Science.gov

Sample records for academic innovation challenge

  1. A Novel Approach for Engaging Academia in Collaborative Projects with NASA through the X-Hab Academic Innovation Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tracy R.; Gattuso, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    The X-Hab Academic Innovation Challenge, currently in its sixth year of execution, provides university students with the opportunity to be on the forefront of innovation. The X-Hab Challenge, for short, is designed to engage and retain students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). NASA identifies necessary technologies and studies for deep space missions and invites universities from around the country to develop concepts, prototypes, and lessons learned that will help shape future space missions and awards seed funds to design and produce functional products of interest as proposed by university teams according to their interests and expertise. Universities propose on a variety of projects suggested by NASA and are then judged on technical merit, academic integration, leveraged funding, and outreach. The universities assemble a multi-discipline team of students and advisors that invest months working together, developing concepts, and frequently producing working prototypes. Not only are students able to gain quality experience, working real world problems that have the possibility to be implemented, but they work closely with subject matter experts from NASA who guide them through an official engineering development process.

  2. A Novel Approach for Engaging Academia in Collaborative Projects with NASA through the X-Hab Academic Innovation Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gill, Tracy R.; Gattuso, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    The X-Hab Academic Innovation Challenge, currently in its sixth year of execution, provides university students with the opportunity to be on the forefront of innovation. The X-Hab Challenge, for short, is designed to engage and retain students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM). NASA identifies necessary technologies and studies for deep space missions and invites universities from around the country to develop concepts, prototypes, and lessons learned that will help shape future space missions and awards seed funds to design and produce functional products of interest as proposed by university teams according to their interests and expertise. Universities propose on a variety of projects suggested by NASA and are then judged on technical merit, academic integration, leveraged funding, and outreach. The universities assemble a multi-discipline team of students and advisors that invest months working together, developing concepts, and frequently producing working prototypes. Not only are students able to gain quality experience, working real world problems that have the possibility of be implemented, but they work closely with subject matter experts from NASA who guide them through an official engineering development process.

  3. Minority Innovation Challenges Institute

    NASA Video Gallery

    Do you want to learn more about how to compete in NASA’s technical challenges for both prestige and significant cash prizes? NASA’s Minority Innovation Challenges Institute trains and mentors mino...

  4. Innovation: It's Academic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Carl

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the development of innovation and business incubators, including the stages of innovation typically addressed by such programs. Describes the efforts of the Thayer School, a graduate professional school at Dartmouth College, in establishing an innovation incubator. (TW)

  5. Challenges to academic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Pardes, H; Pincus, H A

    1983-09-01

    Economic constraints, effects of retrenchments in federal health policy, and increased competition for resources are challenging all sectors of academic medicine. Departments of psychiatry are at particular risk during this era for reasons including the lack of a sound research and research training base in many psychiatry departments; the small number of students entering the field and implications therein for the availability of residency slots in psychiatry; and patterns of allocating resources within academic medical centers which, combined with biases in reimbursement policy toward cognitively based specialties, threaten the economic strength of psychiatric departments. A conceptual model based on marketing principles is proposed to aid in identifying and capitalizing on the unique strengths of the field. PMID:6412571

  6. Innovating Traditional Nursing Administration Challenges.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M Lindell; Fowler, Debra

    2016-03-01

    The evolving and complex practice environment calls for new mindsets among nurse leaders, academics, and nurse innovators to envision innovative ways to manage and optimize traditional tasks and processes in nursing administration. The purpose of this article is to present 3 case studies that used linear programming and simulation to innovate staffing enterprises, financial management of healthcare systems, and curricula development. PMID:26906516

  7. Academic Challenge Program: Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harty, Harold; And Others

    The evaluation report by Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation (Columbus, Indiana) describes findings concerning what works and what does not work in the Academic Challenge Program, a gifted and talented education program at the elementary and middle school levels. A corollary purpose of the report is to share the evaluation plan itself,…

  8. Challenges of the Innovation Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayrapetyan, Ruben

    2010-04-01

    In order to be successful in the modern world a professional needs to be creative, open to innovation, and able to take responsibilities. Innovation and creativity are not skills a person is born with, they have to be taught. However, the course syllabus has almost no room for teaching anything except of standard course topics and even more standard applications. Course project may be a solution to this problem. But being a strong tool for teaching an innovation, such a project is a challenge for both students and instructors. In this talk I will discuss some outputs (both positive and negative) of the innovation project ``Trip to Mars'' given in my ``Differential Equations'' class.

  9. Monitoring challenges and innovative ideas

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neill, R.V.; Hunsaker, C.T.; Levine, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    Monitoring programs are difficult to design even when they focus on specific problems. Ecosystems are complex, and it is often impossible to predetermine what aspects of system structure or dynamics will respond to a specific insult. It is equally difficult to interpret whether a response is a stabilizing compensatory mechanism or a real loss of capacity to maintain the ecosystem. The problems are compounded in a broad monitoring program designed to assess ecosystem health'' at regional and continental scales. It is challenging in the extreme to monitor ecosystem response, at any scale, to past insults as well as an unknown future array of impacts. The present paper will examine some of the fundamental issues and challenges raised by large-scale monitoring efforts. The challenges will serve as a framework and as an excuse to discuss several important topics in more detail. Following the discussion of challenges, we suggest some basic innovations that could be important across a range of monitoring programs. The innovations include integrative measures, innovative methodology, and creative interpretation. 59 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Engineering Innovations for Exploration Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the engineering innovations requirements for the challenges of space exploration which NASA has and will be involved in. It reviews some significant successes in space transportation, exploration and science accomplished during 2009, and it reviews some of the places that are available for exploration in the near term and the specific missions that NASA has assigned to Marshall. It also reviews the project lifecycle management model, that is designed to reduce undefined, but known, risks. It also demonstrates the sustainable long-term program of block upgrades that contribute to long-term success of programs.

  11. Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Innovation & Challenges

    NASA Video Gallery

    On June 2, 2016, NASA’s Office of the Chief Technologist hosted the Showcase of Innovation Challenges in Washington to present and discuss ideas for innovation across the agency, the government, in...

  12. The Challenging Academic Development (CAD) Collective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peseta, Tai

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the Challenging Academic Development (CAD) Collective and describes how it came out of a symposium called "Liminality, identity, and hybridity: On the promise of new conceptual frameworks for theorising academic/faculty development." The CAD Collective is and represents a space where people can open up their contexts and…

  13. Project management - challenges in dealing with academic and non-academic partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henkel, Daniela; Eisenhauer, Anton; Drossou-Berendes, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Modern research projects on national, European and international level are challenged by an increasing requirement of inter and trans-disciplinarily, societal relevance and educational outreach as well as market oriented applications. In particular, to be successful in European research in the frame of HORIZON 2020, the EU Framework Programme for Research and Innovation, it is crucial that relatively large international research consortia involve academic and non-academic partners, NGOs, private and non-private institutions as well as industrial companies. For the management and organisation of such consortia coordinators have to deal with significant differences between multi-national and multi-sectorial administrations and research environments, in order to secure a successful implementation of the project. This often costs research and non-academic partners tremendous efforts, not to say excessive demands. Based on the experiences made in the frame of an Innovative Training Network (ITN) project within the HORIZON 2020 Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions, this presentation identifies organisational pitfalls and major challenges of the project management for European funded research involving multi-national academic and non-academic research partners. Possible strategies are discussed to circumvent and avoid conflicts already at the beginning of the project.

  14. The US Academic Profession: Key Policy Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honan, James P.; Teferra, Damtew

    2001-01-01

    Describes some key policy dilemmas and challenges taking place in the U.S. academic profession. These issues derive from a complex array of demographic, economic, social, and technological developments that have caused major shifts in the areas of assessment and accountability, governance, power, faculty roles, and recruitment patterns. (SLD)

  15. Integrating an Academic Electronic Health Record: Challenges and Success Strategies.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Valerie M; Connors, Helen

    2016-08-01

    Technology is increasing the complexity in the role of today's nurse. Healthcare organizations are integrating more health information technologies and relying on the electronic health record for data collection, communication, and decision making. Nursing faculty need to prepare graduates for this environment and incorporate an academic electronic health record into a nursing curriculum to meet student-program outcomes. Although the need exists for student preparation, some nursing programs are struggling with implementation, whereas others have been successful. To better understand these complexities, this project was intended to identify current challenges and success strategies of effective academic electronic health record integration into nursing curricula. Using Rogers' 1962 Diffusion of Innovation theory as a framework for technology adoption, a descriptive survey design was used to gain insights from deans and program directors of nursing schools involved with the national Health Informatics & Technology Scholars faculty development program or Cerner's Academic Education Solution Consortium, working to integrate an academic electronic health record in their respective nursing schools. The participants' experiences highlighted approaches used by these schools to integrate these technologies. Data from this project provide nursing education with effective strategies and potential challenges that should be addressed for successful academic electronic health record integration. PMID:27326804

  16. Challenges Facing Early Career Academic Cardiologists

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Carl W.; Ahmad, Tariq; Brittain, Evan L.; Bunch, T. Jared; Damp, Julie B.; Dardas, Todd; Hijar, Amalea; Hill, Joseph A.; Hilliard, Anthony A.; Houser, Steven R.; Jahangir, Eiman; Kates, Andrew M.; Kim, Darlene; Lindman, Brian R.; Ryan, John J.; Rzeszut, Anne K.; Sivaram, Chittur A.; Valente, Anne M.; Freeman, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Early-career academic cardiologists currently face unprecedented challenges that threaten a highly valued career path. A team consisting of early career professionals and senior leadership members of American College of Cardiology (ACC) completed this white paper to inform the cardiovascular medicine profession regarding the plight of early career cardiologists and to suggest possible solutions. This paper includes: (1) definition of categories of early career academic cardiologists, (2) general challenges to all categories and specific challenges to each category, (3) obstacles as identified by a survey of current early career members of the ACC, (4) major reasons for the failure of physician-scientists to receive funding from National Institute of Health/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NIH/NHLBI) career development grants, (5) potential solutions, and (6) a call to action with specific recommendations. PMID:24703919

  17. Biomedical innovation in academic institutions: mitigating conflict of interest.

    PubMed

    Nelsen, Lita L; Bierer, Barbara E

    2011-09-14

    As universities and research hospitals move increasingly toward translational research and encouragement of entrepreneurship, more attention must be paid to management of conflicts of interest (COIs) if the public trust is to be maintained. Here, we describe COI policies at two institutions that aim to structure an academic environment that encourages innovation while protecting academic values. PMID:21918104

  18. Strategic Innovation in HE: The Roles of Academic Middle Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallenberg, Ton

    2007-01-01

    This article explains the development of, and presents a theoretical framework for, harnessing the roles of the academic middle manager in strategic innovation in Dutch higher education, thereby increasing higher education's ability to learn, innovate and develop a competitive advantage. The framework is developed from theoretical models of role…

  19. Academic Innovation: Are We Truly Ready for it?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänninen, P. E.

    2015-10-01

    Optics has been in the headlines this year due to the UN-sponsored International Year of Light 2015 (IYL 2015), and due to its presence in the 2014 Nobel Prize awards. The purpose of this article is to highlight the innovation-enabling elements that were behind the work of one of the Nobel Laureates - and the stream of innovations that followed, beyond the Nobel work. I will further, from this and my personal experience, expand some thoughts on the enabling elements of academic innovation and draw some conclusions - and, in particular, try and answer the question "How can academic success be repeated?"

  20. Innovative Trajectory Designs to meet Exploration Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folta, David C.

    2006-01-01

    This document is a viewgraph presentation of the conference paper. Missions incorporated into NASA's Vision for Space Exploration include many different destinations and regions; are challenging to plan; and need new and innovative trajectory design methods to enable them. By combining proven methods with chaos dynamics, exploration goals that require maximum payload mass or minimum duration can be achieved. The implementation of these innovative methods, such as weak stability boundaries, has altered NASA's approach to meet exploration challenges and is described to show how exploration goals may be met in the next decade. With knowledge that various perturbations play a significant role, the mission designer must rely on both traditional design strategies as well as these innovative methods. Over the past decades, improvements have been made that would at first glance seem dramatic. This paper provides a brief narrative on how a fundamental shift has occurred and how chaos dynamics improve the design of exploration missions with complex constraints.

  1. Organizational Structure and Innovation in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Helen A.

    1981-01-01

    Findings of a study conducted at four university libraries support Hage and Aiken's theory that, while the relationship between the structural variability complexity and rate of innovation is positive, it is negative for centralization, formalization, and stratification. The methodology, with some modifications, was shown to be transferable.…

  2. Challenges of Academic Listening in English: Reports by Chinese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Jinyan

    2005-01-01

    Academic listening plays an important role in an ESL university student's academic success. Research in EAP has begun to show that ESL students have difficulty in English academic listening at American universities. Chinese students, who are from a different educational system and cultural environment, experience particular challenges in English…

  3. State Coordinating Agencies and Academic Innovation: A Policy Sector Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schachter, Hindy Lauer

    1986-01-01

    The ways in which state higher education coordinating boards diffuse information about academic innovations is examined, and it is concluded that both the types of change they favor and their dissemination strategies are linked to their political position and the broad political and policy perspective it requires. (Author/MSE)

  4. The Challenge of Deliberation for Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandlbinder, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Academic developers work in a political space between university decision-makers and the academic community, a gap that Marginson and Considine (2000) showed is becoming increasingly wide. In this essay, the author suggests that academic developers might learn from the notion of "deliberation", a notion that has been used extensively in recent…

  5. Academic Boredom in Under- and Over-Challenging Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acee, Taylor W.; Kim, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyunjin J.; Kim, Jung-In; Chu, Hsiang-Ning R.; Kim, Myoungsook; Cho, YoonJung; Wicker, Frank W.

    2010-01-01

    This project explored students' perceptions of academic boredom in under- and over-challenging situations with the hypothesis that boredom is a multidimensional and situation-dependent construct. In Study 1, college students were asked to think of an under- and over-challenging situation and for each situation complete the 36-item Academic Boredom…

  6. Cognitive Level of Academic Challenges Provided to College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittington, M. Susie; McCormick, David F.

    A study assessed the cognitive level of academic challenges incorporated into courses offered in the College of Agricultural Sciences at the Pennsylvania State University. Eleven faculty members from nine departments provided copies of all academic challenges used in their courses. They were categorized by type: activities, problem sets, written…

  7. Pharmaceutical strategy and innovation: an academics perspective.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Ian R; Hayward, John J; Ley, Steven V; Tranmer, Geoffrey K

    2007-06-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is under increasing pressure on many fronts, from investors requiring larger returns to consumer groups and health authorities demanding cheaper and safer drugs. It is also feeling additional pressure from the infringement upon its profit margins by generic drug producers. Many companies are aggressively pursuing outsourcing contracts in an attempt to counter many of the financial pressures and streamline their operations. At the same time, the productivity of the pharmaceutical industry at its science base is being questioned in terms of the number of products and the timeframes required for each company to deliver them to market. This has generated uncertainties regarding the current corporate strategies that have been adopted and the levels of innovation being demonstrated. In this essay we discuss these topics in the context of the global pharmaceutical market, investigating the basis for many of these issues and highlighting the hurdles the industry needs to overcome, especially as they relate to the chemical sciences. PMID:17458911

  8. Health Systems Innovation at Academic Health Centers: Leading in a New Era of Health Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Andrew L; Stout, Somava; Sullivan, Erin E; Griffiths, Elizabeth P; Mountjoy, Ashlin; Phillips, Russell S

    2015-07-01

    Challenged by demands to reduce costs and improve service delivery, the U.S. health care system requires transformational change. Health systems innovation is defined broadly as novel ideas, products, services, and processes-including new ways to promote healthy behaviors and better integrate health services with public health and other social services-which achieve better health outcomes and/or patient experience at equal or lower cost. Academic health centers (AHCs) have an opportunity to focus their considerable influence and expertise on health systems innovation to create new approaches to service delivery and to nurture leaders of transformation. AHCs have traditionally used their promotions criteria to signal their values; creating a health systems innovator promotion track could be a critical step towards creating opportunities for innovators in academic medicine. In this Perspective, the authors review publicly available promotions materials at top-ranked medical schools and find that while criteria for advancement increasingly recognize systems innovation, there is a lack of specificity on metrics beyond the traditional yardstick of peer-reviewed publications. In addition to new promotions pathways and alternative evidence for the impact of scholarship, other approaches to fostering health systems innovation at AHCs include more robust funding for career development in health systems innovation, new curricula to enable trainees to develop skills in health systems innovation, and new ways for innovators to disseminate their work. AHCs that foster health systems innovation could meet a critical need to contribute both to the sustainability of our health care system and to AHCs' continued leadership role within it. PMID:25738387

  9. Academic Inbreeding: Local Challenge, Global Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altbach, Philip G.; Yudkevich, Maria; Rumbley, Laura E.

    2015-01-01

    "Academic inbreeding"--involving the appointment of faculty members who graduated from the institution employing them--is considered a small and peripheral aspect of the academic profession but is quite widespread globally. This paper analyzes the nature of inbreeding and its impact on universities. Data from eight countries where…

  10. The Challenges of OER to Academic Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Tom; Holding, Richard; Howell, Anna; Rodway-Dyer, Sue

    2010-01-01

    The degree to which Open Educational Resources (OER) reflect the values of its institutional provider depends on questions of economics and the level of support amongst its academics. For project managers establishing OER repositories, the latter question--how to cultivate, nurture and maintain academic engagement--is critical. Whilst…

  11. Disruptive innovation in academic medical centers: balancing accountable and academic care.

    PubMed

    Stein, Daniel; Chen, Christopher; Ackerly, D Clay

    2015-05-01

    Numerous academic medicine leaders have argued that academic referral centers must prepare for the growing importance of accountability-driven payment models by adopting population health initiatives. Although this shift has merit, execution of this strategy will prove significantly more problematic than most observers have appreciated. The authors describe how successful implementation of an accountable care health strategy within a referral academic medical center (AMC) requires navigating a critical tension: The academic referral business model, driven by tertiary-level care, is fundamentally in conflict with population health. Referral AMCs that create successful value-driven population health systems within their organizations will in effect disrupt their own existing tertiary care businesses. The theory of disruptive innovation suggests that balancing the push and pull of academic and accountable care within a single organization is achievable. However, it will require significant shifts in resource allocation and changes in management structure to enable AMCs to make the inherent difficult choices and trade-offs that will ensue. On the basis of the theories of disruptive innovation, the authors present recommendations for how academic health systems can successfully navigate these issues as they transition toward accountability-driven care. PMID:25517702

  12. Identifying challenges for academic leadership in medical universities in Iran.

    PubMed

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Masiello, Italo

    2010-05-01

    CONTEXT The crucial role of academic leadership in the success of higher education institutions is well documented. Medical education in Iran has been integrated into the health care system through a complex organisational change. This has called into question the current academic leadership, making Iranian medical universities and schools a good case for exploring the challenges of academic leadership. OBJECTIVES This study explores the leadership challenges perceived by academic managers in medical schools and universities in Iran. METHODS A qualitative study using 18 face-to-face, in-depth interviews with academic managers in medical universities and at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education in Iran was performed. All interviews were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis. RESULTS The main challenges to academic leadership could be categorised under three themes, each of which included three sub-themes: organisational issues (inefficacy of academic governance; an overly extensive set of missions and responsibilities; concerns about the selection of managers); managerial issues (management styles; mismatch between authority and responsibilities; leadership capabilities), and organisational culture (tendency towards governmental management; a boss-centred culture; low motivation). CONCLUSIONS This study emphasises the need for academic leadership development in Iranian medical schools and universities. The ability of Iranian universities to grow and thrive will depend ultimately upon the application of leadership skills. Thus, it is necessary to better designate authorities, roles of academic staff and leaders at governance. PMID:20518985

  13. The Protean Challenge of Game Collections at Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Emma; Mould, David; Smith, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The rise of game development and game studies on university campuses prompts academic libraries to consider how to support teaching and research in this area. This article examines current issues and challenges in the development of game collections at academic libraries. The gaming ecosystem has become more complex and libraries may need to move…

  14. The Evolving Academic Health Center: Challenges and Opportunities for Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirin, Steven; Summergrad, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Regardless of the outcome of current efforts at healthcare reform, the resources that academic health centers need--to provide care for increasingly complex patient populations, support clinical innovation, grow the clinical enterprise, and carry out their research and teaching missions--are in jeopardy. This article examines the value…

  15. [Challenges and strategies of drug innovation].

    PubMed

    Guo, Zong-Ru; Zhao, Hong-Yu

    2013-07-01

    discuss the current challenges and future opportunities for drug innovation in China. PMID:24133969

  16. 4 Challenges to Free Speech in Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    Free speech in American higher education was sorely tested by three bizarre events in the waning days of September and another incident in early October. Each one has potentially grave implications for free expression and academic freedom, and thus merits closer scrutiny. The first event was the extension, then withdrawal and eventual…

  17. Human Resources in Academe: Challenge for Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Dorothy M.

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested that the management and development of human resources in higher education is begging for leadership. That leadership requires complex and special knowledge, strong but harmonious relationships with academic administrators, and a humanistic philosophy that reaches out to people. (LBH)

  18. Challenges of Student Selection: Predicting Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Merwe, D.; de Beer, M.

    2006-01-01

    Finding accurate predictors of tertiary academic performance, specifically for disadvantaged students, is essential because of budget constraints and the need of the labour market to address employment equity. Increased retention, throughput and decreased dropout rates are vital. When making admission decisions, the under preparedness of students…

  19. Discovery of innovative therapeutics: today's realities and tomorrow's vision. 2. Pharma's challenges and their commitment to innovation.

    PubMed

    Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Childers, Wayne E

    2014-07-10

    The pharmaceutical industry is facing enormous challenges, including reduced efficiency, stagnant success rate, patent expirations for key drugs, fierce price competition from generics, high regulatory hurdles, and the industry's perceived tarnished image. Pharma has responded by embarking on a range of initiatives. Other sectors, including NIH, have also responded. Academic drug discovery groups have appeared to support the transition of innovative academic discoveries and ideas into attractive drug discovery opportunities. Part 1 of this two-part series discussed the criticisms that have been leveled at the pharmaceutical industry over the past 3 decades and summarized the supporting data for and against these criticisms. This second installment will focus on the current challenges facing the pharmaceutical industry and Pharma's responses, focusing on the industry's changing perspective and new business models for coping with the loss of talent and declining clinical pipelines as well as presenting some examples of recent drug discovery successes. PMID:24428137

  20. Seeds of Innovation: Three Years of the Technology Innovation Challenge Grant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Larry A.

    This publication describes the 62 projects that received 5-year Technology Innovation Challenge Grants beginning in 1995, 1996, and 1997, with reviews of the projects occurring in late 1999 and early 2000. Part 1 of the report describes the Technology Innovation Challenge Grant (TICG) program and its importance. Part 2 contains the project…

  1. Accelerating change: Fostering innovation in healthcare delivery at academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Andrey; Barnett, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) have the potential to be leaders in the era of healthcare delivery reform, but most have yet to display a commitment to delivery innovation on par with their commitment to basic research. Several institutional factors impede delivery innovation including the paucity of adequate training in design and implementation of new delivery models and the lack of established pathways for academic career advancement outside of research. This paper proposes two initiatives to jumpstart disruptive innovation at AMCs: an institutional "innovation incubator" program and a clinician-innovator career track coupled with innovation training programs. PMID:26250082

  2. Challenges for academic accreditation: the UK experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearman, Richard; Seddon, Deborah

    2010-08-01

    Several factors (government policy, demographic trends, employer pressure) are leading to new forms of degree programmes in UK universities. The government is strongly encouraging engagement between universities and employers. Work-based learning is increasingly found in first and second cycle programmes, along with modules designed by employers and increasing use of distance learning. Engineering faculties are playing a leading part in these developments, and the Engineering Council, the engineering professional bodies and some universities are collaborating to develop work-based learning programmes as a pathway to professional qualification. While potentially beneficial to the engineering profession, these developments pose a challenge to traditional approaches to programme accreditation. This paper explores how this system deals with these challenges and highlights the issues that will have to be addressed to ensure that the system can cope effectively with change, especially the development of individually tailored, work-based second cycle programmes, while maintaining appropriate standards and international confidence.

  3. Pathways and Challenges to Innovation in Aerospace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrile, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores impediments to innovation in aerospace and suggests how successful pathways from other industries can be adopted to facilitate greater innovation. Because of its nature, space exploration would seem to be a ripe field of technical innovation. However, engineering can also be a frustratingly conservative endeavor when the realities of cost and risk are included. Impediments like the "find the fault" engineering culture, the treatment of technical risk as almost always evaluated in terms of negative impact, the difficult to account for expansive Moore's Law growth when making predictions, and the stove-piped structural organization of most large aerospace companies and federally funded research laboratories tend to inhibit cross-cutting technical innovation. One successful example of a multi-use cross cutting application that can scale with Moore's Law is the Evolutionary Computational Methods (ECM) technique developed at the Jet Propulsion Lab for automated spectral retrieval. Future innovations like computational engineering and automated design optimization can potentially redefine space exploration, but will require learning lessons from successful innovators.

  4. Using Open Innovation to Solve NASA Planetary Data Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buquo, L.; Galica, C.; Rader, S.; Woolverton, C.; Wolf, A.; Becker, K.; Ching, M.

    2015-06-01

    The Center of Excellence for Collaborative Innovation, a NASA-led, government-wide center of excellence that provides guidance on all aspects of implementing prize competitions will highlight four successful challenges related to planetary data.

  5. Challenging Stereotypes about Academic Writing: Complexity, Elaboration, Explicitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biber, Douglas; Gray, Bethany

    2010-01-01

    The stereotypical view of professional academic writing is that it is grammatically complex, with elaborated structures, and with meaning relations expressed explicitly. In contrast, spoken registers, especially conversation, are believed to have the opposite characteristics. Our goal in the present paper is to challenge these stereotypes, based…

  6. Interactive Distance-Independent Education: Challenges to Traditional Academic Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besser, Howard; Bonn, Maria

    1997-01-01

    Reports on a distance-independent class taught at the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and examines the challenges this course posed to existing academic culture. Topics include logistical issues, including scheduling, workload, and credit hours; changing personnel and roles; and changes in power and…

  7. The Challenge of Academic Achievement in Early Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse on Counseling and Personnel Services, Ann Arbor, MI.

    This sixth chapter in "The Challenge of Counseling in Middle Schools" presents four articles on academic achievement in early adolescence. "Succeeding in Middle School: A Multimodal Approach," by Edwin Gerler, Jr., Nancy Shannon Drew, and Phyllis Mohr, describes a study conducted to examine the effects of the multimodal program, "Succeeding in…

  8. A Structured Career Intervention Program for Academically Challenged Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salleh, Amla; Abdullah, Syed Mohamad; Mahmud, Zuria; Ghavifekr, Simin; Ishak, Noriah

    2013-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the effects of a 2-week structured intervention program on academically challenged students' career development. A quasi-experimental study was designed using pre-tests, post-tests, and a control group approach to examine the effects of the intervention program. Data were collected from both the experimental…

  9. Academic Freedom and the Challenges of September 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Michelle Asha

    2003-01-01

    Explores the challenges and criticism that some faculty members and the academy encountered following September 11, 2001, and highlights the notable efforts college faculty have made to engage their students, transform the classroom, and invigorate the academy while preserving academic freedom. (SLD)

  10. The Schools and the Challenge of Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, H. Thomas; And Others

    Papers contributed by authors prominent in educational innovation and technology are in this collected work. The authors do not always agree, but a broad pattern of agreement is discernible. They agree on the identification of those major problems confronting the schools today as a result of the new social forces at work; and generally, they agree…

  11. Competitive marketing strategies. A challenge for academic practices.

    PubMed

    Sinioris, M E

    1985-01-01

    A special challenge has been presented to academic medical practices by the new healthcare environment. While increased competition for patients and resources affects all medical groups, it is the academic practices who are responsible for training the physicians of tomorrow. Not only must they sharpen their students' awareness of the new environment and teach them to incorporate effective management strategies into their practices, but they must set an example in effective management as well. The basic concepts of competitive marketing strategy, along with helpful exhibits, are presented here, and strategies for effectively maximizing position are discussed from the viewpoints of product mix, process market, and financing. PMID:10269475

  12. Herding the Academic Cats: The Challenges of "Managing" Academic Research in the Contemporary UK University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deem, Rosemary

    2010-01-01

    This article explores some aspects of and challenges faced by those academics and administrators who undertake the leadership and management of research activity in contemporary UK universities. This analysis is set in the context of almost three decades of reforms to the UK's higher education systems in general and to research funding and audit…

  13. Open Innovation Challenge in Healthcare. Role for Education.

    PubMed

    Dimitriu, Rodica; Lungeanu, Diana; Mãnescu, Cristina; Pantazi, Mirela; Mihalas, George I

    2015-01-01

    The vision of this paper is that collaboration creates new openings for engagement of non-commercial actors, such as universities, in innovation networks on the one hand, while opening up for collaborative innovation, and getting valuable real life anchors on the other hand, all these underpinned by greater connectivity and globalization. We present our approach in re-designing the courses on medical informatics and data processing to meet these challenges by employing public Internet services and media facilitation. PMID:26152962

  14. Laying down a Higher Education Innovation Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harney, John O.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a sampler of notable developments in the world of higher education. Among them are: (1) At the University of Southern Maine, faculty leaders and President Theo Kalikow are working together to address the challenges that stand in the way of economic sustainability. In the spring, after announcing a plan to fire a dozen tenured…

  15. Allergen Challenge Chamber: an innovative solution in allergic rhinitis diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sowa, Jerzy; Wojas, Oksana; Piekarska, Barbara; Sybilski, Adam; Samoliński, Bolesław

    2015-01-01

    The Allergen Challenge Chamber (ACC) is definitely a serious challenge on the one hand and an innovative solution in allergic rhinitis diagnosis on the other. The gradual validation of the chamber (according to the test protocol) will allow for standardisation, which is a process undertaken by centres worldwide. The process of designing a consistent system that allows for creating conditions as those in the case of natural inhalation took into account all the aspects (technical specification) necessary to ensure appropriate inhalation. PMID:26755904

  16. Innovation in Extraterrestrial Service Systems - A Challenge for Service Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergner, David

    2010-01-01

    This presentation was prepared at the invitation of Professor Yukio Ohsawa, Department of Systems Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, for delivery at the International Workshop on Innovating Service Systems, sponsored by the Japanese Society of Artificial Intelligence (JSAI) as part of the JSAI Internation Symposium on AI, 2010. It offers several challenges for Service Science and Service Innovation. the goal of the presentation is to stimulate thinking about how service systems viII evolve in the future, as human society advances from its terrestrial base toward a permanent presence in space. First we will consider the complexity of the International Space Station (ISS) as it is today, with particular emphasis of its research facilities, and focus on a current challenge - to maximize the utilization of ISS research facilities for the benefit of society. After briefly reviewing the basic principles of Service Science, we will discuss the potential application of Service Innovation methodology to this challenge. Then we viII consider how game-changing technologies - in particular Synthetic Biology - could accelerate the pace of sociocultural evolution and consequently, the progression of human society into space. We will use this provocative vision to advance thinking about how the emerging field of Service Science, Management, and Engineering (SSME) might help us anticipate and better handle the challenges of this inevitable evolutionary process.

  17. Economic Growth Challenge/Innovation Incentive: Implementing the Incentive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Economic Growth Challenge / Innovation Incentive, as proposed by the Governor's Commission on Higher Education and the Economy, is a new line item involving reallocation of current higher education funding plus matching levels of performance funding to achieve a major restructuring and refocusing of Ohio's portfolio of doctoral research programs.…

  18. The Future of Management Education in Australia: Challenges and Innovations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Richard; Agarwal, Renu; Green, Roy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose -- The purpose of this paper is to undertake a survey of the external and internal forces changing the nature of business schools and business education. It aims to investigate how management education responds to increasing productivity, innovation and capability challenges, examine how MBA programs currently meet these demands, and how…

  19. Academic Innovation in the Commercial Domain: Case Studies of Successful Transfers of University-Developed Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Joshua B.

    In recent years, considerable attention has been directed toward higher educations role as a driver of economic reform. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the processes and mechanisms by which academic innovations are successfully commercialized. The specific question is, what factors explain why some licensed innovations become bona fide…

  20. A small grant funding program to promote innovation at an academic research hospital.

    PubMed

    Orrell, Kelsey; Yankanah, Rosanna; Heon, Elise; Wright, James G

    2015-10-01

    Innovation is important for the improvement of health care. A small grant innovation funding program was implemented by the Hospital for Sick Children(SickKids) for the Perioperative Services group, awarding relatively small funds (approximately $10 000) in order to stimulate innovation. Of 48 applications,26 (54.2%) different innovation projects were funded for a total allocation of $227 870. This program demonstrated the ability of small grants to stimulate many applications with novel ideas, a wide range of innovations and reasonable academic productivity. PMID:26384144

  1. A small grant funding program to promote innovation at an academic research hospital

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, Kelsey; Yankanah, Rosanna; Heon, Elise; Wright, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Innovation is important for the improvement of health care. A small grant innovation funding program was implemented by the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) for the Perioperative Services group, awarding relatively small funds (approximately $10 000) in order to stimulate innovation. Of 48 applications, 26 (54.2%) different innovation projects were funded for a total allocation of $227 870. This program demonstrated the ability of small grants to stimulate many applications with novel ideas, a wide range of innovations and reasonable academic productivity. PMID:26384144

  2. Academic Dishonesty in Distance Higher Education: Challenges and Models for Moral Education in the Digital Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farisi, Mohammad Imam

    2013-01-01

    Today, in the era of open access to digital-based information and communication, one of the biggest challenges in higher education to realize moral education and to build academic culture and integrity is the emergence of academic dishonesty behaviors among academic members. The paper describes academic dishonesty behaviors in Distance Higher…

  3. Leveraging Public Private Partnerships to Innovate Under Challenging Budget Times

    PubMed Central

    Portilla, Lili M.; Rohrbaugh, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH), academic medical centers and industry have a long and productive history in collaborating together. Decreasing R&D budgets both the private and public sector have made the need for such collaborations paramount [critical?] to reduce the risk of [further?] declines in the number of innovative drugs reaching the market to address pressing public health needs. Doing more with less has forced both industry and public sector research institutions (PSRIs) to leverage resources and expertise in order to de-risk projects. In addition, it provides an opportunity to envision and implement new approaches to accomplish these goals. We discuss several of these innovative collaborations and partnerships at the NIH that demonstrate how the NIH and industry are working together to strenghten the drug development pipeline. PMID:24283971

  4. Challenges Facing Chinese Academic Staff in a UK University in Terms of Language, Relationships and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Hui-hua

    2012-01-01

    The recruitment of international academic staff is viewed as one of the strategies to internationalise the universities. International academic staff, however, usually encounter many challenges when in a foreign context. This study aims to investigate the challenges of Chinese academic staff teaching in the UK in terms of language, relationships…

  5. Nursing academic administration: who will take on the challenge?

    PubMed

    Adams, Lavonne

    2007-01-01

    To address the shortage of qualified candidates interested in nursing academic administration, this study explored factors that influence nursing faculty to pursue administrative positions. Nursing academic administrators and full-time faculty from randomly selected accredited nursing programs in private colleges and universities in the United States participated in this study. Administrators completed the Leadership Practices Inventory-Self and a recruitment questionnaire, whereas faculty completed the Leadership Practices Inventory-Observer and a career aspiration questionnaire. Most faculty respondents (63%) indicated that they would not consider a position with greater administrative responsibility. Respondents identified workload and conflict-related issues as factors likely to discourage their pursuit of administration. Respondents identified additional challenge/variety of work, opportunity to influence organizational climate for change, opportunity to facilitate faculty growth and development, and mix of administration with teaching as likely to encourage their pursuit of administration. Faculty interest in a position with greater administrative responsibility was significantly increased for those who had completed additional course work beyond their highest degree. Practice recommendations included making leadership development opportunities available for faculty interested in administration, exploring methods to manage workload and conflict, and exploring methods to maximize factors identified as likely to encourage the pursuit of academic administration. PMID:17903790

  6. 77 FR 52105 - Announcement of the Innovation in Arms Control Challenge Under the America Competes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... Announcement of the Innovation in Arms Control Challenge Under the America Competes Reauthorization Act of 2011... first ``Innovation in Arms Control Challenge,'' with the goal of spurring innovation, and developing.... Competition Details 1. Subject of the Challenge: This Challenge seeks creative ideas from the general...

  7. Comparison of Traditional and Innovative Techniques to Solve Technical Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of traditional and innovative techniques to solve technical challenges in food storage technology. The planning for a mission to Mars is underway, and the food storage technology improvements requires that improvements be made. This new technology is required, because current food storage technology is inadequate,refrigerators or freezers are not available for food preservation, and that a shelf life of 5 years is expected. A 10 year effort to improve food packaging technology has not enhanced significantly food packaging capabilities. Two innovation techniques were attempted InnoCentive and Yet2.com and have provided good results, and are still under due diligence for solver verification.

  8. Building America Top Innovations 2012: DOE Challenge Home (Formerly Builders Challenge)

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes DOE’s Builders Challenge. Hundreds of leading-edge builders across the country signed on to the Challenge and more than 14,000 homes earned the label, saving homeowners over $10 million a year in utility bills. DOE’s new program, the DOE Challenge Home, increases the rigor of the guidelines including requiring homes to be Zero Net-Energy Ready.

  9. Imagining value, imagining users: academic technology transfer for health innovation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Fiona Alice; Sanders, Carrie B; Lehoux, Pascale

    2009-04-01

    Governments have invested heavily in the clinical and economic promise of health innovation and express increasing concern with the efficacy and efficiency of the health innovation system. In considering strategies for 'better' health innovation, policy makers and researchers have taken a particular interest in the work of universities and related public research organizations: How do these organizations identify and transfer promising innovations to market, and do these efforts make best use of public sector investments? We conducted an ethnographic study of technology transfer offices (TTOs) in Ontario and British Columbia, Canada, to consider the place of health and health system imperatives in judgments of value in early-stage health innovation. Our analysis suggests that the valuation process is poorly specified as a set of task-specific judgments. Instead, we argue that technology transfer professionals are active participants in the construction of the innovation and assign value by 'imagining' the end product in its 'context of use'. Oriented as they are to the commercialization of health technology, TTOs understand users primarily as market players. The immediate users of TTOs' efforts are commercial partners (i.e., licensees, investors) who are capable of translating current discoveries into future commodities. The ultimate end users - patients, clinicians, health systems - are the future consumers of the products to be sold. Attention to these proximate and more distal users in the valuation process is a complex and constitutive feature of the work of health technology transfer. At the same time, judgements about individual technologies are made in relation to a broader imperative through which TTOs seek to imagine and construct sustainable innovation systems. Judgments of value are rendered sensible in relation to the logic of valuation for systems of innovation that, in turn, configure users of health innovation in systemic ways. PMID:19231055

  10. Quality Management of Academic Development Work: Implementation Issues and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kathleen; Radloff, Alex

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarises current ideas about the place of academic development in the twenty-first century university. It focuses on aligning the leadership and management of academic development work with the "ownership" of such work by its key stakeholders--teaching academics, university management and the wider academic development community--and…

  11. Innovative generalist programs: academic health care centers respond to the shortage of generalist physicians.

    PubMed

    Urbina, C; Hickey, M; McHarney-Brown, C; Duban, S; Kaufman, A

    1994-04-01

    Academic health care centers increasingly are exploring innovative ways to increase the supply of generalist physicians. The authors review successful innovations at representative academic health centers in the areas of recruitment and admissions, undergraduate medical education, residency training, and practice support. Lessons learned focus on those areas that have demonstrated improvements in the number and quality of physicians trained in family practice, general pediatrics, and general internal medicine. Successful recruitment of generalism-oriented applicants requires identification and tracking of rural, minority, and other special groups of students at the high school and college levels. Academic health care centers that provide early, sustained, community-based, ambulatory experiences for medical students and residents encourage trainees to maintain and choose generalist careers. Finally, academic health care centers that link with community providers and with state government encourage the retention of generalist physicians through continuing education and teaching networks. PMID:8014749

  12. Perspective: global medicine: opportunities and challenges for academic health science systems.

    PubMed

    Ackerly, D Clay; Udayakumar, Krishna; Taber, Robert; Merson, Michael H; Dzau, Victor J

    2011-09-01

    Globalization is having a growing impact on health and health care, presenting challenges as well as opportunities for the U.S. health care industry in general and for academic health science systems (AHSSs) in particular. The authors believe that AHSSs must develop long-term strategies that address their future role in global medicine. AHSSs should meet global challenges through planning, engagement, and innovation that combine traditional academic activities with entrepreneurial approaches to health care delivery, research, and education, including international public-private partnerships. The opportunities for U.S.-based AHSSs to be global health care leaders and establish partnerships that improve health locally and globally more than offset the potential financial, organizational, politico-legal, and reputational risks that exist in the global health care arena. By examining recent international activities of leading AHSSs, the authors review the risks and the critical factors for success and discuss external policy shifts in workforce development and accreditation that would further support the growth of global medicine. PMID:21785305

  13. Innovation and Consumer Directed Care: Identifying the challenges.

    PubMed

    Gill, Liz; Cameron, Ian D

    2015-12-01

    Our aim was to report clinician and researcher observations about the practical difficulties with achieving the articulated objectives of Consumer Directed Care (CDC). The methods used were as follows: identification of key client community services issues through analysis of qualitative data related to a PhD project; review of the summary of these issues by the supervising academic; presentation of the issues to five clinicians involved with a community service clinical trial; verification of the findings through discussions with a senior community service provider. There is anecdotal evidence that the current overlay of CDC in the existing community-based home services sector for people who are older will continue to prevent its effective implementation. The existing culture and underlying philosophies related to this sector maybe unable to support the level of innovative change required. Research is needed into how the stated objectives of CDC can be achieved in Australia and how this can best be managed. PMID:26643231

  14. Censorship or Selection? Academic Library Holdings of the Top Ten Most Challenged Books of 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Rickey

    2010-01-01

    Academic libraries often serve as the protectors of challenged books. Pressure on public libraries to remove controversial works can and often does result in the restriction of access or removal of the work from those libraries shelves. Academic libraries, however, operate with a stronger sense of academic and intellectual freedom. To analyze how…

  15. 34 CFR 200.1 - State responsibilities for developing challenging academic standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... academic standards. 200.1 Section 200.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC... Assessments § 200.1 State responsibilities for developing challenging academic standards. (a)...

  16. 34 CFR 200.1 - State responsibilities for developing challenging academic standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... academic standards. 200.1 Section 200.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC... Assessments § 200.1 State responsibilities for developing challenging academic standards. (a)...

  17. A Reflective Teaching Challenge to Motivate Educational Innovation

    PubMed Central

    Kirwin, Jennifer; Gonyeau, Michael; Matthews, S. James; Lancaster, Jason; DiVall, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe a teaching challenge intended to increase faculty use of evidence-based and student-centered instructional strategies in the demanding school of pharmacy context with technology-savvy students. Design. A teaching challenge was created that required faculty members to incorporate a “new-to-you” innovative teaching method in a class, course, or experiential activity. The method was linked to at least 1 of 7 evidence-based principles for effective teaching. Faculty members were exposed to colleagues' teaching strategies via brief voluntary presentations at department meetings. Assessment. A post-challenge survey provided assessment data about the challenge. Responses to a baseline survey provided additional information about what faculty members were already doing (52% response rate). Eighty-one percent of faculty respondents completed the challenge. A wide array of new strategies (13 categories such as flipped classrooms and social media) was implemented and 75% included the use of technology. Nearly all respondents (96%) thought that participation in the challenge was worth the effort and planned to participate again the following year. All faculty members intended to continue using their new strategy and 56% planned additional modifications with future implementations. The challenge demonstrated how multiple goals of curricular improvement, faculty development, and student-centered instruction could be achieved together. Conclusion. The teaching challenge motivated most of the faculty members to try something new to them. Links between evidence-based principles and day-to-day activities were strengthened. The new-to-you design placed the challenge within reach of faculty members regardless of their background, subject, or experience. PMID:24954943

  18. Academic Biliteracy Challenges: Korean Scholars in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Sookyung

    2010-01-01

    Studies on academic biliteracy have had a tendency to focus on multilingual scholars' current status of academic biliteracy and not on their prior experiences in their home countries. However, these experiences are vital to understanding their current status of academic biliteracy because the multilingual scholars' distinctive experiences in…

  19. Academics' Professionalism and Quality Mechanisms: Challenges and Tensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an insight into the debate about academic work as a profession. It refers to the sociology of professions and explores how academics in a pre-1992 university in England understood their work as a profession and how they interpreted their professionalism in the context of an audit culture for teaching. It reveals that academics'…

  20. Academic Entrepreneurship, Innovation Policies and Politics in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arapostathis, Stathis

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the process of the emergence in Greece of the "Triple Helix", and the nature of the "Helix" in the context of the concurrent changes occurring in Greek socio-political affairs. The influence of politics and innovation policies on the relationships between academia and government and industry is considered. Emphasis is given to…

  1. International Graduate Students' Academic Writing Practices in Malaysia: Challenges and Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges faced by non-native English speaking international graduate students in their academic writing practices while they studied at a university in Malaysia as well as the solutions they employed when faced with the challenges. Academic Literacies Questionnaire was used to collect data. Based on 131 participants,…

  2. Persistence in the Face of Academic Challenge for Economically Disadvantaged Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Eleanor D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined persistence in the face of academic challenge for economically disadvantaged children. Participants included 103 children attending Head Start preschools, as well as their caregivers and teachers. Child tasks measured persistence in the face of academic challenge as well as emergent implicit theories of intelligence. Caregiver…

  3. The Academic Writing Challenges of Undergraduate Students: A South African Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pineteh, Ernest A.

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the academic writing challenges of undergraduate students at Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT), South Africa. It examines challenges such as lack of a mastery of academic writing conventions, analysis of writing topics, using writing to construct social identities; ability to research and apply knowledge across…

  4. Rethinking Academic Reform and Encouraging Organizational Innovation: Implications for Stakeholder Management in College Sports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comeaux, Eddie

    2013-01-01

    There are increasing concerns about the educational experiences of Division I student-athletes in big-time college sports. Calls for reform have come from within colleges and universities and beyond. The literature of innovative management offers ideas that can help mitigate the academic and athletic divide and offer new ideas for athletic…

  5. Commentary: Implementing Social-Emotional and Academic Innovations--Reflections, Reactions, and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Stephen N.; Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Roach, Andrew T.

    2003-01-01

    The article "Implementation, Sustainability, and Scaling Up of Social-Emotional and Academic Innovations in Public Schools" by Elias, Zins, Graczyk, and Weissberg (2003) is a thought-provoking contribution, and one that begs for more application. Some of the points the authors raise have been articulated in the school and clinical evidence-based…

  6. An Academic Development Model for Fostering Innovation and Sharing in Curriculum Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempster, Jacqueline A.; Benfield, Greg; Francis, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This paper outlines an academic development process based around a two- or three-day workshop programme called a Course Design Intensive (CDI). The CDI process aims to foster collaboration and peer support in curriculum development and bring about pedagogic innovation and positive experiences for both tutors and learners. Bringing participants…

  7. Going the Distance in Academic Libraries: Identifying Trends and Innovation in Distance Learning Resources and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, "U.S. News & World Report" ranked nineteen institutions on its Up-and-Coming national universities list. The universities were put on the list based on rankings from experts in higher education administration. The experts were asked to identify institutions that had implemented innovative ideas in the areas of academics,…

  8. The Relationship among Principals' Technology Leadership, Teaching Innovation, and Students' Academic Optimism in Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chuan-Chung; Yen, Hung-Chin; Kuan, Liu-Yen

    2014-01-01

    This study empirically investigates the relationships among principals' technology leadership, teaching innovations, and students' academic optimism by surveying elementary school educators across Taiwan. Of the total 1,080 questionnaires distributed, 755 valid surveys were returned for a 69.90% return rate. Teachers were asked to indicate the…

  9. Advantages and Challenges of Working as a Clinician in an Academic Department of Medicine: Academic Clinicians' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Christmas, Colleen; Durso, Samuel C.; Kravet, Steven J.; Wright, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The provision of high-quality clinical care is critical to the mission of academic and nonacademic clinical settings and is of foremost importance to academic and nonacademic physicians. Concern has been increasingly raised that the rewards systems at most academic institutions may discourage those with a passion for clinical care over research or teaching from staying in academia. In addition to the advantages afforded by academic institutions, academic physicians may perceive important challenges, disincentives, and limitations to providing excellent clinical care. To better understand these views, we conducted a qualitative study to explore the perspectives of clinical faculty in prominent departments of medicine. Methods Between March and May 2007, 2 investigators conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with 24 clinically excellent internal medicine physicians at 8 academic institutions across the nation. Transcripts were independently coded by 2 investigators and compared for agreement. Content analysis was performed to identify emerging themes. Results Twenty interviewees (83%) were associate professors or professors, 33% were women, and participants represented a wide range of internal medicine subspecialties. Mean time currently spent in clinical care by the physicians was 48%. Domains that emerged related to faculty's perception of clinical care in the academic setting included competing obligations, teamwork and collaboration, types of patients and productivity expectations, resources for clinical services, emphasis on discovery, and bureaucratic challenges. Conclusions Expert clinicians at academic medical centers perceive barriers to providing excellent patient care related to competing demands on their time, competing academic missions, and bureaucratic challenges. They also believe there are differences in the types of patients seen in academic settings compared with those in the private sector, that there is a “public” nature in

  10. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers. PMID:23425986

  11. The innovative medicines initiative: a European response to the innovation challenge.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M

    2012-03-01

    The Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI) was launched in 2008 as a large-scale public-private partnership between the European Commission and the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries and Associations (EFPIA). With a total budget of €2 billion, the IMI aims to boost the development of new medicines across Europe by implementing new collaborative endeavors between large pharmaceutical companies and other key actors in the health-care ecosystem, i.e., academic institutions, small and medium enterprises, patients, and regulatory authorities. Projects conducted by IMI consortia have already delivered meaningful results, providing proof-of-concept evidence for the efficiency of this new model of collaboration. In this article we review recent achievements of the IMI consortia and discuss the growing interest in the IMI as a best-practice model to reinvigorate drug development. PMID:22318619

  12. The Horizontal and Vertical Fragmentation of Academic Work and the Challenge for Academic Governance and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Glen A.

    2013-01-01

    Academic work has become increasingly fragmented. The horizontal fragmentation of the profession into disciplinary tribes has been accompanied by the increasing participation of student affairs and educational development professionals located outside the academic units but are actively engaged in academic work, such as supporting teaching and…

  13. Beyond Academics: Challenging Issues Facing Community College Non-Academic Support Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Judith Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This research focused on identifying and exploring the significant current and emerging community college non-academic support service issues. These auxiliary services, not unlike academic or student affairs, support the community college mission and vision as well as students' academic success. Since December 2007, Americans have been…

  14. The Australian Academic Profession in Transition: Addressing the Challenge of Reconceptualising Academic Work and Regenerating the Academic Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bexley, Emmaline; James, Richard; Arkoudis, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Australia has an ageing academic workforce and the nation's capacity to refresh, build and maintain this workforce during a period of expansion in tertiary education participation needs urgent consideration. To inform possible strategies to recruit and retain academic staff, this study investigates the current attitudes of the academic profession…

  15. Innovation in clinical pharmacy practice and opportunities for academic--practice partnership.

    PubMed

    Gubbins, Paul O; Micek, Scott T; Badowski, Melissa; Cheng, Judy; Gallagher, Jason; Johnson, Samuel G; Karnes, Jason H; Lyons, Kayley; Moore, Katherine G; Strnad, Kyle

    2014-05-01

    Clinical pharmacy has a rich history of advancing practice through innovation. These innovations helped to mold clinical pharmacy into a patient-centered discipline recognized for its contributions to improving medication therapy outcomes. However, innovations in clinical pharmacy practice have now waned. In our view, the growth of academic–practice partnerships could reverse this trend and stimulate innovation among the next generation of pioneering clinical pharmacists. Although collaboration facilitates innovation,academic institutions and health care systems/organizations are not taking full advantage of this opportunity. The academic–practice partnership can be optimized by making both partners accountable for the desired outcomes of their collaboration, fostering symbiotic relationships that promote value-added clinical pharmacy services and emphasizing continuous quality improvement in the delivery of these services. Optimizing academic–practice collaboration on a broader scale requires both partners to adopt a culture that provides for dedicated time to pursue innovation, establishes mechanisms to incubate ideas, recognizes where motivation and vision align, and supports the purpose of the partnership. With appropriate leadership and support, a shift in current professional education and training practices, and a commitment to cultivate future innovators, the academic–practice partnership can develop new and innovative practice advancements that will improve patient outcomes. PMID:24877189

  16. Addressing the "Global Health Tax" and "Wild Cards": Practical Challenges to Building Academic Careers in Global Health.

    PubMed

    Palazuelos, Daniel; Dhillon, Ranu

    2016-01-01

    Among many possible benefits, global health efforts can expand the skills and experience of U.S. clinicians, improve health for communities in need, and generate innovations in care delivery with relevance everywhere. Yet, despite high rates of interest among students and medical trainees to include global health opportunities in their training, there is still no clear understanding of how this interest will translate into viable and sustained global health careers after graduation. Building on a growing conversation about how to support careers in academic global health, this Perspective describes the practical challenges faced by physicians pursuing these careers after they complete training. Writing from their perspective as junior faculty at one U.S. academic health center with a dedicated focus on global health training, the authors describe a number of practical issues they have found to be critical both for their own career development and for the advice they provide their mentees. With a particular emphasis on the financial, personal, professional, and logistical challenges that young "expat" global health physicians in academic institutions face, they underscore the importance of finding ways to support these career paths, and propose possible solutions. Such investments would not only respond to the rational and moral imperatives of global health work and advance the mission of improving human health but also help to fully leverage the potential of what is already an unprecedented movement within academic medicine. PMID:26244256

  17. The Academic Labor Movement: Understanding Its Origin and Current Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the emergence of today's academic labor movement in higher education, noting problems of pay and working conditions among adjunct faculty and graduate students. Explains the historical context, why the movement is important, where the academic leftists are in this movement, what can be done about the situation, and what follows.…

  18. Comparison of Traditional and Innovative Techniques to Solve Technical Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perchonok, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Although NASA has an adequate food system for current missions, research is required to accommodate new requirements for future NASA exploration missions. The Inadequate Food System risk reflects the need to develop requirements and technologies that will enable NASA to provide the crew with a safe, nutritious and acceptable food system while effectively balancing appropriate resources such as mass, volume, and crew time in exploratory missions. As we go deeper into space or spend more time on the International Space Station (ISS), there will be requirements for packaged food to be stored for 3 5 years. New food packaging technologies are needed that have adequate oxygen and water barrier properties to maintain the foods' quality over this extended shelf life. NASA has been unsuccessful in identify packaging materials that meet the necessary requirements when using several traditional routes including literature reviews, workshops, and internal shelf life studies on foods packaged in various packaging materials. Small Business Innovative Research grants were used for accelerating food packaging materials research with limited success. In order to accelerate the process, a theoretical challenge was submitted to InnoCentive resulting in a partial award. A similar food packaging challenge was submitted to Yet2.com and several potential commercial packaging material suppliers were identified that, at least partially, met the requirements. Comparisons and results of these challenges will be discussed.

  19. Innovation in biotechnology: moving from academic research to product development--the case of biosensors.

    PubMed

    Siontorou, Christina G; Batzias, Fragiskos A

    2010-06-01

    The fast pace of technological change in the biotechnology industry and the market demands require continuous innovation, which, owing to the science base of the sector, derives from academic research through a transformation process that converts science-oriented knowledge to marketable products. There appear to be some inherent difficulties in transforming directly the knowledge output of academic research to industrial use. The purpose of this article is to examine certain transition mechanisms from monodisciplinary academic isolation (curiosity-driven and internal-worth innovation) to university-industry alliances (market-driven and public-worth innovation) through inter-organizational multidisciplinary collaboration and contextualize the analysis with the case of biosensors. While the majority of literature on the subject studies the channels of knowledge transfer as determinants of alliance success (transferor/transferee interactions), either from the university side (science base) or the industry side (market base), this article focuses on the transferable (technology base) and how it can be strategically modeled and managed by the industry to promote innovation. Based on the valuable lessons learnt from the biosensor paradigm, the authors argue that strategic industry choices deal primarily with the best stage/point to intersect and seize the university output, implanting the required element of marketability that will transform an idea to a viable application. The authors present a methodological approach for accelerating the knowledge transfer from the university to industry aiming at the effective transition of science to products through a business model reconfiguration. PMID:20214418

  20. Up close: family therapy challenges and innovations around the world.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Janine; Abu-Baker, Khawla; Diez Fernández, Cristina; Chong Garcia, Nelly; Fredman, Glenda; Kamya, Hugo; Martín Higarza, Yolanda; Fortes de Leff, Jacqueline; Messent, Philip; Nakamura, Shin-Ichi; Torun Reid, Fatma; Sim, Timothy; Subrahmanian, Chitra; Zevallos Vega, Roxana

    2014-09-01

    Family therapists from 10 different countries (China, India, Israel including Palestinian citizens, Japan, Mexico, Peru, Spain, Turkey, Uganda, and the United Kingdom) describe systemic therapy in their contexts and current innovative work and challenges. They highlight the importance of family therapy continuing to cut across disciplines, the power of systems ideas in widely diverse settings and institutions (such as courts, HIV projects, working with people forced into exile), extensive new mental health initiatives (such as in Turkey and India), as well as the range of family therapy journals available (four alone in Spain). Many family therapy groups are collaborating across organizations (especially in Asia) and the article presents other ideas for connections such as a clearing house to inexpensively translate family therapy articles into other languages. PMID:25099431

  1. Mergers involving academic health centers: a formidable challenge.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, V D

    2001-10-01

    Escalating economic pressures on the clinical enterprise threaten the missions of education and research in many of the most prestigious academic health centers. Following the model of industry, mergers of the healthcare delivery systems of teaching hospitals and clinics held promise for economies of scale and an improved operating margin. Failure to follow business principles in constructing the merged entity, differences in organizational governance and culture, and inability of physician leadership to prioritize, downsize, and consolidate clinical programs to optimize operational efficiencies all compromise the success of such mergers in academic medicine. Academic institutions and their respective governing boards need to exercise greater discipline in financial analysis and a willingness to make difficult decisions that show favor to one parent institution over another if mergers are to be effective in this setting. To date, an example of a vibrant and successful merger of academic health centers remains to be found. PMID:11603683

  2. Patenting and licensing of university research: promoting innovation or undermining academic values?

    PubMed

    Sterckx, Sigrid

    2011-03-01

    Since the 1980s in the US and the 1990s in Europe, patenting and licensing activities by universities have massively increased. This is strongly encouraged by governments throughout the Western world. Many regard academic patenting as essential to achieve 'knowledge transfer' from academia to industry. This trend has far-reaching consequences for access to the fruits of academic research and so the question arises whether the current policies are indeed promoting innovation or whether they are instead a symptom of a pro-intellectual property (IP) culture which is blind to adverse effects. Addressing this question requires both empirical analysis (how real is the link between academic patenting and licensing and 'development' of academic research by industry?) and normative assessment (which justifications are given for the current policies and to what extent do they threaten important academic values?). After illustrating the major rise of academic patenting and licensing in the US and Europe and commenting on the increasing trend of 'upstream' patenting and the focus on exclusive as opposed to non-exclusive licences, this paper will discuss five negative effects of these trends. Subsequently, the question as to why policymakers seem to ignore these adverse effects will be addressed. Finally, a number of proposals for improving university policies will be made. PMID:19768580

  3. Challenges to "Academic Immunity"--The Beginning of a New Era?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Mark

    2004-01-01

    While the term "academic immunity" is not one usually used, in practice academics in higher education institutions (HEIs) have been immune from legal challenges to their key professional activities. The historical position in the UK has seen both university visitors and the courts consistently refusing to interfere with decisions described as…

  4. The End of Certainty? The Academic Profession and the Challenge of Change (Guest Editorial Essay).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Anthony

    1998-01-01

    Presents an overview of uncertainties and challenges facing academics in the late 1990s. Discusses postmodern attacks on conventional assumptions about knowledge, decline of academic disciplines, increasing demand for vocational relevance, new modes of virtual pedagogies, diversification of education and training, transition to mass higher…

  5. ICT Implementation Challenges and Strategies for ODL Institutions: The ZOU's National Centre Academic Staff Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nenge, Richard Tafara; Chimbadzwa, Zvinaiye; Mapolisa, Tichaona

    2012-01-01

    This study highlighted some of the major challenges that Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU) academic staff experiences in connection with Information Communication Technology (ICT) implementation. It employed a qualitative paradigm rooted in a case study research design focusing on ZOU Academic Staff at the selected Faculties. It purposively sampled…

  6. Investment in Open Innovation Service Providers: NASA's Innovative Strategy for Solving Space Exploration Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogarty, Jennifer A.; Rando, Cynthia; Baumann, David; Richard, Elizabeth; Davis, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    In an effort to expand routes for open communication and create additional opportunities for public involvement with NASA, Open Innovation Service Provider (OISP) methodologies have been incorporated as a tool in NASA's problem solving strategy. NASA engaged the services of two OISP providers, InnoCentive and Yet2.com, to test this novel approach and its feasibility in solving NASA s space flight challenges. The OISPs were chosen based on multiple factors including: network size and knowledge area span, established process, methodology, experience base, and cost. InnoCentive and Yet2.com each met the desired criteria; however each company s approach to Open Innovation is distinctly different. InnoCentive focuses on posting individual challenges to an established web-based network of approximately 200,000 solvers; viable solutions are sought and granted a financial award if found. Based on a specific technological need, Yet2.com acts as a talent scout providing a broad external network of experts as potential collaborators to NASA. A relationship can be established with these contacts to develop technologies and/or maintained as an established network of future collaborators. The results from the first phase of the pilot study have shown great promise for long term efficacy of utilizing the OISP methodologies. Solution proposals have been received for the challenges posted on InnoCentive and are currently under review for final disposition. In addition, Yet2.com has identified new external partners for NASA and we are in the process of understanding and acting upon these new opportunities. Compared to NASA's traditional routes for external problem solving, the OISP methodologies offered NASA a substantial savings in terms of time and resources invested. In addition, these strategies will help NASA extend beyond its current borders to build an ever expanding network of experts and global solvers.

  7. Lessons learned from a history of perseverance and innovation in academic-practice partnerships.

    PubMed

    Libster, Martha Mathews

    2011-01-01

    Nurse leaders today are faced with a pressing concern to reevaluate established community resources and models for academic-practice partnerships that have been used in the preparation of new and advanced practice nurses. Nursing reform in education and practice is not achieved as a simple series of decisions in the present moment with future direction as its object. It is a process in which the outcome is ultimately evaluated within the context of history. Academic-practice partnerships are part of a nursing heritage that has persevered for hundreds of years. This article is a brief synopsis of examples from the historical records that evidence the lessons learned from the experiences of nurses who have formed innovative academic-practice partnerships with religious communities, medical colleges and physicians, government, hospitals, institutions of higher learning, and nursing organizations. PMID:22142931

  8. The Challenge of Self-Renewal in the Innovative College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnstone, Douglas B.

    1990-01-01

    Any successful innovation creates a body of practice, policy, lore, and belief that becomes harder to change the longer it survives. Using case studies to illustrate, the essay outlines a conceptual model for institutional self-assessment of its innovative health and recommends strategies for keeping the innovative spirit alive. (Author/MLW)

  9. Educational Research: The Challenge of Using an Academic Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Clifford

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: In 2010, I was invited to give the annual lecture that honors Lawrence Cremin, the historian of American education who became the seventh president of Teachers College, Columbia University. To pay tribute to the way in which Cremin used an academic discipline to bring rigor and depth to educational research, I described my own…

  10. An Upstart Web Catalog Challenges an Academic-Library Giant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Andrea L.

    2008-01-01

    21-year-old Aaron Swartz is attempting to turn the library world upside down. He is taking on the subscription-based WorldCat, the largest bibliographic database on the planet, by building a free online book catalog that anyone can update. Many academic librarians are wary of Mr. Swartz's project because it will allow nonlibrarians, who may be…

  11. The Academic Achievement Gap: The Suburban Challenge. CSR Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alson, Allan

    Suburban schoolchildren of color, in the aggregate, do not perform as well as their white counterparts. In fact, the academic achievement gaps in many suburban communities are actually greater than those in urban school districts. This research brief looks at the achievement gap in suburban schools, offering preliminary answers to the following…

  12. Sustainability Challenge for Academic Libraries: Planning for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jankowska, Maria Anna; Marcum, James W.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing concern that a variety of factors threaten the sustainability of academic libraries: developing and preserving print and digital collections, supplying and supporting rapidly changing technological and networking infrastructure, providing free services, maintaining growing costs of library buildings, and lowering libraries'…

  13. Federal Freedom To Work Law Challenges Academic Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Charles L.; Ford, William F.

    2002-01-01

    Identifies some of the likely effects of the Senior Citizens' Freedom To Work Act of 2000 on the retirement decisions of professors approaching their normal retirement age as they learn about the added income opportunities created by the new rules. Discusses the Act's potential impact on faculty turnover rates, academic staffing patterns, and the…

  14. Putting Doctoral Education to Work: Challenges to Academic Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boud, David; Tennant, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Professional doctorates designed to meet the needs of particular groups (education, nursing, business, law, etc.) have been established, and the PhD now encompasses a wide range of academic pursuits. However, the combination of the PhD and designated professional doctorates does not exhaust the range of doctoral-level education. Is there a…

  15. Five Challenges for Academic Leaders in the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penney, Sherry H.

    1996-01-01

    It is argued that college presidents should concentrate their efforts in five specific areas: (1) interpreting and managing change; (2) leading academic transformation; (3) balancing constituencies and their opposing claims; (4) finding financial resources; and (5) defending and promoting higher education, by meeting growing and inconsistent…

  16. Exploring the Challenges of Academic Advising for Student Veterans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Rodney; Walker, Erin; Smith, Carol

    2015-01-01

    As troops return to the United States from conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, many student veterans are expected to utilize their education benefits and enroll in higher education. A key element in their success in college will be the quality of academic advising they receive. Student veterans are much more likely than traditional students to drop…

  17. Women Graduates and the Workplace: Continuing Challenges for Academic Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the persistence of a gender gap among university-based academics, despite the development of equity policies and "family-friendly" initiatives. Over four decades of research are reviewed from the liberal states of Australia, Canada, New Zealand, USA and the UK, including my own qualitative interviews in Canada in…

  18. Collection Development Challenges for the 21st Century Academic Librarian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Susan

    2004-01-01

    In the down-sized academic library of the twenty-first century, many librarians with little or no formal collection development training or experience are being entrusted with large departmental budgets, occasionally without the collaboration of a department liaison. How do new librarians, or librarians new to a discipline, deal with this…

  19. Fair Use Challenges in Academic and Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes research into the current application of fair use to meet the missions of U.S. academic and research libraries. Sixty-five librarians were interviewed confidentially by telephone for around one hour each. They were asked about their employment of fair use in five key areas of practice: support for teaching and learning,…

  20. Institutionalization of Community Partnerships: The Challenge for Academic Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Magwood, Gayenell S.; Andrews, Jeannette O.; Zapka, Jane; Cox, Melissa J.; Newman, Susan; Stuart, Gail W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Current public health priorities emphasize the elimination of health disparities, translational research, and transdisciplinary and community alliances. The Center for Community Health Partnerships is a proactive initiative to address new paradigms and priorities in health care through institutionalization of community-university partnerships. This report highlights innovative strategies and lessons learned. PMID:23698666

  1. Strategies used by nurses, academics and students to overcome intercultural communication challenges.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Saras; Barker, Michelle; Mak, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Nurse clinicians and academics need to understand intercultural communication challenges to improve their communication skills and better support students' learning. Gaps exist in the literature regarding intercultural communication resources for students, academics and clinicians. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of clinical nurses, nurse academics, and student nurses regarding intercultural communication challenges. Data were collected using focus group interviews with nineteen clinical facilitators (nurses who supervise nursing students in clinical practice), five clinical nurses, and ten nursing students. Seven nurse academics were interviewed via telephone. The purposive sample was drawn from a tertiary hospital and a university in Australia. Participants were invited to discuss challenging intercultural scenarios they had experienced including strategies they used to overcome such challenges. Using qualitative content analysis data were analysed resulting in four categories which were: 1) prejudice based on cultural diversity; 2) unfamiliarity with cultural boundaries; 3) stereotyping cultural behaviours; and 4) difficulty understanding English. Strategies participants used to mitigate challenges included resorting to cultural validation through alliance building, proactively seeking clarification, and acquiring cultural awareness knowledge. This study highlights intercultural challenges students, clinicians and academics face and signpost the way forward with useful strategies to better inform nurse education. PMID:26365507

  2. Practices that Provide Effective Academic Challenge for First-Year Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter Magolda, Marcia B.; King, Patricia M.; Drobney, Kristy L.

    2010-01-01

    Introducing first-year college students to complex thinking is often complicated by their reliance on external authority. A key task for educators is identifying the nature of experiences that offer academic challenge yet are accompanied with sufficient support for students to engage these challenges meaningfully. The authors report the nature of…

  3. Diversifying Academic and Professional Identities in Higher Education: Some Management Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitchurch, Celia; Gordon, George

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws on an international study of the management challenges arising from diversifying academic and professional identities in higher education. These challenges include, for instance, the introduction of practice-based disciplines with different traditions such as health and social care, the changing aspirations and expectations of…

  4. Academic Preparedness as a Predictor of Achievement in an Engineering Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mentzer, Nathan; Becker, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a student's academic success, measured by grade point average (GPA) in mathematics, science, and communication courses, is correlated with student change in achievement during an engineering design challenge. Engineering design challenges have been implemented and researched in K-16 environments where…

  5. Challenges of Recruiting Candidates with Strong Academic Credentials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Jon; Davis, Trina

    2007-01-01

    A major challenge to improving science education lies in the shortage of qualified science teachers. A potential solution to this challenge consists of directing the energy and talent of graduate students and postdoctoral scientists to reinvigorate science education in schools. This requires creating new, more accessible pathways for science…

  6. The Challenges of Collaborative Knowledge Creation in Open Innovation Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du Chatenier, Elise; Verstegen, Jos A. A. M.; Biemans, Harm J. A.; Mulder, Martin; Omta, Onno

    2009-01-01

    In open innovation teams, people from different organizations work together to develop new products, services, or markets. This organizational diversity can positively influence collaborative knowledge creation but can frustrate and obstruct the process as well. To increase the success rates of open innovation, it is vital to learn how individuals…

  7. Defining "faculty" in academic medicine: responding to the challenges of a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Block, Steven M; Sonnino, Roberta E; Bellini, Lisa

    2015-03-01

    Academic medicine in the United States is at a crossroads. There are many drivers behind this, including health care reform, decreased federal research funding, a refined understanding of adult learning, and the emergence of disruptive innovations in medicine, science, and education. As faculty members are at the core of all academic activities, the definition of "faculty" in academic medicine must align with the expectations of institutions engaged in patient care, research, and education. Faculty members' activities have changed and continue to evolve. Academic health centers must therefore define new rules of engagement that reflect the interplay of institutional priorities with the need to attract, retain, and reward faculty members. In this Commentary, the authors describe and explore the potential effects of the changing landscape for institutions and their clinical faculty members. The authors make a case for institutions to adapt faculty appointment, evaluation, and promotion processes, and they propose a framework for a standardized definition of "faculty" that allows for individual variability. This framework also provides a means to evaluate and reward faculty members' contributions in education, research, and clinical care. The authors propose a deliberate national conversation to ensure that careers in academic medicine remain attractive and sustainable and that the future of academic medicine is secure. PMID:25406611

  8. The Challenge of Change: Using Activity Theory to Understand a Cultural Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourke, Roseanna; McGee, Alyson

    2012-01-01

    This article explains how an inservice teacher education organisation in New Zealand embarked on a cultural innovation to challenge and build bicultural pedagogies, policies and practices. To understand the process and the impact of a three-year cultural innovation both intended and unintended changes need to be explored. Using a framework of…

  9. 76 FR 23543 - The Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge; a Coordinated Initiative To Advance Regional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... Economic Development Administration The Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge; a Coordinated Initiative To Advance Regional Competitiveness AGENCY: Economic Development Administration (EDA), Department of... platform for integrating and coordinating the wide range of Federal economic development resources....

  10. Developing Creativity Ecosystems: Preparing College Students for Tomorrow's Innovation Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulme, Eileen; Thomas, Ben; DeLaRosby, Hal

    2014-01-01

    Eileen Hulme, Ben Thomas, and Hal DeLaRosby argue for the importance of creativity as a learning outcome and challenge higher education to produce students capable of becoming the innovative leaders the twenty-first-century economy requires.

  11. Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovation in Industrial Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-04

    Under the Recovery Act, AMO provided cost-shared funding for early-stage, low-cost, "concept definition studies" of 47 promising innovations for next-generation manufacturing, energy-intensive processes, advanced materials, and greenhouse gas emissions reduction. The brochure provides information on each of these projects.

  12. The Role of Teacher Challenge and Support in High School Students' Academic Engagement in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strati, Anna D.

    2013-01-01

    Using data collected through classroom videotaping, student surveys, and the Experience Sampling Method (ESM), the present study explored associations between teacher-provided intellectual challenge, two types of support (instrumental and emotional), and students' momentary academic engagement in high school science classrooms. Results of 3-level…

  13. Career Advancement of Women Senior Academic Administrators in Indonesia: Supports and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murniati, Cecilia Titiek

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of women have gained access to college and the college teaching profession worldwide. However, women continue to be underrepresented in academic, research, and leadership positions. Women who have aspirations for top leadership positions still encounter numerous internal and external challenges. Existent literature on women…

  14. Oral Academic Discourse Socialisation: Challenges Faced by International Undergraduate Students in a Malaysian Public University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahfoodh, Omer Hassan Ali

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a qualitative study which examines the challenges faced by six international undergraduate students in their socialisation of oral academic discourse in a Malaysian public university. Data were collected employing interviews. Students' presentations were also collected. Semi-structured interviews were transcribed verbatim and…

  15. Challenging Behavior and Early Academic Skill Development: An Integrated Approach to Assessment and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hojnoski, Robin L.; Wood, Brenna K.

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses an approach to assessment and intervention of challenging behavior in early education settings that integrates a focus on instructional conditions and early academic skill development. The authors suggest this approach allows for a better understanding of the relationship between social behavior and child performance with…

  16. Managing Academic Health Centers: Meeting the Challenges of the New Health Care World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commonwealth Fund, New York, NY.

    This report focuses on strategies documented by the Commonwealth Fund Task Force on Academic Health Centers (AHCs) concerning AHCs' management of patient care and research missions. Whatever challenges AHCs face in the future, their ability to respond effectively will be determined by the quality of their governance and management. To improve…

  17. Creating High Challenge/High Support Academic Environments through Constructive Alignment: Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Helen; Richardson, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Higher education needs to provide challenging yet supportive learning environments catering for students with diverse academic needs. There is also an emphasis on using student-driven outcome measures to determine teaching effectiveness. How can these measures be used to reflect upon and evaluate teaching initiatives? Using an undergraduate…

  18. Internal Challenges Affecting Academic Performance of Student-Athletes in Ghanaian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apaak, Daniel; Sarpong, Emmanuel Osei

    2015-01-01

    This paper examined internal challenges affecting academic performance of student-athletes in Ghanaian public universities, using a descriptive survey research design. Proportionate random sampling technique was employed to select Three Hundred and Thirty-Two (332) respondents for the study. The instrument used in gathering data for the study was…

  19. Challenges Facing Women Academic Leadership in Secondary Schools of Irbid Educational Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Jaradat, Mahmoud Khaled Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the challenges facing women academic leadership in secondary schools of Irbid Educational Area. A random sample of 187 female leaders were chosen. They responded to a 49-item questionnaire prepared by the researcher. The items were distributed into four domains: organizational, personal, social and physical…

  20. Productivity and Academic Assessment in Brazil: Challenges for Qualitative Health Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosi, Maria Lucia Magalhaes

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges to the qualitative health research approach, under the regime of productivity that rules current academic evaluation in many countries. The analysis considers aspects common to several contexts, illustrating the discussion with the Brazilian context and, more specifically, within the dynamics of the collective…

  1. A Precarious Presence: Some Realities and Challenges of Academic Casualisation in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothengatter, Maarten; Hil, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on various secondary sources and direct encounters with casual academic staff, this article examines the emergent context and lived experiences of casualisation in Australian universities, with specific reference to on-going developments in teaching arrangements across the sector. Particular attention is paid to the challenges associated…

  2. Academic, Social, and Economic Challenges Faced by Latinos to Attain a College Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Kenel

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the academic, social and economic challenges faced by Latino students to attain a college degree. In addition, of prime importance was the need for improvement and persistence, which led to retention in college enrollment rates for Latino students both at the secondary and postsecondary levels. Findings from this study…

  3. Designing Self-Evaluation Instruments for Academic Programmes: Lessons and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansah, Francis

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to design valid and reliable self-evaluation instruments for periodic evaluation of academic programmes of Bolgatanga Polytechnic in Ghana, using evaluation experts and relevant stakeholders of the polytechnic. This paper presents some of the challenges, including those of institutional support, the technical demands of…

  4. Effects of Presession Satiation on Challenging Behavior and Academic Engagement for Children with Autism during Classroom Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rispoli, Mandy J.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lang, Russell; Kang, Soyeon; Lancioni, Giulio; Parker, Richard

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of presession satiation on challenging behavior and academic engagement during subsequent classroom activities for three 5-6 year-old children with autism. The percentage of 10-s intervals with challenging behavior and academic engagement during 20-min classroom activity sessions was observed under two conditions. One…

  5. "Personalizing" academic medicine: opportunities and challenges in implementing genomic profiling.

    PubMed

    Tweardy, David J; Belmont, John W

    2009-12-01

    BCM faculty members spearheaded the development of a first-generation Personal Genome Profile (Baylor PGP) assay to assist physicians in diagnosing and managing patients in this new era of medicine. The principles that guided the design and implementation of the Baylor PGP were high quality, robustness, low expense, flexibility, practical clinical utility, and the ability to facilitate broad areas of clinical research. The most distinctive feature of the approach taken is an emphasis on extensive screening for rare disease-causing mutations rather than common risk-increasing polymorphisms. Because these variants have large direct effects, the ability to screen for them inexpensively could have a major immediate clinical impact in disease diagnosis, carrier detection, presymptomatic detection of late onset disease, and even prenatal diagnosis. In addition to creating a counseling tool for individual "consumers," this system will fit into the established medical record and be used by physicians involved in direct patient care. This article describes an overall framework for clinical diagnostic array genotyping and the available technologies, as well as highlights the opportunities and challenges for implementation. PMID:19931194

  6. Challenges and opportunities for early-career Teaching-Focussed academics in the biosciences.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Katharine; Gretton, Sarah; Jones, Katherine; Tallents, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-seven percent of academics in UK Higher Education (HE) are in Teaching-Focussed positions, making major contributions to undergraduate programmes in an era of high student expectations when it comes to teaching quality. However, institutional support for Teaching-Focussed academics is often limited, both in terms of peer networking and opportunities for career development. As four early-career stage Teaching-Focussed academics working in a variety of institutions, we explore what motivated our choices to make teaching our primary academic activity, and the challenges that we have faced in doing so. In addition to highlighting the need for universities to fully recognise the achievements of teaching staff, we discuss the role that the various biosciences learned societies have in supporting Teaching-Focussed academics. We identify that there is a need for the learned societies to come together and pool their expertise in this area. The fragmented nature of the Teaching-Focussed academic community means that clear sources of national support are needed in order to best enable the next generation of bioscience educators to reach their full potential. PMID:25977754

  7. Challenges and opportunities for early-career Teaching-Focussed academics in the biosciences

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Katharine; Gretton, Sarah; Jones, Katherine; Tallents, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-seven percent of academics in UK Higher Education (HE) are in Teaching-Focussed positions, making major contributions to undergraduate programmes in an era of high student expectations when it comes to teaching quality. However, institutional support for Teaching-Focussed academics is often limited, both in terms of peer networking and opportunities for career development. As four early-career stage Teaching-Focussed academics working in a variety of institutions, we explore what motivated our choices to make teaching our primary academic activity, and the challenges that we have faced in doing so. In addition to highlighting the need for universities to fully recognise the achievements of teaching staff, we discuss the role that the various biosciences learned societies have in supporting Teaching-Focussed academics. We identify that there is a need for the learned societies to come together and pool their expertise in this area. The fragmented nature of the Teaching-Focussed academic community means that clear sources of national support are needed in order to best enable the next generation of bioscience educators to reach their full potential. PMID:25977754

  8. Innovation, Innovation, Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Innovation, Universities and Skills. The new title of the department offers much food for thought. The title is indeed an intriguing and important one. Bringing the idea of innovation right to the fore is, to use an overworked term, challenging. Pinning down what innovation means is not at all easy. There are three different lines of argument. The…

  9. Empowerment of Non-Academic Personnel in Higher Education: Exploring Associations with Perceived Organizational Support for Innovation and Organizational Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Wing Keung Jason

    2010-01-01

    Employee empowerment has long been associated with organizational outcomes such as innovation, greater effectiveness, and better performance. Non-academic professional employees in higher education are responsible for the important day-to-day operations of a university; therefore, organizational strategies such as employee empowerment that…

  10. Innovative Research into Practice in Support Centers for College Athletes: Implications for the Academic Progress Rate Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comeaux, Eddie

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about the educational experiences of Division I athletes are pervasive. Finding meaningful ways to strike a healthy balance between athletics and academics has been an ongoing struggle for colleges and universities, and this article emphasizes the need for and value of innovation in current practices. The article introduces the Career…

  11. The role of teacher challenge and support in high school students' academic engagement in science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strati, Anna D.

    Using data collected through classroom videotaping, student surveys, and the Experience Sampling Method (ESM), the present study explored associations between teacher-provided intellectual challenge, two types of support (instrumental and emotional), and students' momentary academic engagement in high school science classrooms. Results of 3-level Hierarchical Linear Models indicate that researchers' assessments of teacher-provided challenge positively predicted students' momentary reports of engagement in science learning activities. Teachers' provision of instrumental support was also positively associated with student engagement. Contrary to expectations, teacher provision of emotional support was not consistently related to students' reports of engagement. Both instrumental and emotional support interacted with challenge such that teachers' simultaneous provision of challenge and support was associated with additional gains in student engagement. Consistent with these findings, overtly obstructive (non-supportive) teacher behaviors were associated with decreases in student engagement when instruction was challenging. Results are discussed in terms of implications for theory and instructional practice.

  12. Innovation Inspired by Nature: Capabilities, Potentials and Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Through evolution, nature came up with many effective solutions to its challenges and continually improving them. By mimicking, coping and being inspired, humans have been using Nature's solutions to address their own challenges. In recent years, the implementation of nature's capabilities has intensified with our growing understanding of the various biological and nastic mechanisms and processes. Successes include even the making of humanlike robots that perform such lifelike tasks as walking, talking, making eye-contact, interpreting speech and facial expressions, as well as many other humanlike functions. Generally, once humans are able to implement a function then, thru rapid advances in technology, capabilities are developed that can significantly exceed the original source of inspiration in Nature. Examples include flight where there is no species that can fly as high, carry so much mass, has so large dimensions and fly so fast, and operate at as such extreme conditions as our aircraft and other aerospace systems. However, using the capabilities of today's technology, there are many challenges that are not feasible to address in mimicking characteristics of species and plants. In this manuscript, state-of-the-art of biomimetic capabilities, potentials and challenges are reviewed.

  13. Good Neighbors: Shared Challenges and Solutions Toward Increasing Value at Academic Medical Centers and Universities.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Gerard P

    2015-12-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) and universities are experiencing increasing pressure to enhance the value they offer at the same time that they are facing challenges related to outcomes, controlling costs, new competition, and government mandates. Yet, rarely do the leaders of these academic neighbors work cooperatively to enhance value. In this Perspective the author, a former university regional campus president with duties in an AMC as an academic physician, shares his insights into the shared challenges these academic neighbors face in improving the value of their services in complex environments. He describes the successes some AMCs have had in generating revenues from new clinical programs that reduce the overall cost of care for larger populations. He also describes how several universities have taken a comprehensive approach to reduce overhead and administrative costs. The author identifies six themes related to successful value improvement efforts and provides examples of successful strategies used by AMCs and their university neighbors to improve the overall value of their programs. He concludes by encouraging leaders of AMCs and universities to share information about their successes in value improvements with each other, to seek additional joint value enhancement efforts, and to market their value improvements to the public. PMID:26266460

  14. [The academization of health care. An interim report in the context of current developments and challenges].

    PubMed

    Kälble, K

    2013-08-01

    In the last two decades, the educational landscape for health-care training has been seen in a new light as a result of complex social changes. Against this background, the present report offers an interim appraisal and assessment of the process of making health care more academic in view of current developments and challenges. The report begins with a short description and examination of the present training situation at a pre-academic level; several reform ideas are also presented. Following this, the report reconstructs the first phase of the academization of health care in the 1990s before the advent of the Bachelor's and Master's university degrees, which were created in the framework of the Bologna Reforms, and in which it first became possible to academicize to a limited extent certain areas of the large spectrum of health-care practices. The central part of the report is a discussion of the present situation and the newest developments in the field of academic health care within the context of the Bologna process and further changing conditions. In the conclusion, the report discusses the future prerequisites that could promote a sustainable and qualitative development of the academization of health care. PMID:23884529

  15. Addressing the “Global Health Tax” and “Wild Cards”: Practical Challenges to Building Academic Careers in Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Ranu

    2016-01-01

    Among many possible benefits, global health efforts can expand the skills and experience of U.S. clinicians, improve health for communities in need, and generate innovations in care delivery with relevance everywhere. Yet, despite high rates of interest among students and medical trainees to include global health opportunities in their training, there is still no clear understanding of how this interest will translate into viable and sustained global health careers after graduation. Building on a growing conversation about how to support careers in academic global health, this Perspective describes the practical challenges faced by physicians pursuing these careers after they complete training. Writing from their perspective as junior faculty at one U.S. academic health center with a dedicated focus on global health training, the authors describe a number of practical issues they have found to be critical both for their own career development and for the advice they provide their mentees. With a particular emphasis on the financial, personal, professional, and logistical challenges that young “expat” global health physicians in academic institutions face, they underscore the importance of finding ways to support these career paths, and propose possible solutions. Such investments would not only respond to the rational and moral imperatives of global health work and advance the mission of improving human health but also help to fully leverage the potential of what is already an unprecedented movement within academic medicine. PMID:26244256

  16. Innovating in the medical device industry - challenges & opportunities ESB 2015 translational research symposium.

    PubMed

    Bayon, Y; Bohner, M; Eglin, D; Procter, P; Richards, R G; Weber, J; Zeugolis, D I

    2016-09-01

    The European Society for Biomaterials 2015 Translational Research Symposium focused on 'Innovating in the Medical Device Industry - Challenges & Opportunities' from different perspectives, i.e., from a non-profit research organisation to a syndicate of small and medium-sized companies and large companies. Lecturers from regulatory consultants, industry and research institutions described the innovation process and regulatory processes (e.g., 510K, PMA, combination product) towards market approval. The aim of the present article is to summarise and explain the main statements made during the symposium, in terms of challenges and opportunities for medical device industries, in a constantly changing customer and regulatory environment. PMID:27552808

  17. Empirically supported psychological treatments: the challenge of evaluating clinical innovations.

    PubMed

    Church, Dawson; Feinstein, David; Palmer-Hoffman, Julie; Stein, Phyllis K; Tranguch, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    Clear and transparent standards are required to establish whether a therapeutic method is "evidence based." Even when research demonstrates a method to be efficacious, it may not become available to patients who could benefit from it, a phenomenon known as the "translational gap." Only 30% of therapies cross the gap, and the lag between empirical validation and clinical implementation averages 17 years. To address these problems, Division 12 of the American Psychological Association published a set of standards for "empirically supported treatments" in the mid-1990s that allows the assessment of clinical modalities. This article reviews these criteria, identifies their strengths, and discusses their impact on the translational gap, using the development of a clinical innovation called Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) as a case study. Twelve specific recommendations for updates of the Division 12 criteria are made based on lessons garnered from the adoption of EFT within the clinical community. These recommendations would shorten the cycle from the research setting to clinical practice, increase transparency, incorporate recent scientific advances, and enhance the capacity for succinct comparisons among treatments. PMID:25265265

  18. Innovative multidisciplinary research in environmental epidemiology: the challenges and needs.

    PubMed

    Vena, J E; Weiner, J M

    1999-01-01

    The ability of epidemiology to determine the relationships between health and environmental insults has become exceedingly difficult. The multifactorial nature of disease and the diversity of the insults, which include biologic, physical, social and cultural factors, combined with genetic susceptibility, suggest the need to develop better models of multidisciplinary epidemiologic investigation. This paper highlights the needs of an environmental epidemiologic team, discusses ways to incorporate new ideas across disciplines and to integrate constructs and paradigms of social, ecological, cultural and population determinants with individual-based exposure assessments. Innovation will be the key to the survival and increasing importance of epidemiology in addressing the public health needs of the future, but what are the ways to enhance and encourage creativity in environmental epidemiology? The process of self-renewal and continuing education will be highlighted. Additionally, the complexity of the problems and the need for clear supervision and control of multidisciplinary research efforts require a forum of communication and an 'information-processing approach' beyond those in traditional epidemiologic studies. New approaches in data management and medical informatics must be incorporated into the epidemiologic investigative framework. Methods to be included should focus on opportunities for computer-supported sharing of ideas. Such capabilities minimise the geographic distances and the disparate knowledge and training of the investigators and bring the team closer to the objectives and functions inherent in multidisciplinary investigation. PMID:10703183

  19. Hubble Servicing Challenges Drive Innovation of Shuttle Rendezvous Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Walker, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST) servicing, performed by Space Shuttle crews, has contributed to what is arguably one of the most successful astronomy missions ever flown. Both nominal and contingency proximity operations techniques were developed to enable successful servicing, while lowering the risk of damage to HST systems, and improve crew safety. Influencing the development of these techniques were the challenges presented by plume impingement and HST performance anomalies. The design of both the HST and the Space Shuttle was completed before the potential of HST contamination and structural damage by shuttle RCS jet plume impingement was fully understood. Relative navigation during proximity operations has been challenging, as HST was not equipped with relative navigation aids. Since HST reached orbit in 1990, proximity operations design for servicing missions has evolved as insight into plume contamination and dynamic pressure has improved and new relative navigation tools have become available. Servicing missions have provided NASA with opportunities to gain insight into servicing mission design and development of nominal and contingency procedures. The HST servicing experiences and lessons learned are applicable to other programs that perform on-orbit servicing and rendezvous, both human and robotic.

  20. Satellite clinics in academic ophthalmology programs: an exploratory study of successes and challenges

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Major academic ophthalmology departments have been expanding by opening multi-office locations (“satellites”). This paper offers a first glimpse into satellites of academic ophthalmology departments. Methods Leaders of seven medium to large, geographically diverse departments agreed to participate. One- to two-hour phone interviews were conducted to assess the features of their satellite practices. Results Success as clinical entities, profitability, and access to patients were stated goals for most satellites. In approximate descending order, refractive surgery, retina, oculoplastics, and pediatric ophthalmology were the most common subspecialties offered. Faculty staffing ranged from recruitment specifically for satellites to rotation of existing faculty. Except for a department with only one academic track, satellite doctors were a mix of tenure and mostly non-tenure track faculty. According to these department leaders, scholarly productivity of satellite faculty was similar to that of colleagues at the main campus, though research was more community-based and clinical in nature. Fellowship but little resident education occurred at satellites. Though it was agreed that satellite practices were integral to department finances, they accounted for a smaller percentage of revenues than of total departmental visits. Conclusions Satellite offices have offered access to a better payor mix and have boosted the finances of academic ophthalmology departments. Challenges include maintaining collegiality with referring community physicians, integrating faculty despite geographic distance, preserving the department’s academic “brand name,” and ensuring consistent standards and operating procedures. Satellite clinics will likely help departments meet some of the challenges of health care reform. PMID:24330741

  1. Structural Engineering Managers - Innovation Challenges for their Skills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linkeschová, D.; Tichá, A.

    2015-11-01

    The profession of a structural engineer is highly responsible, because the consequences of a structural engineer's errors result not only in economic damage to the property and often irreversible damage to the environment, they can also lead to direct loss of lives. In the current turbulent, dynamically developing society the managerial methods of structural engineers should not stagnate at the level of the last century applications. This paper deals with the challenges which the ongoing century poses to structural engineers and managers. It compares the results of research regarding the current state of managerial skills of structural engineers in Czech building companies to the defined skills of the 21st century's managers according to the global research programme ITL Research and according to the Vision for the Future of Structural Engineering, drawn up by Structural Engineering Institute - SEI ASCE.

  2. A 10-year review of four academic nurse-managed centers: challenges and survival strategies.

    PubMed

    King, Eunice S

    2008-01-01

    Since 1985, there has been rapid growth in nurse-managed health centers (NMHCs). Many were established by academic schools of nursing, and several have closed. The Independence Foundation undertook this study to identify the challenges and survival strategies employed by four academic nurse-managed center grantees during a 10-year period. Data from Foundation records, interviews with directors and staff from the centers and the National Nursing Centers Consortium, a focus group with center founders, and field notes were analyzed for themes related to the centers' challenges and survival strategies. Although the centers faced many challenges from the sociopolitical environment, the community, and their parent organizations, the most difficult challenge was achieving financial sustainability, which was attainable only by obtaining cost-based reimbursement. Because of existing health policies, that was possible only through organizational restructuring and affiliation with an existing federally qualified health center. The future of nursing centers depends upon favorable health policies, data documenting centers' effectiveness, and adequate preparation of the next generation of nursing center directors and practitioners. PMID:18206838

  3. Dynamic Tensions: Early Reflections from MDRC's Evaluation of the Innovative Professional Development Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MDRC, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In the Innovative Professional Development (iPD) Challenge, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has invested in helping school districts and networks redesign their instructional support systems to better support educators in increasing student success. This Issue Focus, the second in a series, presents early reflections from MDRC's evaluation…

  4. Shell oil's auger TLP/ROV: Challenging, innovative

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, D. )

    1994-04-01

    Shell Oil Co. (Houston) is taking a bold step into the deep-water frontier with development of the $1.2 billion [open quotes]Auger[close quotes] project. After almost four years of construction. Shell Offshore has installed the Auger tension leg platform (TLP) on Garden Banks Block 426, located in the Gulf of Mexico 214 miles southwest of New Orleans in 2,860 feet of water-a depth that surpasses the previous Gulf record by more than 1,000 feet. The Auger TLP, designed and engineered by Shell, is a floating structure held in place by vertical tendons that eliminate significant vertical movement while allowing limited horizontal movement. The TLP will be the first in the Gulf of Mexico to support both a drilling rig and complete production facilities, reaching a peak projected daily production of 46,000 barrels of oil and 125 million cubic feet of gas in the year 2001. Underwater support for this deep-water project will be accomplished by use of one of the most advanced remotely operated vehicle systems ever deployed. In addition to the routine drilling tasks that present a navigation challenge for the system, the ROV is the primary and backup system for production riser connector (PRC) installation and removal operations. This task, coupled with the environmental conditions, significantly increases the total horsepower requirements of the ROV and the complexicity of the deployment system design.

  5. Sustainability of organic food production: challenges and innovations.

    PubMed

    Niggli, Urs

    2015-02-01

    The greatest challenge for agriculture is to reduce the trade-offs between productivity and long-term sustainability. Therefore, it is interesting to analyse organic agriculture which is a given set of farm practices that emphasise ecological sustainability. Organic agriculture can be characterised as being less driven by off-farm inputs and being better embedded in ecosystem functions. The literature on public goods and non-commodity outputs of organic farms is overwhelming. Most publications address the positive effects of organic farming on soil fertility, biodiversity maintenance and protection of the natural resources of soil, water and air. As a consequence of focusing on public goods, organic agriculture is less productive. Meta-analyses show that organic agriculture yields range between 0·75 and 0·8 of conventional agriculture. Best practice examples from disadvantaged sites and climate conditions show equal or, in the case of subsistence farming in Sub-Saharan Africa, higher productivity of organic agriculture. Hence, organic agriculture is likely to be a good model for productive and sustainable food production. Underfunding in R&D addressing specific bottlenecks of organic agriculture are the main cause for both crop and livestock yield gaps. Therefore, the potential for improving the performance of organic agriculture through agricultural research is huge. Although organic farming is a niche in most countries, it is at the verge of becoming mainstream in leading European countries. Consumer demand has grown over the past two decades and does not seem to be a limiting factor for the future development of organic agriculture. PMID:25221987

  6. Challenges Achieved By Innovative Technologies Our Link to a Safer, Cleaner, Healthier Tomorrow - 12369

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Heidi; Shoffner, Peggy; Lagos, Leonel E.

    2012-07-01

    The River Corridor Closure Project is the nation's largest environmental cleanup closure project where innovative technologies are being utilized to overcome DOE's environmental clean-up challenges. DOE provides a Technology Needs Statement that specifies their on-site challenges and the criteria to overcome those challenges. This allows for both the private sector and federally funded organizations to respond with solutions that meet their immediate needs. DOE selects the company based on their ability to reduce risk to human health and the environment, improve efficiency of the cleanup, and lower costs. These technologies are our link to a cleaner, safer, healthier tomorrow. (authors)

  7. Operational research capacity building in Asia: innovations, successes and challenges of a training course

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayana, S.; Wilson, N.; Zachariah, R.; Harries, A. D.

    2013-01-01

    A structured training course on operational research (OR) based on the model created by the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease and Médecins Sans Frontières was conducted in the South Asian region in 2012. Many innovations were introduced into the administration, structure and content of the course. Of 12 participants, 11 successfully completed all pre-defined milestones. Several challenges were identified. The main challenges included shortage of time, especially for data analysis and interpretation, and insufficient numbers of experienced facilitators. Appropriate modifications have been made to the structure and processes of the next course scheduled for 2013. We describe these modifications and the innovations, successes and challenges of this model of training. PMID:26393025

  8. Academic Innovation and Autonomy: An Exploration of Entrepreneurship Education within American Community Colleges and the Academic Capitalist Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mars, Matthew M.; Ginter, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Employing interviews with individuals from 16 community colleges across the country, as well as an independent consultant engaged in activities of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), this study considers the organizational structures and academic practices associated with community college entrepreneurship…

  9. The Attitude of Egyptian SET Academics towards Innovation: Universities and Innovation in a Factor-Driven Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Hadidi, Hala; Kirby, David A.

    2015-01-01

    In the modern knowledge economy universities are being required to operate more entrepreneurially, commercializing the results of their research and spinning out new ventures. The literature on the Triple Helix model (of academic-industry-government relations) is outlined, emphasizing--as does the model--the enhanced role that the modern…

  10. Financial sustainability of academic health centers: identifying challenges and strategic responses.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Jim P; Li, Tao; Shiyanbola, Oyewale O; Jacobson, Janelle J

    2014-06-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) play a vital role in the health care system. The training of health care personnel and delivery of health care services, especially to the most complex and financially challenged patients, has been a responsibility increasingly shouldered by AHCs over the years. Additionally, AHCs play a significant role in researching and developing new treatment protocols, including discovering and validating new health technologies. However, AHCs face unique financial challenges in fulfilling their social mission in the health care system. Reforms being implemented under the Affordable Care Act and shifting economic patterns are threatening the financial sustainability of AHCs.The authors review challenges facing AHCs, including training new health care professionals with fewer funding resources, disproportionate clinical care of complex and costly patients, charity care to uninsured and underinsured, and reduced research funding opportunities. Then, they provide a review of some potential solutions to these challenges, including new reimbursement methods, improvements in operational efficiency, price regulation, subsidization of education, improved decision making and communication, utilization of industrial management tools, and increasing internal and external cooperation. Devising solutions to the evolving problems of AHCs is crucial to improving health care delivery in the United States. Most likely, a combination of market, government, and system reforms will be needed to improve the viability of AHCs and assist them in fulfilling their social and organizational missions. PMID:24871234

  11. The challenge of nurse innovation in the Australian context of universal health care.

    PubMed

    Cashin, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    As nursing pushes further into the realm of primary health care in Australia, an understanding of the challenges to achieving reasonable federal funding of nursing services needs to be understood. This understanding is underpinned by a comprehensive understanding of the concept of universal health care, how the concept relates to the Australian health care context, and the resultant challenges to innovation in health care service delivery in Australia. Universal health care is a global mission and was the most recent theme for the International Council of Nurses Congress in Australia. Universal health care as a concept represents a fundamental shift from the development and funding of discrete interventions or programmes, to that of developing systems of health care. The three critical elements required are a clear definition of what is considered health care and funded for who, how the system is financed, and evaluation. Australia has a system of universal health care and all three elements are addressed. Organised medicine, a key objector to the introduction of the current approach to universal health care in Australia, soon adapted to it, and now fiercely resists change. Medico centricity poses challenges to sustainability as innovation is inhibited. This challenge is illustrated through consideration of the implementation of the financial policy that gave Nurse Practitioners access as providers and prescribers within Medicare funded services. PMID:26552203

  12. United States academic medical centers: priorities and challenges amid market transformation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Irene M; Anason, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    United States academic medical centers (AMCs) have upheld their long-standing reputation for excellence by teaching and training the next generation of physicians, supporting medical research, providing world-class medical care, and offering breakthrough treatments for highly complex medical cases. In recent years, the pace and direction of change reshaping the American health care industry has created a set of new and profound challenges that AMC leaders must address in order to sustain their institutions. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of 116 leading nonprofit academic medical centers and 276 of their affiliated hospitals, all of which are focused on delivering world-class patient care. Formed in 1984, UHC fosters collaboration with and among its members through its renowned programs and services in the areas of comparative data and analytics, performance improvement, supply chain management, strategic research, and public policy. Each year, UHC surveys the executives of its member institutions to understand the issues they view as most critical to sustaining the viability and success of their organizations. The results of UHC's most recent 2011 member survey, coupled with a 2012 Strategic Health Perspectives Harris Interactive presentation, based in parton surveys of major health care industry stakeholders reveal the most important and relevant issues and opportunities that hospital leaders face today, as the United States health care delivery system undergoes a period of unprecedented transformation. PMID:23484431

  13. Why Do Academics Blog? An Analysis of Audiences, Purposes and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mewburn, Inger; Thomson, Pat

    2013-01-01

    Academics are increasingly being urged to blog in order to expand their audiences, create networks and to learn to write in more reader friendly style. This paper holds this advocacy up to empirical scrutiny. A content analysis of 100 academic blogs suggests that academics most commonly write about academic work conditions and policy contexts,…

  14. Analysis of pan-African Centres of excellence in health innovation highlights opportunities and challenges for local innovation and financing in the continent.

    PubMed

    Nwaka, Solomon; Ochem, Alexander; Besson, Dominique; Ramirez, Bernadette; Fakorede, Foluke; Botros, Sanaa; Inyang, Uford; Mgone, Charles; Adae-Mensah, Ivan; Konde, Victor; Nyasse, Barthelemy; Okole, Blessed; Guantai, Anastasia; Loots, Glaudina; Atadja, Peter; Ndumbe, Peter; Sanou, Issa; Olesen, Ole; Ridley, Robert; Ilunga, Tshinko

    2012-01-01

    A pool of 38 pan-African Centres of Excellence (CoEs) in health innovation has been selected and recognized by the African Network for Drugs and Diagnostics Innovation (ANDI), through a competitive criteria based process. The process identified a number of opportunities and challenges for health R&D and innovation in the continent: i) it provides a direct evidence for the existence of innovation capability that can be leveraged to fill specific gaps in the continent; ii) it revealed a research and financing pattern that is largely fragmented and uncoordinated, and iii) it highlights the most frequent funders of health research in the continent. The CoEs are envisioned as an innovative network of public and private institutions with a critical mass of expertise and resources to support projects and a variety of activities for capacity building and scientific exchange, including hosting fellows, trainees, scientists on sabbaticals and exchange with other African and non-African institutions. PMID:22838941

  15. Analysis of pan-African Centres of excellence in health innovation highlights opportunities and challenges for local innovation and financing in the continent

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A pool of 38 pan-African Centres of Excellence (CoEs) in health innovation has been selected and recognized by the African Network for Drugs and Diagnostics Innovation (ANDI), through a competitive criteria based process. The process identified a number of opportunities and challenges for health R&D and innovation in the continent: i) it provides a direct evidence for the existence of innovation capability that can be leveraged to fill specific gaps in the continent; ii) it revealed a research and financing pattern that is largely fragmented and uncoordinated, and iii) it highlights the most frequent funders of health research in the continent. The CoEs are envisioned as an innovative network of public and private institutions with a critical mass of expertise and resources to support projects and a variety of activities for capacity building and scientific exchange, including hosting fellows, trainees, scientists on sabbaticals and exchange with other African and non-African institutions. PMID:22838941

  16. Exploring Challenges that Threaten to Impede the Academic Success of Academically Underprepared Black Males at an HBCU

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Robert T.; Davis, Ryan J.; Hilton, Adriel A.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, education has played a central role in the lives of Blacks. Although Blacks continue their penchant for education, Black males have not fared as well in the educational pipeline. Data for this study emerged from a qualitative investigation of factors that promote success for academically underprepared Black males at a historically…

  17. The Investigation of Challenges in Developing and Implementing New Academic Disciplines in Iranian Universities: Views of the Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghazavi, Mansuoreh; Nasr, Ahmad Reza; Jafari, Ebrahim Mirshah; Mosapour, Neamatollah

    2016-01-01

    The move on decentralization of curriculum development in recent decade has become one of the major tasks in developing scientific fields in Iran. By implementing these programs some drawbacks have become evident. The objective of this study was to identify and assess the existing challenges involved in the development of academic disciplines from…

  18. Academic Research Library as Broker in Addressing Interoperability Challenges for the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, P., II

    2015-12-01

    Data capture is an important process in the research lifecycle. Complete descriptive and representative information of the data or database is necessary during data collection whether in the field or in the research lab. The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Public Access Plan (2015) mandates the need for federally funded projects to make their research data more openly available. Developing, implementing, and integrating metadata workflows into to the research process of the data lifecycle facilitates improved data access while also addressing interoperability challenges for the geosciences such as data description and representation. Lack of metadata or data curation can contribute to (1) semantic, (2) ontology, and (3) data integration issues within and across disciplinary domains and projects. Some researchers of EarthCube funded projects have identified these issues as gaps. These gaps can contribute to interoperability data access, discovery, and integration issues between domain-specific and general data repositories. Academic Research Libraries have expertise in providing long-term discovery and access through the use of metadata standards and provision of access to research data, datasets, and publications via institutional repositories. Metadata crosswalks, open archival information systems (OAIS), trusted-repositories, data seal of approval, persistent URL, linking data, objects, resources, and publications in institutional repositories and digital content management systems are common components in the library discipline. These components contribute to a library perspective on data access and discovery that can benefit the geosciences. The USGS Community for Data Integration (CDI) has developed the Science Support Framework (SSF) for data management and integration within its community of practice for contribution to improved understanding of the Earth's physical and biological systems. The USGS CDI SSF can be used as a reference model to map to Earth

  19. Community ACTION Boards: An Innovative Model for Effective Community–Academic Research Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    James, Sherline; Arniella, Guedy; Bickell, Nina A.; Walker, Willie; Robinson, Virginia; Taylor, Barbara; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Community-based participatory research (CBPR) requires equitable partnerships between community stakeholders and academics. Traditionally, researchers relied on community advisory boards, but these boards often play a reactive role on a project-by-project basis. The East and Central Harlem Health Outcomes (ECHHO) Community Action Board (CAB), however, is an effective, proactive group. Objectives The ECHHO board sought to identify key strategies and tools to build and employ a partnership model, and to disseminate lessons learned to other community–academic partnerships. Methods Current and former board members were interviewed and a wide range of related documents was reviewed. Lessons Learned The board became effective when it prioritized action and relationship-building, across seven key domains: Shared priorities, diversity, participation, transparency, mutual respect and recognition, and personal connections. The model is depicted graphically. Conclusion Community advisory boards may benefit from attention to taking action, and to building relationships between academics and community members. PMID:22616207

  20. Creating a Culture of "Engagement" with Academic Advising: Challenges and Opportunities for Today's Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, Douglas J.

    2006-01-01

    Effective academic advising is recognized as key to college student success and academic retention (Pascarella & Terenzini, 1991; Mastrodicasa, 2001). There are at least seven different structural models for academic advising; each depends to a greater or lesser degree on a level of "engagement" by faculty in the process (Kramer, 2003). Despite…

  1. Academic Freedom: Its Relevance and Challenges for Public Universities in Ghana Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owusu-Ansah, Collins

    2015-01-01

    There have been various shapes of opinions shared on the concept of academic freedom. This concept means different things to many and different people. Those outside the University view academic freedom with some level of suspicion. Even among the academia, academic freedom is rarely understood. To foster the growth of knowledge and its…

  2. Academic Promotion in Malaysian Public Universities: A Critical Look at Issues and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azman, Norzaini; Che Omar, Ibrahim; Yunus, Aida Suraya Md; Zain, Ahmad Nurulazam Md

    2016-01-01

    The expansion and transformation of Malaysian universities have generated major changes in the nature of academic employment and the structure of academic promotion in higher education institutions. These changes have considerable implications, in particular for the policy and practice of academic promotion in the public universities. We argue…

  3. Farms and Learning Partnerships in Farming Systems Projects: A Response to the Challenges of Complexity in Agricultural Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Anne; Nettle, Ruth; Paine, Mark; Kabore, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Managing the competing interests of productivity growth, environmental concerns, landscape change and societal expectations presents challenges for agricultural industries. Innovation projects supporting knowledge development to address these challenges often involve partnerships with commercial farms, a methodology which promises much but has…

  4. Enhancing Cross-functional Collaboration and Effective Problem Solving Through an Innovation Challenge for Point-of-Care Providers.

    PubMed

    Bakallbashi, Eni; Vyas, Anjali; Vaswani, Nikita; Rosales, David; Russell, David; Dowding, Dawn; Bernstein, Michael; Abdelaal, Hany; Hawkey, Regina

    2015-01-01

    An internal employee challenge competition is a way to promote staff engagement and generate innovative business solutions. This Spotlight on Leadership focuses on the approach that a large not-for-profit healthcare organization, the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, took in designing and executing an innovation challenge. The challenge leveraged internal staff expertise and promoted wide participation. This model is 1 that can be replicated by organizations as leaders work to engage employees at the point of service in organization-wide problem solving. PMID:26204375

  5. Scholarship in Academic Surgery: History, Challenges, and Ideas for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Sharon L.

    2013-01-01

    The role of academic surgery is changing. Traditional roles of the triple threat researcher, clinician and teacher, were formulated by Osler and improved upon by Boyle in the 1990s. These include application and integration of research to clinical problems. However, new pressures exist on the academic surgeon. Financial pressures rising costs of health care and decreased research funding all need to be addressed. In addition, retention and advancement of faculty is more difficult with increased emphasis of clinical practice in academic medicine. The future of academic medicine will require personal optimization as a multifaceted academician, businessman, and administrator, as well as rethinking how academic medicine may function in the future. PMID:24436678

  6. Using Grand Challenges For Innovative Teaching in Structural Geology, Geophysics, and Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Wysession, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    An innovative approach to teaching involves using the "Big Ideas" or "Grand Challenges" of a field, as determined by the research community in that area, as the basis for classroom activities. There have been several recent efforts in the areas of structural geology, tectonics, and geophysics to determine these Grand Challenges, including the areas of seismology ("Seismological Grand Challenges in Understanding Earth's Dynamic Systems"), mineral physics ("Unlocking the Building Blocks of the Planet"), EarthScope-related science ("Unlocking the Secrets of the North American Continent: An EarthScope Science Plan for 2010-2020"), and structural geology and tectonics (at the Structural Geology and Tectonics Forum held at Williams College in June, 2012). These research community efforts produced frameworks of the essential information for their fields with the aim of guiding future research. An integral part of this, however, is training the next generation of scientists, and using these Big Ideas as the basis for course structures and activities is a powerful way to make this happen. When activities, labs, and homeworks are drawn from relevant and cutting-edge research topics, students can find the material more fascinating and engaging, and can develop a better sense of the dynamic process of scientific discovery. Many creative ideas for incorporating the Grand Challenges of structural geology, tectonics, and geophysics in the classroom were developed at a Cutting Edge workshop on "Teaching Structural Geology, Geophysics, and Tectonics in the 21st Century" held at the University of Tennessee in July, 2012.

  7. Of Mice and Academics: Examining the Effect of Openness on Innovation. NBER Working Paper No. 14819

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Fiona; Aghion, Philippe; Dewatripont, Mathias; Kolev, Julian; Stern, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Scientific freedom and openness are hallmarks of academia: relative to their counterparts in industry, academics maintain discretion over their research agenda and allow others to build on their discoveries. This paper examines the relationship between openness and freedom, building on recent models emphasizing that, from an economic perspective,…

  8. Building the Innovative and Entrepreneurial University: An Institutional Case Study of Administrative Academic Capitalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Although researchers have explored dimensions of academic capitalism among students and faculty members, knowledge of the roles of administrators at all levels is underdeveloped in the literature. This institutional case study of a public research-extensive university examines the roles of executive and managerial administrators in bringing a…

  9. Implementation, Sustainability, and Scaling up of Social-Emotional and Academic Innovations in Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elias, Maurice J.; Zins, Joseph E.; Graczyk, Patricia A.; Weissberg, Roger P.

    2003-01-01

    Many attempts at bringing successful educational programs and products "to scale" as part of school reform, particularly in urban districts, have been disappointing. Based on the experiences of the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) and reviews of literature addressing implementation failures, observations about…

  10. Industrial and Academic Collaboration: Hybrid Models for Research and Innovation Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Freitas, Sara; Mayer, Igor; Arnab, Sylvester; Marshall, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores how, in the light of global economic downturn and rising student populations, new academic-industrial models for research collaboration based upon specific technological expertise and knowledge can be developed as potential mechanisms for preserving and extending central university research infrastructure. The paper explores…

  11. New academic partnerships in global health: innovations at Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Landrigan, Philip J; Ripp, Jonathan; Murphy, Ramon J C; Claudio, Luz; Jao, Jennifer; Hexom, Braden; Bloom, Harrison G; Shirazian, Taraneh; Elahi, Ebby; Koplan, Jeffrey P

    2011-01-01

    Global health has become an increasingly important focus of education, research, and clinical service in North American universities and academic health centers. Today there are at least 49 academically based global health programs in the United States and Canada, as compared with only one in 1999. A new academic society, the Consortium of Universities for Global Health, was established in 2008 and has grown significantly. This sharp expansion reflects convergence of 3 factors: (1) rapidly growing student and faculty interest in global health; (2) growing realization-powerfully catalyzed by the acquired immune deficiency syndrome epidemic, the emergence of other new infections, climate change, and globalization-that health problems are interconnected, cross national borders, and are global in nature; and (3) rapid expansion in resources for global health. This article examines the evolution of the concept of global health and describes the driving forces that have accelerated interest in the field. It traces the development of global health programs in academic health centers in the United States. It presents a blueprint for a new school-wide global health program at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The mission of that program, Mount Sinai Global Health, is to enhance global health as an academic field of study within the Mount Sinai community and to improve the health of people around the world. Mount Sinai Global Health is uniting and building synergies among strong, existing global health programs within Mount Sinai; it is training the next generation of physicians and health scientists to be leaders in global health; it is making novel discoveries that translate into blueprints for improving health worldwide; and it builds on Mount Sinai's long and proud tradition of providing medical and surgical care in places where need is great and resources few. PMID:21598272

  12. New Academic Partnerships in Global Health: Innovations at Mount Sinai School of Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Landrigan, Philip J.; Ripp, Jonathan; Murphy, Ramon J. C.; Claudio, Luz; Jao, Jennifer; Hexom, Braden; Bloom, Harrison G.; Shirazian, Taraneh; Elahi, Ebby; Koplan, Jeffrey P.

    2011-01-01

    Global health has become an increasingly important focus of education, research, and clinical service in North American universities and academic health centers. Today there are at least 49 academically based global health programs in the United States and Canada, as compared with only one in 1999. A new academic society, the Consortium of Universities for Global Health, was established in 2008 and has grown significantly. This sharp expansion reflects convergence of 3 factors: (1) rapidly growing student and faculty interest in global health; (2) growing realization–powerfully catalyzed by the acquired immune deficiency syndrome epidemic, the emergence of other new infections, climate change, and globalization–that health problems are interconnected, cross national borders, and are global in nature; and (3) rapid expansion in resources for global health. This article examines the evolution of the concept of global health and describes the driving forces that have accelerated interest in the field. It traces the development of global health programs in academic health centers in the United States. It presents a blueprint for a new school-wide global health program at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The mission of that program, Mount Sinai Global Health, is to enhance global health as an academic field of study within the Mount Sinai community and to improve the health of people around the world. Mount Sinai Global Health is uniting and building synergies among strong, existing global health programs within Mount Sinai; it is training the next generation of physicians and health scientists to be leaders in global health; it is making novel discoveries that translate into blueprints for improving health worldwide; and it builds on Mount Sinai’s long and proud tradition of providing medical and surgical care in places where need is great and resources few. PMID:21598272

  13. Patents, innovation, and privatization: Commentary on: "Data management in academic settings: an intellectual property perspective".

    PubMed

    Albin, Ramona C

    2010-12-01

    The framers of the U.S. Constitution believed that intellectual property rights were crucial to scientific advancement. Yet, the framers also recognized the need to balance innovation, privatization, and public use. The courts' expansion of patent protection for biotechnology innovations in the last 30 years raises the question whether the patent system effectively balances these concerns. While the question is not new, only through a thorough and thoughtful examination of these issues can the current system be evaluated. It is then a policy decision for Congress if any change is necessary. PMID:20882419

  14. The challenge of benchmarking health systems: is ICT innovation capacity more systemic than organizational dependent?

    PubMed

    Lapão, Luís Velez

    2015-01-01

    The article by Catan et al. presents a benchmarking exercise comparing Israel and Portugal on the implementation of Information and Communication Technologies in the healthcare sector. Special attention was given to e-Health and m-Health. The authors collected information via a set of interviews with key stakeholders. They compared two different cultures and societies, which have reached slightly different implementation outcomes. Although the comparison is very enlightening, it is also challenging. Benchmarking exercises present a set of challenges, such as the choice of methodologies and the assessment of the impact on organizational strategy. Precise benchmarking methodology is a valid tool for eliciting information about alternatives for improving health systems. However, many beneficial interventions, which benchmark as effective, fail to translate into meaningful healthcare outcomes across contexts. There is a relationship between results and the innovational and competitive environments. Differences in healthcare governance and financing models are well known; but little is known about their impact on Information and Communication Technology implementation. The article by Catan et al. provides interesting clues about this issue. Public systems (such as those of Portugal, UK, Sweden, Spain, etc.) present specific advantages and disadvantages concerning Information and Communication Technology development and implementation. Meanwhile, private systems based fundamentally on insurance packages, (such as Israel, Germany, Netherlands or USA) present a different set of advantages and disadvantages - especially a more open context for innovation. Challenging issues from both the Portuguese and Israeli cases will be addressed. Clearly, more research is needed on both benchmarking methodologies and on ICT implementation strategies. PMID:26301085

  15. Experiences of Academic Members About their Professional Challenges: a Content Analysis Qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Shahhosseini, Zohreh; Danesh, Mahmonier

    2014-01-01

    Background: University faculty members of different disciplines in any country, by giving better quality services, will further accelerate the development of their respective countries. This study aims to explore the experiences of faculty members about their professional challenges. Aim: In this qualitative study, which was conducted in 2013, fifteen faculty members in the departments of clinical and basic sciences of Mazandaran university of Medical Sciences in northern Iran were chosen for semi-structured in-depth interviews by purposive sampling method. All tape-recorded data were fully transcribed and content analysis was performed. Results: After immersion and data analysis, three main themes were emerged including: “Imbalances in academic members’ tasks in different areas”, “Weakness of evaluation and promotion system” and “Failure to provide the infrastructure educational facilities”. The main themes and sub-themes are explained by the help of participants’ direct quotations. Conclusions: This study suggested that it is better to take effective measures to improve the faculty members’ situation and therefore increase their efficiency, effectiveness and productivity. PMID:24825939

  16. Don't Sweat the Big Stuff: Academic Innovation in All Shapes and Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halfond, Jay A.

    2011-01-01

    Faculty don't give themselves enough credit for innovation and creative thinking within higher education. The soap operas of entrenched faculty, factions divided over trivia, professors protecting their sub-disciplines, lengthy and convoluted approval processes, and ongoing acrimony and melodrama all overshadow progress made without fanfare. The…

  17. Personal Leadership in Practice: A Critical Approach to Instructional Design Innovation Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbaugh, Marcia L.

    2013-01-01

    An argument is made in this article for a link between leadership and innovation, when innovation is an outcome of the work approaches and practices that underpin an educational technologist's academic course designs. The practice of instructional design (ID) is continually being challenged to rethink its conceptualization of academic course…

  18. Innovators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NEA Today, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Describes various innovations that have been developed to enhance education. These innovations include: helping educators help at-risk students succeed; promoting high school journalism; ensuring quality online learning experiences; developing a student performing group that uses theater to address social issues; and having students design their…

  19. Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation Report from the Workshop Held July 31-August 2, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Larzelere, Alex R.; Ashby, Steven F.; Christensen, Dana C.; Crawford, Dona L.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; John, Grosh; Stults, B. Ray; Lee, Steven L.; Hammond, Steven W.; Grover, Benjamin T.; Neely, Rob; Dudney, Lee Ann; Goldstein, Noah C.; Wells, Jack; Peltz, Jim

    2013-03-06

    On July 31-August 2 of 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a workshop entitled Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation. This workshop built on three earlier workshops that clearly identified the potential for the Department and its national laboratories to enable energy innovation. The specific goal of the workshop was to identify the key challenges that the nation must overcome to apply the full benefit of taxpayer-funded advanced computing technologies to U.S. energy innovation in the ways that the country produces, moves, stores, and uses energy. Perhaps more importantly, the workshop also developed a set of recommendations to help the Department overcome those challenges. These recommendations provide an action plan for what the Department can do in the coming years to improve the nation’s energy future.

  20. On the added value of forensic science and grand innovation challenges for the forensic community.

    PubMed

    van Asten, Arian C

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the insights and results are presented of a long term and ongoing improvement effort within the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI) to establish a valuable innovation programme. From the overall perspective of the role and use of forensic science in the criminal justice system, the concepts of Forensic Information Value Added (FIVA) and Forensic Information Value Efficiency (FIVE) are introduced. From these concepts the key factors determining the added value of forensic investigations are discussed; Evidential Value, Relevance, Quality, Speed and Cost. By unravelling the added value of forensic science and combining this with the future needs and scientific and technological developments, six forensic grand challenges are introduced: i) Molecular Photo-fitting; ii) chemical imaging, profiling and age estimation of finger marks; iii) Advancing Forensic Medicine; iv) Objective Forensic Evaluation; v) the Digital Forensic Service Centre and vi) Real time In-Situ Chemical Identification. Finally, models for forensic innovation are presented that could lead to major international breakthroughs on all these six themes within a five year time span. This could cause a step change in the added value of forensic science and would make forensic investigative methods even more valuable than they already are today. PMID:24630329

  1. Challenges in oral drug delivery of antiretrovirals and the innovative strategies to overcome them.

    PubMed

    Sosnik, Alejandro; Augustine, Robin

    2016-08-01

    Development of novel drug delivery systems (DDS) represents a promising opportunity to overcome the various bottlenecks associated with the chronic antiretroviral (ARV) therapy of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Oral drug delivery is the most convenient and simplest route of drug administration that involves the swallowing of a pharmaceutical compound with the intention of releasing it into the gastrointestinal tract. In oral delivery, drugs can be formulated in such a way that they are protected from digestive enzymes, acids, etc. and released in different regions of the small intestine and/or the colon. Not surprisingly, with the exception of the subcutaneous enfuvirtide, all the marketed ARVs are administered orally. However, conventional (marketed) and innovative (under investigation) oral delivery systems must overcome numerous challenges, including the acidic gastric environment, and the poor aqueous solubility and physicochemical instability of many of the approved ARVs. In addition, the mucus barrier can prevent penetration and subsequent absorption of the released drug, a phenomenon that leads to lower oral bioavailability and therapeutic concentration in plasma. Moreover, the frequent administration of the cocktail (ARVs are administered at least once a day) favors treatment interruption. To improve the oral performance of ARVs, the design and development of more efficient oral drug delivery systems are called for. The present review highlights various innovative research strategies adopted to overcome the limitations of the present treatment regimens and to enhance the efficacy of the oral ARV therapy in HIV. PMID:26772138

  2. Integration of Treatment Innovation Planning and Implementation: Strategic Process Models and Organizational Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Wayne E. K.; Simpson, D. Dwayne; Knight, Danica K.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    Sustained and effective use of evidence-based practices in substance abuse treatment services faces both clinical and contextual challenges. Implementation approaches are reviewed that rely on variations of plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles, but most emphasize conceptual identification of core components for system change strategies. A 2-phase procedural approach is therefore presented based on the integration of TCU models and related resources for improving treatment process and program change. Phase 1 focuses on the dynamics of clinical services, including stages of client recovery (cross-linked with targeted assessments and interventions), as the foundations for identifying and planning appropriate innovations to improve efficiency and effectiveness. Phase 2 shifts to the operational and organizational dynamics involved in implementing and sustaining innovations (including the stages of training, adoption, implementation, and practice). A comprehensive system of TCU assessments and interventions for client and program-level needs and functioning are summarized as well, with descriptions and guidelines for applications in practical settings. PMID:21443294

  3. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583

    SciTech Connect

    Palladino, Carl; Mason, Bryan; Engle, Matt; LeVangie, James; Dempsey, Gregg; Klemovich, Ron

    2013-07-01

    The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)

  4. Challenges for University Engagement in the UK: Towards a Public Academe?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watermeyer, Richard

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the changing role of universities in the UK as they respond to an engagement agenda that stipulates a more immersive and visible interaction between academics and the public. It constitutes a survey of attitudes to public engagement in a selection of UK universities drawing on interviews with senior academics with managerial…

  5. Challenging Perspectives on Learning and Teaching in the Disciplines: The Academic Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Kerri-Lee D.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on a study of academic staff perspectives on disciplinary communities and skill development in disciplinary contexts. Fifty-five academic staff were interviewed across eight disciplines in four Australian universities. Responses of historians and mathematicians are the focus of this article. A socio-constructivist framework…

  6. Chalkface Challenges: A Study of Academic Dishonesty amongst Students in New Zealand Tertiary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Lambert, Kelly; Ellen, Nicky; Taylor, Louise

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of two investigations into the prevalence and profile of academic dishonesty amongst students in New Zealand's tertiary institutions and compares this with findings from other studies. Staff and students report on their personal experiences of academic dishonesty and these are compared with official information…

  7. Challenges and Opportunities of Information Technology in the 90s. Track VI: Managing Academic Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Six papers from the 1990 CAUSE conference's Track VI, Managing Academic Information Systems are presented. Papers discuss issues related to the integration of merging technologies - computing, communications, classrooms - and their effects on the way "academic business" is conducted. Papers and their authors are as follows: "Networked Information…

  8. Production and supply of high-quality food protein for human consumption: sustainability, challenges, and innovations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyao; Fanzo, Jessica; Miller, Dennis D; Pingali, Prabhu; Post, Mark; Steiner, Jean L; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna E

    2014-08-01

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that 843 million people worldwide are hungry and a greater number suffer from nutrient deficiencies. Approximately one billion people have inadequate protein intake. The challenge of preventing hunger and malnutrition will become even greater as the global population grows from the current 7.2 billion people to 9.6 billion by 2050. With increases in income, population, and demand for more nutrient-dense foods, global meat production is projected to increase by 206 million tons per year during the next 35 years. These changes in population and dietary practices have led to a tremendous rise in the demand for food protein, especially animal-source protein. Consuming the required amounts of protein is fundamental to human growth and health. Protein needs can be met through intakes of animal and plant-source foods. Increased consumption of food proteins is associated with increased greenhouse gas emissions and overutilization of water. Consequently, concerns exist regarding impacts of agricultural production, processing and distribution of food protein on the environment, ecosystem, and sustainability. To address these challenging issues, the New York Academy of Sciences organized the conference "Frontiers in Agricultural Sustainability: Studying the Protein Supply Chain to Improve Dietary Quality" to explore sustainable innovations in food science and programming aimed at producing the required quality and quantity of protein through improved supply chains worldwide. This report provides an extensive discussion of these issues and summaries of the presentations from the conference. PMID:25123207

  9. Innovative work behavior of managers: Implications regarding stressful challenges of modernized public- and private-sector organizations

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Sudeshna Basu; Ray, Anjali

    2009-01-01

    Background: The present study was firstly aimed to find out the nature of stressful life events arising out of the innovative challenges in modernized organizations; and secondly, it tried to identify the relationship between innovative work behavior of managers and the levels of stress arising out of stressful events in modernized organizations (public and private) in West Bengal. Materials and Methods: Data was collected from a sample of 200 managers, by using 3 tools (General Information Schedule, Life Event Inventory and Innovative Work Behavior Scale) through a face-to-face interview. Responses were subjected to both quantitative and qualitative analyses. The data was statistically treated for ‘t’ and ANOVA. Results: Data highlighted the fact that the qualitative profile of stressful events in the lives of managers expressed specificity in terms of their organizational type (public- and private-sector modernized organizations), and levels of stress from stressful life events were significantly higher among the modernized private-sector managers than those among public-sector managers. The prevalence of innovative work behavior was moderately higher among managers of private-sector modernized organizations than their counterparts in public-sector organizations. The trends of innovative work behavior of the managers indicated much variability due to interaction of their level of perceived stressful challenges for innovation and the global forces of change that have unleashed dynamic, systematic and higher expectation level from them. PMID:21180486

  10. National Defense Education and Innovation Initiative: Meeting America's Economic and Security Challenges in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Universities, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Association of American Universities (AAU) calls on the Administration, Congress, and academia, with the help of the business sector, to implement a 21st Century National Defense Education and Innovation Initiative aimed at meeting the economic and security challenges we will face over the next half-century. Government and America's…

  11. The Emergence and Challenging Growth of the Bio-Ethanol Innovation System in Taiwan (1949–2015)

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chao-Chen; Yang, Siang-Cing

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the bio-ethanol innovation system in Taiwan from the perspective of a technology innovation system (TIS). Taiwan is a newly industrialized country and is not currently a main producer of bio-ethanol. This study analyzes the evolution of bio-ethanol innovation system in Taiwan and places a particular emphasis on challenges that present policies face in the context of potential long-term bio-ethanol development. Through an evaluation of the consistency of the present research, technology, development and innovation (RTDI) policies as well as the influence of these policies on the functional dynamics of bio-ethanol innovation system, mechanisms prohibiting the system from flourishing are determined. It is suggested that the production of bio-ethanol in Taiwan would be achieved if the government: (1) fixes long-term targets for both domestic bio-ethanol development and emission reduction; and (2) comprehensively designs a set of interrelated RTDI policies in accordance with the functional pattern of the bio-ethanol innovation system and consistently implements these policies. If such measures were implemented, it is considered that the bio-ethanol innovation system in Taiwan would flourish. PMID:26907306

  12. Installed Base as a Facilitator for User-Driven Innovation: How Can User Innovation Challenge Existing Institutional Barriers?

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Synnøve Thomassen; Jansen, Arild

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses an ICT-based, user-driven innovation process in the health sector in rural areas in Norway. The empirical base is the introduction of a new model for psychiatric health provision. This model is supported by a technical solution based on mobile phones that is aimed to help the communication between professional health personnel and patients. This innovation was made possible through the use of standard mobile technology rather than more sophisticated systems. The users were heavily involved in the development work. Our analysis shows that by thinking simple and small-scale solutions, including to take the user's needs and premises as a point of departure rather than focusing on advanced technology, the implementation process was made possible. We show that by combining theory on information infrastructures, user-oriented system development, and innovation in a three-layered analytical framework, we can explain the interrelationship between technical, organizational, and health professional factors that made this innovation a success. PMID:23304134

  13. Installed base as a facilitator for user-driven innovation: how can user innovation challenge existing institutional barriers?

    PubMed

    Andersen, Synnøve Thomassen; Jansen, Arild

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses an ICT-based, user-driven innovation process in the health sector in rural areas in Norway. The empirical base is the introduction of a new model for psychiatric health provision. This model is supported by a technical solution based on mobile phones that is aimed to help the communication between professional health personnel and patients. This innovation was made possible through the use of standard mobile technology rather than more sophisticated systems. The users were heavily involved in the development work. Our analysis shows that by thinking simple and small-scale solutions, including to take the user's needs and premises as a point of departure rather than focusing on advanced technology, the implementation process was made possible. We show that by combining theory on information infrastructures, user-oriented system development, and innovation in a three-layered analytical framework, we can explain the interrelationship between technical, organizational, and health professional factors that made this innovation a success. PMID:23304134

  14. The Research Circle as a Resource in Challenging Academics' Perceptions of How to Support Students' Literacy Development in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Lotta

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with an action research project in which a group of academics from different disciplines reflect on and gradually extend their knowledge on how to support students' academic literacy development. The aim of this research is to understand how the collaborative work becomes a resource in challenging participants' initial…

  15. Evidence based mental healthcare and service innovation: review of concepts and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kouimtsidis, Ch; John-Smith, St; Kemp, P; Ikkos, G

    2013-01-01

    Health provision systems in the developed western nations are currently facing major financial challenges. In order to meet these challenges, a number of new approaches used to assist the provision of health have been introduced, including the practice of health professionals. These approaches utilize specific methods of data capture and summarization such as: evidence based medicine (EBM) and practice guidelines. Evidence is generated from systematic clinical research as well as reported clinical experience and individually case based empirical evidence. All types of research though (quantitative or qualitative) have limitations. Similarly all types of evidence have advantages and disadvantages and can be complimentary to each other. Evidencebased individual decision (EBID) making is the commonest evidence-based medicine as practiced by the individual clinician in making decisions about the care of the individual patient. It involves integrating individual clinical expertise with the best available external clinical evidence from systematic research. However this sort of evidence-based medicine, focuses excessively on the individual (potentially at the expense of others) in a system with limited budgets. Evidence-based guidelines (EBG) also support the practice of evidence-based medicine but at the organizational or institutional level. The main aim is to identify which interventions, over a range of patients, work best and which is cost-effective in order to guide service development and provision at a strategic level. Doing this effectively is a scientific and statistical skill in itself and the quality of guidelines is based primarily on the quality research evidence. It is important to note that lack of systematic evidence to support an intervention does not automatically mean that an intervention must instantly be abandoned. It is also important that guidelines are understood for what they are, i.e. not rules, or complete statements of knowledge. EBM will

  16. Creating a Culture of Innovation: The Challenge in Becoming and Staying a World-Class University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, William G.

    2014-01-01

    In the 21st century world-class universities will need to be much more focused on innovation, rather than on stability and standardization. An innovative organization is different from a stable one. It requires different skills from its participants, and it functions in a different way from a stable organization. A focus on innovation will…

  17. The food multimix concept: new innovative approach to meeting nutritional challenges in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Zotor, F B; Amuna, P

    2008-02-01

    Food insecurity, chronic hunger, starvation and malnutrition continue to affect millions of individuals throughout the developing world, especially Sub-Saharan Africa. Various initiatives by African governments and International Agencies such as the UN, the industrial nations, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and the World Trade Organisation to boost economic development, have failed to provide the much-needed solution to these challenges. The impact of these economic shifts and the failures of structural adjustment programmes on the nutritional well-being and health of the most vulnerable members of poor communities cannot be over-emphasised. The use of ad hoc measures as an adjunct to community-based rural integrated projects have provided little success and will be unsustainable unless they are linked to harnessing available local resources. The present paper therefore focuses on exploring alternative ways of harnessing the scant agricultural resources by employing a scientific approach to food-related problem-solving. The food multimix (FMM) concept offers a scientific contribution alongside other attempts currently in use by the World Food Programme, WHO and FAO to meet the food insecurity challenges that confront most of the developing world in the twenty-first century. It is an innovative approach that makes better use of traditional food sources as a tool for meeting community nutritional needs. The FMM concept employs a food-based approach using traditional methods of food preparation and locally-available, cheap and affordable staples (fruits, pulses, vegetables and legumes) in the formulation of nutrient-enriched multimixes. Developed recipes can provide > or =40% of the daily nutritional requirements of vulnerable groups, including patients with HIV/AIDS and children undergoing nutrition rehabilitation. The FMM approach can also be used as a medium- to long-term adjunct to community-based rural integration projects aimed at health

  18. Ethical issues in surgical innovation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Megan E; Siegler, Mark; Angelos, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Innovation is responsible for most advances in the field of surgery. Innovative approaches to solving clinical problems have significantly decreased morbidity and mortality for many surgical procedures, and have led to improved patient outcomes. While innovation is motivated by the surgeon's expectation that the new approach will be beneficial to patients, not all innovations are successful or result in improved patient care. The ethical dilemma of surgical innovation lies in the uncertainty of whether a particular innovation will prove to be a "good thing." This uncertainty creates challenges for surgeons, patients, and the healthcare system. By its very nature, innovation introduces a potential risk to patient safety, a risk that may not be fully known, and it simultaneously fosters an optimism bias. These factors increase the complexity of informed consent and shared decision making for the surgeon and the patient. Innovative procedures and their associated technology raise issues of cost and resource distribution in the contemporary, financially conscious, healthcare environment. Surgeons and institutions must identify and address conflicts of interest created by the development and application of an innovation, always preserving the best interest of the patient above the academic or financial rewards of success. Potential strategies to address the challenges inherent in surgical innovation include collecting and reporting objective outcomes data, enhancing the informed consent process, and adhering to the principles of disclosure and professionalism. As surgeons, we must encourage creativity and innovation while maintaining our ethical awareness and responsibility to patients. PMID:24728580

  19. Smart systems and personalized health: the real challenge of bridging the innovation gap.

    PubMed

    Lymberis, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Smart miniaturized systems, emerging from the integration of heterogeneous technologies like micro- and nano electronics, photonics, biotechnology, materials and information & communication technologies are considered today, after two decades of intensive public support, proven concepts and functional prototypes, as key enablers opening up new opportunities for healthcare and in particular personalized health. They offer an enhanced ability to sense, detect, analyze, communicate, respond, and monitor phenomena from macro (e.g. body, tissues) to nano scale (e.g. molecules, genes). For the majority of these projects, planning for the next phase of prototype validation, product design, supply chain, user targeting, clinical validation and commercial roll-out are now taking full attention. The new EU Framework Program for Research and Innovation, Horizon 2020, is focusing on technology transfer support and building ecosystems and value chains to ensure better time to market and higher impact of knowledge-based technologies. The state-of-the-art and upcoming challenges for the implementation of H2020 and new opportunities in smart systems for pHealth are discussed in the paper. PMID:24851956

  20. The Palau AHEC--academizing the public health work plan: capacity development and innovation in Micronesia.

    PubMed

    Dever, Greg; Finau, Sitaleki; Kuartei, Stevenson; Durand, A Mark; Rykken, David; Yano, Victor; Untalan, Pedro; Withy, Kelley; Tellei, Patrick; Baravilala, Wame; Pierantozzi, Sandra; Tellei, Jullie

    2005-03-01

    The Palau Area Health Education Center (AHEC)--a program of the University of Hawaii's John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) and based at Palau Community College--was established in 2001 in response to the recommendations of the 1998 Institute of Medicine (IOM) report--Pacific Partnerships for Health--Charting a New Course for the 21st Century1. One of IOM's core recommendations was to promote the training of the primary health care workforce among the U.S.-Associated Pacific Islands. Since its inception in 2001, the Palau AHEC has coordinated overall 37 postgraduate and undergraduate courses in General Practice and Public Health taught by the University of Auckland Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences and the Fiji School of Medicine's School of Public Health and Primary Care (SPH&PC) in Palau, Yap State, and the Republic of the Marshall Islands. Currently 139 physicians, nurses, health administrators, and environmental health workers are registered as active students in Palau (58), Yap State (22), and the RMI (59). Notably, the Palau AHEC and the SPH&PC have worked in an innovative partnership with the Palau Ministry of Health to operationalize the MOH's public health work plan to implement a comprehensive community health survey of all 4,376 households in Palau, interviewing 79% of the total population, to determine Palau's health indicators. To accomplish this, the SPH&PC developed and taught a curriculum for Palau physicians and public health nurses on how to design the survey, gather, and analyze data in order to develop and implement appropriately responsive intervention and treatment programs to address Palau's old and newer morbidities. In early FY2005, two other Micronesian AHECs--the Yap State and Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands AHECs--were funded through JABSOM administered grants which will also address the primary care training needs of Micronesia's remote and isolated health workforce. PMID:18181474

  1. Strengthening public health education in population and reproductive health through an innovative academic partnership in Africa: the Gates partners experience.

    PubMed

    Oni, Gbolahan; Fatusi, Adesegun; Tsui, Amy; Enquselassie, Fikre; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Ojofeitimi, Ebenezer; Taulo, Frank; Quakyi, Isabella

    2011-01-01

    Poor reproductive health constitutes one of the leading public health problems in the world, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). We report here an academic partnership that commenced in 2003 between a US institution and six universities in SSA. The partnership addresses the human resources development challenge in Africa by strengthening public health education and research capacity to improve population and reproductive health (PRH) outcomes in low-resource settings. The partnership's core activities focused on increasing access to quality education, strengthening health research capacity and translating scholarship and science into policy and practices. Partnership programmes focused on the educational dimension of the human resources equation provide students with improved learning facilities and enhanced work environments and also provide faculty with opportunities for professional development and an enhanced capacity for curriculum delivery. By 2007, 48 faculty members from the six universities in SSA attended PRH courses at Johns Hopkins University, 93 PRH courses were offered across the six universities, 625 of their master's students elected PRH concentrations and 158 had graduated. With the graduation of these and future student cohorts, the universities in SSA will systematically be expanding the number of public health practitioners and strengthening programme effectiveness to resolve reproductive health needs. Some challenges facing the partnership are described in this article. PMID:20614360

  2. Investing in Academic Science for Allied Health Students: Challenges and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packard, Becky Wai-Ling; Gagnon, Janelle L.; Moring-Parris, Riana

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of allied health CTE students and teachers in a new academic science class designed to strengthen science preparation and postsecondary pathways. Situated within a partnership between the community hospital and an urban school district, this case study drew upon the perspectives of the students, the hospital…

  3. E-Books in Academic Libraries: Challenges for Acquisition and Collection Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, William H.

    2013-01-01

    This bibliographic essay examines the difficulties associated with the selection, licensing, acquisition, and management of e-books in academic libraries. The potential advantages of e-book technology are likely to be realized only to the extent that they advance the economic goals of e-book suppliers and are consistent with the legal framework…

  4. Writing and Critical Reading for Learning across the Disciplines: Academic Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daigle, Stephen L.

    Grant projects sponsored by the California State University during 1980-1982 to improve writing and critical reading across the disciplines are discussed. Seven campus writing projects and two critical reading projects were supported by the Academic Program Improvement Fund. Four of the writing projects used faculty workshops and training…

  5. Success in Higher Education: The Challenge to Achieve Academic Standing and Social Position

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Life, James

    2015-01-01

    When students look at their classmates in the classroom, consciously or unconsciously, they see competitors both for academic recognition and social success. How do they fit in relation to others and how do they succeed in achieving both? Traditional views on the drive to succeed and the fear of failure are well known as motivators for achieving…

  6. The Dawn of a New Professionalism in the French Academy? Academics Facing the Challenges of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Linda; Cosnefroy, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Using as an analytical framework Evans's conceptualisation of professionalism, this article examines the implications for academic professionalism in the French higher education sector of reforms and significant changes that have evolved over the last few decades, including: the "Investissements d'Avenir" programme, the…

  7. Challenging Ideology: Could a Better Understanding of Academic Enquiry Lead to Better Public Policy Making?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Does the present level of public unhappiness with the conduct of governance offer an opportunity to revisit the quality of public policy making and the pernicious role of ideology? In this article I argue that there are some strong parallels between academic enquiry and public policy making, and that a better understanding of the former could lead…

  8. Factors Challenging and Supporting Scholarly Activity for Academic Staff in a Regional Australian University Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, John; Bowling, Alison; Griffiths, Jean; Blair, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    With expectations of academic staff to achieve high quality teaching and research outputs as performance measures it is timely to explore how staff perceive they are being supported to meet these ends. This article presents findings of a multi-method study that explored influences impacting on the quality and quantity of scholarly activity being…

  9. 34 CFR 200.1 - State responsibilities for developing challenging academic standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... year, science, and may include other subjects determined by the State. (b) Academic content standards... at least reading/language arts, mathematics, and, beginning in the 2005-06 school year, science... standards in science, a State must develop— (i) Achievement levels and descriptions no later than the...

  10. 34 CFR 200.1 - State responsibilities for developing challenging academic standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... year, science, and may include other subjects determined by the State. (b) Academic content standards... at least reading/language arts, mathematics, and, beginning in the 2005-06 school year, science... standards in science, a State must develop— (i) Achievement levels and descriptions no later than the...

  11. 34 CFR 200.1 - State responsibilities for developing challenging academic standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... year, science, and may include other subjects determined by the State. (b) Academic content standards... define the knowledge and skills that all high school students are expected to know and be able to do in at least reading/language arts, mathematics, and, beginning in the 2005-06 school year,...

  12. The challenges of collaboration for academic and community partners in a research partnership: points to consider.

    PubMed

    Ross, Lainie Friedman; Loup, Allan; Nelson, Robert M; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Kost, Rhonda; Smith, George R; Gehlert, Sarah

    2010-03-01

    The philosophical underpinning of Community-Engaged Research (CEnR) entails a collaborative partnership between academic researchers and the community. The Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) model is the partnership model most widely discussed in the CEnR literature and is the primary model we draw upon in this discussion of the collaboration between academic researchers and the community. In CPBR, the goal is for community partners to have equal authority and responsibility with the academic research team, and that the partners engage in respectful negotiation both before the research begins and throughout the research process to ensure that the concerns, interests, and needs of each party are addressed. The negotiation of a fair, successful, and enduring partnership requires transparency and understanding of the different assets, skills and expertise that each party brings to the project. Delineating the expectations of both parties and documenting the terms of agreement in a memorandum of understanding or similar document may be very useful. This document is structured to provide a "points- to-consider" roadmap for academic and community research partners to establish and maintain a research partnership at each stage of the research process. PMID:20235861

  13. Managing Cultural Change: The Challenge of Merging Library Services, Curriculum Development and Academic Professional Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Sue

    The paper outlines a number of processes that have been implemented by Learning Services at Deakin University (Geelong, Australia) to gain significant and sustained cultural change among staff in a blended organization, comprising the university library service, the curriculum design and development functions and those of academic staff…

  14. Parents' Perspectives on Hmong Students' Academic Challenges in Reading and Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kenneth Kong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this survey study was to investigate the relationship between Hmong students' academic achievements and Hmong parental involvement, home environment, and acculturation adjustment as measured by the Math and English Language Arts sections of the California Standard Test in the United States from parents' perspective regarding student…

  15. Genome network medicine: innovation to overcome huge challenges in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Roukos, Dimitrios H

    2014-01-01

    The post-ENCODE era shapes now a new biomedical research direction for understanding transcriptional and signaling networks driving gene expression and core cellular processes such as cell fate, survival, and apoptosis. Over the past half century, the Francis Crick 'central dogma' of single n gene/protein-phenotype (trait/disease) has defined biology, human physiology, disease, diagnostics, and drugs discovery. However, the ENCODE project and several other genomic studies using high-throughput sequencing technologies, computational strategies, and imaging techniques to visualize regulatory networks, provide evidence that transcriptional process and gene expression are regulated by highly complex dynamic molecular and signaling networks. This Focus article describes the linear experimentation-based limitations of diagnostics and therapeutics to cure advanced cancer and the need to move on from reductionist to network-based approaches. With evident a wide genomic heterogeneity, the power and challenges of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to identify a patient's personal mutational landscape for tailoring the best target drugs in the individual patient are discussed. However, the available drugs are not capable of targeting aberrant signaling networks and research on functional transcriptional heterogeneity and functional genome organization is poorly understood. Therefore, the future clinical genome network medicine aiming at overcoming multiple problems in the new fields of regulatory DNA mapping, noncoding RNA, enhancer RNAs, and dynamic complexity of transcriptional circuitry are also discussed expecting in new innovation technology and strong appreciation of clinical data and evidence-based medicine. The problematic and potential solutions in the discovery of next-generation, molecular, and signaling circuitry-based biomarkers and drugs are explored. PMID:24318985

  16. The Quest for Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Singapore: Strategies and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Pak Tee

    2012-01-01

    Innovation and entrepreneurship are two very important ingredients in the continuous economic growth of Singapore. This article describes and analyses how Singapore attempts to develop innovation and entrepreneurship through initiatives at the national level and at the universities and schools level. In particular, the article examines the recent…

  17. The EU Innovation Agenda: Challenges for European Higher Education and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Vught, Frans

    2009-01-01

    This article analyses the innovation agenda of the European Union (EU), places it in the context of globalisation and explores its foundation in the theoretical innovation systems perspective. It analyses a number of the central policy domains of this agenda: higher education, doctoral education, research and knowledge transfer. In the second part…

  18. A venture capital view of challenges, opportunities, and innovation in biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, L T

    2011-02-01

    Small biotech companies have been an important source of innovation, pipelines, and new products for the pharmaceutical industry, and are primarily financed by venture capital (VC). The significant changes happening within the VC industry have broad implications for these small companies. This includes a shift to financing later-stage programs with increasing interest in orphan or specialty indications. Nontraditional sources of capital and innovative risk-sharing structures can enable early-stage companies. PMID:21252935

  19. Cultures in conflict: a challenge to faculty of academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Magill, M K; Catinella, A P; Haas, L; Hughes, C C

    1998-08-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) are experiencing turmoil in all three of their traditional missions of teaching, research, and patient care. The authors examine origins of universities and medical education to place in historical context the stresses affecting AHCs at the end of the 20th century. They describe the cultures of the university to suggest strategies for successful adaptation to these stresses. Clashes of values and norms of the cultures within universities and AHCs can hinder effective adaptation to external change. Administrators, researchers, teachers, and clinicians can have strongly conflicting perspectives. For example, business skill is of increasing importance to the survival of the clinical enterprise, but not typically valued by faculty members. University faculty have often considered accountability as antithetical to academic freedom, and, until recently, accountability was not strongly demanded of AHCs. The authors conclude that AHC faculty must transcend the outdated view that the roles of the scholar, scientist, and healer are in opposition to those of the leader and manager. If AHCs are to survive and prosper through their current cultural transition, their faculty must understand all these roles as part of their intellectual and organizational responsibility. PMID:9736847

  20. Challenges in Collective Academic Supervision: Supervisors' Experiences from a Master Programme in Guidance and Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichmann-Hansen, Gitte; Thomsen, Rie; Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2015-01-01

    The idea of peer and group learning is not new in higher education. It has been applied and studied extensively in courses, programmes, and other formal classroom contexts. However, there is not, as yet, a correspondingly large body of research into peer learning in supervision contexts. In this article we address the challenges experienced by…

  1. Responding to the Challenges of KM Education in the LIS Sector: Some Academic and Professional Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazeri, Afsaneh; Martin, Bill

    2009-01-01

    As a newly emerging field of study, KM education is faced with significant challenges which continue to evolve. Informed by wider organisational perspectives, this paper presents the findings of recent research into this field. The first part of the research was in the form of an online survey canvassing the views of the wider LIS community on the…

  2. The Challenges for New Academics in Adopting Student-Centred Approaches to Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The current article provides a perspective on the day-to-day challenges that a group of new teachers experienced as they adopted more student-centred approaches to teaching. Three semi-structured interviews were conducted over two years with 11 new teachers from a range of higher education institutions and subject disciplines. The analysis used…

  3. Building an Academe and Government Partnership in Workforce Education: Challenges and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Kerri S.; Self, Mary Jo; Bailey, Lucy; Harris, Ed; Halcomb, Starla; Hill, Brent; Shimp, Upton

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, the College of Education at Oklahoma State University began the task of building a partnership with the Defense Ammunition Center (DAC) in McAlester, Oklahoma, and implementing research-driven, experience-based workforce education. In this article, the authors describe unique features and challenges of this multi-year…

  4. Life after College: The Challenging Transitions of the "Academically Adrift" Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roksa, Josipa; Arum, Richard

    2012-01-01

    From the housing crisis to high debt, from stagnating incomes to high unemployment, the Great Recession has touched most aspects of many people's lives. College graduates, a highly educated group often insulated from the worst of economic challenges, have not been spared. Their unemployment rate reached 9.1 percent in 2010--the highest annual rate…

  5. Health innovations in patient decision support: Bridging the gaps and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chirk Jenn; Lee, Yew Kong; Lee, Ping Yein; Abdullah, Khatijah Lim

    2013-01-01

    Patient decision aids (PDAs) help to support patients in making an informed and value-based decision. Despite advancement in decision support technologies over the past 30 years, most PDAs are still inaccessible and few address individual needs. Health innovation may provide a solution to bridge these gaps. Information and computer technology provide a platform to incorporate individual profiles and needs into PDAs, making the decision support more personalised. Health innovation may enhance accessibility by using mobile, tablet and Internet technologies; make risk communication more interactive; and identify patient values more effectively. In addition, using databases to capture patient data and the usage of PDAs can help: developers to improve PDAs' design; clinicians to facilitate the decisionmaking process more effectively; and policy makers to make shared decision making more feasible and cost-effective. Health innovation may hold the key to advancing PDAs by creating a more personalised and effective decision support tool for patients making healthcare decisions. PMID:23483776

  6. The Globalisation of Higher Education and the Sojourner Academic: Insights into Challenges Experienced by Newly Appointed International Academic Staff in a UK University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The increasingly diverse nature of the higher education academic community in the United Kingdom is under-researched and under-theorised. This article presents an exploratory study of the lived experiences of newly appointed international academic staff as expressed in their written reflections on their professional practice and interpreted by the…

  7. Igniting Innovation: Colleges Get Creative to Meet Persistent Challenges in Race to the Top

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Violino, Bob

    2012-01-01

    When the going gets tough, the tough get...innovative. That's the approach some forward-thinking community college leaders are taking as their institutions set about the task of restocking the nation's workforce in the face of historic enrollments and severe, if seemingly unending, budget cuts. Recognized by the Aspen Institute as the most…

  8. Changing the Subject: The Challenge to Teacher Professionalism of Innovation in OECD Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, John; James, Edwyn; Lang, Manfred

    The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) study, "Innovations in Science, Mathematics and Technology Education" (SMTE), documents 23 projects aimed at enhancing the appeal of science, mathematics, and technology education. The projects began in 13 OECD countries that believed that curricula must be more student-centered and…

  9. New trends and challenges in the European regulation of innovative medicines.

    PubMed

    Enzmann, Harald

    2016-10-01

    Regulators' marketing authorizations for innovative medicines are linked into a complex process with successive crucial decisions. Objectives and decision criteria of the stakeholders in this process, e.g. health technology assessment (HTA) bodies, payers, physicians and patients, vary and may result not only in different but even mutually exclusive requirements. Reacting to changes in scientific, economic and social demands, European regulatory agencies alter content and format of their assessment procedures and their communication. New diagnostic options (e.g. genotyping and biomarkers) and pharmaceutical innovations (e.g. targeted medicines, nanomedicines) are the scientific drivers of this development. Social drivers are the price and reimbursement decisions by HTA bodies and payers, prerequisites for most patients' access to innovative medicines. The European Medicines Agency's adaptive licensing concept and priority medicines scheme foster the early authorization of innovative medicines. HTA builds on regulators' assessment, with additional requirements and economic components. An intensified exchange between all stakeholders, e.g. in multilateral scientific advice procedures has been initiated. Diminishing the differences in the requirements of regulators and HTA bodies is in the best interest of both patients and the pharmaceutical industry, avoiding duplication of work and accelerating patients' access by early decisions on price and reimbursement. PMID:27237379

  10. Collaborating to Innovate: Achievements and Challenges in the New York City Sectors Initiative Planning Phase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff-Bolte, Stacy; Spaulding, Shayne

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, the New York City Department of Small Business Services and representatives from the New York City Workforce Development Funders Group joined together to form the Workforce Innovation Fund (WIF) with the goal of sharing expertise and learning and providing an avenue to merge resources to support common goals. WIF's first project was the…

  11. Innovative Learning Solutions in New Communities: Opportunities and Challenges to Teachers' Conceptions of Workspace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costley, Debra

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the possibilities and opportunities created by large-scale property developers for new ways of learning and working in master-planned communities. The discussion is based on the findings from research of one developer's innovative solutions to learning in newly developed communities and specifically draws on data from one…

  12. All Things to All People: Challenges and Innovations in a Rural Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanchard, Rosemary Ann; Casados, Felicia; Sheski, Harry

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the context in which rural community colleges seek to serve diverse constituencies of adult learners. A variety of innovative approaches to serving diverse adult learners are being undertaken by New Mexico State University at Grants, a two-year college in the New Mexico State University system serving a culturally diverse…

  13. An Innovative Solution to NASA's NEO Impact Threat Mitigation Grand Challenge and Flight Validation Mission Architecture Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong; Barbee, Brent W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a NASA Innovative Advanced Concept (NIAC) Phase 2 study entitled "An Innovative Solution to NASA's Near-Earth Object (NEO) Impact Threat Mitigation Grand Challenge and Flight Validation Mission Architecture Development." This NIAC Phase 2 study was conducted at the Asteroid Deflection Research Center (ADRC) of Iowa State University in 2012-2014. The study objective was to develop an innovative yet practically implementable mitigation strategy for the most probable impact threat of an asteroid or comet with short warning time (< 5 years). The mitigation strategy described in this paper is intended to optimally reduce the severity and catastrophic damage of the NEO impact event, especially when we don't have sufficient warning times for non-disruptive deflection of a hazardous NEO. This paper provides an executive summary of the NIAC Phase 2 study results. Detailed technical descriptions of the study results are provided in a separate final technical report, which can be downloaded from the ADRC website (www.adrc.iastate.edu).

  14. [Innovation in pharmaceutical and health biotechnology industries: challenges for a virtuous agenda].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Marco; Gadelha, Carlos Augusto Grabois; Costa, Laís Silveira; Maldonado, José

    2012-12-01

    Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries comprise a major production subsystem of the health industrial complex in Brazil. It stands out for both its economic importance and its prominent role in developing new technologies in strategic areas. Strengthening the local production of generic drugs in the last decade has significantly increased the number of Brazilian companies in the local pharmaceutical market and has been an important turning point for this industry's growth. However, there remain major structural bottlenecks both in terms of production and continuous innovation. These bottlenecks reveal the high vulnerability of the Brazilian National Health System and point to the need of public policies that promote strengthening the production base and innovation in the pharmaceutical industry and that at the same time meet health-related social demands in health in Brazil. PMID:23532311

  15. Essential Elements of an Academic Program for Whatcom County Public School Students Challenged with Social/Emotional and/or Chronic Mental Health Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell-Jenkins, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    This study identifies essential program elements for Whatcom Discovery Center, a Northwest Educational Service District cooperative program providing academic and social/emotional development services to students who are challenged with severe social/emotional and/or chronic mental health disorders. The seven (7) Superintendents and seven (7)…

  16. The Development of Academic Language Proficiency: Challenges for Middle School Immersion in Hong Kong and Xi'an

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Stella; Hoare, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the development of academic language proficiency through immersion in middle school programmes in Hong Kong and Xi'an. The study reveals that in both contexts students have exposure to complex academic language through teacher talk and textbooks; however, there is not sufficient support for students' academic language use…

  17. Certification challenges in the development of an innovative high payload capacity spent fuel transportation cask

    SciTech Connect

    Mair, B.R.; Severson, M.J.; Ciez, A.P. )

    1990-01-01

    The design approach and certification strategy used in the development of an innovative transportation cask for legal weight truck shipments of spent nuclear fuel is presented. The proposed approach represents a significant departure from conventional cask designs in that it uses titanium alloy, a material with a high strength-to-weight ratio which has no precedent in transportation cask certification. The significant increase in payload obtainable with the proposed approach, and the associated benefits such as reduced life cycle costs, lower personnel exposure, and lower transportation accident risks are discussed. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Trade policy and obesity prevention: challenges and innovation in the Pacific Islands.

    PubMed

    Snowdon, W; Thow, A M

    2013-11-01

    The Pacific Island countries experience some of the highest rates of obesity in the world in part due to substantial dietary changes that mirror changes in the food supply in the region. Economic and political ties, donor aid, and trade links are key drivers of the changing availability and accessibility of processed and imported foods. Pacific Island countries have been innovative in developing trade-related policy approaches to create a less obesogenic food environment. Taxation-based approaches that affect pricing in the region include increased import and excise tariffs on sugared beverages and other high-sugar products, monosodium glutamate, and palm oil and lowered tariffs on fruits and vegetables. Other approaches highlight some higher-fat products through labeling and controlling the supply of high-fat meats. The bans on high-fat turkey tails and mutton flaps highlight the politics, trade agreements and donor influences that can be significant barriers to the pursuit of policy options. Countries that are not signatories to trade agreements may have more policy space for innovative action. However, potential effectiveness and practicality require consideration. The health sector's active engagement in the negotiation of trade agreements is a key way to support healthier trade in the region. PMID:24102909

  19. An Academic Innovation: The Executive Ph.D. in Urban Higher Education at a Historically Black University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Joseph Martin; Payne, Alfredda Hunt

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes how data analysis and data-driven decision making were critical for designing, developing, and assessing a new academic program. The authors--one, the program's founder; the other, an alumna--begin by highlighting some of the elements in the program's incubation and, subsequently, describe some of the components for data…

  20. Production and supply of high-quality food protein for human consumption: Sustainability, challenges, and innovations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that 843 million people worldwide are hungry and a greater number suffer from nutrient deficiencies. Approximately one billion people have inadequate protein intake. The challenge of preventing hunger and malnutrition will become ...

  1. Meeting the Challenge: Between Depopulation and New Industrialization. Innovations in VET in Eastern Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barabasch, Antje

    2012-01-01

    Despite the heavy investments in the economic development of East German industry, the region still faces immanent structural challenges that affect the provision of vocational education and training (VET), in particular apprenticeships, and the availability of a well skilled workforce. In this article the situation of the economy as well as new…

  2. Robotics Competition Expands--FIRST Vex Challenge Inspires Creativity, Ingenuity and Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Amanda

    2006-01-01

    FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) is a multinational, not-for-profit organization that aspires to transform culture-making science, math, engineering, and technology as cool for kids as sports are today. FIRST has an exciting new program in the works--the VEX Challenge, which the author describes in this article.…

  3. Challenges in initiating and conducting personalized cancer therapy trials: perspectives from WINTHER, a Worldwide Innovative Network (WIN) Consortium trial

    PubMed Central

    Rodon, J.; Soria, J. C.; Berger, R.; Batist, G.; Tsimberidou, A.; Bresson, C.; Lee, J. J.; Rubin, E.; Onn, A.; Schilsky, R. L.; Miller, W. H.; Eggermont, A. M.; Mendelsohn, J.; Lazar, V.; Kurzrock, R.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in ‘omics’ technology and targeted therapeutic molecules are together driving the incorporation of molecular-based diagnostics into the care of patients with cancer. There is an urgent need to assess the efficacy of therapy determined by molecular matching of patients with particular targeted therapies. WINTHER is a clinical trial that uses cutting edge genomic and transcriptomic assays to guide treatment decisions. Through the lens of this ambitious multinational trial (five countries, six sites) coordinated by the Worldwide Innovative Networking Consortium for personalized cancer therapy, we discovered key challenges in initiation and conduct of a prospective, omically driven study. To date, the time from study concept to activation has varied between 19 months at Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus in France to 30 months at the Segal Cancer Center, McGill University (Canada). It took 3+ years to be able to activate US sites due to national regulatory hurdles. Access to medications proposed by the molecular analysis remains a major challenge, since their availability through active clinical trials is highly variable over time within sites and across the network. Rules regarding the off-label use of drugs, or drugs not yet approved at all in some countries, pose a further challenge, and many biopharmaceutical companies lack a simple internal mechanism to supply the drugs even if they wish to do so. These various obstacles should be addressed to test and then implement precision medicine in cancer. PMID:25908602

  4. Challenges in initiating and conducting personalized cancer therapy trials: perspectives from WINTHER, a Worldwide Innovative Network (WIN) Consortium trial.

    PubMed

    Rodon, J; Soria, J C; Berger, R; Batist, G; Tsimberidou, A; Bresson, C; Lee, J J; Rubin, E; Onn, A; Schilsky, R L; Miller, W H; Eggermont, A M; Mendelsohn, J; Lazar, V; Kurzrock, R

    2015-08-01

    Advances in 'omics' technology and targeted therapeutic molecules are together driving the incorporation of molecular-based diagnostics into the care of patients with cancer. There is an urgent need to assess the efficacy of therapy determined by molecular matching of patients with particular targeted therapies. WINTHER is a clinical trial that uses cutting edge genomic and transcriptomic assays to guide treatment decisions. Through the lens of this ambitious multinational trial (five countries, six sites) coordinated by the Worldwide Innovative Networking Consortium for personalized cancer therapy, we discovered key challenges in initiation and conduct of a prospective, omically driven study. To date, the time from study concept to activation has varied between 19 months at Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus in France to 30 months at the Segal Cancer Center, McGill University (Canada). It took 3+ years to be able to activate US sites due to national regulatory hurdles. Access to medications proposed by the molecular analysis remains a major challenge, since their availability through active clinical trials is highly variable over time within sites and across the network. Rules regarding the off-label use of drugs, or drugs not yet approved at all in some countries, pose a further challenge, and many biopharmaceutical companies lack a simple internal mechanism to supply the drugs even if they wish to do so. These various obstacles should be addressed to test and then implement precision medicine in cancer. PMID:25908602

  5. Campus Architecture: Building in the Groves of Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dober, Richard P.

    This book describes, defines, and documents campus architectural designs, covering all aspects of campus building and landscape planning in light of today's new challenges--from the updating and revitalization of the existing architectural heritage to the kinds of innovative new buildings required to meet today's and tomorrow's academic needs. The…

  6. Academics and Athletics: Playing for the Same Team: NCAA President Discusses the Challenges of Leading the Organization in an Era of Academic Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    High expectations greeted Dr. Myles Brand when he became president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in January 2003. As the fourth president of the nation's most powerful amateur sports organization, Brand has the distinction of being the first to have been a college president. To carry out reforms that put academics first…

  7. An Examination of Principals' Leadership Practices: Perspectives of Those Who Teach the Academically Gifted and the Academically Challenged in Inclusion Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King-Cassell, LaUanah

    2013-01-01

    Today, President Obama's "Blueprint for Education Reform" places the principal as the key player in raising academic standards and improving learning for all students. Research has been done on the role of the school principal in school effectiveness and school improvement at the elementary, middle, and high school levels. However, very…

  8. Transforming STEM Education in an Innovative Australian School: The Role of Teachers' and Academics' Professional Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissaker, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    The Australian Science and Mathematics School (ASMS) is a purpose-built innovative senior secondary school situated on the grounds of Flinders University, South Australia. The school was established to address declining enrollments in senior secondary mathematics and science, students' negative attitudes, a shortage of qualified science,…

  9. Education through Occupations in American High Schools. Volume II. The Challenges of Implementing Curriculum Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grubb, W. Norton, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers examining the challenges of integrating high school vocational and academic curricula to provide education through occupations: "Components of a Complex Reform" (W. Norton Grubb); "Integrating Vocational and Academic Education: Lessons from Early Innovators" (Kimberly Ramsey et al.); "Improving High Schools…

  10. Weathering the Storms: Acknowledging Challenges to Learning in Times of Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubschman, Betty; Lutz, Marilyn; King, Christine; Wang, Jia; Kopp, David

    2006-01-01

    Students and faculty have had numerous disruptions this academic year with Hurricanes Katrina, Rita, and Wilma developing into major stressors. During this innovative session, we will examine some of the challenges and strategies used by faculty to work with students to maintain empathy and academic rigor in times of stress and disruption, and…

  11. The Astronaut Glove Challenge: Big Innovation from a (Very) Small Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Many measurements were taken by test engineers from Hamilton Sundstrand, the prime contractor for the current EVA suit. Because the raw measurements needed to be converted to torques and combined into a final score, it was impossible to keep track of who was ahead in this phase. The final comfort and dexterity test was performed in a depressurized glove box to simulate real on-orbit conditions. Each competitor was required to exercise the glove through a defined set of finger, thumb, and wrist motions without any sign of abrasion or bruising of the competitor's hand. I learned a lot about arm fatigue! This was a pass-fail event, and both of the remaining competitors came through intact. After taking what seemed like an eternity to tally the final scores, the judges announced that I had won the competition. My glove was the only one to have achieved lower finger-bending torques than the Phase VI glove. Looking back, I see three sources of the success of this project that I believe also operate in other programs where small teams have broken new ground in aerospace technologies. These are awareness, failure, and trust. By remaining aware of the big picture, continuously asking myself, "Am I converging on a solution?" and "Am I converging fast enough?" I was able to see that my original design was not going to succeed, leading to the decision to start over. I was also aware that, had I lingered over this choice or taken time to analyze it, I would not have been ready on the first day of competition. Failure forced me to look outside conventional thinking and opened the door to innovation. Choosing to make incremental failures enabled me to rapidly climb the learning curve. Trusting my "gut" feelings-which are really an internalized accumulation of experiences-and my newly acquired skills allowed me to devise new technologies rapidly and complete both gloves just in time. Awareness, failure, and trust are intertwined: failure provides experiences that inform awareness

  12. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond: challenges of responsible innovation in prenatal screening

    PubMed Central

    Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Bombard, Yvonne; Bianchi, Diana W; Bergmann, Carsten; Borry, Pascal; Chitty, Lyn S; Fellmann, Florence; Forzano, Francesca; Hall, Alison; Henneman, Lidewij; Howard, Heidi C; Lucassen, Anneke; Ormond, Kelly; Peterlin, Borut; Radojkovic, Dragica; Rogowski, Wolf; Soller, Maria; Tibben, Aad; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; van El, Carla G; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT has the potential of helping the practice better achieve its aim of facilitating autonomous reproductive choices, provided that balanced pretest information and non-directive counseling are available as part of the screening offer. Depending on the health-care setting, different scenarios for NIPT-based screening for common autosomal aneuploidies are possible. The trade-offs involved in these scenarios should be assessed in light of the aim of screening, the balance of benefits and burdens for pregnant women and their partners and considerations of cost-effectiveness and justice. With improving screening technologies and decreasing costs of sequencing and analysis, it will become possible in the near future to significantly expand the scope of prenatal screening beyond common autosomal aneuploidies. Commercial providers have already begun expanding their tests to include sex-chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions. However, multiple false positives may undermine the main achievement of NIPT in the context of prenatal screening: the significant reduction of the invasive testing rate. This document argues for a cautious expansion of the scope of prenatal screening to serious congenital and childhood disorders, only following sound validation studies and a comprehensive evaluation of all relevant aspects. A further core message of this document is that in countries where prenatal screening is offered as a public health programme, governments and public health authorities should adopt an active role to ensure the responsible innovation of prenatal screening on the basis of ethical principles. Crucial elements are the quality of the screening process as a whole (including non

  13. Non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy and beyond: challenges of responsible innovation in prenatal screening.

    PubMed

    Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido; Bombard, Yvonne; Bianchi, Diana W; Bergmann, Carsten; Borry, Pascal; Chitty, Lyn S; Fellmann, Florence; Forzano, Francesca; Hall, Alison; Henneman, Lidewij; Howard, Heidi C; Lucassen, Anneke; Ormond, Kelly; Peterlin, Borut; Radojkovic, Dragica; Rogowski, Wolf; Soller, Maria; Tibben, Aad; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth; van El, Carla G; Cornel, Martina C

    2015-11-01

    This paper contains a joint ESHG/ASHG position document with recommendations regarding responsible innovation in prenatal screening with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). By virtue of its greater accuracy and safety with respect to prenatal screening for common autosomal aneuploidies, NIPT has the potential of helping the practice better achieve its aim of facilitating autonomous reproductive choices, provided that balanced pretest information and non-directive counseling are available as part of the screening offer. Depending on the health-care setting, different scenarios for NIPT-based screening for common autosomal aneuploidies are possible. The trade-offs involved in these scenarios should be assessed in light of the aim of screening, the balance of benefits and burdens for pregnant women and their partners and considerations of cost-effectiveness and justice. With improving screening technologies and decreasing costs of sequencing and analysis, it will become possible in the near future to significantly expand the scope of prenatal screening beyond common autosomal aneuploidies. Commercial providers have already begun expanding their tests to include sex-chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions. However, multiple false positives may undermine the main achievement of NIPT in the context of prenatal screening: the significant reduction of the invasive testing rate. This document argues for a cautious expansion of the scope of prenatal screening to serious congenital and childhood disorders, only following sound validation studies and a comprehensive evaluation of all relevant aspects. A further core message of this document is that in countries where prenatal screening is offered as a public health programme, governments and public health authorities should adopt an active role to ensure the responsible innovation of prenatal screening on the basis of ethical principles. Crucial elements are the quality of the screening process as a whole (including non

  14. Biobanks in the era of personalized medicine: objectives, challenges, and innovation: Overview.

    PubMed

    Kinkorová, Judita

    2015-01-01

    Biobanks are an important compound of personalized medicine and strongly support the scientific progress in stratification of population and biomarker discovery and validation due to progress in personalized medicine. Biobanks are an essential tool for new drug discoveries and drug development. Biobanks play an important role in the whole process of patient prevention and prediction, follow-up, and therapy monitoring and optimalization. Biobanks have the specificity in that they cover multidisciplinary approach to the human health combining biological and medical approaches, as well as informative bioinformatics technologies, computationing, and modeling. The importance of biobanks has during the last decade increased in variety and capacity from small collections of samples to large-scale national or international repositories. Collected samples are population-based, disease-specific or rare diseases originating from a diverse profile of individuals. There are various purposes of biobanks, such as diagnostics, pharmacology, or research. Biobanks involve, store, and operate with specific personal information, and as a consequence, such a diversity of biobanking is associated with a broad spectrum of ethical and legal issues. Biobanks are an international phenomenon because any single country, state, or society at the moment is not able to cover all issues involving the whole biobank problematic. Biobanks have an enormous innovative potential in the whole process of biomedical research in the twenty-first century. PMID:26904153

  15. Myosin VI: an innovative motor that challenged the swinging lever arm hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Spudich, James A.; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj

    2010-01-01

    The swinging crossbridge hypothesis states that energy from ATP hydrolysis is transduced to mechanical movement of the myosin head while bound to actin. The light chain-binding region of myosin is thought to act as a lever arm that amplifies movements near the catalytic site. This model has been challenged by findings that myosin VI takes larger steps along actin filaments than early interpretations of its structure seem to allow. We now know that myosin VI does indeed operate by an unusual ~ 180° lever arm swing and achieves its large step size using special structural features in its tail domain. PMID:20094053

  16. High End Computing Technologies for Earth Science Applications: Trends, Challenges, and Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, John (Technical Monitor); Biswas, Rupak; Yan, Jerry C.; Brooks, Walter F.; Sterling, Thomas L.

    2003-01-01

    Earth science applications of the future will stress the capabilities of even the highest performance supercomputers in the areas of raw compute power, mass storage management, and software environments. These NASA mission critical problems demand usable multi-petaflops and exabyte-scale systems to fully realize their science goals. With an exciting vision of the technologies needed, NASA has established a comprehensive program of advanced research in computer architecture, software tools, and device technology to ensure that, in partnership with US industry, it can meet these demanding requirements with reliable, cost effective, and usable ultra-scale systems. NASA will exploit, explore, and influence emerging high end computing architectures and technologies to accelerate the next generation of engineering, operations, and discovery processes for NASA Enterprises. This article captures this vision and describes the concepts, accomplishments, and the potential payoff of the key thrusts that will help meet the computational challenges in Earth science applications.

  17. Addressing the Social, Academic, and Behavioral Needs of Students with Challenging Behavior in Inclusive and Alternative Settings. Highlights from the Forum on Comprehensive Programming for a Diverse Population of Children and Youth with Challenging Behavior: Addressing Social, Academic, and Behavioral Needs within Inclusive and Alternative Settings (Las Vegas, Nevada, February 9-10, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Lyndal M., Ed.; Gable, Robert A., Ed.

    This document presents the texts of 11 major presentations and conference highlights from a February 2001 conference on the social, academic, and behavioral needs of students with challenging behavior in inclusive and alternative settings as required under the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. The presentations…

  18. The challenge of developing academic language in Spanish and English through science: The case of two teachers' strategic teaching practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercuri, Sandra Patricia

    This case study examines the practice of two bilingual education teachers in an attempt to understand the planning and instructional activities occurring in their classrooms by focusing on students' academic language development during science instruction. This site was selected as an 'instrumental' case to examine for several reasons. This school is among the few in the district that is teaching science. Despite the political climate related to bilingual education, the teachers at this school offer an articulated dual immersion program from K to grade six. This site has experienced success in beginning to close the achievement gap between English learners and their native English speaking peers on standardized test measures. Using a qualitative approach, data was collected from two unique cases through detailed observations of classroom practice, audio-taped lessons, an initial and a follow up interview, artifacts and an initial survey. Scarcella's (2003) framework on academic language was used to analyze the different components of academic language of the science instruction. A theoretical framework from Stoddart et al. on levels of integrated planning expertise and Dell' Alba & Sandberg's concept of embodied understanding of practice also informed the study. Three main findings were drawn from this study: (a) academic language can be effectively taught through science instruction when teachers have the expertise to integrate language learning with science inquiry; (b) the teaching of and planning for academic language development through content is shaped over time by teachers' teaching and personal experiences with the content and their ability to integrate both; (c) While a theoretical model of academic language can be used to analyze teachers' instructional strategies during a science lesson, this model has limitations. Teachers' understanding of their own practice developed overtime shaped the way they manipulated the curriculum for their particular grade

  19. Innovation management based on proactive engagement of customers: A case study on LEGO Group. Part II: Challenge of engaging the digital customer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avasilcăi, S.; Rusu, G.

    2015-11-01

    To foster the development of innovative products and new technologies, nowadays companies use an open innovation system, encouraging stakeholders to contribute, using the companies’ online platforms for open innovation or social media, bringing and sharing creative solutions and ideas in order to respond to challenging needs the company directly expresses. Accordingly, the current research continues the analysis of the LEGO Group innovation efforts, aiming to provide a case study approach based on describing the most important projects and online instruments company uses to interact with customers and other external stakeholders. Thus, by analysing the experience of the company in developing projects of involving stakeholders in the innovation processes, the article emphasizes the objective of these past projects developed by LEGO Group, outlining their objectives regarding the focus on the product or process innovation, the team management and stakeholders involved in the innovation actions and the results they obtained. Moreover, the case study highlights the features of the most important online instruments LEGO Group uses at the moment for engaging LEGO fans, children, parents, and other external stakeholders in developing new LEGO sets. Thus, LEGO online instruments provide the opportunity for customers to be creative and to respond to LEGO management team challenges. Accordingly, LEGO involve customers in bringing innovative ideas for LEGO sets through LEGO Ideas instrument, which aims to engage customers in submitting projects, voting and supporting ideas and also sharing them on social media. Also, the research emphasizes the role of supporting the open dialogue and interaction with customers and other external stakeholders through LEGO.com Create & Share Galleries instrument, using their creativity to upload innovative models in the public galleries. The continuous challenges LEGO launches for their fans create a long-term connection between company and

  20. Beyond Academic Evidence: Innovative Uses of Technology Within e-Portfolios in a Doctor of Nursing Practice Program.

    PubMed

    Haverkamp, Jacqueline J; Vogt, Marjorie

    2015-01-01

    Portfolios have been used in higher education for the past several years for assessment of student learning and growth and serve as the basis for summative and formative evaluations. While there is some information in the literature on how undergraduate and graduate medical, nursing, and allied health students might use portfolios to showcase acquired knowledge and skills, there is a dearth of information on the use of e-Portfolios with students in doctor of nursing practice programs. There are also limited findings regarding the creative use of technology (that includes infographics and other multimedia tools) to enhance learning outcomes (Stephens & Parr, 2013). This article presents engaging and meaningful ways technology can be used within e-Portfolios. Thus, e-Portfolios become more than a repository for academic evidence; they become unique stories that reflect the breadth and depth of students' learner-centered outcomes. PMID:26194958

  1. Self-Report and Academic Factors in Relation to High School Students' Success in an Innovative Biotechnology Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterman, Karen; Pan, Yi; Robertson, Jane; Lee, Shelley Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Biotechnology constitutes one of the most challenging, cutting-edge, and rapidly growing fields in science today. Both the practical implications and the hands-on nature of this "modern science" make the topic of biotechnology an attractive addition to the high school science curriculum. The current study is the first of its kind to…

  2. An Investigation of the Organizational Factors that Foster Academic Vitality, Commitment, and Innovation among Two Year College Occupational Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwandt, Linda

    The need to respond to changing student clientele, new educational technologies, and increasing demands to do more with fewer resources presents serious challenges for two-year college faculty and can negatively effect faculty vitality and commitment. Faculty vitality, however, has been shown to be significantly related to the vitality and…

  3. Review: groundwater management practices, challenges, and innovations in the High Plains aquifer, USA—lessons and recommended actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sophocleous, Marios

    2010-05-01

    The US High Plains aquifer, one of the largest freshwater aquifer systems in the world, continues to decline, threatening the long-term viability of the region’s irrigation-based economy. The eight High Plains States take different approaches to the development and management of the aquifer based on each state’s body of water laws that abide by different legal doctrines, on which Federal laws are superposed, thus creating difficulties in integrated regional water-management efforts. Although accumulating hydrologic stresses and competing demands on groundwater resources are making groundwater management increasingly complex, they are also leading to innovative management approaches, which are highlighted in this paper as good examples for emulation in managing groundwater resources. It is concluded that the fragmented and piecemeal institutional arrangements for managing the supplies and quality of water are inadequate to meet the water challenges of the future. A number of recommendations for enhancing the sustainability of the aquifer are presented, including the formation of an interstate groundwater commission for the High Plains aquifer along the lines of the Delaware and Susquehanna River Basins Commissions in the US. Finally, some lessons on groundwater management that other countries can learn from the US experience are outlined.

  4. The future of cardiovascular clinical research in North America and beyond-addressing challenges and leveraging opportunities through unique academic and grassroots collaborations.

    PubMed

    Roe, Matthew T; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Alexander, John H; Goodman, Shaun G; Hernandez, Adrian; Temple, Tracy; Berdan, Lisa; Califf, Robert M; Harrington, Robert A; Peterson, Eric D; Armstrong, Paul W

    2015-06-01

    Recent developments have highlighted the challenges facing cardiovascular clinical research in global contemporary practice, particularly in North America, including shifting priorities for drug development targets, increasing regulatory requirements, and expensive operational approaches for conducting randomized clinical trials. Nonetheless, emerging trends such as the consolidation of practices and hospitals into integrated health systems, the integration of electronic health records from thousands of practices into large data repositories to support prospective research studies, and streamlined operational approaches such as registry-based trials and risk-based monitoring have created numerous opportunities to disrupt the clinical research paradigm. Within this context, academic research organizations around the globe, particularly a strengthened collaboration of 3 established academic research organizations in North America, are uniquely positioned to promote and develop grassroots collaborations across all types of clinical practices, to delineate successful solutions to obstacles that limit clinical research initiatives, and to guide the future of cardiovascular research in the global research environment. PMID:26027610

  5. An Innovative Approach to Informing Research: Gathering Perspectives on Diabetes Care Challenges From an Online Patient Community

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Jay; Schmittdiel, Julie A; Paolino, Andrea R; Schneider, Jennifer L; Goodrich, Glenn K; Lawrence, Jean M; Newton, Katherine M; Nichols, Gregory A; O'Connor, Patrick J; Fitz-Randolph, Marcy; Steiner, John F

    2015-01-01

    interpersonal concerns (trying not to be a burden to others, getting support from family/friends). In our quantitative analysis, similar concerns were expressed across patient subgroups. Conclusions Lifestyle and interpersonal factors were particularly challenging for our online sample of adults with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Our study demonstrates the innovative use of social networking sites and online communities to gather rapid, meaningful, and relevant patient perspectives that can be used to inform the development of research agendas. PMID:26126421

  6. The Challenges of Collaboration for Academic and Community Partners in a Research Partnership: Points to Consider1

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Lainie Friedman; Loup, Allan; Nelson, Robert M.; Botkin, Jeffrey R.; Kost, Rhonda; Smith, George R.; Gehlert, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    the philosophical underpinning of Community-Engaged Research (CEnR) entails a collaborative partnership between academic researchers and the community. The Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) model is the partnership model most widely discussed in the CEnR literature and is the primary model we draw upon in this discussion of the collaboration between academic researchers and the community. In CPBR, the goal is for community partners to have equal authority and responsibility with the academic research team, and that the partners engage in respectful negotiation both before the research begins and throughout the research process to ensure that the concerns, interests, and needs of each party are addressed. The negotiation of a fair, successful, and enduring partnership requires transparency and understanding of the different assets, skills and expertise that each party brings to the project. Delineating the expectations of both parties and documenting the terms of agreement in a memorandum of understanding or similar document may be very useful. This document is structured to provide a “points- to-consider” roadmap for academic and community research partners to establish and maintain a research partnership at each stage of the research process. PMID:20235861

  7. Academic Entrepreneurship in France: The Promotion of Economic Returns of Public Research and Its Political and Scientific Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manifet, Christelle

    2008-01-01

    Emphasising the level of the observation of university configurations and the example of academic entrepreneurship, the author analyses the drivers of economic returns of public research in France. Based on the study of national public policy in this field since 1999 and a general survey of the paths of researchers-entrepreneurs, the article…

  8. Addressing challenges of training a new generation of clinician-innovators through an interdisciplinary medical technology design program: Bench-to-Bedside.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Patrick D; Elder, Craig T; D'Ambrosio, Troy; Langell, John T

    2015-01-01

    Graduate medical education has traditionally focused on training future physicians to be outstanding clinicians with basic and clinical science research skills. This focus has resulted in substantial knowledge gains, but a modest return on investment based on direct improvements in clinical care. In today's shifting healthcare landscape, a number of important challenges must be overcome to not only improve the delivery of healthcare, but to prepare future physicians to think outside the box, focus on and create healthcare innovations, and navigate the complex legal, business and regulatory hurdles of bringing innovation to the bedside. We created an interdisciplinary and experiential medical technology design competition to address these challenges and train medical students interested in moving new and innovative clinical solutions to the forefront of medicine. Medical students were partnered with business, law, design and engineering students to form interdisciplinary teams focused on developing solutions to unmet clinical needs. Over the course of six months teams were provided access to clinical and industry mentors, $500 prototyping funds, development facilities, and non-mandatory didactic lectures in ideation, design, intellectual property, FDA regulatory requirements, prototyping, market analysis, business plan development and capital acquisition. After four years of implementation, the program has supported 396 participants, seen the development of 91 novel medical devices, and launched the formation of 24 new companies. From our perspective, medical education programs that develop innovation training programs and shift incentives from purely traditional basic and clinical science research to also include high-risk innovation will see increased student engagement in improving healthcare delivery and an increase in the quality and quantity of innovative solutions to medical problems being brought to market. PMID:25984273

  9. Challenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allday, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The events that led to the spectacular destruction of the Space Shuttle "Challenger" in 1986 are detailed here. They show how NASA should have heeded engineers' worries over materials problems resulting from a launch in cold weather. Suggestions are made of how pupils could also learn from this tragedy. (Contains 4 figures and 2 footnotes.)

  10. Challenger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, Jonathan

    2002-09-01

    The events that led to the spectacular destruction of the Space Shuttle Challenger in 1986 are detailed here. They show how NASA should have heeded engineers' worries over materials problems resulting from a launch in cold weather. Suggestions are made of how pupils could also learn from this tragedy.

  11. Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Thomas R.

    1975-01-01

    Domestic and international challenges facing the National Society for the Prevention of Blindness are discussed; and U.S. and Russian programs in testing and correcting children's vision, developing eye safety programs in agriculture and industry, and disseminating information concerning the detection and treatment of cataracts are compared. (SB)

  12. An Innovative Solution to NASA's NEO Impact Threat Mitigation Grand Challenge and Flight Validation Mission Architecture Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong; Barbee, Brent; Pitz, Alan; Kaplinger, Brian; Hawkins, Matt; Winkler, Tim; Premaratne, Pavithra; Vardaxis, George; Lyzhoft, Joshua; Zimmerman, Ben

    2015-01-01

    To develop an innovative yet practically implementable mitigation technique for the most probable impact threat of an asteroid or comet with short warning time(i.e., when we don't have sufficient warning times for a deflection mission)

  13. Academic Radiology in the New Healthcare Delivery Environment

    PubMed Central

    Qayyum, Aliya; Yu, John-Paul J.; Kansagra, Akash P.; von Fischer, Nathaniel; Costa, Daniel; Heller, Matthew; Kantartzis, Stamatis; Plowman, R. Scooter; Itri, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing concerns over the rising cost of health care are driving large-scale changes in the way that health care is practiced and reimbursed in the United States. To effectively implement and thrive within this new health care delivery environment, academic medical institutions will need to modify financial and business models and adapt institutional cultures. In this paper, we review the expected features of the new health care environment from the perspective of academic radiology departments. Our review will include background on Accountable Care Organizations, identify challenges associated with the new managed care model, and outline key strategies—including expanding the use of existing information technology infrastructure, promoting continued medical innovation, balancing academic research with clinical care, and exploring new roles for radiologists in efficient patient management—that will ensure continued success for academic radiology. PMID:24200477

  14. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and Their Impact on Academic Library Services: Exploring the Issues and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    2012 was a year of rapid change for education with the advent of MOOCs--Massive Open Online Courses--available for the world to use to learn for free. But what does this mean for the role of the librarian? How has the landscape in education changed, and what are the issues and challenges that librarians now face? This article reviews the position…

  15. English Language and Literature in the Post-War Bosnia and Herzegovina: Challenges and Experiences of a Transcultural Academic Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bal, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an account of the author's firsthand experiences between 2006 and 2010, relating to his involvement in the establishment of the English Language and Literature department at the International University of Sarajevo in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and of the difficulties and challenges of the venture in the post-war country, whose…

  16. Building a sustainable Academic Health Department: the South Carolina model.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lillian Upton; Waddell, Lisa; Kyle, Joseph; Hand, Gregory A

    2014-01-01

    Given the limited resources available to public health, it is critical that university programs complement the development needs of agencies. Unfortunately, academic and practice public health entities have long been challenged in building sustainable collaborations that support practice-based research, teaching, and service. The academic health department concept offers a promising solution. In South Carolina, the partners started their academic health department program with a small grant that expanded into a dynamic infrastructure that supports innovative professional exchange and development programs. This article provides a background and describes the key elements of the South Carolina model: joint leadership, a multicomponent memorandum of agreement, and a shared professional development mission. The combination of these elements allows the partners to leverage resources and deftly respond to challenges and opportunities, ultimately fostering the sustainability of the collaboration. PMID:24667204

  17. The MOOC and Learning Analytics Innovation Cycle (MOLAC): A Reflective Summary of Ongoing Research and Its Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drachsler, H.; Kalz, M.

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the interplay between learning analytics and massive open online courses (MOOCs) and provides a conceptual framework to situate ongoing research in the MOOC and learning analytics innovation cycle (MOLAC framework). The MOLAC framework is organized on three levels: On the micro-level, the data collection and analytics…

  18. Assessment Innovation and Student Experience: A New Assessment Challenge and Call for a Multi-Perspective Approach to Assessment Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevitt, Sheena

    2015-01-01

    The impact of innovative assessment on student experience in higher education is a neglected research topic. This represents an important gap in the literature-given debate around the marketisation of higher education, international focus on student satisfaction measurement tools and political calls to put students at the heart of higher education…

  19. Mapping out the ICT Integration Terrain in the School Context: Identifying the Challenges in an Innovative Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judge, Miriam

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the research findings from the start-up phase of an innovative information and communication technology (ICT) project focused on ICT integration as a complex process involving many factors such as leadership, school readiness and organisational culture. Known locally as Hermes, the project's core objective was to…

  20. Challenging Students in Further Education: Themes Arising from a Study of Innovative FE Provision for Excluded and Disaffected Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attwood, Gaynor; Croll, Paul; Hamilton, Jane

    2004-01-01

    The paper draws on a research project on innovative provision in an FE college for excluded and disaffected young people. The college offers places on vocational courses to students who are still of compulsory school age who have been excluded by or have persistently failed to attend or achieve in school. One set of themes to emerge relates to the…

  1. Data Logging and Data Modelling: Using seismology and seismic data to create challenge in the academic classroom.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neighbour, Gordon

    2013-04-01

    In 2012 Computing and Information Technology was disapplied from the English National Curriculum and therefore no longer has a compulsory programme of study. Data logging and data modelling are still essential components of the curriculum in the Computing and Information Technology classroom. Once the students have mastered the basics of both spreadsheet and information handling software they need to be further challenged. All too often the data used with relation to data-logging and data-handling is not realistic enough to really challenge very able students. However, using data from seismology allows students to manipulate "real" data and enhances their experience of geo-science, developing their skills and then allowing them to build on this work in both the science and geography classroom. This new scheme of work "Seismology at School" has allowed the students to work and develop skills beyond those normally expected for their age group and has allowed them to better appreciate their learning experience of "Natural Hazards" in the science and geography classroom in later years. The students undertake research to help them develop their understanding of earthquakes. This includes using materials from other nations within the European Economic Area, to also develop and challenge their use of Modern Foreign Languages. They are then challenged to create their own seismometers using simple kits and 'free' software - this "problem-solving" approach to their work is designed to enhance team-work and to extend the challenge they experience in the classroom. The students are then are asked to manipulate a "real" set of data using international earthquake data from the most recent whole year. This allows the students to make use of many of the analytical and statistical functions of both spreadsheet software and information handling software in a meaningful way. The students will need to have developed a hypothesis which their work should have provided either validation

  2. Innovation in Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Riskin, Daniel J.; Longaker, Michael T.; Gertner, Michael; Krummel, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the field of surgical innovation from a historical perspective, applying new findings from research in technology innovation. Background: While surgical innovation has a rich tradition, as a field of study it is embryonic. Only a handful of academic centers of surgical innovation exist, all of which have arisen within the last 5 years. To this point, the field has not been well defined, nor have future options to promote surgical innovation been thoroughly explored. It is clear that surgical innovation is fundamental to surgical progress and has significant health policy implications. A process of systematically evaluating and promoting innovation in surgery may be critical in the evolving practice of medicine. Methods: A review of the academic literature in technology innovation was undertaken. Articles and books were identified through technical, medical, and business sources. Luminaries in surgical innovation were interviewed to develop further relevance to surgical history. The concepts in technology innovation were then applied to innovation in surgery, using the historical example of surgical endoscopy as a representative area, which encompasses millennia of learning and spans multiple specialties of care. Results: The history of surgery is comprised largely of individual, widely respected surgeon innovators. While respecting individual accomplishments, surgeons as a group have at times hindered critical innovation to the detriment of our profession and patients. As a clinical discipline, surgery relies on a tradition of research and attracting the brightest young minds. Innovation in surgery to date has been impressive, but inconsistently supported. Conclusion: A body of knowledge on technology innovation has been developed over the last decade but has largely not been applied to surgery. New surgical innovation centers are working to define the field and identify critical aspects of surgical innovation promotion. It is our

  3. Developing Academic Literacy and Voice: Challenges Faced by a Mature ESL Student and Her Instructors (Desarrollo del discurso académico y la voz: retos de una estudiante de inglés como segunda lengua y sus profesores)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Doris

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on critical, socio-cultural and sociolinguistic theories of writing, text and voice, this ethnographic study examines the challenges that a mature ESL student and her instructors in a university course on Spanish Language Media face as they co-construct a common understanding of academic literacy and voice in an undergraduate General…

  4. ESIP meeting session: Institutionalizing the merger of Earth and information sciences for critical US federal government and academic innovation and applications – status and next steps

    EPA Science Inventory

    Earth sciences organizations from around the world – including US government agencies, federally funded efforts and academic institutions – have achieved various levels of maturity in taking advantage of our digital age. Concepts of participatory web, software interop...

  5. Big innovations in a small instrument: technical challenges in a new CCD system design for the Automated Patrol Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miziarski, Stan; Ashley, Michael C. B.; Smith, Greg; Barden, Sam; Dawson, John; Horton, Anthony; Saunders, Will; Brzeski, Jurek; Churilov, Vladimir; Klauser, Urs; Waller, Lew; Mayfield, Don; Correll, David; Phillips, Andre; Whittard, Denis

    2008-07-01

    We describe the design of a new CCD system delivered to the Automated Patrol Telescope at Siding Springs NSW Australia operated by UNSW. A very fast beam (f/1) with a mosaic of two MITLL CCID-34 detectors placed only 1 mm behind the field flattener which also serves as the dewar window, have called for innovative engineering solutions. This paper describes the design and procedure of the field-flattener mounting, differential screw adjustable detector mount and dewar suspension on the external ring providing tip/tilt and focus adjustment.

  6. Academic Buoyancy: Towards an Understanding of Students' Everyday Academic Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.; Marsh, Herbert W.

    2008-01-01

    Academic buoyancy is developed as a construct reflecting everyday academic resilience within a positive psychology context and is defined as students' ability to successfully deal with academic setbacks and challenges that are typical of the ordinary course of school life (e.g., poor grades, competing deadlines, exam pressure, difficult…

  7. Tackling U.S. energy challenges and opportunities: preliminary policy recommendations for enhancing energy innovation in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Anadon, Laura Diaz; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Bunn, Matthew; Jones, Charles

    2009-02-18

    The report offers preliminary recommendations for near-term actions to strengthen the U.S. effort to develop and deploy advanced energy technologies. The report comes as the Obama Administration and the 111th U.S. Congress face enormous challenges and opportunities in tackling the pressing security, economic, and environmental problems posed by the energy sector. Improving the technologies of energy supply and end-use is a prerequisite for surmounting these challenges in a timely and cost-effective way, and this report elaborates on how policy can support develop of these important energy technologies.

  8. Understanding the Challenges of Integrating Scientists and Clinical Teachers in Psychiatry Education: Findings from an Innovative Faculty Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martimianakis, Maria Athina; Hodges, Brian D.; Wasylenki, Donald

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Medical schools and departments of psychiatry around the world face challenges in integrating science with clinical teaching. This project was designed to identify attitudes toward the integration of science in clinical teaching and address barriers to collaboration between scientists and clinical teachers. Methods: The authors explored…

  9. Adolph Coors - Outward Bound Manpower Challenge Program. A Study of an Innovative Program to Train the Hardcore Unemployed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon Associates, San Francisco, CA.

    Initiated in 1968 for "hardcore unemployables," the Adolph Coors Manpower Challenge Program combines a modified Outward Bound Course with a period of work in the Coors Recycling Yard, followed by permanent placement in the Coors Brewery. Based on changing participants' attitudes, the program eases transition to full employment in four phases…

  10. Shape and Surface: The challenges and advantages of 3D techniques in innovative fashion, knitwear and product design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendt, E.

    2016-07-01

    The presentation wants to show what kind of problems fashion and textile designers are facing in 3D-knitwear design, especially regarding fashionable flat-knit styles, and how they can use different kinds of techniques and processes to generate new types of 3D-designs and structures. To create really new things we have to overcome standard development methods and traditional thinking and should start to open our minds again for the material itself to generate new advanced textile solutions. This paper mainly introduces different results of research projects worked out in the master program “Textile Produkte” during lectures in “Innovative Product Design” and “Experimental Knitting”.

  11. Academic Buoyancy and Academic Resilience: Exploring "Everyday" and "Classic" Resilience in the Face of Academic Adversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Academic buoyancy has been defined as a capacity to overcome setbacks, challenges, and difficulties that are part of everyday academic life. Academic resilience has been defined as a capacity to overcome acute and/or chronic adversity that is seen as a major threat to a student's educational development. This study is the first to examine the…

  12. Unique Academic Skillsets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerome, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    For the past eighty-two years, Monroe College has been committed to being a national leader in urban and international education. Established in the fall of 2004, the honors program has been transformative for the college, bringing together a wide range of professionals from across disciplines to provide innovative academic offerings. The program…

  13. Educational Challenges for Children with Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chute, Patricia M.; Nevins, Mary Ellen

    2003-01-01

    This article addresses educational challenges for children with severe to profound hearing loss who receive cochlear implants. Despite the implants, these children face acoustic challenges, academic challenges, attention challenges, associative challenges, and adjustment challenges. (Contains references.) (Author/DB)

  14. The decline of venture capital investment in early-stage life sciences poses a challenge to continued innovation.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Jonathan J

    2015-02-01

    A key element required for translating new knowledge into effective therapies is early-stage venture capital that finances the work needed to identify a lead molecule or medical device prototype and to develop it to the proof-of-concept stage. This early investment is distinguished by great uncertainty over whether the molecule or prototype is safe and effective, the stability of the regulatory standards to which clinical trials are designed, and the likelihood that large follow-on investments for commercial development can be secured. Regulatory and reimbursement policies have a profound impact on the amount of capital and the types of life science projects that investors pursue. In this article I analyze several recent trends in early-stage venture capital funding, describe how these trends are influenced by regulatory and reimbursement policies, and discuss the role of policy makers in bringing new treatments to market. Policy makers can foster renewed private investment into critically needed early-stage products by increasing Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding and public support for clinical trials in targeted areas of interest; creating regulatory pathways to enable early testing of experimental compounds in limited populations; and offering economic incentives for investors and developers in designated therapeutic areas. PMID:25646107

  15. Transformation of health care through innovative use of information technology: challenges for health and medical informatics education.

    PubMed

    Haux, R; Swinkels, W; Ball, M; Knaup, P; Lun, K C

    1998-06-01

    Information storage and processing continues to become increasingly important for health care, and offers enormous potential to be realised in the delivery of health care. Therefore, it is imperative that all health care professionals should learn skills and gain knowledge in the field of health informatics, or medical informatics, respectively. Working Group 1, Health and Medical Informatics Education, of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA WG1) seeks to advance the knowledge of how these skills are taught in courses for the various health care professions around the world, and includes physicians, nurses, administrators, and specialists in medical informatics. IMIA WG1 held its 6th International Conference on Health and Medical Education in Newcastle, Australia, in August 1997. The theme of the conference was 'Transformation of Healthcare through Innovative Use of Information Technology'. This special issue of the International Journal of Medical Informatics on Health and Medical Informatics Education contains selected papers presented at the conference. In addition to the central topic, Educating Health Care Professionals in Medical Informatics the topics telematics, distance education and computer based training were also discussed at the conference. PMID:9726487

  16. Financing Academic Departments of Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liptzin, Benjamin; Meyer, Roger E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the many financial challenges facing academic departments of psychiatry and the resulting opportunities that may arise. Method: The authors review the history of financial challenges, the current economic situation, and what may lie ahead for academic departments of psychiatry. Results: The current environment has…

  17. The Ocean 180 Video Challenge: An Innovative Broader Impacts Strategy for Helping Scientists Share Discoveries and Connect with Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tankersley, R. A.; Watson, M.; Windsor, J. G.; Buckley, M.; Diederick, L.

    2014-12-01

    Scientists conduct exciting, ground-breaking research that addresses many of world's greatest challenges. Yet, far too often, the importance, meaning, and relevance of their discoveries are never shared with persons outside their discipline. Recognizing the need for scientists to communicate more effectively with the public, the Florida Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE Florida) saw an opportunity to connect the two through film. In the fall 2013, COSEE Florida launched the Ocean 180 Video Challenge to tap into the competitive spirit of scientists and inspire them to share their latest discoveries with the public. The competition encouraged scientists to submit short, 3-minute video abstracts summarizing the important findings of recent peer-reviewed papers and highlighting the relevance, meaning, and implications of the research to persons outside their discipline. Videos were initially screened and evaluated by a team of science and communication experts and the winners (from a field of ten finalists) were selected by more than 30,000 middle school students from 285 schools in 13 countries. Our presentation will review the outcomes and lessons learned from the 2014 competition and describe how contest videos are being used for professional development/training and educational purposes. We will also describe how video competitions can benefit both scientists and the target audience and be effective outreach strategies for encouraging scientists to share new discoveries and their enthusiasm for science with K-12 students and the public.

  18. Using a Virtual Learning Environment to Develop Academic Writing with First Year Dance Students: Facing the Challenge of Writing through Digital Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Ben; Thoms, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses research into the facilitation of academic writing for first year dance students using images, emails and the forum of a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). Taking place over several weeks in the early part of the academic year and within a core module entitled Personal and Professional Development in the single honours Dance…

  19. Academic Colorectal Surgery Job Search

    PubMed Central

    Kalady, Matthew F.

    2014-01-01

    The field of academic colorectal surgery encompasses a vast array of possibilities. Clinical care accompanied by research, teaching, innovation, and/or administration provides the foundation for what is considered an academic career. For those choosing academic colorectal surgery, the process of finding and selecting a first job can provoke much angst. This article describes some strategies to approach the academic colorectal job search and provides insight into deciding a career focus, exploring relevant positions, weighing specific factors, and negotiating your first offer. PMID:25067918

  20. Academic colorectal surgery job search.

    PubMed

    Kalady, Matthew F

    2014-06-01

    The field of academic colorectal surgery encompasses a vast array of possibilities. Clinical care accompanied by research, teaching, innovation, and/or administration provides the foundation for what is considered an academic career. For those choosing academic colorectal surgery, the process of finding and selecting a first job can provoke much angst. This article describes some strategies to approach the academic colorectal job search and provides insight into deciding a career focus, exploring relevant positions, weighing specific factors, and negotiating your first offer. PMID:25067918

  1. Data Lakes and Data Visualization: An Innovative Approach to Address the Challenges of Access to Health Care in Mississippi

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Denise D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are a variety of challenges to developing strategies to improve access to health care, but access to data is critical for effective evidence-based decision-making. Many agencies and organizations throughout Mississippi have been collecting quality health data for many years. However, those data have historically resided in data silos and have not been readily shared. A strategy was developed to build and coordinate infrastructure, capacity, tools, and resources to facilitate health workforce and population health planning throughout the state. Objective: Realizing data as the foundation upon which to build, the primary objective was to develop the capacity to collect, store, maintain, visualize, and analyze data from a variety of disparate sources -- with the ultimate goal of improving access to health care. Specific aims were to: 1) build a centralized data repository and scalable informatics platform, 2) develop a data management solution for this platform and then, 3) derive value from this platform by facilitating data visualization and analysis. Methods: A managed data lake was designed and constructed for health data from disparate sources throughout the state of Mississippi. A data management application was developed to log and track all data sources, maps and geographies, and data marts. With this informatics platform as a foundation, a variety of tools are used to visualize and analyze data. To illustrate, a web mapping application was developed to examine the health workforce geographically and attractive data visualizations and dynamic dashboards were created to facilitate health planning and research. Results: Samples of data visualizations that aim to inform health planners and policymakers are presented. Many agencies and organizations throughout the state benefit from this platform. Conclusion: The overarching goal is that by providing timely, reliable information to stakeholders, Mississippians in general will experience improved

  2. Reengineering Academic Medical Centers: Reengineering Academic Values?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korn, David

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of academic medical centers (AMCs) looks at: change due to heavy federal funding in recent decades; adverse consequences, including deemphasis on education in favor of research and clinical service delivery, and discrepancies between AMC internal and external labor markets; and challenges to medical education in research, education, and…

  3. Engineering Encounters: The Tightrope Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Bill

    2014-01-01

    In order to prepare students to become the next innovators, teachers need to provide real-world challenges that allow children to exercise their innovation muscles. Innovation starts with a problem and innovators work to solve a problem by planning, creating, and testing. The real-world innovation process does not happen on a worksheet, and it…

  4. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  5. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 2

    NASA Video Gallery

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  6. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 5

    NASA Video Gallery

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  7. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 3

    NASA Video Gallery

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  8. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 1

    NASA Video Gallery

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  9. HELIOS Technology Challenge, Part 4

    NASA Video Gallery

    The HELIOS Technology Challenge seeks to combine open source innovation, collaboration and partnership with makerspace and input from the general public to help NASA solve major technology challeng...

  10. Which One Triggers the Other? Technological or Social Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulut, Cagri; Eren, Hakan; Halac, Duygu Seckin

    2013-01-01

    The term "innovation" has sometimes been used as a synonym for technological innovation until the concept of "social innovation" attracted academic attention. Since then, these two types of innovation have been investigated individually. It can be claimed that, despite the great importance of social innovation studies,…

  11. Evolving from academic to academic entrepreneur: overcoming barriers to scientific progress and finance.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    The overall goal of my career as an academic chemist has always been the design and creation of advanced therapeutics and diagnostics that address unmet medical need in the management of chronic diseases. Realising this goal has been an immensely difficult process involving multidisciplinary problem-driven research at the chemistry-biology-medicine interfaces. With success in the laboratory, I started seriously to question the value of remaining an academic whose career is spent in the pursuit of knowledge and understanding alone without making any significant effort to translate knowledge and understanding gained into products of genuine utility for public benefit. Therefore, I elected by choice to become an academic entrepreneur, seeking opportunities wherever possible for the translation of the best of my personal and collaborative academic research work into potentially valuable and useful products. This choice has brought with it many unexpected difficulties and challenges. Nevertheless, progress bas been made and sufficient learnt to suggest that this would be an appropriate moment to take stock and provide some personal reflections on what it takes to design and create advanced therapeutics and diagnostics in the laboratory then seek to develop, innovate and translate the best towards market. PMID:27476702

  12. TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS AND SOCIETY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MORSE, DEAN; WARNER, AARON W.

    THE PAPERS AND DISCUSSIONS IN THIS BOOK REPRESENT THE DELIBERATIONS OF THE 1964-65 COLUMBIA SEMINAR OF TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIAL CHANGE IN WHICH, DURING REGULAR MONTHLY MEETINGS THROUGHOUT THE ACADEMIC YEAR, A DIVERSE GROUP OF PHYSICAL SCIENTISTS, SOCIAL SCIENTISTS, BUSINESS LEADERS, AND PUBLIC OFFICIALS ATTEMPED TO RELATE TECHNOLOGY TO INNOVATION AND…

  13. Federal Barriers to Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Raegen; Lake, Robin

    2012-01-01

    With educational outcomes inadequate, resources tight, and students' academic needs growing more complex, America's education system is certainly ready for technological innovation. And technology itself is ripe to be exploited. Devices harnessing cheap computing power have become smart and connected. Voice recognition, artificial intelligence,…

  14. Translational research and the evolving landscape for biomedical innovation.

    PubMed

    Kaitin, Kenneth I

    2012-10-01

    This article addresses current challenges facing pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical developers, including the expiration of patents on many high-revenue-generating products, increasing competition in the marketplace, low public support, high regulatory hurdles, and the increasing time, cost, and risk of new product development. To meet these challenges, drug developers are looking to new models of innovation to improve efficiency, lower risk, and increase output. These new models include codevelopment agreements with small companies, multicompany consortia, and strategic partnerships with academic research centers. In the United States and the European Union, the government is supporting these efforts by creating incentives for academic centers to foster translational research and become more "commercially minded". The goal for all stakeholders is to reduce the barriers to product development and bring new medicines to market in a timely and cost-efficient manner. PMID:22918200

  15. Academic buoyancy: Towards an understanding of students' everyday academic resilience.

    PubMed

    Martin, Andrew J; Marsh, Herbert W

    2008-02-01

    Academic buoyancy is developed as a construct reflecting everyday academic resilience within a positive psychology context and is defined as students' ability to successfully deal with academic setbacks and challenges that are typical of the ordinary course of school life (e.g., poor grades, competing deadlines, exam pressure, difficult schoolwork). Data were collected from 598 students in Years 8 and 10 at five Australian high schools. Half-way through the school year and then again at the end of the year, students were asked to rate their academic buoyancy as well as a set of hypothesized predictors (self-efficacy, control, academic engagement, anxiety, teacher-student relationship) in the area of mathematics. Multilevel modeling found that the bulk of variance in academic buoyancy was explained at the student level. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling showed that (a) Time 1 anxiety (negatively), self-efficacy, and academic engagement significantly predict Time 1 academic buoyancy; (b) Time 2 anxiety (negatively), self-efficacy, academic engagement, and teacher-student relationships explain variance in Time 2 academic buoyancy over and above that explained by academic buoyancy at Time 1; and (c) of the significant predictors, anxiety explains the bulk of variance in academic buoyancy. PMID:19083351

  16. 2012 Innovators Awards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Meg; Raths, David; Namahoe, Kanoe

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors present the 2012 Campus Technology Innovators. These IT leaders have deployed extraordinary technology solutions to meet campus challenges. The authors also recognize the vendors and products involved in making these innovative projects a success. The 10 winners are: (1) University of Arizona (Student Systems and…

  17. Knowledge, Innovation and Internationalisation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Technology Policy Council of Finland, Helsinki.

    Finland is challenged to make the most of globalization by reinforcing its positive aspects. The 1990s taught that success in creating innovations is a key factor for success of business and societies. A precondition, high-level technological and business know-how, requires systematic input into producing social innovations that prevent societal…

  18. Academic-industry Collaborations in Translational Stroke Research.

    PubMed

    Boltze, Johannes; Wagner, Daniel-Christoph; Barthel, Henryk; Gounis, Matthew J

    2016-08-01

    Academic-industry collaborations are an emerging format of translational stroke research. Next to classic contract research models, a multitude of collaboration models has been developed, some of which even allowing for multinational or intercontinental research programs. This development has recently been paralleled by first successful attempts to overcome the translational stroke research road block, such as the unprecedented success of novel endovascular approaches or the advent of the multicenter preclinical trial concept. While the first underlines the role of the industry as a major innovation driver in stroke research, the latter will require enrollment of industrial partners for optimal output. Moreover, academic-industry partnerships are invaluable to bridge the translational "valley of death" as well as funding gaps in times of dwindling public funding and declining high risk capital investments. However, these collaborations are also subject to relevant challenges because interests, values, and aims often significantly differ between cademia and industry. Here, we describe common academic-industry collaboration models as well as associated benefits and challenges in the stroke research arena. We also suggest strategies for improved planning, implementation, guidance, and utilization of academic-industry collaborations to the maximum mutual benefit. PMID:27301976

  19. Making Sense of Academic Life: Academics, Universities and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Peter G.

    Universities and academics today are facing challenges that require more active and self-interested management. The book argues that higher education in the future will not become any more ordered, but will actually become more complex, more fractured and less bounded, and that academics will have to respond with new ways of thinking. The book…

  20. An Academic Library Director's Bestiary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Richard

    2012-01-01

    The article examines some of the non-routine challenges that an academic library director can expect to deal with during his or her career. Each challenge is discussed in a paragraph or two, beginning by characterizing the challenge as an animal that serves as a metaphor for unusual but nonetheless important conditions that can, sooner or later,…

  1. The Effect of Instructional Use of an iPad[R] on Challenging Behavior and Academic Engagement for Two Students with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely, Leslie; Rispoli, Mandy; Camargo, Siglia; Davis, Heather; Boles, Margot

    2013-01-01

    iPads[R] are increasingly used in the education of children with autism spectrum disorder. However, few empirical studies have examined the effects of iPads[R] on student behaviors. The purpose of this study was to compare academic instruction delivered with an iPad[R] to instruction delivered through traditional materials for two students with…

  2. Customer or Refined Student? Reflections on the "Customer" Metaphor in the Academic Environment and the New Pedagogical Challenge to the Libraries and Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tovote, Christina

    This paper discusses customer services in academic libraries. The first section addresses the concept of the "customer." Thereafter, the paper applies the metaphor of the producer and its consumers to the relationship between a university and its students. The second section looks at education as a process of refinement. Next, the establishment of…

  3. Iranian English for Academic Purposes (EAP) Stakeholders' Attitudes toward Using the Internet in EAP Courses for Civil Engineering Students: Promises and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atai, Mahmood Reza; Dashtestani, Reza

    2013-01-01

    English for academic purposes (EAP) has established itself as a considerable part of English as a foreign language (EFL) instruction in Iranian universities. Considering the Internet as a major educational source in EAP reading courses, it is highly important that the stakeholders have positive attitudes toward it and be aware of promises and…

  4. Transforming Academic Practice through Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela

    2010-01-01

    In the context of the fast changing university, how are academics to grow the capacity to cope with continual change and what can academic/faculty developers do to assist them? The paper first establishes the context of higher education as a challenging environment. It then reviews ideas about scholarship and explores the application of these…

  5. Transforming Administration in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honea, Sion M.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the traditional hierarchical administrative structure in academic libraries. Also analyzes some of its features, and questions specific principles of management in order to propose a more balanced organizational type based on organizational behavior and leadership that will best enable academic libraries to meet challenges. (PEN)

  6. Quill Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lori

    2006-01-01

    Teaching high school students the "grammar" of art--the principles and elements of art and design--while also teaching them about creativity and concept can be difficult. This author has found that combining beginning lessons in line, shape, value, texture, form, and color with projects requiring innovation and inspiration, though challenging, is…

  7. How Academic Is Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    University provision for academic development is well established in the USA, UK and many other countries. However, arrangements for its provision and staffing vary. In Australia, there has been a trend towards professional rather than academic staff appointments. Is this appropriate? In this paper, the domains of academic development work are…

  8. Academic Rigor: Reaching Consensus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Patti

    2009-01-01

    Putting semantics aside, today's reality is that schools are expected to be places of rigorous learning and there should be no question that every student needs to be academically challenged. The problem is that most schools have not taken the time to define what is meant by "rigor" and to clarify how it will be recognized when it is in…

  9. Strategies for building a multidisciplinary academic program in women's health.

    PubMed

    Brown, A J

    1999-09-01

    During the decade of the 1990s, women's health has received unprecedented attention from government, industry, marketers of healthcare, and academic medical centers. An assessment of research, education, and healthcare delivery has exposed gaps in our knowledge about gender-related issues. Recognition of gender as a rich frontier for innovation and discovery has resulted in widespread and varied responses and a commensurate increase in activity in the field. However, this diversity of effort has created the new challenge of effectively communicating strategies of response to the multiple disciplines invested in women's health. This article describes a strategy used at Duke University Medical Center to build awareness of women's health through a highly visible and successful Women's Health Seminar Series. The series serves as a focal point for broader efforts to build a comprehensive, multidisciplinary, academic program in women's health with initiatives in clinical care, research, faculty development, provider education, and community outreach. PMID:10534301

  10. Exposing New Academics through Action Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Karen; Fernie, Scott

    2010-01-01

    While collaborative action research is an empowering approach to developing academic practice, it also presents a number of challenges regarding the purpose, nature and consequences of academic development. This research note raises questions and issues concerning how action research exposes new academics to the conflicts and tensions of the…

  11. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  12. Emeritus Colleges: Enriching Academic Communities by Extending Academic Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Roger G.; Zeig, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The emeritus college, a recent higher education innovation, provides retired professors with a means to stay intellectually engaged and continue to contribute professionally in retirement. The emeritus college can also help institutions maintain a steady flow of professional talent by making retirement more attractive for senior academics. This…

  13. Creating environments that foster academic integrity.

    PubMed

    Tippitt, Michelle Pixley; Ard, Nell; Kline, Juanita Reese; Tilghman, Joan; Chamberlain, Barbara; Meagher, P Gail

    2009-01-01

    A number of studies related to academic dishonesty within the nursing student population have been published; however, little has been written in the nursing literature regarding academic integrity and means of promoting this value. In addition to the many short-term solutions to prevent cheating and dissuade academic misconduct that are offered, solutions that promote long-term affective changes underlying the acquisition of academic integrity are needed. This article provides a context for discussions related to academic integrity, explores issues facing faculty when dealing with this challenge, and offers short-term and long-term strategies for creating environments that foster academic integrity. PMID:19753858

  14. Multidimensional Scaling of High School Students' Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmelkin, Liora Pedhazur; Gilbert, Kimberly A.; Silva, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    Although cheating on tests and other forms of academic dishonesty are considered rampant, no standard definition of academic dishonesty exists. The current study was conducted to investigate the perceptions of academic dishonesty in high school students, utilizing an innovative methodology, multidimensional scaling (MDS). Two methods were used to…

  15. Innovating the practice of medical speciality training.

    PubMed

    Fokkema, Joanne P I

    2016-02-01

    Educational innovations are being introduced into medical speciality training. But how do people who participate in medical speciality training (residents, consultants, programme directors) deal with these innovations? And what effects do educational innovations have according to these people?By addressing these questions, this thesis contributes to the knowledge about the challenging process of innovating medical speciality training. PMID:26754312

  16. Special Concluding Essay: Writing for Academic Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saraswathi, V.

    2008-01-01

    Writing for academic publishing is a unique professional challenge. It is enriching and fulfilling; at the same humbling as well as frustrating. In this article I propose to examine the challenge and offer guidelines necessary in the Indian context, where the "publish or perish" syndrome has just arrived. Academics like to publish, but often lack…

  17. Academic Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago City Colleges, IL.

    This statement outlines the academic policies of the City Colleges of Chicago. Part I outlines the Institution's academic standards, covering: (1) student class attendance; (2) the grading system; (3) mid-term grades; (4) the use of non-grade designations; i.e., administrative initiated withdrawal, auditor, no-show withdrawal, incomplete, and…

  18. Academic Bullies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    Many professors have been traumatized by academic bullies. Unlike bullies at school, the academic bully plays a more subtle game. Bullies may spread rumors to undermine a colleague's credibility or shut their target out of social conversations. The more aggressive of the species cuss out co-workers, even threatening to get physical. There is…

  19. Academic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The academy is defined by a fundamentally uncertain pursuit of certainty. The question of whether academic work is a sufficient form of engagement on its own is inseparable from the contradiction inherent to this pursuit. Like any properly academic question, it lends itself to a forum: a response is nearly obligatory for any professor in the…

  20. Academic Duty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Donald

    This book by a former university president examines the state of the research university faculty, focusing on teaching and how success at teaching can be evaluated; ethical problems in reviewing the work of others, research and how it is supported; outside commitments; and research misconduct. Chapters include: "Academic Freedom, Academic Duty,"…

  1. Academic Librarians in the Breach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aby, Steve

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the short- and long-term challenges of academic librarians in an increasingly hostile environment, and the ways in which these challenges reflect the broader struggles of faculty and professionals. What they are experiencing across the country--in the context of corporatization, the elimination of collective bargaining, and…

  2. Moving beyond the Academic Doors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beals, Fiona M.

    2012-01-01

    Using contemporary research methodologies with young people can, and does, pose many ethical challenges for researchers keen to fully incorporate principles of participation and voice into their research endeavours. Adding to the challenge, when the project is grounded outside of an academic context in a not-for-profit community setting, ethical…

  3. Multilingual Faculty across Academic Disciplines: Language Difference in Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavazos, Alyssa G.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the dominance of the English language in scholarship, multilingual academics often encounter challenges in achieving academic biliteracy and identifying successful language negotiation practices in academia. Through personal interviews with self-identified multilingual academics across academic disciplines, this paper explores how they…

  4. Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De George, Richard T.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that Martin Michaelson's proposal in "Should Untenured as Well as Tenured Faculty Be Guaranteed Academic Freedom? A Few Observations," despite its good intentions, is seriously flawed and if adopted in preference to existing standards will weaken rather than strengthen academic freedom. (EV)

  5. Innovation Strategies for a New System of Workforce Development and Lifelong Learning: The Challenge of Today and the Vision for Tomorrow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (NJ1), 2008

    2008-01-01

    There is widespread agreement among policymakers, researchers and economists that in order for regions, states and the nation to compete in the new global economy, workers need to be educated, highly skilled, and ready to learn and adapt to the changing world. Such a workforce will enable greater innovation, higher quality, and the ability to…

  6. How Can VET Systems Meet the Challenges of Innovation and New Skill Requirements? An Exploration of State and Territory Initiatives in Australia. Working Paper No. 59

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrier, Fran

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on a Centre for the Economics of Education and Training (CEET) project that explored policies, programs and other initiatives by Australia's states and territories to support innovation, and to build vocational education and training (VET) capability to respond to its effects on skill needs. The project was undertaken in late…

  7. Digital Savings: A Study of Academic Libraries Finds that Going from Print to Electronic Journals Can Save Money, if It's Done Right, but Challenges Remain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonfeld, Roger C.; Fenton, Eileen Gifford

    2005-01-01

    Without question, the ongoing transition from print to electronic periodicals has challenged librarians to rethink their strategies. While some effects of this change have been immediately apparent--greater breadth of material, easier access, exposure to new sources, publisher package deals, and open access--the broader outcomes on library…

  8. The Perceived Value of Maths and Academic Self-Efficacy in the Appraisal of Fear Appeals Used Prior to a High-Stakes Test as Threatening or Challenging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putwain, David William; Symes, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has examined how messages communicated to students prior to high-stakes exams, that emphasise the importance of avoiding failure for subsequent life trajectory, may be appraised as threatening. In two studies, we extended this work to examine how students may also appraise such messages as challenging or disregard them as being of…

  9. Innovation: Making the Impossible an Option

    NASA Video Gallery

    On June 2, 2016, NASA’s Office of the Chief Technologist hosted the Showcase of Innovation Challenges in Washington to present and discuss ideas for innovation across the agency, the government, in...

  10. Development and Evaluation of the Revised Academic Hardiness Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benishek, Lois A.; Feldman, Jill M.; Shipon, R. Wolf; Mecham, Stacy D.; Lopez, Frederick G.

    2005-01-01

    Researchers have a long-standing interest in better understanding why some students avoid challenging academic course work at the risk of harming their academic standing, whereas others are willing to pursue these types of challenges. The Academic Hardiness Scale (AHS) was developed to better understand characteristics that may differentiate these…

  11. NREL Spectrum of Innovation

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    There are many voices calling for a future of abundant clean energy. The choices are difficult and the challenges daunting. How will we get there? The National Renewable Energy Laboratory integrates the entire spectrum of innovation including fundamental science, market relevant research, systems integration, testing and validation, commercialization and deployment. The innovation process at NREL is interdependent and iterative. Many scientific breakthroughs begin in our own laboratories, but new ideas and technologies come to NREL at any point along the innovation spectrum to be validated and refined for commercial use.

  12. [Hypersensitivity to innovations].

    PubMed

    Boutellier, R; Andereggen, S

    2009-04-15

    Innovation is an important source of our prosperity. Miniaturization that is behind the combination of modules into new products together with today's high technology acceptance lead us to a wave of innovations, of such dimension humanity has never seen in its whole history. However, new technologies are accompanied by risks that often emerge rather late. In compliance to this, man reacts sensitively to the insertion of new technologies. Restrictions and bans are the consequences. Today, we face the challenge of assisting innovation by assessing and limiting their risks at the same time. PMID:19373762

  13. Challenges facing academic research in commercializing event-detector implantable devices for an in-vivo biomedical subcutaneous device for biomedical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juanola-Feliu, E.; Colomer-Farrarons, J.; Miribel-Català, P.; Samitier, J.; Valls-Pasola, J.

    2011-05-01

    It is widely recognized that the welfare of the most advanced economies is at risk, and that the only way to tackle this situation is by controlling the knowledge economies and dealing with. To achieve this ambitious goal, we need to improve the performance of each dimension in the "knowledge triangle": education, research and innovation. Indeed, recent findings point to the importance of strategies of adding-value and marketing during R+D processes so as to bridge the gap between the laboratory and the market and so ensure the successful commercialization of new technology-based products. Moreover, in a global economy in which conventional manufacturing is dominated by developing economies, the future of industry in the most advanced economies must rely on its ability to innovate in those high-tech activities that can offer a differential added-value, rather than on improving existing technologies and products. It seems quite clear, therefore, that the combination of health (medicine) and nanotechnology in a new biomedical device is very capable of meeting these requisites. This work propose a generic CMOS Front-End Self-Powered In-Vivo Implantable Biomedical Device, based on a threeelectrode amperometric biosensor approach, capable of detecting threshold values for targeted concentrations of pathogens, ions, oxygen concentration, etc. Given the speed with which diabetes can spread, as diabetes is the fastest growing disease in the world, the nano-enabled implantable device for in-vivo biomedical analysis needs to be introduced into the global diabetes care devices market. In the case of glucose monitoring, the detection of a threshold decrease in the glucose level it is mandatory to avoid critic situations like the hypoglycemia. Although the case study reported in this paper is complex because it involves multiple organizations and sources of data, it contributes to extend experience to the best practices and models on nanotechnology applications and

  14. The Role of Trust in Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dovey, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of trust in the collaborative learning processes that underpin innovation as a competitive strategy in organizations. Design/methodology/approach: As a conceptual paper, the argument is framed by academic perspectives, drawn from the academic literature on the topic and by professional and…

  15. Academic Village.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Renner Middle School (Plano, Texas) where the sprawling suburbs have been kept at bay while creating the atmosphere of an academic village. Photos and a floor plan are provided. (GR)

  16. Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Building data is given for the following academic libraries: (1) Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois; (2) Abilene Christian College, Abilene, Texas; (3) University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. (MF)

  17. Academic Freedom as a Human Right: An Internationalist Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajagopal, Balakrishnan

    2003-01-01

    Asserting that the university as a transnational community of professors and students poses challenges to traditional conceptions of academic freedom, explores the rethinking of academic freedom as part of a human right to education. (EV)

  18. Academic Leadership and the Restructuring of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The key challenge to academic leadership is to restructure the allocation of academic assets, particularly the organization of the faculty, in ways that better serve emerging societal and scholarly needs.

  19. Viewpoint: A challenge to academic health centers and the National Institutes of Health to prevent unintended gender bias in the selection of clinical and translational science award leaders.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Molly; Bland, Carole

    2007-02-01

    In controlled studies, both men and women preferentially select men over women for leadership positions, even when credentials are identical and despite field studies demonstrating women's equivalent or slightly better leadership effectiveness. The assumption that men will make better leaders than women is attributed to the pervasive existence of unconscious stereotypes that characterize both men and leaders as agentic or action oriented and women as dependent. The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Roadmap is a novel, prestigious award that will place considerable power in the hands of one principal investigator-conditions that predict activation of bias in favor of selecting male leaders. The authors review research supporting this assertion. To mitigate the impact of this bias and broaden the pool of potential leaders for this transformative initiative, the authors offer the following suggestions. To academic health centers they suggest (1) internal search committees comprised of at least 35% women that establish a priori the desired qualities for the CTSA leader and broadly solicit applicants, (2) explicit specification of the full range of desirable skills of a CTSA leader, and (3) systematic efforts to increase awareness of the negative impact of unconscious gender bias on women's advancement. To the NIH they suggest (1) the new multiple principal investigator rule for the CTSA program, (2) a statement in the request for applications (RFA) encouraging diversity among principal investigators, (3) repetition in the RFA of the public NIH statement of the importance of work life balance for young investigators, and (4) constitution of study sections with at least 35% women. PMID:17264704

  20. Innovation Abstracts, Volume XX, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roueche, Suanne D., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    The 52 abstracts in these 29 serial issues describe innovative approaches to teaching and learning in the community college. Sample topics include reading motivation, barriers to academic success, the learning environment, writing skills, leadership in the criminal justice profession, role-playing strategies, cooperative education, distance…

  1. Solving Aviation Challenges

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video highlights the challenges NASA aeronautics researchers are tackling to reduce aircraft noise, emissions, fuel consumption, and the innovative ways they're helping to debut NextGen, a rev...

  2. Crowd Sourcing for Challenging Technical Problems and Business Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Crowd sourcing may be defined as the act of outsourcing tasks that are traditionally performed by an employee or contractor to an undefined, generally large group of people or community (a crowd) in the form of an open call. The open call may be issued by an organization wishing to find a solution to a particular problem or complete a task, or by an open innovation service provider on behalf of that organization. In 2008, the Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD), with the support of Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering, established and implemented pilot projects in open innovation (crowd sourcing) to determine if these new internet-based platforms could indeed find solutions to difficult technical challenges. These unsolved technical problems were converted to problem statements, also called "Challenges" or "Technical Needs" by the various open innovation service providers, and were then posted externally to seek solutions. In addition, an open call was issued internally to NASA employees Agency wide (10 Field Centers and NASA HQ) using an open innovation service provider crowd sourcing platform to post NASA challenges from each Center for the others to propose solutions). From 2008 to 2010, the SLSD issued 34 challenges, 14 externally and 20 internally. The 14 external problems or challenges were posted through three different vendors: InnoCentive, Yet2.com and TopCoder. The 20 internal challenges were conducted using the InnoCentive crowd sourcing platform designed for internal use by an organization. This platform was customized for NASA use and promoted as NASA@Work. The results were significant. Of the seven InnoCentive external challenges, two full and five partial awards were made in complex technical areas such as predicting solar flares and long-duration food packaging. Similarly, the TopCoder challenge yielded an optimization algorithm for designing a lunar medical kit. The Yet2.com challenges yielded many new industry and academic contacts in bone

  3. Skills for Innovation and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Innovation holds the key to ongoing improvements in living standards, as well as to solving pressing social challenges. Skilled people play a crucial role in innovation through the new knowledge they generate, how they adopt and develop existing ideas, and through their ability to learn new competencies and adapt to a changing environment. This…

  4. Regional Resource Center for Innovation

    SciTech Connect

    Theis, K.

    2000-04-26

    The Regional Resource Centers for Innovation (RRCIs) promote networking among the various regional, state, and local specialists who provide services to inventors and small business innovators. This networking facilitates the rapid deployment of I&I technologies that provide solutions for the energy challenges facing the U.S.

  5. A Strategy for Innovative Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, G. W.

    Within the context of a discussion of the challenges facing Canadian higher education, this paper reviews some of the innovative approaches to student retention, curriculum development, and modularization in use at Mohawk College in Ontario. After stressing the need for innovation in advanced technological education in Canada, the paper offers an…

  6. The innovation value chain.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Morten T; Birkinshaw, Julian

    2007-06-01

    The challenges of coming up with fresh ideas and realizing profits from them are different for every company. One firm may excel at finding good ideas but may have weak systems for bringing them to market. Another organization may have a terrific process for funding and rolling out new products and services but a shortage of concepts to develop. In this article, Hansen and Birkinshaw caution executives against using the latest and greatest innovation approaches and tools without understanding the unique deficiencies in their companies' innovation systems. They offer a framework for evaluating innovation performance: the innovation value chain. It comprises the three main phases of innovation (idea generation, conversion, and diffusion) as well as the critical activities performed during those phases (looking for ideas inside your unit; looking for them in other units; looking for them externally; selecting ideas; funding them; and promoting and spreading ideas companywide). Using this framework, managers get an end-to-end view of their innovation efforts. They can pinpoint their weakest links and tailor innovation best practices appropriately to strengthen those links. Companies typically succumb to one of three broad "weakest-link" scenarios. They are idea poor, conversion poor, or diffusion poor. The article looks at the ways smart companies - including Intuit, P&G, Sara Lee, Shell, and Siemens- modify the best innovation practices and apply them to address those organizations' individual needs and flaws. The authors warn that adopting the chain-based view of innovation requires new measures of what can be delivered by each link in the chain. The approach also entails new roles for employees "external scouts" and "internal evangelists," for example. Indeed, in their search for new hires, companies should seek out those candidates who can help address particular weaknesses in the innovation value chain. PMID:17580654

  7. Patients as partners in innovation.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Sean J; Katz, Aviva

    2015-06-01

    As the culture of medical practice has evolved, so has the relationship between the physician and patient. This is decidedly true with regards to the introduction of innovative therapies, especially in the surgical arena. A critical challenge is identifying and defining innovative therapy. Is the proposed treatment an incremental change, a research proposal, or more commonly someplace in between? This gray area creates a transition zone commonly referred to as innovative therapy. Given the complexities of the current landscape of innovation, innovation therapy committees may provide a mechanism to help to guide both physicians and patients through such difficult topics as the process of informed consent, managing conflicts of interest, and how to evaluate the outcomes of innovative therapies. As surgical innovation remains critical to the advancement of care, it must occur in a transparent partnership with patients, under the eye of guiding entities, aimed at ultimately improving outcomes and care. PMID:25976152

  8. Towards a bioethics of innovation.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Wendy; Axler, Renata

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, it has become almost axiomatic that biomedical research and clinical practice should be 'innovative'-that is, that they should be always evolving and directed towards the production, translation and implementation of new technologies and practices. While this drive towards innovation in biomedicine might be beneficial, it also raises serious moral, legal, economic and sociopolitical questions that require further scrutiny. In this article, we argue that biomedical innovation needs to be accompanied by a dedicated 'bioethics of innovation' that attends systematically to the goals, process and outcomes of biomedical innovation as objects of critical inquiry. Using the example of personalised or precision medicine, we then suggest a preliminary framework for a bioethics of innovation, based on the research policy initiative of 'Responsible Innovation'. We invite and encourage critiques of this framework and hope that this will provoke a challenging and enriching new bioethical discourse. PMID:27015740

  9. A Call to Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colleary, Shawn

    2004-01-01

    This article features the Challenge School, a magnet school in the CherryCreek School District in Colorado that focuses on academically advanced, motivated, and gifted students. The school was developed as an alternative to best meet the needs of these students. The Challenge School focuses on high student achievement and commensurate academic…

  10. A Culture Model as Mediator and Repository Source for Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadisadr, Mohammad; Siadat, Seyed Ali; Azizollah, Arbabisarjou; Ebrahim, Ebrahimitabas

    2012-01-01

    As innovation has become one of the most important competitive advantages, academic practitioner's interest in the matter has increased. But, still the question "why lots of organizations fail in their path of article to be innovative" is remained unanswered. In this, among many factors influencing innovation capacity of an organization;…

  11. Innovative Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barsi, Louis M.; Kaebnick, Gweneth W.

    1989-01-01

    The phenomenon of innovation within the university is examined, noting the possibility of innovation as a key to college vitality. A study was conducted using a group of institutions that demonstrated recent innovative spirit. Members of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), each has been recognized in an annual…

  12. Surgical Residency Training at a University-Based Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Rebecca L; Morris, Jon B; Kelz, Rachel R

    2016-02-01

    The past two decades have been witness to some of the most dynamic changes that have occurred in surgical education in all of its history. Political policies, social revolution, and the competing priorities of a new generation of surgical trainees are defining the needs of modern training paradigms. Although the university-based academic program's tripartite mission of clinical service, research, and education has remained steadfast, the mechanisms for achieving success in this mission necessitate adaptation and innovation. The resource-rich learning environment and the unique challenges that face university-based programs contribute to its ability to generate the future leaders of the surgical workforce. PMID:26612020

  13. Turning Regenerative Medicine Breakthrough Ideas and Innovations into Commercial Products.

    PubMed

    Bayon, Yves; Vertès, Alain A; Ronfard, Vincent; Culme-Seymour, Emily; Mason, Chris; Stroemer, Paul; Najimi, Mustapha; Sokal, Etienne; Wilson, Clayton; Barone, Joe; Aras, Rahul; Chiesi, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The TERMIS-Europe (EU) Industry committee intended to address the two main critical issues in the clinical/commercial translation of Advanced Therapeutic Medicine Products (ATMP): (1) entrepreneurial exploitation of breakthrough ideas and innovations, and (2) regulatory market approval. Since January 2012, more than 12,000 publications related to regenerative medicine and tissue engineering have been accepted for publications, reflecting the intense academic research activity in this field. The TERMIS-EU 2014 Industry Symposium provided a reflection on the management of innovation and technological breakthroughs in biotechnology first proposed to contextualize the key development milestones and constraints of allocation of financial resources, in the development life-cycle of radical innovation projects. This was illustrated with the biofuels story, sharing similarities with regenerative medicine. The transition was then ensured by an overview of the key identified challenges facing the commercialization of cell therapy products as ATMP examples. Real cases and testimonies were then provided by a palette of medical technologies and regenerative medicine companies from their commercial development of cell and gene therapy products. Although the commercial development of ATMP is still at the proof-of-concept stage due to technology risks, changing policies, changing markets, and management changes, the sector is highly dynamic with a number of explored therapeutic approaches, developed by using a large diversity of business models, both proposed by the experience, pitfalls, and successes of regenerative medicine pioneers, and adapted to the constraint resource allocation and environment in radical innovation projects. PMID:26179129

  14. Challenges of Implementing a Top-Down Curriculum Innovation in English Language Teaching: Perspectives of Form Iii English Language Teachers in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okoth, Teresa A.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the challenges Form III English language teachers face when implementing the revised integrated English language curriculum. A mixed-method descriptive design was used in Eldoret East SubCounty in Kenya. Data was collected through questionnaires, interviews and reflective conversations. Cluster, purposive and random…

  15. Top 10 Ways To Improve Public Schools. Innovative Solutions To Help Address the Issues and Challenges Facing Most Public School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Comptroller of Public Accounts, Austin.

    This report offers the top 10 challenges identified by public schools and the ways that the Texas School Performance Review (TSPR) suggests that these issues be addressed. The TSPR ensures that scarce education resources are spent in the classroom. For a TSPR review, the TSPR team is invited in for months of detailed study, during which it asks…

  16. Qualification Challenges in the Partner Countries and Member States. Proceedings of the Workshop on Curriculum Innovation (1st, Turin, Italy, September 26-27, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Training Foundation, Turin (Italy).

    These proceedings present 10 presentations and 3 working group reports from a workshop on the challenges of the new learning culture and their consequences for the partner countries of the European Union (EU). "Introduction and Summary of the Workshop" (Bernhard Buck) begins with a brief overview of distinctions between the vocational education…

  17. Teaching matters-academic professional development in the early 21st century.

    PubMed

    Fahnert, Beatrix

    2015-10-01

    Academic work at different career stages has changed and a broadened portfolio of expertise enables academics to adapt, maintain and advance their career. Development related to research activity is naturally driven by methodology and technology. Institutions and peers largely support development in the contexts of dissemination, measuring impact and obtaining funding. A European Commission High Level Group recommended pedagogic training for everyone teaching in Higher Education by 2020 with mandatory continuing professional development and with academic staff recruitment and promotion being linked to teaching performance. Early career teaching experience is already an expectation, and advantage is gained by developing recognized teaching expertise. More senior academics gain an advantage through recognition of higher levels of expertise, also covering elements of leadership and innovation in teaching. This review aims to raise awareness particularly of teaching-related skills within the dimensions of academic professional development in Higher Education, outlining some general directions for development and recognition in context of current challenges to support planning and identifying training needs and opportunities at different career stages. PMID:26347300

  18. Academic Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, William R.

    The internal politics of colleges and the influence of a current emphasis on efficiency on the traditional independence of the academician are analyzed. It is suggested that the academician does not work in the same differentiated, and therefore interdependent, way as someone in industry or a bureaucracy. Academic activity is segmented, which…

  19. Academic Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Brian G.

    The strength of academic freedom has always depended upon historical circumstances. In the United States, higher education began with institutions founded and controlled by religious sects. The notion of who gets educated and to what ends expanded as American democracy expanded. By the 1980's, legitimate calls for equality became a general…

  20. Academic Prophecies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Robert M.; Polishook, Irwin H.

    1985-01-01

    Academic prophecies are characterized by their innocence, detachment from the realities of politics and economics, and deference to a limited cohort of administrative representatives. Careless forecasting of the untested future contributes to public misunderstanding of higher education's role in society. (MLW)

  1. Academic Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Burton R.

    With fragmentation the dominant trend in academic settings around the world, the larger wholes of profession, enterprise, and system are less held together by integrative ideology. Strong ideological bonding is characteristic of the parts, primarily the disciplines. The larger aggregations are made whole mainly by formal superstructure, many…

  2. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally negative practice.…

  3. Academic Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durant, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As colleges and universities become even more complex organizations, advancement professionals need to have the skills, experience, and academic credentials to succeed in this ever-changing environment. Advancement leaders need competencies that extend beyond fundraising, alumni relations, and communications and marketing. The author encourages…

  4. X-Hab Challenge: Students in the Critical Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott; Drew, B. A.; Bailey, L.; Gill, T.; Liolios, S.; Walsh, E.; Dory, J.; Howe, A. S.; Smitherman, D.; Bookout, P.; Howard, Robert; Tri, T.; Toups, Larry

    2012-01-01

    The eXploration Habitat (X-Hab) Academic Innovation Challenge follows a non-typical format for university student competitions. Rather than provide a realistic simulated mission for the students to perform, the X-Hab Challenge puts the student teams in the critical path of NASA's human space flight Exploration systems research and development, and expects them to deliver a product that will likely become heritage for eventual flight systems in the years to come. The added responsibility has two major benefits: the university teams are given real ownership in the NASA vision; students are given Principal Investigator (PI) status for their contribution and are looked upon as peers in the development process. This paper introduces the X-Hab Challenge and discusses the successes behind the program.

  5. 77 FR 72337 - Apps for Vehicles Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Apps for Vehicles Challenge AGENCY: Office of Energy... Vehicles: improving safety and fuel efficiency through technology innovation''. DATES: See, 1. Key Challenge Dates & Deadlines in SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION. ADDRESSES: The Apps for Vehicles Challenge...

  6. What Does Innovation Mean for Moral Educators?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiman, Alan J.; Dotger, Benjamin H.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the links between prosocial moral education, educational innovations and concerns of school system personnel during an innovation's implementation process. The role of social innovations in promoting prosocial moral education is discussed with attention given to the challenges and processes associated with implementing such…

  7. Academic Reform: The More We Change, the Worse We Get

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearl, Arthur

    1970-01-01

    University-developed technologies contribute pollutants; academic credentialism legitimizes racism; scholastic involution produces a mandarin class; the university's "innovations reinforce the existing system. The university is aimless, and because it is, its attempted reforms amount to trivia. (Author)

  8. Academic Trajectories of Newcomer Immigrant Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez-Orozco, Carola; Gaytan, Francisco X.; Bang, Hee Jin; Pakes, Juliana; O'Connor, Erin; Rhodes, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Immigration to the United States presents both challenges and opportunities that affect students' academic achievement. Using a 5-year longitudinal, mixed-methods approach, we identified varying academic trajectories of newcomer immigrant students from Central America, China, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Mexico. Latent class growth curve…

  9. The Hidden Labour Market of the Academic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rouhelo, Anne

    Finding employment as an academic is becoming increasingly challenging for several reasons, including the tightening employment market and increases in the qualifications demanded of jobseekers and the pool of academically trained job seekers. A two-round Delphi study was therefore conducted to identify recruitment channels in the hidden labor…

  10. Academic Camps: Why Spend Summer in Class?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigby, Kristin

    2005-01-01

    Gifted students tend to be drawn to summer gifted programs because of their high level of motivation and their drive to experience an academic challenge (Olszewski-Kubilius & Lee, 2004). Concurrently, academic summer programs yield numerous social-emotional, educational, and family benefits for gifted young people. One of the most beneficial…

  11. Enthusiasm and the Effective Modern Academic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenberg, Brett; Samarkovski, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Academics today face an array of challenges to their enthusiasm, including teaching students from diverse backgrounds with wavering levels of engagement with their studies. Furthermore, reform to the tertiary education sector has seen the corporatisation of universities with management increasingly measuring academic outcomes in respect of both…

  12. Interactive Decision Support for Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamed, Abdallah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to support academic advising, which plays a crucial role in student success and retention. The paper focuses on one of the most challenging tasks involved in academic advising: individual course scheduling. This task includes not only careful planning for different courses over several semesters according to students'…

  13. TH-A-17A-01: Innovation in PET Instrumentation and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, M; Miyaoka, R; Shao, Y

    2014-06-15

    Innovation in PET instrumentation has led to the new millennium revolutionary imaging applications for diagnosis, therapeutic guidance, and development of new molecular imaging probes, etc. However, after several decades innovations, will the advances of PET technology and applications continue with the same trend and pace? What will be the next big thing beyond the PET/CT, PET/MRI, and Time-of-flight PET? How will the PET instrumentation and imaging performance be further improved by novel detector research and advanced imaging system development? Or will the development of new algorithms and methodologies extend the limit of current instrumentation and leapfrog the imaging quality and quantification for practical applications? The objective of this session is to present an overview of current status and advances in the PET instrumentation and applications with speakers from leading academic institutes and a major medical imaging company. Presenting with both academic research projects and commercial technology developments, this session will provide a glimpse of some latest advances and challenges in the field, such as using semiconductor photon-sensor based PET detectors to improve performance and enable new applications, as well as the technology trend that may lead to the next breakthrough in PET imaging for clinical and preclinical applications. Both imaging and image-guided therapy subjects will be discussed. Learning Objectives: Describe the latest innovations in PET instrumentation and applications Understand the driven force behind the PET instrumentation innovation and development Learn the trend of PET technology development for applications.

  14. Challenges Faced by Chinese Academics in the Academic Heartland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Manhong

    2010-01-01

    In an attempt to raise China's international competitiveness, the Chinese government has instituted a series of sweeping reforms in recent years, all with the aim of rapidly expanding the number of higher education places within tertiary institutions. However, this rapid rate of expansion has led to a new set of problems, most notably a scarcity…

  15. It's Academic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Colleges, universities, and independent schools use branding to attract students, keep alumni close, and unite faculty behind the institution. That last bit is key because one can't box and ship global perspectives, personal attention, flexible programs, campus traditions, innovative research, and the limitless other qualities that make…

  16. Cluster Colleges: Viable Step into the Future. Redesigning the Halls of Ivy: Innovations in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ring, Lloyd J.

    1972-01-01

    Describes attempts at the University of California at Santa Cruz to integrate traditional and innovative educational practices through cluster colleges.'' Details the university's organizational structure and selected academic innovations, and forecasts future growth and development. (JH)

  17. The Multimedia Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penuel, William R.; Means, Barbara; Simkins, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Teachers implementing a local history project in Belmont, California, had help from a federally funded technology innovation challenge grant: the Challenge 2000 Multimedia Project. Sponsored by a Silicon Valley school-business partnership, the initiative illustrates how technology can transform classroom learning while supporting instructional…

  18. Promoting Diversity in Academic Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Oscar C.

    2003-01-01

    The challenge every college, university, and state higher education coordinating board has is changing demographics. In most states, minorities are becoming majorities, and the importance of gaining an understanding of other cultures becomes much more evident. To promote diversity in academic leadership, educators must recognize that the college…

  19. Academic Freedom: A Lawyer's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Academic freedom is central to ideas of higher education, yet in the United Kingdom it is facing challenges from changing managerial approaches within some universities and changing governmental expectations. Universities are increasingly expected to focus upon knowledge which can be shown to have value and to exploit the results of academic…

  20. Innovation @ NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roman, Juan A.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the activities National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is doing to encourage innovation across the agency. All information provided is available publicly.

  1. Achieving Excellence: Investing in People, Knowledge and Opportunity. Canada's Innovation Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    To become one of the world's most innovative countries, Canada requires a national innovation strategy for the 21st century. It is progressing toward a more innovative economy, but lags behind many developed countries in terms of overall innovation performance. A national innovation strategy to meet Canada's innovation challenge proposes goals,…

  2. Challenges in teaching modern manufacturing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngaile, Gracious; Wang, Jyhwen; Gau, Jenn-Terng

    2015-07-01

    Teaching of manufacturing courses for undergraduate engineering students has become a challenge due to industrial globalisation coupled with influx of new innovations, technologies, customer-driven products. This paper discusses development of a modern manufacturing course taught concurrently in three institutions where students collaborate in executing various projects. Lectures are developed to contain materials featuring advanced manufacturing technologies, R&D trends in manufacturing. Pre- and post-surveys were conducted by an external evaluator to assess the impact of the course on increase in student's knowledge of manufacturing; increase students' preparedness and confidence in effective communication and; increase students' interest in pursuing additional academic studies and/or a career path in manufacturing and high technology. The surveyed data indicate that the students perceived significant gains in manufacturing knowledge and preparedness in effective communication. The study also shows that implementation of a collaborative course within multiple institutions requires a robust and collective communication platform.

  3. Contracting out Public Schools and Academic Performance: Evidence from Colombia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonilla-Angel, Juan D.

    2011-01-01

    Contracting out public schools to private institutions is an instrument for reforming public education as it may facilitate academic innovation and improve student academic performance through higher school accountability and autonomy. The degree of autonomy that different providers have may vary substantially depending on the contractual and…

  4. New Organisational Structures and the Transformation of Academic Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyhagen, Gigliola Mathisen; Baschung, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    This article will particularly focus on Norway and the consequences for academic work. Frequently in studies of academic work, focus has been on academics' individual autonomy and to what extent the latter is challenged (Altbach in "Ann Am Acad Pol Soc Sci" 448:1-14, 1980; Shattock in "High Educ" 41:27-47, 2001). One of…

  5. Restructuring Revisited: Changing Academic Structures in UK Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, John

    2012-01-01

    In a rapidly changing external environment, for many universities, restructuring of the academic organisation is the most important leadership challenge. In this article, the author provides an analysis of academic restructuring in UK universities. Using the "Commonwealth Universities Yearbook", he looked at the changes in academic structures…

  6. Academic Lexis and Disciplinary Practice: Corpus Evidence for Specificity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, Ken; Tse, Polly

    2009-01-01

    The presence of unfamiliar words and expressions in academic texts is a serious obstacle to students reading in a second language. EAP has responded to this challenge by taking the view that there is a common core of academic vocabulary which is frequent across an academic register. This paper briefly considers this view by examining the range,…

  7. Building Student Awareness of Societal Decision-Making Challenges about Energy through the Study of Earth System Data and Innovations in Energy-Related Materials Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalles, D. R.; Acker, J. G.; Berding, M.

    2014-12-01

    Energy literacy requires knowledge about the trade-offs inherent in energy alternatives, about how humans use energy and have choices in how much energy to use, and about what changes to the Earth system are occurring from energy uses. It also requires collaborative decision-making skills coupled with awareness about what values we bring to the table as we negotiate solutions that serve both personal needs and the common good. Coming up with a notion of the common good requires delineating how environmental crises occurring in other parts of the world compare to our own. We also need to understand criteria for judging what might be viable solutions. This presentation describes work that SRI International is carrying out to meet these awareness-building needs. SRI educational researchers created a curriculum that immerses students in studying regional climate change data about California in comparison to global climate change. Students ponder solution energy-related strategies and impact analyses. The curriculum will be described, as will a collaboration between SRI educational researchers and materials scientists. The scientists are designing and testing technologies for producing biofuels and solar power, and for sequestering carbon from coal fired power plants. As they apply principles of science and engineering to test materials intended to meet these energy challenges, they understand that even if the tests prove successful, if there is not economic feasibility or environmental advantage, the technology may not stand as a viable solution. This educator-scientist team is using the Essential Energy Principles and Next Generation Science Standards to articulate milestones along a trajectory of energy learning. The trajectory starts with simple understandings of what energy is and what constitute our energy challenges. It ends with more the types of more sophisticated understandings needed for designing and testing energy technology solutions.

  8. Fostering innovation without compromising integrity.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Philip A

    2007-03-01

    Industry's interaction with academia has created vast opportunity for innovation but also the potential for undue financial influence. Potential conflicts of interest can occur at the level of the individual researcher or the institution. Implementing guidelines and policies on conflicts of interest can help maintain appropriate separation between academic medicine and industry while permitting medical innovation to proceed. In an effort to retain public trust, Stanford University School of Medicine has enacted policies to identify and manage potential conflicts among its faculty, to divest of holdings in companies conducting studies involving Stanford investigators, and to ban all industry marketing and gifts from Stanford facilities. PMID:17469467

  9. The Life Cycle of Academic Management Fads.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbaum, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that management fads in higher education go through a predictable five-stage process, including creation, narrative evolution, time lag, narrative devolution, and resolution of dissonance. Finds that in the process of "virtual" adoption academic institutions may endorse management innovations for their symbolic benefits but isolate them…

  10. The New Academic Library and Student Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Jim

    2007-01-01

    The academic library in the 21st Century must find innovative ways to remain central to the mission of the institution that it represents, and the people that it serves. Some of those ways involve what traditionally has been the province of student services. After hours events with music and art, poetry slams, and electronic gaming are a few of…

  11. Academic health center hospitals: alternative responses to financial stress.

    PubMed

    Jones, K R; Sloate, S G

    1987-01-01

    Academic health center hospitals face challenges to their survival in an increasingly competitive, challenging, and entrepreneurial environment. University hospitals face a number of major stresses and are responding in various ways to ensure their financial viability. PMID:3305420

  12. MOOCs: The Challenges for Academic Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Cameron

    2013-01-01

    Over the next few years, librarians at many Australian universities will participate in the creation of local Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs). This article aims to prepare librarians for this task. It begins by summarising the development of the MOOC concept and then moves on to review the growing literature on MOOCs and librarians. It…

  13. Academic Challenges: University and High School Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Long Beach. Office of the Chancellor.

    Five partnership programs between California State University (CSU) campuses and high schools are described. The programs seek to improve high school students' preparation for college, with emphasis on articulation between the content of high school courses and the level of student performance expected in introductory university courses in the…

  14. Innovative Work Behaviour in Vocational Colleges: Understanding How and Why Innovations Are Developed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmann, Gerhard; Mulder, Regina H.

    2011-01-01

    In workplaces, innovative products and processes are required to address emerging problems and challenges. Therefore, understanding of employees' innovative work behaviour, including the generation, promotion, and realisation of ideas as components of this behaviour is important. In particular, what fosters innovation development and what triggers…

  15. Blended Learning: Beyond Initial Uses to Helping to Solve Real-World Academic Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Mark A.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Blended learning strategies can be employed in innovative ways to solve real-world academic problems across all academic disciplines. This article can provide administrators and faculty with specific examples to guide them when making decisions about academic planning or institutional strategies for any discipline at all levels of higher…

  16. Transforming Academic Advising through the Use of Information Technology. Monograph Series, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Gary L., Ed; Childs, M. Wayne, Ed.

    This monograph presents 9 papers and 11 reports of innovative applications concerned with the design and integration of technical support systems in the academic advising workplace. The papers are into three parts: technology, student academic advising and planning; using technology to deliver academic support services, and the future roles of…

  17. Engaging a Wider Community: The Academic Library as a Center for Creativity, Discovery, and Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Academic libraries have reported long-term declines in circulation, reference transactions, reserves, and in-house library materials usage. Increasingly, libraries are perceived as being less critical to the academic enterprise. Are these trends irreversible? Perhaps public libraries and some innovative academic libraries can provide us with some…

  18. Radical Innovation in a Conventional Framework. Problems and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romey, Bill

    1977-01-01

    A radical innovation in an academic department is described that involves student-centered, problem-focused organization, with project work replacing courses and students using self-evaluation. Implications are discussed. (Author/LBH)

  19. Deans' Balancing Acts: Education Leaders and the Challenges They Face.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gmelch, Walter H., Ed.

    This collection of papers addresses the personal challenges academics face in successfully responding to "the call" to academic leadership, focusing on who academic deans are, unique challenges to women deans, stress impacting deans' ability to lead, keys to successful entry into the deanship, organizational strategies for leading successfully,…

  20. Canadian cardiac surgeons' perspectives on biomedical innovation.

    PubMed

    Snyman, Gretchen; Tucker, Joseph E L; Cimini, Massimo; Narine, Kishan; Fedak, Paul W M

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to successful innovation can be identified and potentially addressed by exploring the perspectives of key stakeholders in the innovation process. Cardiac surgeons in Canada were surveyed for personal perspectives on biomedical innovation. Quantitative data was obtained by questionnaire and qualitative data via interviews with selected survey participants. Surgeons were asked to self-identify into 1 of 3 categories: "innovator," "early adopter," or "late adopter," and data were compared between groups. Most surgeons viewed innovation favourably and this effect was consistent irrespective of perceived level of innovativeness. Key barriers to the innovation pathway were identified: (1) support from colleagues and institutions; (2) Canada's health system; (3) sufficient investment capital; and (4) the culture of innovation within the local environment. Knowledge of the innovation process was perceived differently based on self-reported innovativeness. The majority of surgeons did not perceive themselves as having the necessary knowledge and skills to effectively translate innovative ideas to clinical practice. In general, responses indicate support for implementation of leadership and training programs focusing on the innovation process in an effort to prepare surgeons and enhance their ability to successfully innovate and translate new therapies. The perspectives of cardiac surgeons provide an intriguing portal into the challenges and opportunities for healthcare innovation in Canada. PMID:22902159

  1. Innovative Partnerships

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szemraj, John

    2001-01-01

    A major responsibility of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is to ensure geospatial data availability. This includes the cooperative production of digital geospatial data through the National Mapping Program's Innovative Partnerships (IP) initiative, which began in October 1992.

  2. One vision of academic nursing centers.

    PubMed

    Esperat, M Christina; Green, Alexia; Acton, Cindy

    2004-01-01

    Reconciling vision, mission, and financial realities into a successful socially responsive endeavor is a challenge for academic nursing centers. A financially viable faculty practice enterprise is a response to this challenge. Entrepreneurial management and strategy assist in establishing financial sustainability. PMID:15651588

  3. Showcase of Innovation: Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate

    NASA Video Gallery

    On June 2, 2016, NASA’s Office of the Chief Technologist hosted the Showcase of Innovation Challenges in Washington to present and discuss ideas for innovation across the agency, the government, in...

  4. Innovating team-based outpatient mental health care in the Veterans Health Administration: Staff-perceived benefits and challenges to pilot implementation of the Behavioral Health Interdisciplinary Program (BHIP).

    PubMed

    Barry, Catherine N; Abraham, Kristen M; Weaver, Kendra R; Bowersox, Nicholas W

    2016-05-01

    In the past decade, the demand for Veterans Health Administration (VHA) mental health care has increased rapidly. In response to the increased demand, the VHA developed the Behavioral Health Interdisciplinary Program (BHIP) team model as an innovative approach to transform VHA general outpatient mental health delivery. The present formative evaluation gathered information about pilot implementation of BHIP to understand the struggles and successes that staff experienced during facility transitions to the BHIP model. Using a purposive, nonrandom sampling approach, we conducted 1-on-1, semistructured interviews with 37 licensed and nonlicensed clinical providers and 13 clerical support staff assigned to BHIP teams in 21 facilities across the VHA. Interviews revealed that having actively involved facility mental health leaders, obtaining adequate staffing for teams to meet the requirements of the BHIP model, creating clear descriptions and expectations for team member roles within the BHIP framework, and allocating designated time for BHIP team meetings challenged many VHA sites but are crucial for successful BHIP implementation. Despite the challenges, staff reported that the transition to BHIP improved team work and improved patient care. Staff specifically highlighted the potential for the BHIP model to improve staff working relationships and enhance communication, collaboration, morale, and veteran treatment consistency. Future evaluations of the BHIP implementation process and BHIP team functioning focusing on patient outcomes, organizational outcomes, and staff functioning are recommended for fully understanding effects of transitioning to the BHIP model within VHA general mental health clinics and to identify best practices and areas for improvement. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27148949

  5. Forward with Imagination: Innovative Library Client Services for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Alan

    This paper considers innovation in academic libraries. The first part explores the definition and nature of innovation and the literature relevant to academic libraries in particular. In the second part, the outcomes of a search of library World Wide Web sites and a survey of International Association of Technological University Libraries (IATUL)…

  6. Understanding the Real Barriers to Technology-Enhanced Innovation in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneckenberg, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Background: Academic staff have a key role to play in the innovation efforts of universities aiming to exploit the potential of web-based learning technologies. Although learning technologies are an important building block of educational innovation, the eLearning adoption rate of European academic staff appears disappointing. The majority of…

  7. Fostering Innovation, Advancing Patient Safety: The Kidney Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Archdeacon, Patrick; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Falk, Ronald J.; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir

    2013-01-01

    Summary To respond to the serious and underrecognized epidemic of kidney disease in the United States, the US Food and Drug Administration and the American Society of Nephrology have founded the Kidney Health Initiative—a public–private partnership designed to create a collaborative environment in which the US Food and Drug Administration and the greater kidney community can interact to optimize the evaluation of drugs, devices, biologics, and food products. The Kidney Health Initiative will bring together all the necessary stakeholders, including patients, regulators, industry, health care providers, academics, and other governmental agencies, to improve patient safety and foster innovation. This initiative is intended to enable the kidney community as a whole to provide the right drug, device, or biologic for administration to the right patient at the right time by fostering partnerships that will facilitate development and delivery of those products and addressing challenges that currently impede these goals. PMID:23744001

  8. Fostering innovation, advancing patient safety: the kidney health initiative.

    PubMed

    Archdeacon, Patrick; Shaffer, Rachel N; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; Falk, Ronald J; Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir

    2013-09-01

    To respond to the serious and underrecognized epidemic of kidney disease in the United States, the US Food and Drug Administration and the American Society of Nephrology have founded the Kidney Health Initiative-a public-private partnership designed to create a collaborative environment in which the US Food and Drug Administration and the greater kidney community can interact to optimize the evaluation of drugs, devices, biologics, and food products. The Kidney Health Initiative will bring together all the necessary stakeholders, including patients, regulators, industry, health care providers, academics, and other governmental agencies, to improve patient safety and foster innovation. This initiative is intended to enable the kidney community as a whole to provide the right drug, device, or biologic for administration to the right patient at the right time by fostering partnerships that will facilitate development and delivery of those products and addressing challenges that currently impede these goals. PMID:23744001

  9. Longitudinal Modelling of Academic Buoyancy and Motivation: Do the 5Cs Hold Up over Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.; Colmar, Susan H.; Davey, Louise A.; Marsh, Herbert W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Academic buoyancy is students' ability to successfully deal with setbacks and challenges that are typical of academic life. The present study extends previous preliminary cross-sectional work that tentatively identified five motivational predictors of academic buoyancy--referred to as the "5Cs" of academic buoyancy: confidence…

  10. Theory to Practice: Cultivating Academic Language Proficiency in Developmental Reading Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Heather N.

    2015-01-01

    Academic language plays a key role in reading comprehension, disciplinary thinking, and overall academic success. However, many approaches to teaching academic language, such as a focus on academic vocabulary, overlook other language features that can pose challenges for students. Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL), arguably one of the three…

  11. Senior academic physicians and retirement considerations.

    PubMed

    Moss, Arthur J; Greenberg, Henry; Dwyer, Edward M; Klein, Helmut; Ryan, Daniel; Francis, Charles; Marcus, Frank; Eberly, Shirley; Benhorin, Jesaia; Bodenheimer, Monty; Brown, Mary; Case, Robert; Gillespie, John; Goldstein, Robert; Haigney, Mark; Krone, Ronald; Lichstein, Edgar; Locati, Emanuela; Oakes, David; Thomsen, Poul Erik Bloch; Zareba, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of academic senior physicians are approaching their potential retirement in good health with accumulated clinical and research experience that can be a valuable asset to an academic institution. Considering the need to let the next generation ascend to leadership roles, when and how should a medical career be brought to a close? We explore the roles for academic medical faculty as they move into their senior years and approach various retirement options. The individual and institutional considerations require a frank dialogue among the interested parties to optimize the benefits while minimizing the risks for both. In the United States there is no fixed age for retirement as there is in Europe, but European physicians are initiating changes. What is certain is that careful planning, innovative thinking, and the incorporation of new patterns of medical practice are all part of this complex transition and timing of senior academic physicians into retirement. PMID:23621971

  12. Academic Productivity as Perceived by Malaysian Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassan, Aminuddin; Tymms, Peter; Ismail, Habsah

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to explore the perspectives of Malaysian academics in relation to academic productivity and some factors affecting it. A large scale online questionnaire was used to gather information from six public universities. The most productive role in the eyes of the academics was found to be teaching, with research and…

  13. Improving accountability through alignment: the role of academic health science centres and networks in England

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As in many countries around the world, there are high expectations on academic health science centres and networks in England to provide high-quality care, innovative research, and world-class education, while also supporting wealth creation and economic growth. Meeting these expectations increasingly depends on partnership working between university medical schools and teaching hospitals, as well as other healthcare providers. However, academic-clinical relationships in England are still characterised by the “unlinked partners” model, whereby universities and their partner teaching hospitals are neither fiscally nor structurally linked, creating bifurcating accountabilities to various government and public agencies. Discussion This article focuses on accountability relationships in universities and teaching hospitals, as well as other healthcare providers that form core constituent parts of academic health science centres and networks. The authors analyse accountability for the tripartite mission of patient care, research, and education, using a four-fold typology of accountability relationships, which distinguishes between hierarchical (bureaucratic) accountability, legal accountability, professional accountability, and political accountability. Examples from North West London suggest that a number of mechanisms can be used to improve accountability for the tripartite mission through alignment, but that the simple creation of academic health science centres and networks is probably not sufficient. Summary At the heart of the challenge for academic health science centres and networks is the separation of accountabilities for patient care, research, and education in different government departments. Given that a fundamental top-down system redesign is now extremely unlikely, local academic and clinical leaders face the challenge of aligning their institutions as a matter of priority in order to improve accountability for the tripartite mission from

  14. Career development for early career academics: benefits of networking and the role of professional societies.

    PubMed

    Ansmann, Lena; Flickinger, Tabor E; Barello, Serena; Kunneman, Marleen; Mantwill, Sarah; Quilligan, Sally; Zanini, Claudia; Aelbrecht, Karolien

    2014-10-01

    Whilst effective networking is vitally important for early career academics, understanding and establishing useful networks is challenging. This paper provides an overview of the benefits and challenges of networking in the academic field, particularly for early career academics, and reflects on the role of professional societies in facilitating networking. PMID:25074842

  15. Academic detailing.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations. PMID:21209521

  16. 77 FR 48162 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for the Challenge To Identify Audacious Goals in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Audacious Goals in Vision Research and Blindness Rehabilitation (Challenge) to stimulate innovation in... proposed goal is bold, daring, original or unconventional, exceptionally innovative, creative, novel,...

  17. Factors Affecting Educational Innovation with in Class Electronic Response Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Mark; Bell, Amani; Comerton-Forde, Carole; Pickering, Joanne; Blayney, Paul

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the use of Rogers' diffusion of innovation perspective to understand the factors affecting educational innovation decisions, specifically in regard to in class electronic response systems. Despite decreasing costs and four decades of research showing strong student support, academic adoption is limited. Using data collected from…

  18. Innovation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyka, Andreas; Scharnhorst, Andrea

    The idea for this book started when we organized a topical workshop entitled "Innovation Networks - New Approaches in Modeling and Analyzing" (held in Augsburg, Germany in October 2005), under the auspices of Exystence, a network of excellence funded in the European Union's Fifth Framework Program. Unlike other conferences on innovation and networks, however, this workshop brought together scientists from economics, sociology, communication science, science and technology studies, and physics. With this book we aim to build further on a bridge connecting the bodies of knowledge on networks in economics, the social sciences and, more recently, statistical physics.

  19. Innovative Solutions to Challenges in Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Jonathan; Burkybile, Sharon

    2000-01-01

    States have had to budget increasing amounts for mandated pupil-transportation services as their state transportation aid has been slashed dramatically. Among school districts, cooperation and coordination through shared services (consortia) have resulted in safer, more reliable, and more efficient transportation. Implementation advice is…

  20. Teaching biomedical technology innovation as a discipline.

    PubMed

    Yock, Paul G; Brinton, Todd J; Zenios, Stefanos A

    2011-07-20

    Recently, universities in the United States and abroad have developed dedicated educational programs in life science technology innovation. Here, we discuss the two major streams of educational theory and practice that have informed these programs: design thinking and entrepreneurship education. We make the case that the process of innovation for new medical technologies (medtech) is different from that for biopharmaceuticals and outline the challenges and opportunities associated with developing a discipline of medtech innovation. PMID:21775665

  1. Air Force academic medicine: a climate survey.

    PubMed

    Jones, Woodson S; Yun, Heather C

    2011-12-01

    Air Force (AF) Medical Service leadership considers education, training, and research as key priorities. However, AF academic physicians' perceptions about the academic environment and challenges to success are not well described. AF faculty physicians were surveyed in autumn 2009. One hundred seventy-two responded and rated the academic environment as needing improvement (median Likert-like score 2 [interquartile range 1] on 1-5 scale). The impact of stepping away from an academically oriented career path for other executive positions was rated negatively (median Likert-like score 2, interquartile range 1). Concerns included loss of clinical skills, career disruption, and the challenge of returning to and/or competing for positions within the academic pathway. New policies limiting deployment of Program Directors and/or key teaching faculty were viewed favorably. Most physicians (59%) completing this survey expressed concerns about the AF academic environment and identified numerous challenges. Information from this survey can guide future initiatives to enhance leadership's goals. PMID:22338353

  2. The changing environment for technological innovation in health care.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C S; Gelijns, A C

    1996-01-01

    A distinguishing feature of American health care is its emphasis on advanced technology. Yet today's changing health care environment is overhauling the engine of technological innovation. The rate and direction of technological innovation are affected by a complex of supply- and demandside factors, including biomedical research, education, patent law, regulation, health care payment, tort law, and more. Some distinguishing features of technological innovation in health care are now at increased risk. Regulatory requirements and rising payment hurdles are especially challenging to small technology companies. Closer management of health care delivery and payment, particularly the standardization that may derive from practice guidelines and clamping down on payment for investigational technologies, curtails opportunities for innovation. Levels and distribution of biomedical research funding in government and industry are changing. Financial constraints are limiting the traditional roles of academic health centers in fostering innovation. Despite notable steps in recent years to lower regulatory barriers and speed approvals, especially for products for life-threatening conditions, the Food and Drug Administration is under great pressure from Congress, industry, and patients to do more. Technology gatekeeping is shifting from hundreds of thousands of physicians acting on behalf of their patients to fewer, yet more powerful, managed care organizations and health care networks. Beyond its direct effects on adoption, payment, and use of technologies, the extraordinary buying leverage of these large providers is cutting technology profit margins and heightening competition among technology companies. It is contributing to unprecedented restructuring of the pharmaceutical and medical device industries, leading to unprecedented alliances with generic product companies, health care providers, utilization review companies, and other agents. These industry changes are already

  3. Continuing Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    As the chapters in this book have identified, the academy and academics have experienced significant radical transformations across the past three decades. In many ways, academics have been eyewitnesses to these changes, and while there is much to mourn about what has been "lost", this is not the time for academic ambivalence towards the effects…

  4. Mathematical Innovation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research funds from the Stennis Space Center, MathSoft, Inc., developed a system that can provide the building blocks for signal analysis and rapid prototyping. The product is the result of work to help NASA develop a complete understanding propulsion test data by using time frequency displays, automatic estimation and denoising, and data analysis plots for wavelet decomposition.

  5. Accelerating Innovation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The word "innovation" seems to be in everyone's lexicon these days; it's even turning up as part of new education job titles in school districts and states. The ideas that undergird it are animating a growing movement that's spurring new policies, programs, and products that carry with them the potential to transform how students learn and how…

  6. Interweaving Knowledge Resources to Address Complex Environmental Health Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Beth Ellen; Suk, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Complex problems do not respect academic disciplinary boundaries. Environmental health research is complex and often moves beyond these boundaries, integrating diverse knowledge resources to solve such challenges. Here we describe an evolving paradigm for interweaving approaches that integrates widely diverse resources outside of traditional academic environments in full partnerships of mutual respect and understanding. We demonstrate that scientists, social scientists, and engineers can work with government agencies, industry, and communities to interweave their expertise into metaphorical knowledge fabrics to share understanding, resources, and enthusiasm. Objective Our goal is to acknowledge and validate how interweaving research approaches can contribute to research-driven, solution-oriented problem solving in environmental health, and to inspire more members of the environmental health community to consider this approach. Discussion The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Superfund Research Program (SRP), as mandated by Congress, has evolved to become a program that reaches across a wide range of knowledge resources. SRP fosters interweaving multiple knowledge resources to develop innovative multidirectional partnerships for research and training. Here we describe examples of how motivation, ideas, knowledge, and expertise from different people, institutions, and agencies can integrate to tackle challenges that can be as complex as the resources they bring to bear on it. Conclusions By providing structure for interweaving science with its stakeholders, we are better able to leverage resources, increase potential for innovation, and proactively ensure a more fully developed spectrum of beneficial outcomes of research investments. Citation Anderson BE, Naujokas MF, Suk WA. 2015. Interweaving knowledge resources to address complex environmental health challenges. Environ Health Perspect 123:1095–1099

  7. Challenges and Solutions for Latin American-Trained International Medical Graduates in Psychiatry Residency

    PubMed Central

    Hausmann-Stabile, Carolina; Zayas, Luis H.; Hauser, David; Carvajal, Carlos; Mejia, Carlina; Nieves, Delia

    2014-01-01

    Objective Latin American-trained IMGs in psychiatry face multiple challenges that go beyond their medical training. These challenges call for innovative problem-solving. Although the professional development of IMGs has been discussed in the professional literature, little is written about their experiences. In this case study report, a group of IMGs reflect on their experiences and describe how they solved challenges. Method Using cogenerative ethnography, four IMGs trained in Colombia, Dominican Republic and Mexico provided insights on their challenges and solutions while adapting to psychiatric residency training. Individual interviews, focused discussion, focus groups, and written reports were analyzed using data reduction, data display, and conclusion drawing techniques. Results We illustrate the challenges of IMG training in psychiatry using their reflections and stories. We categorized these challenges into three domains: immigration and acculturation; social adjustment; and medical training. Quotes were selected to illustrate IMGs’ challenges and coping strategies. Conclusion Some of the combined cultural, social and academic challenges of Latin American-trained IMGs in psychiatry are described. Recognizing and planning for the personal challenges of IMGs in psychiatry can enhance the transition into psychiatric training. Ultimately, improvements in IMG training converts into improved healthcare for all patients. PMID:25673899

  8. [Academic misconduct of graduates and the credit education].

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaoyan; Tang, Xiaoya; Fan, Xuegong

    2011-10-01

    Nowadays the phenomenon of academic misconduct (such as plagiarism, fabrication, falsification, etc.) is very frequent. The reasons for academic misconduct are involved in the problems in graduate education system, social environment and students themselves. Therefore, colleges and universities should place great emphasis on constructing a healthy school environment and academic atmosphere for failure tolerance with the help of high-tech modern means. It also needs to improve the academic supervision and evaluation system, strengthen the punishments for academic misconduct and enhance the mentor's exemplary role in education. The eventual goal for our education is to obtain innovative talents who are integrity, respect science and truth, and are good samples for academic performances. PMID:22086012

  9. Corporate Experiences in Open Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulet, Juan

    In the 21st century, companies are facing new challenges in a rapidly changing environment. Global competition and technological progress, in particular of information and communication technologies, have shortened life cycle products, opened up new markets, and lowered barriers to firm entry. These changes are compelling firms to find new and more rapid ways to innovate.

  10. Academic Buoyancy and Academic Outcomes: Towards a Further Understanding of Students with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Students without ADHD, and Academic Buoyancy Itself

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Academic buoyancy is students' capacity to successfully overcome setback and challenge that is typical of the ordinary course of everyday academic life. It may represent an important factor on the psycho-educational landscape assisting students who experience difficulties in school and schoolwork. Aims: This study investigated the…

  11. Surgical innovation: the ethical agenda

    PubMed Central

    Broekman, Marike L.; Carrière, Michelle E.; Bredenoord, Annelien L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present article was to systematically review the ethics of surgical innovation and introduce the components of the learning health care system to guide future research and debate on surgical innovation. Although the call for evidence-based practice in surgery is increasingly high on the agenda, most surgeons feel that the format of the randomized controlled trial is not suitable for surgery. Innovation in surgery has aspects of, but should be distinguished from both research and clinical care and raises its own ethical challenges. To answer the question “What are the main ethical aspects of surgical innovation?”, we systematically searched PubMed and Embase. Papers expressing an opinion, point of view, or position were included, that is, normative ethical papers. We included 59 studies discussing ethical aspects of surgical innovation. These studies discussed 4 major themes: oversight, informed consent, learning curve, and vulnerable patient groups. Although all papers addressed the ethical challenges raised by surgical innovation, surgeons hold no uniform view of surgical innovation, and there is no agreement on the distinction between innovation and research. Even though most agree to some sort of oversight, they offer different alternatives ranging from the formation of new surgical innovation committees to establishing national registries. Most agree that informed consent is necessary for innovative procedures and that surgeons should be adequately trained to assure their competence to tackle the learning curve problem. All papers agree that in case of vulnerable patients, alternatives must be found for the informed consent procedure. We suggest that the concept of the learning health care system might provide guidance for thinking about surgical innovation. The underlying rationale of the learning health care system is to improve the quality of health care by embedding research within clinical care. Two aspects of a learning health

  12. Innovating Firms and Aggregate Innovation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klette, Tor Jakob; Kortum, Samuel

    2004-01-01

    We develop a parsimonious model of innovation to confront firm-level evidence. It captures the dynamics of individual heterogeneous firms, describes the behavior of an industry with firm entry and exit, and delivers a general equilibrium model of technological change. While unifying the theoretical analysis of firms, industries, and the aggregate…

  13. Convergent innovation for sustainable economic growth and affordable universal health care: innovating the way we innovate.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Laurette; Jha, Srivardhini; Faber, Aida; Struben, Jeroen; London, Ted; Mohapatra, Archisman; Drager, Nick; Lannon, Chris; Joshi, P K; McDermott, John

    2014-12-01

    This paper introduces convergent innovation (CI) as a form of meta-innovation-an innovation in the way we innovate. CI integrates human and economic development outcomes, through behavioral and ecosystem transformation at scale, for sustainable prosperity and affordable universal health care within a whole-of-society paradigm. To this end, CI combines technological and social innovation (including organizational, social process, financial, and institutional), with a special focus on the most underserved populations. CI takes a modular approach that convenes around roadmaps for real world change-a portfolio of loosely coupled complementary partners from the business community, civil society, and the public sector. Roadmaps serve as collaborative platforms for focused, achievable, and time-bound projects to provide scalable, sustainable, and resilient solutions to complex challenges, with benefits both to participating partners and to society. In this paper, we first briefly review the literature on technological innovation that sets the foundations of CI and motivates its feasibility. We then describe CI, its building blocks, and enabling conditions for deployment and scaling up, illustrating its operational forms through examples of existing CI-sensitive innovation. PMID:25294668

  14. Academic Delay of Gratification and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    2011-01-01

    The ability to delay gratification is the cornerstone of all academic achievement and education. It is by delaying gratification that learners can pursue long-term academic and career goals. In general, "delay of gratification" refers to an individual's ability to forgo immediate rewards for the sake of more valuable ones later (Mischel, 1996).…

  15. Statistics Poster Challenge for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Brad; Freeman, Jenny; Stillman, Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    The analysis and interpretation of data are important life skills. A poster challenge for schoolchildren provides an innovative outlet for these skills and demonstrates their relevance to daily life. We discuss our Statistics Poster Challenge and the lessons we have learned.

  16. Perspective: Academic obstetrics-gynecology departments in the city of Philadelphia: are the wheels coming off?

    PubMed

    Croft, Damien J

    2011-03-01

    Maternity care in Philadelphia is in an unprecedented and precarious situation, as all the community hospitals that once provided maternity care services have either closed completely or stopped providing maternity services. Six academic medical centers (AMCs) in the city of Philadelphia now provide care to a population of 1.5 million requiring increasingly complex and expensive maternity care, at the same time as insurance premiums and the malpractice crisis in Pennsylvania peaked. The AMCs are able to continue providing maternity care to this population that includes a large proportion of poor, minority, and un- or underinsured patients thanks to government subsidization of resident education, the services provided by resident physicians, and the influx of government and industry research funds, but the financial outlook of academic obstetrics-gynecology departments in this city is dire. Obstetric academic medicine in Philadelphia has come to more closely resemble a "big wheel" tricycle than Flexner's "three-legged stool." Clinical medicine is the driver (the large front wheel and pedal) pulling along education and research, the two smaller wheels in the back. A maternity care alliance is needed in Philadelphia allowing area AMCs to pool and trade resources, reduce costs, improve quality and innovation, and share risks. Philadelphia may serve as an early warning for other cities and AMCs around the country and has the opportunity to serve as a model for how to overcome these serious challenges. PMID:21248611

  17. Advancing Innovation Through Collaboration: Implementation of the NASA Space Life Sciences Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.

    2010-01-01

    On October 18, 2010, the NASA Human Health and Performance center (NHHPC) was opened to enable collaboration among government, academic and industry members. Membership rapidly grew to 90 members (http://nhhpc.nasa.gov ) and members began identifying collaborative projects as detailed in this article. In addition, a first workshop in open collaboration and innovation was conducted on January 19, 2011 by the NHHPC resulting in additional challenges and projects for further development. This first workshop was a result of the SLSD successes in running open innovation challenges over the past two years. In 2008, the NASA Johnson Space Center, Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) began pilot projects in open innovation (crowd sourcing) to determine if these new internet-based platforms could indeed find solutions to difficult technical problems. From 2008 to 2010, the SLSD issued 34 challenges, 14 externally and 20 internally. The 14 external challenges were conducted through three different vendors: InnoCentive, Yet2.com and TopCoder. The 20 internal challenges were conducted using the InnoCentive platform, customized to NASA use, and promoted as NASA@Work. The results from the 34 challenges involved not only technical solutions that were reported previously at the 61st IAC, but also the formation of new collaborative relationships. For example, the TopCoder pilot was expanded by the NASA Space Operations Mission Directorate to the NASA Tournament Lab in collaboration with Harvard Business School and TopCoder. Building on these initial successes, the NHHPC workshop in January of 2011, and ongoing NHHPC member discussions, several important collaborations have been developed: (1) Space Act Agreement between NASA and GE for collaborative projects (2) NASA and academia for a Visual Impairment / Intracranial Hypertension summit (February 2011) (3) NASA and the DoD through the Defense Venture Catalyst Initiative (DeVenCI) for a technical needs workshop (June 2011) (4

  18. 75 FR 55739 - Cybersecurity, Innovation and the Internet Economy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration RIN 0660-XA18 Cybersecurity, Innovation and the... innovation in the Internet economy has been extended until 5 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) on September 20... cybersecurity challenges in the commercial sector and innovation in the Internet economy, with a closing...

  19. Federal Program Encourages Health Service Innovations on Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nix, Mary P.

    2009-01-01

    There is always room for improvement in the delivery of health services. This article discusses the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's (AHRQ) Health Care Innovations Exchange (www.innovations.ahrq.gov), a comprehensive program that aims to increase awareness of innovative strategies to meet health service delivery challenges and…

  20. CHOA concussion consensus: establishing a uniform policy for academic accommodations.

    PubMed

    Popoli, David Michael; Burns, Thomas G; Meehan, William P; Reisner, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Concussion research generally centers on physical challenges, though aspects such as social functioning and returning to school also warrant attention in pediatric populations. Restoring academic performance postconcussion remains a challenge. Here we provide recommendations addressing a uniform policy for pediatric concussion patients in academic institutions. Tools that may minimize difficulty with academic re-entry include independent educational evaluations, individualized educational programs (IEPs), student support teams (SSTs), letters of academic accommodation, time off, and 504 Plans. Recognition and treatment is crucial for symptom relief and prevention of functional disruption, as is specialist referral during the acute window. We recommend early intervention with a letter of academic accommodation and SST and suggest that 504 Plans and IEPs be reserved for protracted or medically complicated cases. Students with concussion should be observed for anxiety and depression because these symptoms can lead to prolonged recovery, decreased quality of life, and other social challenges. PMID:23960266

  1. Academic medicine in a transformational time.

    PubMed

    Daschle, Thomas A

    2015-01-01

    Public policy and technology are having and will continue to have an extraordinary impact on virtually every aspect of academic medicine. The effects of this combination of policy and technology transformations can hardly be overstated. It is critical to recognize these transformative forces and work to accept and even embrace them enthusiastically. The author examines five major transformative forces affecting academic medicine today: big data, greater transparency, new payment models, emphasis on wellness, and scope of practice. He discusses each of these transformative forces within the context of the current U.S. health care environment and offers suggestions for academic medicine to leverage them. It will take resiliency, innovation, collaboration, engagement in public policy debates, and strong leadership for this country to make the U.S. health care system the success it should be. PMID:25545002

  2. Creativity and innovation: thought and action.

    PubMed

    Pesut, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the significance of creativity and innovation in contemporary health care contexts, and to provide nurses and other health care professionals with models, resources, and ways of thinking about creativity that informs the development of an innovation-action and creative thinking mind-set. As the complexity of health care and nursing escalates, health care providers are challenged to think more creatively and develop innovations that advance the knowledge, learning, and service contributions of their discipline to the health care enterprise. Nursing requires creative thought and innovative action in service of the greater good. PMID:24400465

  3. Critical incident technique: an innovative participatory approach to examine and document racial disparities in breast cancer healthcare services.

    PubMed

    Yonas, Michael A; Aronson, Robert; Schaal, Jennifer; Eng, Eugenia; Hardy, Christina; Jones, Nora

    2013-10-01

    Disproportionate and persistent inequities in quality of healthcare have been observed among persons of color in the United States. To understand and ultimately eliminate such inequities, several public health institutions have issued calls for innovative methods and approaches that examine determinants from the social, organizational and public policy contexts to inform the design of systems change interventions. The authors, including academic and community research partners in a community-based participatory research (CBPR) study, reflected together on the use and value of the critical incident technique (CIT) for exploring racial disparities in healthcare for women with breast cancer. Academic and community partners used initial large group discussion involving a large partnership of 35 academic and community researchers guided by principles of CBPR, followed by the efforts of a smaller interdisciplinary manuscript team of academic and community researchers to reflect, document summarize and translate this participatory research process, lessons learned and value added from using the CIT with principles of CBPR and Undoing Racism. The finding of this article is a discussion of the process, strengths and challenges of utilizing CIT with CBPR. The participation of community members at all levels of the research process including development, collection of the data and analysis of the data was enhanced by the CIT process. As the field of CBPR continues to mature, innovative processes which combine the expertise of community and academic partners can enhance the success of such partnerships. This report contributes to existing literature by illustrating a unique and participatory research application of CIT with principles of CBPR and Undoing Racism. Findings highlight the collaborative process used to identify and implement this novel method and the adaptability of this technique in the interdisciplinary exploration of system-level changes to understand and

  4. Critical incident technique: an innovative participatory approach to examine and document racial disparities in breast cancer healthcare services

    PubMed Central

    Yonas, Michael A.; Aronson, Robert; Schaal, Jennifer; Eng, Eugenia; Hardy, Christina; Jones, Nora

    2013-01-01

    Disproportionate and persistent inequities in quality of healthcare have been observed among persons of color in the United States. To understand and ultimately eliminate such inequities, several public health institutions have issued calls for innovative methods and approaches that examine determinants from the social, organizational and public policy contexts to inform the design of systems change interventions. The authors, including academic and community research partners in a community-based participatory research (CBPR) study, reflected together on the use and value of the critical incident technique (CIT) for exploring racial disparities in healthcare for women with breast cancer. Academic and community partners used initial large group discussion involving a large partnership of 35 academic and community researchers guided by principles of CBPR, followed by the efforts of a smaller interdisciplinary manuscript team of academic and community researchers to reflect, document summarize and translate this participatory research process, lessons learned and value added from using the CIT with principles of CBPR and Undoing Racism. The finding of this article is a discussion of the process, strengths and challenges of utilizing CIT with CBPR. The participation of community members at all levels of the research process including development, collection of the data and analysis of the data was enhanced by the CIT process. As the field of CBPR continues to mature, innovative processes which combine the expertise of community and academic partners can enhance the success of such partnerships. This report contributes to existing literature by illustrating a unique and participatory research application of CIT with principles of CBPR and Undoing Racism. Findings highlight the collaborative process used to identify and implement this novel method and the adaptability of this technique in the interdisciplinary exploration of system-level changes to understand and

  5. Academic trajectories of newcomer immigrant youth.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Orozco, Carola; Gaytán, Francisco X; Bang, Hee Jin; Pakes, Juliana; O'Connor, Erin; Rhodes, Jean

    2010-05-01

    Immigration to the United States presents both challenges and opportunities that affect students' academic achievement. Using a 5-year longitudinal, mixed-methods approach, we identified varying academic trajectories of newcomer immigrant students from Central America, China, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Mexico. Latent class growth curve analysis revealed that although some newcomer students performed at high or improving levels over time, others showed diminishing performance. Multinomial logistic regressions identified significant group differences in academic trajectories, particularly between the high-achieving youth and the other groups. In keeping with ecological-developmental and stage-environment fit theories, School Characteristics (school segregation rate, school poverty rate, and student perceptions of school violence), Family Characteristics (maternal education, parental employment, and household structure), and Individual Characteristics (academic English proficiency, academic engagement, psychological symptoms, gender, and 2 age-related risk factors, number of school transitions and being overaged for grade placement) were associated with different trajectories of academic performance. A series of case studies triangulate many of the quantitative findings as well as illuminate patterns that were not detected in the quantitative data. Thus, the mixed-methods approach sheds light on the cumulative developmental challenges that immigrant students face as they adjust to their new educational settings. PMID:20438174

  6. Highlander prompts pipeline innovations

    SciTech Connect

    Akten, H.T.

    1986-05-05

    Texaco North Sea UK Co.'s Highlander field was developed with innovative subsea engineering which helped bring the field onstream in an 18-month period. Among the engineering challenges met were the design and construction of the Highlander Pipeline System and especially the innovations evident in the first-ever subsea slug catcher and in the retrievable subsea pigging facilities. Located in 420 ft of water in Texaco's North Sea Block 14/20, Highlander is 8 miles west of Texaco's existing Tartan A production platform which stands in approximately 465 ft of water. To bring oil on-stream rapidly, thus maximizing early cash flow, the project was undertaken in two phases. The first phase consisted of one water injector and two producer wells connected to Tartan A via three 8-in. pipelines and associated flexible jumpers/risers. The remaining 4-in. and 12-in. pipelines were flooded with inhibited sea water and left on the seabed for approximately 1 year until commissioning for the project's second phase. All steel pipelines were trenched immediately after laying, and umbilicals were laid into certain of these trenches. Highlander's second phase included an innovative subsea production facility with such unique features as subsea slug catchers and retrievable subsea pigging facilities. Much of the technology involved was developed in Britain and will have worldwide application linking smaller marginal fields to existing platforms swiftly and in a cost effective manner.

  7. Innovation Driver Nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakner, Hubert

    2013-03-01

    When addressing the global societal challenges most solutions will require Nano electronics and Smart Systems - therefore innovation today is mainly based on nanoelectronics which has become one of the most important key enabling technologies and innovation drivers. Nanoelectronics has been extended by other microtechnologies. This results in additional functionalities. The combination of analog and digital electronics, the integration of sensors and actuators, of power devices and rf components on wafer level makes it possible to shrink shoebox sized systems to the size of a matchbox. But there is no innovation without research. Europe (Germany) is top in invention but poor in commercialization - many good ideas fail when going from research to production within the so-called Valley of Death. To overcome this, a clear strategy is necessary. Silicon Saxony, the big Saxonian cluster on micro- and nanoelectronics is presented as a best practice example: clear focus, addressing whole value chains and establishing joint technology platforms has led to a remarkable commercial success in the Dresden area.

  8. Academic Inbreeding in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael H.

    1977-01-01

    Academic inbreeding, the employment for faculty positions of persons who receive their graduate training at the same academic institution, is considered detrimental to an institution's academic environment. Results of a study conducted at 54 universities revealed that almost half the faculty (48 percent) in collegiate nursing programs are drawn…

  9. What Is Academic Vocabulary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F.; Graves, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors address the construct of "academic vocabulary." First, they attempt to bring some clarity to a constellation of terms surrounding academic vocabulary. Second, they compare and contrast definitions of academic vocabulary. Third, they review typologies that researchers and writers have proposed to organize academic…

  10. The Academic Adviser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the idea that "academic" advisers are "academics" who play a major role in connecting the general education curriculum to the students' experience as well as connecting the faculty to the students' holistic experience of the curriculum. The National Academic Advising Association Concept of Academic…

  11. Entry and Transition to Academic Leadership: Experiences of Women Leaders from Turkey and the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hacifazlioglu, Ozge

    2010-01-01

    Academics who aspire to become academic leaders experience a number of changes as they move into administration. New academic leaders find themselves immersed in a transition that demands personal development and creates new learning settings. The purpose of this study is to examine initial challenges experienced by women academic leaders in the…

  12. 76 FR 41526 - Centennial Challenges 2011 Strong Tether Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ...This notice is issued in accordance with 42 U.S.C. 2451 (314)(d). The 2011 Strong Tether Challenge is scheduled and teams that wish to compete may register. Centennial Challenges is a program of prize competitions to stimulate innovation in technologies of interest and value to NASA and the nation. The 2011 Strong Tether Challenge is a prize competition designed to encourage development of......

  13. Serving Transgender Youth: Challenges, Dilemmas and Clinical Examples

    PubMed Central

    Tishelman, Amy C.; Kaufman, Randi; Edwards-Leeper, Laura; Mandel, Francie H.; Shumer, Daniel E.; Spack, Norman P.

    2015-01-01

    Historically, many gender variant individuals have lived in a chronic state of conflict between self-understanding and physical being, one in which there was a continual misalignment between others’ perceptions of them and their internal self-perception of gender. Only recently have professionals from mental health and medical realms come together to provide services to these youth. This paper describes an innovative program: the first mental health and medical multidisciplinary clinic housed in a pediatric academic center in North America to serve the needs of gender variant youth. We describe our model of care, focusing on the psychologist’s role within a multidisciplinary team and the mental health needs of the youth and families assisted. We highlight clinical challenges and provide practice clinical vignettes to illuminate the psychologist’s critical role. PMID:26807001

  14. The Internet and Academics' Workload and Work-Family Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heijstra, Thamar M.; Rafnsdottir, Gudbjorg Linda

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse whether the Internet and other ICT technologies support a work-family balance amongst academics. The study is based on 20 in-depth interviews with academics in Iceland and analysed according to the Grounded Theory Approach. This study challenges the notion that the Internet, as part of ICT technology, makes it…

  15. Publish or Perish: The Myth and Reality of Academic Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Icy

    2014-01-01

    While writing for scholarly publications is considered a crucial dimension of academic work, the "publish-or-perish" system in our field has increasingly caused anxiety and induced stress among not only young academics but also more established scholars. Using my own publishing experience as a point of departure, I challenge the…

  16. Improving Publication: Advice for Busy Higher Education Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Anita

    2016-01-01

    A major challenge for higher education academics is to research and publish when faced with substantial teaching responsibilities, higher student numbers, and higher output expectations. The focus of this piece is to encourage publication more generally by educators, and to build publication capacity, which academic developers can facilitate. The…

  17. Older Academics and Career Management: An Interdisciplinary Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larkin, Jacqui; Neumann, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    The academic workforce is among the oldest (Commonwealth of Australia, 2005) and arguably has the most highly qualified professionals within Australia. Yet career management for this group is seldom discussed. This paper considers Australia's ageing academic work-force and the human resource management challenges and implications this poses for…

  18. The Role of Transnational Networking for Higher Education Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Kelly; Dismore, Harriet

    2015-01-01

    Amidst rapid socio-economic change, higher education (HE) academics across the world face major challenges to its organisation, finance and management. This paper discusses the role of transnational networking in higher education. Data from 40 interviews with geographically distributed academics engaged in learning and teaching transnational…

  19. College Students and Academic Performance: A Case of Taking Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Phylis M.; Pinto, Mary Beth; Parente, Diane H.; Wortman, Thomas I.

    2004-01-01

    College students face a myriad of pressures and challenges in the academic environment as they seek to maintain optimal performance or even to remain in the academic program. In 2002, it was reported that more than 30% of first-year students did not return for their second year of college (Smith), and only 40% are reported to actually compete…

  20. College Students and Academic Performance: A Case of Taking Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield, Phylis M.; Pinto, Mary Beth; Parente, Diane H.; Wortman, Thomas I.

    2009-01-01

    College students face a myriad of pressures and challenges in the academic environment as they seek to maintain optimal performance or even to remain in the academic program. In 2002, it was reported that more than 30% of first-year students did not return for their second year of college (Smith), and only 40% are reported to actually compete…