currently used in evaluating the response to stress are neuroendocrine, immunological and metabolic. The neuroendocrine system is the first to respond to stressful events. Stress stimulates the hypothalamus, leading to the release of CRH, which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce ACTH. Chronic stress directs the synthesis towards cortisol, which may lead to hypo secretion of the other adrenal steroid hormones. The hospital and the disease are stressors for children and caregivers, since stress can interfere with the normal development of young patients, affecting them in the long term. Admitting a child to hospital means interrupting his or her normal daily life and changing the environment that is familiar to him or her. Therefore, the involvement of the family doctor is very important, as many conditions can be solved by visiting his or her office and thus eliminating the need for hospitalization in a pediatric hospital. If, however, the nature of the condition requires that the child should be seen by a pediatrician, the period of hospitalization should not be much extended so as to prevent the appearance of other possible problems that might influence the child's state.

  2. Patient Care Utility Module for DEPMEDS Hospitals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-05

    following groups for their assistance with this project: DEPMEDS Coordinating Group COL Lowman Gober , COL Darlene Grubor, LTC Judy Jackson, LTC Mike...overall ward configurations and obtain necessary dimensions. A market survey was conducted to identify potentially useful components of patient care...usable between beds were identified in the market survey. One was Fairfield Medical Products Corp., Tampa, FL, which manufactures the MEMO (Mobile

  3. Patients' perception of laughter in a rehabilitation hospital.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, N

    1990-01-01

    This article describes a study of patients in a rehabilitation hospital regarding their perception of laughter and its effect on their mood, their opinion of nurses who laugh with patients, and the appropriateness of laughter in this setting. Results from 35 surveys indicated that patients welcome laughter and perceive nurses who laugh with their patients to be therapeutic. Coupled with information from the literature, which described the positive physical, psychological, and social benefits of laughter, the results of this survey support laughter as a therapeutic intervention that nurses can use in helping patients and families through the process of rehabilitation.

  4. Identifying Patients With Sepsis on the Hospital Wards.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Poushali; Edelson, Dana P; Churpek, Matthew M

    2017-04-01

    Sepsis contributes to up to half of all deaths in hospitalized patients, and early interventions, such as appropriate antibiotics, have been shown to improve outcomes. Most research has focused on early identification and treatment of patients with sepsis in the ED and the ICU; however, many patients acquire sepsis on the general wards. The goal of this review is to discuss recent advances in the detection of sepsis in patients on the hospital wards. We discuss data highlighting the benefits and limitations of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria for screening patients with sepsis, such as its low specificity, as well as newly described scoring systems, including the proposed role of the quick sepsis-related organ failure assessment (qSOFA) score. Challenges specific to detecting sepsis on the wards are discussed, and future directions that use big data approaches and automated alert systems are highlighted.

  5. Is Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests Worse During Days of National Academic Meetings in Japan? A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Hatakeyama, Toshihiro; Shimamoto, Tomonari; Izawa, Junichi; Nishiyama, Chika; Iwami, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Background Outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) might be worse during academic meetings because many medical professionals attend them. Methods This nationwide population-based observation of all consecutively enrolled Japanese adult OHCA patients with resuscitation attempts from 2005 to 2012. The primary outcome was 1-month survival with a neurologically favorable outcome. Calendar days at three national meetings (Japanese Society of Intensive Care Medicine, Japanese Association for Acute Medicine, and Japanese Circulation Society) were obtained for each year during the study period, because medical professionals who belong to these academic societies play an important role in treating OHCA patients after hospital admission, and we identified two groups: the exposure group included OHCAs that occurred on meeting days, and the control group included OHCAs that occurred on the same days of the week 1 week before and after meetings. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for confounding variables. Results A total of 20 143 OHCAs that occurred during meeting days and 38 860 OHCAs that occurred during non-meeting days were eligible for our analyses. The proportion of patients with favorable neurologic outcomes after whole arrests did not differ during meeting and non-meeting days (1.6% [324/20 143] vs 1.5% [596/38 855]; adjusted odds ratio 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.88–1.19). Regarding bystander-witnessed ventricular fibrillation arrests of cardiac origin, the proportion of patients with favorable neurologic outcomes also did not differ between the groups. Conclusions In this population, there were no significant differences in outcomes after OHCAs that occurred during national meetings of professional organizations related to OHCA care and those that occurred during non-meeting days. PMID:26639754

  6. Clinical Characteristics of Diabetic Patients Transferred to Korean Referral Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Min Young; Kim, Sang Soo; Lee, In Kyu; Baek, Hong Sun; Lee, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Min Young

    2014-01-01

    Background We evaluated the disease profile and clinical management, including the status of both glycemic control and complications, in patients with diabetes who were transferred to referral hospitals in Korea. Methods Patients referred to 20 referral hospitals in Gyeongsangnam/Gyeongsangbuk-do and Jeollanam/Jeollabuk-do with at least a 1-year history of diabetes between January and June 2011 were retrospectively reviewed using medical records, laboratory tests, and questionnaires. Results A total of 654 patients were enrolled in the study. In total, 437 patients (67%) were transferred from clinics and 197 (30%) patients were transferred from hospitals. A total of 279 patients (43%) visited higher medical institutions without a written medical request. The main reason for the referral was glycemic control in 433 patients (66%). Seventy-three patients (11%) had received more than one session of diabetic education. Only 177 patients (27%) had been routinely self-monitoring blood glucose, and 146 patients (22%) were monitoring hemoglobin A1c. In addition, proper evaluations for diabetic complications were performed for 74 patients (11%). The most common complication was neuropathy (32%) followed by nephropathy (31%). In total, 538 patients (82%) had been taking oral hypoglycemic agents. A relatively large number of patients (44%) had been taking antihypertensive medications. Conclusion We investigated the clinical characteristics of diabetic patients and identified specific problems in diabetic management prior to the transfer. We also found several problems in the medical system, which were divided into three medical institutions having different roles in Korea. Our findings suggested that the relationships among medical institutions have to be improved, particularly for diabetes. PMID:25349826

  7. [Methods used in the hospital for patients' sleep improvement].

    PubMed

    Ryhänen, A; Kuivalainen, L; Meriläinen, P; Isola, A

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe methods used in the hospital for sleep improvement. The article is based on a study of patients' sleep in a Finnish hospital's medical or surgical ward. The patients of the Central Hospital of Northern Carelia's two medical and two surgical wards took part in the research. The data were collected by a structured questionnaire in May-June 1996. Of the replies of 181 patients, the results of 177 were taken to the final analysis. The data were analysed by statistical methods. The data and the results are presented in frequency and percent distributions. The most common method used by the patients to improve their sleep was to choose a good sleeping position. Other methods, which were often used, were reading, watching TV, having a snack, taking a warm shower or praying. The nurses were versatile in using the available methods of nursing for helping the patients to sleep. They informed the patients about their illnesses, nursing regime and the forthcoming operations, consoling and giving support to them. The nurses also organised sleep-supporting environment and gave painkillers and sleeping pills. About 60% of the researched patients were of the opinion, that sleeping tablets were prescribed too often. The patients themselves regarded the information and knowledge about their own treatment as the best way to improve their sleep.

  8. Use of patient and hospital variables in interpreting patient satisfaction data for performance improvement purposes.

    PubMed

    Lessing, Elise E; Beech, Robert P

    2004-07-01

    Satisfaction scores of 349 patients being discharged from a state psychiatric hospital were examined in relation to available norms for the instrument used and selected patient and hospital variables. Mean item scores fell within the less-than-satisfied category on both total and factor scores. Regression analyses indicated minimal effects of patient attributes. Two hospital factors (restraint rate on patient's unit and accessibility of psychosocial groups) significantly predicted satisfaction, with the former having an unexpected positive relationship to satisfaction. Clinicians were able to use the survey data to improve care, but patients' tendency toward undifferentiated positive or negative responding hindered the prioritizing of change efforts.

  9. [Nutritional evaluation and functional class in hospitalized cardiopathy patients].

    PubMed

    Herrera Franco, R; Martínez Martínez, E; López Vega, L T; Astudillo Sandoval, R; Benítez Pérez, C; Ariza Andraca, H

    1999-01-01

    The nutritional state evaluation of any patient with heart disease must include the anthropometric measures, organic metabolic and cellular immunity test. We evaluated the nutritional state of 75 hospitalized patients with heart disease, and its correlation with New York Heart Association class and heart disease type. There was 36 patients (48%) with normal nutritional state, 24 (32%) with grade I malnutrition, 12 (16%) with grade II malnutrition, and 3 (4%) with grade III malnutrition. Of 23 patients with rheumatic valvular heart disease 83.4% have some degree of malnutrition, 37 patients with ischemic heart disease 25% was under nourished. Fifty percent of patients with hypertensive cardiopathy, 75% of the patients with cardiomyopathy and 83% of the 7 patients with other type of heart disease had some degree of malnourishment. There was a direct correlation between nutritional state and functional class, we found no patient in IV class functional with normal nutritional state, or grade I malnutrition.

  10. Patient expectations of fair complaint handling in hospitals: empirical data

    PubMed Central

    Friele, Roland D; Sluijs, Emmy M

    2006-01-01

    Background A common finding in several studies is patients' dissatisfaction with complaint handling in health care. The reasons why are for the greater part unknown. The key to an answer may be found in a better understanding of patients' expectations. We investigated patients' expectations of complaint handling in hospitals. Methods Subjects were patients who had lodged a complaint at the complaint committees of 74 hospitals in the Netherlands. A total of 424 patients (response 75%) completed a written questionnaire at the start of the complaint procedures. Derived from justice theory, we asked what they expected from fair procedures, fair communication and fair outcome of complaint handling. Results The predominant reason for complainants to lodge a complaint was to prevent the incident from happening again. Complainants expected fair procedures from the complaint committee, in particular an impartial position. This was most important to 87% of the complainants. They also expected to be treated respectfully. Furthermore, they expected the hospital and the professional involved to respond to their complaint. A change in hospital performances was the most wanted outcome of complaint handling, according to 79% of the complainants. They also expected disclosure from the professionals. Professionals should admit a mistake when it had occurred. More complainants (65%) considered it most important to get an explanation than an apology (41%). Only 32% of complainants expected the professional to make an effort to restore the doctor-patient relationship. A minority of complainants (7%) wanted financial compensation. Conclusion Nearly all complainants want to prevent the incident from happening again, not out of pure altruism, but in order to restore their sense of justice. We conclude that complaint handling that does not allow for change is unlikely to meet patients' expectations. Secondly, complaint handling should not be left exclusively to complaint committees, the

  11. Sex differences in hospital readmission among colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, J. R.; Fernandez, E.; Moreno, V.; Ribes, J.; Peris, M.; Navarro, M.; Cambray, M.; Borras, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    Background: While several studies have analysed sex and socioeconomic differences in cancer incidence and mortality, sex differences in oncological health care have been seldom considered. Objective: To investigate sex based inequalities in hospital readmission among patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Hospital Universitary in L'Hospitalet (Barcelona, Spain). Participants: Four hundred and three patients diagnosed with colorectal between January 1996 and December 1998 were actively followed up until 2002. Main outcome measurements and methods: Hospital readmission times related to colorectal cancer after surgical procedure. Cox proportional model with random effect (frailty) was used to estimate hazard rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals of readmission time for covariates analysed. Results: Crude hazard rate ratio of hospital readmission in men was 1.61 (95% CI 1.21 to 2.15). When other significant determinants of readmission were controlled for (including Dukes's stage, mortality, and Charlson's index) a significant risk of readmission was still present for men (hazard rate ratio: 1.52, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.96). Conclusions: In the case of colorectal cancer, women are less likely than men to be readmitted to the hospital, even after controlling for tumour characteristics, mortality, and comorbidity. New studies should investigate the role of other non-clinical variable such as differences in help seeking behaviours or structural or personal sex bias in the attention given to patients. PMID:15911648

  12. Patient and family engagement: a survey of US hospital practices

    PubMed Central

    Herrin, Jeph; Harris, Kathleen G; Kenward, Kevin; Hines, Stephen; Joshi, Maulik S; Frosch, Dominick L

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient and family engagement (PFE) in healthcare is an important element of the transforming healthcare system; however, the prevalence of various PFE practices in the USA is not known. Objective We report on a survey of hospitals in the USA regarding their PFE practices during 2013–2014. Results The response rate was 42%, with 1457 acute care hospitals completing the survey. We constructed 25 items to summarise the responses regarding key practices, which fell into three broad categories: (1) organisational practices, (2) bedside practices and (3) access to information and shared decision-making. We found a wide range of scores across hospitals. Selected findings include: 86% of hospitals had a policy for unrestricted visitor access in at least some units; 68% encouraged patients/families to participate in shift-change reports; 67% had formal policies for disclosing and apologising for errors; and 38% had a patient and family advisory council. The most commonly reported barrier to increased PFE was ‘competing organisational priorities’. Summary Our findings indicate that there is a large variation in hospital implementation of PFE practices, with competing organisational priorities being the most commonly identified barrier to adoption. PMID:26082560

  13. Management of the hospitalized patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mendez, Carlos E; Umpierrez, Guillermo

    2013-08-01

    Patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) have minimal to absent pancreatic β-cell function and rely on the exogenous delivery of insulin to obtain adequate and life-sustaining glucose homeostasis. Maintaining glycemic control is challenging in hospitalized patients with T1DM, as insulin requirements are influenced by the presence of acute medical or surgical conditions, as well as altered nutritional intake. The risks of hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, hypoglycemia, and glycemic variability are increased in hospitalized patients with T1DM. Diabetic ketoacidosis and severe hypoglycemia are the 2 most common emergency conditions that account for the majority of hospital admissions in patients with T1DM. The association between hyperglycemia and increased risk of complications and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is well established; however, the impact of glycemic control on clinical outcomes has not been determined in patients with T1DM who present without ketoacidosis. To decrease complications associated with insulin therapy, health care professionals must be well versed in the use of insulin because it is a common source of medication error. For non-critically ill, hospitalized patients, subcutaneous insulin given to cover basal and prandial needs instead of sliding scale is the preferred method of insulin dosing. Protocols are available for initiating and titrating insulin doses, as well as for transitioning from an insulin infusion to a subcutaneous regimen. In our review, we identify and discuss special considerations related to inpatient glycemic control of non-ketotic patients with T1DM. Additionally, point differences and similarities associated with the management of patients with T2DM are discussed.

  14. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A NOVEL TOOL TO PREDICT HOSPITAL READMISSION RISK AMONG PATIENTS WITH DIABETES

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Daniel J.; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Golden, Sherita Hill; Nelson, Deborah B.; McDonnell, Marie E.; Zhao, Huaqing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate a tool to predict the risk of all-cause readmission within 30 days (30-d readmission) among hospitalized patients with diabetes. Methods A cohort of 44,203 discharges was retrospectively selected from the electronic records of adult patients with diabetes hospitalized at an urban academic medical center. Discharges of 60% of the patients (n = 26,402) were randomly selected as a training sample to develop the index. The remaining 40% (n = 17,801) were selected as a validation sample. Multivariable logistic regression with generalized estimating equations was used to develop the Diabetes Early Readmission Risk Indicator (DERRI™). Results Ten statistically significant predictors were identified: employment status; living within 5 miles of the hospital; preadmission insulin use; burden of macrovascular diabetes complications; admission serum hematocrit, creatinine, and sodium; having a hospital discharge within 90 days before admission; most recent discharge status up to 1 year before admission; and a diagnosis of anemia. Discrimination of the model was acceptable (C statistic 0.70), and calibration was good. Characteristics of the validation and training samples were similar. Performance of the DERRI™ in the validation sample was essentially unchanged (C statistic 0.69). Mean predicted 30-d readmission risks were also similar between the training and validation samples (39.3% and 38.7% in the highest quintiles). Conclusion The DERRI™ was found to be a valid tool to predict all-cause 30-d readmission risk of individual patients with diabetes. The identification of high-risk patients may encourage the use of interventions targeting those at greatest risk, potentially leading to better outcomes and lower healthcare costs. PMID:27732098

  15. Methods to evaluate the nutrition risk in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Erkan, Tülay

    2014-01-01

    The rate of malnutrition is substantially high both in the population and in chronic patients hospitalized because of different reasons. The rate of patients with no marked malnutrition at the time of hospitalization who develop malnutrition during hospitalization is also substantially high. Therefore, there are currently different screening methods with different targets to prevent malnutrition and its overlook. These methods should be simple and reliable and should not be time-consuming in order to be used in daily practice. Seven nutrition risk screening methods used in children have been established until the present time. However, no consensus has been made on any method as in adults. It should be accepted that interrogation of nutrition is a part of normal examination to increase awareness on this issue and to draw attention to this issue. PMID:26078678

  16. Establishing a Personal Health Record System in an Academic Hospital: One Year's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Hyun Jung; Jung, Se Young; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung; Baek, Hyunyoung; Lee, Kiheon; Bae, Woo Kyung; Han, Jong-Soo; Kim, Sarah; Park, Hwayeon

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal health records (PHRs) are web based tools that help people to access and manage their personalized medical information. Although needs for PHR are increasing, current serviced PHRs are unsatisfactory and researches on them remain limited. The purpose of this study is to show the process of developing Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH)'s own PHR system and to analyze consumer's use pattern after providing PHR service. Methods Task force team was organized to decide service range and set the program. They made the system available on both mobile application and internet web page. The study enrolled PHR consumers who assessed PHR system between June 2013 and June 2014. We analyzed the total number of users on a monthly basis and the using pattern according to each component. Results The PHR service named Health4U has been provided from June 2013. Every patient who visited SNUBH could register Health4U service and view their medical data. The PHR user has been increasing, especially they tend to approach via one way of either web page or mobile application. The most frequently used service is to check laboratory test result. Conclusion For paradigm shift toward patient-centered care, there is a growing interest in PHR. This study about experience of establishing and servicing the Health4U would contribute to development of interconnected PHR. PMID:26019761

  17. Comorbidity and Pattern of Substance Use in Hospitalized Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sepehrmanesh, Zahra; Ahmadvand, Afshin; Moraveji, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Substance use in patients with psychiatric disorder is an every-day seen. Detection of this comorbidity can significantly affect the treatment of these disorders, as well as substance use. Objectives: This study has been conducted to determine the prevalence and pattern of substance use in hospitalized psychiatric patients. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 210 hospitalized psychiatric patients were selected by simple randomization from all records of hospitalized patients. The instrument of gathering data was a demographic checklist including age, gender, marital status, education, type of disorder and substance abuse and duration of psychiatric disorder. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 16 using Fisher exact and Chi square tests. Results: The mean age of patients was 37.9 years. Most of the patients were male, married and unemployed. The Prevalence of substance use was 36.7%. The most prevalent pattern of substance use was opium, opioid, methamphetamines and other substances (poly substance). The prevalence of substance use in patients with mood disorders was more than the other disorders and the most prevalent substance use in these patients was opium and opioid. Poly substance use was the most prevalent pattern of use (80 %) in psychotic and mood disorders due to substance. Significant difference was seen between genders, marital status, occupation, duration of illness and frequency of substance use (P < 0.05 ), however no significant difference was seen between educational levels, age and substance use. Conclusions: The patients with mood disorders had the highest comorbidity with substance use and concurrent use of poly substance was the most prevalent pattern of use in these patients. Therefore, successful treatment of psychiatric disorders and substance use needs multimodal and more serious interventions. Regarding to the pattern of poly substance use in these patients, careful screening should be performed at admission

  18. Prevalence of Pulmonary Embolism among Patients Hospitalized for Syncope.

    PubMed

    Prandoni, Paolo; Lensing, Anthonie W A; Prins, Martin H; Ciammaichella, Maurizio; Perlati, Marica; Mumoli, Nicola; Bucherini, Eugenio; Visonà, Adriana; Bova, Carlo; Imberti, Davide; Campostrini, Stefano; Barbar, Sofia

    2016-10-20

    Background The prevalence of pulmonary embolism among patients hospitalized for syncope is not well documented, and current guidelines pay little attention to a diagnostic workup for pulmonary embolism in these patients. Methods We performed a systematic workup for pulmonary embolism in patients admitted to 11 hospitals in Italy for a first episode of syncope, regardless of whether there were alternative explanations for the syncope. The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism was ruled out in patients who had a low pretest clinical probability, which was defined according to the Wells score, in combination with a negative d-dimer assay. In all other patients, computed tomographic pulmonary angiography or ventilation-perfusion lung scanning was performed. Results A total of 560 patients (mean age, 76 years) were included in the study. A diagnosis of pulmonary embolism was ruled out in 330 of the 560 patients (58.9%) on the basis of the combination of a low pretest clinical probability of pulmonary embolism and negative d-dimer assay. Among the remaining 230 patients, pulmonary embolism was identified in 97 (42.2%). In the entire cohort, the prevalence of pulmonary embolism was 17.3% (95% confidence interval, 14.2 to 20.5). Evidence of an embolus in a main pulmonary or lobar artery or evidence of perfusion defects larger than 25% of the total area of both lungs was found in 61 patients. Pulmonary embolism was identified in 45 of the 355 patients (12.7%) who had an alternative explanation for syncope and in 52 of the 205 patients (25.4%) who did not. Conclusions Pulmonary embolism was identified in nearly one of every six patients hospitalized for a first episode of syncope. (Funded by the University of Padua; PESIT ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01797289 .).

  19. Environmental Risk Factors for Pneumocystis Pneumonia Hospitalizations in HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Djawe, Kpandja; Levin, Linda; Swartzman, Alexandra; Fong, Serena; Roth, Brenna; Subramanian, Anuradha; Grieco, Katherine; Jarlsberg, Leah; Miller, Robert F.; Huang, Laurence; Walzer, Peter D.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) is the second leading cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients in the United States. Although the host risk factors for the development of PcP are well established, the environmental (climatological, air pollution) risk factors are poorly understood. The major goal of this study was to determine the environmental risk factors for admissions of HIV-positive patients with PcP to a single medical center. Methods. Between 1997 and 2008, 457 HIV-positive patients with microscopically confirmed PcP were admitted to the San Francisco General Hospital. A case-crossover design was applied to identify environmental risk factors for PcP hospitalizations. Climatological and air pollution data were collected from the Environmental Protection Agency and Weather Warehouse databases. Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the association of each environmental factor and PcP hospital admission. Results. Hospital admissions were significantly more common in the summer than in the other seasons. Increases in temperature and sulfur dioxide levels were independently associated with hospital admissions for PcP, but the effects of sulfur dioxide were modified by increasing carbon monoxide levels. Conclusions. This study identifies both climatological and air pollution constituents as independent risk factors for hospitalization of HIV-positive patients with PcP in San Francisco. Thus, the environmental effects on PcP are more likely complex than previously thought. Further studies are needed to understand how these factors exert their effects and to determine if these factors are associated with PcP in other geographic locations. PMID:23042978

  20. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    PubMed

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-09

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective.

  1. Underreporting of Behavioral Problems in Older Hospitalized Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Helen D.; O'Hara, Ruth; Mumenthaler, Martin S.; Cassidy, Erin L.; Buffum, Martha; Kim, Janise M.; Danielsen, Claire E.; Noda, Art; Kraemer, Helena C.; Sheikh, Javaid I.

    2005-01-01

    This descriptive study examined reports of behavioral problems among older patients hospitalized in acute care medical settings. Greater numbers of behavioral problems were reported by nursing staff on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory-Questionnaire than were documented in medical charts over the same time period. Such underreporting may have…

  2. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient’s trust is the service quality. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient’s trust. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. Results: The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P < 0.001) were the strongest factors in predicting patient’s trust, but the quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. Conclusions: The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient’s trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff. PMID:25763258

  3. Results of a venous thromboembolism prophylaxis program for hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Luiz Francisco; Krokoscz, Daniella Vianna C; de Paiva, Edison Ferreira; Furtado, Ilka Spinola; Mattar, Jorge; de Souza e Sá, Marcia Martiniano; de Lira, Antonio Carlos Onofre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the leading cause of preventable death in hospitalized patients. However, existing prophylaxis guidelines are rarely followed. Objective The aim of the study was to present and discuss implementation strategies and the results of a VTE prophylaxis program for medical and surgical patients admitted to a large general hospital. Patients and methods This prospective observational study was conducted to describe the strategy used to implement a VTE prophylaxis program in hospitalized medical and surgical patients and to analyze the results in terms of the risk assessment rate within the first 24 hours after admission, adequacy of the prophylaxis prescription, and prevalence of VTE in the discharge records before and after program implementation. We used the Mantel–Haenszel chi-square test for the linear trend of the data analysis and set the significance level to P<0.05. Results With the support of an institutional VTE prophylaxis committee, a multiple-strategy approach was used in the implementation of the protocol, which included continuing education, complete data recording using computerized systems, and continuous auditing of and feedback to the medical staff and multidisciplinary teams. Approximately 90% of patients were evaluated within the first 24 hours after admission, and no significant difference in this percentage was observed among the years analyzed. A progressive increase in adherence to protocol recommendations, from 63.8% in 2010 to 75.0% in 2014 (P<0.001), was noted. The prevalence of symptomatic VTE in the discharge records of patients decreased from 2.03% in 2009 to 1.69% in 2014 (P=0.033). Conclusion The implementation of a VTE prophylaxis program targeting adult patients admitted to a large hospital employing a multiple-strategy approach achieved high rates of risk assessment within 24 hours of admission, improved the adherence to prophylaxis recommendations in high-risk patients, and reduced the

  4. Interdisciplinary expert consultation via a teleradiology platform--influence on therapeutic decision-making and patient referral rates to an academic tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Helck, A; Matzko, M; Trumm, C G; Grosse, C; Piltz, S; Reiser, M; Ertl-Wagner, B

    2009-12-01

    In addition to teleradiological reporting as a nighthawking or a regular service, teleradiological communication can be used for interdisciplinary expert consultation. We intended to evaluate an interdisciplinary consultation system based on a teleradiology platform with regard to its impact on therapeutic decision-making, directed patient referrals to an academic tertiary care center and the economic benefit for the hospital providing the service. Therefore, consultations from five secondary care centers and consecutive admissions to an academic tertiary care center were prospectively evaluated over a time period of six months. A total of 69 interdisciplinary expert consultations were performed. In 54 % of the cases the patients were consecutively referred to the university hospital for further treatment. In all acutely life-threatening emergencies (n = 9), fast and focused treatment by referral to the academic tertiary care center was achieved (average time to treat 130 min). The admissions to the academic tertiary care center led to improved utilization of its facilities with additional revenue of more than 1,000000 euro p. a. An interdisciplinary expert consultation via a teleradiology platform enables fast and efficient expert care with improved and accelerated patient management and improved utilization of the service providing hospital.

  5. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  6. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  7. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  8. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  9. 38 CFR 17.166 - Dental services for hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. 17.166 Section 17.166 Pensions, Bonuses, and... hospital or nursing home patients and domiciled members. Persons receiving hospital, nursing home, or... are professionally determined necessary to the patients' or members' overall hospital, nursing...

  10. An Intelligent Robotic Hospital Bed for Safe Transportation of Critical Neurosurgery Patients Along Crowded Hospital Corridors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Savkin, Andrey V; Clout, Ray; Nguyen, Hung T

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel design of an intelligent robotic hospital bed, named Flexbed, with autonomous navigation ability. The robotic bed is developed for fast and safe transportation of critical neurosurgery patients without changing beds. Flexbed is more efficient and safe during the transportation process comparing to the conventional hospital beds. Flexbed is able to avoid en-route obstacles with an efficient easy-to-implement collision avoidance strategy when an obstacle is nearby and to move towards its destination at maximum speed when there is no threat of collision. We present extensive simulation results of navigation of Flexbed in the crowded hospital corridor environments with moving obstacles. Moreover, results of experiments with Flexbed in the real world scenarios are also presented and discussed.

  11. Delirium in elderly patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards.

    PubMed

    Fortini, Alberto; Morettini, Alessandro; Tavernese, Giuseppe; Facchini, Sofia; Tofani, Lorenzo; Pazzi, Maddalena

    2014-06-01

    A prospective observational study was conducted to evaluate the impact of delirium on geriatric inpatients in internal medical wards and to identify predisposing factors for the development of delirium. The study included all patients aged 65 years and older, who were consecutively admitted to the internal medicine wards of two public hospitals in Florence, Italy. On admission, 29 baseline risk factors were examined, cognitive impairment was evaluated by Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire, and prevalent delirium cases were diagnosed by Confusion Assessment Method (CAM). Enrolled patients were evaluated daily with CAM to detect incident delirium cases. Among the 560 included patients, 19 (3 %) had delirium on admission (prevalent) and 44 (8 %) developed delirium during hospitalization (incident). Prevalent delirium cases were excluded from the statistical analysis. Incident delirium was associated with increased length of hospital stay (p < 0.01) and institutionalization (p < 0.01, OR 3.026). Multivariate analysis found that cognitive impairment on admission (p < 0.0002), diabetes (p < 0.05, OR 1.936), chronic kidney failure (p < 0.05, OR 2.078) and male gender (p < 0.05, OR 2.178) was significantly associated with the development of delirium during hospitalization. Results show that delirium impact is relevant to older patients hospitalized in internal medicine wards. The present study confirms cognitive impairment as a risk factor for incident delirium. The cognitive evaluation proved to be an important instrument to improve identification of patients at high risk for delirium. In this context, our study may contribute to improve application of preventive strategies.

  12. Medication Reconciliation in Patients Hospitalized in a Cardiology Unit

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Gabriella Fernandes; Santos, Gláucia Beisl Noblat de Carvalho; Rosa, Mário Borges; Noblat, Lúcia de Araújo Costa Beisl

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare drugs prescribed on hospital admission with the list of drugs taken prior to admission for adult patients admitted to a cardiology unit and to identify the role of a pharmacist in identifying and resolving medication discrepancies. Method This study was conducted in a 300 bed university hospital in Brazil. Clinical pharmacists taking medication histories and reconciling medications prescribed on admission with a list of drugs used prior to admission. Discrepancies were classified as justified (e.g., based on the pharmacotherapeutic guidelines of the hospital studied) or unintentional. Treatments were reviewed within 48 hours following hospitalization. Unintentional discrepancies were further classified according to the categorization of medication error severity. Pharmacists verbally contacted the prescriber to recommend actions to resolve the discrepancies. Results A total of 181 discrepancies were found in 50 patients (86%). Of these discrepancies, 149 (82.3%) were justified changes to the patient's home medication regimen; however, 32 (17.7%) discrepancies found in 24 patients were unintentional. Pharmacists made 31 interventions and 23 (74.2%) were accepted. Among unintentional discrepancies, the most common was a different medication dose on admission (42%). Of the unintentional discrepancies 13 (40.6%) were classified as error without harm, 11 (34.4%) were classified as error without harm but which could affect the patient and require monitoring, 3 (9.4%) as errors could have resulted in harm and 5 (15.6%) were classified as circumstances or events that have the capacity to cause harm. Conclusion The results revealed a high number of unintentional discrepancies and the pharmacist can play an important role by intervening and correcting medication errors at a hospital cardiology unit. PMID:25531902

  13. Three distinct cases of copper deficiency in hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Dembinski, Karolina; Gargasz, Anne Elizabeth; Dabrow, Sharon; Rodriguez, Lisa

    2012-08-01

    Although copper deficiency is a rare occurrence in the developed world, attention should be given to the proper supplementation of minerals to at-risk pediatric patients. This study presents 3 distinct cases of copper deficiency in hospitalized patients aged 14 months, 6 years, and 12 years. Two patients had short bowel syndrome, requiring prolonged parenteral nutrition or complex intravenous fluid supplementation. The third patient was severely malnourished. Copper deficiency manifested in all of our patients as either microcytic anemia or pancytopenia with myelodysplastic syndrome. Copper deficiency is an important diagnosis to be considered in patients with prematurity, parenteral nutrition dependency, malabsorption, and/or those with malnutrition. More studies are needed to establish appropriate amounts of copper supplementation to replenish copper stores in deficient patients.

  14. Family Involvement in the Care of Hospitalized Elderly Patients.

    PubMed

    Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Gholizadeh, Leila; Mohammadi, Eesa; Yazdi, Khadijeh

    2015-09-01

    Family participation in caregiving to elderly inpatients is likely to improve the quality of care to older patients. This qualitative design study applied semi-structured interviews to elicit experiences from nurses, families, and patients on the notion of family participation in the care of elderly patients in two general teaching hospitals in Iran. Data were gathered using individual interviews, field notes, and participant observations. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. The following main themes emerged through the data analysis process: (a) safety and quality in patient care and (b) unplanned and unstructured patient care participation. The study concludes that family involvement in caregiving to elderly patients is important, yet the participation should be based upon a planned and structured framework to ensure a safe and satisfying experience for patients, families, and health care team.

  15. [Interpreting the hospitalization experiences of patients with spine lesion].

    PubMed

    de Albuquerque, Ana Lúcia Pereira; de Freitas, Consuelo Helena Aires; Jorge, Maria Salete Bessa

    2009-01-01

    Qualitative study with theoretical axis in symbolic interactionism interpretative of Norman Denzin that had as objective to comprehend the meanings of experiences lived by being victim of spine lesion in context hospital and to describe the narratives in range of experiences lived. The subjects of research were seven patient victims of spine lesion traumatic hospitalized in unity of neurology of Institute Dr. José Frota, sited in Fortaleza/Ce. Interpreted hard fronting to balance of oneself, given to sudden breaking of trajectory of their lives, the organic alterations acquired that pass to be motives of fears, uncertain, non-comfort and menace to life that had along their families.

  16. Inter-hospital transport of critically ill patients; expect surprises

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Inter-hospital transport of critically ill patients is increasing. When performed by specialized retrieval teams there are less adverse events compared to transport by ambulance. These transports are performed with technical equipment also used in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU). As a consequence technical problems may arise and have to be dealt with on the road. In this study, all technical problems encountered while transporting patients with our mobile intensive care unit service (MICU) were evaluated. Methods From March 2009 until August 2011 all transports were reviewed for technical problems. The cause, solution and, where relevant, its influence on protocol were stated. Results In this period of 30 months, 353 patients were transported. In total 55 technical problems were encountered. We provide examples of how they influenced transport and how they may be resolved. Conclusion The use of technical equipment is part of intensive care medicine. Wherever this kind of equipment is used, technical problems will occur. During inter-hospital transports, without extra personnel or technical assistance, the transport team is dependent on its own ability to resolve these problems. Therefore, we emphasize the importance of having some technical understanding of the equipment used and the importance of training to anticipate, prevent and resolve technical problems. Being an outstanding intensivist on the ICU does not necessarily mean being qualified for transporting the critically ill as well. Although these are lessons derived from inter-hospital transport, they may also apply to intra-hospital transport. PMID:22326110

  17. Hospital discharge plan for patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Andrietta, Maria Paula; Lopes Moreira, Rita Simone; Bottura Leite de Barros, Alba Lucia

    2011-01-01

    This integrative review investigates how nurses plan the hospital discharge of patients with Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) since an inadequate discharge plan and patients' subsequent non-adherence to instruction provided upon discharge are indicated as potential factors for re-hospitalization. A total of 24 papers were found in a search carried out in the LILACS and MEDLINE databases between 2004 and 2008, which given the inclusion criteria, were reduced to 14 papers. The papers were analyzed and categorized into "Health Education", and "Nursing Care". The synthesis of results indicates that the discharge plan devised by nurses is based on two categories. The actions of nurses to promote health education can enable patients with CHF to improve self-care.

  18. A growing opportunity: Community gardens affiliated with US hospitals and academic health centers

    PubMed Central

    George, Daniel R.; Rovniak, Liza S.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Hanson, Ryan; Sciamanna, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community gardens can reduce public health disparities through promoting physical activity and healthy eating, growing food for underserved populations, and accelerating healing from injury or disease. Despite their potential to contribute to comprehensive patient care, no prior studies have investigated the prevalence of community gardens affiliated with US healthcare institutions, and the demographic characteristics of communities served by these gardens. Methods In 2013, national community garden databases, scientific abstracts, and public search engines (e.g., Google Scholar) were used to identify gardens. Outcomes included the prevalence of hospital-based community gardens by US regions, and demographic characteristics (age, race/ethnicity, education, household income, and obesity rates) of communities served by gardens. Results There were 110 healthcare-based gardens, with 39 in the Midwest, 25 in the South, 24 in the Northeast, and 22 in the West. Compared to US population averages, communities served by healthcare-based gardens had similar demographic characteristics, but significantly lower rates of obesity (27% versus 34%, P < .001). Conclusions Healthcare-based gardens are located in regions that are demographically representative of the US population, and are associated with lower rates of obesity in communities they serve. PMID:25599017

  19. Provision of safe potable water for immunocompromised patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Hall, J; Hodgson, G; Kerr, K G

    2004-10-01

    We conducted a survey of hospital drinking water provision for patients with immunocompromising conditions in 15 Trusts in the north of England. Ten trusts replied, reporting on provision of drinking water in 14 separate units. Of these, nine provided only tap water to all patients, irrespective of underlying condition. In two units, iced water, with ice from commercially available makers, was used. Five units distinguished between neutropenic and non-neutropenic patients, with the former group receiving cooled, boiled water (three units), sterile water and sterile water or carbonated water (one unit each). No unit provided filtered water. Water in jugs was changed daily, twice daily or only when empty in seven, three and four units, respectively. On 10 units, patients were allowed to provide their own drinking water, but no unit provided written advice to patients on potable water. A survey within our own Trust revealed similar inter-unit disparity. The options for potable water provision were reviewed, taking into account: microbiological quality, organoleptic (perceived taste/smell) acceptability, cost and factors relating to staff safety and patient confidentiality [as it was possible for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive patients on some wards to be identified because they were provided with cooled, boiled water]. It concluded that end-line commercially available water filters were the optimal way to provide drinking water to immunocompromised patients in hospital.

  20. Blood Transfusion Reactions in Elderly Patients Hospitalized in a Multilevel Geriatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lubart, E.; Segal, R.; Tryhub, N.; Sigler, E.; Leibovitz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives. Blood transfusion is a critical issue for patients with chronic diseases such as heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and malignancy. However, side effects are not rare. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the frequency of adverse blood transfusion reactions in hospitalized elderly patients during a one-year period. Design/Setting/Participants. Blood transfusion reactions such as fever, chills, dyspnea, and others following blood transfusions in hospitalized geriatric patients during one-year period were examined. Results. 382 blood units (242 patients) were administered during the study period. In 40 (11%) cases, blood transfusion reactions occurred. Fever was the most common reaction in 29 cases (72%), four (10%) had shortness of breath, and 3 (8%) had vomiting and chills each. There were no lethal cases in the 24-hour period following blood transfusions. Conclusion. A relatively low rate of adverse blood transfusion reactions occurred in our geriatric patients. We may speculate that this is related to underreporting of minor symptoms due to the high percentage of demented patients in this population. PMID:24804100

  1. Prevention of deterioration in acutely ill patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Steen, Colin

    The shift towards providing critical care in general wards has changed the way acutely ill patients are identified, treated and managed in hospital. This requires the expertise of knowledgeable, informed and capable staff. Effective education and appropriate knowledge and skills are required to aid identification of the deteriorating patient and provide prompt, timely and appropriate intervention to prevent further deterioration and possibly death. This article provides information about a systematic approach that will enable healthcare professionals to intervene to prevent deterioration in acutely ill patients.

  2. Malnutrition and hospital prognosis in the alcoholic patient.

    PubMed

    Bienia, R; Ratcliff, S; Barbour, G L; Kummer, M

    1982-01-01

    The nutritional status of 65 alcoholic patients admitted to the Medical Service of a Veterans Administration Hospital was evaluated and compared to that 87 nonalcoholic patients admitted during the same period of time. There was no statistical difference in the prevalence of malnutrition in the alcoholic population (36.9%) when compared to the nonalcoholic population (43.7%). The death rate and incidence of infection were similar in both populations as was the prevalence of anemia, depressed total lymphocyte count, and skin test anergy. Malnutrition, however, correlated with an increased death rate and incidence of infection, regardless of whether the patient was an alcoholic or not.

  3. Goals of care among hospitalized patients: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Haberle, Tyler H; Shinkunas, Laura A; Erekson, Zachary D; Kaldjian, Lauris C

    2011-08-01

    Our objective was to validate 6 literature-derived goals of care by analyzing open-ended and closed-ended responses about goals of care from a previous study of hospitalized patients. Eight clinicians categorized patients' open-ended articulations of their goals of care using a literature-derived framework and then compared those categorizations to patients' own closed-ended selections of their most important goal of care. Clinicians successfully categorized patients' open-ended responses using the literature-derived framework 83.5% of the time, and their categorizations matched patients' closed-ended most important goal of care 87.8% of the time. Goals that did not fit within the literature-derived framework all pertained to the goal of understanding a patient's diagnosis or prognosis; this seventh potential goal can be added to the literature-derived framework of 6 goals of care.

  4. Strategies for cutting hospital beds: the impact on patient service.

    PubMed Central

    Green, L V; Nguyen, V

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop insights on the impact of size, average length of stay, variability, and organization of clinical services on the relationship between occupancy rates and delays for beds. DATA SOURCES: The primary data source was Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Secondary data were obtained from the United Hospital Fund of New York reflecting data from about 150 hospitals. STUDY DESIGN: Data from Beth Israel Deaconess on discharges and length of stay were analyzed and fit into appropriate queueing models to generate tables and graphs illustrating the relationship between the variables mentioned above and the relationship between occupancy levels and delays. In addition, specific issues of current concern to hospital administrators were analyzed, including the impact of consolidation of clinical services and utilizing hospital beds uniformly across seven days a week rather than five. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using target occupancy levels as the primary determinant of bed capacity is inadequate and may lead to excessive delays for beds. Also, attempts to reduce hospital beds by consolidation of different clinical services into single nursing units may be counterproductive. CONCLUSIONS: More sophisticated methodologies are needed to support decisions that involve bed capacity and organization in order to understand the impact on patient service. Images Figure 2 PMID:11409821

  5. Identifying and communicating the contributions of library and information services in hospitals and academic health sciences centers

    PubMed Central

    Abels, Eileen G.; Cogdill, Keith W.; Zach, Lisl

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This article introduces a systematic approach to identifying and communicating the value of library and information services (LIS) from the perspective of their contributions to achieving organizational goals. Methods: The contributions of library and information services (CLIS) approach for identifying and communicating the value of LIS draws on findings from a multimethod study of hospitals and academic health sciences centers. Results: The CLIS approach is based on the concept that an individual unit's value to an organization can be demonstrated by identifying and measuring its contributions to organizational goals. The CLIS approach involves seven steps: (1) selecting appropriate organizational goals that are meaningful in a specific setting; (2) linking LIS contributions to organizational goals; (3) obtaining data from users on the correspondence between LIS contributions and LIS services; (4) selecting measures for LIS services; (5) collecting and analyzing data for the selected measures; (6) planning and sustaining communication with administrators about LIS contributions; and (7) evaluating findings and revising selected goals, contributions, and services as necessary. Conclusions: The taxonomy of LIS contributions and the CLIS approach emerged from research conducted in hospitals and academic health sciences centers and reflect the mission and goals common in these organizations. However, both the taxonomy and the CLIS approach may be adapted for communicating the value of LIS in other settings. PMID:14762462

  6. Thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients with severe clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Eric M; Moses, Maggie C; Park, Lawrence P; Woods, Christopher W; Arepally, Gowthami M

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a common cause of nosocomial diarrhea and colitis. The incidence and prognostic significance of thrombocytopenia as related to mode of acquisition (hospital vs. community), NAP1/027 strain, and disease severity has not been examined. We performed a single-institution retrospective analysis of all adult inpatients from 2013 to 2014 diagnosed with CDI during their hospitalization to document the incidence/prevalence of thrombocytopenia and associated outcomes. Severe disease was defined by a composite endpoint of inpatient death, death within 30 days of discharge, presence of septic shock, or need for colectomy during hospitalization. Of the 533 patients diagnosed with CDI, moderate thrombocytopenia (platelet count <100 × 10(9)/L at time of CDI diagnosis) was present in 15 % of the total cohort and incident thrombocytopenia developed in 3 % of patients after admission. Thrombocytopenia was more common in hospital-acquired disease and associated with increased length of stay, but was not associated with treatment failure. Those with moderate thrombocytopenia were more likely to have severe disease, after controlling for white blood cell count, albumin, and creatinine. Moderate thrombocytopenia is associated with poor prognosis and is a potential risk stratification tool for severe CDI.

  7. [Adverse events in patients from a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Arriaga-Dávila, José de Jesús; Domínguez-Serrano, María Isabel; Guzmán-Bihouet, Beatriz Filomena; Navarrete-Navarro, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Background: detection of adverse events is part of the safety management in hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of adverse events that occurred in a pediatric hospital. Methods: cross-sectional study of the adverse events occurred in a pediatric hospital from 2007 to 2009. Factors associated with their developmental causes were identified. The statistical analysis was descriptive and bivariate, with contingency tables to estimate the relationship between those factors. A p value = 0.05 was considered significant. Results: a total of 177 adverse events were registered. When they began, human factor occurred in 23 cases (13 %, OR = 1.41, p = 0.001), organizational factor was present in 71 cases (40 %, OR = 1.91, p = 0.236) and technical factor in 46 cases (26 %, OR = 0.87, p = 0.01). Blows or bruises from falls as a result of adverse events occurred in 71 cases (40 %, 95 % CI = 64-78). Conclusions: we found 1.84 events per 100 hospital discharges during the study period. The fall of patients ranked first of the adverse events identified.

  8. Inter-hospital and intra-hospital patient transfer: Recent concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Ashish; Singh, Jasveer

    2016-01-01

    The intra- and inter-hospital patient transfer is an important aspect of patient care which is often undertaken to improve upon the existing management of the patient. It may involve transfer of patient within the same facility for any diagnostic procedure or transfer to another facility with more advanced care. The main aim in all such transfers is maintaining the continuity of medical care. As the transfer of sick patient may induce various physiological alterations which may adversely affect the prognosis of the patient, it should be initiated systematically and according to the evidence-based guidelines. The key elements of safe transfer involve decision to transfer and communication, pre-transfer stabilisation and preparation, choosing the appropriate mode of transfer, i.e., land transport or air transport, personnel accompanying the patient, equipment and monitoring required during the transfer, and finally, the documentation and handover of the patient at the receiving facility. These key elements should be followed in each transfer to prevent any adverse events which may severely affect the patient prognosis. The existing international guidelines are evidence based from various professional bodies in developed countries. However, in developing countries like India, with limited infrastructure, these guidelines can be modified accordingly. The most important aspect is implementation of these guidelines in Indian scenario with periodical quality assessments to improve the standard of care. PMID:27512159

  9. Engaging hospitalized patients in clinical care: Study protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Prey, Jennifer; Ryan, Beatriz; Alarcon, Irma; Qian, Min; Bakken, Suzanne; Feiner, Steven; Hripcsak, George; Polubriaginof, Fernanda; Restaino, Susan; Schnall, Rebecca; Strong, Philip; Vawdrey, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients who are better informed and more engaged in their health care have higher satisfaction with health care and better health outcomes. While patient engagement has been a focus in the outpatient setting, strategies to engage inpatients in their care have not been well studied. We are undertaking a study to assess how patients’ information needs during hospitalization can be addressed with health information technologies. To achieve this aim, we developed a personalized inpatient portal that allows patients to see who is on their care team, monitor their vital signs, review medications being administered, review current and historical lab and test results, confirm allergies, document pain scores and send questions and comments to inpatient care providers. The purpose of this paper is to describe the protocol for the study. Methods/design This pragmatic randomized controlled trial will enroll 426 inpatient cardiology patients at an urban academic medical center into one of three arms receiving: 1) usual care, 2) iPad with general internet access, or 3) iPad with access to the personalized inpatient portal. The primary outcome of this trial is patient engagement, which is measured through the Patient Activation Measure. To assess scalability and potential reach of the intervention, we are partnering with a West Coast community hospital to deploy the patient engagement technology in their environment with an additional 160 participants. Conclusion This study employs a pragmatic randomized control trial design to test whether a personalized inpatient portal will improve patient engagement. If the study is successful, continuing advances in mobile computing technology should make these types of interventions available in a variety of clinical care delivery settings. PMID:26795675

  10. Real Money: Complications and Hospital Costs in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hemmila, Mark R.; Jakubus, Jill L.; Maggio, Paul M.; Wahl, Wendy L.; Dimick, Justin B.; Campbell, Darrell A.; Taheri, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Major postoperative complications are associated with a substantial increase in hospital costs. Trauma patients are known to have a higher rate of complications than the general surgery population. We sought to utilize the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) methodology to evaluate hospital costs, length of stay, and payment associated with complications in trauma patients. Study Design Using NSQIP principles, patient data were collected on 512 adult patients admitted to the trauma service for > 24 hours at a Level 1 trauma center (2004–2005). Patients were placed in one of three groups: no complications (none), ≥ 1 minor complication (minor, e.g., urinary tract infection), or ≥ 1 major complication (major, e.g., pneumonia). Total hospital charges, costs, payment, and length of stay associated with each complication group were determined from a cost accounting database. Multiple regression was used to determine the costs of each type of complication after adjusting for differences in age, gender, new injury severity score (nISS), Glasgow coma scale score (GCS), maximum head abbreviated injury scale (AIS), and first emergency department systolic blood pressure. Results 330 (64%) patients had no complications, 53 (10%) had ≥ 1 minor complication, and 129 (25%) had ≥ 1 major complication. Median hospital charges increased from $33,833 (none) to $81,936 (minor) and $150,885 (major). The mean contribution to margin per day was similar for the no complication and minor complication groups ($994 vs $1,115, p=0.7). Despite higher costs, the patients in the major complication group generated a higher mean contribution to margin per day when compared to the no complication group ($2,168, p<0.001). The attributable increase in median total hospital costs when adjusted for confounding variables was $19,915 for the minor complication group (p<0.001), and $40,555 for the major complication group (p<0.001). Conclusion Understanding the costs

  11. Factors and Models Associated with the amount of Hospital Care Services as Demanded by Hospitalized Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    van Oostveen, Catharina J.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Huis in het Veld, Judith G.; Bakker, Piet J.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospitals are constantly being challenged to provide high-quality care despite ageing populations, diminishing resources, and budgetary restraints. While the costs of care depend on the patients' needs, it is not clear which patient characteristics are associated with the demand for care and inherent costs. The aim of this study was to ascertain which patient-related characteristics or models can predict the need for medical and nursing care in general hospital settings. Methods We systematically searched MEDLINE, Embase, Business Source Premier and CINAHL. Pre-defined eligibility criteria were used to detect studies that explored patient characteristics and health status parameters associated to the use of hospital care services for hospitalized patients. Two reviewers independently assessed study relevance, quality with the STROBE instrument, and performed data analysis. Results From 2,168 potentially relevant articles, 17 met our eligibility criteria. These showed a large variety of factors associated with the use of hospital care services; models were found in only three studies. Age, gender, medical and nursing diagnoses, severity of illness, patient acuity, comorbidity, and complications were the characteristics found the most. Patient acuity and medical and nursing diagnoses were the most influencing characteristics. Models including medical or nursing diagnoses and patient acuity explain the variance in the use of hospital care services for at least 56.2%, and up to 78.7% when organizational factors were added. Conclusions A larger variety of factors were found to be associated with the use of hospital care services. Models that explain the extent to which hospital care services are used should contain patient characteristics, including patient acuity, medical or nursing diagnoses, and organizational and staffing characteristics, e.g., hospital size, organization of care, and the size and skill mix of staff. This would enable healthcare managers

  12. The Delivery of Health Services to Demented Patients at a University Hospital: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colenda, Christopher C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Conducted chart review of inpatient dementia patients cared for by neurology, psychiatry, medicine, and surgery services at university hospital. Found differences in symptom profiles, hospital utilization trends, medical comorbidity, and post-hospitalization dispositions. Examined how patients entered hospital system, were assigned to different…

  13. Designing for patients--redeveloping De Bijtjes Hospital.

    PubMed

    Foqué, R

    1995-01-01

    'De Bijtjes' is a hospital for treatment and care of patients with locomotive and neurological disorders, comprising an advanced rehabilitation centre. The existing buildings and the surrounding landscape were integrated in the design, which is a unique combination of a high-specialized hospital and a home-like environment. The surrounding gardens play an important therapeutic and recreative role in the healing and rehabilitation process. The different nursing units, each with their own architectural design, form separate villas around a central court, focusing on creating a small-scale atmosphere. The two nursing villas have a clove-leaf shape with each lobe forming a living unit for ten patients. The motored wheelchair was the scale-forming element for the design of the different utilities.

  14. Acoustical criteria for hospital patient rooms: Resolving competing requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Bennett M.

    2003-10-01

    The acoustical criteria for patient rooms in hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation facilities may be based on several needs. One important requirement is that noise levels in the room be conducive to restful sleep. Also, caregivers must have easy auditory and visual access to the patients, and be able to hear vital sign monitor alarms. This often means that patient rooms are located near central nurse stations and that patient room doors are left open. Further, the recently published federal privacy standards developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HSS) under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) require that ``appropriate physical safeguards'' be put in place to protect the confidentiality of patient health information. The simultaneous and competing requirements for speech privacy, caregiver access, and good sleeping conditions present a serious acoustical challenge to health care facility designers. Specific facility design issues and potential solution strategies are presented.

  15. Risk Factors for Inpatient Hospital Admission in Pediatric Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to determine the risk factors for inpatient admission of pediatric burn patients. Materials & methods This cross-sectional study uses data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (HCUP KID) for the years of 2003, 2006, 2009, and 2012 to estimate the risk factors for inpatient admission for pediatric patients who sustained a burn injury. Patients who sustained a burn between the ages of 1 and 18 years were included. Results A total of 43,453 patients met inclusion criteria. Of those, 42.3% were Caucasian, 20.1% were African American, and 19.3% were Hispanic. Males comprised 63.5% of the studied population. The month of July was associated with a 31.8% increased chance (p=.011) of being admitted to hospital for a pediatric burn. It was found that patients being admitted had a 32.2% increased chance (p=.002) of a fluid and electrolyte abnormality and a 61.0% increased chance (p=.027) of drug abuse.  Conclusions Pediatric burn patients are more likely to be admitted to the hospital having a fluid and electrolyte abnormality, having a drug abuse status, and/or during the month of July. PMID:27335714

  16. Disclosing discourses: biomedical and hospitality discourses in patient education materials.

    PubMed

    Öresland, Stina; Friberg, Febe; Määttä, Sylvia; Öhlen, Joakim

    2015-09-01

    Patient education materials have the potential to strengthen the health literacy of patients. Previous studies indicate that readability and suitability may be improved. The aim of this study was to explore and analyze discourses inherent in patient education materials since analysis of discourses could illuminate values and norms inherent in them. Clinics in Sweden that provided colorectal cancer surgery allowed access to written information and 'welcome letters' sent to patients. The material was analysed by means of discourse analysis, embedded in Derrida's approach of deconstruction. The analysis revealed a biomedical discourse and a hospitality discourse. In the biomedical discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as the messenger of medical information while that of the patients as the carrier of diagnoses and recipients of biomedical information. In the hospitality discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as hosts who invite and welcome the patients as guests. The study highlights the need to eliminate paternalism and fosters a critical reflective stance among professionals regarding power and paternalism inherent in health care communication.

  17. Auditing the nutrition content of patient charts: one hospital's perspective.

    PubMed

    Skopelianos, S

    1993-01-01

    Chart audits are traditionally based on patient charts categorized by disease. An alternate approach, using categorization by four types of nutrition care intervention, has been developed by University Hospital. This paper describes the process followed, criteria developed and the results of two complete chart audits. It was shown that nutrition profile forms improved documentation. Overall norms increased significantly from 81.5% to 90% (p < .05). Discussion centres on the evolutionary process from quality assurance to continuous quality improvement.

  18. Prevalence of factitious disorder with psychological symptoms in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Catalina, M L; Gómez Macias, V; de Cos, A

    2008-01-01

    Factitious disorder is characterized by the invention, production or falsification of physical and psychological symptoms that feign a physical or mental illness. Although it is not rare to find symptoms that seem to be factitious among psychiatric patients (both outpatients and inpatients), we have never been able to confirm this suspicion. Once we had established the suspicion criteria for factitious disorder with psychological symptoms, we discovered that 8% of the patients admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit had factitious symptoms. The patients were mostly women with a mean age of 36.2 years. The most frequent symptoms were non-consistent response to treatment, worsening of the symptoms when faced with the perspective of a discharge plan, disappearance of the symptoms just after being admitted and intense relationship with other patients or staff during the hospitalization. Although it is not possible to determine the method used in the factitious production of the psychological systems accurately, close observation of the patients helps to infer that 75% of the patients exaggerate the psychological symptoms currently present or those occurring in the past and thus experienced at some time during their lifespan. Invention of psychological symptoms never felt before by the patient and deliberate intervention in the psychiatric treatment to modify the evolution of the illness were less frequent. A total of 25% of the patients with suspicion criteria for factitious disorder with psychological symptoms also had physical symptoms considered to be factitious during the hospitalization and 62% of patients with factitious symptoms developed intense relationships with other patients.

  19. Prospective Evaluation of Infection Episodes in Cancer Patients in a Tertiary Care Academic Center: Microbiological Features and Risk Factors for Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Çalık Başaran, Nursel; Karaağaoğlu, Ergun; Hasçelik, Gülşen; Durusu Tanrıöver, Mine; Akova, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to determine the frequency, type, and etiology of infections and the risk factors for infections and mortality in hospitalized cancer patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively enrolled adult cancer patients hospitalized in the internal medicine wards of a tertiary care academic center between January and August 2004. Patients were followed during their hospitalization periods for neutropenia, infections, culture results, and mortality. Results: We followed 473 cancer patients with 818 hospitalization episodes and 384 infection episodes in total. Seventy-nine percent of the infections were nosocomial, and febrile neutropenia (FN) was observed in 196 (51%) of the infection episodes. Bacteremia was found in 29% of FN episodes and in 8% of nonneutropenic patients. Gram-positive bacteria were the leading cause of bacteremia in both neutropenic and nonneutropenic cases (70% and 58%, respectively). Presence of an indwelling central catheter increased bacteremia risk by 3-fold. The overall mortality rate was 17%, whereas 34% of the patients with bloodstream infections died. Presence of bacteremia and advanced disease stage increased overall mortality by 6.1-fold and 3.7-fold, respectively. Conclusion: Nearly half of the cancer patients developed an infection during their hospital stays, with gram-positive bacteria being the predominant etiologic microorganisms. This demonstrates the changing trends in infections considering that, until 2004, gram-negative bacteria were the most predominant microorganisms among cancer patients in our institute. PMID:27095391

  20. Cumulative lactate and hospital mortality in ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both hyperlactatemia and persistence of hyperlactatemia have been associated with bad outcome. We compared lactate and lactate-derived variables in outcome prediction. Methods Retrospective observational study. Case records from 2,251 consecutive intensive care unit (ICU) patients admitted between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. Baseline characteristics, all lactate measurements, and in-hospital mortality were recorded. The time integral of arterial blood lactate levels above the upper normal threshold of 2.2 mmol/L (lactate-time-integral), maximum lactate (max-lactate), and time-to-first-normalization were calculated. Survivors and nonsurvivors were compared and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were applied. Results A total of 20,755 lactate measurements were analyzed. Data are srpehown as median [interquartile range]. In nonsurvivors (n = 405) lactate-time-integral (192 [0–1881] min·mmol/L) and time-to-first normalization (44.0 [0–427] min) were higher than in hospital survivors (n = 1846; 0 [0–134] min·mmol/L and 0 [0–75] min, respectively; all p < 0.001). Normalization of lactate <6 hours after ICU admission revealed better survival compared with normalization of lactate >6 hours (mortality 16.6% vs. 24.4%; p < 0.001). AUC of ROC curves to predict in-hospital mortality was the largest for max-lactate, whereas it was not different among all other lactate derived variables (all p > 0.05). The area under the ROC curves for admission lactate and lactate-time-integral was not different (p = 0.36). Conclusions Hyperlactatemia is associated with in-hospital mortality in a heterogeneous ICU population. In our patients, lactate peak values predicted in-hospital mortality equally well as lactate-time-integral of arterial blood lactate levels above the upper normal threshold. PMID:23446002

  1. Hospital mergers and acquisitions: does market consolidation harm patients?

    PubMed

    Ho, V; Hamilton, B H

    2000-09-01

    Debate continues on whether consolidation in health care markets enhances efficiency or instead facilitates market power, possibly damaging quality. We compare the quality of hospital care before and after mergers and acquisitions in California between 1992 and 1995. We analyze inpatient mortality for heart attack and stroke patients, 90-day readmission for heart attack patients, and discharge within 48 h for normal newborn babies. Recent mergers and acquisitions have not had a measurable impact on inpatient mortality, although the associated standard errors are large. Readmission rates and early discharge increased in some cases. The adverse consequences of increased market power on the quality of care require further substantiation.

  2. Creating a Culture of Patient Safety through Innovative Hospital Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    did not, as a result of chance, prevention , or mitigation. Unfortunately, a small portion of errors do result in an “adverse event”—an injury ...error on patient safety. For example, a 1991 Harvard Medical Practice Study reported that 69 percent of injuries suffered by hospitalized patients in...New York State in 1984 were the result of errors, and nearly 14 percent of these injuries were fatal.2 In another study, 2.4 percent (2,539 out of

  3. Characteristics of Patients with Lower Extremity Trauma with Improved and Not Improved Pain During Hospitalization: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Griffioen, Mari A; Johantgen, Meg; Von Rueden, Kathryn; Greenspan, Joel D.; Dorsey, Susan G.; Renn, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Up to 62% of patients report chronic pain at the injury site 6-12 months after blunt trauma, with pain from lower extremity fractures exceeding that from other sites. High pain intensity at time of injury is a risk factor for chronic pain, but it is not clear what patient characteristics influence the pain intensity level during the immediate hospitalization following injury. Aim The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of collecting pain scores from medical records, to calculate pain trajectories, and to determine whether it is possible to examine patient characteristics by classifying them into those whose pain improved and those whose pain did not improve. Design This descriptive study retrospectively reviewed medical records of 18 randomly chosen patients admitted to an academic trauma center. Methods Patient characteristics and pain scores were collected form electronic and handwritten medical records. Results The pain trajectories calculated from routinely collected pain scores during the in-patient stay showed that for 44% of the patients the pain improved during the hospitalization, for 39% the pain remained the same and for 17% the pain worsened. Variables age, smoking, weight, abbreviated injury scores, length of hospital stay, mean pain score and opioid equianalgesic dose differed based on pain trajectory. Conclusion While patient characteristics differed based on pain trajectory, any significant effects seen from individual tests should be considered tentative, given the number of analyses conducted on this data set. However, feasibility and significance of conducting a larger study has been established. PMID:26545732

  4. Thermal comfort of patients in hospital ward areas.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R. M.; Rae, A.

    1977-01-01

    The patient is identified as being of prime importance for comfort standards in hospital ward areas, other ward users being expected to adjust their dress to suit the conditions necessary for patients comfort. A study to identify the optimum steady state conditions for patients comfort is then described. Although this study raises some doubts as to the applicability of the standard thermal comfort assessment techniques to ward areas, it is felt that its results give a good indication of the steady-state conditions preferred by the patients. These were an air temperature of between 21-5 degrees and 22 degrees C and a relative humidity of between 30% and 70%, where the air velocity was less than 0-1 m/s and the mean radiant temperature was close to air temperature. PMID:264497

  5. Hospital Nurses' Work Environment Characteristics and Patient Safety Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Eun; Scott, Linda D

    2016-08-01

    This integrative literature review assesses the relationship between hospital nurses' work environment characteristics and patient safety outcomes and recommends directions for future research based on examination of the literature. Using an electronic search of five databases, 18 studies published in English between 1999 and 2016 were identified for review. All but one study used a cross-sectional design, and only four used a conceptual/theoretical framework to guide the research. No definition of work environment was provided in most studies. Differing variables and instruments were used to measure patient outcomes, and findings regarding the effects of work environment on patient outcomes were inconsistent. To clarify the relationship between nurses' work environment characteristics and patient safety outcomes, researchers should consider using a longitudinal study design, using a theoretical foundation, and providing clear operational definitions of concepts. Moreover, given the inconsistent findings of previous studies, they should choose their measurement methodologies with care.

  6. “Not Just a Receiver”: Understanding Patient Behavior in the Hospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sonali R.; Haldar, Shefali; Pollack, Ari H.; Kendall, Logan; Miller, Andrew D.; Khelifi, Maher; Pratt, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Patient engagement leads to better health outcomes and experiences of health care. However, existing patient engagement systems in the hospital environment focus on the passive receipt of information by patients rather than the active contribution of the patient or caregiver as a partner in their care. Through interviews with hospitalized patients and their caregivers, we identify ways that patients and caregivers actively participate in their care. We describe the different roles patients and caregivers assume in interacting with their hospital care team. We then discuss how systems designed to support patient engagement in the hospital setting can promote active participation and help patients achieve better outcomes. PMID:28345079

  7. The transition of care from hospital to home for patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Mary M; McCoy, Mary Anne

    2017-02-12

    Approximately 50% to 75% of hospital patients have hypertension. At the time of discharge, patients experience a transition of care as they move from the hospital to home. This article describes the transition of care from the hospital to home for patients with hypertension and discusses practice implications for NPs.

  8. The Role of a Hospital Ethics Consultation Service in Decision-Making for Unrepresented Patients.

    PubMed

    Courtwright, Andrew M; Abrams, Joshua; Robinson, Ellen M

    2017-03-06

    Despite increased calls for hospital ethics committees to serve as default decision-makers about life-sustaining treatment (LST) for unrepresented patients who lack decision-making capacity or a surrogate decision-maker and whose wishes regarding medical care are not known, little is known about how committees currently function in these cases. This was a retrospective cohort study of all ethics committee consultations involving decision-making about LST for unrepresented patients at a large academic hospital from 2007 to 2013. There were 310 ethics committee consultations, twenty-five (8.1 per cent) of which involved unrepresented patients. In thirteen (52.0 per cent) cases, the ethics consultants evaluated a possible substitute decision-maker identified by social workers and/or case managers. In the remaining cases, the ethics consultants worked with the medical team to contact previous healthcare professionals to provide substituted judgement, found prior advance care planning documents, or identified the patient's best interest as the decision-making standard. In the majority of cases, the final decision was to limit or withdraw LST (72 per cent) or to change code status to Do Not Resuscitate/Do Not Intubate (12 per cent). Substitute decision-makers who had been evaluated through the ethics consultation process and who made the final decision alone were more likely to continue LST than cases in which physicians made the final decision (50 per cent vs 6.3 per cent, p = 0.04). In our centre, the primary role of ethics consultants in decision-making for unrepresented patients is to identify appropriate decision-making standards. In the absence of other data suggesting that ethics committees, as currently constituted, are ready to serve as substitute decision-makers for unrepresented patients, caution is necessary before designating these committees as default decision-makers.

  9. Experimental identification of potential falls in older adult hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Aimee; Yang, James; Pati, Debajyoti; Valipoor, Shabboo

    2016-05-03

    Patient falls within hospitals have been identified as serious but largely preventable incidents, particularly among older adult patients. Previous literature has explored intrinsic factors associated with patient falls, but literature identifying possible extrinsic or situational factors related to falls is lacking. This study seeks to identify patient motions and activities along with associated environmental design factors in a patient bathroom and clinician zone setting that may lead to falls. A motion capture experiment was conducted in a laboratory setting on 27 subjects over the age of seventy using scripted tasks and mockups of the bathroom and clinician zone of a patient room. Data were post-processed using Cortex and Visual3D software. A potential fall was characterized by a set of criteria based on the jerk of the upper body׳s center of mass (COM). Results suggest that only motion-related factors, particularly turning, pushing, pulling, and grabbing, contribute most significantly to potential falls in the patient bathroom, whereas only pushing and pulling contribute significantly in the clinician zone. Future work includes identifying and changing precise environmental design factors associated with these motions for an updated patient room and performing motion capture experiments using the new setup.

  10. An analysis of the hospital-patient marketing relationship in the health care industry.

    PubMed

    Paul, D P; Honeycutt, E D

    1995-01-01

    For many years hospitals have viewed patients paternalistically and failed to address many customers' needs and wants in the health care market. Early attempts at marketing by hospitals were haphazard and focused primarily upon advertising and public relations. Through a review and discussion of documented hospital marketing practices, the hospital-patient marketing relationship is examined. Conclusions about hospital marketing practices and suggestions for future research are also provided.

  11. Population Dynamics of Patients with Bacterial Resistance in Hospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Leilei; Pan, Qiuhui; Gao, Xubin; He, Mingfeng

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, the increase of antibiotic resistance has become a major concern worldwide. The researchers found that superbugs with new type of resistance genes (NDM-1) have two aspects of transmission characteristics; the first is that the antibiotic resistance genes can horizontally transfer among bacteria, and the other is that the superbugs can spread between humans through direct contact. Based on these two transmission mechanisms, we study the dynamics of population in hospital environment where superbugs exist. In this paper, we build three mathematic models to illustrate the dynamics of patients with bacterial resistance in hospital environment. The models are analyzed using stability theory of differential equations. Positive equilibrium points of the system are investigated and their stability analysis is carried out. Moreover, the numerical simulation of the proposed model is also performed which supports the theoretical findings. PMID:26904150

  12. Population Dynamics of Patients with Bacterial Resistance in Hospital Environment.

    PubMed

    Qu, Leilei; Pan, Qiuhui; Gao, Xubin; He, Mingfeng

    2016-01-01

    During the past decades, the increase of antibiotic resistance has become a major concern worldwide. The researchers found that superbugs with new type of resistance genes (NDM-1) have two aspects of transmission characteristics; the first is that the antibiotic resistance genes can horizontally transfer among bacteria, and the other is that the superbugs can spread between humans through direct contact. Based on these two transmission mechanisms, we study the dynamics of population in hospital environment where superbugs exist. In this paper, we build three mathematic models to illustrate the dynamics of patients with bacterial resistance in hospital environment. The models are analyzed using stability theory of differential equations. Positive equilibrium points of the system are investigated and their stability analysis is carried out. Moreover, the numerical simulation of the proposed model is also performed which supports the theoretical findings.

  13. Intravenous heparin dosing strategy in hospitalized patients with atrial dysrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Roswell, Robert O; Greet, Brian; Shah, Sunny; Bernard, Samuel; Milin, Alexandra; Lobach, Iryna; Guo, Yu; Radford, Martha J; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2016-08-01

    Patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) have an elevated stroke risk that is 2-7 times greater than in those without AF. Intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH) is commonly used for hospitalized patients with atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter (AFL) to prevent stroke. Dosing strategies exist for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with acute coronary syndromes and venous thromboembolic diseases, but there are no data to guide providers on a dosing strategy for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with AF/AFL. 996 hospitalized patients with AF/AFL on UFH were evaluated. Bolus dosing and initial infusion rates of UFH were recorded along with rates of stroke, thromboemobolic events, and bleeding events as defined by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis criteria. Among 226 patients included in the analysis, 76 bleeding events occurred. Using linear regression analysis, initial rates of heparin infusion ranging from 9.7 to 11.8 units/kilogram/hour (U/kg/h) resulted in activated partial thromboplastin times that were within therapeutic range. The median initial infusion rate in patients with bleeding was 13.3 U/kg/h, while in those without bleeding it was 11.4 U/kg/h; p = 0.012. An initial infusion rate >11.0 U/kg/h yielded an OR 1.95 (1.06-3.59); p = 0.03 for any bleeding event. Using IV heparin boluses neither increased the probability of attaining a therapeutic aPTT (56.1 vs 56.3 %; p = 0.99) nor did it significantly increase bleeding events in the study (35.7 vs 31.3 %; p = 0.48). The results suggest that higher initial rates of heparin are associated with increased bleeding risk. From this dataset, initial heparin infusion rates of 9.7-11.0 U/kg/h without a bolus can result in therapeutic levels of anticoagulation in hospitalized patients with AF/AFL without increasing the risk of bleeding.

  14. Enhancing the therapeutic potential of hospital environments by increasing the personal control and emotional comfort of hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Williams, Anne M; Irurita, Vera F

    2005-02-01

    Previous literature has revealed that patients in various health-care facilities worldwide have experienced dissatisfaction with aspects of the hospital environment. This article focuses on the impact of the hospital environment on patients' perceptions of personal control. The grounded theory method was used, and interviews with 40 patient participants and 75 hours of field observations provided data for this study. Personal control was found to be a central feature of emotional comfort, a therapeutic state that was considered to be an integral part of recovery. This study outlines some new directions for enhancing the therapeutic potential of hospital environments.

  15. Role of relatives of ethnic minority patients in patient safety in hospital care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    van Rosse, Floor; Suurmond, Jeanine; Wagner, Cordula; de Bruijne, Martine; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2016-01-01

    Objective Relatives of ethnic minority patients often play an important role in the care process during hospitalisation. Our objective was to analyse the role of these relatives in relation to the safety of patients during hospital care. Setting Four large urban hospitals with an ethnic diverse patient population. Participants On hospital admission of ethnic minority patients, 20 cases were purposively sampled in which relatives were observed to play a role in the care process. Outcome measures We used documents (patient records) and added eight cases with qualitative interviews with healthcare providers, patients and/or their relatives to investigate the relation between the role of relatives and patient safety. An inductive approach followed by selective coding was used to analyse the data. Results Besides giving social support, family members took on themselves the role of the interpreter, the role of substitutes of the patient and the role of care provider. The taking over of these roles can have positive and negative effects on patient safety. Conclusions When family members take over various roles during hospitalisation of a relative, this can lead to a safety risk and a safety protection for the patient involved. Although healthcare providers should not hand over their responsibilities to the relatives of patients, optimising collaboration with relatives who are willing to take part in the care process may improve patient safety. PMID:27056588

  16. Complete-genome sequencing elucidates outbreak dynamics of CA-MRSA USA300 (ST8-spa t008) in an academic hospital of Paramaribo, Republic of Suriname

    PubMed Central

    Sabat, Artur J.; Hermelijn, Sandra M.; Akkerboom, Viktoria; Juliana, Amadu; Degener, John E.; Grundmann, Hajo; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2017-01-01

    We report the investigation of an outbreak situation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that occurred at the Academic Hospital Paramaribo (AZP) in the Republic of Suriname from April to May 2013. We performed whole genome sequencing with complete gap closure for chromosomes and plasmids on all isolates. The outbreak involved 12 patients and 1 healthcare worker/nurse at the AZP. In total 24 isolates were investigated. spa typing, genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, ad hoc whole genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST), stable core genome MLST (cgMLST) and in silico PFGE were used to determine phylogenetic relatedness and to identify transmission. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) showed that all isolates were members of genomic variants of the North American USA300 clone. However, WGS revealed a heterogeneous population structure of USA300 circulating at the AZP. We observed up to 8 SNPs or up to 5 alleles of difference by wgMLST when the isolates were recovered from different body sites of the same patient or if direct transmission between patients was most likely. This work describes the usefulness of complete genome sequencing of bacterial chromosomes and plasmids providing an unprecedented level of detail during outbreak investigations not being visible by using conventional typing methods. PMID:28106148

  17. Complete-genome sequencing elucidates outbreak dynamics of CA-MRSA USA300 (ST8-spa t008) in an academic hospital of Paramaribo, Republic of Suriname.

    PubMed

    Sabat, Artur J; Hermelijn, Sandra M; Akkerboom, Viktoria; Juliana, Amadu; Degener, John E; Grundmann, Hajo; Friedrich, Alexander W

    2017-01-20

    We report the investigation of an outbreak situation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that occurred at the Academic Hospital Paramaribo (AZP) in the Republic of Suriname from April to May 2013. We performed whole genome sequencing with complete gap closure for chromosomes and plasmids on all isolates. The outbreak involved 12 patients and 1 healthcare worker/nurse at the AZP. In total 24 isolates were investigated. spa typing, genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, ad hoc whole genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST), stable core genome MLST (cgMLST) and in silico PFGE were used to determine phylogenetic relatedness and to identify transmission. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) showed that all isolates were members of genomic variants of the North American USA300 clone. However, WGS revealed a heterogeneous population structure of USA300 circulating at the AZP. We observed up to 8 SNPs or up to 5 alleles of difference by wgMLST when the isolates were recovered from different body sites of the same patient or if direct transmission between patients was most likely. This work describes the usefulness of complete genome sequencing of bacterial chromosomes and plasmids providing an unprecedented level of detail during outbreak investigations not being visible by using conventional typing methods.

  18. Variation in Tracheal Reintubations Among Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery Across Washington State Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Nita; Dale, Christopher R.; Benkeser, David C.; Joffe, Aaron M.; Yanez, N. David; Treggiari, Miriam M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients requiring endotracheal reintubation have higher mortality, increased hospital length of stay and costs. To our knowledge, little is known about the variation in reintubation across hospitals among patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Objectives The objectives of this study were to: (1) Examine the variation in reintubations across Washington State hospitals that perform cardiac surgery, and (2) Explore hospital and patient characteristics associated with variation in reintubation. Design Retrospective cohort study Setting All non-federal hospitals performing cardiac surgery in Washington State Participants 15,103 patients undergoing CABG or valvular surgery between January 1, 2008 and September 30, 2011 Measurements and Main Results Patient and hospital characteristics were compared between hospitals that had a reintubation frequency ≥ 5% or < 5%. Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare the odds of reintubation across the hospitals. We tested for heterogeneity of odds of reintubation across hospitals by performing a likelihood ratio test on the hospital factor. After adjusting for patient-level characteristics and procedure type, significant heterogeneity in reintubations across hospitals was present (p=0.005). Our exploratory analyses suggested that hospitals with lower reintubations were more likely to have greater acute care days and teaching ICUs. Conclusions After accounting for patient and procedure characteristics, significant heterogeneity in the relative odds of requiring reintubation was present across 16 non-federal hospitals performing cardiac surgery in Washington State. Our findings suggest that greater hospital volume and ICU teaching status are associated with less reintubations. PMID:25802193

  19. Hospitalized patients with COPD: analysis of prior treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Giacomelli, Irai Luis; Steidle, Leila John Marques; Moreira, Frederico Fernandes; Meyer, Igor Varela; Souza, Ricardo Goetten; Pincelli, Mariângela Pimentel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Although COPD is a prevalent disease, it is undertreated, and there are no available data regarding previous treatment of COPD in Brazil. This study aimed to determine the appropriateness of maintenance treatment in COPD patients prior to their hospitalization and to identify variables associated with inappropriate treatment. Methods: This was an observational, cross-sectional, analytical study involving 50 inpatients with COPD at two hospitals in the city of Florianópolis, Brazil. The patients completed a questionnaire on parameters related to the maintenance treatment of COPD. Non-pharmacological management and pharmacological treatment were assessed based on the recommendations made by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) in 2011 and by the Brazilian National Ministry of Health in the chronic respiratory diseases section of its Caderno de Atenção Básica (CAB, Primary Care Guidebook). Results: In most of the patients, the COPD was classified as being severe or very severe. Regarding non-pharmacological management, 33% of the patients were smokers, only 32% had been advised to receive the flu vaccine, 28% had received pneumococcal vaccine, and only 6.5% of the patients in the B, C, and D categories received pulmonary rehabilitation. Regarding GOLD and CAB recommendations, pharmacological treatment was inappropriate in 50% and 74% of the patients, respectively. Based on GOLD recommendations, 38% were undertreated. A low level of education, low income, not receiving oxygen therapy, and not receiving the flu vaccine were associated with inappropriate treatment. Conclusions: The application of various non-pharmacological management recommendations was unsatisfactory. Regarding the GOLD recommendations, the high rate of inappropriate maintenance treatment was mainly due to undertreatment. In Brazil, even in severe COPD cases, optimizing treatment to achieve greater benefits continues to be a challenge. PMID:25029645

  20. Etiology of vertigo in Thai patients at Thammasat Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bunasuwan, Parichat; Bunbanjerdsuk, Sacarin; Nilsuwan, Amornwan

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the causes of vertigo in the patients at Otoneurology Clinic, Thammasat Hospital. The data of these patients, collected from the medical records between January 2010 and January 2011, were reviewed and analyzed. From one hundred and forty-nine cases, 49 cases (33%) were men and 100 cases (67%) were women, which yielded the male-to-female ratio of 1:2. The average age of patients was 55 year olds. The most common diagnostic category was peripheral vestibular disorders (80.5%). Other causes were central vestibular disorders (4.7%) and non-vestibular related (4%), whereas the remaining (10.1%) was undiagnosed. The causes of vertigo included benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: BPPV (53%), Meniere's disease (10.1%) and recurrent vestibulopathy (8.1%), while the underlying diseases found were diabetes mellitus (11.4%), hypertension (32.2%) and dyslipidemia (34.2%). In Otoneurology Clinic, Thammasat Hospital, the peripheral vestibular disorders was the main etiology of vertigo, while the three most common causes were BPPV Meniere's disease, and recurrent vestibulopathy respectively.

  1. Using case-mix information in strategic hospital marketing. Deriving market research from patient data.

    PubMed

    Little, A

    1992-01-01

    Hospital survival requires adaptation, adaptation requires understanding, and understanding requires information. These are the basic equations behind hospital strategic marketing, and one of the answers may lie in hospitals' own patient-data systems. Marketers' and administrators' enlightened application of case-mix information could become one more hospital survival tool.

  2. Financial Pressures Prompt Teaching Hospitals to Cut Costs, Raising Fears about Medical Education and Patient Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grassmuck, Karen

    1991-01-01

    Financial pressures are forcing the closure of some teaching hospitals and retrenchment using such strategies as development of ambulatory care and satellite facilities, merging with or acquiring other hospitals, and shortening patient hospital stays. A table lists revenues and profit margins for the 20 largest university-owned teaching hospitals.…

  3. Safe medication management and use of narcotics in a Joint Commission International-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xu; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Xia, Ping; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Safe medication management and use of high-alert narcotics should arouse concern. Risk management experiences in this respect in a large-scale Joint Commission International (JCI)-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People's Republic of China during 2011-2015, focusing on organizational, educational, motivational, and information technological measures in storage, prescribing, preparing, dispensing, administration, and monitoring of medication are summarized. The intensity of use of meperidine in hospitalized patients in 2015 was one-fourth that in 2011. A 100% implementation rate of standard storage of narcotics has been achieved in the hospital since December 2012. A "Plan, Do, Check, Act" cycle was efficient because the ratio of number of inappropriate narcotics prescriptions to total number of narcotics prescriptions for inpatients decreased from August 2014 to December 2014 (28.22% versus 2.96%, P=0.0000), and it was controlled below 6% from then on. During the journey to good pain management ward accreditation by the Ministry of Health, People's Republic of China, (April 2012-October 2012), the medical oncology ward successfully demonstrated an increase in the pain screening rate at admission from 43.5% to 100%, cancer pain control rate from 85% to 96%, and degree of satisfaction toward pain nursing from 95.4% to 100% (all P-values <0.05). Oral morphine equivalent dosage in the good pain management ward increased from 2.3 mg/patient before June 2012 to 54.74 mg/patient in 2014. From 2011 to 2015, the oral morphine equivalent dose per discharged patient increased from 8.52 mg/person to 20.36 mg/person. A 100% implementation rate of independent double-check prior to narcotics dosing has been achieved since January 2013. From 2014 to 2015, the ratio of number of narcotics-related medication errors to number of discharged patients significantly decreased (6.95% versus 0.99%, P=0.0000). Taken together, continuous quality improvements have been

  4. Safe medication management and use of narcotics in a Joint Commission International-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xu; Zhu, Ling-ling; Pan, Sheng-dong; Xia, Ping; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Safe medication management and use of high-alert narcotics should arouse concern. Risk management experiences in this respect in a large-scale Joint Commission International (JCI)-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People’s Republic of China during 2011–2015, focusing on organizational, educational, motivational, and information technological measures in storage, prescribing, preparing, dispensing, administration, and monitoring of medication are summarized. The intensity of use of meperidine in hospitalized patients in 2015 was one-fourth that in 2011. A 100% implementation rate of standard storage of narcotics has been achieved in the hospital since December 2012. A “Plan, Do, Check, Act” cycle was efficient because the ratio of number of inappropriate narcotics prescriptions to total number of narcotics prescriptions for inpatients decreased from August 2014 to December 2014 (28.22% versus 2.96%, P=0.0000), and it was controlled below 6% from then on. During the journey to good pain management ward accreditation by the Ministry of Health, People’s Republic of China, (April 2012–October 2012), the medical oncology ward successfully demonstrated an increase in the pain screening rate at admission from 43.5% to 100%, cancer pain control rate from 85% to 96%, and degree of satisfaction toward pain nursing from 95.4% to 100% (all P-values <0.05). Oral morphine equivalent dosage in the good pain management ward increased from 2.3 mg/patient before June 2012 to 54.74 mg/patient in 2014. From 2011 to 2015, the oral morphine equivalent dose per discharged patient increased from 8.52 mg/person to 20.36 mg/person. A 100% implementation rate of independent double-check prior to narcotics dosing has been achieved since January 2013. From 2014 to 2015, the ratio of number of narcotics-related medication errors to number of discharged patients significantly decreased (6.95% versus 0.99%, P=0.0000). Taken together, continuous quality improvements

  5. An unusual cause of cardiac arrest in a hospitalized patient.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ranjan K; Tumkur, Anil; Bhat, Krishnamurthy; Chacko, Biby

    2013-01-01

    We present an unusual case of 24 year old male who was hospitalized for dental procedure and developed cardiac arrest 2 days after the procedure. The patient presented with swelling of buccal cavity for which a biopsy was taken. Two days after the procedure, apparently normal patient suddenly presented at mid night with VT and VF, which were intractable requiring multiple DC shocks. During this period arterial blood gas analysis revealed severe acidosis. The circumstances led us to suspect poisoning as one of the cause for his medical condition. We looked for commonly available toxins. One of the commonly available toxins is hand sanitizer which contains Isopropyl alcohol, glycerin and perfume. Due to prolonged cardiac arrest and intractable arrhythmia patient had sustained hypoxic brain injury. Patient remained hemodynamically stable for next 9 days although his CNS status did not improve. Patient succumbed to sepsis on 9(th) day. Healthcare professionals should be aware of such possibilities and treat the patients at the earliest and put a check on the easy availability of IPA based hand sanitizers.

  6. Teamwork and Patient Care Teams in an Acute Care Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rochon, Andrea; Heale, Roberta; Hunt, Elena; Parent, Michele

    2015-06-01

    The literature suggests that effective teamwork among patient care teams can positively impact work environment, job satisfaction and quality of patient care. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceived level of nursing teamwork by registered nurses, registered practical nurses, personal support workers and unit clerks working on patient care teams in one acute care hospital in northern Ontario, Canada, and to determine if a relationship exists between the staff scores on the Nursing Teamwork Survey (NTS) and participant perception of adequate staffing. Using a descriptive cross-sectional research design, 600 staff members were invited to complete the NTS and a 33% response rate was achieved (N=200). The participants from the critical care unit reported the highest scores on the NTS, whereas participants from the inpatient surgical (IPS) unit reported the lowest scores. Participants from the IPS unit also reported having less experience, being younger, having less satisfaction in their current position and having a higher intention to leave. A high rate of intention to leave in the next year was found among all participants. No statistically significant correlation was found between overall scores on the NTS and the perception of adequate staffing. Strategies to increase teamwork, such as staff education, among patient care teams may positively influence job satisfaction and patient care on patient care units.

  7. Standardized phase angle indicates nutritional status in hospitalized preoperative patients.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Thiane R; Wazlawik, Elisabeth; Bastos, João Luiz; Nakazora, Lívia M; Scheunemann, Lisiane

    2010-09-01

    There is currently no criterion standard to assess nutritional status, and different methods have been used in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the agreement and the association between bioelectrical impedance analysis derived by standardized phase angle (SPA) and other methods used for the nutritional assessment of body composition, metabolic status, and functional status in surgical patients. The hypothesis was that the SPA is effective for evaluating nutritional status in surgical patients; therefore, it could be used when the application of other assessment methods is not possible. The sample consisted of 125 patients (20-94 years of age) before elective gastrointestinal or hernia repair. The participants were from the Surgical Clinic 1 at the University Hospital of the Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil. Nutritional status was evaluated during the preoperative period based on the triceps skinfold thickness, mid-arm circumference, body mass index, percent weight loss, nutritional risk screening 2002 (NRS 2002), subjective global assessment (SGA), and SPA. The agreement between the SPA and the other methods was assessed with the k coefficient. The agreement between the SPA and the methods of nutritional assessment that were investigated for diagnosing malnutrition was moderate for NRS 2002 and SGA, weak for percent weight loss, and poor for triceps skinfold thickness, mid-arm circumference, and body mass index. There was a significant association between SPA and both NRS 2002 and SGA (P < .001). Our results suggest that SPA is able to indicate the risk of nutritional deficiency in the patients assessed. However, good agreement between SPA and the methods investigated was not observed.

  8. Triumph of hope over experience: learning from interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admissions identified through an Academic Health and Social Care Network

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Internationally health services are facing increasing demands due to new and more expensive health technologies and treatments, coupled with the needs of an ageing population. Reducing avoidable use of expensive secondary care services, especially high cost admissions where no procedure is carried out, has become a focus for the commissioners of healthcare. Method We set out to identify, evaluate and share learning about interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admission across a regional Academic Health and Social Care Network (AHSN). We conducted a service evaluation identifying initiatives that had taken place across the AHSN. This comprised a literature review, case studies, and two workshops. Results We identified three types of intervention: pre-hospital; within the emergency department (ED); and post-admission evaluation of appropriateness. Pre-hospital interventions included the use of predictive modelling tools (PARR – Patients at risk of readmission and ACG – Adjusted Clinical Groups) sometimes supported by community matrons or virtual wards. GP-advisers and outreach nurses were employed within the ED. The principal post-hoc interventions were the audit of records in primary care or the application of the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) within the admission ward. Overall there was a shortage of independent evaluation and limited evidence that each intervention had an impact on rates of admission. Conclusions Despite the frequency and cost of emergency admission there has been little independent evaluation of interventions to reduce avoidable admission. Commissioners of healthcare should consider interventions at all stages of the admission pathway, including regular audit, to ensure admission thresholds don’t change. PMID:22682525

  9. Quality Assessment of Diabetes Online Patient Education Materials from Academic Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorcely, Brenda; Agarwal, Nitin; Raghuwanshi, Maya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess and compare the readability of type 2 diabetes online patient education materials from academic institutions in the northeast USA and the American Diabetes Association. Many US residents utilise the Internet to obtain health information. Studies have shown that online patient education materials…

  10. Measuring patient-perceived quality of care in US hospitals using Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Jared B; Brownstein, John S; Tuli, Gaurav; Nsoesie, Elaine O; McIver, David J; Rozenblum, Ronen; Wright, Adam; Bourgeois, Florence T; Greaves, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients routinely use Twitter to share feedback about their experience receiving healthcare. Identifying and analysing the content of posts sent to hospitals may provide a novel real-time measure of quality, supplementing traditional, survey-based approaches. Objective To assess the use of Twitter as a supplemental data stream for measuring patient-perceived quality of care in US hospitals and compare patient sentiments about hospitals with established quality measures. Design 404 065 tweets directed to 2349 US hospitals over a 1-year period were classified as having to do with patient experience using a machine learning approach. Sentiment was calculated for these tweets using natural language processing. 11 602 tweets were manually categorised into patient experience topics. Finally, hospitals with ≥50 patient experience tweets were surveyed to understand how they use Twitter to interact with patients. Key results Roughly half of the hospitals in the US have a presence on Twitter. Of the tweets directed toward these hospitals, 34 725 (9.4%) were related to patient experience and covered diverse topics. Analyses limited to hospitals with ≥50 patient experience tweets revealed that they were more active on Twitter, more likely to be below the national median of Medicare patients (p<0.001) and above the national median for nurse/patient ratio (p=0.006), and to be a non-profit hospital (p<0.001). After adjusting for hospital characteristics, we found that Twitter sentiment was not associated with Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) ratings (but having a Twitter account was), although there was a weak association with 30-day hospital readmission rates (p=0.003). Conclusions Tweets describing patient experiences in hospitals cover a wide range of patient care aspects and can be identified using automated approaches. These tweets represent a potentially untapped indicator of quality and may be valuable to

  11. Determinants of hospital choice of rural hospital patients: the impact of networks, service scopes, and market competition.

    PubMed

    Roh, Chul-Young; Lee, Keon-Hyung; Fottler, Myron D

    2008-08-01

    Among 10,384 rural Colorado female patients who received MDC 14 (obstetric services) from 2000 to 2003, 6,615 (63.7%) were admitted to their local rural hospitals; 1,654 (15.9%) were admitted to other rural hospitals; and 2,115 (20.4%) traveled to urban hospitals for inpatient services. This study is to examine how network participation, service scopes, and market competition influences rural women's choice of hospital for their obstetric care. A conditional logistic regression analysis was used. The network participation (p < 0.01), the number of services offered (p < 0.05), and the hospital market competition had a positive and significant relationship with patients' choice to receive obstetric care. That is, rural patients prefer to receive care from a hospital that participates in a network, that provides more number of services, and that has a greater market share (i.e., a lower level of market competition) in their locality. Rural hospitals could actively increase their competitiveness and market share by increasing the number of health care services provided and seeking to network with other hospitals.

  12. Technology advances in hospital practices: robotics in treatment of patients.

    PubMed

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is widely considered as the treatment of choice for acute cholecystitis. The safety of the procedure and its minimal invasiveness made it a valid treatment option for a patient not responding to antibiotic therapy. Our research shows that patients positively assess this treatment method, but the world's tendency is to turn to a more sophisticated method utilizing robot-assisted surgery as a gold standard. Providing patient with minimally invasive surgical procedures that utilize the state-of-the-art equipment like the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System underscores the commitment to high-quality patient care while enhancing patient safety. The advantages include minimal invasive scarring, less pain and bleeding, faster recovery time, and shorter hospital stay. The move toward less invasive and less morbid procedures and a need to re-create the true open surgical experience have paved the way for the development and application of robotic and computer-assisted systems in surgery in Poland as well as the rest of the world.

  13. Health Literacy, Education Levels, and Patient Portal Usage During Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Sharon E.; Osborn, Chandra Y.; Kripalani, Sunil; Goggins, Kathryn M.; Jackson, Gretchen Purcell

    2015-01-01

    Patient portal adoption has rapidly increased, and portal usage has been associated with patients’ sociodemographics, health literacy, and education. Research on patient portals has primarily focused on the outpatient setting. We explored whether health literacy and education were associated with portal usage in an inpatient population. Among 60,159 admissions in 2012–2013, 23.3% of patients reported limited health literacy; 50.4% reported some post-secondary education; 34.4% were registered for the portal; and 23.4% of registered patients used the portal during hospitalization. Probability of registration and inpatient portal use increased with educational attainment. Health literacy was associated with registration but not inpatient use. Among admissions with inpatient use, educational attainment was associated with viewing health record data, and health literacy was associated use of appointment and health education tools. The inpatient setting may provide an opportunity to overcome barriers to patient portal adoption and reduce disparities in use of health information technologies. PMID:26958286

  14. Hospital admissions and exercise capacity decline in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Maria A; Gimeno-Santos, Elena; Ferrer, Jaume; Balcells, Eva; Rodríguez, Esther; de Batlle, Jordi; Gómez, Federico P; Sauleda, Jaume; Ferrer, Antoni; Barberà, Joan A; Agustí, Alvar; Gea, Joaquim; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert; Antó, Josep M; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith

    2014-04-01

    Exercise capacity declines with time and is an important determinant of health status and prognosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We hypothesised that hospital admissions are associated with exercise capacity decline in these patients. Clinical and functional variables were collected for 342 clinically stable COPD patients. The 6-min walk distance (6MWD) was determined at baseline and after a mean±sd of 1.7±0.3 years. Information on hospitalisations during follow-up was obtained from centralised administrative databases. Linear regression was used to model changes in exercise capacity. Patients were mostly male (92%), with mean±sd age 67.9±8.6 years, post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s 54±17% predicted and baseline 6MWD 433±93 m. During follow-up, 6MWD decreased by 21.9±51.0 m·year(-1) and 153 (45%) patients were hospitalised at least once. Among patients admitted only for COPD-related causes (50% of those ever admitted), the proportion presenting a clinically significant loss of 6MWD was higher than in patients admitted for only nonrespiratory conditions (53% versus 29%, p=0.040). After adjusting for confounders, annual 6MWD decline was greater (26 m·year(-1), 95% CI 13-38 m·year(-1); p<0.001) in patients with more than one all-cause hospitalisation per year, as compared with those with no hospitalisations. Hospitalisations are related to a greater decline in exercise capacity in COPD.

  15. Nurses' Patient-Centeredness and Perceptions of Care among Medicaid Patients in Hospital Obstetrical Units.

    PubMed

    Aragon, Stephen J; Richardson, Liana J; Lawrence, Wanda; Gesell, Sabina B

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study examined to what degree patient-centeredness-measured as an underlying ability of obstetrical nurses-influenced Medicaid patients' satisfaction with care in hospital obstetrical units. Design. Multigroup structural equation modeling design, using three cross-sectional random samples (n = 300 each) from the 2003 Press Ganey National Inpatient Database. Setting. Self-administered mail surveys. Participants. 900 Medicaid recipients recently discharged from inpatient hospital obstetrical units across the United States. Methods. Multigroup structural equation modeling was used to test the goodness of fit between a hypothesized model based on the Primary Provider Theory and patients' ratings of nurses. Results. The model fitted the data well, was stable across three random samples, and was sustained when compared to a competing model. The patient-centeredness of nurses significantly influenced overall patient satisfaction and explained 66% of its variability. When nurses' patient-centeredness increased by one standard deviation, patients' satisfaction increased by 0.80 standard deviation. Conclusion. This study offers a novel approach to the measurement of the patient-centeredness of nurses and a paradigm for increasing it and its influence on Medicaid patients' satisfaction in hospital obstetrical units.

  16. Nurses' Patient-Centeredness and Perceptions of Care among Medicaid Patients in Hospital Obstetrical Units

    PubMed Central

    Aragon, Stephen J.; Richardson, Liana J.; Lawrence, Wanda; Gesell, Sabina B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study examined to what degree patient-centeredness—measured as an underlying ability of obstetrical nurses—influenced Medicaid patients' satisfaction with care in hospital obstetrical units. Design. Multigroup structural equation modeling design, using three cross-sectional random samples (n = 300 each) from the 2003 Press Ganey National Inpatient Database. Setting. Self-administered mail surveys. Participants. 900 Medicaid recipients recently discharged from inpatient hospital obstetrical units across the United States. Methods. Multigroup structural equation modeling was used to test the goodness of fit between a hypothesized model based on the Primary Provider Theory and patients' ratings of nurses. Results. The model fitted the data well, was stable across three random samples, and was sustained when compared to a competing model. The patient-centeredness of nurses significantly influenced overall patient satisfaction and explained 66% of its variability. When nurses' patient-centeredness increased by one standard deviation, patients' satisfaction increased by 0.80 standard deviation. Conclusion. This study offers a novel approach to the measurement of the patient-centeredness of nurses and a paradigm for increasing it and its influence on Medicaid patients' satisfaction in hospital obstetrical units. PMID:24027634

  17. Every penny counts: interest-free loan programs could benefit both hospitals and patients.

    PubMed

    Hinderks, Jackie; Wreede, Amanda

    2015-11-01

    Patients' average deductibles have more than quadrupled, and their out-of-pocket costs are much higher now than even a decade ago. The higher a hospital bill, the less likely a patient is to pay. Zero-interest loan programs encourage patients to pay, helping both patient and hospital stay afloat.

  18. High Survival Rates and Associated Factors Among Ebola Virus Disease Patients Hospitalized at Donka National Hospital, Conakry, Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Chughtai, Morad; Bah, Elhadj Ibrahima; Barry, Moumié; Béavogui, Kézély; Loua, Tokpagnan Oscar; Malik, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Anecdotal reports suggesting that survival rates among hospitalized patients with Ebola virus disease in Guinea are higher than the 29.2% rate observed in the current epidemic in West Africa. Methods Survival after symptom onset was determined using Kaplan Meier survival methods among patients with confirmed Ebola virus disease treated in Conakry, Guinea from March 25, 2014, to August 5, 2014. We analyzed the relationship between survival and patient factors, including demographics and clinical features. Results Of the 70 patients analyzed [mean age ± standard deviation (SD), 34 ± 14.1; 44 were men], 42 were discharged alive with a survival rate among hospitalized patients of 60% (95% confidence interval, 41.5–78.5%). The survival rate was 28 (71.8%) among 39 patients under 34 years of age, and 14 (46.7%) among 30 patients aged 35 years or greater (p = 0.034). The rates of myalgia (3 of 42 versus 7 of 28, p = 0.036) and hiccups (1 of 42 versus 5 of 28, p = 0.023) were significantly lower among patients who survived. Conclusions Our results provide insights into a cohort of hospitalized patients with Ebola virus disease in whom survival is prominently higher than seen in other cohorts of hospitalized patients. PMID:25992182

  19. Do Spanish Hospital Professionals Educate Their Patients About Advance Directives? : A Descriptive Study in a University Hospital in Madrid, Spain.

    PubMed

    Pérez, María; Herreros, Benjamín; Martín, M Dolores; Molina, Julia; Kanouzi, Jack; Velasco, María

    2016-06-01

    It is unknown whether hospital-based medical professionals in Spain educate patients about advance directives (ADs). The objective of this research was to determine the frequency of hospital-based physicians' and nurses' engagement in AD discussions in the hospital and which patient populations merit such efforts. A short question-and-answer-based survey of physicians and nurses taking care of inpatients was conducted at a university hospital in Madrid, Spain. In total, 283 surveys were collected from medical professionals, of whom 71 per cent were female, with an average age of thirty-four years. Eighty-four per cent had never educated patients about ADs because of lack of perceived responsibility, time, or general knowledge of ADs. Patient populations that warranted AD discussions included those with terminal illnesses (77 per cent), chronic diseases (61 per cent), and elderly patients (43 per cent). Regarding degree of AD understanding in medical professionals: 57 per cent of medical professionals claimed sufficient general knowledge of ADs, 19 per cent understood particulars regarding AD document creation, and 16 per cent were aware of AD regulatory policies. Engagement in AD discussions was considered important by 83 per cent of medical professionals, with 79 per cent interested in participating in such discussions themselves. The majority of hospital physicians and nurses do not educate their patients about ADs, despite acknowledging their importance. Patient populations of highest priority included those with terminal diseases or chronic illness or who are of advanced age.

  20. A Most Unusual Patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnke, Gregory W.; Warshaw, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    This year marks 200 years of patient care at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). In celebration of this milestone, a unique Grand Rounds case is presented. A 450-year-old rotund man admitted 60 times presents with a classic triad of periumbilical pain, bilateral plantar burns, and a frozen scalp. Although this triad may at first strike a cord of familiarity among seasoned clinicians, the disease mechanism is truly noteworthy, being clarified only after a detailed occupational history. Ergo, the lessons hark back to the days of yesteryear, when the history and physical served as the cornerstone of Yuletide clinical diagnosis. A discussion of epidemiology and prognosis accompanies a detailed examination of the pathophysiholiday. Although some consider this patient uncouth, as you will see, he is quite a medical sleuth. The long-standing relationship between this patient and the MGH prompted his family to write a letter of appreciation, which will remind the reader of the meaning that our care brings to patients and their families. Harvey Cushing, who completed his internship at the MGH in 1895, professed “A physician is obligated to consider more than a diseased organ, more even than the whole man—he must view the man in his world.” We hope this unusual Grand Rounds case intrigues you as it reminds you of Cushing’s lesson and wishes you a joyous holiday season. PMID:22107737

  1. Should the "in situ" simulation become the new way in Belgium? Experience of an academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Pospiech, A; Lois, F; Van Dyck, M; Kahn, D; De Kock, M

    2013-01-01

    The place of simulation in medical education, particularly in anesthesia, appears to be more and more evident. However, the history of simulation in Belgium showed that the associated costs remain a barrier. The use of 'in situ' simulation, defined as the practice of simulation in the usual workplace, could solve the problem of providing access to this educational tool. Indeed, it allows reducing equipment and manpower costs: the needed equipment comes from the hospital, and supervision and organization are provided by staff members. It also provides access to simulation for a larger number of individuals on site. The environment is more realistic because the participants operate in their usual workplace, with their customary equipment and team. Furthermore, 'in situ' simulation allows participation of the paramedical staff. This allows developing skills related to teamwork and communication. Despite those numerous advantages, several difficulties persist. The associated logistic and organizational constraints can be cumbersome.

  2. Running a hospital patient safety campaign: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Ozieranski, Piotr; Robins, Victoria; Minion, Joel; Willars, Janet; Wright, John; Weaver, Simon; Martin, Graham P.; Woods, Mary Dixon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Research on patient safety campaigns has mostly concentrated on large-scale multi-organisation efforts, yet locally led improvement is increasingly promoted. The purpose of this paper is to characterise the design and implementation of an internal patient safety campaign at a large acute National Health Service hospital trust with a view to understanding how to optimise such campaigns. Design/methodology/approach The authors conducted a qualitative study of a campaign that sought to achieve 12 patient safety goals. The authors interviewed 19 managers and 45 frontline staff, supplemented by 56 hours of non-participant observation. Data analysis was based on the constant comparative method. Findings The campaign was motivated by senior managers’ commitment to patient safety improvement, a series of serious untoward incidents, and a history of campaign-style initiatives at the trust. While the campaign succeeded in generating enthusiasm and focus among managers and some frontline staff, it encountered three challenges. First, though many staff at the sharp end were aware of the campaign, their knowledge, and acceptance of its content, rationale, and relevance for distinct clinical areas were variable. Second, the mechanisms of change, albeit effective in creating focus, may have been too limited. Third, many saw the tempo of the campaign as too rapid. Overall, the campaign enjoyed some success in raising the profile of patient safety. However, its ability to promote change was mixed, and progress was difficult to evidence because of lack of reliable measurement. Originality/value The study shows that single-organisation campaigns may help in raising the profile of patient safety. The authors offer important lessons for the successful running of such campaigns. PMID:25241600

  3. Making background work visible: opportunities to address patient information needs in the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Logan; Mishra, Sonali R.; Pollack, Ari; Aaronson, Barry; Pratt, Wanda

    2015-01-01

    Despite growing use of patient-facing technologies such as patient portals to address information needs for outpatients, we understand little about how patients manage information and use information technologies in an inpatient context. Based on hospital observations and responses to an online questionnaire from previously hospitalized patients and caregivers, we describe information workspace that patients have available to them in the hospital and the information items that patients and caregivers rate as important and difficult to access or manage while hospitalized. We found that patients and caregivers desired information—such as the plan of care and the schedule of activities—that is difficult to access as needed in a hospital setting. Within this study, we describe the various tools and approaches that patients and caregivers use to help monitor their care as well as illuminate gaps in information needs not typically captured by traditional patient portals. PMID:26958295

  4. 78 FR 6819 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From The Connecticut Hospital Association...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From The Connecticut Hospital Association Federal Patient Safety Organization AGENCY: Agency for... for the formation of Patient Safety Organizations (PSOs), which collect, aggregate, and...

  5. Severity of Anemia Predicts Hospital Length of Stay but Not Readmission in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Garlo, Katherine; Williams, Deanna; Lucas, Lee; Wong, Rocket; Botler, Joel; Abramson, Stuart; Parker, Mark G

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of severe anemia to hospital readmission and length of stay (LOS) in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 3-5. Compared with the general population, patients with moderate CKD have a higher hospital readmission rate and LOS. Anemia in patients with moderate CKD is associated with higher morbidity and mortality. The influence of anemia on hospital outcomes in patients with moderate CKD has not been characterized.We conducted a retrospective cohort study at Maine Medical Center, a 606-bed academic tertiary care hospital. Patients with CKD stages 3-5 and not on dialysis admitted during February 2013 to January 2014 were eligible. Patients with end stage renal disease on hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, kidney transplant, acute kidney injury, gastrointestinal bleeding, active malignancy, pregnancy, and surgery were excluded. The cohort was split into severe anemia (hemoglobin ≤9  g/dL) versus a comparison group (hemoglobin >9 g /dL), and examined for differences in 30-day hospital readmission and LOS.In this study, the data of 1141 patients were included, out of which 156 (13.7%) had severe anemia (mean hemoglobin 8.1 g/dL, SD 0.8). Severe anemia was associated with increased hospital LOS (mean 6.4 (SD 6.0) days vs mean 4.5 (SD 4.0) days, P < 0.001). The difference was 1.7 day longer (95% CI 0.94, 2.45). There was no difference in readmission rate (mean 11.5% vs 10.2%, P = 0.7).Patients with moderate CKD and severe anemia are at risk for increased hospital LOS. Interventions targeting this high-risk population, including outpatient management of anemia, may benefit patient care and save costs through improved hospital outcomes.

  6. Role of blood gas analysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Lee, You Jin; Ryoo, Seung Mok; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Ahn, Shin; Seo, Dong-Woo; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine the relationship between acid–base findings, such as pH, pCO2, and serum lactate levels, obtained immediately after starting cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). A prospective observational study of adult, nontraumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) patients was conducted at an urban academic teaching institution between April 1, 2013 and March 31, 2015. Arterial blood sample for acid–base data was taken from all OHCA patients on arrival to the emergency department. Of 224 OHCA patients, 88 patients with unavailable blood samples or delayed blood sampling or ROSC within 4 minutes were excluded, leaving 136 patients for analysis. The pH in the ROSC group was significantly higher than in the non-ROSC group (6.96 vs. 6.85; P = 0.009). pCO2 and lactate levels in the ROSC group were significantly lower than those in the non-ROSC group (74.0 vs. 89.5 mmHg, P < 0.009; 11.6 vs. 13.6 mmol/L, P = 0.044, respectively). In a multivariate regression analysis, pCO2 was the only independent biochemical predictor for sustained ROSC (OR 0.979; 95% CI 0.960–0.997; P = 0.025) and pCO2 of <75 mmHg was 3.3 times more likely to achieve ROSC (OR 0.302; 95% CI 0.146–0.627; P = 0.001). pCO2 levels obtained during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on ER arrival was associated with ROSC in OHCA patients. It might be a potentially marker for reflecting the status of the ischemic insult. These preliminary results need to be confirmed in a larger population. PMID:27336894

  7. Impact of betablockers on general and local outcome in patients hospitalized for lower extremity peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirault, Tristan; Galloula, Alexandre; Cambou, Jean-Pierre; Lacroix, Philippe; Aboyans, Victor; Boulon, Carine; Constans, Joel; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Messas, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) is one manifestation of atherosclerosis. Patients with PAD have an increased rate of mortality due to concurrent coronary artery disease and hypertension. Betablockers (BB) may, therefore, be prescribed, especially in case of heart failure. However, BB safety in PAD is controversial, because of presumed peripheral hemodynamic consequences of BB that could lead to worsening of symptoms in patients with PAD. In this context, we aimed to determine the impact of BB on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and amputation rate at 1 year after hospitalization for PAD from the COPART Registry population. This is a prospective multicenter observational study collecting data from consecutive patients hospitalized for PAD in vascular medicine departments of 4 academic hospitals in France. Patients with, either claudication, critical limb ischemia or acute lower limb ischemia related to a documented PAD were included. We compared the outcomes of patients with BB versus those without BB in their prescription list at hospital discharge. The mean age of the study population was 70.9 years, predominantly composed of males (71%). Among the 1267 patients at admission, 28% were treated by BB for hypertension, prior myocardial infarction or heart failure. During their hospital stay, 40% underwent revascularization (including bypass surgery 29% and angioplasty 74%), 17% required an amputation, and 5% died. In a multivariate analysis, only prior myocardial infarction was found associated with BB prescription with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.11, P < 0.001. Conversely, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or PAD with ulcer impeded BB prescription (OR: 0.57 and 0.64, P = 0.007; P = 0.001, respectively). One-year overall mortality of patients with BB did not differ from those without (23% vs. 23%, P = 0.95). The 1-year amputation rate did not differ either (4% vs. 6%, P = 0.14). Patients hospitalized for PAD with a

  8. Shaping Patient Education in Rural Hospitals: Learning from the Experiences of Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheckel, Martha; Hedrick-Erickson, Jennifer; Teunis, Jamie; Deutsch, Ashley; Roers, Anna; Willging, Anne; Pittman, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Patient education is a crucial aspect of nursing practice, but much of the research about it is quantitative and has been conducted in urban medical centers. These urban-based studies have limited utility for nurses working in rural hospitals where the populations they serve often have unique and challenging health contexts and cultures. Since…

  9. Systematic Review of Hospital Readmissions in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, Emily; Vuik, Sabine; Darzi, Ara; Aylin, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background. Previous evidence on factors and causes of readmissions associated with high-impact users of stroke is scanty. The aim of the study was to investigate common causes and pattern of short- and long-term readmissions stroke patients by conducting a systematic review of studies using hospital administrative data. Common risk factors associated with the change of readmission rate were also examined. Methods. The literature search was conducted from 15 February to 15 March 2016 using various databases, such as Medline, Embase, and Web of Science. Results. There were a total of 24 studies (n = 2,126,617) included in the review. Only 4 studies assessed causes of readmissions in stroke patients with the follow-up duration from 30 days to 5 years. Common causes of readmissions in majority of the studies were recurrent stroke, infections, and cardiac conditions. Common patient-related risk factors associated with increased readmission rate were age and history of coronary heart disease, heart failure, renal disease, respiratory disease, peripheral arterial disease, and diabetes. Among stroke-related factors, length of stay of index stroke admission was associated with increased readmission rate, followed by bowel incontinence, feeding tube, and urinary catheter. Conclusion. Although risk factors and common causes of readmission were identified, none of the previous studies investigated causes and their sequence of readmissions among high-impact stroke users. PMID:27668120

  10. Temporal Trends of Hospitalized Patients with Heart Failure in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Jong-Chan; Ryu, Kyu-Hyung

    2017-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is an important cardiovascular disease because of its increasing prevalence, significant morbidity, high mortality and rapidly expanding health care costs. The number of HF patients is increasing worldwide and Korea is no exception. Temporal trends of four representative Korean hospitalized HF registries–the Hallym HF study, the Korean Multicenter HF study, the Korean Heart Failure (KorHF) registry and the Korean Acute Heart Failure (KorAHF) registry showed mild survival improvement reflecting overall HF patient care development in Korea despite the increased severity of enrolled patients with higher incidence of multiple comorbidities. Moreover, device therapies such as implantable cardioverter defibrillator and cardiac resynchronization therapy and definitive treatment such as heart transplantation have been increasing in Korea as well. To prevent HF burden increase, it is essential to set up long term effective prevention strategies for better control of ischemic heart disease, hypertension and diabetes, which might be risk factors for HF development. Moreover, proper HF guidelines, performance measures, and performance improvement programs might be necessary to limit HF burden as well. PMID:28154584

  11. Accelerating Best Care in Pennsylvania: adapting a large academic system's quality improvement process to rural community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Haydar, Ziad; Gunderson, Julie; Ballard, David J; Skoufalos, Alexis; Berman, Bettina; Nash, David B

    2008-01-01

    Industrial quality improvement (QI) methods such as continuous quality improvement (CQI) may help bridge the gap between evidence-based "best care" and the quality of care provided. In 2006, Baylor Health Care System collaborated with Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University to conduct a QI demonstration project in select Pennsylvania hospitals using CQI techniques developed by Baylor. The training was provided over a 6-month period and focused on methods for rapid-cycle improvement; data system design; data management; tools to improve patient outcomes, processes of care, and cost-effectiveness; use of clinical guidelines and protocols; leadership skills; and customer service skills. Participants successfully implemented a variety of QI projects. QI education programs developed and pioneered within large health care systems can be adapted and applied successfully to other settings, providing needed tools to smaller rural and community hospitals that lack the necessary resources to establish such programs independently.

  12. Whose responsibility is medication reconciliation: Physicians, pharmacists or nurses? A survey in an academic tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Al-Hashar, Amna; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Eriksson, Tommy; Al Za'abi, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medication errors occur frequently at transitions in care and can result in morbidity and mortality. Medication reconciliation is a recognized hospital accreditation requirement and designed to limit errors in transitions in care. Objectives: To identify beliefs, perceived roles and responsibilities of physicians, pharmacists and nurses prior to the implementation of a standardized medication reconciliation process. Methods: A survey was distributed to the three professions: pharmacists in the pharmacy and physicians and nurses in hospital in-patient units. It contained questions about the current level of medication reconciliation practices, as well as perceived roles and responsibilities of each profession when a standardized process is implemented. Value, barriers to implementing medication reconciliation and the role of information technology were also assessed. Analyses were performed using univariate statistics. Results: There was a lack of clarity of current medication reconciliation practices as well as lack of agreement between the three professions. Physicians and pharmacists considered their professions as the main providers while nurses considered physicians followed by themselves as the main providers with limited roles for pharmacists. The three professions recognize the values and benefits of medication reconciliation yet pharmacists, more than others, stated limited time to implement reconciliation is a major barrier. Obstacles such as unreliable sources of medication history, patient knowledge and lack of coordination and communication between the three professions were expressed. Conclusions: The three health care professions recognize the value of medication reconciliation and want to see it implemented in the hospital, yet there is a lack of agreement with regard to roles and responsibilities of each profession within the process. This needs to be addressed by the hospital administration to design clear procedures and defined roles

  13. Anti-Smoking Practice in Hospitals: An Intercept Survey among Patients in Hubei Province, China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Dunjin; Yan, Yaqiong; Yu, Huihong; Xia, Qinghua; Yang, Niannian; Zhang, Zhifeng; Zhu, Zhaoyang; Li, Fang; Gong, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine whether, in the opinion of patients selected in 13 hospitals of Hubei province, China, hospitals are smoke free. Patients were also asked whether their physicians had inquired about their smoking status. Design/methodology/approach: Patients were recruited through an intercept method (i.e. stopped by the…

  14. Risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients starting hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Eun Hui; Kim, Ha Yeon; Kang, Yong Un; Kim, Chang Seong; Ma, Seong Kwon; Kim, Soo Wan

    2015-01-01

    Background Incident hemodialysis patients have the highest mortality in the first several months after starting dialysis. This study evaluated the in-hospital mortality rate after hemodialysis initiation, as well as related risk factors. Methods We examined in-hospital mortality and related factors in 2,692 patients starting incident hemodialysis. The study population included patients with acute kidney injury, acute exacerbation of chronic kidney disease, and chronic kidney disease. To determine the parameters associated with in-hospital mortality, patients who died in hospital (nonsurvivors) were compared with those who survived (survivors). Risk factors for in-hospital mortality were determined using logistic regression analysis. Results Among all patients, 451 (16.8%) died during hospitalization. The highest risk factor for in-hospital mortality was cardiopulmonary resuscitation, followed by pneumonia, arrhythmia, hematologic malignancy, and acute kidney injury after bleeding. Albumin was not a risk factor for in-hospital mortality, whereas C-reactive protein was a risk factor. The use of vancomycin, inotropes, and a ventilator was associated with mortality, whereas elective hemodialysis with chronic kidney disease and statin use were associated with survival. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy was not associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusion Incident hemodialysis patients had high in-hospital mortality. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, infections such as pneumonia, and the use of inotropes and a ventilator was strong risk factors for in-hospital mortality. However, elective hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease was associated with survival. PMID:26484040

  15. A preliminary study of Patient Dignity Inventory validation among patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cabri, Giulio; Carretti, Eleonora; Galli, Giacomo; Giambalvo, Nina; Rioli, Giulia; Saraceni, Serena; Spiga, Giulia; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Ferri, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the perception of dignity among patients hospitalized in a psychiatric setting using the Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI), which had been first validated in oncologic field among terminally ill patients. Patients and methods After having modified two items, we administered the Italian version of PDI to all patients hospitalized in a public psychiatric ward (Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment of a northern Italian town), who provided their consent and completed it at discharge, from October 21, 2015 to May 31, 2016. We excluded minors and patients with moderate/severe dementia, with poor knowledge of Italian language, who completed PDI in previous hospitalizations and/or were hospitalized for <72 hours. We collected the demographic and clinical variables of our sample (n=135). We statistically analyzed PDI scores, performing Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and principal factor analysis, followed by orthogonal and oblique rotation. We concomitantly administered to our sample other scales (Hamilton Rating Scales for Depression and Anxiety, Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales) to analyze the PDI concurrent validity. Results With a response rate of 93%, we obtained a mean PDI score of 48.27 (±19.59 SD) with excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient =0.93). The factorial analysis showed the following three factors with eigenvalue >1 (Kaiser’s criterion), which explained >80% of total variance with good internal consistency: 1) “Loss of self-identity and social role”, 2) “Anxiety and uncertainty for future” and 3) “Loss of personal autonomy”. The PDI and the three-factor scores were statistically significantly positively correlated with the Hamilton Scales for Depression and Anxiety but not with other scale scores. Conclusion Our preliminary research suggests that PDI can be a reliable tool to assess patients’ dignity perception in a psychiatric setting, until now

  16. Monitoring and root cause analysis of clinical biochemistry turn around time at an academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Kiran P; Trivedi, Amit P; Patel, Dharmik; Gami, Bhakti; Haridas, N

    2014-10-01

    Quality can be defined as the ability of a product or service to satisfy the needs and expectations of the customer. Laboratories are more focusing on technical and analytical quality for reliability and accuracy of test results. Patients and clinicians however are interested in rapid, reliable and efficient service from laboratory. Turn around time (TAT), the timeliness with which laboratory personnel deliver test results, is one of the most noticeable signs of laboratory service and is often used as a key performance indicator of laboratory performance. This study is aims to provide clue for laboratory TAT monitoring and root cause analysis. In a 2 year period a total of 75,499 specimens of outdoor patient department were monitor, of this a total of 4,142 specimens exceeded TAT. With consistent efforts to monitor, root cause analysis and corrective measures, we are able to decreased the specimens exceeding TAT from 7-8 to 3.7 %. Though it is difficult task to monitor TAT with the help of laboratory information system, real time documentation and authentic data retrievable, along with identification of causes for delays and its remedial measures, improve laboratory TAT and thus patient satisfaction.

  17. A comparison of clinicians' access to online knowledge resources using two types of information retrieval applications in an academic hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Sevgin; Cimino, James J.; Koziol, Deloris E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The research studied whether a clinician's preference for online health knowledge resources varied with the use of two applications that were designed for information retrieval in an academic hospital setting. Methods: The researchers analyzed a year's worth of computer log files to study differences in the ways that four clinician groups (attending physicians, housestaff physicians, nurse practitioners, and nurses) sought information using two types of information retrieval applications (health resource links or Infobutton icons) across nine resources while they reviewed patients' laboratory results. Results: From a set of 14,979 observations, the authors found statistically significant differences among the 4 clinician groups for accessing resources using the health resources application (P<0.001) but not for the Infobuttons application (P = 0.31). For the health resources application, the preferences of the 4 clinical groups varied according to the specific resources examined (all P≤0.02). Conclusion: The information-seeking behavior of clinicians may vary in relation to their role and the way in which the information is presented. Studying these behaviors can provide valuable insights to those tasked with maintaining information retrieval systems' links to appropriate online knowledge resources. PMID:23405044

  18. Assessment of patient satisfaction of mentally ill patients hospitalized in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thapinta, Darawan; Anders, Robert L; Wiwatkunupakan, Srinuan; Kitsumban, Voranut; Vadtanapong, Siriluck

    2004-12-01

    Psychiatric patients' satisfaction with their hospital care has not been reported in the Western literature. The concept of asking psychiatric patients about their perceptions of care is relatively new. The purpose of the present investigation was to assess the satisfaction of the care received by a group of acutely mentally ill hospitalized Thai patients. This post-test design examined a random sample of 182 persons hospitalized between 1 March 2000 and 31 July 2000. Using a validated Perception of Care instrument, research assistants assessed patient satisfaction. Patients rated the care as average with none of the items achieving a very good or excellent score. The lowest scoring items were receiving information about their rights, consistency of information provided, and the ease of obtaining information. Women tended to be more satisfied with care as were patients over the age of 55 years (P = 0.02). Patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia were more satisfied with the care than other patients (P = 0.05). It is unknown if satisfaction levels are similar in other institutions in Thailand. None of the areas received excellent or very good ratings. The findings of this study were shared with the staff at the study site. There appears to be a need to develop performance improvement activities designed to address the areas identified as needing improvement. Replication of this study in other Thailand sites would provide an opportunity for agencies to benchmark their findings. By consenting to be a part of this study the staff and patients have taken a positive step forward to improve patient satisfaction with care.

  19. Implementing Patient-Oriented Discharge Summaries (PODS): A Multisite Pilot Across Early Adopter Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hahn-Goldberg, Shoshana; Okrainec, Karen; Damba, Cynthia; Huynh, Tai; Lau, Davina; Maxwell, Joanne; McGuire, Ryan; Yang, Lily; Abrams, Howard B

    2016-01-01

    Communication gaps when patients transition from hospital to either home or community can be problematic. Partnership between Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network (TC LHIN) and OpenLab addressed this through the Patient-Oriented Discharge Summaries (PODS) project. From January through March 2015, eight hospital departments across Toronto came together to implement the PODS, a tool previously developed through a co-design process involving patients, caregivers and providers. This paper presents data on how the hospitals came together and the impact of PODS on the patient and provider experience across these hospitals and discusses it implications.

  20. Patient assessments of hospital maternity care: a useful tool for consumers?

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, B S; Harper, D L; Rosenthal, G E

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine three issues related to using patient assessments of care as a means to select hospitals and foster consumer choice-specifically, whether patient assessments (1) vary across hospitals, (2) are reproducible over time, and (3) are biased by case-mix differences. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Surveys that were mailed to 27,674 randomly selected patients admitted to 18 hospitals in a large metropolitan region (Northeast Ohio) for labor and delivery in 1992-1994. We received completed surveys from 16,051 patients (58 percent response rate). STUDY DESIGN: Design was a repeated cross-sectional study. DATA COLLECTION: Surveys were mailed approximately 8 to 12 weeks after discharge. We used three previously validated scales evaluating patients' global assessments of care (three items)as well as assessments of physician (six items) and nursing (five items) care. Each scale had a possible range of 0 (poor care) to 100 (excellent care). PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patient assessments varied (p<.001) across hospitals for each scale. Mean hospital scores were higher or lower (p<.01) than the sample mean for seven or more hospitals during each year of data collection. However, within individual hospitals, mean scores were reproducible over the three years. In addition, relative hospital rankings were stable; Spearman correlation coefficients ranged from 0.85 to 0.96 when rankings during individual years were compared. Patient characteristics (age, race, education, insurance status, health status, type of delivery) explained only 2-3 percent of the variance in patient assessments, and adjusting scores for these factors had little effect on hospitals' scores. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that patient assessments of care may be a sensitive measure for discriminating among hospitals. In addition, hospital scores are reproducible and not substantially affected by case-mix differences. If our findings regarding patient assessments are generalizable to other patient

  1. Hospital Preparations for Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Patients and Experience Gained from Admission of an Ebola Patient.

    PubMed

    Haverkort, J J Mark; Minderhoud, A L C Ben; Wind, Jelte D D; Leenen, Luke P H; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Ellerbroek, Pauline M

    2016-02-01

    The Major Incident Hospital of the University Medical Centre of Utrecht has a longstanding history of preparing for the management of highly pathogenic and infectious organisms. An assessment of the hospital's preparations for an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever and its experience during admission of a patient with Ebola virus disease showed that the use of the buddy system, frequent training, and information sessions for staff and their relatives greatly increased the sense of safety and motivation among staff. Differing procedures among ambulance services limited the number of services used for transporting patients. Waste management was the greatest concern, and destruction of waste had to be outsourced. The admission of an Ebola patient proceeded without incident but led to considerable demands on staff. The maximum time allowed for wearing personal protective equipment was 45 minutes to ensure safety, and an additional 20 minutes was needed for recovery.

  2. [Structural and clinical characteristics of elderly and senile patients' treatment in regional surgical hospital].

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, A O; Seĭdinov, Sh M; Iusupov, A A

    2011-01-01

    Treatment results of 1219 patients of elderly and senile age, hospitalized in surgical departments of Turkestan during 2001-2008 were analyzed. Demographic characteristics, spectrum of profile pathology as well as concurrent diseases were given. Operative activity and average hospital stay, hospital lethality and complication rates were defined.

  3. Pharmaceutical orientation at hospital discharge of transplant patients: strategy for patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Lívia Falcão; Martins, Bruna Cristina Cardoso; de Oliveira, Francisco Roberto Pereira; Cavalcante, Rafaela Michele de Andrade; Magalhães, Vanessa Pinto; Firmino, Paulo Yuri Milen; Adriano, Liana Silveira; da Silva, Adriano Monteiro; Flor, Maria Jose Nascimento; Néri, Eugenie Desirée Rabelo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe and analyze the pharmaceutical orientation given at hospital discharge of transplant patients. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive and retrospective study that used records of orientation given by the clinical pharmacist in the inpatients unit of the Kidney and Liver Transplant Department, at Hospital Universitário Walter Cantídio, in the city of Fortaleza (CE), Brazil, from January to July, 2014. The following variables recorded at the Clinical Pharmacy Database were analyzed according to their significance and clinical outcomes: pharmaceutical orientation at hospital discharge, drug-related problems and negative outcomes associated with medication, and pharmaceutical interventions performed. Results: The first post-transplant hospital discharge involved the entire multidisciplinary team and the pharmacist was responsible for orienting about drug therapy. The mean hospital discharges/month with pharmaceutical orientation during the study period was 10.6±1.3, totaling 74 orientations. The prescribed drug therapy had a mean of 9.1±2.7 medications per patient. Fifty-nine drug-related problems were identified, in which 67.8% were related to non-prescription of medication needed, resulting in 89.8% of risk of negative outcomes associated with medications due to untreated health problems. The request for inclusion of drugs (66.1%) was the main intervention, and 49.2% of the medications had some action in the digestive tract or metabolism. All interventions were classified as appropriate, and 86.4% of them we able to prevent negative outcomes. Conclusion: Upon discharge of a transplanted patient, the orientation given by the clinical pharmacist together with the multidisciplinary team is important to avoid negative outcomes associated with drug therapy, assuring medication reconciliation and patient safety. PMID:27759824

  4. Facilitators and Threats to the Patient Dignity in Hospitalized Patients with Heart Diseases: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Rabori, Roghayeh Mehdipour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient’s dignity is an important issue which is highlighted in nursing It is an issue that is highly dependent on context and culture. Heart disease is the most common disease in Iran and the world. Identification of facilitator and threatening patient dignity in heart patients is vital. This study aimed to explore facilitator and threatening patient dignity in hospitalized patients with heart disease. Methods: This qualitative content analysis study was performed in 2014 in Kerman, Iran. 20 patients admitted to coronary care units and 5 personnel were selected using purposeful sampling in semi-structured and in depth interviews. Researchers also used documentation and field notes until data saturation. Qualitative data analysis was done constantly and simultaneously with data collection Results: Three central themes emerged: a) Care context which includes human environment and physical environment, b) Holistic safe care including meeting the needs of patients both in the hospital and after discharge, c) Creating a sense of security and an effective relationship between patient and nurse, including a respectful relationship and account the family in health team. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that care context is important for patient dignity as well as physical environment and safe holistic care. PMID:26793729

  5. Implementation of an Acute Care Surgery Service in a Community Hospital: Impact on Hospital Efficiency and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A service led by acute care surgeons managing trauma, critically ill surgical, and emergency general surgery patients via an acute care surgery model of patient care improves hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at university-affiliated hospitals and American College of Surgeons-verified trauma centers. Our goal was to determine whether an acute care surgeon led service, entitled the Surgical Trauma and Acute Resuscitative Service (STARS) that implemented an acute care surgery model of patient care, could improve hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at a community hospital. A total of 492 patient charts were reviewed, which included 230 before the implementation of the STARS [pre-STARS (control)] and 262 after the implementation of the STARS [post-STARS (study)]. Demographics included age, gender, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score, and medical comorbidities. Efficiency data included length of stay in emergency department (ED-LOS), length of stay in surgical intensive care unit (SICU-LOS), and length of stay in hospital (H-LOS), and total in hospital charges. Average age was 64.1 + 16.4 years, 255 males (51.83%) and 237 females (48.17%). Average Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score was 11.9 + 5.8. No significant differences in demographics were observed. Average decreases in ED-LOS (9.7 + 9.6 hours, pre-STARS versus 6.6 + 4.5 hours, post-STARS), SICU-LOS (5.3 + 9.6 days, pre-STARS versus 3.5 + 4.8 days, post-STARS), H-LOS (12.4 + 12.7 days, pre-STARS versus 11.4 + 11.3 days, post-STARS), and total in hospital charges ($419,602.6 + $519,523.0 pre-STARS to $374,816.7 + $411,935.8 post-STARS) post-STARS. Regression analysis revealed decreased ED-LOS-2.9 hours [P = 0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI): -7.0, 1.2], SICU-LOS-6.3 days (P < 0.001; 95% CI: -9.3, -3.2), H-LOS-7.6 days (P = 0.001; 95% CI: -12.1, -3.1), and 3.4 times greater odds of survival (P = 0.04; 95% CI: 1.1, 10.7) post-STARS. In conclusion, implementation of

  6. The Influence of Hospital Market Competition on Patient Mortality and Total Performance Score.

    PubMed

    Haley, Donald Robert; Zhao, Mei; Spaulding, Aaron; Hamadi, Hanadi; Xu, Jing; Yeomans, Katelyn

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 launch of Medicare Value-Based Purchasing has become the platform for payment reform. It is a mechanism by which buyers of health care services hold providers accountable for high-quality and cost-effective care. The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between quality of hospital care and hospital competition using the quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior. The quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior was used as the conceptual framework for this study. Data from the American Hospital Association database, the Hospital Compare database, and the Area Health Resources Files database were used. Multivariate regression analysis was used to examine the effect of hospital competition on patient mortality. Hospital market competition was significantly and negatively related to the 3 mortality rates. Consistent with the literature, hospitals located in more competitive markets had lower mortality rates for patients with acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. The results suggest that hospitals may be more readily to compete on quality of care and patient outcomes. The findings are important because policies that seek to control and negatively influence a competitive hospital environment, such as Certificate of Need legislation, may negatively affect patient mortality rates. Therefore, policymakers should encourage the development of policies that facilitate a more competitive and transparent health care marketplace to potentially and significantly improve patient mortality.

  7. Body Mass Index and Hospital Mortality in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome Receiving Care in a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Camprubi, Mercedes; Cabrera, Sandra; Sans, Jordi; Vidal, Georgina; Salvadó, Teresa; Bardají, Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    Although obesity is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor, some controversy has arisen with regard to its effect on hospital mortality in patients admitted for acute coronary syndrome. Methods. Clinical and anthropometric variables were analyzed in patients consecutively admitted for acute coronary syndrome to a university hospital between 2009 and 2010, and the correlation of those variables with hospital mortality was examined. Results. A total of 824 patients with a diagnosis of myocardial infarction or unstable angina were analyzed. Body mass index was an independent factor in hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.739 (IC 95%: 0.597 − 0.916), P = 0.006). Mortality in normal weight (n = 218), overweight (n = 399), and obese (n = 172) subjects was 6.1%, 3.1%, and 4.1%, respectively, with no statistically significant differences between the groups. Conclusions. There is something of a paradox in the relationship between body mass index and hospital mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome in that the mortality rate decreases as body mass index increases. However, no statistically significant differences have been found in normal weight, overweight, or obese subjects. PMID:22900151

  8. Patient Perceptions of Provider and Hospital Factors Associated With New Medication Communication.

    PubMed

    Bartlett Ellis, Rebecca J; Bakoyannis, Giorgos; Haase, Joan E; Boyer, Kiersten; Carpenter, Janet S

    2016-09-01

    This research examined provider and hospital factors associated with patients' perceptions of how often explanations of new medications were "always" given to them, using Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores. HCAHPS results were obtained for October 2012 to September 2013, from 3,420 hospitals and combined with a Magnet-designated hospital listing. Multiple regression examined correlates of new medication communication, including health care provider factors (perceptions of nurse and physician communication) and health care system factors (magnet designation, hospital ownership, hospital type, availability of emergency services, and survey numbers). Nurse and physician communication was strongly associated with new medication communication (r = .819, p < .001; r = .722, p < .001, respectively). Multivariable correlates included nurse communication (p < .001), physician communication (p < .001), hospital ownership, availability of emergency services, and survey numbers. There was a significant relationship between patients' perceptions of nurse and physician communication and the explanations they had received about their new medications during hospitalization.

  9. Prevalence of Polypharmacy and Drug Interaction Among Hospitalized Patients: Opportunities and Responsabilities in Pharmaceutical Care

    PubMed Central

    Trumic, Edisa; Pranjic, Nurka; Begic, Lejla; Bečić, Fahir

    2012-01-01

    Goal: Polypharmacy and drug-related problems (DRPs) have been shown to prevail in hospitalized patients. We evaluated the prevalence of polypharmacy; and investigated relationship between polypharmacy and: symptoms of DRPs, number of drugs and OTC, index of cumulative morbidity, length of exposure to polypharmacy and the number of days of hospital stay among hospitalized patients. Methodology: A study was performed in Pharmacies „Eufarm Edal“ Tuzla from 2010 to 2011. Polypharmacy was defined as using ≥ 3 drugs. The total study sample of 226 examiners were interviewed with special constructed questionnaires about DRPs. Experimental study group consisted of hospital patients with polypharmacy (n=166) and control group hospital patients without polypharmacy (n=60). Mann-Whitney test was used to test for significant self-reported symptom differences between groups and cross sectional subgroups, t- test and χ2- test for age, gender and treatment data in hospital. Results: The prevalence of polypharmacy was 74% among 226 hospitalized patients. The vulnerable age subgroup of hospitalized patients was men and hospitalized patients aged from 46 to 50 years (not geriatric patients). The prevalence of index of cumulative morbidity was 65%. The most common exposures varied by patient age and by hospital type, with various antibiotics, antidepressants, analgesics, sedatives, antihypertensives, flixotide, ranitidine and others. The prevalence of exposure to OTC and self- treatment was 80%. The prevalence of symptoms of drug-related problems were significantly differed among patients of experimental in relationship of control study group patients (P<0.001). Conclusion: In addition to helping to resolve the above mentioned issues, the results from this study could provide baseline information quantifying the problem of drug- related problems among hospitalized patients receiving polypharmacy and contribute to the formulation and implementation of risk management strategies

  10. Comparative Investigation of Health Literacy Level of Cardiovascular Patients Hospitalized in Private and Educational Hospitals of Kerman City, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Malekzadeh, Sajedeh; Azami, Mohammad; Mirzaei, Moghadameh; Motamedi, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: literacy involves a complex set of abilities to understand and use symbolic systems of a culture for personal development and social development in a diverse set of skills required as an adult to exercise behavior are considered in society Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate Comparative investigation of health literacy level of cardiovascular patients hospitalized in private and public educational hospitals of Kerman city Methods: This study used survey methods, analytical and cross-sectional manner. Data was collected through questionnaires distributed among 200 patients of cardiovascular-hospitalization took place in the city of Kerman. To analyze the data in the description of the mean, standard deviation and frequency distribution tables and the level of analysis to determine the relationship between gender and marital status of health literacy test or nonparametric test Mann-Whitney T-Test and, for the relationship between group employment and residence, a one-way analysis of variance or Kruskal-Wallis test, to evaluate the relationship between age and income, Pearson and Spearman correlation to investigate the relationship between level of education and health literacy of SPPS software version 21 was used. Results: The results showed that 10% of patients at educational hospitals in Kerman adequate health literacy, and 48% of patients in private hospitals had adequate health literacy. As a result, there is a significant difference of health literacy between the two types of hospital (p-value <0/0001). Conclusions: The results showed that most patients had inadequate and border health literacy have been. Health plans, preparation of simple educational system and understanding, spending more time and have a discussion with the lower speed In connection with the patient’s doctor and medical staff, Including ways to help patients with low health literacy and improve their health literacy is. PMID:27041812

  11. Appropriateness of outpatient gastrointestinal endoscopy in a non-academic hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mangualde, João; Cremers, Marie I; Vieira, Ana M; Freire, Ricardo; Gamito, Élia; Lobato, Cristina; Alves, Ana L; Augusto, Fátima; Oliveira, Ana P

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the appropriate use and the diagnostic yield of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy in this subgroup of patients. METHODS: In total, 789 consecutive outpatients referred for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy [381 for esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and 408 for colonoscopy] were prospectively enrolled in the study. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) guidelines were used to assess the relationship between appropriateness and the presence of relevant endoscopic findings. RESULTS: The overall inappropriate rate was 13.3%. The indications for EGD and colonoscopy were, respectively, appropriate in 82.7% and 82.6% of the exams, uncertain in 5.8% and 2.4% and inappropriate in 11.5% and 15%. The diagnostic yield was significant higher for EGDs and colonoscopies judged appropriate and uncertain when compared with those considered inappropriate (EGD: 36.6% vs 36.4% vs 11.4%, P = 0.004; Colonoscopy: 24.3% vs 20.0% vs 3.3%, P = 0.001). Of the 25 malignant lesions detected, all but one was detected in exams judged appropriate or uncertain. CONCLUSION: This study shows a good adherence to ASGE guidelines by the referring physicians and a significant increase of the diagnostic yield in appropriate examinations, namely in detecting neoplastic lesions. It underscores the importance that the appropriateness of the indication assumes in assuring high-quality GI endoscopic procedures. PMID:22013500

  12. Clinical and imaging correlates of EEG patterns in hospitalized patients with encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Raoul; Stevens, Robert D; Kaplan, Peter W

    2013-04-01

    To identify the relationship between pathologic electroencephalographic (EEG) patterns, clinical and neuroradiological abnormalities, and outcome in hospitalized patients with acute encephalopathy. This 5-year cohort study was performed at an academic tertiary care center. EEGs in 154 patients with altered mental status were classified according to five predefined patterns: Isolated continuous slowing of background activity (theta, theta/delta, and delta activity) and patterns with slowing background activity with episodic transients [i.e., triphasic waves (TWs) or frontal intermittent delta activity (FIRDA)]. Clinical characteristics, blood tests and neuroimaging were compared among groups. Associations between EEG patterns and structural and non-structural abnormalities were calculated. Glasgow Outcome Score >3 at discharge was defined as favorable and 1-3 as unfavorable outcome. In multivariable analyses, theta was associated with brain atrophy (OR 2.6, p = 0.020), theta/delta with intracerebral hemorrhages (OR 6.8, p = 0.005), FIRDA with past cerebrovascular accidents (OR 2.7, p = 0.004), TWs with liver or multi-organ failure (OR 6, p = 0.004; OR 4, p = 0.039), and delta activity with alcohol/drug abuse with or without intoxication, and HIV infection (OR 3.8, p = 0.003; OR 9, p = 0.004). TWs were associated with death (OR 4.5, p = 0.005); theta/delta with unfavorable outcomes (OR 2.5, p = 0.033), while patients with FIRDA had favorable outcomes (OR 4.8, p = 0.004). In encephalopathic patients, well-defined EEG patterns are associated with specific pathological conditions and outcomes, suggesting that mechanistic hypotheses underlie these abnormal EEG patterns. To clarify the respective contributions of non-structural and structural abnormalities to encephalopathy reflected in specific EEG patterns, prospective studies using continuous EEG monitoring during the acute onset of encephalopathy are needed.

  13. Complementary effect of patient volume and quality of care on hospital cost efficiency.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong Hoon; Park, Imsu; Jung, Ilyoung; Dey, Asoke

    2015-12-04

    This study explores the direct effect of an increase in patient volume in a hospital and the complementary effect of quality of care on the cost efficiency of U.S. hospitals in terms of patient volume. The simultaneous equation model with three-stage least squares is used to measure the direct effect of patient volume and the complementary effect of quality of care and volume. Cost efficiency is measured with a data envelopment analysis method. Patient volume has a U-shaped relationship with hospital cost efficiency and an inverted U-shaped relationship with quality of care. Quality of care functions as a moderator for the relationship between patient volume and efficiency. This paper addresses the economically important question of the relationship of volume with quality of care and hospital cost efficiency. The three-stage least square simultaneous equation model captures the simultaneous effects of patient volume on hospital quality of care and cost efficiency.

  14. Estimating Treatment and Treatment Times for Special and Nonspecial Patients in Hospital Ambulatory Dental Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Dara J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study compared the treatments and the amount of time needed for treatment of the dental needs of developmentally disabled, severely compromised, and moderately compromised patients with those of nondisabled patients in a hospital ambulatory dental clinic. (MSE)

  15. Can Hospital Cultural Competency Reduce Disparities in Patient Experiences with Care?

    PubMed Central

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Elliott, Marc N.; Pradhan, Rohit; Schiller, Cameron; Hall, Allyson; Hays, Ron D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultural competency has been espoused as an organizational strategy to reduce health disparities in care. Objective To examine the relationship between hospital cultural competency and inpatient experiences with care. Research Design The first model predicted Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores from hospital random effects, plus fixed effects for hospital cultural competency, individual race/ethnicity/language, and case-mix variables. The second model tested if the association between a hospital’s cultural competency and HCAHPS scores differed for minority and non-Hispanic white patients. Subjects The National CAHPS® Benchmarking Database’s (NCBD) HCAHPS Surveys and the Cultural Competency Assessment Tool of Hospitals (CCATH) Surveys for California hospitals were merged, resulting in 66 hospitals and 19,583 HCAHPS respondents in 2006. Measures Dependent variables include ten HCAHPS measures: six composites (communication with doctors, communication with nurses, staff responsiveness, pain control, communication about medications, and discharge information), two individual items (cleanliness, and quietness of patient rooms), and two global items (overall hospital rating, and whether patient would recommend hospital). Results Hospitals with greater cultural competency have better HCAHPS scores for doctor communication, hospital rating, and hospital recommendation. Furthermore, HCAHPS scores for minorities were higher at hospitals with greater cultural competency on four other dimensions: nurse communication, staff responsiveness, quiet room, and pain control. Conclusions Greater hospital cultural competency may improve overall patient experiences, but may particularly benefit minorities in their interactions with nurses and hospital staff. Such effort may not only serve longstanding goals of reducing racial/ethnic disparities in inpatient experience, but may also contribute to general quality improvement

  16. Febrile morbidity and hospital stay in high-risk cesarian section patients at a non-teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Persad

    1998-07-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the incidence of postcesarian febrile morbidity and relate this to hospital stay in a high-risk indigent population treated at a private non-teaching hospital.Methods: This was a retrospective chart review of all patients done between January 1995 and December 1996. Discharge summaries, antepartums, progress notes, and labs were reviewed for each patient. Of 257 charts reviewed, 5 were inadequate for various reasons. Board-certified surgeons performed and assisted in the operations. Twenty-one patients had scant prenatal care and 6 had no prenatal care. All patients had the abdomen scrubbed with Betadine soap prior to painting. No shaving was done. Gloves were changed after closure of uterine incision. The pelvis was copiously irrigated with 3-4 L of saline. The subcutaneous layer was irrigated from a height of 6-12" with 12 to 1 L of fluid. After this step, this layer is not touched by anything from the operating field.Results: Of 162 patients with primary cesarian, 20 had postoperative fever, 18 with endometritis, 2 with wound infections. All but 5 of these patients had labor as ruptured membranes of 12 hours or more. Four had prolonged 2nd stage. Of 28 failed VBACs, 2 had fever vs none for 59 elective repeat cesarians. The average hospital stay for febrile patients was 4.4 days vs 2.7 for afebrile patients. The incidence of wound infection was 0.8%. The incidence of fever was 12.2% for primary cesarians and 8.8% in the total study group of 249 patients.Conclusion: This study demonstrates that the adoption of simple measures presented in Methods can dramatically decrease the incidence and severity of postcesarian fever, especially wound infection, thereby allowing safe, early hospital discharge.

  17. Factor structure of the SOCRATES questionnaire in hospitalized medical patients

    PubMed Central

    Bertholet, Nicolas; Dukes, Kim; Horton, Nicholas J.; Palfai, Tibor P.; Pedley, Alison; Saitz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), a 19-item instrument developed to assess readiness to change alcohol use among individuals presenting for specialized alcohol treatment, has been used in various populations and settings. Its factor structure and concurrent validity has been described for specialized alcohol treatment settings and primary care. The purpose of this study was to determine the factor structure and concurrent validity of the SOCRATES among medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use not seeking help for specialized alcohol treatment. The subjects were 337 medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use, identified during their hospital stay. Most of them had alcohol dependence (76%). We performed an Alpha Factor Analysis (AFA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the 19 SOCRATES items, and forced 3 factors and 2 components, in order to replicate findings from Miller & Tonigan (1996) and Maisto et al (1999). Our analysis supported the view that the 2 component solution proposed by Maisto et al (1999) is more appropriate for our data than the 3 factor solution proposed by Miller & Tonigan (1996). The first component measured Perception of Problems and was more strongly correlated with severity of alcohol related consequences, presence of alcohol dependence, and alcohol consumption levels (average number of drinks per day and total number of binge drinking days over the past 30 days)compared to the second component measuring Taking Action. Our findings support the view that the SOCRATES is comprised of two important readiness constructs in general medical patients identified by screening PMID:19395177

  18. The Emergence of Suicidal Ideation during the Post-Hospital Treatment of Depressed Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Andover, Margaret S.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2008-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on the emergence of suicidal ideation in recently hospitalized patients undergoing treatment for depression. As part of a larger clinical trial, patients (N = 103) with major depression without suicidal ideation at hospital discharge were followed for up to 6 months while receiving study-related outpatient…

  19. Roadmap to an effective quality improvement and patient safety program implementation in a rural hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Ingabire, Willy; Reine, Petera M; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Kirk, Catherine M; Nahimana, Evrard; Nepomscene Uwiringiyemungu, Jean; Ndayisaba, Aphrodis; Manzi, Anatole

    2015-12-01

    Implementation lessons: (1) implementation of an effective quality improvement and patient safety program in a rural hospital setting requires collaboration between hospital leadership, Ministry of Health and other stakeholders. (2) Building Quality Improvement (QI) capacity to develop engaged QI teams supported by mentoring can improve quality and patient safety.

  20. Stroke Patients Communicating Their Healthcare Needs in Hospital: A Study within the ICF Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has identified that many patients admitted into acute hospital stroke units have communication-related impairments such as hearing, vision, speech, language and/or cognitive communicative impairment. However, no research has identified how many patients in acute hospital stroke units have difficulty actually…

  1. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  2. Hospitalizations in patients with atrial fibrillation: an analysis from ROCKET AF

    PubMed Central

    DeVore, Adam D.; Hellkamp, Anne S.; Becker, Richard C.; Berkowitz, Scott D.; Breithardt, Guenter; Hacke, Werner; Halperin, Jonathan L.; Hankey, Graeme J.; Mahaffey, Kenneth W.; Nessel, Christopher C.; Singer, Daniel E.; Fox, Keith A. A.; Patel, Manesh R.; Piccini, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The high costs associated with treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) are primarily due to hospital care, but there are limited data to understand the reasons for and predictors of hospitalization in patients with AF. Methods and results The ROCKET AF trial compared rivaroxaban with warfarin for stroke prophylaxis in AF. We described the frequency of and reasons for hospitalization during study follow-up and utilized Cox proportional hazards models to assess for baseline characteristics associated with all-cause hospitalization. Of 14 171 patients, 14% were hospitalized at least once. Of 2614 total hospitalizations, 41% were cardiovascular including 4% for AF; of the remaining, 12% were for bleeding. Compared with patients not hospitalized, hospitalized patients were older (74 vs. 72 years), and more frequently had diabetes (46 vs. 39%), prior MI (23 vs. 16%), and paroxysmal AF (19 vs. 17%), but less frequently had prior transient ischaemic attack/stroke (49 vs. 56%). After multivariable adjustment, lung disease [hazard ratio (HR) 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29–1.66], diabetes [1.22, (1.11–1.34)], prior MI [1.27, (1.13–1.42)], and renal dysfunction [HR 1.07 per 5 unit GFR < 65 mL/min, (1.04–1.10)] were associated with increased hospitalization risk. Treatment assignment was not associated with differential rates of hospitalization. Conclusion Nearly 1 in 7 of the moderate-to-high-risk patients with AF enrolled in this trial was hospitalized within 2 years, and both AF and bleeding were rare causes of hospitalization. Further research is needed to determine whether care pathways directed at comorbid conditions among AF patients could reduce the need for and costs associated with hospitalization. PMID:27174904

  3. Building a patient-centered hospital web site: best practices in china.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    In this case study, based on six criteria, four Chinese hospitals were chosen from a national sample to showcase, through content analysis and in-depth interviews, the best practices of serving patients online. The extensive findings have addressed the following three questions: what these hospitals have in common in their Web development, what problems and challenges they are facing, and how they have excelled in serving their patients online. The study concludes that, like larger hospitals, smaller hospitals can also excel in creating an outstanding Web site to serve their patients so long as they truly care about their patients, have a clear vision and strong expertise in IT development. The study also concludes that Chinese private hospitals can learn from these state-owned hospitals in establishing a good reputation through professional and responsible interaction with patients. The four hospitals studied may shed light on the Web development in many other Chinese hospitals that are going through the same healthcare new media adoption. The findings from this study can also help Chinese hospitals form their visions in serving patients online.

  4. Association between perceived inadequate staffing and musculoskeletal pain among hospital patient care workers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Sup; Okechukwu, Cassandra; Dennerlein, Jack T.; Boden, Leslie I.; Hopcia, Karen; Hashimoto, Dean M.; Sorensen, Glorian

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine association between perceived inadequate staffing and musculoskeletal pain and to evaluate the role of work-related psychosocial and physical work factors in the association among hospital patient care workers. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 1572 patient care workers in two academic hospitals. Perceived inadequate staffing was measured using the ‘staffing adequacy subscale’ of Nursing Work Index, which is a continuous scale that averages estimates of staffing adequacy by workers in the same units. Musculoskeletal pain (i.e. neck/shoulder, arm, low back, lower extremity, any musculoskeletal pain, and the number of area in pain) in the past 3 months was assessed using a self-reported Nordic questionnaire. Multilevel logistic regression was applied to examine associations between perceived inadequate staffing and musculoskeletal pain, considering clustering among the workers in the same units. Results We found significant associations of perceived inadequate staffing with back pain (OR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.04, 2.15) and the number of body area in pain (OR: 1.42, 95% CI: 1.01, 2.00) after adjusting for confounders including work characteristics (job title, having a second job or not, day shift or not, and worked hours per week). When we additionally adjusted for physical work factors (i.e. use of a lifting device, and the amount of the time for each of five physical activities on the job), only the association between perceived inadequate staffing and back pain remained significant (OR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.19), whereas none of the associations was significant for all of musculoskeletal pains including back pain (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.66, 1.41) when we additionally adjusted for work-related psychosocial factors (i.e. job demands, job control, supervisor support, and co-worker support) instead of physical work factors. Conclusions Perceived inadequate staffing may be associated with higher prevalence of back pain and work

  5. Hospital revenue cycle management and payer mix: do Medicare and Medicaid undermine hospitals' ability to generate and collect patient care revenue?

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Simone; Wheeler, John R C

    2010-01-01

    The continuing efforts of government payers to contain hospital costs have raised concerns among hospital managers that serving publicly insured patients may undermine their ability to manage the revenue cycle successfully. This study uses financial information from two sources-Medicare cost reports for all US hospitals for 2002 to 2007 and audited financial statements for all bond-issuing, not-for-profit hospitals for 2000 to 2006 to examine the relationship between hospitals' shares of Medicare and Medicaid patients and the amount of patient care revenue they generate as well as the speed with which they collect their revenue. Hospital-level fixed effects regression analysis finds that hospitals with higher Medicare and Medicaid payer mix collect somewhat higher average patient care revenues than hospitals with more privately insured and self-pay patients. Hospitals with more Medicare patients also collect on this revenue faster; serving more Medicaid patients is not associated with the speed of patient revenue collection. For hospital managers, these findings may represent good news. They suggest that, despite increases in the number of publicly insured patients served, managers have frequently been able to generate adequate amounts of patient revenue and collect it in a timely fashion.

  6. Partners in Care: Design Considerations for Caregivers and Patients During a Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew D.; Mishra, Sonali R.; Kendall, Logan; Haldar, Shefali; Pollack, Ari H.; Pratt, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Informal caregivers, such as close friends and family, play an important role in a hospital patient’s care. Although CSCW researchers have shown the potential for social computing technologies to help patients and their caregivers manage chronic conditions and support health behavior change, few studies focus on caregivers’ role during a multi-day hospital stay. To explore this space, we conducted an interview and observation study of patients and caregivers in the inpatient setting. In this paper, we describe how caregivers and patients coordinate and collaborate to manage patients’ care and wellbeing during a hospital stay. We define and describe five roles caregivers adopt: companion, assistant, representative, navigator, and planner, and show how patients and caregivers negotiate these roles and responsibilities throughout a hospital stay. Finally, we identify key design considerations for technology to support patients and caregivers during a hospital stay. PMID:27148596

  7. Measuring the Burden of Hospitalization in Patients with Parkinson´s Disease in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Pascual-Garcia, Raquel; San-Roman-Montero, Jesus; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Castrodeza-Sanz, Javier; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This epidemiological survey estimates the hospitalization burden related to Parkinson´s Disease in Spain. Methods This observational retrospective survey was performed by reviewing data from the National Surveillance System for Hospital Data, which includes more than 98% of Spanish hospitals. All hospitalizations of patients with Parkinson´s disease that were reported from 1997–2012 were analyzed. Codes were selected using the 9th International Classification of Diseases: ICD-9-CM: 332.0. Results A total of 438,513 hospital discharges of patients with Parkinson´s Disease were reported during the study period. The annual hospitalization rate was 64.2 cases per 100,000. The average length of hospital stay was 10 days. The trend for the annual hospitalization rate differed significantly depending on whether Parkinson´s disease was the main cause of hospitalization (n = 23,086, 1.14% annual increase) or was not the main cause of hospitalization (n = 415,427, 15.37% annual increase). The overall case-fatality rate among hospitalized patients was 10%. The case fatality rate among patient´s hospitalized with Parkinson´s disease as the main cause of hospitalization was 2.5%. The hospitalization rate and case-fatality rate significantly increased with age. The primary causes of hospitalization when Parkinson´s disease was not coded as the main cause of hospitalization were as follows: respiratory system diseases (24%), circulatory system diseases (19%), injuries and poisoning, including fractures (12%), diseases of the digestive system (10%) and neoplasms (5%). The annual average cost for National Health Care System was € 120 M, with a mean hospitalization cost of €4,378. Conclusions Parkinson´s disease poses a significant health threat in Spain, particularly in the elderly. While hospitalizations due to Parkinson´s Disease are relatively stable over time, the number of patients presenting with Parkinson´s disease as an important comorbidity has

  8. Factor structure of the SOCRATES questionnaire in hospitalized medical patients.

    PubMed

    Bertholet, Nicolas; Dukes, Kim; Horton, Nicholas J; Palfai, Tibor P; Pedley, Alison; Saitz, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), a 19-item instrument developed to assess readiness to change alcohol use among individuals presenting for specialized alcohol treatment, has been used in various populations and settings. Its factor structure and concurrent validity has been described for specialized alcohol treatment settings and primary care. The purpose of this study was to determine the factor structure and concurrent validity of the SOCRATES among medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use not seeking help for specialized alcohol treatment. The subjects were 337 medical inpatients with unhealthy alcohol use, identified during their hospital stay. Most of them had alcohol dependence (76%). We performed an Alpha Factor Analysis (AFA) and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the 19 SOCRATES items, and forced 3 factors and 2 components, in order to replicate findings from Miller and Tonigan (Miller, W. R., & Tonigan, J. S., (1996). Assessing drinkers' motivations for change: The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Psychology of Addictive Behavior, 10, 81-89.) and Maisto et al. (Maisto, S. A., Conigliaro, J., McNeil, M., Kraemer, K., O'Connor, M., & Kelley, M. E., (1999). Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a sample of primary care patients. Addictive Behavior, 24(6), 879-892.). Our analysis supported the view that the 2 component solution proposed by Maisto et al. (Maisto, S.A., Conigliaro, J., McNeil, M., Kraemer, K., O'Connor, M., & Kelley, M.E., (1999). Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a sample of primary care patients. Addictive Behavior, 24(6), 879-892.) is more appropriate for our data than the 3 factor solution proposed by Miller and Tonigan (Miller, W. R., & Tonigan, J. S., (1996). Assessing drinkers' motivations for change: The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Psychology of Addictive Behavior, 10, 81-89.). The first component measured

  9. Analysis of Outcomes of the NRS 2002 in Patients Hospitalized in Nephrology Wards

    PubMed Central

    Borek, Paulina; Chmielewski, Michał; Małgorzewicz, Sylwia; Dębska Ślizień, Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Malnutrition is a common problem among hospitalized patients. In chronic kidney disease, it affects up to 50% of the population. Undernourishment has an adverse effect on prognosis and prolongs convalescence. The aim of the study was to test the effectiveness of NRS (Nutrition Risk Screening) -2002 in the assessment of risk of malnutrition for patients hospitalized in nephrology wards. The aim was to develop clinical characteristics of malnourished patients and to assess the relationship between nutritional status and patient outcome. Methods: The analysis included 292 patients, consecutively admitted to nephrology wards. NRS-2002 was assessed in comparison to subjective global assessment. Associations with patient characteristics and outcome were evaluated. Results: Out of all the respondents, 119 patients (40%) suffered from malnutrition. The NRS-2002 showed a very strong relationship with Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) (p < 0.0001). Malnourished patients were older, were characterized by a significantly lower body mass index (BMI), and had a much longer hospitalization duration. In multiple regression analysis, the presence of malnutrition proved to be an independent predictor of the duration of hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: Malnutrition is highly prevalent among patients hospitalized in nephrology wards, and it affects the length of hospitalization. Identification of malnourished patients and patients at serious risk of malnutrition progression allows the implementation of appropriate nutritional intervention. PMID:28300757

  10. [Hospital at home: assessment of early discharge in terms of patients mortality and satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Damiani, G; Pinnarelli, L; Ricciardi, G

    2006-01-01

    New organizational models are essentials for European Hospitals because of restraining budget and ageing of population. Hospital at home is an alternative to inpatient care, effective both in clinical and economic ground. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of Hospital at Home in terms of decreased mortality and patient satisfaction. We carried out a meta-analysis of the literature about hospital at home interventions. We searched Medline (to December 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (to October 2002) and other bibliographical databases, with a supplementary handsearching of literature. We used the following keywords: hospital at home, home hospitalization, mortality, patient satisfaction, cost, acute hospital care, conventional hospitalization. We included studies respecting the following criteria: analytical or experimental studies aimed at compare early discharge to hospital at home and continued care in an acute hospital. Review Manager 4.2 software was used to collect data and perform statistical analysis. We found 2420 articles searching for the chosen keywords. Twelve studies (2048 patients) were included for death outcome and six studies (1382 patients) were included for satisfaction outcome. The selected studies indicated a greater effect size of patient satisfaction in home patients than hospitalized ones (Odds Ratio: 1.58 95% CI: 1.25, 2.00) and showed no difference in terms of mortality (Risk Difference: -0.01 95% CI: -0.03, 0.02). Our results underline the effectiveness of this organizational model, as an alternative to continued care in an acute hospital. Further useful considerations could be drawn by economic evaluation studies carried out on field.

  11. Malpractice liability, patient safety, and the personification of medical injury: opportunities for academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Sage, William M

    2006-09-01

    The political battle over trial lawyers and "tort reform" centers on whether or not to reduce incentives to sue for medical malpractice by capping damages in malpractice suits and limiting legal fees. But the current struggle mis-states the case for innovation in medical malpractice policy. Rather than focus exclusively on the financial consequences of legal claims, malpractice reform should move closer to the bedside, emphasizing error prevention, open communication, rapid compensation, and efficient insurance of the costs of injury. Academic health centers are well positioned to lead this effort in each of their three recognized missions: patient care, teaching, and research. Academic health centers enjoy greater institutional cohesiveness and research capacity than most other medical practice settings. Perhaps most important, their high visibility ensures that patients who suffer avoidable harm within their walls become salient to the public as individuals, not merely as dollar entries in a litigation ledger.

  12. Hyponatremia in patients hospitalized with heart failure: a condition often overlooked in low-income settings

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Khalid; Workicho, Abdulhalik; Gudina, Esayas Kebede

    2016-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia is a common electrolyte abnormality in patients with heart failure (HF). It is independently associated with increased short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. The main objective of this study was to assess patterns of hyponatremia and its association with discharge outcomes in patients with HF admitted to a teaching hospital in Ethiopia. Patients and methods This is a descriptive, prospective, hospital-based cohort study of patients with HF admitted to Jimma University Hospital, Ethiopia, between November 1, 2013 and July 31, 2014. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information on sociodemographic characteristics, clinical profile at admission, and outcomes at discharge. Plasma sodium concentration was analyzed at admission for all patients. The relationship between hyponatremia at admission and in-hospital mortality, as well as length of hospital stay, was assessed using both bivariate analysis and multivariable logistic regressions. The level of statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Results Of 152 participants admitted with HF, 44 (28.9%) had hyponatremia, which is defined as serum sodium level <135 mmol/L. Patients on salt restriction, on chronic diuretic treatment (furosemide and spironolactone), and with impaired renal function at admission were found to be highly affected. Hyponatremia was found to be associated with increased in-hospital mortality (P=0.008) and longer hospital stay (16.6 vs 12 days, P<0.001). Patients with hyponatremia also had lower blood pressure and poor functional status at discharge. Conclusion This study demonstrates that hyponatremia is highly prevalent in patients hospitalized with HF and is associated with increased in-hospital mortality and longer hospital stay. Thus, great emphasis should be given to identify high-risk patients, and prevention and early detection of hyponatremia to prevent its deleterious effects. Large-scale national studies are also needed to complement our

  13. Patient Safety Events and Harms During Medical and Surgical Hospitalizations for Persons With Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Daumit, Gail L.; McGinty, Emma E.; Pronovost, Peter; Dixon, Lisa B.; Guallar, Eliseo; Ford, Daniel E.; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.; Boonyasai, Romsai T.; Thompson, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study explored the risk of patient safety events and associated nonfatal physical harms and mortality in a cohort of persons with serious mental illness. This group experiences high rates of medical comorbidity and premature mortality and may be at high risk of adverse patient safety events. Methods Medical record review was conducted for medical-surgical hospitalizations occurring during 1994–2004 in a community-based cohort of Maryland adults with serious mental illness. Individuals were eligible if they died within 30 days of a medical-surgical hospitalization and if they also had at least one prior medical-surgical hospitalization within five years of death. All admissions took place at Maryland general hospitals. A case-crossover analysis examined the relationships among patient safety events, physical harms, and elevated likelihood of death within 30 days of hospitalization. Results A total of 790 hospitalizations among 253 adults were reviewed. The mean number of patient safety events per hospitalization was 5.8, and the rate of physical harms was 142 per 100 hospitalizations. The odds of physical harm were elevated in hospitalizations in which 22 of the 34 patient safety events occurred (p<.05), including medical events (odds ratio [OR]=1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.3–1.7) and procedure-related events (OR=1.6, CI=1.2–2.0). Adjusted odds of death within 30 days of hospitalization were elevated for individuals with any patient safety event, compared with those with no event (OR=3.7, CI=1.4–10.3). Conclusions Patient safety events were positively associated with physical harm and 30-day mortality in nonpsychiatric hospitalizations for persons with serious mental illness. PMID:27181736

  14. Hospital-based dental care for persons with disabilities: a study of patient selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Hulland, S; Sigal, M J

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to generate a medical and dental profile of patients attending the Mount Sinai Hospital Dental Program for Persons with Disabilities, to determine if certain selected criteria could identify patients likely to require dental care in that setting. The need for dental care under general anesthesia was used as the prime indicator that care should be provided in a hospital setting. A retrospective review of all the charts of the patients enrolled in this hospital program was undertaken. Results indicated that patients who were treated in this hospital-based dental program had the following characteristics: moderate to profound mental retardation (39.5%), moderate to severe behavioral problems (31.1%), and/or a history of seizure activity (29.1%). Behavioral criteria appear to be the predominant reason for the provision of hospital-based dental care for persons with disabilities.

  15. Fever in hospitalized HIV-infected patients in Western French Guiana: first think histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Vantilcke, Vincent; Boukhari, Rachida; Jolivet, Anne; Vautrin, Cyrille; Misslin, Caroline; Adenis, Antoine; Nacher, Mathieu

    2014-08-01

    In Western French Guiana, there was a dramatic increase in HIV prevalence between 1990 and 2000. The present study describes the causes of fever among HIV patients hospitalized in the medical ward of the only hospital in the western part of French Guiana. A retrospective descriptive study was conducted between 1 January 2008 and 30 June 2010 in the department of medicine of Saint Laurent du Maroni Hospital. The main characteristics of 67 patients having presented with fever in the first 48 hours of hospitalization were described. Among patients with CD4 <200/mm(3)the main febrile opportunistic infection was disseminated histoplasmosis (41.1%). Among patients with CD4 counts <50/mm(3)and fever without focal points 85.7% had disseminated histoplasmosis. Three patients died and all had disseminated histoplasmosis. Disseminated histoplasmosis is the most common febrile opportunistic infection in western French Guiana. Primary prophylaxis with itraconazole among immunocompromised patients seems warranted.

  16. Predictive Factors for a Long Hospital Stay in Patients Undergoing Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ko-iam, Wasana; Sandhu, Trichak; Paiboonworachat, Sahattaya; Pongchairerks, Paisal; Chotirosniramit, Anon; Chotirosniramit, Narain; Chandacham, Kamtone; Jirapongcharoenlap, Tidarat

    2017-01-01

    Background. Although the advantages of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) over open cholecystectomy are immediately obvious and appreciated, several patients need a postoperative hospital stay of more than 24 hours. Thus, the predictive factors for this longer stay need to be investigated. The aim of this study was to identify the causes of a long hospital stay after LC. Methods. This is a retrospective cohort study with 500 successful elective LC patients being included in the analysis. Short hospital stay was defined as being discharged within 24 hours after the operation, whereas long hospital stay was defined as the need for a stay of more than 24 hours after the operation. Results. Using multivariable analysis, ten independent predictive factors were identified for a long hospital stay. These included patients with cirrhosis, patients with a history of previous acute cholecystitis, cholangitis, or pancreatitis, patients on anticoagulation with warfarin, patients with standard-pressure pneumoperitoneum, patients who had been given metoclopramide as an intraoperative antiemetic drug, patients who had been using abdominal drain, patients who had numeric rating scale for pain > 3, patients with an oral analgesia requirement > 2 doses, complications, and private ward admission. Conclusions. LC difficulties were important predictive factors for a long hospital stay, as well as medication and operative factors. PMID:28239497

  17. Challenges in contemporary academic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Black, Peter M

    2006-03-01

    Traditionally, the ideal academic neurosurgeon has been a "quadruple threat," with excellence in clinical work, teaching, research, and administration. This tradition was best exemplified in Harvey Cushing, who developed the field of neurosurgery 90 years ago. This paradigm will probably have to change as academic neurosurgeons face major challenges. In patient care, these include increasing regulatory control, increasing malpractice costs, consolidation of expensive care in academic centers, and decreasing reimbursement; in resident teaching, work hour limitations and a changing resident culture; in research, the increasing dominance of basic scientists in governmental funding decisions and decreased involvement of neurosurgeons in scientific review committees; and in administration, problems of relationships in the workplace, patient safety, and employment compliance in an increasingly bureaucratic system. To meet these challenges, the new academic neurosurgeon will probably not be a quadruple threat personally but will be part of a quadruple threat in a department and institution. Neurosurgeons in such a setting will have to work with hospital, medical school, and national and international groups to address malpractice, reimbursement, subspecialization, and training problems; find supplemental sources of income through grants, development funds, and hospital support; lead in the development of multidisciplinary centers for neuroscience, brain tumor, spine, and other initiatives; and focus on training leaders for hospital, regional, and national groups to reconfigure neurosurgery. Collaboration, flexibility, and leadership will be characteristic of the academic neurosurgeon in this new era.

  18. Clinical Audit of COPD Patients Requiring Hospital Admissions in Spain: AUDIPOC Study

    PubMed Central

    Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; López-Campos, Jose Luis; Álvarez-Martínez, Carlos J.; Castro-Acosta, Ady; Agüero, Ramón; Hueto, Javier; Hernández-Hernández, Jesús; Barrón, Manuel; Abraira, Victor; Forte, Anabel; Sanchez Nieto, Juan Miguel; Lopez-Gabaldón, Encarnación; Cosío, Borja G.; Agustí, Alvar

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds AUDIPOC is a nationwide clinical audit that describes the characteristics, interventions and outcomes of patients admitted to Spanish hospitals because of an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (ECOPD), assessing the compliance of these parameters with current international guidelines. The present study describes hospital resources, hospital factors related to case recruitment variability, patients’ characteristics, and adherence to guidelines. Methodology/Principal Findings An organisational database was completed by all participant hospitals recording resources and organisation. Over an 8-week period 11,564 consecutive ECOPD admissions to 129 Spanish hospitals covering 70% of the Spanish population were prospectively identified. At hospital discharge, 5,178 patients (45% of eligible) were finally included, and thus constituted the audited population. Audited patients were reassessed 90 days after admission for survival and readmission rates. A wide variability was observed in relation to most variables, hospital adherence to guidelines, and readmissions and death. Median inpatient mortality was 5% (across-hospital range 0–35%). Among discharged patients, 37% required readmission (0–62%) and 6.5% died (0–35%). The overall mortality rate was 11.6% (0–50%). Hospital size and complexity and aspects related to hospital COPD awareness were significantly associated with case recruitment. Clinical management most often complied with diagnosis and treatment recommendations but rarely (<50%) addressed guidance on healthy life-styles. Conclusions/Significance The AUDIPOC study highlights the large across-hospital variability in resources and organization of hospitals, patient characteristics, process of care, and outcomes. The study also identifies resources and organizational characteristics associated with the admission of COPD cases, as well as aspects of daily clinical care amenable to improvement. PMID:22911875

  19. Atrial fibrillation is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in ischemic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Cheung-Ter; Wong, Yi-Sin; Wu, Chi-Shun; Su, Yu-Hsiang

    2016-01-01

    Background/purpose In-hospital mortality rate of acute ischemic stroke patients remains between 3% and 18%. For improving the quality of stroke care, we investigated the factors that contribute to the risk of in-hospital mortality in acute ischemic stroke patients. Materials and methods Between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2011, 2,556 acute ischemic stroke patients admitted to a stroke unit were included in this study. Factors such as demographic characteristics, clinical characteristics, comorbidities, and complications related to in-hospital mortality were assessed. Results Of the 2,556 ischemic stroke patients, 157 received thrombolytic therapy. Eighty of the 2,556 patients (3.1%) died during hospitalization. Of the 157 patients who received thrombolytic therapy, 14 (8.9%) died during hospitalization. History of atrial fibrillation (AF, P<0.01) and stroke severity (P<0.01) were independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality. AF, stroke severity, cardioembolism stroke, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors of hemorrhagic transformation. Herniation and sepsis were the most common complications of stroke that were attributed to in-hospital mortality. Approximately 70% of in-hospital mortality was related to stroke severity (total middle cerebral artery occlusion with herniation, basilar artery occlusion, and hemorrhagic transformation). The other 30% of in-hospital mortality was related to sepsis, heart disease, and other complications. Conclusion AF is associated with higher in-hospital mortality rate than in patients without AF. For improving outcome of stroke patients, we also need to focus to reduce serious neurological or medical complications. PMID:27418830

  20. Multi-View Interaction Modelling of human collaboration processes: a business process study of head and neck cancer care in a Dutch academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Stuit, Marco; Wortmann, Hans; Szirbik, Nick; Roodenburg, Jan

    2011-12-01

    In the healthcare domain, human collaboration processes (HCPs), which consist of interactions between healthcare workers from different (para)medical disciplines and departments, are of growing importance as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly integrated. Existing workflow-based process modelling tools for healthcare process management, which are the most commonly applied, are not suited for healthcare HCPs mainly due to their focus on the definition of task sequences instead of the graphical description of human interactions. This paper uses a case study of a healthcare HCP at a Dutch academic hospital to evaluate a novel interaction-centric process modelling method. The HCP under study is the care pathway performed by the head and neck oncology team. The evaluation results show that the method brings innovative, effective, and useful features. First, it collects and formalizes the tacit domain knowledge of the interviewed healthcare workers in individual interaction diagrams. Second, the method automatically integrates these local diagrams into a single global interaction diagram that reflects the consolidated domain knowledge. Third, the case study illustrates how the method utilizes a graphical modelling language for effective tree-based description of interactions, their composition and routing relations, and their roles. A process analysis of the global interaction diagram is shown to identify HCP improvement opportunities. The proposed interaction-centric method has wider applicability since interactions are the core of most multidisciplinary patient-care processes. A discussion argues that, although (multidisciplinary) collaboration is in many cases not optimal in the healthcare domain, it is increasingly considered a necessity to improve integration, continuity, and quality of care. The proposed method is helpful to describe, analyze, and improve the functioning of healthcare collaboration.

  1. Neglected disease in mentally ill patients: Major tuberculosis outbreak in a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Zmak, Ljiljana; Obrovac, Mihaela; Lovric, Zvjezdana; Jankovic Makek, Mateja; Katalinic Jankovic, Vera

    2017-04-01

    As tuberculosis incidence decreases, the possibility of overlooking the disease increases, especially in vulnerable populations. We describe here a major tuberculosis outbreak among mentally ill patients in Croatia, focusing on 1 regional hospital where most patients were hospitalized. The outbreak emphasizes the vulnerability of mentally ill patients to tuberculosis infection and the complexity of infection control measures in psychiatric institutions. The awareness of tuberculosis in these settings should be maintained to interrupt prolonged exposure and avoid unnecessary infection.

  2. Hospital commitment to community orientation and its association with quality of care and patient experience.

    PubMed

    Kang, Raymond; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana

    2013-01-01

    We examine the association between hospital community orientation and quality-of-care measures, which include process measures for patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia as well as measures of patient experience. The community orientation measure is obtained from the 2009 American Hospital Association's Annual Survey Database. Information on hospital quality of care and patient experience comes from 2009 Hospital Quality Alliance data and results from the 2009 Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (Medicare.gov, 2009). To evaluate the relationship between community orientation and measures of quality and patient experience, we used multivariate linear regressions. Organizational and market control variables included bed size, ownership, teaching status, safety net status, number of nurses per patient day, multihospital system status, network status, extent of reliance on managed care, market competition, and location within an Aligning Forces for Quality community (these communities have multistakeholder alliances and focus on improving quality of care at the community level). After controlling for organizational factors, we found that hospitals with a stronger commitment to community orientation perform better on process measures for all three conditions, and they report higher patient experience of care scores for one measure, than do those demonstrating weaker commitment. Hospital commitment to community orientation is significantly related to the provision of high-quality care and to one measure of patient experience of care.

  3. Hospital Preparations for Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Patients and Experience Gained from Admission of an Ebola Patient

    PubMed Central

    Minderhoud, A.L.C. (Ben); Wind, Jelte D.D.; Leenen, Luke P.H.; Hoepelman, Andy I.M.; Ellerbroek, Pauline M.

    2016-01-01

    The Major Incident Hospital of the University Medical Centre of Utrecht has a longstanding history of preparing for the management of highly pathogenic and infectious organisms. An assessment of the hospital’s preparations for an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever and its experience during admission of a patient with Ebola virus disease showed that the use of the buddy system, frequent training, and information sessions for staff and their relatives greatly increased the sense of safety and motivation among staff. Differing procedures among ambulance services limited the number of services used for transporting patients. Waste management was the greatest concern, and destruction of waste had to be outsourced. The admission of an Ebola patient proceeded without incident but led to considerable demands on staff. The maximum time allowed for wearing personal protective equipment was 45 minutes to ensure safety, and an additional 20 minutes was needed for recovery. PMID:26812146

  4. Changes in physical function after hospitalization in patients with nursing and healthcare-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tadashi; Miyashita, Naoyuki; Kawai, Yasuhiro; Horita, Nobuyuki; Yano, Shoichiro; Oka, Yuko; Oda, Takashi; Okimoto, Niro

    2016-10-01

    To clarify the functional changes after hospitalization due to pneumonia in elderly Japanese patients, we investigated the changes in physical functioning, nutritional routes, and diet that occurred after hospitalization in patients with nursing and healthcare-associated pneumonia (NHCAP). We analyzed 405 patients with NHCAP and compared findings with 448 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Among the NHCAP patients, 140 (34%) patients showed a decline in activities of daily living function between baseline and discharge. After hospital discharge, 149 (37%) NHCAP patients did not return to the same residence location compared with where they were living prior to hospital admission. The frequency of this outcome was significantly higher in NHCAP patients than in CAP patients (p < 0.0001). After 6 months' follow-up, of the patients who transferred to different hospitals, 41 (73%) patients with CAP had returned to their own home, but only 16 (20%) patients with NHCAP could return home (p < 0.0001). Rates of alteration of nutritional route and type of diet from oral nutrition were significantly higher in NHCAP patients compared with CAP patients (22% vs 4%, p < 0.0001). Our results demonstrated that approximately one-third of hospitalized patients with NHCAP showed a decline in physical function. In addition, approximately one-fifth of NHCAP patients had changed their route of nutrition and type of diet. Our results indicated that physicians should attach greater importance to preventative measures against NHCAP rather than relying on antibiotic therapy post-infection in the management of pneumonia in elderly patients in order to extend their healthy life expectancy.

  5. Quality information and fragmented markets: patient responses to hospital volume thresholds.

    PubMed

    Kronebusch, Karl

    2009-10-01

    Over the last two decades, information dissemination policies to improve patient hospital choice have emerged. But during this same period, policy makers have also generally adopted a market-oriented approach vis-à-vis hospitals, with limited regulation of facility expansion and few restrictions on hospital mergers and ownership changes. These policies may be in tension, and this analysis examines whether there have been changes over time in patient responses to information about the value of high-volume hospitals and the degree to which hospital market changes may have limited these patient responses. The results indicate modest changes consistent with an increase in quality-seeking behavior for several services for which research indicates a volume-outcome relationship. At the same time, there are services for which trends have been moving in the opposite direction--toward greater local-care seeking--and changes for the remaining services have been fairly small. Even for services with a trend toward greater patient sensitivity to volume as a marker for quality, however, hospital market changes have reduced the change over time in high-volume hospital use. These results highlight some of the limitations of market-oriented strategies for increasing patient use of high-quality hospitals.

  6. Effect of hospitalization on rest-activity rhythm and quality of life of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Parganiha, Arti; Taj, Saba; Chandel, Priyanka; Sultan, Armiya; Choudhary, Vivek

    2014-05-01

    Rest-activity rhythm and quality of life (QoL) in three cohorts, namely (1) cancer in-patients, (2) out-patients, and (3) control subjects were studied. The patients of the former two groups were chosen randomly from the Regional Cancer Center, Raipur, India. All patients received chemotherapy for 3-4 consecutive days. The in-patients remained hospitalized for the entire period of chemotherapy plus one day post treatment. The out-patients, unlike the in-patients, went to their homes daily after treatment. Rest-activity rhythm of the patients was monitored using Actical. Quality of life (QoL) and psychological status of patients were assessed using EORTC QLQ-C30 and Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale, respectively. Each subject exhibited significant circadian rhythm in rest-activity. The average values for Mesor, amplitude, peak activity, autocorrelation coefficient and dichotomy index of all three groups varied significantly between one group to the other in the following order: in-patient < out-patient < control. Further, quality of life, measured from responses on functional and symptom scales, was better off in cancer out-patients compared to the in-patients. It is concluded that hospitalization alters rest-activity rhythm parameters markedly and deteriorates QoL in cancer patients. Nevertheless, further extensive investigation is desirable to support the above speculation and to ascertain if hospitalization produces similar effects on patients suffering from diseases other than cancer.

  7. Effectiveness of Remote Patient Monitoring After Discharge of Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure: The Better Effectiveness After Transition–Heart Failure (BEAT-HF) Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Michael K.; Romano, Patrick S.; Edgington, Sarah; Aronow, Harriet U.; Auerbach, Andrew D.; Black, Jeanne T.; De Marco, Teresa; Escarce, Jose J.; Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Hanna, Barbara; Ganiats, Theodore G.; Greenberg, Barry H.; Greenfield, Sheldon; Kaplan, Sherrie H.; Kimchi, Asher; Liu, Honghu; Lombardo, Dawn; Mangione, Carol M.; Sadeghi, Bahman; Sadeghi, Banafsheh; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Tong, Kathleen; Fonarow, Gregg C.

    2016-01-01

    Importance It remains unclear whether telemonitoring approaches provide benefits for patients with heart failure (HF) after hospitalization. Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of a care transition intervention using remote patient monitoring in reducing 180-day all-cause readmissions among a broad population of older adults hospitalized with HF. Design, Setting, and Participants We randomized 1437 patients hospitalized for HF between October 12, 2011, and September 30, 2013, to the intervention arm (715 patients) or to the usual care arm (722 patients) of the Better Effectiveness After Transition–Heart Failure (BEAT-HF) study and observed them for 180 days. The dates of our study analysis were March 30, 2014, to October 1, 2015. The setting was 6 academic medical centers in California. Participants were hospitalized individuals 50 years or older who received active treatment for decompensated HF. Interventions The intervention combined health coaching telephone calls and telemonitoring. Telemonitoring used electronic equipment that collected daily information about blood pressure, heart rate, symptoms, and weight. Centralized registered nurses conducted telemonitoring reviews, protocolized actions, and telephone calls. Main outcomes and measures The primary outcome was readmission for any cause within 180 days after discharge. Secondary outcomes were all-cause readmission within 30 days, all-cause mortality at 30 and 180 days, and quality of life at 30 and 180 days. Results Among 1437 participants, the median age was 73 years. Overall, 46.2% (664 of 1437) were female, and 22.0% (316 of 1437) were African American. The intervention and usual care groups did not differ significantly in readmissions for any cause 180 days after discharge, which occurred in 50.8% (363 of 715) and 49.2% (355 of 722) of patients, respectively (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.88-1.20; P = .74). In secondary analyses, there were no significant differences in 30-day

  8. Effects of auditing patient safety in hospital care: design of a mixed-method evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Auditing of patient safety aims at early detection of risks of adverse events and is intended to encourage the continuous improvement of patient safety. The auditing should be an independent, objective assurance and consulting system. Auditing helps an organisation accomplish its objectives by bringing a systematic, disciplined approach to evaluating and improving the effectiveness of risk management, control, and governance. Audits are broadly conducted in hospitals, but little is known about their effects on the behaviour of healthcare professionals and patient safety outcomes. This study was initiated to evaluate the effects of patient safety auditing in hospital care and to explore the processes and mechanisms underlying these effects. Methods and design Our study aims to evaluate an audit system to monitor and improve patient safety in a hospital setting. We are using a mixed-method evaluation with a before-and-after study design in eight departments of one university hospital in the period October 2011–July 2014. We measure several outcomes 3 months before the audit and 15 months after the audit. The primary outcomes are adverse events and complications. The secondary outcomes are experiences of patients, the standardised mortality ratio, prolonged hospital stay, patient safety culture, and team climate. We use medical record reviews, questionnaires, hospital administrative data, and observations to assess the outcomes. A process evaluation will be used to find out which components of internal auditing determine the effects. Discussion We report a study protocol of an effect and process evaluation to determine whether auditing improves patient safety in hospital care. Because auditing is a complex intervention targeted on several levels, we are using a combination of methods to collect qualitative and quantitative data about patient safety at the patient, professional, and department levels. This study is relevant for hospitals that want to

  9. Hospitality and Collegial Community: An Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Explains a collegial ethic of hospitality as a cardinal academic virtue and suggests a way of building a "collegium," the covenantal community of academe. Discusses how academicians can develop hospitable teaching, hospitable scholarship, and hospitable service. (Author/SLD)

  10. Epidemiologic characteristics of 10 years hospitalized patients with glaucoma at shanghai eye and ear, nose, and throat hospital.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yingying; Zhang, Yuqiu; Sun, Xinghuai

    2016-07-01

    To analyze the epidemiologic characteristics of hospitalized patients with glaucoma at Shanghai Eye and Ear, Nose, and Throat Hospital in the relative well economic condition area Eastern China.Researchers reviewed the 10 years charts of patients with a discharge diagnosis of glaucoma at this hospital from January 2004 to December 2013. With the criteria used for diagnoses of different types of glaucoma, the constitution of this disease between the first and last 5 years was compared and analyzed.A total of 11,864 cases were enrolled according to the criteria of diagnoses for 10 years. Primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) was the main type (51.69%) followed by secondary glaucoma (SG, 28.14%), primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) (10.41%), and congenital glaucoma (7.16%). Other glaucoma types were less prevalent (2.61%). PACG has seen a declining trend (from 57.75% to 48.41%), while the proportion of SG has increased (from 23.68% to 34.21%). For the POAG group, there is no increasing trend and the same is true of CG. The mean age of PACG patients was 62.28 year-old, while it was 46 year-old for the POAG and SG groups. The patients of PACG had more women than men (M/F ratio: 1:1.92). The reverse was the case with regard to POAG (M/F ratio: 1.97:1).In Eastern China, although PACG has some decreased, but still is the most commonly encountered type of glaucoma, while SG has significantly increased, and POAG has slightly decreased in hospitalized patients during recent 10 years.

  11. High and varying prices for privately insured patients underscore hospital market power.

    PubMed

    White, Chapin; Bond, Amelia M; Reschovsky, James D

    2013-09-01

    Across 13 selected U.S. metropolitan areas, hospital prices for privately insured patients are much higher than Medicare payment rates and vary widely across and within markets, according to a study by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) based on claims data for about 590,000 active and retired nonelderly autoworkers and their dependents. Across the 13 communities, aver­age hospital prices for privately insured patients are about one-and-a-half times Medicare rates for inpatient care and two times what Medicare pays for outpa­tient care. Within individual communities, prices vary widely, with the highest-priced hospital typically paid 60 percent more for inpatient services than the lowest-priced hospital. The price gap within markets is even greater for hospital outpatient care, with the highest-priced hospital typically paid nearly double the lowest-priced hospital. In contrast to the wide variation in hospital prices for pri­vately insured patients across and within markets, prices for primary care physi­cian services generally are close to Medicare rates and vary little within markets. Prices for specialist physician services, however, are higher relative to Medicare and vary more across and within markets. Of the 13 markets, five are in Michigan, which has an unusually concentrated private insurance market, with one insurer commanding a 70-percent market share. Despite the presence of a dominant insurer, almost all Michigan hospi­tals command prices that are higher than Medicare, and some hospitals com­mand prices that are twice what Medicare pays. In the eight markets outside of Michigan, private insurers generally pay even higher hospital prices, with even wider gaps between high- and low-priced hospitals. The variation in hospital and specialist physician prices within communities underscores that some hospitals and physicians have significant market power to command high prices, even in markets with a dominant insurer.

  12. End-of-life hospital care for cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Dudevich, Alexey; Chen, Allie; Gula, Cheryl; Fagbemi, Josh

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in Canada, and the number of new cases is expected to increase as the population ages and grows. This study examined the use of hospital services in the last month of life by adult cancer patients who died in Canadian acute care hospitals in fiscal year 2012-2013. Almost 25,000 Canadian cancer patients - excluding those in Quebec - died in acute care hospitals, representing approximately 45% of the estimated cancer deaths in 2012-2013. The proportion of in-hospital deaths varied across jurisdictions. Twenty-three percent of these patients were admitted to acute care multiple times in their last 28 days of life, with a higher percentage for rural (29%) compared to urban (21%) patients. Relatively few patients used intensive care units or received inpatient chemotherapy in their last 14 days of life.

  13. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF PATIENTS WITH PROXIMAL HUMERUS FRACTURE TREATED AT HOSPITAL SÃO PAULO, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Ana Paula Cortes; Mestieri, Mariana Christovam; Pontin, José Carlos Baldocchi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze the epidemiological aspects of proximal humerus fractures and describe the profile of patients with proximal humerus fractures hospitalized and treated at Hospital São Paulo, between 2008 and 2013. Methods: Hospital records were retrospectively analyzed for surgically treated patients diagnosed with proximal humerus fracture. Age, gender, injury mechanism, length of hospital stay, performed treatment and associated diseases were considered. Results: From all patients studied, 52 were female at their sixth decade of life. As for the injury mechanism, fall from height was the main cause for women (88.46%) and for man it was motorcycle accidents (31.42%). Fixation with locked plate was the most frequently used treatment. Conclusion: Most patients were female in their fifth decade of life, injured mainly by fall from height. Fixation with locked plate was the most frequently used treatment and the patients were admitted for 7 days, on average. Level of Evidence II, Retrospective Study. PMID:26981037

  14. The prevalence of acromegaly in hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kentaro; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Iguchi, Genzo; Hirota, Yushi; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Bando, Hironori; Matsumoto, Ryusaku; Takahashi, Michiko; Sakaguchi, Kazuhiko; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of acromegaly is estimated to be 8-24/100,000, but several recent studies suggest it is underestimated. In particular, acromegaly is considered more prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) than in the normal population. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of acromegaly in hospitalized patients with T2DM. A total of 327 hospitalized patients with T2DM were recruited as subjects. If serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels were found to be elevated, random GH level was measured or oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. Five patients with elevated serum IGF-1 levels and random GH level or inadequate suppression of GH in the OGTT underwent pituitary magnetic resonance imaging. Of those patients, pituitary adenoma was detected in 2 patients. These 2 patients were diagnosed with acromegaly, as they also exhibited mild acromegalic features. Intriguingly, both these patients exhibited severe macroangiopathy and an absence of microangiopathy. The prevalence of acromegaly in the hospitalized patients with T2DM in this study was therefore 0.6%, suggesting a higher prevalence than that predicted. Although a large-scale prospective study is required to clarify the precise prevalence of acromegaly in hospitalized patients with T2DM, the present study shows that it is useful to screen hospitalized patients with T2DM for acromegaly by measuring their serum IGF-1 level.

  15. Care-seeking behaviour and diagnostic processes for symptomatic giardiasis in children attending an academic paediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, Angel A; Almirall, Pedro; Ávila, Ivonne; Salazar, Yohana; Alfonso, Maydel

    2014-09-01

    Giardiasis is one of the commonest intestinal parasitic infections in Cuba. In order to determine care-seeking behaviour and diagnostic processes in paediatric in-patients with giardiasis, structured questionnaires were administered by interview mothers of children with giardiasis during January to December 2010. During the study period, 97 children were diagnosed with giardiasis, of whom 86 (88·6%) caregivers were interviewed. The median number of days from symptoms onset to the first presentation in a health unit was 2 days (range: 0-15 days). The pattern of care-seeking behaviour was variable; 41 (47·7%) of children initially visited the emergency unit in a paediatric hospital. Sixty-six children had, at least, one further contact for help before diagnosis of giardiasis was made (range: 1-5 contacts) and of the 128 contact visits, 94 (73·4%) were also targeted more to hospitals. There was a median time of 6 days between the first presentation to a health unit until diagnosis, which was mainly made by microscopic examination of duodenal aspiration. Among factors investigated in mothers, only knowing other person with giardiasis had significant association with their ability to suspect giardiasis [odds ratio (OR): 29·8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3·71-239·4, P = 0·001]. Requesting a faecal specimen or ordering duodenal aspiration for microscopic examination during the first visit appeared associated with correct diagnosis (OR: 3·84, 95% CI: 1·57-9·40, P = 0·003). Efforts should be made to increase doctors' awareness of- and diagnostic skills for childhood giardiasis. At the same time, it is necessary to improve caregivers' awareness about giardiasis.

  16. Patient safety culture in two Finnish state-run forensic psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kuosmanen, Anssi; Tiihonen, Jari; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Eronen, Markku; Turunen, Hannele

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture refers to the way patient safety is regarded and implemented within an organization and the structures and procedures in place to support this. The aim of this study was to evaluate patient safety culture, identify areas for improvement, and establish a baseline for improving state hospitals in Finland. Cross-sectional design data were collected from two state-run forensic hospitals in Finland using an anonymous, Web-based survey targeted to hospital staff based on the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire. The response rate was 43% (n = 283). The overall patient safety level was rated as excellent or very good by 58% of respondents. The highest positive grade was for "teamwork within units" (72%). The lowest rating was for "nonpunitive response to errors" (26% positive). Good opportunities for supplementary education had a statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) effect on 9 of 12 Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture dimensions. Statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) differences in patient safety culture were also found in the staff's educational background, manager status, and between the two hospitals. These findings suggest there are a number of patient safety problems related to cultural dimensions. Supplementary education was shown to be a highly significant factor in transforming patient safety culture and should therefore be taken into account alongside sufficient resources.

  17. What really matters? A multi-view perspective of one patient's hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kelly J; Duff, Jed; Walker, Kim

    2014-11-28

    Abstract Background: 'Patient experience' is both recognised and solicited as a means of assessing healthcare delivery and a method for gauging patient centredness. Research comparing healthcare recipient and provider perceptions regarding the same episode of care is lacking. Aim: To identify what mattered to a patient and family member (healthcare recipients) during the patient's hospital experience and to examine the healthcare provider's awareness of what mattered. Methods: A qualitative descriptive investigation was undertaken using semi-structured interviews designed to compare multiple perceptions of one patient's hospital experience. Interviews were undertaken with the patient, family member, and healthcare providers. A definition of hospital experience was sought from each participant. Additional phrases as presented by the patient and family member were coded and grouped into categories and then salient themes. Phrases as presented by the healthcare providers were coded, and then allocated to the previously identified themes. Findings: One patient, his wife and seven healthcare providers (doctors (2), registered nurses (4) and a patient care orderly (1)) were interviewed. Definitions of 'hospital experience' differ between participants. Recipients include pre and post hospital admission periods, whereas providers limit hospital experience to admission. Three salient themes emerged from recipient data suggesting; medication management, physical comfort and emotional security are what mattered to the recipients. Awareness was dependent upon theme and differed between the providers. Conclusion: Hospital experience as a term is poorly defined, and definitions differ between recipients and providers of care. Healthcare providers are not always aware of what matters to the patient and family during their hospital admission.

  18. Impact of aortic aneurysm on hospitalizations in patients with marfan syndrome: a multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Collins, R Thomas; Phomakay, Venusa; Zarate, Yuri A; Tang, Xinyu

    2015-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder affecting 1 in 3,000 people. Cardiovascular involvement is a prominent feature of MFS, with aortic dissection and/or rupture being the leading cause of death. Advances in the medical and surgical care of patients with MFS have improved survival. Hospital resource utilization and outcomes have not been evaluated in a large population of patients with MFS. We sought to analyze pediatric hospital resource utilization and outcomes in patients with MFS. Nationally distributed data from 43 pediatric hospitals in the 2004-2011 Pediatric Health Information System database were used to identify patients admitted to the hospital with International Classification of Diseases-9th Revision codes for a diagnosis of MFS. Aortic aneurysm (AA) with or without dissection, length of stay (LOS), and hospital charges were determined. During the study period, there were 1,978 admissions in 1,228 patients with MFS. AA was present in 217 (11%) admissions in 188 (15%) patients (63% male). Mean age of patients with AA was 13.8 ± 5.9 years. Aortic dissection or rupture was present in 15 (7% with AA) admissions in 15 (8% with AA) patients (mean age 15.7 ± 5.2 years). Other cardiac diagnoses occurred more commonly in the AA cohort (p < 0.0001), regardless of the reason for admission. Cardiothoracic surgical procedures were performed in 116 AA admissions (53%). Mean LOS, hospital charges per admission, and charges per day were significantly higher in AA cohort compared to those without AA. In-hospital mortality for AA was 2%. The presence of AA in patients with MFS increases hospital resource utilization. Cardiothoracic surgeries are commonly performed in this cohort. Other cardiovascular diagnoses are more prevalent in patients with AA suggesting a more severe phenotype.

  19. Assaultive behavior in state psychiatric hospitals: differences between forensic and nonforensic patients.

    PubMed

    Linhorst, Donald M; Scott, Lisa Parker

    2004-08-01

    Forensic patients are occupying an increasingly large number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals. The presence of these mentally ill offenders has raised concerns about the risk they present to nonforensic patients. This study compared the rate of assaults and factors associated with assaultive behavior among 308 nonforensic patients and two groups of forensic patients including 469 patients found not guilty by reason of insanity and 76 pretrial patients. Consistent with other studies, nonforensic patients had higher rates of assaults than either group of forensic patients. However, being a forensic patient did not affect the odds of assault when controlling for the effects of demographic and clinical variables in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. Factors associated with assaults in each of the three patient groups were identified using multivariate analyses. Implications are presented for treatment of assaultive behavior, mixing of forensic and nonforensic patients within state hospitals, forensic release policies, and future research.

  20. Marijuana use and inpatient outcomes among hospitalized patients: analysis of the nationwide inpatient sample database.

    PubMed

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Akinyemiju, Tomi; Meng, Qingrui; Sakhuja, Swati; Hayward, Reid

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between marijuana use and health outcomes among hospitalized patients, including those hospitalized with a diagnosis of cancer. A total of 387,608 current marijuana users were identified based on ICD-9 codes for marijuana use among hospitalized patients in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database between 2007 and 2011. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between marijuana use and heart failure, cardiac disease, stroke, and in-hospital mortality. All models were adjusted for age, gender, race, residential income, insurance, residential region, pain, and number of comorbidities. Among hospitalized patients, marijuana use was associated with a 60% increased odds of stroke (OR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.44-1.77) compared with non-users, but significantly reduced odds of heart failure (OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.75-0.82), cardiac disease (OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.82-0.91), or in-hospital mortality (OR: 0.41, 95% CI: 0.38-0.44). Among cancer patients, odds of in-hospital mortality was significantly reduced among marijuana users compared with non-users (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.35-0.55). Hospitalized marijuana users were more likely to experience a stroke compared with non-users, but less likely to experience in-hospital mortality. Prospective studies will be needed to better characterize the health effects of marijuana use, especially among older, sicker, and/or hospitalized patients. In the meantime, conversations regarding marijuana use/misuse may be warranted in the clinical setting in order for patients and healthcare providers to adequately weigh the anticipated benefits of marijuana use with potentially significant health risks.

  1. Nutritional Status of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Admitted in Hospital With Acute Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Barkha; Kant, Surya; Mishra, Rachna; Verma, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are frequently hospitalized with an acute exacerbation. Patients with COPD often lose weight. Consequently, deterioration in nutritional status (loss of lean body mass) is a likely repercussion of acute exacerbation in hospitalized COPD patients. The study was carried out to assess the nutritional status of COPD patients with acute exacerbation, during the period of hospital admission, and to evaluate the relationships between the nutritional indices and the pulmonary function parameters. Methods A cross sectional observation study constituting 83 COPD patients consecutively hospitalized with acute exacerbation on accrual during a period of one year. Lung function was measured by routine spirometry. Nutritional status was assessed by the measurement of anthropometric parameters. Hospital outcome was also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0 Independent t-tests and Pearsons correlation coefficient was used. Results Mean body weight was 50.03 ± 9.23 kg. Subjects had approximately 5 kg weight loss in previous six months. All the subjects had low BMI (19.38 ± 3.10) and MUAC (21.18 ± 2.31) that was significantly below the predicted levels. The correlation between body weight and FEV1/FVC% was good (r = 0.648, p = 0.003). BMI was negatively correlated (r = - 0.0103, p= 0.03) with duration of hospital stay. Conclusions The high prevalence of malnutrition among hospitalized COPD patients with acute exacerbation is related to their lung function and hospital outcome such as duration of hospital stay. Keywords Nutritional status; COPD; Acute exacerbation; Hospitalization PMID:21811522

  2. Organizational performance impacting patient satisfaction in Ontario hospitals: a multilevel analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction in health care constitutes an important component of organizational performance in the hospital setting. Satisfaction measures have been developed and used to evaluate and improve hospital performance, quality of care and physician practice. In order to direct improvement strategies, it is necessary to evaluate both individual and organizational factors that can impact patients’ perception of care. The study aims were to determine the dimensions of patient satisfaction, and to analyze the individual and organizational determinants of satisfaction dimensions in hospitals. Methods We used patient and hospital survey data as well as administrative data collected for a 2008 public hospital report in Ontario, Canada. We evaluated the clustering of patient survey items with exploratory factor analysis and derived plausible dimensions of satisfaction. A two-level multivariate model was fitted to analyze the determinants of satisfaction. Results We found eight satisfaction factors, with acceptable to good level of loadings and good reliability. More than 95% of variation in patient satisfaction scores was attributable to patient-level variation, with less than 5% attributable to hospital-level variation. The hierarchical models explain 5 to 17% of variation at the patient level and up to 52% of variation between hospitals. Individual patient characteristics had the strongest association with all dimensions of satisfaction. Few organizational performance indicators are associated with patient satisfaction and significant determinants differ according to the satisfaction dimension. Conclusions The research findings highlight the importance of adjusting for both patient-level and organization-level characteristics when evaluating patient satisfaction. Better understanding and measurement of organization-level activities and processes associated with patient satisfaction could contribute to improved satisfaction ratings and care quality. PMID

  3. Site selection in global clinical trials in patients hospitalized for heart failure: perceived problems and potential solutions

    PubMed Central

    Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Greene, Stephen J.; Mentz, Robert J.; Adams, Kirkwood F.; Anker, Stefan D.; Arnold, Malcolm; Baschiera, Fabio; Cleland, John G. F.; Cotter, Gadi; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Giordano, Christopher; Metra, Marco; Misselwitz, Frank; Mühlhofer, Eva; Nodari, Savina; Peacock, W. Frank; Pieske, Burkert M.; Sabbah, Hani N.; Sato, Naoki; Shah, Monica R.; Stockbridge, Norman L.; Teerlink, John R.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Zalewski, Andrew; Zannad, Faiez; Butler, Javed

    2014-01-01

    There are over 1 million hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) annually in the United States alone, and a similar number has been reported in Europe. Recent clinical trials investigating novel therapies in patients with hospitalized HF (HHF) have been negative, and the post-discharge event rate remains unacceptably high. The lack of success with HHF trials stem from problems with understanding the study drug, matching the drug to the appropriate HF subgroup, and study execution. Related to the concept of study execution is the importance of including appropriate study sites in HHF trials. Often overlooked issues include consideration of the geographic region and the number of patients enrolled at each study center. Marked differences in baseline patient co-morbidities, serum biomarkers, treatment utilization and outcomes have been demonstrated across geographic regions. Furthermore, patients from sites with low recruitment may have worse outcomes compared to sites with higher enrollment patterns. Consequently, sites with poor trial enrollment may influence key patient end points and likely do not justify the costs of site training and maintenance. Accordingly, there is an unmet need to develop strategies to identify the right study sites that have acceptable patient quantity and quality. Potential approaches include, but are not limited to, establishing a pre-trial registry, developing site performance metrics, identifying a local regionally involved leader and bolstering recruitment incentives. This manuscript summarizes the roundtable discussion hosted by the Food and Drug Administration between members of academia, the National Institutes of Health, industry partners, contract research organizations and academic research organizations on the importance of selecting optimal sites for successful trials in HHF. PMID:23099992

  4. Treatment satisfaction and recovery in Saami and Norwegian patients following psychiatric hospital treatment: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Sørlie, Tore; Nergård, Jens-Ivar

    2005-06-01

    Treatment, treatment satisfaction and recovery in Saami and Norwegian patients treated in a psychiatric hospital were compared. Although half of the Saami patients preferred to speak Saami with their therapists, only one patient did. The extensive use of traditional helpers was only partly recognized. Despite no differences in type and amount of treatment or symptom-change during the hospital stay, the Saami patients showed less satisfaction with all investigated treatment parameters including contact with staff, treatment alliance, information and global treatment satisfaction. There was less agreement between the ratings of the therapists and the Saami patients. Suggestions for improvements are made.

  5. Patient satisfaction questionnaire and quality achievement in hospital care: the case of a Greek public university hospital.

    PubMed

    Matis, Georgios K; Birbilis, Theodossios A; Chrysou, Olga I

    2009-11-01

    The scope of this research has been to investigate the satisfaction of Greek patients hospitalized in a tertiary care university public hospital in Alexandroupolis, Greece, in order to improve medical, nursing and organizational/administrative services. It is a cross-sectional study involving 200 patients hospitalized for at least 24 h. We administered a satisfaction questionnaire previously approved by the Greek Health Ministry. Four aspects of satisfaction were employed (medical, hotel facilities/organizational, nursing, global). Using principal component analysis, summated scales were formed and tested for internal consistency with the aid of Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The non-parametric Spearman rank correlation coefficient was also used. The results reveal a relatively high degree of global satisfaction (75.125%), yet satisfaction is higher for the medical (89.721%) and nursing (86.432%) services. Moreover, satisfaction derived from the hotel facilities and the general organization was found to be more limited (76.536%). Statistically significant differences in participant satisfaction were observed (depending on age, gender, citizenship, education, number of previous admissions and self-assessment of health status at the first and last day of patients' stay) for the medical, nursing and hotel facilities/organizational dimension, but not for global satisfaction. The present study confirms the results of previously published Greek surveys.

  6. Analysis Treatment Guideline versus Clinical Practice Protocol in Patients Hospitalized due to Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Alessandra da Graça; Makdisse, Marcia; Katz, Marcelo; Santana, Thamires Campos; Yokota, Paula Kiyomi Onaga; Galvão, Tatiana de Fatima Gonçalves; Bacal, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the availability of guidelines for treatment of heart failure (HF), only a few studies have assessed how hospitals adhere to the recommended therapies. Objectives Compare the rates of adherence to the prescription of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blockers (ACEI/ARB) at hospital discharge, which is considered a quality indicator by the Joint Commission International, and to the prescription of beta-blockers at hospital discharge, which is recommended by national and international guidelines, in a hospital with a case management program to supervise the implementation of a clinical practice protocol (HCP) and another hospital that follows treatment guidelines (HCG). Methods Prospective observational study that evaluated patients consecutively admitted to both hospitals due to decompensated HF between August 1st, 2006, and December 31st, 2008. We used as comparing parameters the prescription rates of beta-blockers and ACEI/ARB at hospital discharge and in-hospital mortality. Results We analyzed 1,052 patients (30% female, mean age 70.6 ± 14.1 years), 381 (36%) of whom were seen at HCG and 781 (64%) at HCP. The prescription rates of beta-blockers at discharge at HCG and HCP were both 69% (p = 0.458), whereas those of ACEI/ARB were 83% and 86%, respectively (p = 0.162). In-hospital mortality rates were 16.5% at HCP and 27.8% at HCG (p < 0.001). Conclusion There was no difference in prescription rates of beta-blocker and ACEI/ARB at hospital discharge between the institutions, but HCP had lower in-hospital mortality. This difference in mortality may be attributed to different clinical characteristics of the patients in both hospitals. PMID:26815461

  7. Delirium is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Pieralli, Filippo; Vannucchi, Vieri; Mancini, Antonio; Grazzini, Maddalena; Paolacci, Giulia; Morettini, Alessandro; Nozzoli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common reason for hospitalization and death in elderly people. Many predictors of in-hospital outcome have been studied in the general population with CAP. However, data are lacking on the prognostic significance of conditions unique to older patients, such as delirium and the coexistence of multiple comorbidities. The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors of in-hospital outcome in elderly patients hospitalized for CAP. In this retrospective study, consecutive patients with CAP aged ≥65 years were enrolled between January 2011 and June 2012 in two general wards. Clinical and laboratory characteristics were collected from electronic medical records. The end-point of the study was the occurrence of in-hospital death. 443 patients (mean age 81.8 ± 7.5, range 65-99 years) were enrolled. More than 3 comorbidities were present in 31 % of patients. Mean confusion, blood urea nitrogen, respiratory rate, blood pressure and age ≥65 years (CURB-65) score was 2.5 ± 0.7 points. Mean length of stay was 7.6 ± 5.7 days. In-hospital death occurred in 54 patients (12.2 %). At multivariate analysis, independent predictors of in-hospital death were: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR 6.21, p = 0.005), occurrence of at least one episode of delirium (OR 5.69, p = 0.017), male sex (OR 5.10, p < 0.0001), and CURB-65 score (OR 3.98, p < 0.0001). Several predictors of in-hospital death (COPD, male gender, CURB-65) in patients with CAP older than 65 years are similar to those of younger patients. In this cohort of elderly patients, the occurrence of delirium was highly prevalent and represented a distinctive predictor of death.

  8. Hospital Analgesia Practices and Patient-reported Pain After Colorectal Resection

    PubMed Central

    Regenbogen, Scott E.; Mullard, Andrew J.; Peters, Nanette; Brooks, Shannon; Englesbe, Michael J.; Campbell, Darrell A.; Hendren, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to characterize patient-reported outcomes of analgesia practices in a population-based surgical collaborative. Background Pain control among hospitalized patients is a national priority and effective multimodal pain management is an essential component of postoperative recovery, but there is little understanding of the degree of variation in analgesia practice and patient-reported pain between hospitals. Methods We evaluated patient-reported pain scores after colorectal operations in 52 hospitals in a state-wide collaborative. We stratified hospitals by quartiles of average pain scores, identified hospital characteristics, pain management practices, and clinical outcomes associated with highest and lowest case-mix-adjusted pain scores, and compared against Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems pain management metrics. Results Hospitals with the lowest pain scores were larger (503 vs 452 beds; P<0.001), higher volume (196 vs 112; P=0.005), and performed more laparoscopy (37.7% vs 27.2%; P<0.001) than those with highest scores. Their patients were more likely to receive local anesthesia (31.1% vs 12.9%; P<0.001), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (33.5% vs 14.4%; P<0.001), and patient-controlled analgesia (56.5% vs 22.8%; P<0.001). Adverse postoperative outcomes were less common in hospitals with lowest pain scores, including complications (20.3% vs 26.4%; P<0.001), emergency department visits (8.2% vs 15.8%; P<0.001), and readmissions (11.3% vs 16.2%; P=0.01). Conclusions Pain management after colorectal surgery varies widely and predicts significant differences in patient-reported pain and clinical outcomes. Enhanced postoperative pain management requires dissemination of multimodal analgesia practices. Attention to patient-reported outcomes often omitted from surgical outcomes registries is essential to improving quality from the patient's perspective. PMID:26756749

  9. Comparing patient care seeking pathways in three models of hospital and TB programme collaboration in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Public hospitals in China play an important role in tuberculosis (TB) control. Three models of hospital and TB control exist in China. The dispensary model is the most common one in which a TB dispensary provides both clinical and public health care. The specialist model is similar to the former except that a specialist TB hospital is located in the same area. The specialist hospital should treat only complicated TB cases but it also treats simple cases in practice. The integrated model is a new development to integrate TB service in public hospitals. Patients were diagnosed, treated and followed up in this public hospital in this model while the TB dispensary provides public health service as case reporting and mass education. This study aims to compare patient care seeking pathways under the three models, and to provide policy recommendation for the TB control system reform in China. Methods Six sites, two in each model, were selected across four provinces, with 293 newly treated uncomplicated TB patients being randomly selected. Results The majority (68%) of TB patients were diagnosed in hospitals. Patients in the integrated model presented the simplest care seeking pathways, with the least number of providers visited (2.2), shortest treatment delays (2 days) and the least medical expenditure (2729RMB/401USD). On the contrary, patients in the specialist model had the highest number of provider visits (4), longest treatment delays (23 days) and the highest medical expenditure (11626RMB/1710USD). Logistic regression suggested that patients who were hospitalised tended to have longer treatment delays and higher medical expenditure. Conclusion Specialist hospital treating uncomplicated cases not using the standard regimens posed a threat to TB control. The integrated model has shortened patient treatment pathways, and reduced patient costs; therefore, it could be considered as the direction for future reform of China’s TB control system. PMID

  10. Understanding patient-to-worker violence in hospitals: a qualitative analysis of documented incident reports

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Hamblin, Lydia; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Upfal, Mark J.; Ager, Joel; Luborsky, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Aim To explore catalysts to, and circumstances surrounding, patient-to-worker violent incidents recorded by employees in a hospital system database. Background Violence by patients towards healthcare workers (Type II workplace violence) is a significant occupational hazard in hospitals worldwide. Studies to date have failed to investigate its root causes due to a lack of empirical research based on documented episodes of patient violence. Design Qualitative content analysis. Methods Content analysis was conducted on the total sample of 214 Type II incidents documented in 2011 by employees of an American hospital system with a centralized reporting system. Findings The majority of incidents were reported by nurses (39·8%), security staff (15·9%) and nurse assistants (14·4%). Three distinct themes were identified from the analysis: Patient Behaviour, Patient Care and Situational Events. Specific causes of violence related to Patient Behaviour were cognitive impairment and demanding to leave. Catalysts related to patient care were the use of needles, patient pain/discomfort and physical transfers of patients. Situational factors included the use/presence of restraints; transitions in the care process; intervening to protect patients and/or staff; and redirecting patients. Conclusions Identifying catalysts and situations involved in patient violence in hospitals informs administrators about potential targets for intervention. Hospital staff can be trained to recognize these specific risk factors for patient violence and can be educated in how to best mitigate or prevent the most common forms of violent behaviour. A social–ecological model can be adapted to the hospital setting as a framework for prevention of patient violence towards staff. PMID:25091833

  11. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model.

    PubMed

    Moore, Julia E; Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E

    2016-05-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. Funded projects have been sustained (76% reported full sustainability) and spread to over 200 new sites. Lessons learned include the following: assess readiness, develop tailored implementation materials, consider characteristics of implementation supports, protect champion time and consider evaluation feasibility.

  12. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model

    PubMed Central

    Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D.; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. Funded projects have been sustained (76% reported full sustainability) and spread to over 200 new sites. Lessons learned include the following: assess readiness, develop tailored implementation materials, consider characteristics of implementation supports, protect champion time and consider evaluation feasibility. PMID:27232234

  13. Maintained effectiveness of an electronic alert system to prevent venous thromboembolism among hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Lecumberri, Ramón; Marqués, Margarita; Díaz-Navarlaz, María Teresa; Panizo, Elena; Toledo, Jon; García-Mouriz, Alberto; Páramo, José A

    2008-10-01

    Despite current guidelines, venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis is underused. Computerized programs to encourage physicians to apply thromboprophylaxis have been shown to be effective in selected populations. Our aim was to analyze the impact of the implementation of a computer-alert system for VTE risk in all hospitalized patients of a teaching hospital. A computer program linked to the clinical record database was developed to assess all hospitalized patients' VTE risk daily. The physician responsible for patients at high risk was alerted, but remained free to order or withhold prophylaxis. Over 19,000 hospitalized, medical and surgical, adult patients between January to June 2005 (pre-intervention phase), January to June 2006 and January to June 2007 (post-intervention phase), were included. During the first semesters of 2006 and 2007, an electronic alert was sent to 32.8% and 32.2% of all hospitalized patients, respectively. Appropriate prophylaxis among alerted patients was ordered in 89.7% (2006) and 88.5% (2007) of surgical patients, and in 49.2% (2006) and 64.4% (2007) of medical patients. A sustained reduction of VTE during hospitalization was achieved, Odds ratio (OR): 0.53, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.25-1.10) and OR: 0.51, 95%CI (0.24-1.05) during the first semesters of 2006 and 2007 respectively, the impact being significant (p < 0.05) among medical patients in 2007, OR: 0.36, 95%CI (0.12-0.98). The implementation of a computer-alert program helps physicians to assess each patient's thrombotic risk, leading to a better use of thromboprophylaxis, and a reduction in the incidence of VTE among hospitalized patients. For the first time, an intervention aimed to improve VTE prophylaxis shows maintained effectiveness over time.

  14. Use of a Hospital-Wide Screening Program for Early Detection of Sepsis in General Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    MacQueen, Ian T; Dawes, Aaron J; Hadnott, Tracy; Strength, Kristen; Moran, Gregory J; Holschneider, Christine; Russell, Marcia M; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2015-10-01

    Sepsis remains a significant source of mortality among hospitalized patients. This study examines the usage of a vital sign-based screening protocol in identifying postoperative patients at risk for sepsis at an academic-affiliated medical center. We identified all general surgery inpatients undergoing abdominopelvic surgery from January to June 2014, and compared those with positive screening tests to a sample of screen-negative controls. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify predictors of positive screening tests and progression to severe sepsis. In total, 478 patients underwent abdominopelvic operations, 59 had positive screening tests, 33 qualified for sepsis, and six progressed to severe sepsis. Predictors of a positive screening test were presence of cancer [odds ratio (OR) 30.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-420], emergency operation (OR 6.5, 95% CI 1.7-24), longer operative time (OR 2.2/h, 95% CI 1.2-4.1), and presence of postoperative infection (OR 6.4, 95% CI 1.5-27). The screening protocol had sensitivity 100 per cent and specificity 88 per cent for severe sepsis. We identified no predictors of severe sepsis. In conclusion, vital sign-based screening provides value by drawing early attention to patients with potential to develop sepsis, but escalation of care for these patients should be based on clinical judgment.

  15. [Hospital care in Estonia: thoughts on patient privacy].

    PubMed

    Schoenacker, Aline

    2017-03-01

    A student nurse is doing a work placement in a hospital in Estonia. The care techniques are identical to those with which she is familiar. However, the application of concepts of privacy and modesty is somewhat different. A reflexive analysis of the situation ensures no hasty judgements are made and enables her to think about the place of her own representations.

  16. Introducing Physical Education to Hospital Learning--Can Patients Participate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Issaka, Ayuba; Hopkins, Liza

    2015-01-01

    Children and young people with chronic health conditions are at greater risk of school absence and poorer educational achievement than their healthy peers. A range of strategies are implemented in home, school and hospital settings to improve the connection of these children and young people to their educational pathways, yet gaps in provision…

  17. 75 FR 20511 - Respecting the Rights of Hospital Patients to Receive Visitors and to Designate Surrogate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... Hospital Patients to Receive Visitors and to Designate Surrogate Decision Makers for Medical Emergencies... unable to act as a legal surrogate if their partner is incapacitated. For all of these Americans,...

  18. Doctor and Patient Questions as a Measure of Doctor-Centredness in UAE Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Focuses on a description of consultations conducted in English between doctors and patients of various nationalities in the hospitals of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, specifically the extent to which such consultations are doctor-centered. (Author/VWL)

  19. Quality Improvement Initiative Reduces Serious Safety Events in Pediatric Hospital Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Annual Conferences Newsletter AHRQ News Now Search News & Events Topics Search ahrq.gov About About AHRQ Profile ... May 2013 Quality improvement initiative reduces serious safety events in pediatric hospital patients Previous Page Next Page ...

  20. Public hospital palliative social work: addressing patient cultural diversity and psychosocial needs.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Monique; Cárdenas, Yvette; Epperhart, Regina; Hernandez, Jose; Ruiz, Susana; Russell, Linda; Soriano, Karolina; Thornberry, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Through creative practice innovations and a wide range of professional competencies, social work has contributed substantively to the development of the palliative care field (Harper, 2011 ). As the field continues to grow and evolve, new opportunities are emerging to profile palliative social work in diverse health care settings. A statewide initiative to spread palliative care in California's public hospitals provided just such an opportunity. Palliative social workers from six public hospitals participating in the initiative formed a group to discuss palliative social work in this unique hospital setting. This article highlights the group's insights and experiences as they address the significant cultural diversity and psychosocial needs of public hospital patients receiving palliative care.

  1. Potential for radioactive patient excreta in hospital trash and medical waste

    SciTech Connect

    Evdokimoff, V.; Cash, C.; Buckley, K.

    1994-02-01

    Radioactive excreta from nuclear medicine patients can enter solid waste as common trash and medical biohazardous waste. Many landfills and transfer stations now survey these waste streams with scintillation detectors which may result in rejection of a hospital`s waste. Our survey indicated that on the average either or both of Boston University Medical Center Hospital`s waste streams can contain detectable radioactive excreta on a weekly basis. To avoid potential problems, radiation detectors were installed in areas where housekeepers carting trash and medical waste must pass through to ensure no radioactivity leaves the institution. 3 refs.

  2. Assaultive Behavior in State Psychiatric Hospitals: Differences Between Forensic and Nonforensic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhorst, Donald M.; Scott, Lisa Parker

    2004-01-01

    Forensic patients are occupying an increasingly large number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals. The presence of these mentally ill offenders has raised concerns about the risk they present to nonforensic patients. This study compared the rate of assaults and factors associated with assaultive behavior among 308 nonforensic patients and two…

  3. The Short-Term Effects of In-Hospital Respite on the Patient with Alzheimer's Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Benjamin; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Assessed cognitive and functional status levels of Alzheimer's disease patients prior to admission to two-week in-hospital respite program and at conclusion of respite. Found that patients with poorest status tended to show improvement on some measures following respite. Patients with higher initial levels of performance tended to show slight…

  4. Costs and outcomes associated with hospitalized cancer patients with neutropenic complications: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Schilling, M Blane; Parks, Connie; Deeter, Robert G

    2011-09-01

    The average total hospitalization costs for adult cancer patients with neutropenic complications were quantified and the average length of hospital stay (LOS), all-cause mortality during hospitalization and reimbursement rates were determined. This observational retrospective cohort study identified adult patients with cancer who were hospitalized from January 2005 through June 2008 using a large private US health care database (>342 inpatient facilities). ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes identified patients by cancer type and who had neutropenic complications. The utilization and accounting systems of the hospitals were used to calculate mean (±95% confidence interval) hospitalization costs and LOS and percent all-cause mortality and reimbursement. Costs were adjusted to 2009 US dollars. There were 3,814 patients who had cancer and neutropenia, 1,809 (47.4%) also had an infection or fever and 1,188 (31.1%) had infection. Mean hospitalization costs were $18,042 (95% CI 16,997-19,087) for patients with neutropenia, $22,839 (95% CI 21,006-24,672) for patients with neutropenia plus infection or fever and $27,587 (95% CI 24,927-30,247) for patients with neutropenia plus infection. Mean LOS were 9 days (95% CI 8.7-9.3), 10.7 days (95% CI 10.2-11.2) and 12.6 days (95% CI 11.9-13.3), respectively. Mortality followed a similar trend; 8.3, 13.7 and 19.4%, respectively. By cancer type, hematologic malignancies had the highest average hospitalization costs and longest mean LOS of $52,579 (95% CI 42,183-62,975) and 20.3 days (95% CI 17.4-23.2), and a high mortality rate of 20.0%, while primary breast cancer patients had the lowest cost of $8,413 (95% CI 6,103-10,723), shortest LOS of 5.5 days (95% CI 4.2-6.8) and lowest mortality (0%). Mean reimbursement rates were 100.0, 101.5 and 95.4% for patients with neutropenia, neutropenia plus infection or fever and neutropenia plus infection, respectively. Hospitalized cancer patients with neutropenic complications had a higher all

  5. Clinical assessment of the oral cavity of patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit of an emergency hospital

    PubMed Central

    da Cruz, Maristela Kapitski; de Morais, Teresa Márcia Nascimento; Trevisani, Deny Munari

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the oral health status of patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit. Methods Clinical assessment of the oral cavity was performed in 35 patients at two time-points (up to 48 hours after admission and 72 hours after the first assessment) and recorded in data collection forms. The following data were collected: plaque index, condition of the mucosa, presence or absence of dental prosthesis, number of teeth present, and tongue coating index. Results The prevalence of nosocomial infection was 22% (eight patients), with 50% respiratory tract infections. All patients exhibited oral biofilm, and 20 (57%) showed biofilm visible to the naked eye; tongue coating was present on more than two thirds of the tongue in 24 patients (69%) and was thick in most cases. A significant increase in plaque index (p=0.007) occurred after 72 hours, although the tongue coating index was p<0.001 regarding the area and p=0.5 regarding the thickness. Conclusion The plaque and tongue coating indices increased with the length of hospital stay at the intensive care unit. PMID:25607267

  6. Risk adjusting survival outcomes of hospitals that treat cancer patients without information on cancer stage

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, David G.; Rubin, David M.; Elkin, Elena B.; Neill, Ushma S.; Duck, Elaine; Radzyner, Mark; Bach, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Instituting widespread measurement of outcomes for cancer hospitals using administrative data is difficult due to the lack of cancer specific information such as disease stage. Objective To evaluate the performance of hospitals that treat cancer patients using Medicare data for outcome ascertainment and risk adjustment, and to assess whether hospital rankings based on these measures are influenced by the addition of cancer-specific information. Design Risk adjusted cumulative mortality of patients with cancer captured in Medicare claims from 2005–2009 nationally were assessed at the hospital level. Similar analyses were conducted in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Result (SEER)-Medicare data for the subset of the US covered by the SEER program to determine whether the exclusion of cancer specific information (only available in cancer registries) from risk adjustment altered measured hospital performance. Setting Administrative claims data and SEER cancer registry data Participants Sample of 729,279 fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries treated for cancer in 2006 at hospitals treating 10+ patients with each of the following cancers, according to Medicare claims: lung, prostate, breast, colon. An additional sample of 18,677 similar patients in SEER-Medicare administrative data. Main Outcomes and Measures Risk-adjusted mortality overall and by cancer type, stratified by type of hospital; measures of correlation and agreement between hospital-level outcomes risk adjusted using Medicare data alone and Medicare data with SEER data. Results There were large outcome differences between different types of hospitals that treat Medicare patients with cancer. At one year, cumulative mortality for Medicare-prospective-payment-system exempt hospitals was 10% lower than at community hospitals (18% versus 28%) across all cancers, the pattern persisted through five years of follow-up and within specific cancer types. Performance ranking of hospitals was

  7. Hospital-based pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD in Sweden--a national survey.

    PubMed

    Wadell, K; Janaudis Ferreira, T; Arne, M; Lisspers, K; Ställberg, B; Emtner, M

    2013-08-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is an evidence-based, multidisciplinary and cost-effective intervention that leads to improved health in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD. However, the availability of PR programs varies between and within different countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the availability and content of hospital-based PR programs in patients with COPD in Sweden. A cross-sectional descriptive design was applied using a web-based questionnaire which was sent out to all hospitals in Sweden. The questionnaire consisted of 32 questions that concerned availability and content of PR in patients with COPD during 2011. Seventy out of 71 hospitals responded the electronic survey. Forty-six (66%) hospitals offered PR for patients with COPD. Around 75% of the hospitals in southern and middle parts of Sweden and 33% of the hospitals in the northern part offered PR. Thirty-four percent of the patients declined participation. A total number of 1355 patients participated in PR which represents 0.2% of the COPD population in Sweden. All hospitals had exercise training as major component and 76% offered an educational program. Not even half a percent of the patients with COPD in Sweden took part in a hospital-based PR program during 2011. There was a considerable geographic discrepancy in availability over the country. To enable a greater part of the increasing number of patients with COPD to take part in this evidence-based treatment, there is a need of evaluating other settings of PR programs; in primary care, at home and/or over the internet.

  8. Hospital-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by Legionella pneumophila in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Lai, C-C; Tan, C-K; Chou, C-H; Hsu, H-L; Huang, Y-T; Liao, C-H; Hsueh, P-R

    2010-04-01

    The Legionella species is an important cause of communityand hospital-acquired pneumonia. Bacteremic pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila is rarely reported. We describe the first reported case of hospital-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by L. pneumophila from Taiwan in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura who received steroid treatment. The patient was successfully treated with ceftazidime and clindamycin initially, followed by ciprofloxacin for 14 days. The blood isolate was further confirmed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

  9. Accuracy of patient's turnover time prediction using RFID technology in an academic ambulatory surgery center.

    PubMed

    Marchand-Maillet, Florence; Debes, Claire; Garnier, Fanny; Dufeu, Nicolas; Sciard, Didier; Beaussier, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Patients flow in outpatient surgical unit is a major issue with regards to resource utilization, overall case load and patient satisfaction. An electronic Radio Frequency Identification Device (RFID) was used to document the overall time spent by the patients between their admission and discharge from the unit. The objective of this study was to evaluate how a RFID-based data collection system could provide an accurate prediction of the actual time for the patient to be discharged from the ambulatory surgical unit after surgery. This is an observational prospective evaluation carried out in an academic ambulatory surgery center (ASC). Data on length of stay at each step of the patient care, from admission to discharge, were recorded by a RFID device and analyzed according to the type of surgical procedure, the surgeon and the anesthetic technique. Based on these initial data (n = 1520), patients were scheduled in a sequential manner according to the expected duration of the previous case. The primary endpoint was the difference between actual and predicted time of discharge from the unit. A total of 414 consecutive patients were prospectively evaluated. One hundred seventy four patients (42%) were discharged at the predicted time ± 30 min. Only 24% were discharged behind predicted schedule. Using an automatic record of patient's length of stay would allow an accurate prediction of the discharge time according to the type of surgery, the surgeon and the anesthetic procedure.

  10. Device-associated infection rates and bacterial resistance in six academic teaching hospitals of Iran: Findings from the International Nocosomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).

    PubMed

    Jahani-Sherafat, Somayeh; Razaghi, Maryam; Rosenthal, Victor D; Tajeddin, Elahe; Seyedjavadi, Simasadat; Rashidan, Marjan; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Rostampour, Maryam; Haghi, Arezo; Sayarbayat, Masoumeh; Farazmandian, Somayeh; Yarmohammadi, Tahere; Arshadi, Fardokht K; Mansouri, Nahid; Sarbazi, Mohammad R; Vilar, Mariano; Zali, Mohammad R

    2015-01-01

    Device-associated health care-acquired infections (DA-HAIs) pose a threat to patient safety, particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, few data regarding DA-HAI rates and their associated bacterial resistance in ICUs from Iran are available. A DA-HAI surveillance study was conducted in six adult and pediatric ICUs in academic teaching hospitals in Tehran using CDC/NHSN definitions. We collected prospective data regarding device use, DA-HAI rates, and lengths of stay from 2584 patients, 16,796 bed-days from one adult ICU, and bacterial profiles and bacterial resistance from six ICUs. Among the DA-HAIs, there were 5.84 central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABs) per 1000 central line-days, 7.88 ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAPs) per 1000 mechanical ventilator-days and 8.99 catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) per 1000 urinary catheter-days. The device utilization ratios were 0.44 for central lines, 0.42 for mechanical ventilators and 1.0 for urinary catheters. The device utilization ratios of mechanical ventilators and urinary catheters were higher than those reported in the ICUs of the INICC and the CDC's NHSN reports, but central line use was lower. The DA-HAI rates in this study were higher than the CDC's NHSN report. However, compared with the INICC report, the VAP rate in our study was lower, while the CLAB rate was similar and the CAUTI rate was higher. Nearly 83% of the samples showed a mixed-type infection. The most frequent pathogens were Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterococcus spp. In the S. aureus isolates, 100% were resistant to oxacillin. Overall resistances of A. baumannii and K. pneumonia to imipenem were 70.5% and 76.7%, respectively. A multiple drug resistance phenotype was detected in 68.15% of the isolates. The DA-HAI rates in Iran were shown to be higher than the CDC-NHSN rates and similar to the INICC rates

  11. Potential of Drug Interactions among Hospitalized Cancer Patients in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Tavakoli-Ardakani, Maria; Kazemian, Kaveh; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Mehdizadeh, Mahshid

    2013-01-01

    Cancer patients are more susceptible to adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs) due to receiving multiple medications especially chemotherapy medications, hormonal agents and supportive care drugs. The aim of this study is to describe the prevalence of potential DDIs and to identify risk factors for these potential interactions in hospitalized cancer patients in a developing country. A cross-sectional study conducted by reviewing charts of 224 consecutive in hospitalized patients in hematology-oncology ward of a teaching hospital in Tehran, during a 12 month period from July 2009 to July 2010. “Drug Interaction Facts 2008, 2009: The Authority on Drug Interactions” was used for screening the potential drug-drug interactions. Potential interactions were classified by levels of severity and documentation. The median age of patients was 50 years, the length of hospital stay for patient was 5 days and the number of drugs per patient was 8 drugs. Two hundred and twenty-eight potential interactions were detected. Nearly 14% of the interactions were major and 60% were moderate. Approximately 9% and 10% potential interactions were graded as established and probable. In multivariate analysis, being older than 61 years old, suffering from hematologic cancer, source of cancer in different specific organs (esophagus, testis and cervices more than other sources), and number of ordered drugs for patients were independent predictors of having at least one potential DDI in hospital order. Suffering from hematologic cancer, source of cancer in different organs, length of hospital stay and number of ordered drugs for patients were independent predictors for number of interactions per patients. Having a DDI seems to be more likely to occur in patients older than 61 years old. Hematologic cancers, having more medications in physician’s order, longer length of hospital stay, esophageal cancer, testicular cancer and cervical cancer have related to having a DDI and also having more

  12. The Accuracy of Portable Monitoring in Diagnosing Significant Sleep Disordered Breathing in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rohit; Abdoh, Mamoun; Nagori, Mohammedumer; Littleton, Stephen; Gueret, Renaud; Tulaimat, Aiman

    2016-01-01

    Background Polysomnograms are not always feasible when sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is suspected in hospitalized patients. Portable monitoring is a practical alternative; however, it has not been recommended in patients with comorbidities. Objective We evaluated the accuracy of portable monitoring in hospitalized patients suspected of having SDB. Design Prospective observational study. Setting Large, public, urban, teaching hospital in the United States. Participants Hospitalized patients suspected of having SDB. Methods Patients underwent portable monitoring combined with actigraphy during the hospitalization and then polysomnography after discharge. We determined the accuracy of portable monitoring in predicting moderate to severe SDB and the agreement between the apnea hypopnea index measured by portable monitor (AHIPM) and by polysomnogram (AHIPSG). Results Seventy-one symptomatic patients completed both tests. The median time between the two tests was 97 days (IQR 25–75: 24–109). Forty-five percent were hospitalized for cardiovascular disease. Mean age was 52±10 years, 41% were women, and the majority had symptoms of SDB. Based on AHIPSG, SDB was moderate in 9 patients and severe in 39. The area under the receiver operator characteristics curve for AHIPM was 0.8, and increased to 0.86 in patients without central sleep apnea; it was 0.88 in the 31 patients with hypercapnia. For predicting moderate to severe SDB, an AHIPM of 14 had a sensitivity of 90%, and an AHIPM of 36 had a specificity of 87%. The mean±SD difference between AHIPM and AHIPSG was 2±29 event/hr. Conclusion In hospitalized, symptomatic patients, portable monitoring is reasonably accurate in detecting moderate to severe SDB. PMID:27992566

  13. Patient-oriented interactive E-health tools on U.S. hospital Web sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edgar; Chang, Chiu-Chi Angela

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide evidence for strategic planning regarding e-health development in U.S. hospitals. A content analysis of a representative sample of the U.S. hospital Web sites has revealed how U.S. hospitals have taken advantage of the 21 patient-oriented interactive tools identified in this study. Significant gaps between various types of hospitals have also been found. It is concluded that although the majority of the U.S. hospitals have adopted traditional functional tools, they need to make significant inroad in implementing the core e-business tools to serve their patients/users, making their Web sites more efficient marketing tools.

  14. Post-acute home care and hospital readmission of elderly patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K

    2004-11-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce hospital readmission during the post-acute period. Using proportional Cox regression analysis, the authors examined the independent and joint effects of post-acute informal and formal services on hospital readmission. No evidence of service impact was found. Rather, hospital readmission was associated with a longer length of CHF history and noncompliance with medication regimes. Research, policy, and practice implications are discussed.

  15. Relationship of hospital organizational culture to patient safety climate in the Veterans Health Administration.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christine W; Meterko, Mark; Rosen, Amy K; Shibei Zhao; Shokeen, Priti; Singer, Sara; Gaba, David M

    2009-06-01

    Improving safety climate could enhance patient safety, yet little evidence exists regarding the relationship between hospital characteristics and safety climate. This study assessed the relationship between hospitals' organizational culture and safety climate in Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals nationally. Data were collected from a sample of employees in a stratified random sample of 30 VA hospitals over a 6-month period (response rate = 50%; n = 4,625). The Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations (PSCHO) and the Zammuto and Krakower surveys were used to measure safety climate and organizational culture, respectively. Higher levels of safety climate were significantly associated with higher levels of group and entrepreneurial cultures, while lower levels of safety climate were associated with higher levels of hierarchical culture. Hospitals could use these results to design specific interventions aimed at improving safety climate.

  16. A framework to analyze hospital-wide patient flow logistics: evidence from an Italian comparative study.

    PubMed

    Villa, Stefano; Prenestini, Anna; Giusepi, Isabella

    2014-04-01

    Through a comparative study of six Italian hospitals, the paper develops and tests a framework to analyze hospital-wide patient flow performance. The framework adopts a system-wide approach to patient flow management and is structured around three different levels: (1) the hospital, (2) the pipelines (possible patient journeys within the hospital) and (3) the production units (physical spaces, such as operating rooms, where service delivery takes places). The focus groups and the data analysis conducted within the study support that the model is a useful tool to investigate hospital-wide implications of patient flows. The paper provides also evidence about the causes of hospital patient flow problems. Particularly, while shortage of capacity does not seem to be a relevant driver, our data shows that patient flow variability caused by inadequate allocation of capacity does represent a key problem. Results also show that the lack of coordination between different pipelines and production units is critical. Finally, the problem of overlapping between elective and unscheduled cases can be solved by setting aside a certain level of capacity for unexpected peaks.

  17. Reduction of assaultive behavior following anger treatment of forensic hospital patients with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Novaco, Raymond W; Taylor, John L

    2015-02-01

    Anger is related to violence prior to hospitalization, during hospitalization, and after discharge. Meta-analyses have established treatment efficacy in reducing anger, but few studies have addressed whether reduced anger leads to lowered aggressive behavior. This study concerns individually-delivered anger treatment, specialized for offenders with intellectual disabilities, delivered twice weekly for 18 sessions to 50 forensic hospital patients. Assessments involved patient self-report of anger, staff ratings of anger and aggression, and case records of assaultive incidents. Physical assault data were obtained from records 12 months pre-treatment and 12 months post-treatment. Significant reductions in assaults following treatment were found by GEE analyses, controlling for age, gender, length of stay, IQ, and pre-hospital violence. Following treatment, physical attacks reduced by more than half, dropping from approximately 3.5 attacks per patient 6 months prior to treatment, versus approximately 1 attack per patient in the 6-12 month interval post-treatment. In hierarchical regressions, controlling for IQ, reduction in physical assaults was associated with pre-to post-treatment change in anger level. These findings buttress the efficacy of anger treatment for patients having histories of violence and have significance for patient mental health, hospital staff well-being, therapeutic milieu, hospital management, and service delivery costs.

  18. Experiences of hospitalization in patients with multiple sclerosis: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Ghafari, Somayeh; Fallahi-Khoshknab, Masoud; Norouzi, Kian; Mohamadi, Eisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with multiple sclerosis experience hospitalization several times in their lives. Certainly, providing efficient and high-quality care by healthcare professionals is not possible unless the experiences of patients’ hospitalization are taken into consideration. This qualitative study was aimed to identify experiences of patients with multiple sclerosis in their hospitalization. Materials and Methods: A qualitative content analysis method was used to conduct this study. The study participants were 25 patients with multiple sclerosis, who were chosen by purposeful sampling. Data were collected through non-structured interviews. Results: The analysis resulted in the emergence of 4 themes and 11 subthemes. The main themes were: Religiosity, emotional reactions, seeking support, and feeling of being in a cage. Conclusions: Awareness of families and healthcare providers of the reactions of patients with multiple sclerosis to hospitalization will help them to deal effectively with patients and to improve relationships with them. However, by understanding the patients’ experiences, the practitioners gain expertise and can join in the patients’ health journey in a therapeutic way during the hospitalization period. In addition, the findings can serve to create a framework for developing nursing care processes including informational and supporting programs for multiple sclerosis patients during hospitalization while taking into consideration patients’ needs and cultural backgrounds. PMID:24949063

  19. Obstetrician/gynecologist hospitalists: can we improve safety and outcomes for patients and hospitals and improve lifestyle for physicians?

    PubMed

    Olson, Rob; Garite, Thomas J; Fishman, Alan; Andress, Ianthe F

    2012-08-01

    Over the last 5 years, a new obstetric-gynecologic hospitalist model has emerged rapidly, the primary focus of which is the care and safety of the laboring patient. The need for this type of practitioner has been driven by a number of factors: various types of patient safety programs that require a champion and organizer; the realization that bad outcomes and malpractice lawsuits often result from the lack of immediate availability of a physician in the labor and delivery suite; the desire for many younger practicing physicians to seek a balance between their personal and professional lives; the appeal of shift work as opposed to running a busy private practice; the waning amount of training that new residency graduates receive in critical skills that are needed on labor and delivery; the void in critical care of the laboring patient that is created by the outpatient focus of many physicians in maternal-fetal medicine; the need for hospitals to have a group of physicians to implement protocols and policies on the unit, and the need for teaching in all hospitals, not just academic centers. By having a dedicated group of physicians whose practice is limited mostly to the care of the labor and delivery aspects of patient care, there is great potential to address many of these needs. There are currently 164 known obstetrician/gynecologist hospitalist programs across the United States, with 2 more coming on each month; the newly formed Society of Obstetrician/Gynecologist Hospitalists currently has >80 individual members. This article addresses the advantages, challenges, and variety of Hospitalist models and will suggest that what may be considered an emerging trend is actually a sustainable model for improved patient care and safety.

  20. Relation between amoxicillin concentration in sputum of COPD patients and length of hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; ten Bokum, Leonore; Movig, Kris; van der Valk, Paul; Kerstjens, Huib; van der Palen, Job; Hendrix, Ron

    2011-04-01

    Amoxicillin is a widely used antibiotic in COPD. Little is known about the transfer of amoxicillin into sputum of COPD patients. The objective was to investigate the relationship between the concentration of amoxicillin in sputum in hospitalized COPD patients and length of hospitalization. To be effective against bacterial pathogens, the amoxicillin concentration in target tissues should be higher than the Minimal Inhibiting Concentration (MIC) of 2 mg/l. Therefore, this was also used as the cut-off value for the amoxicillin concentration in sputum, as a marker for lung tissue concentration. Fifty-two COPD in-patients with an exacerbation, treated with amoxicillin clavulanic acid, were included in this cohort study. Of these patients 7 also had pneumonia. Patients were divided in patients with an amoxicillin sputum concentration ≥ 2 mg/l and < 2 mg/l. Furthermore, inflammation markers in sputum and serum and clinical parameters were obtained. Of the 33 patients with usable sputum, 11 had a concentration in sputum ≥ 2 mg/l. The mean length of hospitalization for patients with concentrations below the MIC90 to common respiratory pathogens was 11.0 days, while for patients with concentrations at or above the MIC90 this was 7.0 days (p = 0.005). COPD patients admitted for an acute exacerbation of COPD, with a sputum concentration of amoxicillin ≥ 2 mg/l had a markedly reduced length of hospitalization compared to patients with a concentration < 2 mg/l. It is worthwhile testing whether individualized treatment based on sputum amoxicillin concentrations of patients during hospitalization for acute exacerbations can effectively reduce hospital stay.

  1. Management and Outcomes Among Chinese Hospitalized Patients With Established Cardiovascular Disease or Multiple Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jingang; Yang, Yuejin; Gu, Hongqiu; Li, Wei; Hu, Dayi

    2016-02-01

    We assessed the management and outcomes among hospitalized patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease (PAD), or with multiple (≥ 2) cardiovascular (CV) risk factors (multiple risk factors [MRFs]). We retrospectively studied 3732 hospitalized patients of either CV disease or ≥ 2 risk factors for atherothrombosis from October 2004 to January 2005. Outcomes included CV death, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and hospitalization for atherothrombotic events. About one-third had disease involving ≥ 1 vascular bed. Medication was more intense in patients with CAD than in others. The lowest use of statins and antiplatelet treatment was in the PAD-only group. Patients with PAD experienced a higher CV mortality (5.1%) than the patients with CAD (3.73%) or stroke (4.1%), P < .001. Cardiovascular death ranged from 1.2% for patients with MRFs, 2.8% for patients with 1-bed disease, 4.7% for patients with 2-bed disease to 6.4% for patients with 3-bed disease (P for trend <.001). For hospitalized patients with established atherosclerotic arterial disease, a substantial increase in CV event rates occurs with increasing numbers of affected arterial beds. Patients with PAD were at an especially high risk.

  2. In-Hospital Outcome of Patients with Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction: Results from Royal Hospital Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Registry, Oman

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Mohammad S.; Panduranga, Prashanth; Al-Mukhaini, Mohammed; Al-Riyami, Abdullah; El-Deeb, Mohammad; Rahman, Said Abdul; Al-Riyami, Mohammed B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cardiogenic shock (CS) is still the leading cause of in-hospital mortality in patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). The aim of this study was to determine the in-hospital mortality and clinical outcome in AMI patients presenting with CS in a tertiary hospital in Oman. Methods This retrospective observational study included patients admitted to the cardiology department between January 2013 and December 2014. A purposive sampling technique was used, and 63 AMI patients with CS admitted to (36.5%) or transferred from a regional hospital (63.5%) were selected for the study. Results Of 63 patients, 73% (n = 46) were Omani and 27% (n = 17) were expatriates: 79% were male and 21% were female. The mean age of patients was 60±12 years. The highest incidence of CS (30%) was observed in the 51–60 year age group. Diabetes mellitus (43%) and hypertension (40%) were the predominant risk factors. Ninety-two percent of patients had ST-elevation MI, 58.7% patients were thrombolysed, and 8% had non-ST-elevation MI. Three-quarters (75%) of CS patients had severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction (defined as ejection fraction <30%). Coronary angiogram showed single vessel disease in 17%, double vessel disease in 40%, and triple vessel disease in 32% and left main disease in 11%. The majority of the patients (93.6%) underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), among them 23 (36.5%) underwent primary PCI. In-hospital mortality was 52.4% in this study. Conclusions CS in AMI patients presenting to a tertiary hospital in Oman have high in-hospital mortality despite the majority undergoing PCI. Even though the in-hospital mortality is comparable to other studies and registries, there is an urgent need to determine the causes and find any remedies to provide better care for such patients, specifically concentrating on the early transfer of patients from regional hospitals for early PCI. PMID:26814946

  3. Changes in patient flow among five hospitals participating in a learning collaborative.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Megan; Van Dyke, Kevin J; Howell, Embry; Adams, Fiona; Moss, Dina; Yonek, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This was an evaluation of the efforts of five hospitals that participated in a collaborative aimed at improving patient flow and reducing emergency department (ED) crowding. Interviews with hospital implementation team members were conducted at two separate times, and multivariate linear regression models and bivariate logistic models were constructed to assess changes in ED length of stay (LOS) and left without being seen (LWBS). By the end of the collaborative, four of the five hospitals had at least one fully implemented improvement strategy. Those hospitals experienced modest improvements in patient flow: a hospital that implemented front-end improvements and devoted additional resources to fast track had a 51-min reduction in ED LOS, another that implemented only front-end improvements had a 9-min reduction in LOS, a third hospital that improved communication between the ED and inpatient units to facilitate admissions decreased LWBS from 0.6% to 0.4%, and a fourth hospital reduced LOS by 59 min for mid-acuity patients by establishing a new care process for them. Results suggest that relatively small changes may lead to improvements in measures of patient flow that are modest, at best.

  4. Predictive Factors for Hospitalization of Patients with Heat Illness in Yamaguchi, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takahiro; Todani, Masaki; Oda, Yasutaka; Kaneko, Tadashi; Kaneda, Kotaro; Fujita, Motoki; Miyauchi, Takashi; Tsuruta, Ryosuke

    2015-09-18

    The objective of the study was to investigate the predictive factors for the hospitalization of patients who presented with mild to moderate heat illness at an emergency department. We conducted a retrospective survey of hospitals with an emergency department in Yamaguchi Prefecture, Japan. The survey questionnaire entries included patient age, sex, use of an ambulance, vital signs, blood examination conducted at the emergency department, the length of hospitalization, and outcome. We analyzed the predictive factors for hospitalization in patients with heat illness. A total of 127 patients were analyzed. Of these, 49 (37%) were admitted, with 59% discharged on the day following admission. In univariate analysis, the following inpatient characteristics were predictive for hospitalization: old age, low Glasgow Coma Scale score, elevated body temperature, increased serum C-reactive protein, and increased blood urea nitrogen. In logistic regression multivariate analysis, the following were predictive factors for hospitalization: age of ≥ 65 years (odds ratio (OR) 4.91; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.42-17.00), body temperature (OR 1.97; 95% CI 1.14-3.41), Glasgow Coma Scale (OR 0.40; 95% CI 0.16-0.98), and creatinine (OR 2.92; 95% CI 1.23-6.94). The results suggest that the elderly with hyperthermia, disturbance of consciousness, and elevated serum creatinine have an increased risk for hospitalization with heat illness.

  5. Rational use of elemental and nonelemental diets in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed Central

    Fairfull-Smith, R; Abunassar, R; Freeman, J B; Maroun, J A

    1980-01-01

    Study A included 30 patients who received immediate postoperative enteral feeding with a nonelemental diet. The nonelemental diet was well tolerated. Study patients rapidly achieved nitrogen equilibrium and had a cumulative nitrogen balance of -11.1 g verus -46.7 g for the control group. In part B, 16 patients with varying degrees of bowel dysfunction received elemental and nonelemental diets in a crossover design. Patients with moderate small bowel impairment tolerated nonelemental better than the elemental diets. In those patients with more severe bowel impairment, the elemental diet was better tolerated. Nitrogen balance for both types of diet was similar in both groups of patients. It is concluded that nonelemental diets are better tolerated in most patients with moderate degrees of small bowel abnormality. In patients with severe bowel abnormality, elemental diets may be better tolerated, but nonelemental diets should still be the initial formula. PMID:7436590

  6. Our recommendations for avoiding exposure to fungi outside the hospital for patients with haematological cancers.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Heredia, Ella J; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2014-06-01

    Despite several chemotherapeutic and preventative advances, opportunistic fungal infections remain common unintended consequences of cancer treatment. Currently, cancer patients spend most of their time between treatments at home, where they can inadvertently come across potential hazards from environmental and food sources. Therefore, infection prevention measures are of the utmost importance for these patients. Although clinicians closely observe patients throughout their treatment courses in the hospital, the focus of clinical visits is predominantly on cancer care, and clinicians seldom provide recommendations for prevention of such infections. Herein, we provide practical recommendations for busy clinicians to help them educate patients regarding potential sources of fungal infections outside the hospital.

  7. Nurses' attire in a special hospital: perceptions of patients and staff.

    PubMed

    Brennan, W; Scully, W; Tarbuck, P; Young, C

    Nurses' uniforms have been the subject of ongoing debate in many areas. Following the Ashworth Hospital inquiry, two wards at the hospital piloted the wearing of casual clothes by nurses. Patients and nurses in these wards completed questionnaires to evaluate the effects of the change. The results showed that the patients felt casual clothes helped remove a 'them and us' distinction and enhanced nurse/patient relationships. Nurses found casual clothes to be more comfortable and practical. Although concern was expressed that, without uniform, nurses might not be readily identifiable in an emergency situation, the change to casual clothing was generally viewed positively by both patients and nurses.

  8. Patient walk detection in hospital room using Microsoft Kinect V2.

    PubMed

    Liang Liu; Mehrotra, Sanjay

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a system using Kinect sensor to detect patient walk automatically in a hospital room setting. The system is especially essential for the case when the patient is alone and the nursing staff is absent. The patient activities are represented by the features extracted from Kinect V2 skeletons. The analysis to the recognized walk could help us to better understand the health situation of the patient and the possible hospital acquired infection (HAI), and provide valuable information to healthcare givers for making a corresponding treatment decision and alteration. The Kinect V2 depth sensor provides the ground truth.

  9. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Goel, Noopur; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital in such patients. This is important in order to minimize unnecessary diagnostic workup and provide adequate treatment and safe hospital stay for these patients.

  10. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital in such patients. This is important in order to minimize unnecessary diagnostic workup and provide adequate treatment and safe hospital stay for these patients. PMID:27433362

  11. Nurses awareness of patients rights in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad Nejad, Esmaeil; Begjani, Jamaloddin; Abotalebi, Ghasem; Salari, Amir; Ehsani, Seyyedeh Roghayeh

    2011-01-01

    Patients’ rights observance is one of the effective measures of patients’ satisfaction of health care services. We performed this study at the aim of evaluation of nurses’ awareness of patients’ rights in a teaching hospital in Tehran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2010. In this study 156 nurses were randomly selected. Two-part questionnaire was used for data collection. The validity and reliability of questionnaire was determined and then it was distributed between subjects. The data were analyzed by SPSS version 15 using descriptive and inferential statistics. Our results showed that %58.33, %39.10 and % 2.56 of nurses have good, medium, and poor levels of awareness respectively. We observed a significant relationship between nurses awareness and work experience (P=0.008) and concurrent work in public and private hospitals (P=0.01). The most of the nurses (%95.51) were aware of “right to privacy protection and ensure confidentiality of information” and the least of them (%33.97) were aware of “right to receiving necessary information about the health care providers, the rate of tariff and insurance coverage”. According to our survey it is concluded that implementation of Patients’ Right Charter in this hospital is accompanied by some limitations which necessitates promotion of the nurses’ awareness about patients’ rights. Taken together in order to enhance nurses’ awareness special measures and strategies should be considered. PMID:23908744

  12. [Study of morbidity in patients hospitalized at the Clinic Hospital at the Medical School of the USP-1989].

    PubMed

    Lebrão, M L; Litvoc, J; Figueiredo, G M; Leite, R M

    1993-01-01

    The diagnostic categories of the patients discharged from the "Hospital das Clínicas" of the University of São Paulo in 1989 were arranged according the International Classification of Diseases (I.C.D.) and analysed. In each Group sex, age and the reason of discharge or death was indicated. The data concerning 39,601 cases were provided by the Medical Data Service of the "Instituto Central" of the "Hospital das Clínicas". Only the principal diagnosis was taken into account. In the "Instituto de Psiquiatria" most the patients (55.4%) were males between 20 and 49 years of age. The main diagnostic categories were affective psychoses (20.3%), schizophrenic disorders (15%), and disorders related to alcoholism (9.5%). The mortality rate was 0.27%. In the "Instituto da Criança" 56% of the patients that left the hospital were male children and 45.8% of them were less than one year old. Regarding to the diagnostic categories the most important one was that of the diseases of the respiratory system with 27.1% of cases, followed by that of infectious and parasitic diseases with 16.0% of cases. Within the respiratory diseases the most important were the pneumonias caused by not specified microorganisms, and within the infectious diseases the most important was the diarrhea of presumably infectious origin. The mortality rate in this Institute was 9.4%. The "Instituto de Ortopedia e Traumatologia" left 3,825 patients 61.7% males, and 46.9% of them were aged between 20 and 49 years. The greatest number of cases (57.1%) belonged to the Chapter "Injury and Poisoning" followed by that of "Diseases of the Muscoleskeletal System" and Connective Tissue Diseases (23.5%). In this Institute the mortality rate was 1.2%. From the "Instituto do Coração" 7,194 patients were discharged; 65% of them were males, varying their age between 50 and 69 years. The diseases of the circulatory system were mostly ischemic heart disease, miocardiopathies and rheumatic heart diseases. Mortality rate

  13. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  14. Factors affecting time of access of in-patient care at Webuye District hospital, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Otsyula, Barasa K.; Downing, Raymond; Yakubu, Kenneth; Miima, Miriam; Ifeyinwa, Okoye

    2016-01-01

    Background Among many Kenyan rural communities, access to in-patient healthcare services is seriously constrained. It is important to understand who has ready access to the facilities and services offered and what factors prevent those who do not from doing so. Aim To identify factors affecting time of access of in-patient healthcare services at a rural district hospital in Kenya. Setting Webuye District hospital in Western Kenya. Methods A cross-sectional, comparative, hospital-based survey among 398 in-patients using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results were analysed using SPSS V.12.01. Results The median age of the respondents, majority of whom were female respondents (55%), was 24 years. Median time of presentation to the hospital after onset of illness was 12.5 days. Two hundred and forty seven patients (62%) presented to the hospital within 2 weeks of onset of illness, while 151 (38%) presented after 2 weeks or more. Ten-year increase in age, perception of a supernatural cause of illness, having an illness that was considered bearable and belief in the effectiveness of treatment offered in-hospital were significant predictors for waiting more than 2 weeks to present at the hospital. Conclusion Ten-year increment in age, perception of a supernatural cause of illness (predisposing factors), having an illness that is considered bearable and belief in the effectiveness of treatment offered in hospital (need factors) affect time of access of in-patient healthcare services in the community served by Webuye District hospital and should inform interventions geared towards improving access. PMID:27796120

  15. Evaluating the complexity of online patient education materials about brain aneurysms published by major academic institutions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Raghav; Adeeb, Nimer; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Moore, Justin M; Patel, Apar S; Kim, Christopher; Thomas, Ajith J; Ogilvy, Christopher S

    2016-08-19

    OBJECTIVE Health care education resources are increasingly available on the Internet. A majority of people reference these resources at one point or another. A threshold literacy level is needed to comprehend the information presented within these materials. A key component of health literacy is the readability of educational resources. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the American Medical Association have recommended that patient education materials be written between a 4th- and a 6th-grade education level. The authors assessed the readability of online patient education materials about brain aneurysms that have been published by several academic institutions across the US. METHODS Online patient education materials about brain aneurysms were downloaded from the websites of 20 academic institutions. The materials were assessed via 8 readability scales using Readability Studio software (Oleander Software Solutions), and then were statistically analyzed. RESULTS None of the patient education materials were written at or below the NIH's recommended 6th-grade reading level. The average educational level required to comprehend the texts across all institutions, as assessed by 7 of the readability scales, was 12.4 ± 2.5 (mean ± SD). The Flesch Reading Ease Scale classified the materials as "difficult" to understand, correlating with a college-level education or higher. An ANOVA test found that there were no significant differences in readability among the materials from the institutions (p = 0.215). CONCLUSIONS Brain aneurysms affect 3.2% of adults 50 years or older across the world and can cause significant patient anxiety and uncertainty. Current patient education materials are not written at or below the NIH's recommended 4th- to 6th-grade education level.

  16. [Reasons for Hospital Treatment of Psychiatric Patients before and after the Opening of a Satellite Ward].

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, R P; Schmidt-Michel, P O

    2002-04-01

    A satellite ward is a psychiatric ward at a general hospital settled within the catchment area that is administered by a psychiatric hospital. The objective of the satellite model is to approach community treatment on the one hand and somatic medicine on the other hand, consequently diminishing the threshold for hospital treatment. This study investigated whether the diagnostic, psychopathologic and social reasons for admissions changed from this catchment area due to the lower threshold of a satellite ward. The results were controlled with another catchment area's admissions to the 30 km distant psychiatric hospital. The opening of the satellite ward was followed by an 81 % increase of admissions. In particular, admissions of patients with neuroses and personality disorders were more frequent. There was no change of the severity code of psychopathology at admission. From the catchment area of the satellite ward less patients were admitted involuntarily whereas more admissions happened due to social reasons and after patients' own decision.

  17. Detection of iron-deficiency anemia in hospitalized patients by zinc protoporphyrin.

    PubMed

    Wong, S S; Qutishat, A S; Lange, J; Gornet, T G; Buja, L M

    1996-01-15

    The diagnostic value of zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) as an indicator of iron-deficient anemia (IDA) in hospitalized patients is assessed in this study. ZPP was measured using an AVIV hematofluorometer with a coefficient of variation (CV) less than 5% and a recovery of greater than 97%. A reference range of 53-70 mu mol/mol heme was determined for ZPP in non-anemic patients in a hospital population. Hospitalized patients (221) with low hemoglobin (< 120 g/l) were evaluated for their iron status. ZPP and other anemia tests were performed. Macrocytic patients with mean corpuscular volume (MCV) greater than 98 fl) were excluded from the study. Seventy-four microcytic patients (MCV < 80 fl) were determined as having IDA according to a diagnostic algorithm. A distribution study of these microcytic patients showed that there was a significant overlap of values between the IDA and non-IDA patients for all serum anemia tests. A receiver-operator curve analysis revealed that ZPP has a relatively high degree of diagnostic efficiency better than iron and ferritin for this patient population. At a cutoff value > 170 mu mol/mol heme, ZPP has a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 90%. In addition, ZPP is also elevated in normocytic patients (MCV = 80-98 fl) with low ferritin values, who may have iron depletion. From these data, it is proposed that ZPP may be used as a screening tool for IDA in hospitalized patients.

  18. Association between market concentration of hospitals and patient health gain following hip replacement surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pistollato, Michele; Charlesworth, Anita; Devlin, Nancy; Propper, Carol; Sussex, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between market concentration of hospitals (as a proxy for competition) and patient-reported health gains after elective primary hip replacement surgery. Methods Patient Reported Outcome Measures data linked to NHS Hospital Episode Statistics in England in 2011/12 were used to analyse the association between market concentration of hospitals measured by the Herfindahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) and health gains for 337 hospitals. Results The association between market concentration and patient gain in health status measured by the change in Oxford Hip Score (OHS) after primary hip replacement surgery was not statistically significant at the 5% level both for the average patient and for those with more than average severity of hip disease (OHS worse than average). For 12,583 (49.1%) patients with an OHS before hip replacement surgery better than the mean, a one standard deviation increase in the HHI, equivalent to a reduction of about one hospital in the local market, was associated with a 0.104 decrease in patients’ self-reported improvement in OHS after surgery, but this was not statistically significant at the 5% level. Conclusions Hospital market concentration (as a proxy for competition) appears to have no significant influence (at the 5% level) on the outcome of elective primary hip replacement. The generalizability of this finding needs to be investigated. PMID:25213207

  19. Limited usefulness of lymphocytopenia in screening for AIDS in hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Boyko, W J; Schechter, M T; Constance, P; Nitz, R

    1985-01-01

    Lymphocytopenia is often present in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and has been suggested as a useful screening test for AIDS. Of 625 patients consecutively admitted to an acute care university teaching hospital 91 (15%) were found to have a lymphocyte count of less than 1 X 10(9)/L, and 25 (4%) had a count of less than 0.5 X 10(9)/L. The corresponding figures for 32 patients at the hospital in whom AIDS had been diagnosed were 13 (41%) and 4 (13%). Absolute lymphocyte counts in hospitalized patients should not be used as the sole means of identifying patients at high risk for AIDS. PMID:4016638

  20. Analyzing patient's waiting time in emergency & trauma department in public hospital - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslan, Shazwa; Tahir, Herniza Md; Nordin, Noraimi Azlin Mohd; Zaharudin, Zati Aqmar

    2014-09-01

    Emergency and Trauma Department (ETD) is an important element for a hospital. It provides medical service, which operates 24 hours a day in most hospitals. However overcrowding is not exclusion for ETD. Overflowing occurs due to affordable services provided by public hospitals, since it is funded by the government. It is reported that a patient attending ETD must be treated within 90 minutes, in accordance to achieve the Key Performance Indicator (KPI). However, due to overcrowd situations, most patients have to wait longer than the KPI standard. In this paper, patient's average waiting time is analyzed. Using Chi-Square Test of Goodness, patient's inter arrival per hour is also investigated. As conclusion, Monday until Wednesday was identified as the days that exceed the KPI standard while Chi-Square Test of Goodness showed that the patient's inter arrival is independent and random.

  1. Factors affecting decision-making of patients choosing acupuncture in a public hospital

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Thean Howe Bryan; Kong, Keng He; Low, Yin Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background With increasing evidence to support its practice, acupuncture has been integrated within many hospitals around the world. The purpose of this study is to understand the factors affecting decision making of patients as they select acupuncture treatment for their medical conditions and symptoms within a public hospital. Methods A qualitative study consisting of in depth interviews with 14 patients was conducted. All patients attended an acupuncture clinic within a public hospital. Data collected was analysed via thematic analysis. Results Four main factor groups affecting decision making of patients were identified- factors affecting the level and value of patient-centric care, the confidence and trust patients place within the acupuncture service, the presence of collaborative efforts between acupuncturists and Western medicine practitioners, and the knowledge, culture and belief society has regarding the role of acupuncture and Western medicine. All participants interviewed had more than one factor group present as enablers toward their eventual selection of acupuncture for ailment management. It was also noted that although the majority of participants had sufficient knowledge regarding acupuncture, there were a select few who had misperceptions or no knowledge regarding certain aspects of acupuncture. Conclusions There may be certain patterns in the way patients choose to utilise acupuncture services in public hospitals. Further studies should also be carried out in other public hospitals to analyse the factor groups identified further. PMID:26697443

  2. Drug-Drug Interaction Associated with Mold-Active Triazoles among Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Andes, David; Azie, Nkechi; Yang, Hongbo; Harrington, Rachel; Kelley, Caroline; Tan, Ruo-Ding; Wu, Eric Q; Franks, Billy; Kristy, Rita; Lee, Edward; Khandelwal, Nikhil; Spalding, James

    2016-06-01

    The majority of hospitalized patients receiving mold-active triazoles are at risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Efforts are needed to increase awareness of DDIs that pose a serious risk of adverse events. Triazoles remain the most commonly utilized antifungals. Recent developments have included the mold-active triazoles (MATs) itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, which are first-line agents for the treatment of filamentous fungal infections but have the potential for DDIs. This objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of triazole DDIs. Hospitalized U.S. adults with MAT use were identified in the Cerner HealthFacts database, which contained data from over 150 hospitals (2005 to 2013). The severities of DDIs with MATs were categorized, using drug labels and the drug information from the Drugdex system (Thompson Micromedex), into four groups (contraindicated, major, moderate, and minor severity). DDIs of minor severity were not counted. A DDI event was considered to have occurred if the following two conditions were met: (i) the patient used at least one drug with a classification of at least a moderate interaction with the MAT during the hospitalization and (ii) there was a period of overlap between the administration of the MAT and that of the interacting drug of at least 1 day. A total of 6,962 hospitalizations with MAT use were identified. Among them, 88% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use, 86% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 93% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use included the use of a concomitant interacting drug. A total of 68% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 34% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 20% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the use of at least one drug with a DDI of contraindicated severity. A total of 83% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 61% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 82% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the

  3. Drug-Drug Interaction Associated with Mold-Active Triazoles among Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Azie, Nkechi; Yang, Hongbo; Harrington, Rachel; Kelley, Caroline; Tan, Ruo-Ding; Wu, Eric Q.; Franks, Billy; Kristy, Rita; Lee, Edward; Khandelwal, Nikhil; Spalding, James

    2016-01-01

    The majority of hospitalized patients receiving mold-active triazoles are at risk of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Efforts are needed to increase awareness of DDIs that pose a serious risk of adverse events. Triazoles remain the most commonly utilized antifungals. Recent developments have included the mold-active triazoles (MATs) itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, which are first-line agents for the treatment of filamentous fungal infections but have the potential for DDIs. This objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of triazole DDIs. Hospitalized U.S. adults with MAT use were identified in the Cerner HealthFacts database, which contained data from over 150 hospitals (2005 to 2013). The severities of DDIs with MATs were categorized, using drug labels and the drug information from the Drugdex system (Thompson Micromedex), into four groups (contraindicated, major, moderate, and minor severity). DDIs of minor severity were not counted. A DDI event was considered to have occurred if the following two conditions were met: (i) the patient used at least one drug with a classification of at least a moderate interaction with the MAT during the hospitalization and (ii) there was a period of overlap between the administration of the MAT and that of the interacting drug of at least 1 day. A total of 6,962 hospitalizations with MAT use were identified. Among them, 88% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use, 86% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 93% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use included the use of a concomitant interacting drug. A total of 68% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 34% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 20% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the use of at least one drug with a DDI of contraindicated severity. A total of 83% of hospitalizations with posaconazole use, 61% of hospitalizations with itraconazole use, and 82% of hospitalizations with voriconazole use included the

  4. Pre-Hospital Intravenous Fluid is Associated with Increased Survival in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hampton, David A.; Fabricant, Löic J.; Differding, Jerry; Diggs, Brian; Underwood, Samantha; De La Cruz, Dodie; Holcomb, John B.; Brasel, Karen J.; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Fox, Erin E.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Rahbar, Mohammad H.; Phelan, Herb A.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Muskat, Peter; Myers, John G.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Wade, Charles E.; Cotton, Bryan A.; Schreiber, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Delivery of intravenous crystalloid fluids (IVF) remains a tradition-based priority during pre-hospital resuscitation of trauma patients. Hypotensive and targeted resuscitation algorithms have been shown to improve patient outcomes. We hypothesized that receiving any pre-hospital IVF is associated with increased survival in trauma patients compared to receiving no pre-hospital IVF. Methods Prospective data from ten Level 1 trauma centers were collected. Patient demographics, pre-hospital IVF volume, pre-hospital and Emergency Department vital signs, life-saving interventions, laboratory values, outcomes and complications were collected and analyzed. Patients who did or did not receive pre-hospital IVF were compared. Tests for non-parametric data were utilized to assess significant differences between groups (p ≤ 0.05). Cox regression analyses were performed to determine the independent influence of IVF on outcome and complications. Results The study population consisted of 1245 trauma patients; 45 were removed due to incomplete data; 84% (n=1009) received pre-hospital IVF, and 16% (n=191) did not. There was no difference between the groups with respect to gender, age, and Injury Severity Score. The on-scene systolic blood pressure (SBP) was lower in the IVF group (110 vs. 100 mmHg, p<0.04) and did not change significantly after IVF, measured at ED admission (110 vs. 105 mmHg, p=0.05). Hematocrit/hemoglobin, fibrinogen, and platelets were lower (p<0.05), and Prothrombin Time/International Normalized Ratio and Partial Thromboplastin Time were higher (p<0.001) in the IVF group. The IVF group received a median fluid volume of 700ml (IQR: 300-1300). The Cox regression revealed that pre-hospital fluid administration was associated with increased survival, Hazard Ratio: 0.84 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.72, 0.98; p=0.03). Site differences in ISS and fluid volumes were demonstrated (p<0.001). Conclusions Pre-hospital IVF volumes commonly used by PROMMTT

  5. The incidence, risk factors and characteristics of pressure ulcers in hospitalized patients in China

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qixia; Li, Xiaohua; Qu, Xiaolong; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Liyan; Su, Chunyin; Guo, Xiujun; Chen, Yuejuan; Zhu, Yajun; Jia, Jing; Bo, Suping; Liu, Li; Zhang, Rui; Xu, Ling; Wu, Leyan; Wang, Hai; Wang, Jiandong

    2014-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are very common in hospital patients. Though many studies have been reported in many countries, the large-scale benchmarking prevalence of pressure ulcers in China is not available. The aim of this study is to quantify the prevalence of pressure ulcers and the incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers and analyze risk factors in hospitalized patients in China. A multi-central cross-sectional survey was conducted in one university hospital and 11 general hospitals in China. The Minimum Data Set (MDS) recommended by European Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel (EUPAP) was used to collect information of inpatients. All patients stayed in hospital more than 24 hours and older than 18 years signed consent form and were included. Data from 39952 out of 40415 (98.85%) inpatients were analyzed. Of the 39952 patients, 631 patients (including 1024 locations) had pressure ulcers. The prevalence rate of pressure ulcers in 12 hospitals was 1.58% (0.94-2.97%). The incidence of hospital-acquired pressure ulcers (HAPU) was 0.63% (0.20-1.20%). The most common locations developed pressure ulcers were sacrum, heels, and iliac crests. The common stages of pressure ulcers were stage I and II. Patients in Intensive Care Unit, Geriatric and Neurological Department were easier to develop pressure ulcers. The prevalence and incidence of pressure ulcers in China was lower than that reported in European and other countries. The stages of pressure ulcers in China were different than that reported in European countries. Our study provides with a baseline value for intensive research on pressure ulcer in China. PMID:24966973

  6. Initial Factors Influencing Duration of Hospital Stay in Adult Patients With Peritonsillar Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Hsi; Su, Hsing-Hao; Tsai, Yi-Wen; Hou, Yu-Yi; Chang, Kuo-Ping; Chi, Chao-Chuan; Lin, Ming-Yee; Wu, Pi-Hsiung

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To review cases of peritonsillar abscess and investigate the initial clinical factors that may influence the duration of hospitalization. To determine the predictive factors of prolonged hospital stay in adult patients with peritonsillar abscess. Methods Subjects were adults hospitalized with peritonsillar abscess. We retrospectively reviewed 377 medical records from 1990 to 2013 in a tertiary medical center in southern Taiwan. The association between clinical characteristics and the length of hospital stay was analyzed with independent t-test, univariate linear regression and multiple linear regression analysis. Results The mean duration of hospitalization was 6.2±6.0 days. With univariate linear regression, a prolonged hospital stay was associated with several variables, including female gender, older ages, nonsmoking status, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, band forms in white blood cell (WBC) counts, and lower hemoglobin levels. With multiple linear regression analysis, four independent predictors of hospital stay were noted: years of age (P<0.001), history of diabetes mellitus (P<0.001), ratio of band form WBC (P<0.001), and hemoglobin levels (P<0.001). Conclusion In adult patients with peritonsillar abscess, older ages, history of diabetes mellitus, band forms in WBC counts and lower hemoglobin levels were independent predictors of longer hospitalization. PMID:27334514

  7. Knowledge is Power. A quality improvement project to increase patient understanding of their hospital stay

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson Thomas, Eleanor; Edwards, Lloyd; McArdle, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Patients frequently leave hospital uninformed about the details of their hospital stay with studies showing that only 59.9% of patients are able to accurately state their diagnosis and ongoing management after discharge. 1 2 This places patients at a higher risk of complications. Educating patients by providing them with accurate and understandable information enables them to take greater control, potentially reducing readmission rates, and unplanned visits to secondary services whilst providing safer care and improving patient satisfaction. 3 4 We wished to investigate whether through a simple intervention, we could improve the understanding and retention of key pieces of clinical information in those patients recently admitted to hospital. A leaflet was designed to trigger patients to ask questions about key aspects of their stay. This was then given to inpatients who were interviewed two weeks later using telephone follow up to assess their understanding of their hospital admission. Patients were asked about their diagnosis, new medications, likely complications, follow up arrangements and recommended points of contact in case of difficulty. Sequential modifications were made using PDSA cycles to maximise the impact and benefit of the process. Baseline data revealed that only 77% of patients could describe their diagnosis and only 27% of patients knew details about their new medications. After the leaflet intervention these figures improved to 100% and 71% respectively. Too often patients are unaware about what happens to them whilst in hospital and are discharged unsafely and dissatisfied as a result. A simple intervention such as a leaflet prompting patients to ask questions and take responsibility for their health can make a difference in potentially increasing patient understanding and thereby reducing risk. PMID:28321297

  8. [University professors in the Soviet Occupation Zone and the German Democratic Republic up to 1961: Academic alternation of generations at university psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Kumbier, E; Haack, K

    2015-05-01

    After WWII a politically guided staffing policy foresaw an exchange program for professors from the Soviet Occupation Zone and the German Democratic Republic (GDR). In the field of medicine this initiative was not successful. With respect to university psychiatric/neurological hospitals this experiment failed as a result of a shortage of personnel due to the consequences of war, denazification and people migrating into western occupation zones. Criteria for politically selecting promising young talent which had been propagated by the Socialist Unity Party of Germany (Sozialistische Einheitspartei Deutschlands, SED) were thus not relevant in academic medicine until 1961; however, the communist rulers had great interest in bringing professional and academic resources up to date. Politically implicated representatives in the field were also included in this process. At the forefront was the interest in functioning medical care and education in order to be able to train much needed health professionals. At the end of the 1950s a new generation of professors was established at the university hospitals. This generation rotation demonstrated the politically intended replacement of the "old" professor generation and the transition to a new GDR generation that had been trained after 1945. This second generation of professors inherited vacant professorships and defined and shaped research and academia until the end of the GDR much more than the previous generation had and also more than the one that followed. The generation of professors continued to feel a strong affiliation with their academic teachers and consequently continued their tradition in the sense of a school, for the most part independent of political circumstances.

  9. Innovative Payment Mechanisms in Maryland Hospitals: An Empirical Analysis of Readmissions under Total Patient Revenue

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Karoline; Perman, Chad; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Background The state of Maryland implemented innovative budgeting of outpatient and inpatient services in eight rural hospitals under the Total Patient Revenue (TPR) system in July, 2010. Methods This paper uses data on Maryland discharges from the 2009-2011 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Inpatient Databases (SID). Individual inpatient discharges from eight treatment hospitals and three rural control hospitals (n=374,353) are analyzed. To get robust estimates and control for trends in the state, we also compare treatment hospitals to all hospitals in Maryland that report readmissions (n=1,997,164). Linear probability models using the difference-in-differences approach with hospital fixed effects are estimated to determine the effect of the innovative payment mechanisms on hospital readmissions, controlling for patient demographics and characteristics. Results Difference-in-differences estimates show that after implementation of TPR in the treatment hospitals, there were no statistically significant changes in the predicted probability of readmissions. Conclusions Early evidence from the TPR program shows that readmissions were not affected in the 18 months after implementation. Implications : As the health care system innovates, it is important to evaluate the success of these innovations. One of the goals of TPR was to lower readmission rates, however these rates did not show consistent downward trends after implementation. Our results suggest that payment innovations that provide financial incentives to ensure patients receive care in the most appropriate setting while maintaining quality of care may not have immediate effects on commonly used measures of hospital quality, particularly for rural hospitals that may lack coordinated care delivery infrastructure. PMID:25264518

  10. [A sheet for deciphering the cries of hospitalized elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Gomas, Jean-Marie; Tribout, Didier; Knorreck, Fanny; Denis, Michel; Petrognani, Annie; Sales, Elodie

    2014-01-01

    Crying out is not an insignificant act and it is important to fight against this misconception. Any caregiver can be confronted with this phenomenon with elderly hospitalised patients. Their cries must be understood, analysed and taken into account as they correspond to a particular situation experienced by the elderly patient. There are tools to help caregivers diagnose and reflect on this clinical context. This article presents the example of an interpretation sheet which can help caregivers decipher patients' cries.

  11. In-Hospital Mortality among Rural Medicare Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: The Influence of Demographics, Transfer, and Health Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Knudson, Alana D.; Klug, Marilyn G.; Wynne, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Context/Purpose: Most rural hospitals can provide medical care to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients, but a need for advanced cardiac care requires timely transfer to a tertiary hospital. There is little information on AMI in-hospital mortality predictors among rural transfer patients. Methods: Cross-sectional retrospective analyses on…

  12. Psychological approach of non-epileptic to epileptic patients: the dynamics of attitude changes during hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Jedrzejczak, J; Owczarek, K; Majkowski, J

    1999-09-01

    Measures of interpersonal relations of non-epileptic patients to epileptic patients were studied in search of answers to two questions: what is the initial attitude of non-epileptic patients to epileptic patients; and, do any changes in attitude occur during time spent together in hospital? In order to study these personal relations, a formal analysis of preferences was carried out. Twenty-two non-epileptic patients admitted to the Neurology and Epileptology Department, Medical Centre for Postgraduate Education, Warsaw were studied. Subjects were asked to rank-order (from 1 to 9 points) suggested ways of distributing the profits of a hypothetical joint (e.g., with a room-mate) money-earning venture. The experimental procedure for each patient was repeated for all three room-mates. Preferences were assessed three times - the day after admission to hospital, after 11 days and after 21 days in hospital. Following this procedure, it was possible to trace the dynamics of the patients' interpersonal relations. The data were correlated (Spearman's r(s)) and submitted to analysis of variance (MANOVA) with repeated measures. Analysis of the attitudes of patients with non-epileptic neurological disorders towards epileptic patients revealed a dynamic tendency - from negative (measures one and partly two) to positive attitudes after three weeks spent together in hospital (measure three).

  13. Readmission of older patients after hospital discharge for hip fracture: a multilevel approach

    PubMed Central

    Paula, Fátima de Lima; da Cunha, Geraldo Marcelo; Leite, Iúri da Costa; Pinheiro, Rejane Sobrino; Valente, Joaquim Gonçalves

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To identify individual and hospital characteristics associated with the risk of readmission in older inpatients for proximal femoral fracture in the period of 90 days after discharge. METHODS Deaths and readmissions were obtained by a linkage of databases of the Hospital Information System of the Unified Health System and the System of Information on Mortality of the city of Rio de Janeiro from 2008 to 2011. The population of 3,405 individuals aged 60 or older, with non-elective hospitalization for proximal femoral fracture was followed for 90 days after discharge. Cox multilevel model was used for discharge time until readmission, and the characteristics of the patients were used on the first level and the characteristics of the hospitals on the second level. RESULTS The risk of readmission was higher for men (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.37; 95%CI 1.08–1.73), individuals more than 79 years old (HR = 1.45; 95%CI 1.06–1.98), patients who were hospitalized for more than two weeks (HR = 1.33; 95%CI 1.06-1.67), and for those who underwent arthroplasty when compared with the ones who underwent osteosynthesis (HR = 0.57; 95%CI 0.41–0.79). Besides, patients admitted to state hospitals had lower risk for readmission when compared with inpatients in municipal (HR = 1.71; 95%CI 1.09–2.68) and federal hospitals (HR = 1.81; 95%CI 1.00–3.27). The random effect of the hospitals in the adjusted model remained statistically significant (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Hospitals have complex structures that reflect in the quality of care. Thus, we propose that future studies may include these complexities and the severity of the patients in the analysis of the data, also considering the correlation between readmission and mortality to reduce biases. PMID:27143616

  14. Statewide Longitudinal Hospital Use and Charges for Pediatric and Adolescent Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Sapna; Barbeau, Bree; Wright, Jennifer; Fluchel, Mark; Kirchhoff, Anne C.; Nelson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated longitudinal hospitalization outcomes (total charges, hospital days and admissions) among pediatric and adolescent patients with cancer compared with individuals from the general population without cancer using a novel and efficient three-step regression procedure. Methods: The statewide Utah Population Database, with linkages to the Utah Cancer Registry, was used to identify 1,651 patients who were diagnosed with cancer from 1996 to 2009 at ages 0 to 21 years. A comparison group of 4,953 same-sex and -age individuals was generated from birth certificates. Claims-based hospitalization data from 1996 to 2012 were retrieved from the Utah Department of Health. Using the regression method, we estimated survival (differences due to survival) and intensity (differences due to resource accumulation) effects of the cancer diagnosis on hospitalization outcomes within 10 years after diagnosis. Results: At 10 years after diagnosis, on average, patients with cancer incurred $51,723 (95% CI, $48,100 to $58,284) more in charges, spent 30 additional days (95% CI, 27.7 to 36.1 days) in the hospital, and had 5.7 (95% CI, 5.4 to 6.4) more admissions than the comparison group. Our analyses showed that the highest hospitalization burden occurred during the first 4 years of diagnosis. Patients with leukemia incurred the greatest hospitalization burden throughout the 10 years from diagnosis. Intensity effects explained the majority of differences in hospital outcomes. Conclusion: Our results suggest that children and adolescents who were diagnosed with cancer in 2014 in the United States will incur over $800 million more in hospital charges than individuals without cancer by 2024. Interventions to reduce this burden should be explored in conjunction with improving health and survival outcomes. PMID:26105667

  15. A systematic review of hospitalization resulting from medicine-related problems in adult patients

    PubMed Central

    Al Hamid, Abdullah; Ghaleb, Maisoon; Aljadhey, Hisham; Aslanpour, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    Aims Medicine-related problems (MRPs) represent a major issue leading to hospitalization, especially in adult and elderly patients. The aims of this review are to investigate the prevalence, causes and major risk factors for MRPs leading to hospitalization in adult patients and to identify the main medicine classes involved. Methods Studies were identified through electronic searches of Medline, Embase, Scopus and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts between January 2000 and May 2013. A systematic review was conducted of both retrospective and prospective studies. Studies included were those involving hospitalization resulting from MRPs in adults (≥18 years old), whereas studies excluded were those investigating drug misuse and abuse and studies investigating MRPs in hospitalized patients. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 20. Results Forty-five studies were identified, including 21 that investigated hospitalization resulting from adverse drug reactions, six studies that investigated hospitalization due to adverse drug events and 18 studies that investigated hospitalization due to MRPs. The median prevalence rates of hospitalization resulting from adverse drug reactions, adverse drug events and MRPs were 7% (interquartile range, 2.4–14.9%), 4.6% (interquartile range, 2.85–16.6%) and 12.1% (interquartile range, 6.43–22.2%), respectively. The major causes contributing to MRPs were adverse drug reactions and noncompliance. In addition, the major risk factors associated with MRPs were old age, polypharmacy and comorbidities. Moreover, the main classes of medicines implicated were medicines used to treat cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Conclusions Hospitalization due to MRPs had a high prevalence, in the range of 4.6–12.1%. Most MRPs encountered were prevalent among adult patients taking medicines for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. PMID:24283967

  16. Variability of hospital resources for acute care of COPD patients: the European COPD Audit.

    PubMed

    López-Campos, Jose Luis; Hartl, Sylvia; Pozo-Rodriguez, Francisco; Roberts, C Michael

    2014-03-01

    Studies have suggested that larger hospitals have better resources and provide better care than smaller ones. This study aimed to explore the relationship between hospital size, resources, organisation of care and adherence to guidelines. The European COPD Audit was designed as a pilot study of clinical care and a survey of resources and organisation of care. Data were entered by clinicians to a multilingual web tool and analysed centrally. Participating hospitals were divided into tertiles on the basis of bed numbers and comparisons made of the resources, organisation of care and adherence to guidelines across the three size groups. 13 national societies provided data on 425 hospitals. The mean number of beds per tertile was 220 (lower), 479 (middle), and 989 (upper). Large hospitals were more likely to have resources and increased numbers of staff; hospital performance measures were related in a minority of indicators only. Adherence to guidelines also varied with hospital size, but the differences were small and inconsistent. There is a wide variation in the size, resources and organisation of care across Europe for hospitals providing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease care. While larger hospitals have more resources, this does not always equate to better accessibility or quality of care for patients.

  17. Bridging the Self-care Deficit Gap: Remote Patient Monitoring and the Hospital-at-Home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafazzo, Joseph A.; Leonard, Kevin; Easty, Anthony C.; Rossos, Peter G.; Chan, Christopher T.

    This study examines the use of a remote patient monitoring intervention to address the challenge of patient self-care in complex hospital-at-home therapies. It was shown that in a home hemodialysis patient group, remote patient monitoring facilitated self-care and was supported by patients and, in particular, family caregivers. This does not come without cost to the patient however, who now has greater personal responsibility and accountability for their health management. Promising results from this study indicate that most patients are willing to assume this cost in exchange for the possibility of improved health outcomes.

  18. A qualitative study of nursing care for hospitalized patients with acute mania.

    PubMed

    Daggenvoorde, Thea; Geerling, Bart; Goossens, Peter J J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with a bipolar disorder and currently experiencing acute mania often require hospitalization. We explored patient problems, desired patient outcomes, and nursing interventions by individually interviewing 22 nurses. Qualitative content analysis gave a top five of patients problems, desired patient outcomes and nursing interventions, identified as most important in the interviews. We then conducted three focus group meetings to gain greater insight into these results. Intensive nursing care is needed, fine-tuning on the patient as a unique person is essential, taking into account the nature and severity of the manic symptoms of the patient.

  19. Evaluation of use of electronic patient controlled analgesia pumps to improve patient safety in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Dykes, Patricia; Mcintosh, Kathleen; Buckley, Elizabeth; Yoon, Catherine; Luppi, Carol; Bane, Anne; Bates, David W

    2014-01-01

    Patient controlled analgesia (PCA) and Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) pumps are methods of pain control with complex smart infusion devices and are widely used in hospitals. Smart PCA/PCEA pumps can be programmed with the dose and rate of medications within pre-set ranges. However, adverse effects have been reported associated with these pumps' use. In this paper, we describe a prevalence observational study where observers used an electronic data collection tool to record pump settings and medications with PCA pumps, corresponding medication orders to identify errors. The results showed that there were many labeling and tubing change tag errors, which were a violation of hospital policy. A few potential harmful medication errors were identified but no critical errors. Study results suggest the importance of a standard process of PCA pump use. Next steps include implementing a safety bundle for improving PCA practice to support safe and effective pain management.

  20. Hospitalization rates, length of stay and in-hospital mortality in a cohort of HIV infected patients from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Lara E; Ribeiro, Sayonara R; Veloso, Valdilea G; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Luz, Paula M

    2016-12-03

    In this study, we evaluated trends in hospitalization rates, length of stay and in-hospital mortality in a cohort of HIV-infected patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 2007 through 2013. Among the 3991 included patients, 1861 hospitalizations occurred (hospitalization rate of 10.44/100 person-years, 95% confidence interval 9.98-10.93/100 person-years). Hospitalization rates decreased annually (per year incidence rate ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.89-0.95) as well as length of stay (median of 15 days in 2007 vs. 11 days in 2013, p-value for trend<0.001), and in-hospital mortality (13.4% in 2007 to 8.1% in 2013, p-value for trend=0.053). Our results show that, in a middle-income setting, hospitalization rates are decreasing over time and non-AIDS hospitalizations are currently more frequent than those related to AIDS. Notwithstanding, compared with high-income settings, our patients had longer length of stay and higher in-hospital mortality. Further studies addressing these outcomes are needed to provide information that may guide protocols and interventions to further reduce health-care costs and in-hospital mortality.

  1. Clinical Features and Outcomes of IPF Patients Hospitalized for Pulmonary Infection: A Japanese Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Ryo; Nishiyama, Osamu; Sano, Hiroyuki; Iwanaga, Takashi; Higashimoto, Yuji; Kume, Hiroaki; Tohda, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Many patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) undergo hospitalizations due to pulmonary infections. We retrospectively investigated the characteristics of hospitalizations due to pulmonary infection in patients with IPF to elucidate causative pathogens and mortality. We reviewed patients with IPF who were admitted between January 2008 and December 2014 for pulmonary infections including pneumonia and bronchitis. The causative pathogen, the relationship between the site of pneumonia and existing IPF radiological patterns on high-resolution chest CT, and predictors of mortality were evaluated. Forty-eight IPF patients were hospitalized a totally of 81 times due to pulmonary infection during the study period. In the 48 first-time admissions after IPF diagnosis, causative pathogens were detected in 20 patients (41.6%). The most common pathogen was Haemophilus influenzae (14.5%) followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (4.1%), Staphylococcus aureus (4.1%), Branhamella catarrhalis (4.1%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (4.1%). Among all 81 admissions, the most common pathogen was P. aeruginosa (12.3%), followed by H. influenzae (8.6%), S. aureus (6.1%) and Escherichia coli (4.9%). No relationship was observed between the detected pathogen and the site of pneumonia. The 30-day and hospital mortality rates were 14.5% and 18.7%, respectively. Pneumonia severity index on admission was significantly associated with both 30-day and hospital mortality. In conclusion, IPF patients hospitalized for pulmonary infections had high 30-day and hospital mortality. In contrast to community-acquired pneumonia, the causative pathogens mainly consisted of gram-negative bacteria. The PSI score may be a significant predictor of mortality. These results provide information for empiric antibiotic selection when treating IPF patients with pulmonary infections. PMID:27959904

  2. A systematic review on the effect of the organisation of hospital discharge on patient health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Carrat, Fabrice; Hejblum, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Objective The transition from hospital to home represents a key step in the management of patients and several problems related to this transition may arise, with potential adverse effects on patient health after discharge. The purpose of our study was to explore the association between components of the hospital discharge process including subsequent continuity of care and patient outcomes in the post-discharge period. Design Systematic review of observational and interventional studies. Setting We conducted a combined search in the Medline and Web of Science databases. Additional studies were identified by screening the bibliographies of the included studies. The data collection process was conducted using a standardised predefined grid that included quality criteria. Participants A standard patient population returning home after hospitalisation. Primary and secondary outcomes Adverse health outcomes occurring after hospital discharge. Results In the 20 studies fulfilling our eligibility criteria, the main discharge-process components explored were: discharge summary (n=2), discharge instructions (n=2), drug-related problems at discharge (n=4), transition from hospital to home (n=5) and continuity of care after hospital discharge (n=7). The major subsequent patient health outcomes measured were: rehospitalisations (n=18), emergency department visits (n=8) and mortality (n=5). Eight of the 18 studies exploring rehospitalisations and two of the eight studies examining emergency department visits reported at least one significant association between the discharge process and these outcomes. None of the studies investigating patient mortality reported any significant such associations between the discharge process and these outcomes. Conclusions Irrespective of the component of the discharge process explored, the outcome considered (composite or not), the sample size and the study design, no consistent statistical association between hospital discharge and patient

  3. A public hospital closes. Impact on patients' access to care and health status.

    PubMed

    Bindman, A B; Keane, D; Lurie, N

    1990-12-12

    We studied the impact of the closing of a public hospital on patients' access to care and health status. We surveyed individuals who had been medical inpatients at Shasta General Hospital, Redding, Calif, in the year prior to its closing and compared them with those in a second county, San Luis Obispo, whose public hospital did not close. Surveys were administered after the closing of Shasta General Hospital and 1 year later. We assessed outcomes using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form and a series of transition questions that asked about changes in health over time. Data were available for 88% of patients at 1 year: 219 from Shasta County and 195 from San Luis Obispo County. At follow-up, the percentage of patients from Shasta County who reported no regular provider increased from 14.0 to 27.7 and the percentage who reported they were denied care rose from 10.8 to 16.9. Meanwhile, patients in San Luis Obispo County reported improved access to a regular provider and the level of denied care was unchanged. Patients in Shasta County had significant declines on the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form in health perception, social and role function, and increases in pain as compared with those patients in San Luis Obispo County. The closing of a public hospital had a significant effect on access to health care and was associated with a decline in health status.

  4. Improving Psychiatric Hospital Care for Pediatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Gabriels, Robin L.; Agnew, John A.; Beresford, Carol; Morrow, Mary Ann; Mesibov, Gary; Wamboldt, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and/or intellectual disabilities (ID) are at greater risk for psychiatric hospitalization compared to children with other disorders. However, general psychiatric hospital environments are not adapted for the unique learning styles, needs, and abilities of this population, and there are few specialized hospital-based psychiatric care programs in the United States. This paper compares patient outcomes from a specialized psychiatric hospital program developed for pediatric patients with an ASD and/or ID to prior outcomes of this patient population in a general psychiatric program at a children's hospital. Record review data indicate improved outcomes for patients in the specialized program of reduced recidivism rates (12% versus 33%) and decreased average lengths of inpatient stay (as short as 26 days versus 45 days). Available data from a subset of patients (n = 43) in the specialized program showed a decrease in irritability and hyperactivity behaviors from admission to discharge and that 35 previously undetected ASD diagnoses were made. Results from this preliminary study support specialized psychiatric care practices with this population to positively impact their health care outcomes. PMID:22934179

  5. Redesigning roles for patient-centered care. The hospitality representative.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, J; Serpico-Thompson, D

    1992-01-01

    Nurses cannot always meet patients' expectations for nonclinical care. The authors describe the operational redesign of several hotel-related functions to enhance the provision of nonclinical care. This system enhances care delivery to better balance patients' perceptions of the clinical with the non-clinical components of care.

  6. Evaluating denture cleanliness of patients in a regional dental hospital.

    PubMed

    Mylonas, P; Attrill, D C; Walmsley, A D

    2016-08-12

    Aims To evaluate the quality of clinical record keeping and determine quality of denture cleanliness; record baseline denture cleanliness for 60 patients; introduce denture hygiene instruction (DHI); and then re-assess the patients for improvement and enhanced record keeping.Methods Analysis of patients' denture hygiene instruction record keeping (n = 60) was undertaken retrospectively. The Denture Cleanliness Index (DCI) was utilised to assess denture cleanliness (best score 0, worst score 4). Baseline DCI scores were taken and individual DHI was delivered. After one month, patients were reviewed and scored, with record keeping quality analysed.Results At baseline, 11.7% (n = 7) of patients had DCI scores of ≤2, improving to 93.8% (n = 45) after one month, demonstrating short-term improvement in denture cleanliness. Only 63% (n = 38) of patients had evidence of a record of DHI within their notes at baseline, improving to 100% at recall.Conclusions New patient information leaflet and clinical guidelines on denture hygiene have been written and implemented. The results of this study suggest that this may be a relatively straightforward method to achieve a short-term improvement in denture cleanliness. The implementation of a DCI score is helpful in allowing patients to improve denture hygiene and its wider use is supported.

  7. Complaints handling in hospitals: an empirical study of discrepancies between patients' expectations and their experiences

    PubMed Central

    Friele, Roland D; Sluijs, Emmy M; Legemaate, Johan

    2008-01-01

    Background Many patients are dissatisfied with the way in which their complaints about health care are dealt with. This study tested the assumption that this dissatisfaction consists – in part at least – of unmet expectations. Methods Subjects were 279 patients who lodged a complaint with the complaints committees of 74 hospitals in the Netherlands. They completed two questionnaires; one on their expectations at the start of the complaints handling process, and one on their experiences after the complaints procedure (pre-post design; response 50%). Dependent variables are patients' satisfaction and their feeling that justice was done; independent variables are the association between patients' expectations and their experiences. Results Only 31% of the patients felt they had received justice from the complaints process. Two thirds of the patients were satisfied with the conduct of the complaints committee, but fewer were satisfied with the conduct of the hospital or the medical professional (29% and 18%). Large discrepancies between expectations and experiences were found in the case of doctors not admitting errors when errors had been made, and of hospital managements not providing information on corrective measures that were taken. Discrepancies collectively explained 51% of patients' dissatisfaction with the committee and one third of patients' dissatisfaction with the hospital and the professional. The feeling that justice was done was influenced by the decision on the complaint (well-founded or not), but also by the satisfaction with the conduct of the committee, the hospital management and the professional involved. Conclusion It is disappointing to observe that less than one third of the patients felt that justice had been done through the complaints handling process. This study shows that the feeling that justice had been done is not only influenced by the judgement of the complaints committee, but also by the response of the professional. Furthermore

  8. Predictive factors for hospitalization of nonurgent patients in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chip-Jin; Liao, Pei-Ju; Chang, Yu-Che; Kuan, Jen-Tze; Chen, Jih-Chang; Hsu, Kuang-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonurgent emergency department (ED) patients are a controversial issue in the era of ED overcrowding. However, a substantial number of post-ED hospitalizations were found, which prompted for investigation and strategy management. The objective of this study is to identify risk factors for predicting the subsequent hospitalization of nonurgent emergency patients. This was a retrospective study of a database of adult nontrauma ED visits in a medical center for a period of 12 months from January 2013 to December 2013. Patient triages as either Taiwan Triage and Acuity Scale (TTAS) level 4 or 5 were considered “nonurgent.” Basic demographic data, primary and secondary diagnoses, clinical parameters including blood pressure, heart rate, body temperature, and chief complaint category in TTAS were analyzed to determine if correlation exists between potential predictors and hospitalization in nonurgent patients. A total of 16,499 nonurgent patients were included for study. The overall hospitalization rate was 12.47 % (2058/16,499). In the multiple logistic regression model, patients with characteristics of males (odds ratio, OR = 1.37), age more than 65 years old (OR = 1.56), arrival by ambulance (OR = 2.40), heart rate more than 100/min (OR = 1.47), fever (OR = 2.73), and presented with skin swelling/redness (OR = 4.64) were predictors for hospitalization. The area under receiver-operator calibration curve (AUROC) for the prediction model was 0.70. Nonurgent patients might still be admitted for further care especially in male, the elderly, with more secondary diagnoses, abnormal vital signs, and presented with dermatologic complaints. Using the TTAS acuity level to identify patients for diversion away from the ED is unsafe and will lead to inappropriate refusal of care for many patients requiring hospital treatment. PMID:27368040

  9. [Characteristics of acute renal failure in elderly patients admitted to a small town hospital].

    PubMed

    Lou, L M; Boned, B; Gimeno, J A; Beguer, P; Cruz, A; Telmo, S; Lou, M T; Gómez Sánchez, R

    2002-01-01

    We studied the features of acute renal failure (ARF) in elderly patients treated in a hospital, without an intensive care unit, to identify etiological factors and establish adequate preventive measures and treatment. During twelve consecutive months we studied prospectively 99 patients with ARF diagnosed by conventional criteria, an incidence of 1,238 cases per million per year. ARF affected 1.78% of patients admitted to hospital. We analyzed age, sex, serum creatinine, diuresis, etiology, type of ARF, preexisting chronic diseases, treatment, complications and outcome. Preexisting chronic diseases were common, the most frequent being hypertension (54%) and diabetes (39%). Previous treatments for cardiovascular diseases were frequent (angiotensin-renin system blockade 35.4%, diuretics 50.5%). 79% of ARF arose in hospital, 21% outside hospital. ARF was pre-renal in 60%, renal in 31% and post-renal in 9%. 34.7% were caused by volume depletion, 23.4% by low cardiac output and 23.4% by infection. 44.4% of ARF patients had oliguria or anuria latrogenic factors contributed to the ethiology of ARF in 35.3% of patients. Hospital stay was doubled by ARF the presence of ARF and the mortality was 36.4%. The rate was higher in ARF arising in hospital than in ARF acquired before admission. Factors that had a significant influence on the mortality rate were comorbid conditions, oliguroanuria, ARF of renal origin and serum albumin. We conclude that ARF has a high incidence, morbidity and mortality in this elderly population. Volume depletion, associated cardiovascular pathology and pharmacological treatment are important etiological factors in those with ARF outside hospital. Adequate treatment of ARF and avoidance of nephrotoxic medications are necessary in hospital.

  10. Under-diagnosing and under-treating iron deficiency in hospitalized patients with gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    El-Halabi, Mustapha M; Green, Michael S; Jones, Christopher; Salyers Jr, William J

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether patients hospitalized with gastrointestinal (GI) blood loss anemia are being checked and treated for iron deficiency. METHODS: Retrospective chart review was conducted for all patients admitted to a single tertiary care hospital between 11/1/2011 and 1/31/2012 for any type of GI bleeding. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients who had their iron studies checked during a hospitalization for GI blood loss anemia. Secondary outcomes included percentage of anemic GI bleeders who had adequate documentation of anemia and iron deficiency, and those who were treated for their iron deficiency. Then we tried to identify possible predictors of checking iron studies in an attempt to understand the thought process that physicians go through when managing these patients. Iron deficiency was defined as Iron saturation less than 15% or ferritin level less than 45 μg/L. Anemia was defined as hemoglobin level less than 13 g/dL for males and 12 g/dL for females. RESULTS: Three hundred and seven GI bleeders were hospitalized during the study period, and 282 of those (91.9%) had anemia during their hospital stay. Ninety-five patients (30.9%) had iron studies performed during hospitalization, and 45 of those (47.4%) were actually found to be iron deficient. Only 29 of those 45 iron deficient patients were discharged home on iron supplements. Of the 282 patients that had anemia during hospitalization, 50 (17.7%) had no documentation of the anemia in their hospital chart. Of the 45 patients that had lab proven iron deficiency anemia (IDA), only 22 (48.5%) had documentation of IDA in at least one note in their chart. Predictors of checking iron studies in anemic GI bleeders were lower mean corpuscular volume, documentation of anemia, having fecal occult blood testing, not having hematemesis or past history of GI bleeding. There were no significant differences between the teaching and non-teaching services in any patient characteristics or outcomes

  11. Troponin T: role in altering patient management and enabling earlier discharge from a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Owen, A; Khan, W; Griffiths, K D

    2001-03-01

    The use of troponin T to facilitate early patient discharge was investigated in a prospective study in a district general hospital. Troponin T was measured in 91 patients admitted over a period of 6 months with chest pain but without evidence of myocardial infarction. The main outcome measure was length of hospital stay. A negative troponin T was found in 70 patients. Fifty of these were discharged within 24 h of the troponin result being available and they had a significantly shorter hospital stay than a case control group and a historical control group from the previous 6 months. Troponin T measurement has a role in altering patient management by enabling early discharge, resulting in significant cost savings and increasing bed availability.

  12. Evidence-based nursing-sensitive indicators for patients hospitalized with depression in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thapinta, Darawan; Anders, Robert L; Mahatnirunkul, Suwat; Srikosai, Soontaree

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate nursing-sensitive indicators for patients hospitalized with depression in Thailand. The initial draft, consisting of 12 categories with 37 subcategories, was then evaluated by experts in the US and Thailand. Hospital records were then utilized to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the indicators. The finalized instrument consisted of 11 categories with 43 items with a validity of .98 and internal consistency of .88. This is the first set of indicators developed to evaluate nursing-sensitivity for patients hospitalized with a diagnosis of depression in Thailand. Having nursing indicators for depressed patients provides nurses with concrete tools to evaluate their work with depressed patients, allowing these staff to assess their work in a very specific, methodical, and consistent manner. When problems are discovered, both the staff and administration can work to address these issues through training, procedural changes, and departmental shifts.

  13. An Outcome Evaluation of Reality Orientation Therapy with Geriatric Patients in a State Mental Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Clarke S.; Ivory, Peter B. C. B.

    1976-01-01

    Reality Orientation (RO) Therapy, a recently developed mode of treatment for use with geriatric patients was discussed. A controlled study was conducted comparing the effects of RO with those of traditional hospital care. The results indicated that RO is a promising technique for use with a chronic geriatric patient population. (Author)

  14. The appropriateness of referral of medically compromised dental patients to hospital.

    PubMed

    Absi, E G; Satterthwaite, J; Shepherd, J P; Thomas, D W

    1997-04-01

    Hospital departments of oral and maxillofacial surgery make a substantial contribution to both managing and treating medically-compromised dental patients. Contracting arrangements should take account of this. Demographic data suggest that the treatment of medically-compromised elderly dentate patients will become increasingly important in the General Dental Service (GDS). To determine the medical conditions and treatment requirements prompting referral of these patients to hospital, a prospective study was undertaken of 75 consecutive adults referred for hospital treatment specifically because of a medical condition which prevented delivery of routine dental care in the GDS. Patients (mean age: 56 years) were referred mainly from general medical (33%) and dental (62%) practitioners. Cardiovascular disease was the most frequently cited medical condition requiring referral (43%; n = 32 cases). Forty-eight patients (64%) were symptomatic on presentation and on average had attended on 2.3 occasions before definitive treatment was instituted. Fifty-two patients (70%) had no special treatment requirements other than those available in the GDS, 11 patients (15%) simply required antibiotic prophylaxis and 81% were treated by undergraduates or junior staff. These data suggest that many patients referred for dental hospital treatment because of underlying medical condition are not in fact medically-compromised and may be treated in the primary care setting.

  15. [Creative activities in home care for terminally-ill cancer patients at a rural municipal hospital].

    PubMed

    Miyao, Y; Tonouchi, A; Yokoyama, H

    1999-12-01

    Karuizawa Hospital is a rural, small town municipal hospital with 60 beds, located in Nagano Prefecture in central Japan. The terminal stages of patients who were treated in our department of surgery but later died of cancer are reviewed. In the five year period extending from April, 1994 through March, 1999 sixty patients died from cancer. Of them, 34 people died in their own home and 26 in our hospital. The annual ratio of patients who died at home to those who died in the hospital are analyzed, as well as whether these ratios differed according to the location of the patient's cancer. The identity of the patients' main home caregiver was sought, as well as how many days the patients resided at home until they passed away, and how frequently doctors or nurses visited their home. Some of the doctors' attempts to gain informed consent are described. Based on the findings, the authors recommend an end to the practice of first revealing the name and details of a patient's disease to his/her family. It was also found that documented information is useful in order to promote smooth relationships among patients, family members, and the doctor.

  16. Medication prescribing patterns among chronic kidney disease patients in a hospital in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Ramahi, Rowa

    2012-03-01

    To determine the medication prescribing patterns in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a Malaysian hospital, we prospectively studied a cohort of 600 patients in two phases with 300 patients in each phase. The first phase was carried out from the beginning of February to the end of May 2007, and the second phase was from the beginning of March to the end of June 2008. Patients with CKD who had an estimated creatinine clearance ≤ 50 mL/min and were older than 18 years were included. A data collection form was used to collect data from the patients' medical records and chart review. All systemic medications prescribed during hospitalization were included. The patients were prescribed 5795 medications. During the first phase, the patients were prescribed 2814 medication orders of 176 different medications. The prescriptions were 2981 of 158 medications during the second phase. The mean number of medications in the first and second phases was 9.38 ± 3.63 and 9.94 ± 3.78 respectively (P-value = 0.066). The top five used medications were calcium carbonate, folic acid/vitamin B complex, metoprolol, lovastatin, and ferrous sulfate. The most commonly used medication classes were mineral supplements, vitamins, antianemic preparations, antibacterials, and beta-blocking agents. This study provides an overview of prescription practice in a cohort of hospitalized CKD patients and indicates possible areas of improvement in prescription practice.

  17. Outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia complex among ventilated pediatric patients linked to hospital sinks.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Cynthia A; Cohen, Adam L; Trevino, Ingrid; Rupp, Angela Hammer; Harris, Michelle; Forkan-Kelly, Sinead; Noble-Wang, Judith; Jensen, Bette; Shams, Alicia; Arduino, Matthew J; LiPuma, John J; Gerber, Susan I; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2011-11-01

    We investigated a cluster of Burkholderia cepacia complex colonization in ventilated pediatric patients. Isolates from 15 patients, 2 sink drains, and several ventilator components were found to belong to a single B cenocepacia clone. Hospital tap water used during oral and tracheostomy care was identified as the most likely mechanism for transmission.

  18. A "Prepaid Package" for Obstetrics: Effect on Teaching and Patient Care in a University Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Philip E.

    1976-01-01

    The changing social milieu has removed the charity patient but not the need for a teaching population. The University Hospital's program is described, in which patients prepaid a fixed, single fee for all obstetrics-related care through the third post partum day. (LBH)

  19. Development of a communication intervention to assist hospitalized suddenly speechless patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Carmen S; Rowe, Meredeth; Koeppel, Brent; Thomas, Loris; Troche, Michelle S; Paguio, Glenna

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare staff face significant challenges while caring for hospitalized patients experiencing sudden inability to verbalize their needs (sudden speechlessness). Familiar methods of communication such as non-verbal strategies are limited and often fail to assist suddenly speechless patients (SS) communicate their needs. Consequently, strategies tailored to the needs of hospitalized speechless patients are necessary, and must consider factors intrinsic to the patients and the complexities of the acute care environment. The feasibility and usability of a multi-functional prototype communication system (speech-generating device) tailored to the needs of hospitalized SS patients was evaluated in this pilot study. Adult SS patients admitted to the intensive care setting (n=11) demonstrated independent use of a multi-functional communication system that integrated messages and strategies tailored to the needs of the hospitalized SS patient. Participants reported high satisfaction levels and considered the use of the technology of high importance during an SS event. Additional research should focus on evaluating the impact of technology specific communication interventions on enhancing the communication process between SS patients and healthcare staff.

  20. The Paradox of Nursing Terminal Patients in a Belgian General Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timmermans, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    Analyzed how nurses deal with terminal and dying patients in two inpatient wards in Belgian general hospital. Observed that nurses often felt dissatisfied with their terminal caregiving. Suggests terminal care include specific physical, social, religious, and psychological services, given to terminal patient and family, to obtain as high a level…

  1. Hospitalization Cost Offset of a Hostility Intervention for Coronary Heart Disease Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Karina W.; Gidron, Yori; Mostofsky, Elizabeth; Trudeau, Kimberlee J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors evaluated hospitalization cost offset of hostility management group therapy for patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) from a previously published randomized controlled trial (Y. Gidron, K. Davidson, & I. Bata, 1999). Twenty-six male patients with myocardial infarction or unstable angina were randomized to either 2 months of…

  2. Defining the Needs of Patients with Intellectual Disabilities in the High Security Psychiatric Hospitals in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, S. D.; Dolan, M.; Johnston, S.; Middleton, H.; Harty, M. A.; Carlisle, J.; Thornicroft, G.; Appleby, L.; Jones, P.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that a substantial proportion of the patients with intellectual disabilities (ID) in the high security psychiatric hospitals (HSPHs) should be transferred to more appropriate services to cater for their specific needs in the longer term. The individual and placement needs of high secure psychiatric patients detained…

  3. Thromboprophylaxis is associated with reduced post-hospitalization venous thromboembolic events in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N.; Cagan, Andrew; Gainer, Vivian S.; Cheng, Su-Chun; Cai, Tianxi; Scoville, Elizabeth; Konijeti, Gauree G; Szolovits, Peter; Shaw, Stanley Y; Churchill, Susanne; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Murphy, Shawn N.; Kohane, Isaac; Liao, Katherine P.

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have increased risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE); those who require hospitalization have particularly high risk. Few hospitalized patients with IBD receive thromboprophylaxis. We analyzed the frequency of VTE following IBD-related hospitalization, risk factors for post-hospitalization VTE, and the efficacy of prophylaxis in preventing post-hospitalization VTE. Methods In a retrospective study, we analyzed data from a multi-institutional cohort of patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis and at least 1 IBD-related hospitalization. Our primary outcome was a VTE event. All patients contributed person time from the date of the index hospitalization to development of VTE, subsequent hospitalization, or end of follow-up. Our main predictor variable was pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis. Cox proportional hazard models adjusting for potential confounders were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results From a cohort of 2788 patients with at least 1 IBD-related hospitalization, 62 patients developed VTE following discharge (2%). Incidences of VTE at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days after the index hospitalization were 3.7/1000, 4.1/1000, 5.4/1000, and 9.4/1000 person-days respectively. Pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis during the index hospital stay was associated with a significantly lower risk of post-hospitalization VTE (HR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.22–0.97). Increased numbers of co-morbidities (HR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.16–1.47) and need for corticosteroids before hospitalization (HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.02 –2.87) were also independently associated with risk of VTE. Length of hospitalization or surgery during index hospitalization was not associated with post-hospitalization VTE. Conclusions Pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis during IBD-related hospitalization is associated with reduced risk of post-hospitalization VTE. PMID:24632349

  4. Burden of stroke and other cardiovascular complications in patients with atrial fibrillation hospitalized in France

    PubMed Central

    Cotté, Francois-Emery; Chaize, Gwendoline; Gaudin, Anne-Françoise; Samson, Adeline; Vainchtock, Alexandre; Fauchier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Aims Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with numerous cardiovascular complications. We sought to estimate the annual burden of cardiovascular complications in AF patients in French hospitals. Methods and results All AF patients hospitalized in France in 2012 were identified from the national public/private hospital database. Comorbid conditions and medical histories were documented using medical records dating back 5 years. Reasons for hospitalization, type of admission (emergency or otherwise), length of stay, rehabilitation transfers, and death at discharge were identified and costs of acute and rehabilitation care determined (2012 Euros). In total, 533 044 AF patients (mean age ± SD 78.0 ± 11.4 years, 47.1% women) were hospitalized in 2012 for any reason. Hospitalizations were cardiovascular-related in 267 681 patients [22.5% cardiac dysrhythmia, 18.3% heart failure, 7.1% vascular/ischaemic diseases, 6.9% stroke/transient ischaemic attack (TIA)/systemic embolism (SE), and 1.3% haemorrhages]. Patients with stroke/TIA/SE had higher rates of emergency admission (68.1%), transfer to rehabilitation unit (28.1%), and death at discharge (13.7%) than those with other cardiovascular complications, with the exception of haemorrhages, where emergency admission rates were similar. They also had longer mean lengths of stay (12.6 ± 13.2 days for acute care and 46.8 ± 42.5 days for rehabilitation). The annual total cost (acute care and rehabilitation) for all hospitalized cardiovascular events was €1.94 billion, of which heart failure represented €805 million, vascular/ischaemic diseases €386 million, stroke €362 million, cardiac dysrhythmia €341 million, and haemorrhage €48 million. Conclusion Half a million patients with AF were hospitalized in France in 2012. Cardiovascular-related hospitalizations involved half of these admissions, for a global burden of almost €2 billion, equivalent to 2.6% of total expenditure in French hospitals. Among these

  5. Patient education process in teaching hospitals of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Seyedin, Hesam; Goharinezhad, Salime; Vatankhah, Soodabeh; Azmal, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patient education is widely recognized as a core component of nursing. Patient education can lead to quality outcomes including adherence, quality of life, patients' knowledge of their illness and self-management. This study aimed to clarify patient education process in teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) in Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013. In this descriptive quantitative study, the sample covered 187 head nurses selected from ten teaching hospitals through convenience sampling. Data were collected with a questionnaire developed specifically for this study. The questionnaire measured patient education process in four dimensions: need assessment, planning, implementing and evaluating. Results: The overall mean score of patient education was 3.326±0.0524. Among the four dimensions of the patient education process, planning was in the highest level (3.570±0.0591) and the lowest score belonged to the evaluation of patient education (2.840 ±0.0628). Conclusion: Clarifying patient education steps, developing standardized framework and providing easily understandable tool-kit of the patient education program will improve the ability of nurses in delivering effective patient education in general and specialized hospitals. PMID:26478878

  6. Elective surgical patients' narratives of hospitalization: the co-construction of safety.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Carole; Saunders, Mark N K

    2013-12-01

    This research explores how elective surgical patients make sense of their hospitalization experiences. We explore sensemaking using longitudinal narrative interviews (n=72) with 38 patients undergoing elective surgical procedures between June 2010 and February 2011. We consider patients' narratives, the stories they tell of their prior expectations, and subsequent post-surgery experiences of their care in a United Kingdom (UK) hospital. An emergent pre-surgery theme is that of a paradoxical position in which they choose to make themselves vulnerable by agreeing to surgery to enhance their health, this necessitating trust of clinicians (doctors and nurses). To make sense of their situation, patients draw on technical (doctors' expert knowledge and skills), bureaucratic (National Health Service as a revered institution) and ideological (hospitals as places of safety), discourses. Post-operatively, themes of 'chaos' and 'suffering' emerge from the narratives of patients whose pre-surgery expectations (and trust) have been violated. Their stories tell of unmet expectations and of inability to make shared sense of experiences with clinicians who are responsible for their care. We add to knowledge of how patients play a critical part in the co-construction of safety by demonstrating how patient-clinician intersubjectivity contributes to the type of harm that patients describe. Our results suggest that approaches to enhancing patients' safety will be limited if they fail to reflect patients' involvement in the negotiated process of healthcare. We also provide further evidence of the contribution narrative inquiry can make to patient safety.

  7. Effect of educational television commercial on pre-hospital delay in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Haruo; Kon, Tomoya; Ueno, Tatsuya; Haga, Rie; Yamazaki, Keishi; Yagihashi, Kei; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Administering intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) within 4.5 h or endovascular procedures within 8 h of ischemic stroke onset may reduce the risk of disability. The effectiveness of media campaigns to raise stroke awareness and shorten pre-hospital delay is unclear. We studied 1144 consecutive ischemic stroke patients at Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, Japan, between March 2010 and February 2014. From March 2012, the government sponsored an educational campaign based on a television commercial to improve knowledge of stroke symptoms and encourage ambulance calls for facial palsy, arm palsy, or speech disturbance. For the 544 and 600 patients admitted before and during the intervention, respectively, we recorded the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke type, the time when patients or bystanders recognized stroke symptoms, and hospital arrival time. Pre-hospital delay, as the time interval from awareness of stroke to hospital arrival, was categorized as 0-3, 3-6, and 6+ h. The mean pre-hospital delay was shorter (12.0 vs 13.5 h; P = 0.0067), the proportion of patients arriving within 3 h was larger (55.7 vs 46.5 %; P = 0.0021), and the proportion arriving after 6 h was smaller (32.7 vs 39.5 %; P = 0.0162) in the intervention group than in the pre-intervention group. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients treated with r-tPA (6 and 7.5 % of the intervention and pre-intervention groups, respectively). A television-based public education campaign potentially reduced pre-hospital delay for ischemic stroke patients, but the r-tPA treatment rate was unchanged.

  8. The practices of isolating tuberculosis infectious patients at hospitals of Vhembe district, Limpopo Province

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Airborne infections pose a serious threat to susceptible individuals whenever they are together in confined spaces with patients coughing up tuberculosis (TB) bacilli. In healthcare facilities, those with infectious TB should, as far as possible, be isolated from non-infectious patients in order to prevent exposure to the infectious droplet nuclei generated by infected patients. Aim This article aims to describe the use of masks and isolation of infectious TB patients at hospitals of Vhembe district, Limpopo Province in order to inform future policy and practices. Setting This study was conducted at seven of the eight hospitals in Vhembe district. Methods A cross-sectional qualitative design of a descriptive nature was used. Purposive sampling was used to select 57 focus group participants. Necessary approval, permission and clearance were obtained. The participants’ rights were respected. Results This study confirmed that TB cubicles were not reserved for patients with infectious TB and that many TB inpatients at hospitals of Vhembe district were not isolated; masks were not used consistently or appropriately by patients, staff or visitors. Furthermore, the movement of TB inpatients in isolation was not restricted. Conclusions There is an unnecessary risk of becoming infected with TB at the rural hospitals of Vhembe district as a result of incorrect isolation practices. The development and implementation of a quality control programme, as well as ongoing training at the hospital level, would improve the TB infection control measures practised by healthcare workers at hospitals in Vhembe district and reduce the risk of acquiring TB at these hospitals. PMID:26245416

  9. Using Novel Technology to Determine Mobility Among Hospitalized Heart Failure Patients: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Howie-Esquivel, Jill; Zaharias, Evanthia

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with heart failure (HF) experience frequent rehospitalizations and poor functional capacity. Early hospital mobility may prevent functional decline, but mobility patterns among hospitalized HF patients are not yet known. Accelerometers may provide a method to monitor and measure patient mobility objectively. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe mobility and function using accelerometers among hospitalized HF patients. Methods Wireless accelerometers were attached to the thigh and ankle of previously ambulatory hospitalized HF patients (n = 32) continuously for up to 5 days, beginning on the second day of hospitalization. The mean proportion of time spent lying, sitting, and standing or walking daily was measured. Ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs) and physical function was measured using the Katz Index and Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Results Patients’ mean age was 58.2 ± 13.6 and 78% (n = 25) were male. Mean New York Heart Association Class upon enrollment and at the end of the study period was 2.9 ± 0.8 and 2.2 ± 0.8 respectively. A mean Katz Index of 5.6 ± 1.1 upon enrollment demonstrated minimal dependence on assistance for completion of ADLs (possible scores 0 - 6). However, mobility testing revealed low physical function, with mean SPPB scores of 6.4 ± 3.1 (possible scores 0 - 12). During hospitalization, 70% of the measured hospital stay (16.8 hours/day) was spent lying in bed. The average time spent standing or walking was 4.1%, or 59 minutes per day and the range was 0-10% (0 - 150 minutes). Conclusions Immobility was pervasive as HF patients spent almost all of their time sitting or lying in bed despite their baseline ambulatory status and improved NYHA class.

  10. A Web-Based Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT) to Assess Patient Perception in Hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Tsair-Wei; Wang, Wen-Chung; Huang, Sheng-Yun; Lai, Wen-Pin

    2011-01-01

    Background Many hospitals have adopted mobile nursing carts that can be easily rolled up to a patient’s bedside to access charts and help nurses perform their rounds. However, few papers have reported data regarding the use of wireless computers on wheels (COW) at patients’ bedsides to collect questionnaire-based information of their perception of hospitalization on discharge from the hospital. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative efficiency of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) and the precision of CAT-based measures of perceptions of hospitalized patients, as compared with those of nonadaptive testing (NAT). An Excel module of our CAT multicategory assessment is provided as an example. Method A total of 200 patients who were discharged from the hospital responded to the CAT-based 18-item inpatient perception questionnaire on COW. The numbers of question administrated were recorded and the responses were calibrated using the Rasch model. They were compared with those from NAT to show the advantage of CAT over NAT. Results Patient measures derived from CAT and NAT were highly correlated (r = 0.98) and their measurement precisions were not statistically different (P = .14). CAT required fewer questions than NAT (an efficiency gain of 42%), suggesting a reduced burden for patients. There were no significant differences between groups in terms of gender and other demographic characteristics. Conclusions CAT-based administration of surveys of patient perception substantially reduced patient burden without compromising the precision of measuring patients’ perceptions of hospitalization. The Excel module of animation-CAT on the wireless COW that we developed is recommended for use in hospitals. PMID:21844001

  11. [Medical microbiology laboratories in Dutch hospitals: essential for safe patient care].

    PubMed

    Bonten, M J M

    2008-12-06

    The Netherlands Health Care Inspectorate investigated the quality of medical microbiology laboratories in Dutch hospitals. By and large the laboratories fulfilled the requirements for appropriate care, although some processes were unsatisfactory and some were insufficiently formalised. In the Netherlands, laboratories for medical microbiology are integrated within hospitals and medical microbiologists are responsible for the diagnostic processes as well as for co-treatment of patients, infection prevention and research. This integrated model contrasts to the more industrialised model in many other countries, where such laboratories are physically distinct from hospitals with a strong focus on diagnostics. The Inspectorate also concludes that the current position of medical microbiology in Dutch hospitals is necessary for patient safety and that outsourcing of these facilities is considered unacceptable.

  12. [Public music concerts in a psychiatric hospital: effects on public opinion and as therapy for patients].

    PubMed

    Takasaka, Y; Yokota, O; Tanioka, T; Nagata, K; Yasuoka, K; Toda, H

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the effects of music therapy concerts, which were held 60 times over a four year period, 1992 to 1996, in Geiyo Psychiatric Hospital, Kochi Prefecture and found that; 1) Musicians who performed at the concerts were not only from Kochi prefecture but also from other prefectures (10 times) and from four foreign countries (7 times). 2) Live concerts in a small hall had a positive influence on patients and drew the patient's attention and interest away from their hallucinations and delusions to the real world. Moreover, the concerts provided the patients with chances to acquire social graces such as being well-groomed. 3) Explanations by the musicians, interviews with the musicians and the seasonal choruses accompanied by the musicians were helpful to give the patients motives for recovering communication skills and to interact with society. 4) Inquiries to the patients about the concerts indicated discrepancies between the poor observed estimations during the concerts (83.3%) and the good subjective impressions expressed by the patients (82.0%), suggesting that the patients were not good at expressing their internal emotions through facial expressions or attitudes. 5) Many citizens including children came to the concerts and/or gave aid to the hospital because the concerts were open to the public and we suggest that this contributed to improving the general publics' image of psychiatric hospitals. Questionnaires revealed that 90% of people in a control group had a bad image of psychiatric hospitals in Japan, but only 32% of the members of the general public who attended our concerts had a bad image of psychiatric hospitals. In addition, the revolving ratio of the hospital beds rose from 0.4 to 1.2 over the four years, which also suggests a beneficial effect on the patients.

  13. Suspect SARS patient puts hospital's plan on defense.

    PubMed

    Huser, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    A patient possibly infected with SARS posed issues for protecting healthcare workers and others that had not been faced before. The article gives the results of an internal critique of problems that arose and their solution.

  14. On Hospital Wards, Patient Crises May Have 'Domino Effect'

    MedlinePlus

    ... assistant professor of medicine at the University of Chicago, said in a university news release. "After caring ... patients who were admitted to the University of Chicago Medicine from 2009 to 2013. The researchers focused ...

  15. Sleep Patterns and Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Hospitalized Patients With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Tanev, Kaloyan S; Winokur, Andrew; Pitman, Roger K

    2017-03-15

    The authors examined 28 dementia inpatients receiving treatment as usual. Beginning-to-end differences in neuropsychiatric symptoms and actigraphic sleep patterns were measured. Using a mixed-model, the authors regressed neuropsychiatric symptoms on average sleep minutes (between-subjects effect) and each night's deviation from average (within-subject effect). Sleep did not significantly differ from beginning to end of participation, whereas neuropsychiatric symptoms did. Average sleep minutes predicted average neuropsychiatric symptoms (p=0.002), but each night's deviation from the average did not predict next day's symptoms (p=0.90). These findings raise questions about the immediate benefits of treating sleep-wake disturbances on neuropsychiatric symptoms in hospitalized inpatients with dementias.

  16. Utilization of telemedicine by heart disease patients following hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Morguet, Andreas J; Kühnelt, Paul; Kallel, Antje; Rauch, Ursula; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter

    2008-01-01

    NYHA class III and IV chronic heart failure has been established as a potential indication for telemedical care and monitoring already. We conducted a prospective study to assess the utilization of telemedical services by cardiac patients in order to identify further indications. A total of 540 patients (mean age 59 years) with various heart diseases participated for at least 30 days in a home-based telemedicine service programme. The two primary outcome measures were the rates of symptom-driven telephone calls (A) and ECG transmissions (B) per patient-year. The total follow-up was 68,649 days, with a median of 93 days. Symptomatic patients placed 713 calls and transmitted 221 ECGs. Poisson regression analysis with subset selection yielded four significant (P < 0.05) independent positive predictors of the use of the telemedicine service: (1) recent repeat (at least one previous) percutaneous coronary intervention (A, P = 0.010; B, P = 0.001); (2) recent cardioversion for atrial fibrillation or flutter (A, P < 0.0001; B, P < 0.0001); (3) ejection fraction (A, P = 0.012; B, P > 0.05); and (4) reciprocal of age (A, P < 0.0001; B, P > 0.05). These data suggest that telemedicine may benefit patients following repeat percutaneous coronary intervention or cardioversion for atrial fibrillation. Since patients availed themselves of telemedicine service less with deteriorating ejection fraction and increasing age, individuals with chronic heart failure will need dedicated programmes, especially when they are older.

  17. A metasynthesis of patient-provider communication in hospital for patients with severe communication disabilities: informing new translational research.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Bronwyn; Balandin, Susan

    2014-12-01

    Poor patient-provider communication in hospital continues to be cited as a possible causal factor in preventable adverse events for patients with severe communication disabilities. Yet to date there are no reports of empirical interventions that investigate or demonstrate an improvement in communication in hospital for these patients. The aim of this review was to synthesize the findings of research into communication in hospital for people with severe communication disabilities arising from lifelong and acquired stable conditions including cerebral palsy, autism, intellectual disability, aphasia following stroke, but excluding progressive conditions and those solely related to sensory impairments of hearing or vision. Results revealed six core strategies suggested to improve communication in hospital: (a) develop services, systems, and policies that support improved communication, (b) devote enough time to communication, (c) ensure adequate access to communication tools (nurse call systems and communication aids), (d) access personally held written health information, (e) collaborate effectively with carers, spouses, and parents, and (f) increase the communicative competence of hospital staff. Currently there are no reports that trial or validate any of these strategies specifically in hospital settings. Observational and evaluative research is needed to investigate the ecological validity of strategies proposed to improve communication.

  18. Patient Safety in Obstetrics and Gynecology Departments of two Teaching Hospitals in Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bindiya; Guleria, Kiran; Arora, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Background: A healthy safety culture is integral to positive health care. A sound safety climate is required in Obstetrics and Gynecology to prevent adverse outcomes. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess and compare patient safety culture in two departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Materials and Methods: Using a closed-ended standard version of Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS), respondents were asked to answer 42 survey items, grouped into 10 dimensions and two outcome variables in two tertiary care teaching hospitals in Delhi. Qualitative data were compared using Fisher's exact test and chi-square test wherever applicable. Mean values were calculated and compared using unpaired t-test. Results: The overall survey response rate was 55%. A positive response rate of 57% was seen in the overall perception of patient safety that ranged from very good to acceptable. Sixty-four percent showed positive teamwork across hospital departments and units, while 36% gave an affirmative opinion with respect to interdepartmental handoffs. However, few adverse events (0-10) were reported in the last 12 months and only 38% of mistakes by doctors were reported. Half of the respondents agreed that their mistakes were held against them. There was no statistical difference in the safety culture between the two hospitals. Conclusions: Although the perception of patient safety and standards of patient safety were high in both the hospitals' departments, there is plenty of scope for improvement with respect to event reporting, positive feedback, and nonpunitive error. PMID:27385879

  19. Care interaction adding challenges to old patients' well-being during surgical hospital treatment.

    PubMed

    Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Høybye, Mette Terp

    2015-01-01

    Today, hospitals offer surgical treatment within a short hospital admission. This brief interaction may challenge the well-being of old patients. The aim of this study was to explore how the well-being of old hospitalized patients was affected by the interaction with staff during a fast-track surgical treatment and hospital admission for colon cancer. We used an ethnographic methodology with field observations and unstructured interviews focusing on one patient at a time (n=9) during a full day; the hours ranging from 7:45 a.m. to 8 p.m. Participants were between 74 and 85 years of age and of both sexes. The study was reported to the Danish Data Protection Agency with reference number (2007-58-0010). The encounter between old patients and the staff was a main theme in our findings elucidating a number of care challenges. The identified care challenges illustrated "well-being as a matter of different perspectives," "vulnerability in contrast to well-being," and "staff mix influencing the care encounter." The experience of well-being in old cancer patients during hospital admission was absent or challenged when staff did not acknowledge their individual vulnerability and needs.

  20. [Nursing patients with learning and physical disabilities in hospitals - a systematic literature review].

    PubMed

    Dörscheln, Iris; Lachetta, Raphael; Schulz, Michael; Tacke, Doris

    2013-02-01

    People with learning and physical disabilities require special attention and nursing care during hospitalisation. A systematic literature research in the databases PUBMED, CINAHL and Cochrane Library (1990-2011) was conducted, 17 relevant publications could be found. The following problems were identified. The situation of people with learning disabilities in hospital is characterised by communication barriers between patients and health care professionals. Furthermore, the emotional situation of patients has to be emphasised. In the foreign environment of a hospital, they suffer from fear and uncertainty. Both phenomena interact with each other and are influenced by conditions such as time, continuity of care, professional competence, and attitudes towards disabled people. Family members are able to calm the patients. They take on the task of translating. Clinical Nurse Specialists are familiar with these problems. They improve the situation of learning disabled patients in the hospital. The studies show small samples and the results need further verification. Results out of Germany, Austria and Switzerland are not available. Therefore, in these countries further empirical research on this topic is strongly recommended. The results indicate the importance of obtaining comprehensive information about needs of disabled patients before their hospital stay. Family members should be involved in nursing care during a hospital stay.

  1. Management of Restless Legs Syndrome/Willis-Ekbom Disease in Hospitalized and Perioperative Patients.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Cathy

    2015-09-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a sensorimotor disorder that can cause significant discomfort, impaired quality of life, poor mood, and disturbed sleep. Because the disorder is chronic and associated with multiple comorbidities, RLS can be seen in an inpatient or perioperative setting. Certain characteristics of the hospitalized or surgical context can exacerbate or unmask RLS. Importantly, RLS and the associated discomfort and insomnia can prolong hospital stay and negatively impact outcomes. RLS medications should be continued during the hospital admission when possible. Avoidance of excessive phlebotomy and medications known to trigger RLS is helpful. Patients should increase activity when acceptable.

  2. Outcome of bacteraemia in patients admitted to the adult medical wards of the UKM hospital.

    PubMed

    Petrick, P; Kong, N C T; Nordiah, A J; Cheong, I K S; Tamil, M A

    2007-10-01

    The clinical outcome of bacteraemic patients is influenced by many factors. It is vital to know one's own local hospital epidemiological data so as to provide optimal care to the affected patients. This was a prospective, observational study carried out in the said patient population over a period of four months in the year 2005. One hundred and ninety one patients presented with bacteraemia over the study period. Fifty-two (27%) of the patients died. Mechanical ventilation, inappropriate empirical antibiotic usage, Chinese ethnicity and low serum albumin levels independently affected prognosis. These factors should alert physicians to those patients who require more intensive monitoring and care.

  3. Dermatological problems in geriatric patients: a hospital based study.

    PubMed

    Thapa, D P; Jha, A K; Kharel, C; Shrestha, S

    2012-09-01

    Geriatric health care has become a major issue worldwide. There are no data regarding geriatric dermatologic diseases are available from Nepal. Patients of 60 years and above were enrolled in the Nepali fiscal year 2067(April 2010-April 2011). The data included age, sex, place, and diagnosis. The aim of the study is to determine the characteristic pattern and frequency of dermatoses in dermatologic patients aged 60 years and above. There were total of 6442 patients who visited out patients department. Out of which frequency of geriatric patients were 330, which constitute about 5.1%. The male to female ratio was 50% each. The most common cutaneous dermatoses was eczema 35.8%, fungal infection 13.6%, viral infection 7%, followed by pruritus 7.3%, scabies and photodermatitis 4.5% each, Inflammatory papulosquamous disorder 3.3%, Bacterial infection and Icthyosis 2.1% each, vesiculobullous 1.8%, tumors and pigmentary disorder 0.6% and Miscellaneous group (keratoderma, callus, urticaria, diabetic ulcer, burgers disease, burning feet syndrome, Rosacea, Drug rash-amoxicillin, senile acne, prurigo nodularis, hansens disease, pellagra, Actinic cheilitis) 15.8%. Few patients had more than one dermatoses which constitute < 1% .Photodermatitis was found to be statistically significant. The most common dermatoses were Eczema in females followed by Photodermatitis and comparatively in males viral and fungal infections were common. This study depicts various characteristic patterns of dermatoses seen in elderly. Eczema and infections was found to be most common diseases seen in elderly. Further epidemiologic studies including treatment, follow-up of elderly patients has to be carried out to know the burden of the disease and decrease morbidity and psychological concern associated with diseases.

  4. THE EFFECT OF OUTPATIENT SERVICE QUALITY ON PATIENT SATISFACTION IN TEACHING HOSPITALS IN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    Pouragha, Behrouz; Zarei, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The quality of services plays a primary role in achieving patient satisfaction. The main purpose of this study was to explore the effect of outpatient service quality on patient satisfaction in teaching hospitals in Iran. Methods: this cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014. The study sample included 500 patients were selected with systematic random method from the outpatient departments (clinics) of four teaching hospitals in Tehran. The survey instrument was a questionnaire consisted of 44 items, which were confirmed its reliability and validity. The data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation, and multivariate regression methods with the SPSS.18 software. Results: According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience in the outpatient departments of the teaching hospitals and thus evaluated the services as good. Perceived service costs, physician consultation, physical environment, and information to patient were found to be the most important determinants of outpatient satisfaction. Conclusion: The results suggest that improving the quality of consultation, providing information to the patients during examination and consultation, creating value for patients by reducing costs or improving service quality, and enhancing the physical environment quality of the clinic can be regarded as effective strategies for the management of teaching hospitals toward increasing outpatient satisfaction. PMID:27047262

  5. Ethnicity and anticoagulation management of hospitalized patients with atrial fibrillation in northwest China

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xinchun; Zhou, Xianhui; Song, Shifei; Wu, Min; Baolatejiang, Roza; Lu, Yanmei; Li, Yaodong; Zhang, Wenhui; Lv, Wenkui; Ye, Yuanzheng; Zhou, Qina; wang, Hongli; Zhang, Jianghua; Xing, Qiang; Tang, Baopeng

    2017-01-01

    The therapeutic management and health challenges caused by atrial fibrillation (AF) differ between different groups. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical features of patients hospitalized with AF and to explore the use of anticoagulation treatments in Han and Uygur patients in Xinjiang, northwest China. Data were collected from a retrospective descriptive study involving patients hospitalized at 13 hospitals in Xinjiang, China from Jul 1, 2014 to Jun 31, 2015. Anticoagulation management was measured according to guideline-recommended risk scores. A total of 4,181 patients with AF were included (mean age 69.5 ± 11.7 years, 41.4% females; 71.5% Han, 28.5% Uygur). The prevalence of AF in Uygur individuals may occur earlier than in Han individuals (mean age 64.9 vs 71.3, P < 0.001). Most of the hospitalized patients with AF had a high risk of stroke (CHA2DS2-VASc score ≥2; 80.6% Han vs 73.7% Uygur, P < 0.05); this risk was especially high in elderly patients. In AF patients, the application of anticoagulants according to the guidelines is far from expected, and the underutilization of anticoagulants exists in both ethnic groups. PMID:28393880

  6. PREVALENCE OF BACTERIAL RESISTANCE IN HOSPITALIZED CIRRHOTIC PATIENTS IN SOUTHERN BRAZIL: A NEW CHALLENGE

    PubMed Central

    COSTABEBER, Ane Micheli; de MATTOS, Angelo Alves; SUKIENNIK, Teresa Cristina Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: An increased frequency of infections by multiresistant bacteria has been described in hospitalized patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bacterial resistance profile in cirrhotic patients. Methods: This is a retrospective observational study. We assessed the antimicrobial susceptibility of 5,839 bacterial isolates from patients with and without cirrhosis. Regarding the multidrug resistance, we evaluated 4,505 bacterial isolates from 2,180 patients. Results: Two hundred and fifty-one patients had cirrhosis (mean age 57.6 ± 11 years; 61.8% were male, 47.8% of cases associated with hepatitis C virus). Of the isolates of patients with and without cirrhosis, 174/464 (37.5%) and 1,783/4,041 (44.1%) were multiresistant, respectively (p = 0.007). E. coli was the most common multiresistant bacteria in both groups. Approximately 20% of E. coli and Klebsiella sp. isolates were ESBL-producers and 44% of S. aureus isolates were methicillin-resistant in cirrhotic patients. In cirrhotic patients admitted to the emergency department, hospital ward, and intensive care unit, 28.3%, 50% and 40% had multiresistant isolates, respectively. In patients with and without cirrhosis, 36.2% and 33.5% of isolates were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, respectively. Conclusions: The empirical treatment of infections in hospitalized patients using broad-spectrum antibiotics should consider the observed pattern of bacterial resistance. PMID:27253738

  7. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority.

  8. Human rights and patients' privacy in UK hospitals.

    PubMed

    Woogara, J

    2001-05-01

    The European Convention on Human Rights has been incorporated into UK domestic law. It gives many rights to patients within the National Health Service (NHS). This article explores the concept of patients' right to privacy. It stresses that privacy is a basic human right, and that its respect by health professionals is vital for a patient's physical, mental, emotional and spiritual well-being. I argue that health professionals can violate patients' privacy in a variety of ways. For example: the right to enjoy their property; the right to protect their medical and personal information as confidential; the right to expect treatment with dignity during intimate care; and the right to control their personal space and territory. Some preliminary evidence indicates that many health care practitioners, including nurses, are presently unaware of the articles of the Convention and the implications of the Human Rights Act 1998. In order to prevent litigation for breaches of patients' privacy, it is advocated that universities and other educational institutions, the Government and NHS trusts should help to produce a clear educational strategy and protocols so that students and practitioners are well informed in this field. Although 41 European countries are presently the signatories of the European Convention on Human Rights, including the UK, it is important to stress that the principles discussed in this article are applicable world-wide.

  9. Hospitalization and cost after switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics in schizophrenia patients in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Boonlue, Tuanthon; Subongkot, Suphat; Dilokthornsakul, Piyameth; Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Pattanaprateep, Oraluck; Suanchang, Orabhorn; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2016-01-01

    Background Several clinical practice guidelines suggest using atypical over typical antipsychotics in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Nevertheless, cost-containment policy urged restricting usage of atypical antipsychotics and switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics. Objective This study aimed to evaluate clinical and economic impacts of switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics in schizophrenia patients in Thailand. Methods From October 2010 through September 2013, a retrospective cohort study was performed utilizing electronic database of two tertiary hospitals. Schizophrenia patients aged 18 years or older and being treated with atypical antipsychotics were included. Patients were classified as atypical antipsychotic switching group if they switched to typical antipsychotics after 180 days of continual atypical antipsychotics therapy. Outcomes were schizophrenia-related hospitalization and total health care cost. Logistic and Poisson regression were used to evaluate the risk of hospitalization, and generalized linear model with gamma distribution was used to determine the health care cost. All analyses were adjusted by employing propensity score and multivariable analyses. All cost estimates were adjusted according to 2013 consumer price index and converted to US$ at an exchange rate of 32.85 Thai bahts/US$. Results A total of 2,354 patients were included. Of them, 166 (7.1%) patients switched to typical antipsychotics. The adjusted odds ratio for schizophrenia-related hospitalization in atypical antipsychotic switching group was 1.87 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23–2.83). The adjusted incidence rate ratio was 2.44 (95% CI 1.57–3.79) for schizophrenia-related hospitalizations. The average total health care cost was lower in patients with antipsychotic switching (−$64; 95% CI −$459 to $332). Conclusion Switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia-related hospitalization

  10. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Schizophrenia Referred to Farabi Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shakeri, Jalal; Karimi, Kamyar; Farnia, Vahid; Golshani, Senobar; Alikhani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our study was conducted to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia. Methods The study population included all patients with schizophrenia who were referred to Farabi Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran, between March 2014 and March 2015. A total of 280 subjects who met the study criteria were selected according to the census sampling method. Results The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 30.4% (20.7% in men and 51.5% in women). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was greater in patients > 40 years than patients aged 20–40 years. There was a significant relationship between marital status and number of hospitalizations with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Conclusions Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia, healthcare professionals should take measures to identify the risk factors and timely treatment of affected patients, thereby improving the patient’s quality of life and reducing health costs. PMID:27403239

  11. Assessment of malnutrition in hip fracture patients: effects on surgical delay, hospital stay and mortality.

    PubMed

    Symeonidis, Panagiotis D; Clark, David

    2006-08-01

    The importance of malnutrition in elderly hip fracture patients has long been recognised. All patients operated upon for a hip fracture over a five-year period were assessed according to two nutritional markers : a) serum albumin levels and b) peripheral blood total lymphocyte count. Patients were subdivided into groups according to the four possible combinations of these results. Outcomes according to four clinical outcome parameters were validated: a) waiting time to operation b) length of hospitalisation, c) in-hospital mortality, and d) one-year postoperative mortality. Significant differences were found between malnourished patients and those with normal laboratory values with regard to surgical delay and one year postoperative mortality. Malnourished patients were also more likely to be hospitalised longer than a month and to die during their hospital stay, but the difference was not significant. The combination of serum albumin level and total lymphocyte count can be used as an independent prognostic factor in hip fracture patients.

  12. Assessment of patient safety culture among healthcare providers at a teaching hospital in Cairo, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Aboul-Fotouh, A M; Ismail, N A; Ez Elarab, H S; Wassif, G O

    2012-04-01

    A previous study in Cairo, Egypt highlighted the need to improve the patient safety culture among health-care providers at Ain Shams University hospitals. This descriptive cross-sectional study assessed healthcare providers' perceptions of patient safety culture within the organization and determined factors that played a role in patient safety culture. A representative sample of 510 physicians, nurses, pharmacists, technicians and labourers in different departments answered an Arabic version of the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality hospital survey for patient safety culture. The highest mean composite positive score among the 12 dimensions was for the organizational learning for continuous improvement (78.2%), followed by teamwork (58.1%). The lowest mean score was for the dimension of non-punitive response to error (19.5%). Patient safety culture still has many areas for improvement that need continuous evaluation and monitoring to attain a safe environment both for patients and health-care providers.

  13. Evidence-based management of tracheostomies in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Littlewood, Keith E

    2005-04-01

    There is little evidence-based literature on the management of tracheostomized patients. The existing data relate to the role of tracheostomy in specific disease states, the timing of tracheostomy, and comparison of open surgical to percutaneous tracheostomy. Tracheostomy protocols are under development. A recent series of 1,130 patients who underwent tracheostomy had a combined procedural, early, and late complication rate of approximately 4%, which is an improvement from the earlier complication rate. In the recent series, tracheal stenosis overtook hemorrhage as the leading complication, by 2 to 1. Tracheal stenosis accounted for nearly half of the complications. Half of the tracheal stenoses required surgical correction. All the patients who developed tracheal stenosis had endotracheal tubes for > 12 days before tracheostomy.</