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Sample records for academic mentoring program

  1. An Evaluation of the Academic Volunteer and Mentor Service Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illig, David C.

    This report evaluates the performance of the California Academic Volunteer and Mentor Service Program, addressing an assessment of the impact of mentoring on middle school and high school student achievement, attendance, and behavior. The program's goal is to use volunteer mentors to provide support to children at risk of academic failure and…

  2. Using Mentoring to Improve Academic Programming for African American Male Youths with Mild Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell-Whatley, Gloria D.; Algozzine, Bob; Obiakor, Festus

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the impact that mentoring programs can have on the academic achievement and social development of young African American males. Provides steps for starting a mentoring program, examines the mentor's role, offers suggestions for mentor-student interactions, and offers some cautionary considerations, such as legal ramifications and school…

  3. Developing an Organizational Understanding of Faculty Mentoring Programs in Academic Medicine in Major American Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer Zellers, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and contextual factors associated with faculty mentoring programs in academic medicine within major research institutions in the United States, and explores the usefulness of organizational behavior theory in understanding these relationships. To date, many formal faculty mentoring programs are in operation…

  4. School-Based Mentoring Programs: Using Volunteers to Improve the Academic Outcomes of Underserved Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Amanda; Grossman, Jean Baldwin; DuBois, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research suggests that school-based mentoring programs like those offered by Big Brothers Big Sisters of America (BBBSA) yield small but statistically significant improvements in the academic performance of mentored students and in their beliefs in their own scholastic efficacy. The present study uses data from a randomized control trial…

  5. Mentoring Faculty in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Pololi, Linda; Knight, Sharon

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss an alternative structure and a broader vision for mentoring of medical faculty. While there is recognition of the need for mentoring for professional advancement in academic medicine, there is a dearth of research on the process and outcomes of mentoring medical faculty. Supported by the literature and our experience with both formal dyadic and group peer mentoring programs as part of our federally funded National Center of Leadership in Academic Medicine, we assert that a group peer, collaborative mentoring model founded on principles of adult education is one that is likely to be an effective and predictably reliable form of mentoring for both women and men in academic medicine. PMID:16117759

  6. The Professional Mentor Program Plus: An Academic Success and Retention Tool for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Chaunda L.; Homant, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    To promote the academic success of and to retain adult students of color, the Academic Services Unit at the University of Detroit Mercy (UDM), an urban Catholic university, in Detroit Michigan, has designed and implemented the Professional Mentor Program Plus, funded by the State of Michigan's King-Chavez-Parks (KCP) higher education initiative,…

  7. Mentoring Programs for Underrepresented Minority Faculty in Academic Medical Centers: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Beech, Bettina M.; Calles-Escandon, Jorge; Hairston, Kristen G.; Langdon, Sarah E.; Latham-Sadler, Brenda A.; Bell, Ronny A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mentoring is critical for career advancement in academic medicine. However, underrepresented minority (URM) faculty often receive less mentoring than their nonminority peers. The authors conducted a comprehensive review of published mentoring programs designed for URM faculty to identify “promising practices.” Method Databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC, PsychLit, Google Scholar, Dissertations Abstracts International, CINHAL, Sociological Abstracts) were searched for articles describing URM faculty mentoring programs. The RE-AIM framework (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance) formed the model for analyzing programs. Results The search identified 73 citations. Abstract reviews led to retrieval of 38 full-text articles for assessment; 18 articles describing 13 programs were selected for review. The reach of these programs ranged from 7 to 128 participants. Most evaluated programs on the basis of the number of grant applications and manuscripts produced or satisfaction with program content. Programs offered a variety of training experiences, and adoption was relatively high, with minor changes made for implementing the intended content. Barriers included time-restricted funding, inadequate evaluation due to few participants, significant time commitments required from mentors, and difficulty in addressing institutional challenges faced by URM faculty. Program sustainability was a concern because programs were supported through external funds, with minimal institutional support. Conclusions Mentoring is an important part of academic medicine, particularly for URM faculty who often experience unique career challenges. Despite this need, relatively few publications exist to document mentoring programs for this population. Institutionally supported mentoring programs for URM faculty are needed, along with detailed plans for program sustainability. PMID:23425989

  8. Toward promoting generative cultures of intentional mentoring within academic settings.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Allison N; Williams, Michelle K; Allen, George J

    2005-09-01

    Mentoring promotes ongoing learning of clinical psychologists, regardless of their expertise and experience. Most academic programs, however, do not possess vigorous mentoring cultures in which mentors simultaneously are learners. Academic programs are largely based on "mastery" philosophies that tacitly aim mentoring at less-experienced peers. This orientation can make stigmatizing mentoring opportunities, especially for psychologists from underrepresented populations. Using concepts from experiential learning theory, we articulate interventions to invigorate mentoring cultures and make mentoring less stigmatizing.

  9. A program to recruit and mentor future academic dentists: successes and challenges.

    PubMed

    Gironda, Melanie W; Bibb, Carol A; Lefever, Karen; Law, Clarice; Messadi, Diana

    2013-03-01

    There is a continuing shortage of academic dentists due to myriad factors. However, each graduating class of dental students includes a select group who choose to explore academic positions. It is this group of potential academic dentists that a four-year R25 initiative, funded by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, has targeted with the intent of increasing their numbers and mentoring them for success in a future faculty position. The aims of the program at the School of Dentistry, University of California, Los Angeles, are to target and recruit potential clinician-scientists and to design and implement an Academic Track (AT) that complements existing clinical and research training with the comprehensive skill set of pedagogical, organizational, and personal strategies necessary to be successful in an academic career. Recruitment to the AT targeted candidates from a variety of sources including those enrolled in the dual D.D.S./M.S. and D.D.S./Ph.D. programs, dental residents, Ph.D. candidates in other disciplines, and predental students. Through a variety of professional development activities in the AT, selected students receive teaching, leadership, and mentoring experiences. Outcomes and lessons learned related to specific activities and lessons learned are presented in this article, and a model that recognizes the diverse paths to an academic career in dentistry is recommended.

  10. Student Satisfaction with an Online University and Its Mentoring Program as Predictors of Student Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Alberto M.

    2013-01-01

    In an increasingly competitive world, many universities have tried to improve academic performance, retention and graduation rates by introducing online education or mentoring. Although researchers have explored university mentoring using qualitative methods, few have addressed the quantitative connection between student mentoring and academic…

  11. Building Community in Academic Settings: The Importance of Flexibility in a Structured Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Robyn; Freeman, Mark; Barrie, Simon; Bell, Amani; O'Connor, Donna; Waugh, Fran; Sykes, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Academic mentoring is increasingly being used by many universities as a tool to enhance the quality of research-led teaching, promote cross-faculty collaboration and encourage a mentoring culture and community. This article reports on a pilot project established to investigate the benefits of building flexibility into a structured academic…

  12. Structured Opportunities: Exploring the Social and Academic Benefits for Peer Mentors in Retention Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiyama, Judy Marquez; Luca, Sandra Guillen

    2014-01-01

    Informed by the experiences of former peer mentors, this qualitative study examines the structure of opportunity of a university retention program. Extending the concept of social capital, the study investigates the experiences of students who served as peer mentors, and how their involvement in the retention program has influenced their social…

  13. Best Practices Mentoring New Full-Time Faculty: Reenergizing and Improving an Existing Formal Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edman, Jayne

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring is often used in academic settings (deJanasz & Sullivan, 2004). There is though, a lack of evaluation of these mentoring programs (Savage, Karp & Logue, 2004). Hopkins and Grigoriu (2005) found that research on mentoring in community colleges focused more on the informal mentoring of college leadership and less on the formal mentoring of…

  14. Exploring Student Perceptions of Academic Mentoring and Coaching Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    While there is an abundant amount of research relative to coaching and mentoring programs, there is little understanding about the interaction between coaches/mentors and students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate student perceptions of their academic coaching and mentoring experiences at two Southern California community…

  15. Managing Mentoring Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IUME Briefs, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Some programs for helping at-risk youth achieve excellent results, while others do not. One reason for program success can be proper management. Mentoring is a promising strategy for helping at-risk youth. Planners who want to create effective mentoring programs should look at the implementation experiences of other youth programs. Evaluations…

  16. Mentoring in neurology: filling the residency gap in academic mentoring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul R; Marsh, Elisabeth B

    2014-03-11

    Effective academic mentoring significantly affects a physician's choice of career, academic productivity, and professional trajectory. The mentoring relationship is necessary for the continued success of medical training. It is critical to cultivate a climate in which mentoring can thrive. In order to improve the quality and outcomes of mentoring, we must adopt a comprehensive plan. There are interventions at every level of training that will ensure that the current cohort of neurologists receives the requisite expertise needed to flourish and inspire future trainees. Professional organizations must articulate a comprehensive vision of mentoring. Institutions must create an infrastructure to support mentors. Mentors should work in active partnerships with their mentees to forge sustained, productive relationships. Mentees must actively contribute to their own mentoring. Proper mentorship will ensure a bright future for academic neurology.

  17. A Year of Mentoring in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Rabatin, Joseph S; Lipkin, Mack; Rubin, Alan S; Schachter, Allison; Nathan, Michael; Kalet, Adina

    2004-01-01

    We describe a specific mentoring approach in an academic general internal medicine setting by audiotaping and transcribing all mentoring sessions in the year. In advance, the mentor recorded his model. During the year, the mentee kept a process journal. Qualitative analysis revealed development of an intimate relationship based on empathy, trust, and honesty. The mentor's model was explicitly intended to develop independence, initiative, improved thinking, skills, and self-reflection. The mentor's methods included extensive and varied use of questioning, active listening, standard setting, and frequent feedback. During the mentoring, the mentee evolved as a teacher, enhanced the creativity in his teaching, and matured as a person. Specific accomplishments included a national workshop on professional writing, an innovative approach to inpatient attending, a new teaching skills curriculum for a residency program, and this study. A mentoring model stressing safety, intimacy, honesty, setting of high standards, praxis, and detailed planning and feedback was associated with mentee excitement, personal and professional growth and development, concrete accomplishments, and a commitment to teaching. PMID:15109327

  18. An IT Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruse, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author features the IT Mentor Program at the Carlos Rosario International Career Center in Northeast Washington, D.C., which was implemented by the center's workforce director, Claudia Lujan, and under the support and direction of its founder and executive director, Sonia Gutierrez. The program pairs students with mentors to…

  19. Mentor Networks in Academic Medicine: Moving Beyond a Dyadic Conception of Mentoring for Junior Faculty Researchers

    PubMed Central

    DeCastro, Rochelle; Sambuco, Dana; Ubel, Peter A.; Stewart, Abigail; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Career development award programs often require formal establishment of mentoring relationships. The authors sought to gain a nuanced understanding of mentoring from the perspective of a diverse national sample of faculty clinician-researchers who were all members of formal mentoring relationships. Method Between February 2010 and August 2011, the authors conducted semi-structured, in-depth telephone interviews with 100 former recipients of National Institutes of Health mentored career development awards and 28 of their mentors. Purposive sampling ensured a diverse range of viewpoints. Multiple analysts thematically coded verbatim transcripts using qualitative data analysis software. Results Three relevant themes emerged: (1) the numerous roles and behaviors associated with mentoring in academic medicine, (2) the improbability of finding a single person who can fulfill the diverse mentoring needs of another individual, and (3) the importance and composition of mentor networks. Many respondents described the need to cultivate more than one mentor. Several participants discussed the utilization of peer mentors, citing benefits such as pooled resources and mutual learning. Female participants generally acknowledged the importance of having at least one female mentor. Some observed that their portfolio of mentors needed to evolve in order to remain effective. Conclusions Those who seek to promote the careers of faculty in academic medicine should focus upon developing mentoring networks, rather than hierarchical mentoring dyads. The members of each faculty member's mentoring team or network should reflect the protégé's individual needs and preferences, with special attention towards ensuring diversity in terms of area of expertise, academic rank, and gender. PMID:23425990

  20. Mentoring Academic Journal Reviewers: Brokering Reviewing Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, John

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on an ongoing programme to develop new academic journal reviewers through mentoring. It analyses data from correspondence between experienced reviewer/mentors and new reviewer/mentees at an online journal. With the overlying objective of improving internal review quality, the mentoring programme has been initiated to raise…

  1. Peer Mentors Can Improve Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asgari, Shaki; Carter, Frederick, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between peer mentoring and academic performance. Students from two introductory psychology classes either received (n = 37) or did not receive (n = 36) peer mentoring. The data indicated a consistent improvement in the performance (i.e., grades on scheduled exams) of the mentored group. A similar pattern…

  2. School-Based Mentoring Programs: Using Volunteers to Improve the Academic Outcomes of Underserved Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Amanda; Grossman, Jean; DuBois, David

    2015-01-01

    Prior research on mentoring relationships outside of school does point toward relationship closeness and related indicators of the emotional quality of the mentor-protégé tie as important influences on youth outcomes. There is preliminary evidence that this may also be the case for School Based Mentoring (SBM), or at least that closeness promotes…

  3. Best Practices in Academic Mentoring: A Model for Excellence

    PubMed Central

    Nick, Jan M.; Delahoyde, Theresa M.; Del Prato, Darlene; Mitchell, Claudia; Ortiz, Jennifer; Ottley, Clarise; Young, Patricia; Cannon, Sharon B.; Lasater, Kathie; Reising, Deanna; Siktberg, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring is important for the recruitment and retention of qualified nurse faculty, their ongoing career development, and leadership development. However, what are current best practices of mentoring? The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of a model for excellence in establishing a formal mentoring program for academic nurse educators. Six themes for establishing a formal mentoring program are presented, highlighting best practices in mentoring as culled from experience and the literature. Themes reflect aims to achieve appropriately matched dyads, establish clear mentorship purpose and goals, solidify the dyad relationship, advocate for and guide the protégé, integrate the protégé into the academic culture, and mobilize institutional resources for mentoring support. Attending to the six themes will help mentors achieve important protégé outcomes, such as orientation to the educator role, integration into the academic community, development of teaching, scholarship, and service skills, as well as leadership development. The model is intended to be generalizable for faculty teaching in a variety of academic nursing institution types and sizes. Mentoring that integrates the six themes assists faculty members to better navigate the academic environment and more easily transition to new roles and responsibilities. PMID:22685645

  4. Best practices in academic mentoring: a model for excellence.

    PubMed

    Nick, Jan M; Delahoyde, Theresa M; Del Prato, Darlene; Mitchell, Claudia; Ortiz, Jennifer; Ottley, Clarise; Young, Patricia; Cannon, Sharon B; Lasater, Kathie; Reising, Deanna; Siktberg, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring is important for the recruitment and retention of qualified nurse faculty, their ongoing career development, and leadership development. However, what are current best practices of mentoring? The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of a model for excellence in establishing a formal mentoring program for academic nurse educators. Six themes for establishing a formal mentoring program are presented, highlighting best practices in mentoring as culled from experience and the literature. Themes reflect aims to achieve appropriately matched dyads, establish clear mentorship purpose and goals, solidify the dyad relationship, advocate for and guide the protégé, integrate the protégé into the academic culture, and mobilize institutional resources for mentoring support. Attending to the six themes will help mentors achieve important protégé outcomes, such as orientation to the educator role, integration into the academic community, development of teaching, scholarship, and service skills, as well as leadership development. The model is intended to be generalizable for faculty teaching in a variety of academic nursing institution types and sizes. Mentoring that integrates the six themes assists faculty members to better navigate the academic environment and more easily transition to new roles and responsibilities.

  5. Trajectories of Mentors' Perceived Self-Efficacy during an Academic Mentoring Experience: What They Look Like and What Are Their Personal and Experimental Correlates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larose, Simon

    2013-01-01

    In my study, mentors matched with college mentees evaluated their self-efficacy nine times, during their participation in an academic mentoring program. Three distinct groups emerged as follows: (a) mentors who perceived themselves as moderately efficient throughout the mentoring relationship (the moderate stable (MS) group), (b) mentors who…

  6. Experiences and Perceptions of Mentors in a Community Mentoring Program for At-Risk Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Belinda K.

    2013-01-01

    This phenomenological case study explored the perceptions and experiences of mentors who work for a community-based mentoring program that was created to provide at-risk minority students with male role models. Most studies from the past 20 years have assessed mainly the academic, social, and emotional outcomes of mentoring among at-risk minority…

  7. Relationship of Peer Mentoring to Academic Success and Social Engagement for First Year College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Brenda O.

    2013-01-01

    A correlational explanatory research design examined the relationship between peer mentoring, academic success and social engagement of first year college students participating in a peer mentoring program at a research one university in the southeastern United States. One hundred thirty-eight participants from the peer mentoring program responded…

  8. Mentor Age and Youth Developmental Outcomes in School-Based Mentoring Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, NaYoung

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring programs that provide guidance and support for disadvantaged youth have expanded rapidly during the past decade in the United States. Research suggests that students with teenage mentors exhibit positive youth development, including enhanced academic self-esteem and connectedness. By contrast, some studies showed that programs that offer…

  9. The Impact of Peer Mentoring on Mentee Academic Performance: Is Any Mentoring Style Better than No Mentoring at All?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leidenfrost, Birgit; Strassnig, Barbara; Schütz, Marlene; Carbon, Claus-Christian; Schabmann, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Universities frequently offer support programs to assist first-year students with the transition from school to the university. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different mentoring styles on mentee academic performance after 1 year and 2 years of study. Participants consisted of 417 psychology students who started their…

  10. Effect of Peer Mentors on Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonin, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Undergraduate peer mentoring programs strive to retain students who solve their own problems, develop options, unravel obstacles, and establish a process of figuring out solutions. A crucial component of obtaining that goal is to effectively train peer mentors to serve as advocates to freshman undergraduate students. Terrion and Philion (2008)…

  11. Mentor Program Provides STEM Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-alim, Jamaal

    2011-01-01

    The ACE Mentor Program provides early career exposure, mentoring, and scholarships to high school students in an attempt to encourage them to enter one of the three fields that make up the ACE acronym: (1) architecture; (2) construction; and (3) engineering. Founded in 1993 by longtime engineering consultant Charles Thornton, the program is…

  12. Early Career Academic Staff Support: Evaluating Mentoring Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, J. Denard; Lunsford, Laura Gail; Rodrigues, Helena A.

    2015-01-01

    Which academics benefit from participation in formal mentoring programmes? This study examined the needs and mentoring networks of new academics with evaluative data from a pilot mentoring programme. Themes from these data point towards re-envisioning initiatives for academic staff development. First, an examination of the expansion of mentoring…

  13. Levinson's Dream Theory and Its Relevance in an Academic Executive Mentoring Program: An Exploratory Study of Executive Mentors' Practice and Individuation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Douglas Martin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relevance that executive mentors' Dream journeys had for their mentoring practices. Dream journeys are the visions of where young adults see themselves in the future, and how they integrate themselves into the adult world over time. It was anticipated that a better understanding of executive mentors'…

  14. Mentors' Perspectives on the Effectiveness of a Teacher Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tant-Tierce, Tabatha

    2013-01-01

    Teacher retention is an issue in education, and the loss of teachers has a direct affect on student achievement. Schools are battling the attrition of beginning teachers by the use of mentoring programs. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a mentoring program, according to teachers who have served as mentors,…

  15. University Academics' Experiences of Learning through Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambler, Trudy; Harvey, Marina; Cahir, Jayde

    2016-01-01

    The use of mentoring for staff development is well established within schools and the business sector, yet it has received limited consideration in the higher education literature as an approach to supporting learning for academics. In this study located at one metropolitan university in Australia, an online questionnaire and one-on-one…

  16. Mentoring Urban Black Middle School Male Students: Implications for Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Derrick M.; Iwamoto, Derek K.; Ward, Nadia; Potts, Randolph; Boyd, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Researchers have called for innovative and culturally responsive intervention programs to enhance male, Black middle school students' academic achievement. Mentoring has received considerable attention as a novel remedy. Although anecdotal evidence supports the positive role of mentoring on academic achievement, these results are not consistent.…

  17. What kind of mentoring do we need? A review of mentoring program studies for medical students.

    PubMed

    Hur, Yera; Kim, Sun; Lee, Keumho

    2013-03-01

    Nearly every medical school in Korea has a student advisory program, regardless of its form or method, but it is plagued by efficiency. To examine efficient means of delivering student advisory programs, we chose 'mentoring' as one solution and reviewed the concepts of a mentor and mentoring, the qualities and roles of a mentor, and examples of national and international cases of mentoring. The concept of mentoring is diverse, but it connotes and stresses aspects, such as individual guidance, tutoring, life coaching, and role modeling. We conclude that the quality of many student advisory programs can be elevated by providing holistic and systematic guidance that meets the demands of the mentees; giving individual, continuous, and intimate coaching; and guiding a balanced academic and social life and career, which will develop good doctors who can provide a holistic health care.

  18. The Effects of Participation of School Children as Mediators in Contrast to Non-Mediators in a Mentored Mediation Program as Related to Academic Achievement, Developmental Disposition, and Conflict Orientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Eimear M.

    2010-01-01

    This study focused on the effects of elementary students' participation in a mentored peer mediation program during a school year as it related to three variables, academic achievement, developmental disposition, and conflict orientation. "Phase I", academic achievement, focused on the relationship between participation in this…

  19. Multiple Mentoring in Academe: Developing the Professorial Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Janasz, Suzanne C.; Sullivan, Sherry E.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies in business organizations have shown that mentoring provides numerous benefits for both individuals and organizations. Most of this mentoring research has been based on traditional, hierarchical mentor-protege relationships in non-academic settings. We discuss why there is little empirical research on faculty mentoring and review…

  20. REFORMA/UCLA Mentor Program: A Mentoring Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauler, Sandra

    Although mentoring dates back to Greek mythology, the concept continues to thrive in today's society. Mentoring is a strategy that successful people have known about for centuries. The REFORMA/UCLA Mentor Program has made use of this strategy since its inception in November 1985 at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the…

  1. Critical Issues in Mentoring and Mentoring Program for Beginning Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganser, Tom; Bainer, Deborah L.; Bendixen-Noe, Mary; Brock, Barbara L.; Stinson, Anne D'Antonio; Giebelhaus, Carmen; Runyon, Charles Kent

    This collection of papers identifies critical issues in mentoring and mentoring programs. Paper 1, "Support Behaviors Among Teachers in Authentic Settings" (Deborah L. Bainer), discusses the following issues: (1) mentoring is just one of the types of support behaviors needed and practiced by teachers in elementary schools; (2) support…

  2. A mentor training program improves mentoring competency for researchers working with early-career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mallory O; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective mentors, and the few that exist have a dearth of empirical support of their impact. In 2013, we recruited 34 faculty from across the US engaged in HIV-related clinical research to participate in a 2-day Mentoring the Mentors workshop. The workshop included didactic and interactive content focused on a range of topics, such as mentor-mentee communication, leadership styles, emotional intelligence, understanding the impact of diversity (unconscious bias, microaggressions, discrimination, tokenism) for mentees, and specific tools and techniques for effective mentoring. Pre- and post-workshop online evaluations documented high rates of satisfaction with the program and statistically significant improvements in self-appraised mentoring skills (e.g. addressing diversity in mentoring, communication with mentees, aligning mentor-mentee expectations), as assessed via a validated mentoring competency tool. This is the first mentoring training program focused on enhancing mentors' abilities to nurture investigators of diversity, filling an important gap, and evaluation results offer support for its effectiveness. Results suggest a need for refinement and expansion of the program and for more comprehensive, long-term evaluation of distal mentoring outcomes for those who participate in the program.

  3. How Mentoring Relationships Evolve: A Longitudinal Study of Academic Pediatricians in a Physician Educator Faculty Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balmer, Dorene; D'Alessandro, Donna; Risko, Wanessa; Gusic, Maryellen E.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Mentoring is increasingly recognized as central to career development. Less attention has been paid, however, to how mentoring relationships evolve over time. To provide a more complete picture of these complex relationships, the authors explored mentoring from a mentee's perspective within the context of a three-year faculty…

  4. The Women in Emergency Medicine Mentoring Program: An Innovative Approach to Mentoring

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Julie L.; Jimenez, Heather L.; Walthall, Jennifer; Allen, Sheryl E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Women in medicine report many gender-specific barriers to their career success and satisfaction, including a lack of mentors and role models. The literature calls for innovative strategies to enhance mentorship for women in medicine. Objective To describe the content, perceived value, and ongoing achievements of a mentoring program for women in emergency medicine. Methods The program offered mentoring for female faculty and residents in an academic emergency medicine department. Volunteers participated in group mentoring sessions using a mosaic of vertical and peer mentoring. Sessions focused on topics specific to women in medicine. An anonymous, electronic survey was sent to women who participated during 2004–2010 to assess the perceived value of the program and to collect qualitative feedback. Preliminary achievements fulfilling the program's goals were tracked. Results A total of 46 women (64%) completed the survey. The results showed a positive perceived value of the program (average, 4.65 on a 5-point Likert scale) in providing mentors and role models (4.41), in offering a supportive environment (4.39), in providing discussions pertinent to both personal (4.22) and professional development (4.22), while expanding networking opportunities (4.07). Notable achievements included work on the creation of a family leave policy, establishing lactation space, collaboration on projects, awards, and academic advancement. Conclusion This innovative model for mentoring women is perceived as a valuable asset to the academic department and residency. It offers the unique combination of expanding a female mentor pool by recruiting alumni and using a mosaic of vertical and peer mentoring. PMID:23997883

  5. Integrating Mentoring with Curriculum: Mentor Leadership Programs for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    Student "Mentor" and "Leadership" Programs impact the climate and culture of schools. Students are capable of outstanding leadership when given the opportunities and constructs to be successful. The evidence is clear that those schools that embrace student leadership and mentor programs have more positive events, activities,…

  6. Peer Mentoring Styles and Their Contribution to Academic Success among Mentees: A Person-Oriented Study in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leidenfrost, Birgit; Strassnig, Barbara; Schabmann, Alfred; Spiel, Christiane; Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to explore peer mentoring styles and examine their contribution to academic success among mentees. Data were collected as part of a comprehensive evaluation of a peer mentoring program. The sample consisted of 49 mentors (advanced students) who supported 376 mentees (first year students) in small groups. Indicators for…

  7. Peer Mentoring as an Academic Resource: Or "My Friend Says..."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, JaneMaree; Lindsay, Jo; Peel, Vicki; Twomey, Christina

    2006-01-01

    On current projections in could take thirty years for women to be equally represented in the academic workplace. Traditional methods of mentoring by senior staff often seem relics of an earlier era, but here a group of more junior academics reflect on the success of a peer-mentoring exercise which helped transform their first experience of…

  8. A Review of Undergraduate Mentoring Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershenfeld, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes published studies on undergraduate mentoring programs from 2008 to 2012. Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria, which included empirical research on formal mentoring programs with undergraduate students as mentees or mentors. Each study was assessed based on limitations identified in two earlier reviews of the mentoring…

  9. Mentoring: Studies of Effective Programs in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBolt, Gary

    In examining the theoretical place of induction in the process of becoming a teacher, this paper compares five school-based collaborative models of the use of mentors as part of induction programs to support new teachers. The following aspects of each program are compared: (1) goals; (2) training of mentors; (3) support provided for mentors; and…

  10. Repaving the road to academic success: the IMeRGE approach to peer mentoring.

    PubMed

    Bussey-Jones, Jada; Bernstein, Lisa; Higgins, Stacy; Malebranche, David; Paranjape, Anuradha; Genao, Inginia; Lee, Bennett; Branch, William

    2006-07-01

    In recent years, academic health centers have made a considerable effort to encourage medical students and physicians-in-training to consider academic medicine as a career choice. For physicians, selecting a career in academic medicine may be the first hurdle, but the challenge of successfully maintaining an academic career is perhaps a more formidable task. Mentoring is a much-needed response to this challenge. But the success of traditional mentoring programs at academic institutions is often limited by, among other things, the availability of senior faculty who can serve as mentors. The authors describe the formation and organization of the Internal Medicine Research Group at Emory (IMeRGE), an innovative peer mentoring group within the Division of General Medicine at Emory University. This group, born partially out of the mentoring needs of our women and minority faculty, shared the primary goal of fostering a collaborative atmosphere among junior faculty, while simultaneously acquiring experience through advanced faculty development. The authors present our methods of garnering division support for designated time and financial resources, defining member responsibilities, developing a curriculum, providing peer support, and seeking advisors with expertise in the areas on which we wished to focus. In addition to the development of IMeRGE, the authors provide an overview of the pros and cons of traditional mentoring versus peer mentoring; discuss the challenges faced by IMeRGE and strategies for addressing these issues; and present the paradigm of IMeRGE as a template for alternative forms of academic mentorship.

  11. Minority Student Perceptions of the Impact of Mentoring to Enhance Academic Performance in STEM Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendricks, Kimberly D.; Nedunuri, K. V.; Arment, Anthony R.

    2013-01-01

    The Benjamin Banneker Scholars Program (BBSP) was designed at an HBCU to increase the academic performance, retention, and graduation of minority students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). At the end of each academic year, students completed a BBSP Post-Program Satisfaction Survey. Each year Mentoring was consistently…

  12. A Mentor Training Program Improves Mentoring Competency for Researchers Working with Early-Career Investigators from Underrepresented Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mallory O.; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective…

  13. Mentor training within academic health centers with Clinical and Translational Science Awards.

    PubMed

    Abedin, Zainab; Rebello, Tahilia J; Richards, Boyd F; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-10-01

    Multiple studies highlight the benefits of effective mentoring in academic medicine. Thus, we sought to quantify and characterize the mentoring practices at academic health centers (AHCs) with Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA). Here we report findings pertaining specifically to mentor training at the level of the KL2 mentored award program, and at the broader institutional level. We found only four AHCs did not provide any form of training. One-time orientation was most prevalent at the KL2 level, whereas formal face-to-face training was most prevalent at the institutional level. Despite differences in format usage, there was general consensus at both the KL2 and institutional level about the topics of focus of face-to-face training sessions. Lower-resource training formats utilized at the KL2 level may reveal a preference for preselection of qualified mentors, while institutional selection of resource-heavy formats may be an attempt to raise the mentoring qualifications of the academic community as a whole. The present work fits into the expanding landscape of academic mentoring literature and sets the framework for future longitudinal, outcome studies focused on identifying the most efficient strategies to develop effective mentors.

  14. When Email and Mentoring Unite: The Implementation of a Nationwide Electronic Mentoring Program--MentorNet, the National Electronic Industrial Mentoring Network for Women in Engineering and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Single, Peg Boyle; Muller, Carol B.

    Electronic mentoring (e-mentoring) programs are providing unprecedented opportunities for establishing mentoring relationships. E-mentoring is the merger of mentoring with electronic communications and links mentors with proteges independent of geography or scheduling constraints. In this case study, the authors apply a model of structured…

  15. Evaluation of an Online Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Sharon; Camilli, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the evaluation of an online mentoring program for preparing pre-service elementary teachers at a small liberal arts college is described. An intervention was created to investigate the effects of online mentoring with preservice teachers, where mentoring is defined as a reciprocal relationship formed between an experienced teacher…

  16. A cross-cultural mentoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Huang-Nissen, S.; Myers, R.Y.

    1995-04-01

    This report summarized the results of the pilot Cross-Cultural Mentoring Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, from the inception of the program idea through its implementation and assessment. It discusses the benefits of mentoring, the origins of the program, program design and implementation, program assessment, and conclusions and recommendations.

  17. Best Practices in Mentoring in NOAA Scholarship Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, M.; Sarvis, S.; Dancy, V.

    2015-12-01

    Through established scholarship programs, NOAA hosts 125 - 175 undergraduate students each summer to participate in internship opportunities at agency facilities. In order to host a scholar, NOAA labs and offices must designate a mentor who develops a project and oversees activities of the student throughout the summer. NOAA implements best practices in mentoring in the following ways: mentor and intern responsibilities are clearly defined in a manual; mentors are required to take an online mentor training class; mentors and scholars are matched through an online system and scholars conduct a site visit prior to beginning the internship; proposed internship projects are reviewed by scholarship program managers to assure they are sufficiently analytical and will advance the student in their future academic and career goals; and mentors are surveyed at the midpoint, allowing scholarship program managers to identify problems and intervene if possible. These practices have resulted in strong results. Students identify the mentor relationship, hands-on experience and networking with professionals as the three most important outcomes of the internship experience.

  18. Targeted Mentoring: Evaluation of a Program.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Carolyn A; Harold, Rena D; Ahmedani, Brian K; Cramer, Elizabeth P

    2009-01-01

    Targeted mentoring refers to mentoring aimed at a particular population. This article presents the evaluation of a mentoring program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons in social work education. Forty-three mentors and protégés responded to a survey regarding their program experiences. The results highlight the need for targeted mentoring, although some disparities of experience for mentors and protégés in this program are apparent. In general, mentors felt positive about participating, giving back to the LGBT community, and were more satisfied with their experiences than were the protégés, who were looking for more specific types of instrumental and psychosocial support.

  19. Mentoring medical students in academic emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Garmel, Gus M

    2004-12-01

    Mentoring is an important aspect of career development for medical students, residents, and junior faculty. It is vital to the professional growth and maturation of individuals early in each phase of their careers. Additionally, mentoring has a critical role throughout all career stages, because the mentor-mentee relationship provides mutual benefit to both participants. This article will describe the role of the mentor, suggest ways to increase the likelihood of successful mentoring, and identify pitfalls in the mentoring process predominantly related to medical students. In contrast to role models, mentors play an active part in the development of a young physician's career. This difference will be discussed. Finally, this article will describe the responsibilities of career guidance and recommendation letter authorship that mentors assume for medical students.

  20. Evaluating Mentoring Programs. P/PV Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Jean Baldwin

    2009-01-01

    This methodological brief is designed to provide both program operators and researchers with practical advice about how to assess a program's implementation and impact. Adapted from an article that first appeared in "The Handbook of Youth Mentoring" (DuBois and Karcher, ed. 2005), the brief focuses on the evaluation of mentoring programs, but the…

  1. Spectrum Approach to Mentoring: An Evidence-Based Approach to Mentoring for Academics Working in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Marina; Ambler, Trudy; Cahir, Jayde

    2017-01-01

    Anecdotal and empirical evidence indicates that mentoring can be a successful strategy for supporting professional learning, yet limited literature exists on approaches to mentoring designed specifically for academics working in higher education. The aim of this study was to create an approach to mentoring tailored to the needs of academics and…

  2. Using a Geriatric Mentoring Narrative Program to Improve Medical Student Attitudes towards the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Pamela; Cohen, Diane; Novack, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    This study examined first-year medical student attitudes concerning the elderly before and after instituting a geriatric mentoring program. The program began and ended with a survey designed to assess students' attitudes toward the elderly. During the mentoring program, students visited the same senior for four visits throughout the academic year.…

  3. 5 years of experience with a large-scale mentoring program for medical students

    PubMed Central

    Pinilla, Severin; Pander, Tanja; von der Borch, Philip; Fischer, Martin R.; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present our 5-year-experience with a large-scale mentoring program for undergraduate medical students at the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU). We implemented a two-tiered program with a peer-mentoring concept for preclinical students and a 1:1-mentoring concept for clinical students aided by a fully automated online-based matching algorithm. Approximately 20-30% of each student cohort participates in our voluntary mentoring program. Defining ideal program evaluation strategies, recruiting mentors from beyond the academic environment and accounting for the mentoring network reality remain challenging. We conclude that a two-tiered program is well accepted by students and faculty. In addition the online-based matching seems to be effective for large-scale mentoring programs. PMID:25699108

  4. 5 years of experience with a large-scale mentoring program for medical students.

    PubMed

    Pinilla, Severin; Pander, Tanja; von der Borch, Philip; Fischer, Martin R; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present our 5-year-experience with a large-scale mentoring program for undergraduate medical students at the Ludwig Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU). We implemented a two-tiered program with a peer-mentoring concept for preclinical students and a 1:1-mentoring concept for clinical students aided by a fully automated online-based matching algorithm. Approximately 20-30% of each student cohort participates in our voluntary mentoring program. Defining ideal program evaluation strategies, recruiting mentors from beyond the academic environment and accounting for the mentoring network reality remain challenging. We conclude that a two-tiered program is well accepted by students and faculty. In addition the online-based matching seems to be effective for large-scale mentoring programs.

  5. Addressing the Academic and Social Needs of Young Male Students through School-Based Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Curtis E.

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the problem within the U.S. public school system to sustainably meet the academic and social needs of its African American male students. The administrative team of the elementary school in this study desired an evaluation of a school-based male mentoring program that was designed to address these needs. The program, Gentlemen…

  6. Transitional and Transformational Spaces: Mentoring Young Academics through Writing Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Arlene; Parker, Shabnam

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of writing centre interventions on student writing in higher education has been well-documented in academic literacies studies. This paper changes the focus of investigation from student to consultant and, consequently, explores the way in which an academic writing centre can function as a mentoring environment for young…

  7. A Mentor Program--Possibilities Unlimited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Helaine D.

    1980-01-01

    A mentor program designed to coordinate community experiences for gifted and talented students in 43 schools (grades K through 12) in Springfield (MA) is described and examples of program activities based on J. Renzulli's Enrichment Triad Model are cited. (CL)

  8. Distance Mentoring in the NASA/Kennedy Space Center Virtual Science Mentor Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckingham, Gregg

    This study examines the results of a three year video mentoring program, the NASA Virtual Science Mentor (VSM) program, which paired 56 NASA mentor engineers and scientists with 56 middle school science teachers in seven Southwest Florida counties. The study sought to determine the impact on students, mentors, and teachers participating in the…

  9. Peer mentoring program in an interprofessional and interdisciplinary curriculum in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Camila Aparecida Machado; de França Carvalho, Carolina Prado; Céspedes, Isabel Cristina; de Oliveira, Flávia; Le Sueur-Maluf, Luciana

    2015-01-01

    The Federal University of São Paulo, Baixada Santista Campus was founded in 2006 with five degree-granting programs in physical education, physiotherapy, nutrition, psychology, and occupational therapy. The guiding principle behind the programs' educational mission was centered on the development of health care professionals capable of working in interdisciplinary teams with an emphasis on holistic patient care. This pedagogical structure required peer-mentoring programs in order to integrate different areas of knowledge and to improve learning strategies among new generations of students. The authors' objective in the present report is to discuss the strategies and activities of the peer-mentoring program in histophysiology and gross anatomy in an interdisciplinary and interprofessional curriculum. Evaluations by students, mentors and professors are presented, along with a statistical analysis of variance comparing student performance in the module assessments according to their participation in the peer-mentoring activities. The results demonstrated that students who participated in peer-mentoring activities enjoyed a higher rate of academic success than those who did not participate. In addition, student and mentor evaluations of the peer mentoring program were highly positive. The program enabled mentors to gain a deeper knowledge of the subjects addressed in the learning modules, as well as to develop intrinsic teaching skills during their time as mentors. In short, the authors believe that the peer-mentoring program has been validated for its effectiveness in raising student academic performance.

  10. Development and Implementation of a Peer Mentoring Program for Early Career Gerontological Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, Ashley Leak; Brody, Ab; Perez, Adriana; Shillam, Casey; Edelman, Linda S.; Bond, Stewart M.; Foster, Victoria; Siegel, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Purpose In conjunction with the National Hartford Centers of Gerontological Nursing Excellence (NHCGNE), formerly known as the Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Initiative (BAGNC), the Hartford Gerontological Nursing Leaders (HGNL) developed and executed a program beginning in 2011 to enhance both (a) the experience of newly selected scholars and fellows to the NHCGNE and (b) the ongoing professional development of the HGNL. The purpose of this article is to describe key strategies used to develop and execute the mentoring program and to present the formative and summative program evaluation. Design The program was launched in January 2011 with seven peer mentor and mentee matches. In June 2012, the peer mentoring committee solicited feedback on the development of the peer mentoring program and changes were made for the subsequent cohorts. Findings An additional 12 matches were made in the following 2 years (2012 and 2013), for a total of 31 matches to date. We have learned several key lessons from our three cohorts regarding how to structure, implement, and carefully evaluate a peer mentoring program. Conclusions Informal evaluation of our peer mentoring program noted several challenges for both peer mentors and mentees. Having knowledge of and addressing those challenges may increase the overall quality and effectiveness of peer mentoring programs and, in turn, benefit academic nursing by strengthening the faculty workforce. Clinical Relevance Findings from development and implementation of a peer mentoring program for gerontological faculty could lead to new and adaptable programs in a variety of clinical and education settings. PMID:25808927

  11. Mentoring urban Black Middle-School Male Students: Implications for Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Derrick M.; Iwamoto, Derek; Ward, Nadia; Potts, Randolph; Boyd, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Researchers have called for innovative and culturally responsive intervention programs to enhance male, African American middle school students’ academic achievement. Mentoring has received considerable attention as a novel remedy. Although anecdotal evidence supports the positive role of mentoring on academic achievement, these results are not consistent. The Benjamin E. Mays Institute (BEMI) builds on the ideals of mentoring to counter the effects academic underachievement among adolescent Black males by building a model that is Afro-centric, uses pro-social modeling, and emphasizes cultural strengths and pride, and single-sex instruction in a dual-sex educational environment. Sixty-one middle-school Black males were enrolled (BEMI: n=29; Comparison: n=32) in this study. Results revealed that students in the BEMI program had significantly greater academic attachment scores and academic success than their non-mentored peers. Additionally, racial identity attitudes of immersion/emersion and internalization and identification with academics were also significantly associated with standardized achievement tests and GPA. Policy and practice implications are discussed. PMID:20379371

  12. Mentoring Programs: An Opportunity to "Pay It Forward"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loy, Darcy

    2013-01-01

    Being a mentor to young professionals embodies the pay-it-forward concept. Think of the potential impact if one chose to mentor three people, and they then chose to mentor nine more people, and those went on to mentor 27 more people. The results could be prodigious. Successful mentoring programs have become valuable, organizational assets. In a…

  13. Student Mentors' benefits in the Higher European Education: Academic Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Rojas, S.; Gónzlez-Tirados, R. M.; Sánchez, M. E.; Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Saa-Requejo, A.; Gascó, G.; Moratiel, R.; Fabregat, J.; Antón, J. M.; Andina, D.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    For several years the Spanish University has been experiencing changes that affect not only the educational area but also innovation and investigation in the classroom. In this sense, we carried out a first step in a senior student mentor project in order to facilitate adaptation of the new students, providing information, advice and guidance on different academic and social aspects. Here, we understand mentoring (including e-mentoring) as a relationship between a more senior student (mentor) and a few junior lesser experienced students (mentees). Mentoring is intended to develop and grow the skills, knowledge, confidence, and cultural understanding of the mentees aiming to help them succeed. Consequently, this work arises from our concern about studentś need. A test has been designed to assess studentś interest in the three fundamental aspects of mentoring: academic, social and administrative orientation. The test involved 16 questions related to these three different aspects on mentoring, evaluating each question from 1 (none) to 4 (totally). Surveys have been conducted on this topic at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) with students on different levels and modules of degrees in Agricultural Engineering. The same activity has been applied to the new degrees that have started last course (2010-11) in the Bologna Plan's requirements and will replace the precedents progressively. We have analyzed the answers considering sex, age, course and attitude to participate in the mentoring project. Several discussions are presented based on these results. Acknowledgements Funding provided by CEIGRAM (Research Centre for the Management of Agricultural and Environmental Risks) and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) through Educational Innovation Project is greatly appreciated. Educational Innovation Project: "Training of senior students as mentors in different subjects of undergraduate and graduate degrees at ETSI Agrónomos"

  14. A Peer Mentor Tutor Program in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S. M.; Jacob, A. T.; Buehlman, J. D.; Middlecamp, C. H.

    2001-05-01

    The Peer Mentor Tutor (PMT) program in the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Physics Department matches upper level undergraduate physics majors in small groups with students potentially at-risk for having academic trouble with their gateway introductory non-calculus physics course or for feeling isolated at the University. The program enhances students'learning and confidence by providing an emphasis on problem solving, a supportive environment for asking questions, and opportunities for acquiring missing math skills. The students assisted include, among others, returning adults, students of color,students with English as a second language, and students who have never taken physics in high school. The tutors acquire teaching and leadership experience with ongoing training throughout the year. The Physics PMT program is run in collaboration with a similar program in Chemistry. The peer model is also being applied to other science courses at the University of Wisconsin. We will describe the structure of the Physics PMT program and our current efforts to expand the program into a broader Physics Learning Center that may serve multiple purposes and courses.

  15. Virtual Mentoring Program within an Online Doctoral Nursing Education Program: A Phenomenological Study.

    PubMed

    Welch, Susan

    2017-02-22

    The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of doctoral nursing education students who participated in a virtual mentoring program. A phenomenological design was used to enable the researchers to gain an understanding of the research phenomenon. The three patterns that emerged during the study were Confirmation of Mentoring, Building Communities, and Learning the Role of Doctoral Student. Under the pattern of Confirmation of Mentoring were the themes of Receiving Academic Support and Receiving Personal Support. Under the pattern of Building Communities were the themes of Getting to Know Mentors and Understanding the Importance of Relationships. Under the pattern of Learning of Role of Doctoral Student were the themes of Balancing Time and Learning Technology. Additional research is needed to more fully explore virtual mentoring within doctoral programs.

  16. Culturally Diverse Undergraduate Researchers' Academic Outcomes and Perceptions of Their Research Mentoring Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byars-Winston, Angela M.; Branchaw, Janet; Pfund, Christine; Leverett, Patrice; Newton, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have empirically investigated the specific factors in mentoring relationships between undergraduate researchers (mentees) and their mentors in the biological and life sciences that account for mentees' positive academic and career outcomes. Using archival evaluation data from more than 400 mentees gathered over a multi-year period (2005-2011) from several undergraduate biology research programs at a large, Midwestern research university, we validated existing evaluation measures of the mentored research experience and the mentor-mentee relationship. We used a subset of data from mentees (77% underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities) to test a hypothesized social cognitive career theory model of associations between mentees' academic outcomes and perceptions of their research mentoring relationships. Results from path analysis indicate that perceived mentor effectiveness indirectly predicted post-baccalaureate outcomes via research self-efficacy beliefs. Findings are discussed with implications for developing new and refining existing tools to measure this impact, programmatic interventions to increase the success of culturally diverse research mentees and future directions for research.

  17. Culturally Diverse Undergraduate Researchers’ Academic Outcomes and Perceptions of Their Research Mentoring Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Branchaw, Janet; Pfund, Christine; Leverett, Patrice; Newton, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have empirically investigated the specific factors in mentoring relationships between undergraduate researchers (mentees) and their mentors in the biological and life sciences that account for mentees’ positive academic and career outcomes. Using archival evaluation data from more than 400 mentees gathered over a multi-year period (2005–11) from several undergraduate biology research programs at a large, Midwestern research university, we validated existing evaluation measures of the mentored research experience and the mentor-mentee relationship. We used a subset of data from mentees (77% underrepresented racial/ethnic minorities) to test a hypothesized social cognitive career theory model of associations between mentees’ academic outcomes and perceptions of their research mentoring relationships. Results from path analysis indicate that perceived mentor effectiveness indirectly predicted post-baccalaureate outcomes via research self-efficacy beliefs. Findings are discussed with implications for developing new and refining existing tools to measure this impact, programmatic interventions to increase the success of culturally diverse research mentees and future directions for research. PMID:27065568

  18. Mentoring for Professional Geropsychology within a Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Bob G.

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring in doctoral programs in professional psychology has its roots in mentoring in science programs of all types. Professional psychology in general may suffer from conflating mentoring with clinical supervision. Using the Pikes Peak Model competencies as a framework, mentoring in attitudes, knowledge, and skills related to professional…

  19. Professional Development of Mentors within a Beginning Teacher Induction Program: How Does the Garden (Mentors) Grow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Iris M.; Sandlin, Ruth A.

    This study examined the impact of a beginning teacher induction program on involved mentors' teaching competence. Additionally, it investigated the relationship of mentor's self-efficacy to program impact. Approximately 1,600 beginning teachers and 700 mentors from 56 school districts participated in a state-funded induction program in which…

  20. Creating More Effective Mentors: Mentoring the Mentor.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Monica; Johnson, Mallory

    2016-09-01

    Given the diversity of those affected by HIV, increasing diversity in the HIV biomedical research workforce is imperative. A growing body of empirical and experimental evidence supports the importance of strong mentorship in the development and success of trainees and early career investigators in academic research settings, especially for mentees of diversity. Often missing from this discussion is the need for robust mentoring training programs to ensure that mentors are trained in best practices on the tools and techniques of mentoring. Recent experimental evidence shows improvement in mentor and mentee perceptions of mentor competency after structured and formalized training on best practices in mentoring. We developed a 2-day "Mentoring the Mentors" workshop at UCSF to train mid-level and senior HIV researchers from around the country [recruited mainly from Centers for AIDS Research (CFARs)] on best practices, tools and techniques of effective mentoring. The workshop content was designed using principles of Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) and included training specifically geared towards working with early career investigators from underrepresented groups, including sessions on unconscious bias, microaggressions, and diversity supplements. The workshop has been held three times (September 2012, October 2013 and May 2015) with plans for annual training. Mentoring competency was measured using a validated tool before and after each workshop. Mentoring competency skills in six domains of mentoring-specifically effective communication, aligning expectations, assessing understanding, fostering independence, addressing diversity and promoting development-all improved as assessed by a validated measurement tool for participants pre- and -post the "Mentoring the Mentors" training workshops. Qualitative assessments indicated a greater awareness of the micro-insults and unconscious bias experienced by mentees of diversity and a commitment to improve awareness and

  1. The Role of Interpersonal Comfort, Attributional Confidence, and Communication Quality in Academic Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Laetitia; Waters, Lea

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore mentoring between supervisors and their postgraduate students by (a) investigating types of mentoring functions offered in academic mentoring relationships, (b) exploring perceptions of supervisors and their postgraduate students about provisions for mentoring support, and (c) examining how interpersonal…

  2. Program Support and Value of Training in Mentors' Satisfaction and Anticipated Continuation of School-Based Mentoring Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillin, Samuel D.; Straight, Gerald G.; Saeki, Elina

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we tested a theoretical model of training practices in school-based mentoring by comparing the differences between two mentoring programs on mentor-reported program support, value of training, relationship satisfaction, and plans to continue mentoring. The two mentoring programs that we compared were conducted at the same school and…

  3. Teachers' Perceptions of Interpersonal Mentoring Relationships in One Early Childhood Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaunae, Cathrine

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to gain a greater understanding of the interpersonal relationships between mentors and mentees in one early childhood, teacher-initiated, mentoring program. The mentoring program was designed to facilitate the induction process of newly-employed teachers into the university-based early childhood center.…

  4. "Having the Right Chemistry": A Qualitative Study of Mentoring in Academic Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Vicki A.; Palepu, Anita; Szalacha, Laura; Caswell, Cheryl; Carr, Phyllis L.; Inui, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Sought to develop a deeper understanding of mentoring by exploring lived experiences of academic medicine faculty members. Almost 98 percent of participants identified lack of mentoring as the first or second most important factor hindering career progress in academic medicine. Prized mentors have "clout," knowledge, and interest in the…

  5. Sandia's mentoring program : an ongoing success.

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, Soila

    2003-12-01

    This report summarizes the Mentoring Program at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), which has been an on-going success since its inception in 1995. The Mentoring Program provides a mechanism to develop a workforce able to respond to changing requirements and complex customer needs. The program objectives are to enhance employee contributions through increased knowledge of SNL culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. Mentoring is a proven mechanism for attracting new employees, retaining employees, and developing leadership. It helps to prevent the loss of corporate knowledge from attrition and retirement, and it increases the rate and level of contributions of new managers and employees, also spurring cross-organizational teaming. The Mentoring Program is structured as a one-year partnership between an experienced staff member or leader and a less experienced one. Mentors and mentees are paired according to mutual objectives and interests. Support is provided to the matched pairs from their management as well as division program coordinators in both New Mexico and California locations. In addition, bi-monthly large-group training sessions are held.

  6. Mentoring Programs in Nebraska. Resources for Youth and Volunteers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska ETV Network, Lincoln.

    "One PLUS one," the PLUS Project on Mentoring, is a Public Television Outreach Alliane campaign to promote mentoring and literacy. The Nebraska Educational Television (ETV) Network, in an attempt to match experienced, responsible adults (mentors) with youth facing profound academic and emotional challenges, compiled a directory of…

  7. Mentor Programs and the Impact on School Connectedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherman, Jodi L.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation was designed to examine the impact school-based mentor programs have on school connectedness when compared to a control group with no mentoring. Further, the study was designed to determine the differential impact between peer mentoring and adult mentoring. The research study was also designed to provide data to inform the…

  8. Citrus Community College District Mentor Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, Diane; Sprague, Caroline

    The Citrus College faculty and staff addressed the problem of lower career aspirations among women by establishing a support group, Citrus Women in Higher Education (CWHE). In addition to group meetings and special programs of interest, the CWHE has developed a mentor program to address the problem of blocked careers faced by women. The goals of…

  9. The New York State Mentoring Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuomo, Matilda R.

    This conference address discusses New York State programs for children and families, focusing on a mentoring program. New York State has 44 rural counties, which comprise 80% of the state's total area. Rural schools face limited financial resources and access to services. Rural school children are more likely to face failure than urban or suburban…

  10. Mentoring children of prisoners: program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bruster, Belinda E; Foreman, Kim

    2012-01-01

    This program evaluation explores Seton Youth Shelters, Mentoring Children's Prisoners (MCP) Program. The following questions were research: (a) Where are the children residing, (b) Are mentoring services effective, (c) How are the children faring emotionally and psychologically, and (d) How often and what form of communication do they use. The findings reveal that youth participating in MCP have an increased interest in school, better relationships with their family, and find speaking to someone about everyday issues or problems helpful. Family members report a positive change in the youth attitude, increase interest in school, completion of homework, and greater interest in their well-being.

  11. The Content of Electronic Mentoring: A Study of Special Educators Participating in an Online Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the content and frequency of interactions that occurred in an electronic mentoring program involving beginning special educators and their mentors. In addition, the characteristics of mentors' and mentees' and perceived outcomes of mentees' were provided. This study sought to address questions about the…

  12. Changes in Mentor Efficacy and Perceptions Following Participation in a Youth Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strapp, Chehalis M.; Gilles, Andrew W.; Spalding, Anne E.; Hughes, Caleb T.; Baldwin, Annika M.; Guy, Kendra L.; Feakin, Kenna R.; Lamb, Adam D.

    2014-01-01

    Although mentoring programs are increasing in popularity as a preventative intervention strategy for youth, little is known about the experience from the mentor's perspective. In this study, we describe a longitudinal assessment of 41 mentors, including 13 men and 28 women (M[subscript age]?=?21.93?years, SD?=?3.21) working with at-risk youth in a…

  13. Starting an e-Mentor Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caron, Daniel W.

    2008-01-01

    Mentorship is a valuable learning tool. A quick search of the Internet will result in hundreds of examples of mentorship between students, teachers, and people from industry. In this article, the author describes an e-mentor program used by aerospace students at Kingswoood Regional High School in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. The author also describes…

  14. Mentoring program design and implementation in new medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Fornari, Alice; Murray, Thomas S.; Menzin, Andrew W.; Woo, Vivian A.; Clifton, Maurice; Lombardi, Marion; Shelov, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Mentoring is considered a valuable component of undergraduate medical education with a variety of programs at established medical schools. This study presents how new medical schools have set up mentoring programs as they have developed their curricula. Methods Administrators from 14 US medical schools established since 2006 were surveyed regarding the structure and implementation of their mentoring programs. Results The majority of new medical schools had mentoring programs that varied in structure and implementation. Although the programs were viewed as valuable at each institution, challenges when creating and implementing mentoring programs in new medical schools included time constraints for faculty and students, and lack of financial and professional incentives for faculty. Conclusions Similar to established medical schools, there was little uniformity among mentoring programs at new medical schools, likely reflecting differences in curriculum and program goals. Outcome measures are needed to determine whether a best practice for mentoring can be established. PMID:24962112

  15. The Anatomy of a Mentoring Program for Beginning Urban Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freiberg, Melissa R.; And Others

    This study outlines and evaluates an urban school district's mentoring program in which 18 veteran teachers are selected to serve as full-time mentors for up to 10 beginning teachers or 4 persons participating in an alternative certification program. Methods of data collection included surveys and focus group interviews with mentor teachers,…

  16. A Mentoring Program in Environmental Science for Underrepresented Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, L.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    We developed a four-year program, combining educational and career support and research activities, to recruit and retain students from underrepresented groups in environmental sciences. Specifically, the program: ○ Assigns each student a faculty or graduate student mentor with whom the student conducts research activities. ○ Includes a weekly group meeting for team building and to review professional development and academic topics, such as time management and research ethics. ○ Requires students to make multiple formal presentations of their research proposals and results. ○ Provides scholarships and stipends for both the academic year and to engage students in summer research. The program seeks to achieve several goals including: ● Enhance academic performance. ● Encourage continued study in environmental science. ● Facilitate students completing their studies at UVM. ● Increase students’ interest in pursuing science careers. ● Create a more welcoming academic environment. To assess progress toward achievement of these goals, we conducted individual structured interviews with participating undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty members at two points in time. First, interviews were conducted in the fall of 2007 after two years, and again in spring 2009, after four years. An independent research consultant, Dr. Livingston, conducted the interviews. In 2009, over the course of three days, the interviews included three graduate student and two faculty mentors, and six of the seven undergraduate students. Of the six students, three were juniors and three were graduating seniors. Results of the 2009 interviews echoed those of 2007. Both students and their mentors are quite satisfied with the program. The student presentations, weekly meetings, mentoring relationships, and summer research experiences all get high ratings from program participants. Students give high praise to their mentors and the program directors for providing

  17. An Exploration of the "Lived Experience" of One Cohort of Academic Peer Mentors at a Small Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couchman, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    Academic peer mentoring programs have gained a firm place in higher education student support over the last couple of decades. One such program, Supplemental Instruction (SI), has been extensively evaluated as particularly effective in the United States and has subsequently figured in recommendations for adoption by both Australian and New Zealand…

  18. Peer-Mentoring Undergraduate Accounting Students: The Influence on Approaches to Learning and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Alison; Stevenson, Lorna; Connelly, Patricia; Duff, Angus; Dunlop, Angela

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the impact of a student peer-mentoring programme (the Mentor Accountant Project, MAP) on first-year undergraduates' academic performance. The development of MAP was informed by reference to extant literature; it relies on the voluntary services of third-year students who then act as mentors to first-year student mentees in…

  19. Increasing Self-Esteem and School Connectedness through a Multidimensional Mentoring Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Keith A.; Vidourek, Rebecca; Davis, Beth; McClellan, Warren

    2002-01-01

    Examines findings from a multidisciplinary mentoring program for fourth graders. Students were admitted to the program based on responses to a survey on self-esteem; school, peer, and family connectedness; and risk taking behavior. The program emphasized relationship building, self-esteem enhancement, goal setting, and academic assistance.…

  20. Mentoring For Success: REU Program That Help Every Student Succeed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, B. L.

    2015-12-01

    NSF REU site programs provide remarkable opportunities for students to experience first-hand the challenges and rewards of science research. Because REU positions are relatively scarce, applicant pools are large, and it is easy to fill available positions with students who already have well-developed research skills and proven abilities to excel academically. Advisors bringing REU participants into their labs may see this as the ideal situation. However, using experience and academic record as the primary selection criteria ignores an enormous pool of talented students who have simply never been in a position to show, or discover themselves, what they can do. Reaching this audience requires a shift in strategy: recruiting in ways that reach students who are unaware of REU opportunities; adjusting our selection criteria to look beyond academics and experience, putting as much emphasis on future potential as we do on past performance; finding, or developing, mentors who share this broader vision of working with students; and providing an institutional culture that ensure every student has the kind of multi-node support network that maximizes his or her success. REU programs should be primary tools to developing a deeper and broader science workforce. Achieving that goal will require innovative approaches to finding, recruiting, and mentoring participants.

  1. Juvenile Mentoring Program: A Progress Review. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novotney, Laurence C.; Mertinko, Elizabeth; Lange, James; Baker, Tara Kelley

    The greatest support offered by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention for youth mentoring has been through the Juvenile Mentoring Program (JUMP), which provides one-to-one mentoring for youth at risk of delinquency, gang involvement, educational failure, or dropping out of school. Information on JUMP has been collected through…

  2. Redefining Mentoring: An Evaluation of a Second-Year Teacher Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bettencourt, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Mentoring programs for beginning teachers have garnered much attention in the field of education in the past decade. There is an increasing call for the redefinition of the traditional mentoring program, which often caters only to the first-year teacher, providing primarily emotional and procedural support. The Plymouth Public Schools (PPS) has…

  3. Mentoring the Next Generation of Faculty: Supporting Academic Career Aspirations among Doctoral Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtin, Nicola; Malley, Janet; Stewart, Abigail J.

    2016-01-01

    We know little about the role of faculty mentoring in the development of interest in pursuing an academic career among doctoral students. Drawing on Social Cognitive Career Theory, this study examined the relationships between different kinds of mentoring (instrumental, psychosocial, and sponsorship) and academic career self-efficacy, interests,…

  4. A mentor-protégé program for new faculty, Part II: Stories of mentors.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Carol B; Brannan, Jane; White, Anne

    2010-12-01

    Mentorship has been identified as an influential factor in retaining new nursing faculty. A mentor-protégé program for novice faculty was implemented to promote development of the protégés in their role as nurse educators. A qualitative research study conducted to illuminate the meaning of experiences of mentors led to the emergence of four patterns: The Significance of the Mentor-Protégé Relationship, Communication as Important Between Mentor and Protégé, The Mentor-Protégé Program-Protégé's Perspectives, and The Mentoring Role as Expert Educator. The data from the study support the significance of providing mentorship to novice or new nurse educators. The data suggest that mentors benefit from participation in a mentor-protégé program as much as the protégés. Similar programs are needed in nursing if we are to mentor and encourage faculty to begin and remain in the role of educators to combat the future nurse educator shortage.

  5. Formal Mentoring Programs: The Relationship of Program Design and Support to Mentors' Perceptions of Benefits and Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parise, Marc R.; Forret, Monica L.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship of formal mentoring program design elements (i.e., voluntary participation, input to matching, and effectiveness of training) and management support to the benefits and costs perceived by formal mentors. Data were collected from 97 formal mentors from a Midwestern financial institution. Multiple regressions…

  6. Assessment of a University-Based Distance Education Mentoring Program from a Quality Management Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barczyk, Casimir; Buckenmeyer, Janet; Feldman, Lori; Hixon, Emily

    2011-01-01

    This study describes assessment results from the Distance Education Mentoring Program (DEMP) at Purdue University Calumet, Indiana, USA. The program, sponsored by the university's Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, was made available to all teaching faculty who wished to become proteges and develop their skills at teaching online courses. The…

  7. A mentoring program for new school nurses.

    PubMed

    Houghton, Connie

    2003-02-01

    Until recent years, school nursing practice consisted mainly of screenings and first aid. However, the changing health, social, and emotional needs of children in the school setting have brought about an expansion of school nursing services. Now school nurses must not only perform routine first aid and screenings, but they must also carry out independent health assessments, monitor various medications, counsel students from troubled homes, collaborate with their educational partners, and complete numerous reports. Historically, school nurses began their careers with little specialized education or orientation. However, with the increased demands in school nursing, it is important to guide, advise, and mentor new school nurses so they can reach a level of competency and confidence more quickly. In this descriptive study, new school nurses were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction with the School Nurse-Mentoring Program. The findings of this study indicate that a mentoring program for new school nurses results in increased career satisfaction, a higher level of competency, and health benefits for the students being served.

  8. A hospital/school science fair mentoring program for middle school students.

    PubMed

    Torres, B; Harris, R F; Lockwood, D; Johnson, J; Mirabal, R; Wells, D T; Pacheco, M; Soussou, H; Robb, F; Weissman, G K; Gwosdow, A R

    1997-12-01

    The Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the James P. Timilty Middle School established a partnership to enhance science education, promote faculty development, and improve the health status and academic performance of all Timilty students. This article describes one of the Partnership's Science Connection programs, the Science Fair Mentoring Program, designed to enhance middle school science education, inform urban early adolescents about professions in the health field, inspire them to pursue postsecondary study in the health sciences, and prepare them for rigorous academic work in high school. In this program, hospital-based clinical and research staff mentor young adolescent students. The authors describe the planning, implementation, and evaluation of the Science Fair Mentoring Program as an innovative learning experience.

  9. Assessment of the efficacy of a peer mentoring program in a university setting.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Miguel A; Castaño, Gloria; Calles, Ana M; Sánchez-Herrero, Silvia

    2010-11-01

    In the present study, the efficacy of a formal mentoring program applied to fourth and fifth year students of the Psychology Faculty of the Complutense University is assessed. In this program, fifth-year students took on the role of mentors and fourth-year students, the role of mentees. To assess the efficacy, the group of mentors was compared with a group of non-mentors and the group of mentees with a group of non-mentees, before and after the program, taking into account the variables related to career development function (knowledge acquired of the academic setting and satisfaction with the career of Psychology) and the psychosocial function (self-concept, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and involvement). The results show a statistically significant increase in the knowledge acquired about the academic setting as a consequence of the program, both in the group of mentors and in the group of mentees. Moreover, the mentors achieved a better average grade in the subjects of the specialty of Work Psychology. There were no statistically significant differences between the experimental group and the control group in satisfaction with the career of Psychology, or in self-concept, self-esteem, or self-efficacy.

  10. Rec and Read Mentor Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Amy Carpenter; Halas, Joannie

    2011-01-01

    For the past six years in Winnipeg, Canada, young people from diverse Aboriginal backgrounds have been volunteering their time, energy, and talents to develop and deliver after-school physical activity, nutrition, and education programs for children in their school's neighbourhood. Known as "Rec and Read," the after-school activities are…

  11. Developing a Latino Mentoring Program: Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sáenz, Victor B.; Ponjuan, Luis; Segovia, Jorge, Jr.; Del Real Viramontes, José

    2015-01-01

    This chapter highlights the development of Project MALES (Mentoring to Achieve Latino Educational Success). At the center of Project MALES is a mentoring program that aims to cultivate an engaged support network for males of color at the University of Texas at Austin and across surrounding communities. Specifically, there is a discussion of the…

  12. Exploring Mentor and Mentee Perceptions of Mentoring Programs for At-Risk Students: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Eric

    2012-01-01

    At-risk youth face many difficulties including higher dropout rates, lack of positive adult support, poor neighborhood conditions, exposure to violence, and a lack of parental support and family stability. Mentoring programs for at-risk youth may help mitigate these difficulties, but the quality of the mentor-mentee relationship is predictive of…

  13. Hybrid-Mentoring Programs for Beginning Elementary Science Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bang, EunJin

    2013-01-01

    This study examines four induction models and teacher changes in science teaching practices, as a result of several mentoring programs. It explores three different computer-mediated mentoring programs, and a traditional offline induction program--in terms of interactivity, inquiry-based teaching, and topics of knowledge. Fifteen elementary science…

  14. Mentoring in biomedical science graduate programs: a student's perspective.

    PubMed

    Dockter, J L

    1998-10-01

    The traditional model for the mentoring of graduate students has been for the student to receive all formal mentoring from the thesis advisor, the laboratory principal investigator (PI). While this continues to be a successful model for some students, other students find that they need or desire additional mentors during their graduate career. Graduate programs have a responsibility to provide their students with increased mentoring opportunities. Three means that graduate programs could use to serve the diverse needs of students are discussed as well as the potential benefits to the program and the students.

  15. Increasing self-esteem and school connectedness through a multidimensional mentoring program.

    PubMed

    King, Keith A; Vidourek, Rebecca A; Davis, Beth; McClellan, Warren

    2002-09-01

    High levels of self-esteem and positive school, peer, and family connections represent protective factors against youth involvement in risky behavior. This paper reports findings from year one of the Healthy Kids Mentoring Program, a multidisciplinary mentoring program for fourth-grade students in a Midwestern public school. In October 2000, 28 fourth-grade students were admitted into the program, based on findings from a 55-item survey distributed to all fourth-grade students (N = 283) regarding overall self-esteem, school, peer, and family connectedness and involvement in risky behavior. The program, which ran from January 2000 to May 2000, consisted of four components: 1) relationship building, 2) self-esteem enhancement, 3) goal setting, 4) academic assistance. Pretest-Posttest data showed significant improvements at posttest in mentored students' self-esteem levels and positive connections to school, peers, and family. Mentored students also were significantly less likely to be depressed or involved in bullying and fighting at posttest than at pretest. Compared to nonmentored students, mentored students reported significantly higher school and family connectedness scores at posttest. Recommendations for effective mentoring program design are offered.

  16. A Mentoring Program Drills down on the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Emily; Sinclair, Steve; Gschwend, Laura

    2015-01-01

    The Santa Cruz/Silicon Valley New Teacher Project--under the aegis of the New Teacher Center--devised a program to train teacher mentors to help new teachers incorporate the Common Core standards into their teaching. The three-year program yielded five critical lessons: Mentors need ongoing support to develop their readiness and willingness to…

  17. Early Childhood Mentoring Programs: A Survey of Community Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breunig, Gretchen Stahr; Bellm, Dan

    Mentoring programs offer experienced caregivers and directors new encouragement to remain in the field by helping them learn to share their skills with others and grow in the profession. This report is the result of an information-gathering process among mentoring programs for early childhood educators in the United States. Following an…

  18. Hidden Treasures in Theological Education: The Writing Tutor, the Spiritual Director, and Practices of Academic and Spiritual Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaghjian, Lucretia B.

    2013-01-01

    Mentoring is an important but often overlooked resource in theological education and students' academic and spiritual formation. This essay profiles the mentoring practices and postures of the writing tutor and the spiritual director as exemplars of academic and spiritual mentoring. An extended probe of this analogy affirms the integration of…

  19. Mentor-Protege Commitment Fit and Relationship Satisfaction in Academic Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poteat, Laura F.; Shockley, Kristen M.; Allen, Tammy D.

    2009-01-01

    Based on a sample of students and their faculty mentors, this study examined how the fit between mentor and protege levels of commitment is associated with both partners' relationship satisfaction. Mentoring dyads were classified into groups according to fit between partners' commitment, and relationship satisfaction was compared across groups.…

  20. Sandia National Laboratories corporate mentor program : program review, May 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Tibbetts, Tiffany; Tarro, Talitha; Dudeck, William; Bristol, Colette; Stephens, Jim

    2005-01-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories Corporate Mentor Program provides a mechanism for the development and retention of Sandia's people and knowledge. The relationships formed among staff members at different stages in their careers offer benefits to all. These relationships can provide experienced employees with new ideas and insight and give less experienced employees knowledge of Sandia's culture, strategies, and programmatic direction. The program volunteer coordinators are dedicated to the satisfaction of the participants, who come from every area of Sandia. Since its inception in 1995, the program has sustained steady growth and excellent customer satisfaction. This report summarizes the accomplishments, activities, enhancements, and evaluation data for the Corporate Mentor Program for the 2003/2004 program year ending May 1, 2004.

  1. Mentors Have Consequences and Reap Returns in Academic Biochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, Robert; Long, J. Scott

    This paper explores the possible measurable effects of mentors (major professors) on the subsequent productivity of the mentor's students. Also asked is whether there are benefits to the productive scientist who acts as a mentor. Analysis is based on a population of male biochemists (N=66) who obtained their doctorates in 1957, 1958, 1962, and…

  2. Mentoring from Different Social Spheres: How Can Multiple Mentors Help in Doctoral Student Success in Ed.D Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Tarae; Ghosh, Rajashi

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral students leave their programs early due to lack of mentoring relationships needed to support degree completion and success. However, how mentoring contributes to Ed.D degree completion is not widely studied. In this qualitative narrative study, we sought to explore how multiple mentoring relationships reduced attrition in an Ed.D program.…

  3. Mentoring Programs: Key Differences in Support for Beginning Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fick, Virginia E.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the issue of mentoring and its problems in aiding in the induction of new teachers into various school systems. Such a study is justified because teacher shortages remain a real threat in many areas of this country. The research sought to demonstrate that a mentor program without clear guidelines and accountability may actually…

  4. Students' Perceptions of Mentoring in a University Cooperative Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fifolt, Matthew M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine students' perceptions of mentoring in a university cooperative education (co-op) program. Within this setting, students report to a supervisor. This supervisor has direct responsibility for the student and may influence the quality of the co-op experience by providing a mentoring role. A need existed to…

  5. Online Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, Carole

    2000-01-01

    When Urseline Academy girls need career advice, academic guidance, or personal support, they e-mail their mentors--professional women in the Dallas area whose "real-world" knowledge helps the students make informed choices. The program is an outgrowth of a summer internship program stressing student-centered learning. (MLH)

  6. A Model for Teacher Mentoring of Poor and Minority Children: A Case Study of an Urban Israeli School Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayalon, Aram

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is fourfold. First, it identifies a growing international interest on the part of educators and school officials in finding effective ways to mentor especially poor and minority students toward academic success. Second, it reviews the literature on mentoring as it pertains to this population. Third, it details a case…

  7. Forming University and Teacher Partnerships in an Effort to Reframe and Rethink Mentoring Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guise, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Although there is some agreement in the field of education as to what constitutes a mentor and the roles and responsibilities of a mentor, mentoring programs vary drastically across states and across schools with respect to the amount of structure and the resources available to implement these programs. Too often, mentoring programs take on a…

  8. The Medical College of Wisconsin Senior Mentor Program: Experience of a Lifetime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Tovah; Cohan, Mary; Bragg, Dawn S.; Bedinghaus, Joan

    2006-01-01

    The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW) Senior Mentor Program (SMP) has been offered to a small group of first and second year medical students as a course alternative to the traditional physician mentor program. The program links students with healthy older adult mentors and includes mentor/student visits, didactic sessions, written assignments,…

  9. The Influence of Protege-Mentor Relationships and Social Networks on Women Doctoral Students' Academic Career Aspirations in Physical Sciences and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Physical sciences and engineering doctoral programs serve as the most important conduit through which future academics are trained and prepared in these disciplines. This study examined women doctoral students' protege-mentor relationships in Physical sciences and engineering programs. Particularly, the study examined the influence of such…

  10. Race Still Matters: Considerations for Mentoring Black Women in Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Sharon L.; Land, Lynette Danley; Hinton-Hudson, Veronica D.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the experiences of Black women faculty employed by predominantly White institutions. Using extant literature interwoven with narrative data, we provided an analysis of how some Black women experience mentoring and/or the mentor-mentee relationship. Emergent themes suggested two significant career trajectory points for the faculty…

  11. An Aphasia Mentoring Program: Perspectives of Speech-Language Pathology Students and of Mentors with Aphasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purves, Barbara A.; Petersen, Jill; Puurveen, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In contrast to clinician-as-expert models, social models of clinical practice typically acknowledge people with aphasia as equal partners in intervention. Given this, there may be a place within speech-language pathology education for programs situating people with aphasia as experts. This paper describes an aphasia mentoring program that…

  12. The Benefits of Mentoring for Engineering Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Jean E.; Haines, Valerie A.

    The authors examined the benefits of mentoring for female and male engineering students and whether the benefits of mentoring differ depending on the sex of the mentor. Kram's framework of career development, psychosocial, and role-modeling functions was used to examine the benefits of mentoring for 1,069 engineering students. It was found that students with mentors were more socially integrated into their academic programs than students without mentors and that male mentors were more effective in this function than female mentors. Few students reported psychosocial benefits from being mentored, although female proteges reported more if they had female mentors. An unexpected finding for the role-modeling benefits was that mentored students reported less commitment to engineering careers than students without mentors. The authors close with a discussion of the implications of these findings and suggestions for future research in this area.

  13. Mentoring for Business Engagement as Continuing Professional Development of University Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helyer, Ruth; Lee, Dionne

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports an innovative continuing professional development (CPD) project for academic staff in a UK university. The aim of the project is to develop academics' skills in relating to the business environment. The project has a number of strands, but the principal focus of this paper is upon a mentoring initiative. Much CPD in universities…

  14. Spawning Academic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Vernon

    This paper briefly describes initiation of academic programming in the area of student development and transplantation of that programming into departmental and college curricula. Obvious advantages of this approach include placing student development courses in tne hands of staff who know students best, insuring the courses' continued existence,…

  15. Pygmalion in the Program: The Role of Teenage Peer Mentors' Attitudes in Shaping Their Mentees' Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karcher, Michael J.; Davidson, Alice J.; Rhodes, Jean E.; Herrera, Carla

    2010-01-01

    Cross-age peer mentoring programs, in which teenagers mentor younger children, have proliferated in recent years, yet there is disagreement about the effectiveness of such programs. This study tested whether teen mentors' attitudes about children interact with their mentees' characteristics to moderate outcomes of cross-age peer mentoring. The…

  16. 48 CFR 3052.219-71 - DHS mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...; and (3) Mentor-Protégé agreements, approved by the DHS OSDBU. (c) Mentor participation in the program... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false DHS mentor-protégÃ... CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 3052.219-71 DHS mentor-protégé program. As prescribed...

  17. 48 CFR 3052.219-71 - DHS mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...; and (3) Mentor-Protégé agreements, approved by the DHS OSDBU. (c) Mentor participation in the program... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true DHS mentor-protégÃ... CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 3052.219-71 DHS mentor-protégé program. As prescribed...

  18. 48 CFR 3052.219-71 - DHS mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...; and (3) Mentor-Protégé agreements, approved by the DHS OSDBU. (c) Mentor participation in the program... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false DHS mentor-protégÃ... CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 3052.219-71 DHS mentor-protégé program. As prescribed...

  19. Teaching Certificate Program Participants’ Perceptions of Mentor-Mentee Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalvo, Jasmine D.; Ramsey, Darin C.; Sprunger, Tracy L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess teaching certificate program (TCP) participants’ perceptions of mentor-mentee relationships. Methods. A 15-item survey instrument was administered to all 2014-2015 participants of the Indiana Pharmacy Teaching Certificate (IPTeC) program. Results. One hundred percent of IPTeC program participants (83/83) responded to the survey. The majority of participants indicated that having a professional mentor was either very important (52%) or important (47%) to their professional development and preferred to choose their own professional mentor (53%). Mentor characteristics rated as highly important by mentees included having similar clinical practice interests (82%), having similar research interests (66%), and being available to meet face-to-face (90%). Age, race, and gender of the mentor were not rated by mentees as important. Conclusion. Teaching certificate program participants place high importance on having a professional mentor. Mentorship of pharmacists completing TCPs should be a priority for current pharmacy faculty members so adequate guidance is available to future pharmacy educators. PMID:27170813

  20. Teaching Certificate Program Participants' Perceptions of Mentor-Mentee Relationships.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Amy Heck; Gonzalvo, Jasmine D; Ramsey, Darin C; Sprunger, Tracy L

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To assess teaching certificate program (TCP) participants' perceptions of mentor-mentee relationships. Methods. A 15-item survey instrument was administered to all 2014-2015 participants of the Indiana Pharmacy Teaching Certificate (IPTeC) program. Results. One hundred percent of IPTeC program participants (83/83) responded to the survey. The majority of participants indicated that having a professional mentor was either very important (52%) or important (47%) to their professional development and preferred to choose their own professional mentor (53%). Mentor characteristics rated as highly important by mentees included having similar clinical practice interests (82%), having similar research interests (66%), and being available to meet face-to-face (90%). Age, race, and gender of the mentor were not rated by mentees as important. Conclusion. Teaching certificate program participants place high importance on having a professional mentor. Mentorship of pharmacists completing TCPs should be a priority for current pharmacy faculty members so adequate guidance is available to future pharmacy educators.

  1. A Qualitative Program Evaluation of a Structured Leadership Mentoring Program at a Large Aerospace Corporation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teller, Romney P.

    2011-01-01

    The researcher utilized a qualitative approach to conduct a program evaluation of the organization where he is employed. The study intended to serve as a program evaluation for the structured in-house mentoring program at a large aerospace corporation (A-Corp). This program evaluation clarified areas in which the current mentoring program is…

  2. Mentoring the next generation of neuroscience nurses: a pilot study of mentor engagement within an academic-service partnership.

    PubMed

    Bay, Esther H; Binder, Cindi; Lint, Carrie; Park, Stephanie

    2015-04-01

    Resulting from a system-wide launch of an academic-service partnership that united a research-intensive School of Nursing and a tertiary healthcare system, neuroscience nurses used a team-based approach in mentoring undergraduate nursing students in neuroscience nursing. They linked their team approach to the Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing report and American Association of Neuroscience Nurses' (2012) strategic plan to prepare neuroscience nurses for the future. Using case reports containing both the mentors' and students' perspective, we showcase sophomore nursing students' development in neuroscience nursing with focus on their developing skills in competency, leadership, and collaboration. Results from this implementation phase include improved reliability in performing undergraduate neurological assessments; developing competency in collaborating with the health team using a culturally sensitive approach; beginning leadership in managing a patient with seizures; and collaborating with families in patient-family-focused care. Evaluation of the effectiveness of this mentored approach to clinical undergraduate nursing education will focus on confidence building for students and mentors.

  3. Mentoring radiology residents: why, who, when, and how.

    PubMed

    Mainiero, Martha B

    2007-08-01

    Mentoring residents can help develop them into more successful practicing radiologists, guide them into academic practice, and help safeguard the future of the specialty. However, there are barriers to successful mentoring. Mentoring is typically undervalued and time consuming and requires the establishment of a mutually satisfactory interpersonal relationship between a resident and a mentor. This article discusses the barriers to successful mentoring and provides some practical suggestions on improving the culture of mentoring within a radiology residency program.

  4. Perceived autonomy and relatedness as moderating the impact of teacher-student mentoring relationships on student academic adjustment.

    PubMed

    Larose, Simon; Tarabulsy, George; Cyrenne, Diane

    2005-03-01

    This study examined the impact of a 10-hour teacher-student mentoring relationship on the academic adjustment of at-risk college students. A quasi-experimental design involving a comparison group (NM: students with No Mentor), a High Relatedness/Autonomy group (HR/HA: students who perceived high levels of relatedness and autonomy during the mentoring process) and a Low Relatedness/Autonomy group (LR/LA: students who perceived low levels of relatedness and autonomy during the mentoring process) was used for that purpose. Academic adjustment and performance were assessed before (Time 1) and five months after involvement in mentoring (Time 3) for all students. Perceived relatedness and autonomy were assessed after the last mentoring meeting (Time 2) for students involved in mentoring relationships only. Results indicated better social adjustment and institutional attachment in college for the HR students than for the LR and NM students, even after controlling for initial adjustment, performance and social network dispositions. In addition, the LR and LA students presented lower academic and emotional adjustment in college and lower academic performance than NM, HR, and HA students. The potential positive and negative impacts of mentoring relationships are discussed in light of autonomy and relatedness processes. Editors' Strategic Implications: Especially valuable is the articulation of why mentoring might be expected to affect social and academic adjustment outcomes via its effects on the development of autonomy and relatedness. Application of attachment theory and measurement to the study of mentoring is a strategy that shows promise.

  5. Academic Program Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinebaug Valley Community Coll., Danielson, CT.

    During the spring 1981 semester, Quinebaug Valley Community College (QVCC) conducted a survey of high school students and influential members of the community to obtain assessments of the need for various academic programs at QVCC. Questionnaires were distributed to nine high schools, where juniors and seniors were asked to indicate their possible…

  6. Effective faculty preceptoring and mentoring during reorganization of an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Benson, Carole A; Morahan, Page S; Sachdeva, Ajit K; Richman, Rosalyn C

    2002-09-01

    The experience and lessons learned in the design, implementation and initial evaluation of a demonstration faculty-to-faculty mentoring program, during a time of major institutional reorganization, are described. The question addressed was: Can a voluntary mentoring program be established with minimal resources and be effective in the context of major organizational change? Key design elements included two-tiered programs (one year preceptoring and multi-year mentoring), voluntary participation, and selection of senior faculty members by the junior faculty members. A total of 20% of junior faculty and 30% of senior faculty participated. Faculty indicated the program was worth the time invested, had a positive impact on their professional life and increased productivity. There was high satisfaction with the mentoring relationship, especially the psychosocial mentoring functions, and a trend toward increased retention of minority faculty. Within two years, the program was institutionalized into the Office for Faculty Affairs, and faculty approved a mentoring policy. It is concluded that voluntary mentoring programs can have a positive impact on junior and senior faculty satisfaction, reinvigorate the collegial culture, and improve productivity and retention even during a time of reorganization and minimal resources.

  7. Lay health mentors in community-based older adult disability prevention programs: provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dossa, Almas; Capitman, John A

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we explored provider perspectives on the benefits of and implementation challenges in using lay health mentor peers in a community-based replication of an efficacious 12-month older adult disability prevention program. In addition, we describe the association of the mentor program with site features and program completion. We conducted semi-structured telephone interviews with nurses, social workers, and site managers and obtained primary data on site features and secondary data on program completion. Major themes included the importance of the health mentor program and implementation challenges. Sites with mentor programs were more likely to have older adults complete the program compared with sites without mentor programs. Rural, small, and less diverse sites were more likely to have health mentor programs than urban, large, and more diverse sites. Implications include a need to fund more lay health mentor programs, obtain adequate staffing including minority staff for health mentor support, and implement strategies to improve program efficiency.

  8. Evaluating virtual STEM mentoring programs: The SAGANet.org experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, S. M.; Walker, S. I.; Miller, E.; Anbar, M.; Kacar, B.; Forrester, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Many school districts within the United States continue to seek new ways of engaging students within Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. SAGANet.org, a web-based 501c3 Astrobiology outreach initiative, works with a number of schools, partnering K-12 students and their families with professional scientist mentors from around the world to teach and inspire students using virtual technology platforms. Current programs include two mentoring partnerships: pairing scientist-mentors with at-risk youth at the Pittsburg Community School in Pittsburg CA, and pairing scientist-mentors with families from the Kyrene del Cielo Elementary School in Chandler AZ. These programs represent two very different models for utilizing the virtual media platform provided by SAGANet.org to engage K-12 students and their families in STEM. For the former, scientists mentor the students of the Pittsburg School as part of the formal in-class curriculum. For the latter, scientists work with K-5 students and their families through Cielo's Science & Engineering Discovery Room to develop a science project as part of an informal learning experience that is independent of the formal curriculum. In this presentation, we (1) discuss the challenges and successes of engaging these two distinct audiences through virtual media, (2) present the results of how these two very-different mentoring partnership impact K-12 students science self-efficacy, interest in science, and STEM career awareness, and (3) share the impact of the mentoring experience on the mentor's confidence and self-efficacy with communicating science to the public.

  9. Peer Mentors in a Postsecondary Education Program for Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Justina A.; Gibbons, Melinda M.; Cihak, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Few researchers have examined peer mentors in a postsecondary program for students with intellectual disabilities. Peer mentors (N=39) were surveyed regarding their TypeFocus personality type and how the experience of mentoring affected them. The mentoring experience was assessed qualitatively and results are reported. Results indicated a strong…

  10. Interdisciplinary and Distance Mentoring in a National Substance Abuse Faculty Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morzinski, Jeffrey A.; Graham, Antonnette V.; Straussner, S. Lala A.; Schoener, Eugene; Marcus, Marianne T.; Madden, Theresa; Brown, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Mentoring is an important aspect of professional development, but can it advance substance use disorder skills in a national, interdisciplinary fellowship program? This evaluation study used a telephone survey to examine the influence of distance mentoring, interdisciplinary mentoring, and mentor functions on fellows' satisfaction, learning and…

  11. Evaluation of Mentoring Practices Experienced by Student Teachers during a Teacher Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capa, Yesim; Loadman, William E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive survey study was to evaluate the mentoring that occurred in a preservice teacher education program. The mentoring literature was reviewed to select important characteristics of mentor teachers and mentoring practices during field experiences to be included in the instrument. Based on this review, the following…

  12. Increases in Academic Connectedness and Self-Esteem among High School Students Who Serve as Cross-Age Peer Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karcher, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Cross-age mentoring programs are peer helping programs in which high school students serve as mentors to younger children. The study in this article compared fall-to-spring changes on connectedness, attachment, and self-esteem between 46 teen mentors and 45 comparison classmates. Results revealed an association between serving as a cross-age peer…

  13. The National Mentoring Program in Israel--Challenges and Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorman, Rachel; Rachmel, Shlomit; Bashan, Zipi

    2016-01-01

    The National Mentoring Program was created in 2009 by the Division for Gifted and Outstanding Students in the Ministry of Education and is implemented by the Szold Institute. The program aims to cultivate future leaders in Israel. Highly gifted 10th and 11th graders are matched with top rate professionals in students' areas of interest. They work…

  14. Transformative Learning of Mentors from an Immigrant Workplace Connections Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shan, Hongxia; Butterwick, Shauna

    2017-01-01

    Mentorship programs have been deployed within immigrant and settlements services to integrate newcomers to the Canadian labor market. These programs are often assessed for their impacts on immigrant mentees. Little attention has been paid to how they may have influenced mentors. In this context, this study, from the perspective of transformative…

  15. Research-Based Practices in Afterschool Mentoring Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sara C.; Yarbrough, Anna-Margaret; Besnoy, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Most communities have afterschool programs that give school-aged students a safe place to go after the dismissal bell rings. The next step after simply providing a safe haven is to create a nurturing environment that develops young people's talents and supports their needs. A formal mentoring program can help to achieve this goal. In order to…

  16. WWC Quick Review of the Report "Impact Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Education's Student Mentoring Program"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the effects of the U.S. Department of Education's Student Mentoring Program (SMP) on students' interpersonal relationships, academic outcomes, and delinquent and risk behaviors. The study focused on approximately 2,600 at-risk fourth-through- eighth-grade students in 32 SMP sites. Applicants were randomly assigned to a…

  17. Role of Intergenerational Mentoring for Supporting Youth Development: An Examination of the "Across Ages" Program in the U. S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mano, Momoko

    2007-01-01

    Meeting the diverse needs of young people who are coping with such problems as delinquent behaviors or poor academic performance is an urgent issue today. This paper aims to demonstrate the benefits of introducing intergenerational mentoring activities into educational programs for supporting "at risk" adolescents by highlighting some innovative…

  18. From Mentoring to Monitoring: The Impact of Changing Work Environments on Academics in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, John; Gordon, Sue; Schuck, Sandy

    2008-01-01

    Universities in many western nations are experiencing increasing performance measures for academic accountability. This paper maps the pitted pathway that has led Australian universities from mentoring to monitoring and from performance enhancement to performance evaluation, and reviews implications for teaching and learning in higher education.…

  19. Mentoring First-Year College Students: The Impact on Academic Performance and Social Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avalos-Louie, Mirella I.

    2013-01-01

    In this 2-semester qualitative case study, the researcher/mentor intended to develop an understanding of how the process of mentorship unfolded for four academically at-risk first-year college students. The "College Student Inventory" (CSI) was administered at the onset of the study, followed by student interviews, class observations,…

  20. "Comadres" among Us: The Power of Artists as Informal Mentors for Women of Color in Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santamaría, Lorri J.; Jaramillo, Nathalia E.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we, "colegas"/colleagues of color, explore the ways in which the literary and artistic contributions of Gloria Anzaldúa, Octavia Butler, and Frida Kahlo have inspired, nurtured, and profoundly influenced our personal and professional lives as academics. We underscore the importance of mentoring for women of color in…

  1. Mentor Texts and the Coding of Academic Writing Structures: A Functional Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobar Alméciga, Wilder Yesid; Evans, Reid

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present pedagogical experience was to address the English language writing needs of university-level students pursuing a degree in bilingual education with an emphasis in the teaching of English. Using mentor texts and coding academic writing structures, an instructional design was developed to directly address the shortcomings…

  2. Impact of Professional Student Mentored-Research Fellowship on Medical Education and Academic Medicine Career Path

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Terry; Kelly, Thomas H.; Starnes, Catherine P.; Sawaya, B. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Context This study explores the long-term impact of the Professional Student Mentored Research Fellowship (PSMRF) program at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine (UKCOM) on medical students’ research productivity and career paths. Methods Demographic characteristics, academic profiles, number of publications and residency placements from 2007-2012 were used to assess 119 PSMRF graduates against a comparison cohort of 898 UKCOM (non-PSMRF) students. Results PSMRF students had higher MCAT scores at admission (31.5 ± 0.6 vs. 30.6 ± 0.2, p = 0.007) and achieved higher USMLE Step 1 scores (228 ± 4.2 vs. 223 ± 1.5, p = 0.03) than comparison group. PSMRF students were more likely to publish Pubmed-indexed papers (36.7% vs. 17.9%, p < 0.0001), achieve AOA status (19.3% vs. 8.5%, p = 0.0002) and match to top 25 U.S. News and World Report residency programs (23.4% vs. 12.1%, p = 0.008). A greater proportion of PSMRF fellows matched to top tier competitive specialties (23% vs. 14.2%, p= 0.07), however this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions The PSMRF program shows a significant increase in enrollment, as well as positive associations with indicators of success in medical school and subsequent quality of residency program. PMID:25996460

  3. Mentors' Perspectives on Group Mentorship: A Descriptive Study of Two Programs in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alleyne, Shirley Diana; Horner, Michelle Schnabel; Walter, Garry; Fleisher, Stacia Hall; Arzubi, Eric; Martin, Andres

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors assess mentors' perceptions of mentoring and experiences participating in an intensive, small-group mentorship program, with particular attention to potential challenges in their retention and the recruitment of new mentors to similar, future programs. Methods: Similar group mentorship programs were implemented at two child…

  4. Law School Academic Support Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wangerin, Paul T.

    1989-01-01

    This article attempts to bridge a perceived gap between legal education and education theory as well as the gap between academic counseling and independent learning by examining law school academic support programs. The article argues that a multidisciplinary analysis provides a helpful basis for evaluating academic support programs that address…

  5. Using Video Cases to Scaffold Mentoring Competencies: A Program Design from the Young Women Leaders Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Bryan Rossiter

    2013-01-01

    This capstone project conducted an intervention using video cases to scaffold traditional methods of concept presentation in a youth mentoring program. Video cases delivered online were chosen as a methodology to strengthen the support and practitioner aspects indicative of mentoring program success rates (D. L. DuBois, Holloway, Valentine, &…

  6. The Academic Dental Careers Fellowship Program: a pilot program to introduce dental students to academia.

    PubMed

    Rogér, James M

    2008-04-01

    The Academic Dental Careers Fellowship Program (ADCFP) was established in 2006 by the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) with the financial support of the ADA Foundation to encourage dental students to consider careers in dental education and to provide participating fellows with insights into academic life. The ADA Foundation provided funding during the 2006-07 academic year for eleven dental student fellows, who were paired with faculty mentors at their respective schools. Fellows and mentors attended a two-day retreat in the summer of 2006, and over the course of the subsequent year in dental school, the fellows with guidance from their mentors participated in preclinical laboratory, classroom, small-group, and clinical teaching experiences; designed and implemented a research project; developed a philosophy of education; completed career reflection essays; assembled a portfolio to represent their ADCFP activities and projects; conducted a series of interviews with faculty designed to expose students to roles, issues, and career paths in academic dentistry; and presented a synopsis of their experiences at the ADEA Annual Session in New Orleans in March 2007. The fellows and mentors completed midyear and end-of-year evaluations of the ADCFP in which feedback and recommendations were collected by telephone interviews and questionnaires. Fellows reported positive experiences and an increased interest in and understanding of academic careers. Mentors also evaluated the ADCFP positively and reported enhancements in their mentoring skills. This article describes the goals and format of the ADCFP, summarizes program evaluation data elicited from the fellows and mentors, and proposes recommendations for future fellowship classes.

  7. A Phenomenological Investigation on the Role of Mentoring in the Academic Development of African American Male Secondary Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inge, Jillian

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine how the construct of mentoring by African American males can support the academic development of African American male students. Since African American male students perform significantly lower in academic subjects than their counterparts of other ethnicities, there is an exigent need for change in this area. Built upon the conceptual framework of communal interactions and identity, the inquiry questioned the experiences of mentors for African American male secondary students, and their perceptions of the influence of a mentoring relationship when the mentor and mentee are of similar backgrounds. Participants in this study were 7 African American males who had mentored or were currently mentoring African American male students. Data, obtained through semi structured interviews and focus group interviews, were coded for themes that reflected the experiences of mentors in mentoring African American males. Mentors in this study reported that students with whom they share similar backgrounds and experiences were better able to relate to them than those who had dissimilar backgrounds and experiences. In addition, mentors reported their mentees were more likely to envision themselves in professional areas beyond their perceived cultural norm when they routinely interact with successful African American males from various fields; thus, it was important for mentors to provide opportunities for students to interact with professionals. Contributions to social change will emerge as African American male mentors understand and employ their roles as a fundamental component in the academic development of African American male secondary students and thus empower this population of students to achieve academic success and to serve in a capacity that nurtures their immediate surroundings.

  8. Are Facilitated Mentoring Programs Beneficial? A Randomized Experimental Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Toby Marshall; Song, Zhaoli

    2008-01-01

    Results from a pretest-posttest randomized field experiment study with a control group comparing the impact of high- and low-level-facilitated mentoring programs on new employees' performance and perceptions about their jobs and organization were reported in this paper. Results indicated increases in job satisfaction, organizational commitment,…

  9. Building an Effective School-Based Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Cindy Ann; Stormont, Melissa A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth are at risk for failure in school due to various school, family, and community characteristics. To provide more support for youth at risk, school-based mentoring programs have become increasingly popular. However, this seemingly simple intervention is actually quite complex and must be implemented with integrity and fidelity. Although…

  10. Campus Kids Mentoring Program: Fifteen Years of Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Jerri

    2009-01-01

    This article features Campus Kids, a mentoring program located at Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington. Gonzaga is a Jesuit University with a strong commitment to social justice and humanistic education. Campus Kids began, in the true sense of a community partnership, as an attempt to connect community resources (potential university…

  11. Good Guidance on the Ground: Mentoring International Service Learning Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Bill

    2000-01-01

    Describes a program at St. Mary's College of Maryland that involves collaboration with the Peace Corps to provide "on the ground" mentoring in the Gambia for students carrying out individual service learning research projects. Suggests that collaboration between universities and the Peace Corps can generate multiple benefits for all…

  12. Interactivity Between Proteges and Scientists in an Electronic Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnett, Cara; Wildemuth, Barbara M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2006-01-01

    Interactivity is defined by Henri (1992) as a three-step process involving communication of information, a response to this information, and a reply to that first response. It is a key dimension of computer-mediated communication, particularly in the one-on-one communication involved in an electronic mentoring program. This report analyzes the…

  13. The Influence of an Academic Pharmacy Mentorship Program on Mentees' Commitment to Pursue an Academic Career.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Caroline M; Adams, Jennifer

    2017-02-25

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Walmart Scholars Program on mentees' attitudes towards and decision to pursue a career in academia. Upon completion of the AACP Walmart Scholars Program, wherein mentor-mentee pairs attend the AACP Annual Meeting to learn about academic pharmacy careers, mentees wrote essays evaluating the program. Their views on academic pharmacy careers were analyzed for themes in the evaluations. Of the mentees who addressed the impact of the program on their perspectives on a career in academic pharmacy, over half stated the program positively influenced pursuit of such a career. This reinforces the importance of mentorship for those interested in or new to academic pharmacy.

  14. The Influence of an Academic Pharmacy Mentorship Program on Mentees’ Commitment to Pursue an Academic Career

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Caroline M.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) Walmart Scholars Program on mentees’ attitudes towards and decision to pursue a career in academia. Upon completion of the AACP Walmart* Scholars Program, wherein mentor-mentee pairs attend the AACP Annual Meeting to learn about academic pharmacy careers, mentees wrote essays evaluating the program. Their views on academic pharmacy careers were analyzed for themes in the evaluations. Of the mentees who addressed the impact of the program on their perspectives on a career in academic pharmacy, over half stated the program positively influenced pursuit of such a career. This reinforces the importance of mentorship for those interested in or new to academic pharmacy. PMID:28289293

  15. Mentoring Faculty: Results from National Science Foundation's ADVANCE Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Faculty mentoring programs are common components of National Science Foundation ADVANCE awards. The ADVANCE program aims to increase the number of women on the faculty in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) departments through grants to individuals and to entire institutions. These grants target a change in institutional culture so that faculty from non-majority groups will succeed and thrive. Mentoring programs are generally designed to fit the particular institution(s) or target population (e.g., meteorologists at the beginning of their careers). A successful mentoring program makes the implicit knowledge necessary for faculty success explicit: policies and practices are made transparent; routes for finding answers are clarified or generated with faculty input; faculty overcome a sense of isolation and develop a community. Mentoring programs may be formal, with assigned mentors and mentees, or informal, with opportunities for beginning, middle and advanced career STEM faculty to mingle, generally over food and sometimes with a formal speaker. The programs are formally evaluated; in general, attention to mentoring generates better outcomes for all faculty. Research indicates that most successful scientists have a network of mentors rather than relying on one person to help navigate department, institution, and profession. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's (UNL) award, ADVANCE-Nebraska, offered opportunities for faculty to informally network over luncheons with women speakers, advanced in their careers. We also offered after-hours networking receptions. In response to faculty feedback, we shifted to a series of panel discussions entitled "Conversations". Most panels were conducted by successful UNL faculty; about one-third had an outside expert on a given topic. Topics were chosen based on faculty feedback and targeted specifically to beginning faculty (How to Start Up a Lab; How to Balance Teaching and Writing), mid-career faculty (Putting

  16. Mentoring in Clinical-Translational Research: A Study of Participants in Master's Degree Programs.

    PubMed

    McGinn, Aileen P; Lee, Linda S; Baez, Adriana; Zwanziger, Jack; Anderson, Karl E; Seely, Ellen W; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2015-12-01

    Research projects in translational science are increasingly complex and require interdisciplinary collaborations. In the context of training translational researchers, this suggests that multiple mentors may be needed in different content areas. This study explored mentoring structure as it relates to perceived mentoring effectiveness and other characteristics of master's-level trainees in clinical-translational research training programs. A cross-sectional online survey of recent graduates of clinical research master's program was conducted. Of 73 surveys distributed, 56.2% (n = 41) complete responses were analyzed. Trainees were overwhelmingly positive about participation in their master's programs and the impact it had on their professional development. Overall the majority (≥75%) of trainees perceived they had effective mentoring in terms of developing skills needed for conducting clinical-translational research. Fewer trainees perceived effective mentoring in career development and work-life balance. In all 15 areas of mentoring effectiveness assessed, higher rates of perceived mentor effectiveness was seen among trainees with ≥2 mentors compared to those with solo mentoring (SM). In addition, trainees with ≥2 mentors perceived having effective mentoring in more mentoring aspects (median: 14.0; IQR: 12.0-15.0) than trainees with SM (median: 10.5; IQR: 8.0-14.5). Results from this survey suggest having ≥2 mentors may be beneficial in fulfilling trainee expectations for mentoring in clinical-translational training.

  17. Mentoring in Higher Education Should Be the Norm to Assure Success: Lessons Learned from the Faculty Mentoring Program, West Chester University, 2008-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Nadine M.; Lucas, Lisa; Hyers, Lauri L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a wealth of qualitative and quantitative data regarding the positive effects of higher education mentoring programs on faculty satisfaction, retention, tenure, and promotion, mentoring programs are not widespread. The authors examine evaluative data from the first four years of the Faculty Mentoring Program at West Chester University. Of…

  18. A Mentoring Program for Inquiry-Based Teaching in a College Geometry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Nathaniel; Wakefield, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a mentoring program designed to prepare novice instructors to teach a college geometry class using inquiry-based methods. The mentoring program was used in a medium-sized public university with approximately 12,000 undergraduate students and 1,500 graduate students. The authors worked together to implement a mentoring program…

  19. The Importance of Mentoring Programs to Women's Career Advancement in Biotechnology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Daun Robin

    2005-01-01

    Mentoring programs provide benefits to mentors, proteges, and organizations, but not all organizations have such programs in place. In those that do, women's exclusion from informal networks limits their visibility and, in turn, their chances of acquiring a mentor. This poses a barrier to women's career advancement, as does the absence of female…

  20. 48 CFR 652.219-72 - Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Department of State Mentor....219-72 Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program. As prescribed in 619.202-70(o)(1), insert the following provision: Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program (APR 2004) (a) Large and small...

  1. 48 CFR 652.219-72 - Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Department of State Mentor....219-72 Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program. As prescribed in 619.202-70(o)(1), insert the following provision: Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program (APR 2004) (a) Large and small...

  2. 48 CFR 652.219-72 - Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Department of State Mentor....219-72 Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program. As prescribed in 619.202-70(o)(1), insert the following provision: Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program (APR 2004) (a) Large and small...

  3. 48 CFR 652.219-72 - Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Department of State Mentor....219-72 Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program. As prescribed in 619.202-70(o)(1), insert the following provision: Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program (APR 2004) (a) Large and small...

  4. 48 CFR 652.219-72 - Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Department of State Mentor....219-72 Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program. As prescribed in 619.202-70(o)(1), insert the following provision: Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program (APR 2004) (a) Large and small...

  5. Society for Women in Academic Psychiatry: A Peer Mentoring Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seritan, Andreea L.; Bhangoo, Robinder; Garma, Sylvia; DuBe, Jane; Hales, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Despite an increasing presence of women in medicine, the percentage of women in academic psychiatry remains low. At the University of California, Davis, women represent two-thirds of psychiatry residents; however, the percentage of female faculty is one-third. This article presents a novel approach to the academic gender gap problem.…

  6. Science mentor program at Mission Hill Junior High School

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlquist, K.

    1994-12-31

    Science graduate students from the University of California at Santa Cruz mentor a class of 7th graders from the Mission Hill Junior High School. The program`s purpose is: (1) to create a scientific learning community where scientists interact at different levels of the educational hierarchy; (2) to have fun in order to spark interest in science; and (3) to support girls and minority students in science. A total of seven mentors met with the students at least once a week after school for one quarter to tutor and assist with science fair projects. Other activities included a field trip to a university earth science lab, judging the science fair, and assisting during laboratory exercises. Graduate students run the program with minimal organization and funding, communicating by electronic mail. An informal evaluation of the program by the mentors has concluded that the most valuable and effective activities have been the field trip and assisting with labs. The actual {open_quotes}mentor meetings{close_quotes} after school did not work effectively because they had a vaguely defined purpose and the kids did not show up regularly to participate. Future directions include redefining ourselves as mentors for the entire school instead of just one class and better coordinating our activities with the teachers` curriculum. We will continue to assist with the labs and organize formal tutoring for students having problems with math and science. Finally, we will arrange more activities and field trips such as an amateur astronomy night. We will especially target girls who attended the {open_quotes}Expanding Your Horizons{trademark} in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering{close_quotes} career day for those activities.

  7. PUENTE Project: The Mentor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maestas-Flores, Margarita; Chavez, Mauro

    This manual was developed for individuals serving as mentors in Evergreen Valley College's PUENTE Project, a program which integrates the skills of an English teacher, a Hispanic counselor, and Hispanic professionals/mentors into a team structure in an attempt to assist Hispanic students in making academic improvements, to build self-confidence,…

  8. Mentor and Protege Goal Orientations as Predictors of Newcomer Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullick, Julia M.; Smith-Jentsch, Kimberly A.; Yarbrough, Charyl Staci; Scielzo, Shannon A.

    2012-01-01

    Although many academic organizations offer formal mentoring programs, little is known about how individual characteristics of peer mentors and their proteges interact to reduce new-student stress. First-year college students participated in a peer-mentoring program designed to reduce stress. The results of this study demonstrated that proteges who…

  9. The Naturoptic Method for Safe Recovery of Vision: Mentored Tutoring, Earnings, Academic Entity Financial Resources Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambursky, Nicole D.; McLeod, Roger David; Silva, Sandra Helena

    2009-05-01

    This is a novel method for safely and naturally improving vision. with applications for minority, female, and academic entity, financial advantages. The patented Naturoptic Method is a simple system designed to work quickly, requiring only a minimal number of sessions for improvement. Our mentored and unique activities investigated these claims by implementing the Naturoptic method on ourselves over a period of time. Research was conducted at off campus locations with the inventor of the Naturoptic Method. Initial visual acuity and subsequent progress is self assessed, using standard Snellen Eye Charts. Research is designed to document improvements in vision with successive uses of the Naturoptic Method, as mentored teachers or Awardees of ``The Kaan Balam Matagamon Memorial Award,'' with net earnings shared by the designees, academic entities, the American Indians in Science and Engineering Society, AISES, or charity. The Board requires Awardees, its students, or affiliates, to sign non-disclosure agreements. 185/1526

  10. Women in science, engineering, and math mentors pilot program

    SciTech Connect

    O`Leary, C.T.

    1994-12-31

    The Women in Science, Engineering, and Math Mentors Program is a partnership program conducted by New York State Education and Research Network (NYSERNet), Rochester Institutes of Technology (RIT) and the Pittsford and Rochester City School districts. The goal of this project is to introduce high school girls to professional women from both educational and industrial scientific fields. The pilot program began in the fall of 1993 with the girls coming to RIT`s campus, via the video interactive network or in person, for a careers assessment seminar. Then they carried on {open_quotes}e-pal{close_quotes} relationships via electronic conferencing on the data network to pursue many mentors and a myriad of different career avenues. The questions ranged from simple information requests regarding the requirements for a job to in-depth pursuit of emotional and personal characteristics needed for different professions. The luncheon finale brought us together on RIT`s campus to get to know each other face to face. We then toured the Micro-electronics lab and manufacturing facility at RIT. A 1993-94 school year program now involves over 140 mentors and students. We have partnered with other projects in the Rochester area to extend the sharing of the vast resources of our community.

  11. The Cross-Age Mentoring Program: A Developmental Intervention for Promoting Students' Connectedness across Grade Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karcher, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    In cross-age peer mentoring programs, high school students mentor younger students. Prior research demonstrates the positive effects for mentees as well as for mentors. This context-based, strengths-promoting intervention is designed to help school counselors foster high school students' leadership and collaboration skills while simultaneously…

  12. An Alternative Approach for MBA Mentor Programs: Empower the Protégé

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artis, Andrew B.

    2013-01-01

    A new approach is proposed to maximize the benefits of mentor relationships between master of business administration (MBA) students and executives by empowering students to select and recruit their own mentors, and then be responsible for managing those relationships. This mentor program is designed to be short but intensive. First-year MBA…

  13. Establishing an academic laboratory: mentoring as a business model

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    It is a tremendous honor for my group and me to receive the recognition of the 2014 Women in Cell Biology Junior Award. I would like to take the opportunity of this essay to describe my scientific journey, discuss my philosophy about running a group, and propose what I think is a generalizable model to efficiently establish an academic laboratory. This essay is about my view on the critical components that go into establishing a highly functional academic laboratory during the current tough, competitive times. PMID:25360043

  14. Early Career Academic Mentoring Using Twitter: The Case of #ECRchat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Hazel; Wheat, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Early career academics around the world frequently see themselves as being in need of targeted career support to navigate the years directly following PhD graduation. The growth of discussion groups on Twitter that target these users raises questions about their potential usefulness to address career development support needs. This paper reflects…

  15. Impeccable Advice: Supporting Women Academics through Supervision and Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Suki; Coate, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    At the time when Diana was writing " A Woman's Guide to Doctoral Studies" (2001), she was supervising a number of female doctoral students. She drew on some of their experiences in the writing of the book, and they in return benefited from the extensive insights she had about the politics of academic life that she portrays in her…

  16. A mentoring program for underrepresented-minority students at the University of Rochester School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Abernethy, A D

    1999-04-01

    Mentoring underrepresented-minority (URM) students poses a special challenge because most medical schools have few URM faculty and many non-URM faculty hesitate to be mentors for URM students. Some medical students perform less well in the clinical years than would be expected from their pre-clinical performances. One factor is some students' difficulty in adapting to the culture of medicine, which mentors can help students overcome. The University of Rochester School of Medicine created the Medical Student Mentoring Program to address the needs of URM students and non-URM faculty who could be mentors. The program, offered in 1995-96 and 1996-97, trained mentors, created a bicultural support group for URM students, and provided structured mentoring. Interviews were conducted with faculty and students to identify critical areas that influence the success of URM students in their clinical years; URM faculty, residents, and advanced students shared their experiences with the program students at reflection group meetings. Mentors participated in an initial orientation. Of the 42 students eligible during 1995-1997, 30 participated and were assigned to 15 mentors. At the end of the program's first year, the students and mentors gave their reactions, and although there were some differences in their viewpoints, overall they considered the program useful. Non-URM faculty appreciated the support and guidance that allowed them to mentor URM students more effectively. The program ran formally for two years, and some of the mentoring relationships continued into the third year. Loss of funding and change in administrative leadership contributed to the ending of this program. Mentoring continues to be a priority at the medical center, and a new mentoring program has been developed for URM and non-URM medical students.

  17. The Organizational and Human Dimensions of Successful Mentoring Programs and Relationships. Perspectives in Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochan, Frances K., Ed.

    This collection of papers examines mentoring in a variety of settings. The 17 papers are: (1) "The Organizational and Human Dimensions of Successful Mentoring Across Diverse Settings" (Frances K. Kochan); (2) "Parents Mentoring Parents for School Success" (Nathan T. Avani); (3) "Project Nia (Purpose): A University/School Partnership to Enhance…

  18. Making a Difference with At-Risk Students: The Benefits of a Mentoring Program in Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindt, Suzanne F.; Blair, Cody

    2017-01-01

    Middle level students classified as at-risk may benefit from a mentoring relationship to help them during this transitionary period of adolescence. Prior research findings highlight the benefits of mentoring programs for both mentors and mentees. This article provides a review of literature in mentoring programs and discusses a specific example of…

  19. An introprofessional geriatric medication activity within a senior mentor program.

    PubMed

    Shrader, Sarah; Hummel, Heather; Byrd, Lauren; Wiley, Kathy

    2013-02-12

    Objective. To determine whether a required interprofessional geriatric medication activity within a senior mentor program changed pharmacy and medical students' attitudes regarding interprofessional collaboration.Design. Interprofessional teams, consisting of 1 third-year pharmacy student and 2 second-year medical students, conducted an in-home interview and medication history with a senior mentor (geriatric patient). The team members then collaboratively analyzed and discussed the patient's medication use and wrote an essay in which they identified the patient's medication problems and reflected on the interprofessional experience.Assessment. Students completed a validated survey instrument to measure pharmacist-physician attitudes about interprofessional collaboration before and after the experience. Pharmacy and medical students' already generally positive attitudes regarding interprofessional relationships were maintained and, in some instances, significantly improved. Students found the activity enhanced their geriatric training and increased their understanding of an interprofessional team.Conclusion. Incorporation of a geriatric medication activity within a senior mentor program maintained or improved pharmacy and medical students' positive attitudes about interprofessional collaboration and enhanced geriatric training within the curriculum.

  20. AstroPAL: A Mentoring Program for Grad Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    The Astronomy Peer Advising Leaders program (AstroPAL) provides guidance for incoming grad students from a team of student volunteers who have passed their 2nd year Qualifier Exam. The purpose is to pair first years with a mentor who can help them through some of the stresses or difficulties that come with being a new grad student. AstroPALs and mentees meet privately about once a month in a casual setting to talk about how they're adjusting to the new surroundings, how they're handling the workload, etc. New students can join AstroPAL at any time during their first two years, and can stop receiving guidance once they feel comfortable in the program. Mentees will be assigned an AstroPAL based on preference and availability, and an AstroPAL Liason will always be in place to facilitate mentor reassignments or other issues if necessary. After passing the 2nd year Qualifier Exam, mentees are eligible to serve as mentors to incoming students.

  1. Preparation and Validation of Mentor Self-Efficacy and Perceived Program Support Scales (M-SEPPS): An Empirical Study in Mentoring Intervention Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvery, Suzannah Vallejo

    2013-01-01

    Mentoring research to date focuses on outcomes related to program goals and theoretical background, and almost all of these relate to the experience of the mentee. Very little research has been completed on the other side of the dyad--the mentor--despite the fact that mentor expectations and experience contribute significantly to the perceived…

  2. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 26 - Mentor-Protégé Program Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mentor-Protégé Program Guidelines D Appendix D... BUSINESS ENTERPRISES IN DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Pt. 26, App. D Appendix D to Part 26—Mentor-Protégé Program Guidelines (A) The purpose of this program element is to...

  3. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 26 - Mentor-Protégé Program Guidelines

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mentor-Protégé Program Guidelines D Appendix D... BUSINESS ENTERPRISES IN DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Pt. 26, App. D Appendix D to Part 26—Mentor-Protégé Program Guidelines (A) The purpose of this program element is to...

  4. Mentoring School-Age Children: Relationship Development in Community-Based and School-Based Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Carla; Sipe, Cynthia L.; McClanahan, Wendy S.

    This study explored the experiences of volunteers and the development of relationships within the two largest contingents of one-on-one mentoring programs: community-based programs and school-based programs. The emphases of school-based programs were studied, along with the quality of developed relationships between youth and mentors and the…

  5. Redesigning a clinical mentoring program for improved outcomes in the clinical training of clerks.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Der; Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lee, Cheng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mentorship has been noted as critical to medical students adapting to clinical training in the medical workplace. A lack of infrastructure in a mentoring program might deter relationship building between mentors and mentees. This study assessed the effect of a redesigned clinical mentoring program from the perspective of clerks. The objective was to assess the benefits of the redesigned program and identify potential improvements. Methods A redesigned clinical mentoring program was launched in a medical center according to previous theoretical and practical studies on clinical training workplaces, including the elements of mentor qualifications, positive and active enhancers for mentor-mentee relationship building, the timing of mentoring performance evaluation, and financial and professional incentives. A four-wave web survey was conducted, comprising one evaluation of the former mentoring program and three evaluations of the redesigned clinical mentoring program. Sixty-four fifth-year medical students in clerkships who responded to the first wave and to at least two of the three following waves were included in the study. A structured and validated questionnaire encompassing 15 items on mentor performance and the personal characteristics of the clerks was used. Mixed linear models were developed for repeated measurements and to adjust for personal characteristics. Results The results revealed that the redesigned mentoring program improved the mentors' performance over time for most evaluated items regarding professional development and personal support provided to the mentees. Conclusions Our findings serve as an improved framework for the role of the institution and demonstrate how institutional policies, programs, and structures can shape a clinical mentoring program. We recommend the adoption of mentorship schemes for other cohorts of medical students and for different learning and training stages involved in becoming a physician.

  6. Mentoring Among Scientists: Implications of Interpersonal Relationships within a Formal Mentoring Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan D. Maughan

    2006-11-01

    Mentoring is an established strategy for learning that has its root in antiquity. Most, if not all, successful scientists and engineers had an effective mentor at some point in their career. In the context of scientists and engineers, mentoring has been undefined. Reports addressing critical concerns regarding the future of science and engineering in the U.S. mention the practice of mentoring a priori, leaving organizations without guidance in its application. Preliminary results from this study imply that formal mentoring can be effective when properly defined and operationalized. Recognizing the uniqueness of the individual in a symbiotic mentor-protégé relationship significantly influences a protégé’s learning experience which carries repercussions into their career intentions. The mentor-protégé relationship is a key factor in succession planning and preserving and disseminating critical information and tacit knowledge essential to the development of leadership in the science and technological industry.

  7. EnvironMentors: Addressing the need for STEM education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, John

    This study is an evaluation of the EnvironMentors program. A nationwide program, EnvironMentors seeks to boost participation in environmentally-related STEM fields through academic mentorship. Chapter one provides an overview of the issue and need for this research. In chapter two, survey data is analyzed in order to determine the importance of student demographics. In chapter three, an interpretive review of the mentor experience is explored. The final chapter provides synthesis and recommendations for EnvironMentors administrators.

  8. The Scholarly Project Initiative: introducing scholarship in medicine through a longitudinal, mentored curricular program.

    PubMed

    Schor, Nina Felice; Troen, Philip; Kanter, Steven L; Levine, Arthur S

    2005-09-01

    Many U.S. medical schools offer students the opportunity to undertake laboratory or clinical research or another form of scholarly project over the summer months, yet few require this as a prerequisite for graduation, and even fewer provide comprehensive didactic material in preparation for the performance of such a project as an integrated component of their curricula. The authors describe the Scholarly Project Initiative of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, a novel, longitudinal, and required program. The program will aim to provide all students with structured preparatory coursework, foster critical analytical and communication skills, and introduce the breadth and depth of the research and scholarly enterprise engendered by modern academic medicine in the contexts of both the classroom and an individual, mentored experience. The initiative has two goals: encouraging an interest in academic medicine in an era marked by the continuing decline in the number of physician-investigators, and fostering the development of physicians who have confidence in their abilities to practice medicine with creativity, original and analytical thought, and relentless attention to the scientific method. Planning for the Scholarly Project Initiative began officially at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine's Curriculum Colloquium in May 2003. The initiative was implemented with the first-year class of July 2004 as part of the new "Scientific Reasoning and Medicine" block of the School of Medicine's curriculum. The block as a whole includes traditional lectures, small-group laboratory and problem-based sessions, and mentored independent study components.

  9. Psychology of Mentoring: The Case of Talented College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, Laura Gail

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the psychology of mentoring in a mixed-method analysis of archival interview records from academically talented college students (N = 128), who had participated in a faculty mentor program for 6 semesters. Qualitative analysis revealed one fourth of the students did not feel mentored and that there was a connection between…

  10. Professionalization and retention outcomes of a university-service mentoring program partnership.

    PubMed

    Latham, Christine L; Ringl, Karen; Hogan, Mikel

    2011-01-01

    With the use of a university-service partnership to introduce mentoring and shared governance, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of these interventions on nurse perceptions of the supportive culture of the workplace environment, professional skill development, decisional involvement, and retention and vacancy rates. A nonequivalent pretest-posttest, noncontrol group design was used with mentors of newly hired mentees to evaluate their workplace perspectives following mentor classes, ongoing mentor support, and a formal mentor-management workforce governance board. A convenience sample of 89 RNs from two acute care facilities attended mentoring and professionalization classes and worked with 109 mentees over 1-3 years. Mentors reported improved teamwork and the ability to deal with conflict but wanted more administrative oversight of the quality and scope of practice of support staff and additional interdepartmental collaboration. One hospital's vacancy rate decreased by 80%, and the other facility's retention rate improved by 21%. The data suggest that a mentor program with comprehensive education and mentor-management alliances through formal workforce environment governance enhances professionalization of frontline nurses and helps sustain a positive, constructive workplace environment. Mentoring classes on communication and cultural sensitivity skills and other leadership concepts, followed by mentor support and mentor-administrative forums, have positive implications for sustained improvement of a supportive culture as perceived by hospital-based RNs and new nurse graduates.

  11. Generational Influences in Academic Emergency Medicine: Teaching and Learning, Mentoring, and Technology (Part I)

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Nicholas M.; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Mills, Angela M.; Brunett, Patrick H.; Promes, Susan B.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time in history, four generations are working together – Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation Xers, and Millennials. Members of each generation carry with them a unique perspective of the world and interact differently with those around them. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic emergency medicine (EM). Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can help address some common issues encountered in academic EM. Through recognition of the unique characteristics of each of the generations with respect to teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology, academicians have the opportunity to strategically optimize interactions with one another. PMID:21314779

  12. Generational influences in academic emergency medicine: teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology (part I).

    PubMed

    Mohr, Nicholas M; Moreno-Walton, Lisa; Mills, Angela M; Brunett, Patrick H; Promes, Susan B

    2011-02-01

    For the first time in history, four generations are working together-traditionalists, baby boomers, generation Xers (Gen Xers), and millennials. Members of each generation carry with them a unique perspective of the world and interact differently with those around them. Through a review of the literature and consensus by modified Delphi methodology of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Aging and Generational Issues Task Force, the authors have developed this two-part series to address generational issues present in academic emergency medicine (EM). Understanding generational characteristics and mitigating strategies can help address some common issues encountered in academic EM. Through recognition of the unique characteristics of each of the generations with respect to teaching and learning, mentoring, and technology, academicians have the opportunity to strategically optimize interactions with one another.

  13. Academic Advising during Program Discontinuance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Michelle A.

    2006-01-01

    Academic program closure is explored and student advising needs that emerged in 3 stages of program decline and discontinuation are identified. Data from interviews and advising communication of 20 graduate students enrolled in a master of education program targeted for discontinuation were qualitatively analyzed within a framework of an…

  14. Benefits and Barriers: Case Study of a Government Technology-Mediated Group Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Brigitte; Cheng, Kwan Fan; Gorley, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to describe the design of a provincial government ministry group mentoring program and examine mentees' and mentors' experiences in the program. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 151 mentees rated their satisfaction in a post-program survey. The survey was followed by in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 10…

  15. Designing and Implementing a Mentoring Program to Support Clinically-Based Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, John E.; Gut, Dianne; Beam, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    This article describes one teacher preparation program's approach to designing and implementing a mentoring program to support clinically-based teacher education. The design for the program is based on an interview study that compared the mentoring experiences of 18 teachers across three different contexts: student teaching, early field…

  16. Improving the Mentoring Experience for Pre-College Program Participants through Organizational Change and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCargo, Donavan D.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative action research investigated the experiences of mentors and program participants of a pre-college program designed to assist students in grades 7-12 progress through secondary education and eventually pursue a college degree. The pre-college program afterschool mentoring component played a significant role in keeping program…

  17. Effects of the Just One Mentoring Program on Student Persistence at Milwaukee Area Technical College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Emma

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation investigated the effects of the intervention of the Just One Mentoring Program on student persistence in completing their career programs. The population for this study consisted of a heterogeneous group of students enrolled in the Just One Mentoring Program during summer 2003 through fall 2006 at a community college located in…

  18. The Potential Contribution of Mentor Programs to Relational Permanency for Youth Aging out of Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avery, Rosemary J.

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes published research regarding the effectiveness of mentor programs in general, and for youth in foster care specifically, as a basis for evidence-based practice in child welfare. It examines the pros and cons of mentor programs and characteristics of programs that are more or less effective for achieving specific social…

  19. Mentor Master and the Game Show: It's Academic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Patricia D.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews an authoring system for courseware development (Applesoft Basic) consisting of a programed template allowing preparation of instructional units composed of text, questions, and graphics. A higher-priced version includes a game. Geology, oceanography, space science, meteorology, human/plant anatomy, and cells/genetics diagrams are available…

  20. 48 CFR 1852.219-77 - NASA Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false NASA Mentor-ProtégÃ... and Clauses 1852.219-77 NASA Mentor-Protégé Program. As prescribed in 1819.7215, insert the following clause: NASA Mentor-Protégé Program (Month/Year) (a) Prime contractors are encouraged to participate...

  1. 48 CFR 1852.219-77 - NASA Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false NASA Mentor-ProtégÃ... and Clauses 1852.219-77 NASA Mentor-Protégé Program. As prescribed in 1819.7215, insert the following clause: NASA Mentor-Protégé Program (Month/Year) (a) Prime contractors are encouraged to participate...

  2. 48 CFR 1852.219-77 - NASA Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true NASA Mentor-ProtégÃ... and Clauses 1852.219-77 NASA Mentor-Protégé Program. As prescribed in 1819.7215, insert the following clause: NASA Mentor-Protégé Program (MAY 2009) (a) Prime contractors are encouraged to participate in...

  3. 48 CFR 1852.219-77 - NASA Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false NASA Mentor-ProtégÃ... and Clauses 1852.219-77 NASA Mentor-Protégé Program. As prescribed in 1819.7215, insert the following clause: NASA Mentor-Protégé Program (Month/Year) (a) Prime contractors are encouraged to participate...

  4. 48 CFR 1852.219-77 - NASA Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false NASA Mentor-ProtégÃ... and Clauses 1852.219-77 NASA Mentor-Protégé Program. As prescribed in 1819.7215, insert the following clause: NASA Mentor-Protégé Program (Month/Year) (a) Prime contractors are encouraged to participate...

  5. Negotiation in Academic Medicine: Narratives of Faculty Researchers and Their Mentors

    PubMed Central

    Sambuco, Dana; Dabrowska, Agata; DeCastro, Rochelle; Stewart, Abigail; Ubel, Peter A.; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Few researchers have explored the negotiation experiences of academic medical faculty even though negotiation is crucial to their career success. The authors sought to understand medical faculty researchers' experiences with and perceptions of negotiation. Method Between February 2010 and August 2011, the authors conducted semi-structured, in-depth telephone interviews with 100 former recipients of National Institutes of Health mentored career development awards and 28 of their mentors. Purposive sampling ensured a diverse range of viewpoints. Multiple analysts thematically coded verbatim transcripts using qualitative data analysis software. Results Participants described the importance of negotiation in academic medical careers but also expressed feeling naïve and unprepared for these negotiations, particularly as junior faculty. Award recipients focused on power, leverage, and strategy, and they expressed a need for training and mentorship to learn successful negotiation skills. Mentors, by contrast, emphasized the importance of flexibility and shared interests in creating win-win situations for both the individual faculty member and the institution. When faculty construed negotiation as adversarial and/or zero-sum, participants believed it required traditionally masculine traits and perceived women to be at a disadvantage. Conclusions Academic medical faculty often lack the skills and knowledge necessary for successful negotiation, especially early in their careers. Many view negotiation as an adversarial process of the sort that experts call “hard positional bargaining.” Increasing awareness of alternative negotiation techniques (e.g., “principled negotiation,” in which shared interests, mutually satisfying options, and fair standards are emphasized), may encourage the success of medical faculty, particularly women. PMID:23425992

  6. Establishing a Physics mentoring Program for a Philadelphia Middle School

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlack, J. T.; Wilson, A.; Harris, W.; White, A.; Mehta, S. S.; Ramdass, V.

    2010-03-01

    Our SPS chapter has established a regular physics mentoring program at Independence Charter Middle School located in Philadelphia, PA. Members visit the school on a bi-weekly basis and perform 1-2 hour, inquiry-based lecture demonstrations of physics phenomena that integrate with the science lessons of middle school students. At the end of the school year, a capstone activity in the form of a Rube Goldberg competition among the middle school students was held on the Drexel campus with Drexel faculty and graduate students participating as judges.

  7. Batting 300 is Good: Perspectives of Faculty Researchers and their Mentors on Rejection, Resilience, and Persistence in Academic Medical Careers

    PubMed Central

    DeCastro, Rochelle; Sambuco, Dana; Ubel, Peter A.; Stewart, Abigail; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Professional rejection is a frequent experience in an academic medical career. The authors sought to understand how rejection affects those pursuing such careers and why some individuals may be more resilient than others in a population of individuals with demonstrated ability and interest in research careers. Method Between February 2010 and August 2011, the authors conducted semi-structured, in-depth telephone interviews with 100 former recipients of National Institutes of Health mentored career development awards and 28 of their mentors. Purposive sampling ensured a diverse range of viewpoints. Multiple analysts thematically coded verbatim transcripts using qualitative data analysis software. Results Participants described a variety of experiences with criticism and rejection in their careers, as well as an acute need for persistence and resilience in the face of such challenges. Through their narratives, participants also vividly described a range of emotional and behavioral responses to their experiences of professional rejection. Their responses illuminated the important roles that various factors, including mentoring and gender, play in shaping the ultimate influence of rejection on their own careers and on the careers of those they have mentored. Conclusions Responses to rejection vary considerably, and negative responses can lead promising individuals to abandon careers in academic medicine. Resilience does not, however, appear to be immutable—it can be learned. Given the frequency of experiences with rejection in academic medicine, strategies such as training mentors to foster resilience may be particularly helpful in improving faculty retention in academic medicine. PMID:23425991

  8. The Influence of Involvement with Faculty and Mentoring on the Self-Efficacy and Academic Achievement of African American and Latino College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFreitas, Stacie Craft; Bravo, Antonio, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    African American and Latino college students were surveyed to examine the influence of involvement with faculty and mentoring on self-efficacy and academic achievement. It was hypothesized that involvement with faculty and mentoring were related to greater academic achievement. It was suggested that the relationship of these factors was mediated…

  9. The Mentor inside You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerlin, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring occurs in formal and informal ways. While formal mentoring programs are valuable, the majority of people are likely to have opportunities for informal mentoring in their workplace and in their communities. The author makes the point that mentors are all around us, and each of us may have the capacity to mentor or to be mentored, whether…

  10. The GTA Mentoring Program: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Developing Future Faculty as Teacher-Scholars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaia, A. Celeste; Corts, Daniel P.; Tatum, Holly E.; Allen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary mentoring program for graduate teaching assistance, the Graduate Teaching Assistant (GTA) program. Outlines the vision and structure of the program and highlights its many benefits, which include the development of personal and professional relationships. (SLD)

  11. Redesigning a clinical mentoring program for improved outcomes in the clinical training of clerks

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Der; Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lee, Cheng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mentorship has been noted as critical to medical students adapting to clinical training in the medical workplace. A lack of infrastructure in a mentoring program might deter relationship building between mentors and mentees. This study assessed the effect of a redesigned clinical mentoring program from the perspective of clerks. The objective was to assess the benefits of the redesigned program and identify potential improvements. Methods A redesigned clinical mentoring program was launched in a medical center according to previous theoretical and practical studies on clinical training workplaces, including the elements of mentor qualifications, positive and active enhancers for mentor–mentee relationship building, the timing of mentoring performance evaluation, and financial and professional incentives. A four-wave web survey was conducted, comprising one evaluation of the former mentoring program and three evaluations of the redesigned clinical mentoring program. Sixty-four fifth-year medical students in clerkships who responded to the first wave and to at least two of the three following waves were included in the study. A structured and validated questionnaire encompassing 15 items on mentor performance and the personal characteristics of the clerks was used. Mixed linear models were developed for repeated measurements and to adjust for personal characteristics. Results The results revealed that the redesigned mentoring program improved the mentors’ performance over time for most evaluated items regarding professional development and personal support provided to the mentees. Conclusions Our findings serve as an improved framework for the role of the institution and demonstrate how institutional policies, programs, and structures can shape a clinical mentoring program. We recommend the adoption of mentorship schemes for other cohorts of medical students and for different learning and training stages involved in becoming a physician. PMID

  12. The Impact of an Advisor-Advisee Mentoring Program on the Achievement, School Engagement, and Behavior Outcomes of Rural Eighth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrick, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory two-group pretest-posttest comparative survey study was to determine the effect of a team adviser-advisee academic, behavior, and character mentoring program on the achievement, school engagement, and behavior outcomes of eighth grade students determined to be above (n = 21) and below (n = 15) eligibility guidelines…

  13. Academic Challenge Program: Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harty, Harold; And Others

    The evaluation report by Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation (Columbus, Indiana) describes findings concerning what works and what does not work in the Academic Challenge Program, a gifted and talented education program at the elementary and middle school levels. A corollary purpose of the report is to share the evaluation plan itself,…

  14. A Survey of Faculty Mentoring Programs in AACSB Schools of Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Bruce C.; Kannan, Vijay R.

    2014-01-01

    The human resources management literature offers considerable evidence that mentoring programs can positively influence a variety of measures of both individual and organizational performance. This study examines the use and effectiveness of faculty mentoring programs at business schools in the United States. A survey of 118 schools accredited by…

  15. Evaluation of a School-Based Mentoring Program for At-Risk Middle School Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Converse, Noelle; Lignugaris/Kraft, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a school-based mentoring program on at-risk students' office referrals, unexcused absences, and school attitude. Students who participated in the mentoring program had statistically significant reductions in office referrals and statistically significant improvements in school attitude. Based on an analysis of…

  16. EnvironMentors: Mentoring At-Risk High School Students through University Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, Melissa H.; Baustian, Melissa M.; Saari, Courtney R.; Welsh, Susan; D'Elia, Christopher F.; Powers, Joseph E.; Gaston, Suzan; Francis, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Informal place-based environmental education is a proven approach for increasing environmental awareness for students in urban cities. This article describes and qualitatively evaluates the first two academic years of the EnvironMentors program at Louisiana State University (LSU-EM), which is part of a national network of EnvironMentors programs.…

  17. Mentoring Programs to Affect Delinquency and Associated Outcomes of Youth At-Risk: A Comprehensive Meta-Analytic Reviewi

    PubMed Central

    Tolan, Patrick H.; Henry, David B.; Schoeny, Michael S.; Lovegrove, Peter; Nichols, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a meta-analytic review of selective and indicated mentoring interventions for effects for youth at risk on delinquency and key associated outcomes (aggression, drug use, academic functioning). We also undertook the first systematic evaluation of intervention implementation features and organization and tested for effects of theorized key processes of mentor program effects. Methods Campbell Collaboration review inclusion criteria and procedures were used to search and evaluate the literature. Criteria included a sample defined as at-risk for delinquency due to individual behavior such as aggression or conduct problems or environmental characteristics such as residence in high-crime community. Studies were required to be random assignment or strong quasi-experimental design. Of 163 identified studies published 1970 - 2011, 46 met criteria for inclusion. Results Mean effects sizes were significant and positive for each outcome category (ranging form d =.11 for Academic Achievement to d = .29 for Aggression). Heterogeneity in effect sizes was noted for all four outcomes. Stronger effects resulted when mentor motivation was professional development but not by other implementation features. Significant improvements in effects were found when advocacy and emotional support mentoring processes were emphasized. Conclusions This popular approach has significant impact on delinquency and associated outcomes for youth at-risk for delinquency. While evidencing some features may relate to effects, the body of literature is remarkably lacking in details about specific program features and procedures. This persistent state of limited reporting seriously impedes understanding about how mentoring is beneficial and ability to maximize its utility. PMID:25386111

  18. Creating a Culture of Student Success: The SEEK Scholars Peer Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zevallos, Ana L.; Washburn, Mara

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decades, Vincent Tinto, Edmund Thile, Francis Ianni, and others all link mentoring to better academic performance, improved social adjustment, enhanced academic experiences, and greater rates of degree completion. Even more specifically, Jean E. Rhodes, Renée Spencer, Thomas E. Keller, Belle Liang, and Gil Noam describe three…

  19. Mentoring for 2000 and beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, K. M.; Farrance, M. A.

    1994-01-01

    Today, more than 40 percent of the United States workforce are women. However, only a small percentage of working women are employed in science or engineering fields. The numbers of women in engineering and math professions have actually decreased since 1984. Last year, a mentoring program was created at NASA Ames Research Center aimed at encouraging young girls to stay in school, increasing their self confidence and helping them perform better academically. Teachers at the Ronald McNair Intermediate School matched fifth through eighth grade students with women engineers at NASA Ames. Results from a year-end survey submitted by the mentees indicated that the program was successful in achieving its first-year goals; more than one student reported that she felt 'really special' because of her mentor's efforts. The NASA Ames Mentor program has continued into the 1992-93 academic year with both returning mentor/mentee pairs and new participants.

  20. Mentoring programs for medical students - a review of the PubMed literature 2000 - 2008

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although mentoring is acknowledged as a key to successful and satisfying careers in medicine, formal mentoring programs for medical students are lacking in most countries. Within the framework of planning a mentoring program for medical students at Zurich University, an investigation was carried out into what types of programs exist, what the objectives pursued by such programs are, and what effects are reported. Methods A PubMed literature search was conducted for 2000 - 2008 using the following keywords or their combinations: mentoring, mentoring program, medical student, mentor, mentee, protégé, mentorship. Although a total of 438 publications were identified, only 25 papers met the selection criteria for structured programs and student mentoring surveys. Results The mentoring programs reported in 14 papers aim to provide career counseling, develop professionalism, increase students' interest in research, and support them in their personal growth. There are both one-to-one and group mentorships, established in the first two years of medical school and continuing through graduation. The personal student-faculty relationship is important in that it helps students to feel that they are benefiting from individual advice and encourages them to give more thought to their career choices. Other benefits are an increase in research productivity and improved medical school performance in general. Mentored students also rate their overall well-being as higher. - The 11 surveys address the requirements for being an effective mentor as well as a successful mentee. A mentor should empower and encourage the mentee, be a role model, build a professional network, and assist in the mentee's personal development. A mentee should set agendas, follow through, accept criticism, and be able to assess performance and the benefits derived from the mentoring relationship. Conclusion Mentoring is obviously an important career advancement tool for medical students. In Europe

  1. The Middle School Mentoring Program in Allied Health: A Proposed Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Lori Stewart; Kearns, Ellen Hope; Lafferty, Sharon; Lampignano, John; Pappas, Virginia M.

    2000-01-01

    A model mentoring program to interest middle school students in allied health careers incorporates features of tech prep, career academies, and the Yes I Can program. Activities include speakers, service learning, career day, interdisciplinary presentations, and job shadowing. (SK)

  2. Fostering Leadership through Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moir, Ellen; Bloom, Gary

    2003-01-01

    Describes University of California Santa Cruz New Teacher Center mentor-driven beginning-teacher induction program now in its 15th year. Includes mentor selection, training, and development; mentors as school leaders; and induction programs for beginning principals. (PKP)

  3. Natural Mentors, Racial Pride, and Academic Engagement among Black Adolescents: Resilience in the Context of Perceived Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittrup, Audrey R.; Hussain, Saida B.; Albright, Jamie N.; Hurd, Noelle N.; Varner, Fatima A.; Mattis, Jacqueline S.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the potential of relational closeness in the natural mentoring relationships (NMRs) of Black students to counter and protect against the noxious effects of school-based discrimination on academic engagement. The study sample included 663 Black students between the ages of 12 and 19 (M = 14.96 years, SD = 1.81 years), all…

  4. Perceptions of a Statewide Mentor Program for New Itinerant Vision Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pogrund, Rona L.; Chrissy Cowan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Mentoring is valuable for the retention of new teachers. This article describes a model statewide mentor program for new itinerant vision professionals who work with students from birth to age 22. The results of a recent survey of satisfaction are reported, along with implications for the field. Methods: The proteges who participated…

  5. Testing of the "Healthy 'Little' Lives Project": A Training Program for Big Sister Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Michelle R.

    2010-01-01

    Big Brothers/Big Sisters is a national program aimed at providing mentors for disadvantaged children. This study tested whether Big Sister mentors could be trained to increase communication with their Little Sisters about sexual health issues. The study tested an intervention based on social cognitive theory in which a sexual health communication…

  6. Health Information Management Education: A Comparison of Faculty Mentoring in Traditional vs. Distance Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidian, Marilyn R.

    2010-01-01

    Fifty years of research has demonstrated the value of faculty mentoring for students. The purpose of this research was to explore the faculty mentoring experiences among graduates of traditional and distance education programs in health information management professional education. The sample (n = 1039) was drawn from baccalaureate and masters…

  7. GirlPOWER! Strengthening Mentoring Relationships through a Structured, Gender-Specific Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryce, Julia M.; Silverthorn, Naida; Sanchez, Bernadette; DuBois, David L.

    2010-01-01

    The authors examine GirlPOWER! an innovative program that uses structure and group-based activities to enhance one-to-one mentoring relationships for young adolescent girls from the perspective of the focus, purpose, and authorship dimensions of mentoring relationships that Karcher and Nakkula described. The discussion draws on several sources of…

  8. Report Card on the Unfunded Mentoring Program in Indiana: New Teachers' Voices Are Finally Heard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freemyer, Jim; Townsend, Robert; Freemyer, Sarah; Baldwin, Margie

    2010-01-01

    The need to support and retain beginning teachers is vital. This study sought to determine if the mentoring programs in Indiana are effectively supporting and retaining new teachers. The study has national ramifications in that it also seeks to determine if withdrawing an annual stipend for mentors to work with new teachers negatively impacts the…

  9. Assessment of Student and Faculty Mentor Perceptions of an International Undergraduate Research Program in Physical Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houser, Chris; Cahill, Anthony; Lemmons, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we assess whether students and their faculty mentors in a Research Experience for Undergraduates program have similar perceptions about the relative importance of different outcomes of their study abroad experience. Results of a Q-analysis reveal a significant difference of opinion between the students and the faculty mentors. It is…

  10. Planning a School-Based Mentoring Program. Lessons Learned. Volume 1, Issue 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garringer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    School-based mentoring (SBM) has exploded in popularity in recent years: Today approximately one fourth of the youth mentoring programs in the country use a school-based format (Herrera, Grossman, Kauh, Feldman, & McMaken, 2007). In SBM, a K-12 student is paired with an adult from the community or an older (usually high school) student in a…

  11. The Roles of Site-Based Mentors in Educational Leadership Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowser, Audrey; Hux, Annette; McBride, Jackie; Nichols, Cindy; Nichols, Joe

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on whether the roles of site based mentors in an educational leadership program were successfully completed. Three hundred eleven internship candidates' portfolios were reviewed to determine whether mentors essentially performed the tasks of collaboration, supervision, and evaluation of their protegees portfolios. A bibliography…

  12. Student-Faculty Lunch Program to Increase Mentoring and Facilitate Cross-Program Relationships in School of Nursing.

    PubMed

    Lewinski, Allison; Wainwright, Kristin; Gordon, Helen; Derouin, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Let's DU Lunch is a pilot program launched to explore the impact of a low-cost, student-faculty lunch program to increase mentoring and facilitate cross-program relationships. This program gave students the opportunity to go to lunch with a faculty member of their choice. A total of 71 students and 25 faculty participated. This program provided the opportunity for positive student-faculty interaction and mentoring and facilitated cross-program relationships.

  13. Multilevel approach to mentoring in the Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonine, K. E.; Dontsova, K.; Pavao-Zuckerman, M.; Paavo, B.; Hogan, D.; Oberg, E.; Gay, J.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation focuses on different types of mentoring for students participating in Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs with examples, including some new approaches, from The Environmental and Earth Systems Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program at Biosphere 2. While traditional faculty mentors play essential role in students' development as researchers and professionals, other formal and informal mentoring can be important component of the REU program and student experiences. Students receive mentoring from program directors, coordinators, and on site undergraduate advisors. While working on their research projects, REU students receive essential support and mentoring from undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral scientists in the research groups of their primary mentors. Cohort living and group activities give multiple opportunities for peer mentoring where each student brings their own strengths and experiences to the group. Biosphere 2 REU program puts strong emphasis on teaching students to effectively communicate their research to public. In order to help REUs learn needed skills the outreach personnel at Biosphere 2 mentor and advise students both in groups and individually, in lecture format and by personal example, on best outreach approaches in general and on individual outreach projects students develop. To further enhance and strengthen outreach mentoring we used a novel approach of blending cohort of REU students with the Cal Poly STAR (STEM Teacher And Researcher) Program fellows, future K-12 STEM teachers who are gaining research experience at Biosphere 2. STAR fellows live together with the REU students and participate with them in professional development activities, as well as perform research side by side. Educational background and experiences gives these students a different view and better preparation and tools to effectively communicate and adapt science to lay audiences, a challenge commonly facing

  14. An Investigation of Same- versus Cross-Gender Matching for Boys in Formal School-Based Mentoring Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanchewa, Stella S.; Rhodes, Jean E.; Schwartz, Sarah E. O.; Olsho, Lauren E. W.

    2014-01-01

    Although assigned mentoring relationships have typically involved same-gender matches, a growing number of programs, particularly those in schools, have begun pairing female mentors with male mentees. This practice stems, in large part, from the relative dearth of male mentors and programs' efforts to increase the availability of youth mentoring…

  15. Student Mentoring Programs: Education's Monitoring and Information Sharing Could Be Improved. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-04-581

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaul, Marnie S.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB), Congress authorized a school-based mentoring grant program. This study examined: the basic elements, policies, and procedures of successful mentoring programs; key characteristics of NCLB-funded mentoring efforts (the extent to which they had the basic elements, policies, and procedures of…

  16. "A Circular Council of People with Equal Ideas": The Mentoring Mosaic in a Preservice Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Susan A.

    2017-01-01

    Mentoring in music education programs is such a ubiquitous part of the process; it is sometimes overlooked or subsumed under other categories. The purpose of this article is to highlight mentoring relationships within an undergraduate music teacher education program. Formal, informal, vertical, and horizontal mentoring are examined from the…

  17. Academic outreach: health careers enhancement program for minorities.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, J. L.; Wile, M. Z.

    1990-01-01

    This article describes the 6-week Health Careers Enhancement Program for Minorities inaugurated in the summer of 1988 at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. The program was developed for minority and economically disadvantaged college undergraduates and postbaccalaureate premedical students. Its major objectives were to stimulate and maintain the interest of minority students in health careers and prepare these students for entry into health professions and for successful completion of these programs. A unique aspect of the program was academic outreach. Case Western Reserve University minority alumni and community minority physicians participated as clinical role models, mentors, and teachers; community and state minority leaders served as inspirational speakers and role models. The program was designed not only to incorporate cognitive and skill development activities, but to also include features distinctive to the Case Western Reserve University curriculum, specifically, organ system teaching, preceptor groups, medical apprenticeship program, and student tutors. PMID:2280430

  18. The Longitudinal Elderly Person Shadowing Program: Outcomes from an Interprofessional Senior Partner Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basran, Jenny F. S.; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina; Walker, Doreen; MacLeod, Peggy; Allen, Bev; D'Eon, Marcel; McKague, Meredith; Chopin, Nicola S.; Trinder, Krista

    2012-01-01

    The University of Saskatchewan's Longitudinal Elderly Person Shadowing (LEPS) is an interprofessional senior mentors program (SMP) where teams of undergraduate students in their first year of medicine, pharmacy, and physiotherapy; 2nd year of nutrition; 3rd year nursing; and 4th year social work partner with community-dwelling older adults.…

  19. A Collaborative Approach to a Chronic Care Problem: An Academic Mentor's Point of View.

    PubMed

    Vallis, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Healthcare Collaboration for Innovation and Improvement in Chronic Disease (AHC) represents a social experiment of sorts. The AHC provided a platform to integrate regions, health issues, healthcare systems, providers and individuals/families living with chronic disease. As such, the scope of the AHC was very broad, providing a rich learning environment but also risking biting off more than it could chew. I participated in this experiment as an academic mentor to three of the improvement projects (IPs) with Health PEI, Central Health and Western Health and also was a member of the IP extended team at Nova Scotia Health Authority (formerly Capital Health) in Nova Scotia. My professional contribution was from the perspective of health behaviour change - change at the level of the patient and family living with chronic disease, at the level of the healthcare provider working within an expert-based, siloed system, and at the level of the healthcare system - the managers and decision-makers.

  20. El Camino College Academic Program Review Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Camino Coll., Torrance, CA.

    This document presents El Camino College's academic program review guidelines as of January 1999. Academic programs are scheduled for full evaluation once every six years and involve a two-year process. By or before the beginning of each fall semester, the Office of Academic Affairs notifies the dean of each division as to which programs are to be…

  1. Who Plans? Who Participates? Critically Examining Mentoring Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansman, Catherine A.

    Informal mentoring is dependent on the relationship developed between mentor and protege, but job needs and task designs within organizations may also define and construct them. The intent is to foster organizational goals and help new employees become acclimated to workplace culture while learning from experienced practitioners. How to choose…

  2. Anchoring a Mentoring Network in a New Faculty Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beane-Katner, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Intentional mentoring of the next generation of faculty is critical if they are to be successful teacher-scholars. The traditional model of one-on-one mentoring is insufficient given the changing demographics of next-generation faculty members, their particular expectations, the limited professional training they receive in graduate school, and…

  3. Faculty Mentors' Perspectives on E-Mentoring Post-Professional Occupational Therapy Doctoral Students.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Nancy; Jacobs, Karen; Ryan, Cathryn

    2016-12-01

    E-mentoring is a viable option for mentoring students in occupational therapy educational programs. The objective of this study was to investigate faculty perspectives of faculty-to-student e-mentoring in an online post-professional doctor of occupational therapy program. In a retrospective mixed-method design, nine faculty members described features and outcomes of e-mentoring 48 doctoral students. Online survey results were analysed quantitatively for descriptive statistics; transcripts from structured interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The results showed that successful, satisfactory e-mentoring is student-centered, flexible, frequent, academically and psychosocially supportive; faculty members must be skilled in adapting e-mentoring to the needs and objectives of each mentee; e-mentoring provides opportunities for faculty members and students to achieve academic and professional objectives and growth. The findings suggest that implementation of e-mentoring may be a useful model in other occupational therapy programs. There is a need for future studies with broader participant pool, observable measures of e-mentoring, standardized measures of satisfaction and success and comparison between e-mentoring with and without web camera. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. New Program for New Faculty Mentoring at California State University, Chico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teasdale, R.; McCarthy, K.; Phillips, C.; Silliman, K.; Fosen, C.; Thomas, M.

    2015-12-01

    CSU, Chico is a comprehensive university with high expectations for both teaching (4 courses per semester) and scholarly work. In an attempt to introduce faculty to their new positions, a two-day New Faculty Orientation has been offered for the last two decades. In AY 2014-15, in an attempt to improve the first year experience for new faculty, the Office of Faculty Affairs established and assessed a New Faculty Mentoring program. Eight college-based mentors were selected based on recommendations by College Deans who suggested successful teachers and scholars who could provide the social and leadership skills to effectively guide others. Based on a needs-assessment survey new faculty completed during orientation, mentors met with their new faculty cohort at least monthly to discuss campus resources, host workshops and provide other support in areas of time management, work-life balance, teaching pedagogies, discipline-specific internal and external funding resources, student support resources, and the preparation of Review/Retention documents. Mentors were paid a small stipend for their work and met twice each semester to discuss readings on mentoring best practices, their mentoring activities with new faculty and to compare the needs of their mentees. Survey results from 28 of 37 new faculty respondents indicate they valued Review/Retention workshops, mentor reviews of teaching and the opportunity to visit mentor classrooms for examples of good teaching practices. Social events helped establish cohorts, although some mentees indicated that some cohorts were too large. An unforeseen outcome was recognition that mid-year hires need to also be included in new faculty cohort groups. Moving forward, mentors will continue to work with their original mentees for a 2nd year. A new group of mentors will be identified for faculty starting in fall 2015 who will work with smaller first-year faculty cohorts and will coordinate with the first generation mentors for peer support.

  5. DHS National Technical Nuclear Forensics Program FY 10 Summary Report: Graduate Mentoring Assistance Program (GMAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Martha R. Finck Ph.D.

    2011-10-01

    This program provides practical training to DHS graduate fellows in the DOE laboratory complex. It involves coordinating students, their thesis advisors, and their laboratory project mentors in establishing a meaningful program of research which contributes to the graduate student's formation as a member of the nuclear forensics community. The summary report details the student/mentor experience and future plans after the first summer practicum. This program provides practical training to DHS graduate fellows in the DOE laboratory complex. It involves coordinating students, their thesis advisors, and their laboratory project mentors in establishing a meaningful program of research which contributes to the graduate student's formation as a member of the nuclear forensics community. This final written report includes information concerning the overall mentoring experience, including benefits (to the lab, the mentors, and the students), challenges, student research contributions, and lab mentor interactions with students home universities. Idaho National Laboratory hosted two DHS Nuclear Forensics graduate Fellows (nuclear engineering) in summer 2011. Two more Fellows (radiochemistry) are expected to conduct research at the INL under this program starting in 2012. An undergraduate Fellow (nuclear engineering) who worked in summer 2011 at the laboratory is keenly interested in applying for the NF Graduate Fellowship this winter with the aim of returning to INL. In summary, this program appears to have great potential for success in supporting graduate level students who pursue careers in nuclear forensics. This relatively specialized field may not have been an obvious choice for some who have already shown talent in the traditional areas of chemistry or nuclear engineering. The active recruiting for this scholarship program for candidates at universities across the U.S. brings needed visibility to this field. Not only does this program offer critical practical training

  6. Mentoring in healthcare: A rehabilitation hospital's launch of an innovative program for emerging leaders.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Michelle; Wilson, Carol

    2015-01-01

    With enterprise-wide interest by physicians, management, staff, and volunteers in developing future leaders across their organization, this article describes efforts to design, implement, and evaluate an inaugural, 1-year formal mentoring program for the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, Alberta Health Services. Evaluation surveys were analyzed highlighting critical success factors incorporating a broad, diverse mentee/mentor applicant process, well-defined mentee/mentor selection/matching criteria, and use of a formal program to support knowledge acquisition through projects, learning sessions, and presentations.

  7. Mentoring in Medicine Program Encourages Careers in Health | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Health Careers Mentoring in Medicine Program Encourages Careers in Health Past Issues / Summer ... is now an associate professor of clinical emergency medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in ...

  8. New Brunswick: development of a Web-based orientation program and enhancing senior nurses' mentoring skills.

    PubMed

    Auffrey, Marise; Cormier-Daigle, Monique; Gagnon-Ouellette, Anne

    2012-03-01

    This project to help new nurse recruits integrate into the hospital work environment had two components: the development of a new web-based orientation tool in French for new recruits and mentor training for more experienced nurses. The aim of the first component was to redesign delivery of the nursing orientation program by assessing individual needs of new recruits and developing "just in time" information sessions with online access and e-learning modules. The second component aimed to develop a voluntary mentorship training program for senior nurses that offered training on the role and responsibility of mentors. A total of 30 orientation modules were created as resources that could be adapted to the needs of each nursing unit and accessed online. Sixty nurse recruits used the programs. A mentor training program was developed, and 28 nurses were trained as mentors. The mentorship literature and guides, produced in French, will be a valuable resource for francophone nurses across Canada.

  9. Academic Life-Support: The Self Study of a Transnational Collaborative Mentoring Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bristol, Laurette; Adams, Anne E.; Guzman Johannessen, B. Gloria

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we examined the collaborative mentoring processes of a transnational network. A narrative approach was employed to explore the mentoring practices and experiences of 19 women involved in the CURVE-Y-FRiENDs (C-Y-F) network. Their mentoring practices go beyond transnational, ethnic, discipline, and university borders. The processes…

  10. A Facilitated Peer Mentoring Program for Junior Faculty to Promote Professional Development and Peer Networking

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Geoffrey M.; Simmons, Jill H.; Xu, Meng; Gesell, Sabina B.; Brown, Rebekah F.; Cutrer, William B.; Gigante, Joseph; Cooper, William O.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the design, implementation, and efficacy of a faculty development program in a cohort of early-career junior faculty. Method Interested junior faculty members were divided into interdisciplinary small groups led by senior faculty facilitators. The groups met monthly for 1.5 hours to review a modular curriculum from 2011 to 2013. Using a survey at two time points (September 2011 and May 2013) and an interim program evaluation, the authors collected data on participants’ demographics, faculty interconnectedness, and self-reported knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSA) in the domains of professional development and scholarship, including the ability to write career goals and align activities with those goals. Results A total of 104 junior faculty participated in the program. They demonstrated changes in self-reported KSA in the domains of professional development (P = .013, P = .001) and scholarship (P = .038, P = .015) with an increase in ability to write career goals (P < .001), align activities with those goals (P < .001), and in the number of and amount of time spent pursuing activities related to those goals (P = .022). These changes were more significant among female faculty and were not affected by academic rank or time since last training. Interconnectedness among faculty increased during the period of study--the number of nodes and ties between nodes within the network increased. Conclusions This facilitated peer mentoring program for junior faculty was effective in improving the KSA necessary to promote early career advancement and peer networking, especially for women. PMID:25830537

  11. Characteristics of Successful and Failed Mentoring Relationships: A Qualitative Study Across Two Academic Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Straus, Sharon E.; Johnson, Mallory O.; Marquez, Christine; Feldman, Mitchell D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To explore the mentor–mentee relationship with a focus on determining the characteristics of effective mentors and mentees and understanding the factors influencing successful and failed mentoring relationships. Method The authors completed a qualitative study through the Departments of Medicine at the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine and the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine between March 2010 and January 2011. They conducted individual, semistructured interviews with faculty members from different career streams and ranks and analyzed transcripts of the interviews, drawing on grounded theory. Results The authors completed interviews with 54 faculty members and identified a number of themes, including the characteristics of effective mentors and mentees, actions of effective mentors, characteristics of successful and failed mentoring relationships, and tactics for successful mentoring relationships. Successful mentoring relationships were characterized by reciprocity, mutual respect, clear expectations, personal connection, and shared values. Failed mentoring relationships were characterized by poor communication, lack of commitment, personality differences, perceived (or real) competition, conflicts of interest, and the mentor’s lack of experience. Conclusions Successful mentorship is vital to career success and satisfaction for both mentors and mentees. Yet challenges continue to inhibit faculty members from receiving effective mentorship. Given the importance of mentorship on faculty members’ careers, future studies must address the association between a failed mentoring relationship and a faculty member’s career success, how to assess different approaches to mediating failed mentoring relationships, and how to evaluate strategies for effective mentorship throughout a faculty member’s career. PMID:23165266

  12. Prediction of junior faculty success in biomedical research: comparison of metrics and effects of mentoring programs.

    PubMed

    von Bartheld, Christopher S; Houmanfar, Ramona; Candido, Amber

    2015-01-01

    Measuring and predicting the success of junior faculty is of considerable interest to faculty, academic institutions, funding agencies and faculty development and mentoring programs. Various metrics have been proposed to evaluate and predict research success and impact, such as the h-index, and modifications of this index, but they have not been evaluated and validated side-by-side in a rigorous empirical study. Our study provides a retrospective analysis of how well bibliographic metrics and formulas (numbers of total, first- and co-authored papers in the PubMed database, numbers of papers in high-impact journals) would have predicted the success of biomedical investigators (n = 40) affiliated with the University of Nevada, Reno, prior to, and after completion of significant mentoring and research support (through funded Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence, COBREs), or lack thereof (unfunded COBREs), in 2000-2014. The h-index and similar indices had little prognostic value. Publishing as mid- or even first author in only one high-impact journal was poorly correlated with future success. Remarkably, junior investigators with >6 first-author papers within 10 years were significantly (p < 0.0001) more likely (93%) to succeed than those with ≤6 first-author papers (4%), regardless of the journal's impact factor. The benefit of COBRE-support increased the success rate of junior faculty approximately 3-fold, from 15% to 47%. Our work defines a previously neglected set of metrics that predicted the success of junior faculty with high fidelity-thus defining the pool of faculty that will benefit the most from faculty development programs such as COBREs.

  13. Academic Programs in Alternative Education: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruzzi, Betsy Brown; Kraemer, Jacqueline

    2006-01-01

    This paper, second in a series of papers on alternative education, examines the academic programming in alternative education programs by reviewing the literature specifically focused on the academic programs in alternative education and summarizing a survey of fifteen alternative education programs. It suggests options for further research on…

  14. A Literature Review of Afterschool Mentoring Programs for Children at Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Sara; Yarbrough, Anna-Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Afterschool programs such as tutoring and school-based or community-based programs have effectively functioned as prevention and intervention programs for children at risk. This literature review focuses on afterschool mentoring programs for children at risk. The purpose of reviewing the literature was to (a) determine the breadth and scope of the…

  15. Medical student and senior participants' perceptions of a mentoring program designed to enhance geriatric medical education.

    PubMed

    Corwin, Sara J; Frahm, Kathryn; Ochs, Leslie A; Rheaume, Carol E; Roberts, Ellen; Eleazer, G Paul

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the Senior Mentor Program was implemented as an innovative, instructional method in the University of South Carolina's medical school curriculum designed to enhance and strengthen student training in geriatrics. This study qualitatively analyzed second- year medical students' and senior participants' perceptions of and attitudes towards the Senior Mentor Program as an effective learning modality. A total of 36 second-year students from two consecutive classes (2002-2003) and 42 senior mentors at USC's School of Medicine participated in five and seven separate focus group interviews, respectively. The group discussions were transcribed and a content analysis performed using NVivo. The coding scheme and analyses were driven by the data collected and recurrent themes were examined across all focus groups. Overall, student and senior mentor participants viewed the program positively. Thematic comparisons by participant type indicate a shared view that the mentoring relationship has a far-reaching, educational, professional, and personal impact. Both students and seniors agreed that myths and stereotypes about aging were dispelled and students indicated that a close, caring relationship with an older person will change they way they practice. A longitudinal mentoring program that pairs students with community-dwelling seniors can be a valuable addition to traditional geriatric curricular activities designed to increase students' skills and compassion for caring for older adults.

  16. The organizational impact of a new graduate pediatric nurse mentoring program.

    PubMed

    Halfer, Diana; Graf, Elaine; Sullivan, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Successful mentoring programs for new graduate nurses are designed to provide professional supports to ease the transition of these newcomers from student to practicing nurse. In the financially constrained health care environment, a resource-intensive program can be sustained only by leaders who see quantitative evidence of organizational impact over time. A descriptive study was undertaken at a pediatric academic medical center to compare the job satisfaction and retention rates of two cohorts of new graduate nurses: one before and one after the implementation of a Pediatric RN Internship Program. In this study overall job satisfaction was significantly higher in the post-internship group as compared to the pre-internship group. Improved job satisfaction was also reflected in a lower turnover rate (12% vs. 20% in the pre-internship group) that was sustained during the 2-year post-intervention study period. By lowering turnover rates, organizations avoid costs associated with recruitment, orientation, and temporary labor coverage for vacant RN positions.

  17. Recycling Mentors: an intergenerational, service-learning program to promote recycling and environmental awareness.

    PubMed

    D'abundo, Michelle L; Fugate-Whitlock, Elizabeth I; Fiala, Kelly A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of Recycling Mentors was to implement an intergenerational, service-learning program focused on promoting recycling and environmental awareness among students enrolled in Community Health (HEA 301) and Current Issues in Gerontology (GRN 440/540) and adults older than 60 years. Recycling Mentors was conducted in New Hanover County (NHC), North Carolina, where a moderate climate and coastal location attracts many tourists, retirees, and college students. A community like NHC is a good place to implement service-learning that educates both students and older adults about the benefits of recycling to individual health and the environment. During the Fall 2009 semester, undergraduate and graduate students completed institutional review board training and then conducted the program with older adults. The education component of Recycling Mentors included a pre/post survey, brochure, and scheduled visits. Overall, Recycling Mentors was positive service-learning experience with students identifying salient outcomes such as learning about recycling and the environment and working with older adults. In addition, teaching the education component of Recycling Mentors was good practice for students who will be the future health professionals. While service-learning and environmentally themed projects are common, a program that combines the 2 like Recycling Mentors is unique and has the potential to motivate individual change while positively impacting the local community and the environment.

  18. Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2002 Data

    SciTech Connect

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2003-10-01

    The survey includes degrees granted between July 1, 2001 and June 30, 2002. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2002. Thirty-five academic programs were in the survey universe and all responded (100% response rate). One of the 35 programs reported that it was discontinued after the 2001-2002 academic year. Also, two programs were discontinued after the previous academic year (2000-2001) and were not included in 2002 survey.

  19. Community Contexts for Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Stephen F.; Hamilton, Mary Agnes; Hirsch, Barton J.; Hughes, Jan; King, Jacqueline; Maton, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Mentoring programs attempt to foster a relationship that is too often missing from the lives of disadvantaged children and youth. However, in view of both the power and the limitations of mentoring programs, it is important to understand how mentoring occurs naturally. Assuming an ecological perspective, we examine mentoring in four contexts:…

  20. The RWJ Executive Nurse Fellows Program, Part 2: Mentoring for leadership success.

    PubMed

    Bellack, Janis P; Morjikian, Robin L

    2005-12-01

    This article is the second in a 3-part series describing the RWJ Executive Nurse Fellows Program, an advanced leadership program for nurses in senior executive roles who aspire to help lead and shape the US healthcare system of the future. Part 1 (October 2005) described the program, its core leadership competencies, and the primary components. This article discusses the mentor experience that is a cornerstone of the 3-year fellowship program. Fellows are encouraged to have this experience with senior-level executives outside of healthcare in order to broaden their leadership perspectives. Examples of these mentor experiences are described from the viewpoints of both fellows and mentors, including successes, challenges, and lessons learned. Part 3 (February 2006) will explain how fellows are required to create a business plan for their leadership project because it is so important for nurse leaders to offer a strong business case for proceeding with anew initiative, service, or program.

  1. 48 CFR 1019.202-70 - The Treasury Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The Treasury Mentor-Protégé Program. 1019.202-70 Section 1019.202-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 1019.202-70 The Treasury...

  2. 48 CFR 719.273-9 - Obligations under the Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Mentor or Protégé may voluntarily withdraw from the Program. However, in no event shall such withdrawal...-Protégé Program impacted the Protégé'(s) ability to receive contract(s) and subcontract(s) from private... mutually agreed upon Program period, the conclusion of the contract, or the voluntary withdrawal by...

  3. 48 CFR 852.219-72 - Evaluation factor for participation in the VA mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... program. As prescribed in 819.7115(b), insert the following clause: Evaluation Factor for Participation in the VA Mentor-Protégé Program (DEC2009) This solicitation contains an evaluation factor or sub-factor regarding participation in the VA Mentor-Protégé Program. In order to receive credit under the...

  4. 48 CFR 852.219-72 - Evaluation factor for participation in the VA mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... program. As prescribed in 819.7115(b), insert the following clause: Evaluation Factor for Participation in the VA Mentor-Protégé Program (DEC2009) This solicitation contains an evaluation factor or sub-factor regarding participation in the VA Mentor-Protégé Program. In order to receive credit under the...

  5. 48 CFR 852.219-72 - Evaluation factor for participation in the VA mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... program. As prescribed in 819.7115(b), insert the following clause: Evaluation Factor for Participation in the VA Mentor-Protégé Program (DEC2009) This solicitation contains an evaluation factor or sub-factor regarding participation in the VA Mentor-Protégé Program. In order to receive credit under the...

  6. 48 CFR 852.219-72 - Evaluation factor for participation in the VA mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... program. As prescribed in 819.7115(b), insert the following clause: Evaluation Factor for Participation in the VA Mentor-Protégé Program (DEC2009) This solicitation contains an evaluation factor or sub-factor regarding participation in the VA Mentor-Protégé Program. In order to receive credit under the...

  7. 76 FR 70828 - Proposed Information Collection (Mentor-Protégé Program Application and Reports) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... needed to establish a mentor-prot g program agreement between a large business, veteran-owned small business and service-disabled veteran-owned small business and to report the success of the program. DATES... will be used to institute a mentor-prot g program whereby large businesses agree to provide...

  8. Building a novel inpatient diabetes management mentor program: a blueprint for success.

    PubMed

    Modic, Mary Beth; Sauvey, Rebecca; Canfield, Christina; Kukla, Aniko; Kaser, Nancy; Modic, Joselyn; Yager, Christina

    2013-01-01

    The intent of this project was to create a formalized educational program for bedside nurses responsible for inpatient diabetes management. Bedside nurses are recruited to serve as diabetes management mentors. The mentors receive advanced education concerning teaching and learning principles, the AADE7™ Self-Care Behaviors, and diabetes management strategies. They teach their peers, advocate for patients, and facilitate referrals for outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) programs. The focus of these ongoing educational activities is to foster the development of diabetes management mentors and to create teaching tools that mentors can use with peers to address practice gaps or skill deficiencies. The diabetes management mentor is integral in enhancing the care of patients with diabetes in the hospital. The empowerment of bedside nurses as mentors for their peers and their patients is an invaluable asset that helps nurses take ownership of their practice. This role could be applied to other complex disease entities, helping nurses to develop specific management skills to improve patient outcomes and enhance patient satisfaction.

  9. How we developed the GIM clinician-educator mentoring and scholarship program to assist faculty with promotion and scholarly work.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Amanda; Yeh, Hsin Chieh; Bass, Eric B; Brancati, Frederick; Levine, David; Cofrancesco, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    Clinician Educators' (CEs) focus on patient care and teaching, yet many academic institutions require dissemination of scholarly work for advancement. This can be difficult for CEs. Our division developed the Clinician-Educator Mentoring and Scholarship Program (CEMSP) in an effort to assist CEs with scholarship, national reputation, recognition, promotion and job satisfaction. The key components are salary-supported director and co-director who coordinate the program and serve as overall mentors and link CEs and senior faculty, and a full-time Senior Research Coordinator to assist with all aspects of scholarship, a close relationship with the General Internal Medicine (GIM) Methods Core provides advanced statistical support. Funding for the program comes from GIM divisional resources. Perceived value was evaluated by assessing the number of manuscripts published, survey of faculty regarding usage and opinion of CEMSP, and a review of faculty promotions. Although impossible to attribute the contributions of an individual component, a program specifically aimed at helping GIM CE faculty publish scholarly projects, increase participation in national organizations and focus on career progression can have a positive impact.

  10. A Mentoring Volunteer Program for Orthodox Jewish Adults with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Robin Fran

    2012-01-01

    Prevocational and vocational training are interventions that are widely recognized as personally satisfying forms of occupation that can increase self-determination and employability while improving a person's health and well-being. In recent years a related intervention, structured peer mentoring, has been associated with increased community…

  11. GirlPOWER! Strengthening mentoring relationships through a structured, gender-specific program.

    PubMed

    Pryce, Julia M; Silverthorn, Naida; Sanchez, Bernadette; DuBois, David L

    2010-01-01

    The authors examine GirlPOWER! an innovative program that uses structure and group-based activities to enhance one-to-one mentoring relationships for young adolescent girls from the perspective of the focus, purpose, and authorship dimensions of mentoring relationships that Karcher and Nakkula described. The discussion draws on several sources of data that contributed to the development and ongoing refinement of the program. The authors highlight their efforts to design the program in a way that navigates the tensions they encountered in balancing attention to competing concerns associated with each dimension. Based on their analysis, they conclude that what may appear to be competing areas of emphasis in mentoring relationships, such as a focus on goals or relationship development, may in practice often prove to be mutually reinforcing and thus synergistic. Their experience underscores a need to complement program enhancements such as GirlPOWER! with individualized support that is geared to the unique backgrounds of mentors and the distinctive features of each mentoring relationship.

  12. Academic Magnet Program at Burke High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sklarz, David P.

    A plan for the academic magnet high school (AMHS) program offered by the Charleston County (South Carolina) School District is presented in this report. A program overview describes general goals for students, which would emphasize thinking skills in all academic core areas, problem-solving skills in mathematics and research-based science,…

  13. The Value of Preparing PhD Students as Research Mentors: Application of Kram's Temporal Mentoring Model.

    PubMed

    Abbott-Anderson, Kristen; Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea; Lyles, Annmarie A

    The ability to successfully mentor others is an essential skill necessary for building and strengthening an infrastructure of well-prepared nurse faculty to accelerate advancements in nursing science. Mentoring is a fundamental part of the nurse faculty role, but new faculty are often unprepared to take on mentoring roles early in their academic career. Applied training in research mentoring initiated during doctor of philosophy (PhD) programs may better prepare future faculty to manage teaching and mentoring responsibilities earlier and with greater confidence. The unique opportunity exists for PhD students to engage in research mentoring with undergraduate nursing students, with probable benefits for both the mentor and the mentee. This manuscript uses Kram's temporal mentoring model as a guide to examine the training experiences of 3 PhD students mentoring undergraduate nursing students and discusses the benefits and challenges associated with these mentoring relationships. Collectively, these experiences provide preliminary support and guidance for the development and adoption of formal PhD mentor training programs to better prepare future PhD nursing faculty for their mentoring responsibilities.

  14. A process evaluation of the art of yoga project mentor program for incarcerated teenage girls.

    PubMed

    Harris, Danielle Arlanda; Malone, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Returning to the community upon release from custody is a difficult process to navigate, and there are scant resources available to juvenile female offenders, in particular. Comprehensive wraparound aftercare and mentor services are a central component of successful community reentry, and the well-established unique characteristics of juvenile girls make it necessary to create programs catered specifically to them. The present study employed a case study design to describe and evaluate the Art of Yoga Project's Mentor Program. Eight girls and their mentors were followed for a period of 12 months after the girls' release from custody. Preliminary results from qualitative content analysis suggest that the program was valuable for the girls who participated.

  15. Decreasing the Stigma of Mental Illness Through a Student-Nurse Mentoring Program: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Fokuo, J Konadu; Goldrick, Virginia; Rossetti, Jeanette; Wahlstrom, Carol; Kocurek, Carla; Larson, Jonathon; Corrigan, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Stigma is defined as endorsing prejudicial attitudes about mental illness leading to discriminatory behaviors. It undermines the quality of medical care received by people with mental illness. Research suggests contact based interventions are effective in reducing stigma and increasing positive attitudes towards people with mental illness. This paper describes the development of a consumer led student-nurse mentoring program as part of nursing student education. People with lived mental health experience would mentor student nurses regarding the harmful effects of stigma and the beneficial outcomes of affirming attitudes. Seventy members of stakeholder groups (people with lived mental health experience and student nurses) participated in focus groups. Qualitative analyses revealed themes across stakeholder groups regarding: perceived mental health stigma from nurses, ways to reduce stigma, target message for the mentorship program, characteristics of mentors and logistics in developing such a program within the student nurse curricula.

  16. College Library Directors Mentor Program: "Passing It On:" A Personal Reflection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Larry

    1997-01-01

    Describes the College Library Directors Mentor Program with the Council on Library Resources (CLR) which provides an opportunity for first-year college library directors to benefit from the advice and guidance of more experienced colleagues. Discusses the development of the program, the role of professional library organizations, cost, benefits,…

  17. Nurturing a Generation of Leaders: The College Library Directors' Mentor Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Larry

    2017-01-01

    The College Library Directors' Mentor Program has operated for more than 20 years, during which a substantial portion of the target audience of first-year library directors of small colleges has participated. Through this article, the authors identify the purpose of the program, describe its evolution and current status, and examine the nature of…

  18. Interprofessional Dialogues within a Senior Mentoring Program: Incorporating Gerontology Students as Facilitation Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kropf, Nancy P.; Idler, Ellen; Flacker, Jonathan; Clevenger, Carolyn; Rothschild, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Effective health care with older adults requires that clinicians and practitioners are knowledgeable about aging issues and have the skills to work within an interdisciplinary team context. This article describes a Senior Mentoring Program that paired clinical students in medicine, nursing, and a physician assistant program with community-dwelling…

  19. Technology Mentor Fellowship Program: A Technology Integration Professional Development Model for Classroom Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denton, Jon J.; Davis, Trina J.; Smith, Ben L.; Strader, R. Arlen; Clark, Francis E.; Wang, Li

    2005-01-01

    This multi-year program was based on the premise a digital divide exists between the technology skill levels of public school faculties compared to those of undergraduate teacher education candidates. The Technology Mentor Fellowship Program (TMFP) matched technologically-proficient pre-service teachers with K-12 teachers to model technology as an…

  20. Examining the Benefits of a Faculty Technology Mentoring Program on Graduate Students' Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Evrim

    2016-01-01

    Higher education environments need further evidence of the impact of faculty technology mentoring (FTM) models on graduate students to promote and sustain these programs as well as develop policies related to their support. To address this need, the current study investigated the impact of a university-wide FTM program on participating graduate…

  1. National Implications in Juvenile Justice: The Influence of Juvenile Mentoring Programs on At Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belshaw, Scott H.; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2007-01-01

    In 1972 the federal government created the Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Act that procured funding for various governmental programs to combat the sudden increase in juvenile crime. A provision of this Act set out the creation of mentoring programs to help decrease the juvenile crime rate and dropout rates in secondary schools. This…

  2. Intensive English Programs in the United States: An Overview of Structure and Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Amy S.

    2013-01-01

    Although English as a second language (ESL) programs are common in the United States, there is surprisingly little research documenting the existing structures and mentoring strategies they use. This lack of research could be partly due to ESL programs' widely varying internal structures (Larson, 1990) and the fact that they are often marginalized…

  3. Considerations for Coursework and Mentoring in an Alternative-Route-to- Licensure Program for STEM Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burbank, Mary D.; Shooter, Wynn; Groth, Cori A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to investigate stakeholders' perspectives on coursework and the role of mentors within a unique teacher education program for prospective teachers of mathematics in an alternative-route-to-licensure program. The alternative route reflects a partnership between an institution of higher education, a state office of…

  4. The Implementation of Inmate Mentor Programs in the Correctional Treatment System as an Innovative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Jana; McClure, Scott; Koutsenok, Igor; Lord, Scot

    2008-01-01

    In October 2006, the California Men's Colony (CMC) in San Luis Obispo, faced with staff recruitment and retention difficulties, took an innovative step to utilize long-term sentenced inmates as peer mentors and primary counselors to lead their prison-based therapeutic community (TC) program. The program was designed, developed, and implemented…

  5. Mentoring new social work faculty:a gerontological perspective.

    PubMed

    Maramaldi, Peter; Gardner, Daniel; Berkman, Barbara; Ireland, Kristen; D'Ambruoso, Sarah; Howe, Judith L

    2004-01-01

    The John A. Hartford Foundation, in collaboration with the Gerontological Society of America, has developed new models to create geriatric faculty capacity within social work. The Faculty Scholars Program is building faculty leadership in academic geriatric social work through a strategic approach that includes long-distance national and institution- based mentoring. While mentoring models have proven to be effective means of career development, this is relatively new in academic social work and little is known about the impact of long-distance mentoring in association with sponsorship from a mentor at the scholar's home institution. This paper describes the mentoring model and its conceptual underpinnings. Evaluation data from an ongoing evaluation is presented in discussion of the strengths and limitations of the mentoring model.

  6. The Effect of iMentor's College Ready Program on High School Students' College Aspirations and Non-Cognitive Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrill, Lisa; Siman, Nina; Kang, David; Soltani, Jasmine; Wulach, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of research shows that school-based mentoring programs can be a flexible and cost-effective way to improve student outcomes. Effective mentoring programs create close bonds between students and caring adults, providing students with an important source of emotional support. This study tests the effects of a new model--whole…

  7. Designing Higher Education Curriculum to Increase Graduate Outcomes and Work Readiness: The Assessment and Mentoring Program (AMP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkinson, Kate A.; Benson, Amanda C.

    2016-01-01

    Pre-service teacher programs have a responsibility to equip graduating students with more than the minimum skill sets required by governing bodies. The Assessment and Mentoring Program (AMP) is a four-way collaborative mentoring learning community underpinned by social constructivism. Conducted in Victoria, Australia during the 2014-2016 academic…

  8. More than Colleagues: Tracing the Experiences of Career and Technical Education Instructors Engaged in Faculty-to-Faculty Mentoring Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findley, Daniel E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the impact of faculty-to-faculty mentoring programs on the experiences of both mentors and first-year instructor proteges in Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs with an emphasis on practitioner-educators in nursing and in welding-fabrication. The study was undertaken for four reasons: (a)…

  9. Mentoring in Context: A Comparison of Two U.S. Programs for Beginning Teachers. NCRTL Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feiman-Nemser, Sharon; Parker, Michelle B.

    This study describes how the contexts of mentoring shape the perspectives and practices of mentors in the Teacher Trainee Program in Los Angeles (California), an effort to recruit candidates to teach in inner city secondary schools by providing on-the-job training to college graduates, and in the Graduate Intern Program in Albuquerque (New…

  10. Kinesiology Career Club: Undergraduate Student Mentors' Perspectives on a Physical Activity-Based Teaching Personal and Social Responsibility Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, David S.; Veri, Maria J.; Willard, Jason J.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present university student mentors' perspectives on the impact of a teaching personal and social responsibility (TPSR) model youth program called the Kinesiology Career Club. Data sources in this qualitative case study included program observations, mentoring reflections, and semistructured interviews. Data…

  11. Establishing a Nurse Mentor Program to Improve Nurse Satisfaction and Intent to Stay.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sara Jane

    Mentoring is an intervention to foster development and socialization of new registered nurses to an organization or unit. A nurse mentor program was developed and implemented with the purpose to improve new registered nurse satisfaction and intent to stay. A pre- and postintervention design was used in a rural emergency department to evaluate nurse job satisfaction and intent to stay in the job. Intent to stay in the job mean scores increased, and the registered nurse participants reported program satisfaction through verbal and written feedback.

  12. Student supports: developmental education and other academic programs.

    PubMed

    Bettinger, Eric P; Boatman, Angela; Long, Bridget Terry

    2013-01-01

    , and mentoring programs, as well as supports that target the competing responsibilities of students, namely caring for dependents and balancing employment with schoolwork. They conclude that the limited resources of institutions and equally limited funds of students make it imperative for postsecondary institutions to improve student academic supports and other services.

  13. The Society for Women in the Physical Sciences: a successful mentoring program at UC Berkeley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Kristine

    2000-04-01

    The Society for Women in the Physical Sciences (SWPS, http://socrates.berkeley.edu/ swps) at the University of California at Berkeley has been up and running successfully for three years. This organization aims to increase the number of women undergrad majors in physics, astronomy, and geology and to foster a general sense of community among all the women in these departments: faculty, postdocs, and students. The program consists of three parts: mentoring, events, and resources. The mentoring portion pairs 4 to 5 undergraduate women with one graduate mentor. These mentoring groups meet approximately weekly to visit labs, work on homework, go to science museums, or just talk and gather ideas from one another. SWPS also organizes monthly events that include all members of the department and which have in the past been social events, workshops, or discussion forums. Finally, SWPS writes and distributes, on paper and on our website, a series of guides which make “informal” information, such as where are the quiet places to study, more easily available. During this talk I will present more of the details of this program. In addition, I will present anecdotal and quantitative results of the program at Berkeley and discuss how this program has been implemented at other universities. Finally, I will discuss the general strategies behind the program and how they can be applied to other programs aimed at women in science.

  14. Planning for the next generation of public health advocates: evaluation of an online advocacy mentoring program.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Emily; Stoneham, Melissa; Saunders, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Despite being viewed as a core competency for public health professionals, public health advocacy lacks a prominent place in the public health literature and receives minimal coverage in university curricula. The Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia (PHAIWA) sought to fill this gap by establishing an online e-mentoring program for public health professionals to gain knowledge through skill-based activities and engaging in a mentoring relationship with an experienced public health advocate. This study is a qualitative evaluation of the online e-mentoring program. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with program participants at the conclusion of the 12-month program to examine program benefits and determine the perceived contribution of individual program components to overall advocacy outcomes. Results Increased mentee knowledge, skills, level of confidence and experience, and expanded public health networks were reported. Outcomes were dependent on participants' level of commitment, time and location barriers, mentoring relationship quality, adaptability to the online format and the relevance of activities for application to participants' workplace context. Program facilitators had an important role through the provision of timely feedback and maintaining contact with participants. Conclusion An online program that combines public health advocacy content via skill-based activities with mentoring from an experienced public health advocate is a potential strategy to build advocacy capacity in the public health workforce. So what? Integrating advocacy as a core component of professional development programs will help counteract current issues surrounding hesitancy by public health professionals to proactively engage in advocacy, and ensure that high quality, innovative and effective advocacy leadership continues in the Australian public health workforce.

  15. A mentor-based portfolio program to evaluate pharmacy students' self-assessment skills.

    PubMed

    Kalata, Lindsay R; Abate, Marie A

    2013-05-13

    Objective. To evaluate pharmacy students' self-assessment skills with an electronic portfolio program using mentor evaluators. Design. First-year (P1) and second-year (P2) pharmacy students used online portfolios that required self-assessments of specific graded class assignments. Using a rubric, faculty and alumni mentors evaluated students' self-assessments and provided feedback. Assessment. Eighty-four P1 students, 74 P2 students, and 59 mentors participated in the portfolio program during 2010-2011. Both student groups performed well overall, with only a small number of resubmissions required. P1 students showed significant improvements across semesters for 2 of the self-assessment questions; P2 students' scores did not differ significantly. The P1 scores were significantly higher than P2 scores for 3 questions during spring 2011. Mentors and students had similar levels of agreement with the extent to which students put forth their best effort on the self-assessments. Conclusion. An electronic portfolio using mentors based inside and outside the school provided students with many opportunities to practice their self-assessment skills. This system represents a useful method of incorporating self-assessments into the curriculum that allows for feedback to be provided to the students.

  16. Mentoring in surgical training.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Prem; Narra, Maruthi; Woo, Henry

    2015-04-01

    Surgical mentors have helped trainees develop fulfilling and academically productive careers, while supervisors are formally assigned to impart skills and oversee training. This paper reviews the comparative roles of the supervisor and mentor and how they overlap, while exploring the impact of the 'unknown' mentor. While the supervisor's role in directing the student is formally recognized, the mentee will personally select a mentor who successfully models the career and life balance to which the mentee aspires. The unknown mentor is known only to the mentee. The mentee's commitment to communicating with both mentor and supervisor is crucial to success. Better processes can be used to guide the mentor relationship. Confusion between the two roles - mentor and supervisor - is due to their complementary nature as well as an overlap in roles. Both remain essential to the growth and development of the surgical trainee. The unknown mentor could give detached advice and guidance to the student, while acting as a positive role model.

  17. Does Mentoring Matter? A Multidisciplinary Meta-Analysis Comparing Mentored and Non-Mentored Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Eby, Lillian T.; Allen, Tammy D.; Evans, Sarah C.; Ng, Thomas; DuBois, David

    2008-01-01

    The study of mentoring has generally been conducted within disciplinary silos with a specific type of mentoring relationship as a focus. The purpose of this article is to quantitatively review the three major areas of mentoring research (youth, academic, workplace) to determine the overall effect size associated with mentoring outcomes for protégés. We also explored whether the relationship between mentoring and protégé outcomes varied by the type of mentoring relationship (youth, academic, workplace). Results demonstrate that mentoring is associated with a wide range of favorable behavioral, attitudinal, health-related, relational, motivational, and career outcomes, although the effect size is generally small. Some differences were also found across type of mentoring. Generally, larger effect sizes were detected for academic and workplace mentoring compared to youth mentoring. Implications for future research, theory, and applied practice are provided. PMID:19343074

  18. The Impact of Mentoring Programs on Teachers in Urban Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wider, Beyonka Shantel

    2012-01-01

    Retaining teachers is a pressing issue facing many urban middle schools in the southern US. Urban middle schools continually face increased teacher turnover rates in spite of state mandated induction and mentoring programs. Drawing from Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory, the purpose of the qualitative case study was to examine urban middle…

  19. High Retention of Minority and International Faculty through a Formal Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Susan L.; Dennison, Susan T.; Davenport, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    In these economic times, retention of new faculty, particularly minority and international faculty, is a high priority. In this study, retention of new faculty from 2006 to 2013 was compared for participants and nonparticipants in a formal mentoring program. Retention was 92% for participating faculty and 58% for nonparticipating new faculty. For…

  20. Teachers Training Teachers: Four Perspectives on an Innovative Mentoring Program for Intern Science Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diehl, Christine L.; Harris, Jerilyn; Barrios, David; O'Connor, Heather; Fong, Jennifer

    The Graduate School of Education (GSE) at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB), the San Francisco Unified School District (SFUSD), and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have collaborated to pilot an on-site training and mentoring program for intern science teachers. Exit interviews suggest that its innovative mentoring…

  1. Structuring Serendipity: Mentoring as a Component of Leadership Development Programs in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonebright, Denise A.

    2014-01-01

    The need to develop a pool of well-qualified future leaders is a key concern for human resource development scholars and practitioners in higher education. Research indicates that formal leadership development programs are most effective when they are based on experiential models. Mentoring is one experiential component that can enhance such…

  2. A Case Study of a Southeastern African American Male Mentoring Community College Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senegal, Pamela Gibson

    2011-01-01

    This research is a qualitative case study exploring the experiences of African American male mentoring community college students. Such programs have proliferated throughout higher education, over the past 20 years, in an effort to improve the retention, performance and goal attainment of African American males. The theoretical framework shaping…

  3. Florida Public Health Training Center: Evidence-Based Online Mentor Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frahm, Kathryn A.; Alsac-Seitz, Biray; Mescia, Nadine; Brown, Lisa M.; Hyer, Kathy; Liburd, Desiree; Rogoff, David P.; Troutman, Adewale

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an Online Mentor Program (OMP) designed to support and facilitate mentorships among and between Florida Department of Health (FDOH) employees and USF College of Public Health students using a Web-based portal. The Florida Public Health Training Center (FPHTC) at the University of South Florida (USF) College of Public Health…

  4. 48 CFR 852.219-71 - VA mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false VA mentor-protégé program. 852.219-71 Section 852.219-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses...

  5. 48 CFR 352.219-71 - Mentor-protégé program reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mentor-protégé program reporting requirements. 352.219-71 Section 352.219-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions...

  6. 48 CFR 352.219-70 - Mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mentor-protégé program. 352.219-70 Section 352.219-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses...

  7. 48 CFR 552.219-75 - GSA Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the GSA Office of Small Business Utilization (E), Washington, DC 20405, (202) 501-1021, for further... Mentor-ProtéGé Program (SEP 2009) (a) Prime contractors, including small businesses, are encouraged to... subcontracting plan, or that are eligible small businesses; (2) Protégés are subcontractors to the...

  8. 48 CFR 852.219-71 - VA mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Protégé Program (DEC 2009) (a) Large businesses are encouraged to participate in the VA Mentor-Protégé... small businesses and veteran-owned small businesses to enhance the small businesses' capabilities and..., which are service-disabled veteran-owned small business concerns or veteran-owned small...

  9. Mentoring for Talent Development, Creativity, Social Skills, and Insider Knowledge: The APA Catalyst Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Subotnik, Rena F.; Edmiston, Ashley M.; Cook, Lucas; Ross, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    The mentoring component of the American Psychological Association Catalyst Program, and the Pinnacle Model upon which it was built, was derived from Bloom's (1985) model of talent development. According to Bloom and his associates, optimal instruction for talent development takes place in three stages. During the first stage, young people are…

  10. Social Community: A Mechanism to Explain the Success of STEM Minority Mentoring Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mondisa, Joi-Lynn; McComb, Sara A.

    2015-01-01

    Social community may be a mechanism that explains the success of minority mentoring programs. We define a social community as an environment where like-minded individuals engage in dynamic, multidirectional interactions that facilitate social support. In this conceptual article, we propose a social community model for science, technology,…

  11. Multigenerational and Virtual: How Do We Build a Mentoring Program for Today's Workforce?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houck, Christiana

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at virtual mentoring programs through a lens of generational differences, technological preferences, and communication styles. Best practices are framed to address the need to prepare the incoming millennials to lead the workforce as baby boomers exit. After a review of the literature, ideas are culled to apply the theory to a…

  12. Creating Mentoring Programs as a Means of Retaining Qualified Special Education Personnel. Practice Brief. Winter 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Eve

    2011-01-01

    In response to high rates of attrition, increasing numbers of states and localities are developing mentoring programs as a means of retaining qualified special education personnel. Based on examples drawn from around the country, including states and localities with which the Personnel Improvement Center (PIC) has worked, this practice brief…

  13. Medical Student and Senior Participants' Perceptions of a Mentoring Program Designed to Enhance Geriatric Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corwin, Sara J.; Frahm, Kathryn; Ochs, Leslie A.; Rheaume, Carol E.; Roberts, Ellen; Eleazer, G. Paul

    2006-01-01

    In 2000, the Senior Mentor Program was implemented as an innovative, instructional method in the University of South Carolina's medical school curriculum designed to enhance and strengthen student training in geriatrics. This study qualitatively analyzed second-year medical students' and senior participants' perceptions of and attitudes towards…

  14. A Program Evaluation of the Special Education Mentor Training in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ann Marie H.

    2013-01-01

    Retaining effective teachers is a challenge in every classroom, but nowhere more than in special education classrooms. The purpose of the study was to conduct a program evaluation using archival data that were collected as a part of the Special Education Advanced Mentor Training (SEAMT) in South Carolina. Drawing on Erikson's Intimacy vs.…

  15. Mentored Discussions of Teaching: An Introductory Teaching Development Program for Future STEM Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baiduc, Rachael R.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Ruggeri, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Today's science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduate students and postdoctoral fellows are tomorrow's new faculty members; but these junior academicians often receive limited pedagogical training. We describe four iterations of an entry-level program with a low time commitment, Mentored Discussions of Teaching (MDT). The…

  16. U.S. Geological Survey Mentoring Program - Paired for a Powerful Science Future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, K.F.; Clarke, S.D.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) prides itself in its excellence in science. The resource bank of skills and knowledge that is contained within the current employees of the USGS is what makes our science excellent. With an aging workforce, we must ensure that the knowledge and skills represented by those years of experience are passed to new employees. To ensure that this bank of knowledge and experience is not lost and thereby sustain the excellence of our science, the Mentoring Program focuses on intentional mentoring, the deliberate transfer of skills and knowledge. Skills transfer from more experienced employees to those who are less experienced is critical. By placing an emphasis on intentional mentoring, we help to meet the scientific and technical needs of the employees by offering a cost-effective way to gain knowledge and skills necessary to maintain excellence in science. By encouraging and fostering a mentoring atmosphere within the USGS, we are investing in the future of our organization. With improved technical skills, increased job effectiveness, and resulting satisfaction, USGS employees will not only be more invested and engaged, they will also be able to work smarter, thus benefiting from the experience of their mentor.

  17. New Century Scholars: A Mentorship Program to Increase Workforce Diversity in Academic Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Pachter, Lee M; Kodjo, Cheryl

    2015-07-01

    This article describes a program aimed to increase workforce diversity and underrepresented minority (URM) representation in academic pediatric medicine. The New Century Scholars (NCScholars) program is a core program in the Academic Pediatric Association, the largest national organization for academic pediatric generalists. The program selects URM pediatric (or medicine-pediatrics) residents who are interested in academic careers and provides each NCScholar with a junior and senior mentor, as well as travel grants to the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting where activities specific to the program are held, and provides ongoing mentorship and career counseling support.The authors discuss the origination, operation, and changes to the program over the first 10 years of its existence, as well as outcome data for the participants in the program. To date, 60 of the 63 NCScholars have finished residency and/or have made postresidency plans, and 38 of these URM pediatricians (63%) have entered academic careers. The authors suggest that this type of mentorship program for URM pediatric trainees can be used as a model for other specialties and medical organizations.

  18. Peer-Mentored Preparedness (PM-Prep): A New Disaster Preparedness Program for Adults Living Independently in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenman, David Paul; Bazzano, Alicia; Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Tseng, Chi-hong; Lewis, Mary-Ann; Lamb, Kerry; Lehrer, Danise

    2014-01-01

    The authors studied a health promotion program called PM-Prep (Peer-Mentored Prep), which was designed to improve disaster preparedness among adults living independently in the community. PM-Prep consists of four 2-hour classes co-taught by a health educator and peer-mentors. Adults were randomly assigned to an experimental arm or a wait-list…

  19. A Case Study of the Perceptions of Faculty in a Formalized Mentoring Program at a Private 4-Year College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Sheri E.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative case study was designed to investigate mentors and mentees and their relationships in a formal group-mentoring program. Results and findings were expected to contribute to the literature on how to best support future new faculty and senior faculty careers by providing data on the opinions of those who participated in the mentoring…

  20. Are You Satisfied? Exploring the Mediating Effects of Mentoring Communication Strategies in Predicting Chinese International Graduate Students' Program Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Qinghua; Orrego Dunleavy, Victoria; Phillips, Jasmine Rene

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how mentoring initiation and maintenance strategies mediate the relationship between acculturative stress and intercultural communication competence on Chinese graduate students' program satisfaction. Results supported a partial mediation effect for mentoring maintenance strategies. By specifying the mediating effect, the model…

  1. Toward an Effective Mentoring Program Planning by Using Needs Assessment: For New Elementary Teachers in Seoul, Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, DaeYeon; Kwon, Dae-Bong

    This study investigated what new Korean elementary teachers wanted to learn and what experienced teachers, regarded as potential mentors, expected to teach to beginning teachers. The study was conducted to help determine the contents of a mentoring program being developed for new elementary teachers by using needs assessment. Separate…

  2. Year-Long Peer Mentoring Activity to Enhance the Retention of Freshmen STEM Students in a NSF Scholarship Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutright, Teresa J.; Evans, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The last year of a National Science Foundation (NSF) funded scholarship program was used to provide pseudo-formal peer mentoring activities to engineering, mathematics, and science undergraduates. A one-credit class was used to afford time for peer mentors and mentees to interact. During the fall semester, seniors augmented each week's topics with…

  3. Mentor Policy and the Quality of Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polikoff, Morgan S.; Desimone, Laura M.; Porter, Andrew C.; Hochberg, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring is a common form of support for beginning teachers. State and district mentoring policies vary along a number of dimensions, yet policymakers have little evidence to draw on in designing effective mentoring programs. We use quantitative and qualitative data from a study of beginning middle school mathematics teachers in 10 districts to…

  4. Brief Instrumental School-Based Mentoring for Middle School Students: Theory and Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillin, Samuel D.; Lyons, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of an intentionally brief school-based mentoring program. This academic goal-focused mentoring program was developed through a series of iterative randomized controlled trials, and is informed by research in social cognitive theory, cognitive dissonance theory, motivational interviewing, and research in academic…

  5. Recruiting Mentors in Out-of-School Time Programs: What's Involved? Research-to-Results Brief Practitioner Insights. Publication #2007-05

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowie, Lillian; Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta

    2007-01-01

    Many young people would benefit from having a mentor, but some out-of-school time programs face the challenge of recruiting mentors to meet the needs of these young people. This brief summarizes steps that programs can use to recruit mentors and recommends resources that can be used in this process. (Contains 38 endnotes.)

  6. Diversity in academic medicine no. 6 successful programs in minority faculty development: ingredients of success.

    PubMed

    Daley, Sandra P; Palermo, Ann-Gel; Nivet, Marc; Soto-Greene, Maria L; Taylor, Vera S; Butts, Gary C; Johnson, Jerry; Strelnick, A Hal; Lee-Rey, Elizabeth; Williams, Beverly; Dorscher, Jocelyn; Lipscomb, Wanda D; McDowell, Sherria; Cornbill, Ray; Mindt, Monica Rivera; Herbert-Carter, Janice; Fry-Johnson, Yvonne W; Smith, Quentin T; Rust, George; Kondwani, Kofi

    2008-12-01

    This article describes the ingredients of successful programs for the development of minority faculty in academic medicine. Although stung by recent cuts in federal funding, minority faculty development programs now stand as models for medical schools that are eager to join the 140-year-old quest for diversity in academic medicine. In this article, the ingredients of these successful faculty development programs are discussed by experts in minority faculty development and illustrated by institutional examples. Included are descriptions of program goals and content, mentoring and coaching, selecting participants, providing a conducive environment, managing the program, and sustaining support. This article is a companion to another article, "Successful Programs in Minority Faculty Development: Overview," in this issue of the Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine.

  7. A mentoring program to help junior faculty members achieve scholarship success.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Harold

    2014-03-12

    The University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy launched the Bill and Karen Campbell Faculty Mentoring Program (CMP) in 2006 to support scholarship-intensive junior faculty members. This report describes the origin, expectations, principles, and best practices that led to the introduction of the program, reviews the operational methods chosen for its implementation, provides information about its successes, and analyzes its strengths and limitations.

  8. Developing Mentors: Adult participation, practices, and learning in an out-of-school time STEM program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipio, Deana Aeolani

    This dissertation examines learning within an out-of-school time (OST) Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) broadening participation program. The dissertation includes an introduction, three empirical chapters (written as individual articles), and a conclusion. The dissertation context is a chemical oceanography OST program for middle school students called Project COOL---Chemical Oceanography Outside the Lab. The program was a collaboration between middle school OST programming, a learning sciences research laboratory, and a chemical oceanography laboratory. Both labs were located at a research-based university in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Participants include 34 youth, 12 undergraduates, and five professional scientists. The dissertation data corpus includes six years of ethnographic field notes across three field sites, 400 hours of video and audio recordings, 40 hours of semi-structured interviews, and more than 100 participant generated artifacts. Analysis methods include comparative case analysis, cognitive mapping, semiotic cluster analysis, video interaction analysis, and discourse analysis. The first empirical article focuses on synthesizing productive programmatic features from four years of design-based research.. The second article is a comparative case study of three STEM mentors from non-dominant communities in the 2011 COOL OST Program. The third article is a comparative case study of undergraduates learning to be mentors in the 2014 COOL OST Program. Findings introduce Deep Hanging as a theory of learning in practice. Deep Hanging entails authentic tasks in rich contexts, providing access, capitalizing on opportunity, and building interpersonal relationships. Taken together, these three chapters illuminate the process of designing a rich OST learning environment and the kinds of learning in practice that occurred for adult learners learning to be mentors through their participation in the COOL OST program. In

  9. Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Science and Engineering Education, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2004-03-01

    The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2002 and August 31, 2003. Thirty-three academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during the survey time period and all responded (100% response rate). Three of the programs included in last year's report were discontinued or out-of-scope in 2003. One new program has been added to the list. This year the survey data include U.S. citizenship, gender, and race/ethnicity by degree level.

  10. Mentoring new faculty in a department of psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Fox, E C; Waldron, J A; Bohnert, P; Hishinuma, E S; Nordquist, C R

    1998-06-01

    A formalized mentoring program was developed in response to several problems experienced by new faculty in a department of psychiatry. Goals of the program were to facilitate socialization/orientation to academic psychiatry, facilitate and improve functioning of faculty, and increase retention of new faculty members. A 36-item questionnaire and a program evaluation form were developed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. Significant differences were found for the overall mean of all pre- vs. postmeasures and the sum of the items related to facilitation of socialization/orientation to academic psychiatry. Mentors and mentees evaluated the program as worthwhile and would recommend it to other faculty members.

  11. Academic Cancer Center Phase I Program Development.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Arthur E; Flaherty, Keith T; Weiner, George J; Chen, Robert; Azad, Nilofer S; Pishvaian, Michael J; Thompson, John A; Taylor, Matthew H; Mahadevan, Daruka; Lockhart, A Craig; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; Berlin, Jordan D; Smith, David C; Sarantopoulos, John; Riese, Matthew; Saleh, Mansoor N; Ahn, Chul; Frenkel, Eugene P

    2017-04-01

    Multiple factors critical to the effectiveness of academic phase I cancer programs were assessed among 16 academic centers in the U.S. Successful cancer centers were defined as having broad phase I and I/II clinical trial portfolios, multiple investigator-initiated studies, and correlative science. The most significant elements were institutional philanthropic support, experienced clinical research managers, robust institutional basic research, institutional administrative efforts to reduce bureaucratic regulatory delays, phase I navigators to inform patients and physicians of new studies, and a large cancer center patient base. New programs may benefit from a separate stand-alone operation, but mature phase I programs work well when many of the activities are transferred to disease-oriented teams. The metrics may be useful as a rubric for new and established academic phase I programs. The Oncologist 2017;22:369-374.

  12. The effect of a state Department of Education mentoring program for teachers on science student achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Gilda Darlene

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the Georgia Department of Education Science Specialist teacher-mentoring program on student achievement on science standardized tests. This study analyzed the impact this program has had on student achievement in participating high schools when compared with high schools across the state where the program had not intervened. The Georgia High School Graduation Test, physical science end-of-course, and biology end-of-course test data, from a three year period, were collected from the Georgia Department of Education website and analyzed using an independent-t test and the Mann-Whitney test. While test score improvements cannot be entirely attributed to the Science Specialist mentoring program, the study revealed state-wide increases in physical science end-of-course tests and the Georgia High School Graduation Test scores over the three-year period in those schools participating in the teacher-mentoring program. Significant increases in students with disabilities populations and economically disadvantaged populations were also noted.

  13. Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

    2005-03-01

    This annual report details the number of nuclear engineering bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees awarded at a sampling of academic programs from 1998-2004. It also looks at nuclear engineering degrees by curriculum and the number of students enrolled in nuclear engineering degree programs at 31 U.S. universities in 2004.

  14. German Academic Programs in Technical Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Herb J.

    2003-01-01

    While research in international technical communication has flourished during the last 10 years, there has been little published on technical communication programs outside the United States. This article addresses this need by describing 12 representative academic technical communication programs in Germany, including Germany's first master's…

  15. Closing Academic Programs: Pitfalls and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckel, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Closing programs is the most severe of the three strategies campuses typically consider during difficult financial times: generating new revenue, making across-the-board spending cuts, or undertaking targeted cuts. Closures of academic programs can have lasting negative fallout and the savings may not be as great as anticipated, but at certain…

  16. Jones Center Vocational/Academic Program (JCVA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rydalch, Jeff

    This document provides information on the Jones Center Vocational/Academic Program of the Granite School District (Utah), the purpose of which is to maintain or reintegrate students who are potential high school dropouts or dropouts into appropriate educational alternatives. Its mission statement is followed by a list of program components,…

  17. The Role of Mentoring in Health Promotion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Judd

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how mentoring in health promotion differs from other key support roles, noting what the underlying rationale is behind mentoring, how a mentoring program should be designed, what the historical and theoretical roots of mentoring are, and what strategies mentors can use to be more effective. A research agenda for the mentoring approach is…

  18. Developing Mentors: An Analysis of Shared Mentoring Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower-Phipps, Laura; Klecka, Cari Van Senus; Sature, Amanda L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how experienced teachers share and articulate effective mentoring practices can guide efforts to prepare quality mentors. This qualitative study focused on mentoring practices within a teacher-designed student-teaching program conceptualized while the mentor teachers within the program were students in a graduate-level mentoring…

  19. The GLOBE Program in Alabama: A Mentoring Approach to State-wide Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, G. N.

    2003-12-01

    Established in 1997, the GLOBE in Alabama (GIA) partnership has trained more than 1,000 teachers in almost 500 schools - over 25% of the total number of K-12 schools in Alabama. Over those five years, GIA has strived to achieve recognition of GLOBE as the "glue" to Alabama's new education program, the Alabama Math, Science and Technology Initiative (AMSTI). In 2003, GIA trained over 370 AMSTI K-8 teachers at two AMSTI hub sites in north Alabama. As the AMSTI program grows with the addition of future hub sites (eleven are planned), GIA must ready itself to train thousands of AMSTI teachers during the two-week summer professional development institutes that are part of AMSTI. A key component of AMSTI is a mentoring program conducted by math and science specialists - classroom educators loaned to the AMSTI hub sites by the school systems each hub site serves. The AMSTI mentoring program mirrors the GIA mentoring model begun in 1999 that originally funded regional GLOBE master teachers to provide technical assistance, feedback, and coaching for other GLOBE teachers. In schools where GIA mentor teachers were working, nearly a 100% increase in GLOBE student data reporting was noted. The GIA mentors now work within the hub site framework to ensure implementation of GLOBE as an integrated part of AMSTI. With the continued support of the State of Alabama, GIA will establish a network of mentors who work with the AMSTI hub site specialists in providing support for all AMSTI teachers. GIA is administered by the National Space Science and Technology Center, a partnership between NASA and the State of Alabama's seven research universities. Operational funding for GIA has been provided by the University of Alabama in Huntsville's Earth System Science Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the Alabama Space Grant Consortium, The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, the Alabama State Department of Education, and Legacy. GIA has been able to build on these

  20. Mentoring Experiences and Latina/o University Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salas, Richard; Aragon, Antonette; Alandejani, Jehan; Timpson, William M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of 17 Latina/o students who participated in a university mentoring program that included academic and cultural resources, involvement, and leadership opportunities. The goal was to understand their lived experiences and their own perceptions of their academic success and persistence. An interpretive…

  1. Connecting Families: A Pediatric IBD Center's Development and Implementation of a Volunteer Parent Mentor Program.

    PubMed

    Donegan, Amy; Boyle, Brendan; Crandall, Wallace; Dotson, Jennifer L; Lemont, Cinda; Moon, Tania; Kim, Sandra C

    2016-05-01

    It is estimated that over one million people are living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in the United States and that 20-25% of those are children. Pediatric IBD presents with more severe and extensive disease when compared to adults. As with all pediatric chronic illnesses, the patient as well as their parents and siblings are impacted by this diagnosis. Parents often feel afraid, isolated, stressed, angry, guilty, and overwhelmed when their child is diagnosed. Often, there is lack of structured support systems within the healthcare system to meet the complex needs of these families and they are often looking for support outside of the medical setting. Utilization of trained parent mentors as a source of support to newly diagnosed families is one method of addressing these needs. With minimal additional resources, we describe the feasibility of the development and implementation of a volunteer, parent mentoring program that went from an IBD-patient focused program to one that rapidly expanded to a hospital-wide program involving more than 200 mentors matched to over 300 mentees within a 2-year period.

  2. WHK Student Internship Enrollment, Mentor Participation Up More than 50 Percent | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer The Werner H. Kirsten Student Internship Program (WHK SIP) has enrolled the largest class ever for the 2013–2014 academic year, with 66 students and 50 mentors. This enrollment reflects a 53 percent increase in students and a 56 percent increase in mentors, compared to 2012–2013 (43 students and 32 mentors), according to Julie Hartman, WHK SIP director.

  3. Building the Youth Mentoring Knowledge Base: Publishing Trends and Coauthorship Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakeslee, Jennifer E.; Keller, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the long history and widespread popularity of youth mentoring, only in the past two decades has an academic literature emerged to support the development of program policies and practices. This study examines knowledge development in the field of youth mentoring, with special attention to trends in the number and nature of articles…

  4. What a Difference Mentoring Makes: Service Learning and Engagement for College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Michelle E.; Marks, Jaime L.; Derrico, Lindsay

    2004-01-01

    Colleges are increasingly interested in ways to better engage students in their academic careers. This article reports 20 college students' experiences as mentors for at-risk fourth-graders through a mentoring program called The Learning Connection (TLC), run by the Community Services Office at Moravian College. The study describes students'…

  5. Comparative study of an externship program versus a corporate-academic cooperation program for enhancing nursing competence of graduating students

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background New graduates report intense stress during the transition from school to their first work settings. Managing this transition is important to reduce turnover rates. This study compared the effects of an externship program and a corporate-academic cooperation program on enhancing junior college students’ nursing competence and retention rates in the first 3 months and 1 year of initial employment. Methods This two-phase study adopted a pretest and posttest quasi-experimental design. All participants were graduating students drawn from a 5-year junior nursing college in Taiwan. There were 19 and 24 students who participated in the phase I externship program and phase II corporate-academic cooperation program, respectively. The nursing competence of the students had to be evaluated by mentors within 48 hours of practicum training and after practicum training. The retention rate was also surveyed at 3 months and 1 year after beginning employment. Results Students who participated in the corporate-academic cooperation program achieved a statistically significant improvement in nursing competence and retention rates relative to those who participated in the externship program (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively). Conclusions The corporate-academic cooperation program facilitates the transition of junior college nursing students into independent staff nurses, enhances their nursing competence, and boosts retention rates. PMID:23945287

  6. 2015 Stewardship Science Academic Programs Annual

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Terri; Mischo, Millicent

    2015-02-01

    The Stockpile Stewardship Academic Programs (SSAP) are essential to maintaining a pipeline of professionals to support the technical capabilities that reside at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) national laboratories, sites, and plants. Since 1992, the United States has observed the moratorium on nuclear testing while significantly decreasing the nuclear arsenal. To accomplish this without nuclear testing, NNSA and its laboratories developed a science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program to maintain and enhance the experimental and computational tools required to ensure the continued safety, security, and reliability of the stockpile. NNSA launched its academic program portfolio more than a decade ago to engage students skilled in specific technical areas of relevance to stockpile stewardship. The success of this program is reflected by the large number of SSAP students choosing to begin their careers at NNSA national laboratories.

  7. Cross-Registration and Joint Academic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strandness, Jean T.

    1999-01-01

    The development of a cross-registration system and formation of joint academic programs between colleges create a variety of educational opportunities for students and provide both direct and indirect benefits to a consortium's member institutions and their faculty. The Tri-College University Consortium in North Dakota illustrates the advantages…

  8. Systemwide Academic Program Review: The Florida Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Joan A.; And Others

    The Florida Plan for systemwide academic program review is detailed in this report. Factors leading to the initiation of systemwide review, including population changes and the changing role of the predominantly black Florida A&M University, are discussed. The design and scope of the review process are explained and selection of consultants to…

  9. Gifted Student Academic Achievement and Program Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Katrina Ann Woolsey

    2010-01-01

    Gifted academic achievement has been identified as a major area of interest for educational researchers. The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether there was a relation between the quality of gifted programs as perceived by teachers, coordinators and supervisors of the gifted and the achievement of the same gifted students in 6th and 7th…

  10. Mentoring program guides new hospital trustees. A religious institute ensures trustee orientation is mission and value based.

    PubMed

    Coyle, M

    1994-05-01

    In 1990 the Sisters of Charity began offering a mentoring program to ensure that sisters who serve on boards of its sponsored institutions can fulfill their commitment to effective stewardship. For participating healthcare facilities, the program offers an assurance that their trustees will have a clear direction, common information, and a mission- and value-based orientation process. The new trustees gain a basic understanding of their role and responsibilities as trustees, including the ministerial dimension. Mentors in the program benefit by refreshing their understanding of issues facing trustees. Participants in the mentoring program must meet the criteria for all trustees and demonstrate a special commitment to the congregation's mission and philosophy. The mentors are selected on the basis of their experience, availability, and commitment to the congregation's mission and philosophy. After participating in at least one board meeting, the new trustees, along with their mentors, attend an orientation seminar that focuses on sponsorship's history, purposes, principles, and policies and the system's services, roles, and functions. A second seminar is held nine months later for evaluation and follow-up. In addition, the mentors and trustees meet regularly before and/or after each board meeting to discuss pertinent issues, board dynamics, and the new trustee's participation.

  11. Public-academic partnerships: a rapid small-grant program for policy-relevant research: motivating public-academic partnerships.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Carolyn I; Arbuckle, Melissa R; Simpson, Helen B; Herman, Daniel B; Stroup, T Scott; Skrobala, Anne M; Sederer, Lloyd I; Appel, Anita; Essock, Susan M

    2013-02-01

    To help grow a cadre of researchers with the knowledge and skills to pursue topics of great utility to public mental health systems, the director of the Division of Mental Health Services and Policy Research at Columbia University used funding from the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) to create a rapid small-grant program called the OMH Policy Scholars Program. This column uses two case examples to describe how this public-academic partnership exposes early-career researchers to the needs and complexities of large public mental health systems while providing them with senior research and policy mentors to help ensure the success of the scholars' projects and oversee their introduction to and work within the public mental health system. This type of collaboration is one model of encouraging early-career psychiatric researchers to pursue policy-relevant research.

  12. Nurse Mentors to Advance Quality Improvement in Primary Health Centers: Lessons From a Pilot Program in Northern Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Elizabeth A; Jayana, Krishnamurthy; Cunningham, Troy; Washington, Maryann; Mony, Prem; Bradley, Janet; Moses, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    High-quality care during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period is critically important since maternal and child morbidity and mortality are linked to complications that arise during these stages. A nurse mentoring program was implemented in northern Karnataka, India, to improve quality of services at primary health centers (PHCs), the lowest level in the public health system that offers basic obstetric care. The intervention, conducted between August 2012 and July 2014, employed 53 full-time nurse mentors and was scaled-up in 385 PHCs in 8 poor rural districts. Each mentor was responsible for 6 to 8 PHCs and conducted roughly 6 mentoring visits per PHC in the first year. This paper reports the results of a qualitative inquiry, conducted between September 2012 and April 2014, assessing the program's successes and challenges from the perspective of mentors and PHC teams. Data were gathered through 13 observations, 9 focus group discussions with mentors, and 25 individual and group interviews with PHC nurses, medical officers, and district health officers. Mentors and PHC staff and leaders reported a number of successes, including development of rapport and trust between mentors and PHC staff, introduction of team-based quality improvement processes, correct and consistent use of a new case sheet to ensure adherence to clinical guidelines, and increases in staff nurses’ knowledge and skills. Overall, nurses in many PHCs reported an increased ability to provide care according to guidelines and to handle maternal and newborn complications, along with improvements in equipment and supplies and referral management. Challenges included high service delivery volumes and/or understaffing at some PHCs, unsupportive or absent PHC leadership, and cultural practices that impacted quality. Comprehensive mentoring can build competence and improve performance by combining on-the-job clinical and technical support, applying quality improvement principles, and promoting team

  13. Nurse Mentors to Advance Quality Improvement in Primary Health Centers: Lessons From a Pilot Program in Northern Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Elizabeth A; Jayana, Krishnamurthy; Cunningham, Troy; Washington, Maryann; Mony, Prem; Bradley, Janet; Moses, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    High-quality care during labor, delivery, and the postpartum period is critically important since maternal and child morbidity and mortality are linked to complications that arise during these stages. A nurse mentoring program was implemented in northern Karnataka, India, to improve quality of services at primary health centers (PHCs), the lowest level in the public health system that offers basic obstetric care. The intervention, conducted between August 2012 and July 2014, employed 53 full-time nurse mentors and was scaled-up in 385 PHCs in 8 poor rural districts. Each mentor was responsible for 6 to 8 PHCs and conducted roughly 6 mentoring visits per PHC in the first year. This paper reports the results of a qualitative inquiry, conducted between September 2012 and April 2014, assessing the program's successes and challenges from the perspective of mentors and PHC teams. Data were gathered through 13 observations, 9 focus group discussions with mentors, and 25 individual and group interviews with PHC nurses, medical officers, and district health officers. Mentors and PHC staff and leaders reported a number of successes, including development of rapport and trust between mentors and PHC staff, introduction of team-based quality improvement processes, correct and consistent use of a new case sheet to ensure adherence to clinical guidelines, and increases in staff nurses' knowledge and skills. Overall, nurses in many PHCs reported an increased ability to provide care according to guidelines and to handle maternal and newborn complications, along with improvements in equipment and supplies and referral management. Challenges included high service delivery volumes and/or understaffing at some PHCs, unsupportive or absent PHC leadership, and cultural practices that impacted quality. Comprehensive mentoring can build competence and improve performance by combining on-the-job clinical and technical support, applying quality improvement principles, and promoting team

  14. 48 CFR 719.273 - The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... International Development (USAID) Mentor-Protégé Program. 719.273 Section 719.273 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Mentor-Protégé Program 719.273 The U.S. Agency...

  15. The use of mentoring programs to improve energy balance behaviors in high-risk children.

    PubMed

    Haire-Joshu, Debra; Nanney, Marilyn S; Elliott, Michael; Davey, Cynthia; Caito, Nicole; Loman, Deborah; Brownson, Ross C; Kreuter, Matthew W

    2010-02-01

    This study tested the impact of a multicomponent intervention entitled "Partners of all Ages Reading About Diet and Exercise" (PARADE) a child-focused energy balance intervention incorporated into mentoring programs. We used a group randomized nested cohort design randomizing mentoring program sites (n = 119) and children (N = 782; females = 49%; African American = 37%; mean (s.d.) age = 8.5 (1.5) years) to intervention or usual care conditions. PARADE mentors delivered eight lesson plans addressing key concepts related to diet and activity; eight child-focused computer-tailored storybooks with messages targeting that child's diet and activity patterns and eight parent action support newsletters. When compared to the control group, PARADE children were more knowledgeable of diet and activity guidelines (P < 0.01), challenged themselves more to eat five fruits and vegetables (FV) (P < 0.01) and be active 1 h daily (P < 0.01), and to ask for FV for snack (P = 0.015). Calories from high fat foods decreased in overweight/obese children, but not for normal weight children (P = 0.059). There were no significant differences in fruit and vegetable intake, total calories, percent time being active, or BMI z-score. The combination of one-to-one mentoring, child-focused computer based tailoring, and parent support may impact important behavioral change precursors in environments over which the child has control, especially among normal weight children. Further, work is needed to evaluate the impact of family-focused multicomponent interventions, including computer-tailored approaches, directed toward both the parent and the child.

  16. Mentoring Scaffoldings: Do They Promote College Access?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis, University of Southern California, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This paper summarizes what is known and what is not known about mentoring programs focused on youth and related to college-going. Several aspects of mentoring are reviewed so that the concept and some program variations--such as peer and adult mentors, informal and formal mentoring, compensated and uncompensated mentoring, one-to-one and group…

  17. A Helping Hand? A Study into an England-Wide Peer Mentoring Program to Address Bullying Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide findings from a study into a school peer mentoring program which matched children aged between 9 and 12?years of age who were bullied or at-risk of being bullied with older student mentors. In total, 372 mentees as well as a comparison group of 1,249 young people from 22 English schools completed a…

  18. Ms. Mentor Unmasked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Paula

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Emily Toth, who writes the monthly "Ms. Mentor" academic advice column in the "Chronicle of Higher Education" and teaches in the English department at Louisiana State University, in Baton Rouge. She is the author of "Ms. Mentor's Impeccable Advice for Women in Academia" (1997), "Inside Peyton Place: The Life…

  19. Research Methodology and Youth Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBois, David L.; Doolittle, Fred; Yates, Brian T.; Silverthorn, Naida; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2006-01-01

    Mentoring programs for youth have grown tremendously in popularity in recent years and in many important respects reflect core principles of community psychology. Mentoring of youth is a complex phenomenon, however, with a range of significant processes occurring at the levels of individual youth and their mentors, youth-mentor relationships and…

  20. Exploring the Written Dialogues of Two First-Year Secondary Science Teachers in an Online Mentoring Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, EunJin; Luft, Julie A.

    2014-02-01

    This study explored the yearlong learning processes of two first-year secondary science teachers participating in an online mentoring program, through examination of their written dialogues within the program and other data. Using a case study method, this study (a) explored the patterns of written dialogues between the two new teachers and their mentors over the course of a year, (b) documented pertinent topics of importance, and finally (c) illustrated the new realities created in the mentees' classrooms as a result of the online mentoring process. Penelope and Bradley, who taught at an urban school and at a suburban school respectively, were selected as subjects. Our analysis revealed that the two pairs of mentee-mentors showed different participation patterns that affected the intensity of the creation of new realities, and affected whether the mentees tried/vetted new teaching practices suggested by their mentors. Yet, analysis also revealed that certain elements in the written dialogues between pairs were found to be similar, in that construction of knowledge was evident between both pairs when friction developed and appropriate teamwork emerged to deal with it. The topics of greatest interest and importance within the dialogues were those related to the logistics of the school system and the processes and methodologies of teaching. These results suggest that online mentoring programs are an effective dialogical tool for transferring the knowledge of experts to novices, and for thus expediting the professional induction and growth of new science teachers.

  1. Engagement and Mentor Support as Drivers of Social Development in the Project K Youth Development Program.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Cassandra M; Deane, Kelsey L; Harré, Niki; Courtney, Matthew G R; Moore, Julie

    2017-03-01

    Youth development programs can achieve positive social outcomes, however studies comparing the influence of different program components are rare. Structural equation modeling of longitudinal, multilevel data (N = 327) from Project K, a multi-component youth development program, assessed how experiences of engagement or support in each component affected social outcomes. Participants reported significant gains in social self-efficacy and sense of community after the program. Engagement in the outdoor adventure and support during the mentoring partnership components significantly contributed to observed social gains, while engagement in the community service component did not. Results confirm youth development programs can positively influence adolescent social development, while highlighting the importance of moving beyond "black box" investigations in order to maximize program impact and efficiency.

  2. 48 CFR 1552.219-70 - Mentor-Protege Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... purpose of the Program is to increase the participation of small disadvantaged businesses (SDBs) as... with SDB's and EPA's large business prime contractors (although small businesses may participate as... lead to greater success in competition for contract opportunities; to promote the economic stability...

  3. Implementing a Peer Mentoring Model in the Clemson Eportfolio Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ring, Gail L.

    2015-01-01

    Since the implementation of the ePortfolio Program in 2006, Clemson University has incorporated peer review for the formative feedback process. One of the challenges with this large-scale implementation has been ensuring that all work is reviewed and constructive feedback is provided in a timely manner. In this article, I discuss the strategies…

  4. Implementation and Impact of the Check & Connect Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heppen, Jessica; O'Cummings, Mindee; Poland, Lindsay; Zeiser, Krissy; Mills, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    High school graduation rates remain unacceptably low in the U.S., especially among disadvantaged youth (Chapman, Laird, Ifill, & KelalRamani, 2011; Stillwell, 2010), with troubling implications for future earnings and employment status (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2012). Check & Connect (C&C) is an individualized program that pairs…

  5. The Tzu Chi Silent Mentor Program: Application of Buddhist Ethics to Teach Student Physicians Empathy, Compassion, and Self-Sacrifice.

    PubMed

    Santibañez, Scott; Boudreaux, Debra; Tseng, Guo-Fang; Konkel, Kimberly

    2016-10-01

    The Buddhist Tzu Chi Silent Mentor Program promotes the donation of one's body to science as a selfless act by appealing to the Buddhist ethics of compassion and self-sacrifice. Together, faculty, families, and donors help medical students to learn the technical, spiritual, emotional, and psychological aspects of medicine. Students assigned to each "Silent Mentor" visit the family to learn about the donor's life. They see photos and hear family members' stories. Afterwards, students write a brief biography of the donor which is posted on the program website, in the medical school, and on the dissection table. In this paper, we: (1) summarize the Silent Mentor Program; (2) describe findings from an assessment of medical students who recently completed a new version of the program in Malaysia; and (3) explore how healthcare settings could benefit from this innovative program.

  6. Experiences in the New York Academy of Sciences STEM Mentoring Program (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomposi, C.; Thompson, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    In the Fall of 2010, The New York Academy of Sciences (NYAS) established an after school STEM Mentoring Program. The program recruits both current graduate students and postdocs to teach an after school curriculum to 4th-8th graders in any of the following areas: genetics, human body systems, space science, earth science, robotics, or math. Since its inception, the program has grown and now has branches in New York City, Newark (NJ), and other locations. My talk will focus on my experiences within the NYAS STEM Mentoring program during both the Fall of 2012 and the Fall of 2013 (expected teaching fellow). As a teaching fellow, I not only developed a unique curriculum in Earth Science Education, along with my teaching partner, but also delivered the lectures and executed various laboratory exercises to maintain a hands-on learning environment for the students. I will discuss the development of a coherent earth science curriculum, focused around the theme of ';Natural Disasters' and culminating in our semester-end project in which the students completed an AGU-style presentation for community members. I plan to describe how the students' perception of earth science changed from the program's beginning to its end 10 weeks later. Best practices of the inquiry-based, student-centered curriculum will be discussed, with the hope that they can be applied across similar educational and outreach opportunities.

  7. SOMAS-URM: The Evolution of a Mentoring and Summer Research Program.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Julio J; Tonidandel, Scott

    2009-01-01

    The need to enhance recruitment and retention of students in the sciences to strengthen the economic and scientific foundation of the United States was recently underscored by the National Science Board. The SOMAS Program (Support Of Mentors And their Students) addresses this need using a two-pronged strategy: 1) Junior faculty receive mentoring and instruction in launching research programs that engage student collaborators; and 2) College students are introduced to discovery in the neurosciences by conducting original research with their professors. Junior faculty from predominantly undergraduate institutions are invited to submit applications to obtain summer research support for undergraduate students who will spend 10 weeks collaborating with the faculty member on projects of common interest. Awards cover a travel and a supply budget, summer student housing, as well as faculty and student stipends. The faculty mentors and their students are to use the travel support to attend the joint Annual Meetings of the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) and the Faculty for Undergraduate Neuroscience (FUN). Faculty Awardees are required to participate in the Survival Skills and Ethics Workshop held at the SfN Meeting to prepare them to write grants aimed at supporting their research programs. Students are to present their summer research findings at the FUN Poster Session held jointly with the SfN Meeting. Students are also required to attend Survival Skills Workshop sessions that focus on ethics in research and that provide tips on applying to graduate school. The SOMAS-URM Program presently emphasizes recruitment and retention of underrepresented groups to enhance participation in scientific discovery by the full range of the American population.

  8. Benefits of Peer Mentoring to Mentors, Female Mentees and Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalpazidou Schmidt, Evanthia; Faber, Stine Thidemann

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a study of a pilot mentoring program for early career female researchers at a university that addressed the under-representation of female researchers in senior academic positions. Embracing a grounded theory approach, we draw on a design comprising an ex-ante and an ex-post evaluation. We disclose that development…

  9. The Importance of MS PHD'S and SEEDS Mentoring and Professional Development Programs in the Retenion of Underrepresented Minorities in STEM Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, J.; Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Ricciardi, L.

    2012-12-01

    According to a recent study by the National Academy of Sciences, underrepresented minority (URM) participation in STEM disciplines represents approximately one third of the URM population in the U.S. Thus, the proportion of URM in STEM disciplines would need to triple in order to reflect the demographic makeup in the U.S. Individual programs targeting the recruitment and retention of URM students in STEM have demonstrated that principles of mentoring, community building, networking, and professional skill development are crucial in encouraging URM students to remain in STEM disciplines thereby reducing this disparity in representation. However, to paraphrase an old African proverb, "it takes a village to nurture and develop a URM student entering into the STEM community." Through programs such as the Institute for Broadening Participation's Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S) Professional Development Program in Earth system science and the Ecological Society of America's Strategies for Ecology Education, Diversity and Sustainability (SEEDS), URM students are successfully identifying and benefitting from meaningful opportunities to develop the professional skills and strategies needed to achieve their academic and career goals. Both programs share a philosophy of professional development, reciprocal mentoring, field trips, internships, employment, research partnerships, collaborations, fellowships, scholarships, grants, and professional meeting travel awards to support URM student retention in STEM. Both programs share a mission to bring more diversity and inclusivity into STEM fields. Both programs share a history of success at facilitating the preparation and advancement of URM students. This success has been documented with the multitude of URM students that have matriculated through the programs and are now actively engaged in the pursuit of advanced degrees in STEM or entering the STEM workforce. Anonymous surveys from

  10. A narrative inquiry into novice science mentor teachers' mentoring practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseem, Samina

    Many teacher education programs hire new mentors every year to work with their student teacher population. The literature about teacher mentoring suggests the importance of relevant and ongoing professional development (PD) for teacher mentors at all levels. However, it is much more commonly the case that most teacher mentors volunteer and do not have access to PD. Past research about mentoring provides a descriptive sense of the practices of experienced mentors, especially within a PD context, but little is known about how novice mentors, who are mentoring for the first or the second time, with no prior PD related to mentoring articulate their work as mentors. Using the telling form of narrative inquiry, my study documented how four novice science mentors (NSMs) who had no prior mentoring-related PD articulated the work of mentoring through the stories they told about their past experiences as learners and teachers. The term learner included experiences that the NSMs had before school through K-12 and in their teacher education programs. The experiences as a teacher referred to NSMs' in-service experiences -- teaching, coaching, and mentoring (if any). Each NSM was interviewed once a month for a period of five months. The interviews captured experiences of the NSMs since their childhood to present day experiences as teachers to summarize the experiences that informed their current mentoring practices; to document salient mentoring practices they employed; to identify sources and factors that shaped those practices, and to understand mentoring from mentor teachers' perspectives. Clandinin and Connelly's (2000) three commonplaces (temporality- sociality- place ) framework was used for structuring interview questions and analyzing data. The NSMs employed number of practices discussed in the literature. The study found that the most influential life experiences were upbringing, student teaching, teaching, prior mentoring, and coaching. By taking temporality into

  11. The Effects of Mentoring Relationships on Preservice Teachers' Attitudes toward Academically Diverse Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Tonya R.; Callahan, Carolyn M.; Tomlinson, Carol A.

    1999-01-01

    Preservice teachers from seven universities were studied to investigate how they developed an awareness of the needs of academically diverse learners and modified instruction to meet those needs. As novices became more acquainted with classroom realities, they gained a clearer picture of the complexity involved in appropriate curriculum…

  12. Exploring the Written Dialogues of Two First-Year Secondary Science Teachers in an Online Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bang, EunJin; Luft, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the yearlong learning processes of two first-year secondary science teachers participating in an online mentoring program, through examination of their written dialogues within the program and other data. Using a case study method, this study (a) explored the patterns of written dialogues between the two new teachers and their…

  13. From Nothing to Something: The Nuts and Bolts of Building a Mentoring Program in a Health Sciences College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franko, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I report the development of a mentoring program in a College of Health Sciences comprised of schools of nursing, pharmacy, and health professions (which include physical therapy, speech pathology and audiology, applied psychology, and physician assistant programs) at a large private university. Although university-wide mentoring…

  14. Mentoring Increases Connectedness and Knowledge: A Cross-Sectional Evaluation of Two Programs in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Michelle S.; Miller, Susan Milam; Rettew, David C.; Althoff, Robert; Ehmann, Mary; Hudziak, James J.; Martin, Andres

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors assess changes in knowledge and feeling connected to the field of child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) after participation in a brief mentoring program held at two CAP conferences. Methods: Similar mentorship programs were implemented at two CAP conferences, one national (N=119 participants), one international (N=53). The…

  15. Developing a District-Wide Academic Awards Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Elaine

    1989-01-01

    The Shaperville Academic Recognition Program is a district-wide program for the encouragement and recognition of academic excellence and an attempt to instill in students a natural respect for academic achievement. This article describes its development and implementation from conception to planned obsolescence due to successful reformation of…

  16. Learning to Teach: Examining the Knowledge and Meanings Constructed by Novice Teachers within a Multi-Year, Standards-Based Induction and Mentoring Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    Mentoring and induction programs have moved to the forefront as a strategy for helping novice teachers adjust to the challenges of teaching and develop as effective educators. Induction and mentoring efforts may begin with helping new teachers become acclimated to the classroom and cope with immediate problems, but programs must also assist the…

  17. 48 CFR 653.219-71 - DOS form DS-4053, Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application. 653.219-71 Section 653.219-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 653.219-71 DOS form DS-4053, Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application. As prescribed in 619.102-70(i),...

  18. 48 CFR 653.219-71 - DOS form DS-4053, Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application. 653.219-71 Section 653.219-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 653.219-71 DOS form DS-4053, Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application. As prescribed in 619.102-70(i),...

  19. 48 CFR 653.219-71 - DOS form DS-4053, Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application. 653.219-71 Section 653.219-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 653.219-71 DOS form DS-4053, Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application. As prescribed in 619.102-70(i),...

  20. 48 CFR 653.219-71 - DOS form DS-4053, Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application. 653.219-71 Section 653.219-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 653.219-71 DOS form DS-4053, Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application. As prescribed in 619.102-70(i),...

  1. 48 CFR 653.219-71 - DOS form DS-4053, Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application. 653.219-71 Section 653.219-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 653.219-71 DOS form DS-4053, Department of State Mentor-Protégé Program Application. As prescribed in 619.102-70(i),...

  2. 48 CFR 3052.219-72 - Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program. 3052.219-72 Section 3052.219-72...

  3. 48 CFR 3052.219-72 - Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program. 3052.219-72 Section 3052.219-72...

  4. 48 CFR 3052.219-72 - Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program. 3052.219-72 Section 3052.219-72...

  5. 48 CFR 3052.219-72 - Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program. 3052.219-72 Section 3052.219-72...

  6. 48 CFR 3052.219-72 - Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program. As prescribed in (HSAR) 48... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evaluation of prime contractor participation in the DHS mentor-protégé program. 3052.219-72 Section 3052.219-72...

  7. 48 CFR 952.219-70 - DOE Mentor-Protege program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Contractor's performance as a Mentor may be evaluated as part of the award fee plan. Mentor and Protege firms will develop and submit “lessons learned” evaluations to DOE at the conclusion of the contract. Any...

  8. 48 CFR 952.219-70 - DOE Mentor-Protege program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Contractor's performance as a Mentor may be evaluated as part of the award fee plan. Mentor and Protege firms will develop and submit “lessons learned” evaluations to DOE at the conclusion of the contract. Any...

  9. 48 CFR 952.219-70 - DOE Mentor-Protege program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... contractor's performance as a Mentor may be evaluated as part of the award fee plan. Mentor and Protege firms will develop and submit “lessons learned” evaluations to DOE at the conclusion of the contract. Any...

  10. 48 CFR 952.219-70 - DOE Mentor-Protege program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Contractor's performance as a Mentor may be evaluated as part of the award fee plan. Mentor and Protege firms will develop and submit “lessons learned” evaluations to DOE at the conclusion of the contract. Any...

  11. 48 CFR 952.219-70 - DOE Mentor-Protege program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Contractor's performance as a Mentor may be evaluated as part of the award fee plan. Mentor and Protege firms will develop and submit “lessons learned” evaluations to DOE at the conclusion of the contract. Any...

  12. Student Attitudes and Preferences toward an E-Mentoring Program: A Survey of Journalism Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Switzer, Jamie; Switzer, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    Advances in information and communication technologies (ICTs) provide new opportunities for mentoring, eliminating the need for a synchronous meeting. We report the findings of a survey that measured university student perceptions of the roles and expectations of online mentors and the likelihood of using an online mentor if given the opportunity.…

  13. Tools for a Formal Mentoring Program: A Guide Every Mentee in Coaching Can Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Vincent; Pastore, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Mentoring is crucial for the development of competent coaches (Jones, Harris, & Miles, 2009), and athletic departments and sport organizations are encouraged to use this process that links an inexperienced coach with a veteran mentor coach (Megginson & Clutterbuck, 1995). Mentored coaches benefit from gaining insight and wisdom into their…

  14. Virtual Mentoring: Developing Global Leaders for Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohlson, Matthew; Froman, Russell

    2012-01-01

    CAMP (Collegiate Achievement Mentoring Program) Gator is a leadership-mentoring program in which collegiate student leaders serve as mentors to at-risk K-12 students. In addition, partnerships with Cisco and Franklin Covey Education have provided the program with the technology resources to conduct "virtual leadership mentoring" sessions…

  15. Communities of Practice at an Academic Library: A New Approach to Mentoring at the University of Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrich, Kristin J.; Attebury, Ramirose

    2010-01-01

    The increased focus on interdisciplinarity and collaboration in academia necessitates a re-evaluation of established mentoring practices. This article reviews the literature on traditional and peer mentoring models, explores Communities of Practice (CoP) within learning organizations, and discusses the implementation and evaluation of a CoP at the…

  16. Mentoring mission leaders of the future. Program prepares laity for ministry leadership.

    PubMed

    Cullen, M E; Richardt, S; Hume, R

    1997-01-01

    As religious sponsors increasingly relinquished their CEO positions throughout the 1980s and early 1990s, they established mission integration positions-staffed primarily by women religious-to help ensure the Catholic identity of their facilities. Now that role, too, is undergoing change as sponsors seek to empower the laity in their organizations with responsibility for carrying on the Church's healing mission. At St. Vincent Hospitals and Health Services in Indianapolis, the Daughters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul, the organization's sponsor, has developed a mentoring program to train the laity in the roles and responsibilities involved in mission. The year-long program has 11 modules that present theory on such topics as ethics, spirituality, the sponsor's history and charism, and the relationship of the healthcare organization to the Church. Participants also attend committee meetings, complete a mission integration project, and gain practical experience in mission-related activities.

  17. The Art of Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Mentoring provides students with role models, inspiration and encouragement that helps paint the promise of a successful future. In this article, the author discusses examples of successful mentoring programs in career and technical education. Among them is the High Tech Girls Society (HTGS). The program was started in the 2003-2004 school year in…

  18. The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program at the University of Washington: Increasing Diversity Through Research Experiences and Mentoring Since 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfield, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Graduate students in the astronomy department at the University of Washington began the Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) after recognizing that underrepresented students in STEM fields are not well retained after their transition from high school. Pre-MAP is a research and mentoring program that begins with a keystone seminar. First year students enroll in the Pre-MAP seminar to learn astronomical research techniques that they apply to research projects conducted in small groups. Students also receive one-on-one mentoring and peer support for the duration of the academic year and beyond. They are incorporated early into the department by attending Astronomy Department events and Pre-MAP field trips. Successful Pre-MAP students have declared astronomy and physics majors, expanded their research projects beyond the fall quarter, presented posters at the UW Undergraduate Research Symposium, and received research fellowships and summer internships. In this talk, we will discuss how we identified the issues that Pre-MAP was designed to address, what we've learned after six years of Pre-MAP, and share statistical results from a long-term quantitative comparison evaluation.

  19. High School Teen Mentoring Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Big Brothers Big Sisters Edmonton & Area, in partnership with Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, are providing the High School Teen Mentoring Program, a school-based mentoring program where mentor-mentee matches meet for one hour per week to engage in relationship-building activities at an elementary school. This initiative aims to…

  20. Training Future Leaders of Academic Medicine: Internal Programs at Three Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morahan, Page S.; Kasperbauer, Dwight; McDade, Sharon A.; Aschenbrener, Carol A.; Triolo, Pamela K.; Monteleone, Patricia L.; Counte, Michael; Meyer, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews need for internal leadership training programs at academic health centers and describes three programs. Elements common to the programs include small classes, participants from many areas of academic medicine and health care, building on prior experience and training, training conducted away from the institution, short sessions, faculty…

  1. Peer mentoring: untapped potential.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Susan

    2010-06-01

    Peer mentoring is a potential solution to the many challenges that nursing education is faced with today, including increasing class sizes, rising competency requirements, decreasing number of faculty, tightening budgets, and shrinking clinical placement opportunities. This article describes a successful peer mentoring program in the nursing clinical learning center at a southern Ontario university. The benefits to mentors, students, and the educational institution are discussed. In their role, peer mentors develop an increase in confidence with skills as well as with leadership and teaching abilities. Peer mentors provide a student-centered service that results in frequent positive feedback from students in all levels of the nursing program. A suggestion for the future potential of this role also is offered to expand undergraduate nursing students' exposure to peer mentoring.

  2. The survive and thrive program: encouraging coaching, mentoring, and peer learning among new local health officials.

    PubMed

    Henry, Vonna; Sarpy, Sue Ann; Green, Rachel; Kaplan, Seth; Bonzon, Ramon

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for programs tailored to train the approximately 300 new local health officials (LHOs) who emerge each year with the knowledge and skills needed to build, maintain, and enhance public health capacity and infrastructure. The Survive and Thrive program incorporates a curriculum that is designed to address the challenges faced by a new LHO. The Survive and Thrive program seeks to address these issues by leveraging the expertise of the current generation of local public health leadership by incorporating experienced LHOs as coaches. Coaching, mentoring, and peer assistance by seasoned LHOs is critical to these new learning opportunities. This article highlights aspects of the coaching component of Survive and Thrive program. Actual examples of its relevance to the professional growth and development of new LHOs and the coaches themselves are presented. The article also describes the novel approach of including coaches in evaluating program effectiveness. The Survive and Thrive program's coaching component can serve as a template for other public health leadership programs and related workforce development initiatives as well as a model to help facilitate lifelong learning of LHOs.

  3. Supporting mentors working with students with intellectual disabilities in higher education.

    PubMed

    Giust, Amanda M; Valle-Riestra, Diana M

    2016-01-01

    Project Panther LIFE is an inclusive postsecondary transition program for students with intellectual disabilities providing university access and participation with the primary goal of employment at program completion. Students in the program receive support from their academic mentors and peer coaches during the academic year. This study examines the skills and activities mentors use during their weekly sessions with students with intellectual disabilities and identifies areas in which mentors may require further support or training. Data analysis revealed major themes related to inclusion, self-determination, and adaptive behavior skills. Upon review of the data, we suggest that mentors need ongoing support from transition programs especially in areas related to encouraging self-advocacy and supporting time management.

  4. The Mentoring Match. Teacher's Guide to Action. School to Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Albany. Two Year Coll. Development Center.

    This guide, which is intended for teachers interested in starting a workplace mentoring program, presents information about mentors and mentoring that can be used to match students with the right mentors in the workplace and help prepare and support students and mentors in enhancing the student-mentor match. The guide begins with background…

  5. What Affects Willingness to Mentor in the Future? An Investigation of Attachment Styles and Mentoring Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Sheng; Noe, Raymond A.; Wang, Zhong-Ming; Greenberger, David B.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the influence of attachment styles and mentoring experiences on willingness to mentor in the future in a formal mentoring program in China. For both mentors and proteges, avoidance and anxiety dimensions of attachment styles and their interaction had a significant influence on willingness to mentor in the future. Mentoring…

  6. College Student Mentors and Latino Youth: A Qualitative Study of the Mentoring Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoche, Lisa L.; Zamboanga, Byron L.

    2006-01-01

    This phenomenological study describes the meaning of mentoring relationships from the perspectives of six purposefully selected mentors involved in the Latino Achievement Mentoring Program (LAMP), and investigates underlying themes regarding the mentors' relationships. Clusters of themes pertaining to the mentors' relationship with the mentee, the…

  7. NSDC's Standards to the Rescue: Focus on Context, Process, and Content Provides a Strong Foothold for Mentor Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appolloni, Sharyn

    2009-01-01

    Each year, 200 novice teachers arrive at the schools in a large district in Reno, Nevada. The district's challenge is to create a comprehensive system of support for these teachers. For eight years, the district has provided a site-mentor for each of the novice teachers and required attendance in a two-year program of study as part of the New…

  8. 48 CFR 1052.219-73 - Department of the Treasury Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Department of the Treasury... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1052.219-73 Department of the Treasury Mentor-Protégé Program. As described in DTAR...

  9. Health Mentor-Reported Outcomes and Perceptions of Student Team Performance in a Longitudinal Interprofessional Education Program.

    PubMed

    Umland, Elena; Collins, Lauren; Baronner, Ashley; Lim, Edwin; Giordano, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    The need to evaluate the impact of interprofessional education (IPE) on learner outcomes is clear, but assessment of IPE's impact on patient health and well-being is lacking. This mixed-methods study evaluated perspectives of community volunteers, health mentors (HMs) who have at least one chronic condition, who participated in an IPE curriculum. In May 2014, 93 HMs concluding the Health Mentors Program completed a survey evaluating their student teams according to the Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competencies' four domains and program impact on health/wellbeing using a 4-point Likert scale (1=strongly disagree; 4=strongly agree). The average response to statements regarding the four domains of values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, communication, and teamwork statements were all >3.0. HMs rated program satisfaction on a 10-point scale (1=least satisfied, 10=most satisfied) and answered open-ended outcome questions. The average program satisfaction score was 9.13±1.43; increased motivation to make and maintain healthy behaviors was reported. In a follow-up focus group with 10 mentors, high satisfaction levels from working with interprofessional student teams were reported, and substantial improvements in managing health conditions and improving overall health status were relayed. Further studies will determine if the patient-reported outcomes of the mentors correlate with objective health measures.

  10. 48 CFR 852.219-72 - Evaluation factor for participation in the VA mentor-protégé program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the VA Mentor-Protégé Program (DEC2009) This solicitation contains an evaluation factor or sub-factor... factor or sub-factor, the offeror must provide with its proposal a copy of a signed letter issued by...

  11. A Descriptive Study of the Effects of Mentoring and Induction Programs on Novice Teacher Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackermann, John M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of mentoring and induction programs on the self-efficacy beliefs of novice teachers. As school districts in Pennsylvania attempt to maintain highly qualified staff in all curricular areas, supporting newly hired teachers is at the forefront of educational policy in the United States. Beyond training novice teachers,…

  12. Creating a Pipeline for African American Computing Science Faculty: An Innovative Faculty/Research Mentoring Program Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charleston, LaVar J.; Gilbert, Juan E.; Escobar, Barbara; Jackson, Jerlando F. L.

    2014-01-01

    African Americans represent 1.3% of all computing sciences faculty in PhD-granting departments, underscoring the severe underrepresentation of Black/African American tenure-track faculty in computing (CRA, 2012). The Future Faculty/Research Scientist Mentoring (FFRM) program, funded by the National Science Foundation, was found to be an effective…

  13. The Senior Mentor Program at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine: An Innovative Geriatric Longitudinal Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Ellen; Richeson, Nancy A.; Thornhill, Joshua T., IV; Corwin, Sara J.; Eleazer, G. Paul

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes development, implementation, and evaluation strategies of a longitudinal geriatric curriculum, the Senior Mentor Program (SMP). The rationale for exposing undergraduate medical students to healthy, community-dwelling older adults is to use the relationship and activities as vehicles for improving knowledge of aging and…

  14. The Effects of a Mentoring Program on African American Collegiate Football Students at a Predominately White Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosemond, LaNise D.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this interpretivist qualitative study is to discover and explore what factors influence African American collegiate football student athletes with regard to their experiences that participated in a mentoring program at a predominately white institution. The grounded theory methodology was used for this study. Ten African American…

  15. Perspectives from Pre-Service Mathematics and Science Teachers in an Urban Residency Program: Characteristics of Effective Mentors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Rubén; Harter, Rod A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to examine mathematics and science pre-service teachers' perceptions of their mentoring experiences during their 1st year in the Teaching Residency Program for Critical Shortage Areas, an initiative designed to recruit, prepare, and retain teachers for high-need urban schools. Results from this mixed-methods study…

  16. Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Senior Mentor Program: The University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Gray, Peggy; Hosokawa, Michael C.; Zweig, Steven C.

    2006-01-01

    At the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Medicine, we developed a voluntary senior-mentor program, the Senior Teacher Educator Partnership (STEP), for first- and second-year medical students. Using qualitative research methods, we examined the impact of STEP on medical students' attitudes and then assessed the congruence of what is learned…

  17. Assessment of a Constructivist-Motivated Mentoring Program to Enhance the Teaching Skills of Atmospheric Science Graduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drossman, Howard; Benedict, Jim; McGrath-Spangler, Erica; Van Roekel, Luke; Wells, Kelley

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative mentoring program in which graduate students (fellows) from a university atmospheric science research department team-taught environmental science classes with professors in a liberal arts college. The mentorship allowed fellows to develop and test the effectiveness of curriculum based on the Process Oriented…

  18. Implementing a Cross-District Principal Mentoring Program: A Human Resources Approach to Developing Midcareer Principals' Leadership Capacities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Della Sala, Matthew R.; Klar, Hans W.; Lindle, Jane Clark; Reese, Kenyae L.; Knoeppel, Robert C.; Campbell, Michael; Buskey, Frederick C.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the key role that principals play in leading schoolwide change, districts' efforts to support principals are often limited, particularly in rural settings. In this article, we report the preliminary findings of a cross-district mentoring program for nine midcareer rural school principals. The collaboratively developed human resource…

  19. Impact of the Federal School-Based Student Mentoring Program. NCEE Evaluation Brief. NCEE 2009-4074

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Office of Management and Budget requested that the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) oversee an independent impact evaluation of the federal Student Mentoring Program, and in 2005 IES contracted with Abt Associates and its team of subcontractors (Branch Associates, Moore and Associates, and the Center for Resource Management) to conduct…

  20. 13 CFR 124.520 - What are the rules governing SBA's Mentor/Protégé program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... plan, and to improve its ability to successfully compete for contracts. (b) Mentors. Any concern or non... due to lessons learned and practical experience gained because of the 8(a) BD program, or through its... protégé firm meet the goals established in its SBA-approved business plan; (ii) Establish a single...

  1. 13 CFR 124.520 - What are the rules governing SBA's Mentor/Protégé program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... plan, and to improve its ability to successfully compete for contracts. (b) Mentors. Any concern or non... due to lessons learned and practical experience gained because of the 8(a) BD program, or through its... protégé firm meet the goals established in its SBA-approved business plan; (ii) Establish a single...

  2. Improving Undergraduate Research Experiences With An Intentional Mentoring Program: Lessons Learned Through Assessment of Keck Geology Consortium Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, K. R.; Garver, J. I.; Greer, L.; Pollock, M.; Varga, R. J.; Davidson, C. M.; Frey, H. M.; Hubbard, D. K.; Peck, W. H.; Wobus, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Keck Geology Consortium, with support from the National Science Foundation (REU Program) and ExxonMobil, is a collaborative effort by 18 colleges to improve geoscience education through high-quality research experiences. Since its inception in 1987 more than 1350 undergraduate students and 145 faculty have been involved in 189 yearlong research projects. This non-traditional REU model offers exceptional opportunities for students to address research questions at a deep level, to learn and utilize sophisticated analytical methods, and to engage in authentic collaborative research that culminates in an undergraduate research symposium and published abstracts volume. The large numbers of student and faculty participants in Keck projects also affords a unique opportunity to study the impacts of program design on undergraduate research experiences in the geosciences. Students who participate in Keck projects generally report significant gains in personal and professional dimensions, as well as in clarification of educational and career goals. Survey data from student participants, project directors, and campus advisors identify mentoring as one of the most critical and challenging elements of successful undergraduate research experiences. Additional challenges arise from the distributed nature of Keck projects (i.e., participants, project directors, advisors, and other collaborators are at different institutions) and across the span of yearlong projects. In an endeavor to improve student learning about the nature and process of science, and to make mentoring practices more intentional, the Consortium has developed workshops and materials to support both project directors and campus research advisors (e.g., best practices for mentoring, teaching ethical professional conduct, benchmarks for progress, activities to support students during research process). The Consortium continues to evolve its practices to better support students from underrepresented groups.

  3. Multicultural Mentoring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen-Sommerville, Lenola

    1994-01-01

    Describes the mentoring relationship between George Washington Carver and Henry Agard Wallace who later became a great scientist and Vice President of the United States. Explains what mentoring is and discusses classroom implications for mentoring. (PR)

  4. Academic Achievement Programs and Youth Development: A Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redd, Zakia; Cochran, Stephanie; Hair, Elizabeth; Moore, Kristin

    Based on the view that programs with a strong academic component may reduce the substantial educational disparities for American students from disadvantaged backgrounds or in chronically underperforming schools and school districts, this synthesis of research on academic achievement programs describes how such programs may help children and…

  5. Mentoring: The Contextualisation of Learning--Mentor, Protege and Organisational Gain in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Chris

    2003-01-01

    A British university's hospitality education program matched students with industry mentors. For students, mentoring helped contextualize learning and contributed to personal development. Mentors gained personal satisfaction, and employers were able to hire vocationally aware graduates. (Contains 43 references.) (SK)

  6. Mentoring for research skill development.

    PubMed

    Records, Kathie; Emerson, Roberta J

    2003-12-01

    The nursing shortage is significantly affecting the nursing academic environment. A self-perpetuating cycle of insufficient numbers of faculty with inadequate preparation for academia could lead to a profound decline in the nursing profession. Institutions often implement mentoring plans for new tenure track faculty, and the challenge is even greater in environments that are not research intensive. This article describes the implementation of the research arm of an institutional mentoring plan for new tenure track faculty. The plan was designed to facilitate new faculty's attainment of tenure, while expediting the development of a satisfying career in academia. Doctoral education does not necessarily provide graduates with all the tools required to be successful researchers. However, specific guidance may be provided in the developing of a research program; creating networks and selecting consultants; preparing presentations and publications; and developing grantsmanship skills, particularly for institutions without established research centers.

  7. Strategies for developing a culture of mentoring in postdoctoral periodontology.

    PubMed

    Hempton, Timothy J; Drakos, Dimitrios; Likhari, Vikram; Hanley, James B; Johnson, Lonnie; Levi, Paul; Griffin, Terrence J

    2008-05-01

    Dental education in the United States and Canada is currently experiencing a crisis with respect to faculty recruitment and retention. The major reasons for the status of dental and specialty education are lower salaries and lack of interest. To make up for this deficit in the specialty of periodontology, our current educators need to utilize strategies targeted towards an existing potential teaching resource: the postdoctoral students in periodontology. The intent of this article is to review the current crisis in dental faculty recruitment and retention, show how it affects the specialty of periodontics, and describe how creating a culture of mentoring may facilitate more engagement of periodontal residents in the teaching process during their postdoctoral training. The strategies utilized to develop a culture of mentoring in the Department of Periodontology at Tufts University are presented. They include methodologies to develop and enhance residents' mentoring skills, thereby helping to compensate for the shortage of periodontists involved in academics. Measurement of the mentoring strategy is presented from data obtained from an online survey of third-year predoctoral students' perceptions of their interaction with residents as their clinical instructors. Moreover, the numbers of program alumni engaged in teaching prior to and after the mentoring program was initiated are also presented as an outcome of the mentoring program. Developing a culture of mentoring in postdoctoral periodontology programs can be an important tool to enable individuals to become more involved in the process of teaching and mentoring during their postdoctoral training. This outcome could ameliorate the deficit of periodontists engaged as formal educators. Moreover, development and expansion of a culture of mentoring in a periodontolgy program may encourage recent graduates to become more involved in teaching subsequent to graduation.

  8. Opening Doors: Mentoring on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brief paper describes the computerized mentoring program of Project DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) at the University of Washington. Introductory material notes the origins of the mentoring concept and the value of DO-IT mentors to their proteges. The program centers on providing mentoring via the Internet…

  9. Influences on Faculty Willingness to Mentor Undergraduate Students from Another University as Part of an Interinstitutional Research Training Program.

    PubMed

    Morales, Danielle X; Grineski, Sara E; Collins, Timothy W

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the National Institutes of Health invested $31 million in 10 primary institutions across the United States through the Building Undergraduate Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) program; one requirement of BUILD is sending undergraduate trainees from those primary institutions to partner institutions for research experiences. Mechanisms like BUILD are designed to broaden research opportunities for students, especially those from underrepresented backgrounds. However, to our knowledge, no studies have examined faculty willingness to mentor undergraduates from other institutions through structured training programs. Survey data from 536 faculty members at 13 institutions were collected in Fall 2013 and analyzed using multiple statistical techniques. Results show that faculty who valued the opportunity to increase diversity in the academy and those who believed that mentoring undergraduates benefited their own research expressed greater willingness to serve as research mentors to visiting undergraduates, and faculty who perceived that they did not have the ability to accommodate additional students expressed less willingness to do so. Most respondents viewed student and faculty incentives as motivating factors in their willingness to mentor, but their perspectives on different types of incentives varied based on faculty career stage, discipline, and research funding status. Results have important implications for designing multi-institutional undergraduate research training programs.

  10. Influences on Faculty Willingness to Mentor Undergraduate Students from Another University as Part of an Interinstitutional Research Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Danielle X.; Grineski, Sara E.; Collins, Timothy W.

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, the National Institutes of Health invested $31 million in 10 primary institutions across the United States through the Building Undergraduate Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) program; one requirement of BUILD is sending undergraduate trainees from those primary institutions to partner institutions for research experiences. Mechanisms like BUILD are designed to broaden research opportunities for students, especially those from underrepresented backgrounds. However, to our knowledge, no studies have examined faculty willingness to mentor undergraduates from other institutions through structured training programs. Survey data from 536 faculty members at 13 institutions were collected in Fall 2013 and analyzed using multiple statistical techniques. Results show that faculty who valued the opportunity to increase diversity in the academy and those who believed that mentoring undergraduates benefited their own research expressed greater willingness to serve as research mentors to visiting undergraduates, and faculty who perceived that they did not have the ability to accommodate additional students expressed less willingness to do so. Most respondents viewed student and faculty incentives as motivating factors in their willingness to mentor, but their perspectives on different types of incentives varied based on faculty career stage, discipline, and research funding status. Results have important implications for designing multi-institutional undergraduate research training programs. PMID:27521237

  11. Development of a Student Mentored Research Program between a Complementary and Alternative Medicine University and a Traditional, Research Intensive University

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Barbara M.; Furner, Sylvia E.; Cramer, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    The global need to develop clinician-scientists capable of using research in clinical practice, translating research knowledge into practice, and carrying out research that affects the quality, efficacy, and efficiency of health care is well-documented. The complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professions embrace the call to develop physician-researchers to carry out translational and applied research for CAM modalities. CAM universities face unique challenges when implementing research training compared to traditional, research intensive (TRI) universities and medical centers where the majority of medical research is carried out. The authors present the development and outcomes of a mentored research program (MRP) between a CAM and a TRI institution, the National University of Health Sciences and the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, between 2006 and 2012. CAM pre-doctoral students engaged in a full-immersion semester at the TRI, including didactic courses and active research with a TRI faculty research mentor. Half of the participating doctor of chiropractic (DC) students continued on to PhD programs and half established integrative medicine, primary care clinical careers. Establishing rigorous criteria for mentors and mentees, communicating expectations, developing solid relationships between the mentor, mentee, and home school advisor, responding quickly to impediments, and providing adequate support from CAM and TRI investigators were key to the MRP success. To sustain research opportunities, coordinated degree programs for the DC and master of public health (DC/MPH) and master of clinical and translational research (DC/MS CTS) were established. PMID:24988423

  12. How Effective are Your Mentoring Relationships? Mentoring Quiz for Residents.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Nagy, Paul; Chhabra, Avneesh; Lee, Cindy S

    Mentoring is an essential part of a resident's career development. It plays an important role in nurturing, and sustaining success along the career path of a young physician. Mentoring is a long-term goal that is development-driven rather than performance-driven. Although specific learning goals may be used as a basis, the focus of mentoring may also include self-confidence, self-perception, and work-life balance. A number of residency programs have implemented mentoring programs in their institutions. This article discusses the importance of mentoring, illustrates "do's and don'ts" for mentees and demonstrates how to choose the ideal mentor. Finally, a "mentoring quiz" is designed to evaluate your mentoring relationship.

  13. A Program Evaluation of the Experiences Provided to Novice Teachers through M School District's Teacher-Mentor Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puryear, Pamela Ann

    2012-01-01

    Novice teachers often lack effective teaching strategies and exhibit poor classroom management, which creates disruptions in the classroom that lessen the quality of instructional time for students. The purpose of this program evaluation was to examine a teacher-mentor training program and the experiences provided to participants to gain a deeper…

  14. Student-Mentor Relationships and Students' College Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Chenoa S.; Preciado, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Many college and SAT preparation programs are designed to improve the postsecondary success of traditionally marginalized students. In addition to academic preparation, students' social and emotional preparation is important for the transition from high school to college. Mentors can serve as role models and supports to aid students in this…

  15. What Makes Proteges Take Mentors' Advice in Formal Mentoring Relationships?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, SuJin; Kim, Do-Yeong

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the factors affecting a protege's willingness to take a mentor's advice. The sample for this study consisted of 183 proteges from two different South Korean organizations who were part of formal mentoring programs. We found protege commitment to be the principal factor that predisposes a protege to take advice from mentors and…

  16. Mentoring in general surgery in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Kaderli, Reto M.; Klasen, Jennifer M.; Businger, Adrian P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mentorship has been found as a key factor for a successful and satisfying career in academic medicine and surgery. The present study was conducted to describe the current situation of mentoring in the surgical community in Switzerland and to evaluate sex differences regarding the impact of mentoring on career success and professional satisfaction. Methods The study was designed as an anonymous national survey to all members of the Swiss Surgical Society in 2011 (820 ordinary and 49 junior members). It was a 25-item questionnaire addressing mentor–mentee relationships and their impact on the professional front. Results Of the 869 mailed surveys, 512 responses were received (response rate: 58.9%). Mentor–mentee relationships were reported by 344 respondents (68.1%) and structured mentoring programs were noted in 23 respondents (6.7%). Compared to individuals without mentors, male mentees exhibited significantly higher subjective career advancement (5.4±1.2 vs. 5.0±1.3; p=0.03) and career development (3.3±1.9 vs. 2.5±1.7; p<0.01) scores, but the differences for female mentees were not statistically significant (4.7±1.1 vs. 4.3±1.2, p=0.16; 2.5±1.6 vs. 1.9±1.4, p=0.26; respectively). The pursuit of an academic career was not influenced by the presence of a mentor–mentee relationship for female (p=0.14) or male participants (p=0.22). Conclusions Mentor–mentee relationships are important for the career advancement of male surgeons. The reason for the lack of an impact on the careers of female surgeons is difficult to ascertain. However, mentoring also provides lifelong learning and personal development. Thus, specific attention should be paid to the development of more structured mentoring programs for both sexes. PMID:25833825

  17. Development and pilot testing of a standardized training program for a patient-mentoring intervention to increase adherence to outpatient HIV care.

    PubMed

    Cully, Jeffrey A; Mignogna, Joseph; Stanley, Melinda A; Davila, Jessica; Wear, Jackie; Amico, K Rivet; Giordano, Thomas P

    2012-03-01

    Although peer interventionists have been successful in medication treatment-adherence interventions, their role in complex behavior-change approaches to promote entry and reentry into HIV care requires further investigation. The current study sought to describe and test the feasibility of a standardized peer-mentor training program used for MAPPS (Mentor Approach for Promoting Patient Self-Care), a study designed to increase engagement and attendance at HIV outpatient visits among high-risk HIV inpatients using HIV-positive peer interventionists to deliver a comprehensive behavioral change intervention. Development of MAPPS and its corresponding training program included collaborations with mentors from a standing outpatient mentor program. The final training program included (1) a half-day workshop; (2) practice role-plays; and (3) formal, standardized patient role-plays, using trained actors with "real-time" video observation (and ratings from trainers). Mentor training occurred over a 6-week period and required demonstration of adherence and skill, as rated by MAPPS trainers. Although time intensive, ultimate certification of mentors suggested the program was both feasible and effective. Survey data indicated mentors thought highly of the training program, while objective rating data from trainers indicated mentors were able to understand and display standards associated with intervention fidelity. Data from the MAPPS training program provide preliminary evidence that peer mentors can be trained to levels necessary to ensure intervention fidelity, even within moderately complex behavioral-change interventions. Although additional research is needed due to limitations of the current study (e.g., limited generalizability due to sample size and limited breadth of clinical training opportunities), data from the current trial suggest that training programs such as MAPPS appear both feasible and effective.

  18. ASHE Reader on Academic Programs in Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Clifton F., Ed.

    Historical and philosophical perspectives on college academic programs, current curriculum practices and agendas, and academic program development and implementation are considered in 20 articles in a reader designed for graduate classes in higher education administration. Titles and authors are as follows: "Frames of Reference" (Frederick…

  19. Students' Perception of IS Academic Programs, IS Careers, and Outsourcing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, Ben; Cata, Teuta

    2008-01-01

    The authors compared the perceptions of information systems (IS) students with those of IS practitioners regarding IS careers, the practice of outsourcing, and academic programs. Results indicate that students and practitioners appreciate the integration of real-life practice in academic programs and that the general perception of IS careers is…

  20. Academic Autonomy for Adult Degree Programs: Independence with Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Judson

    2012-01-01

    North Park University's adult program has moved steadily from a centralized governance structure toward a more distributed structure in many ways. The School of Adult Learning hires its own faculty, some of whom are full time in the adult program. The school also has autonomy over academic policy. Ultimately, this academic autonomy has fostered…

  1. Development of cities mentor project: an intervention to improve academic outcomes for low-income urban youth through instruction in effective coping supported by mentoring relationships and protective settings.

    PubMed

    Grant, Kathryn E; Farahmand, Farahnaz; Meyerson, David A; Dubois, David L; Tolan, Patrick H; Gaylord-Harden, Noni K; Barnett, Alexandra; Horwath, Jordan; Doxie, Jackie; Tyler, Donald; Harrison, Aubrey; Johnson, Sarah; Duffy, Sophia

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes an iterative process used to develop a new intervention for low-income urban youth at risk for negative academic outcomes (e.g., disengagement, failure, drop-out). A series of seven steps, building incrementally one upon the other, are described: 1) identify targets of the intervention; 2) develop logic model; 3) identify effective elements of targets; 4) vet intervention with stakeholders; 5) develop models for sustaining the intervention; 6) develop measures of relevant constructs currently missing from the literature; 7) assess feasibility and usability of the intervention. Methods used to accomplish these steps include basic research studies, literature reviews, meta-analyses, focus groups, community advisory meetings, consultations with scholarly consultants, and piloting. The resulting intervention provides early adolescents in low-income urban communities with a) training in contextually relevant coping, b) connection to mentors who support youth's developing coping strategies, and c) connection to youth-serving community organizations, where youth receive additional support.

  2. Evidence Equals Excellence: The application of an evidence-based practice model in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Balakas, Karen; Potter, Patricia; Pratt, Elizabeth; Rea, Gail; Williams, Jennifer

    2009-03-01

    An evidence-based practice (EBP) program that is designed to develop mentors in both clinical and academic settings has the potential for transforming a health care organization. This article describes an innovative program, Evidence Equals Excellence, which consists of two components: a clinical practice component for health care clinicians and an academic program for baccalaureate and graduate nursing students. The development of EBP mentors creates a core group of clinicians who can assist fellow staff members apply evidence at the bedside. An academic program prepares new graduates to partner easily with clinical mentors to support and initiate successful practice changes.

  3. An Innovative University-Based Mentoring Program: Affecting College Students' Attitudes and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Carolyn; Welsh, Megan; Mayer, Allison; Bolay, Jennifer; Southard, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Students who had enrolled in an innovative university-based service-learning class were asked to reflect on their expectations prior to mentoring youth attending high-poverty high schools, and whether they believed they had met these expectations post-mentoring. Findings indicated that students primarily were motivated by learning about the…

  4. 48 CFR 1019.202-70 - The Treasury Mentor Protégé Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... exceed 5% of the relative importance assigned to the non-price factors. If this incentive is used, the... provisions and contract clauses (1) Insert the provision at 1052.219-73, Department of the Treasury Mentor... offer subcontracting possibilities. (2) Insert the clause at 1052.219-75, Mentor Requirements...

  5. The Changing Paradigm of Graduate Student Professional Socialization and Mentoring in Graduate Adult Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael T.; Deggs, David

    2012-01-01

    The importance of mentoring has been consistently emphasized in American higher education especially at the graduate level. Increased emphasis on research and teaching for faculty as well as migration to distance education delivery formats has affected the amount of time that faculty can devote to mentoring graduate students. Some graduate program…

  6. A Study of the Mentoring Program for First Year School Superintendents in Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolsey, Tina

    2013-01-01

    Mentoring first-year superintendents in Missouri began as an informal process with the pairing of a veteran superintendent (mentor) with a first-year superintendent (protege) by the Missouri Association of School Administrators (MASA). The adoption of the Career Continuous Professional Certification by the Missouri State Board of Education…

  7. Deconstructing Serendipity: Focus, Purpose, and Authorship in Lunch Buddy Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavell, Timothy A.; Henrie, Joye L.

    2010-01-01

    Lunch buddy mentoring is a particular kind of school-based mentoring program: college student mentors meet twice weekly during school lunch with mentees, and a new mentor is provided each semester. The program is designed to benefit elementary school children who are highly aggressive or chronically bullied. Novel to lunch buddy mentoring is a…

  8. Academic program models for undergraduate biomedical engineering.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Shankar M

    2014-01-01

    There is a proliferation of medical devices across the globe for the diagnosis and therapy of diseases. Biomedical engineering (BME) plays a significant role in healthcare and advancing medical technologies thus creating a substantial demand for biomedical engineers at undergraduate and graduate levels. There has been a surge in undergraduate programs due to increasing demands from the biomedical industries to cover many of their segments from bench to bedside. With the requirement of multidisciplinary training within allottable duration, it is indeed a challenge to design a comprehensive standardized undergraduate BME program to suit the needs of educators across the globe. This paper's objective is to describe three major models of undergraduate BME programs and their curricular requirements, with relevant recommendations to be applicable in institutions of higher education located in varied resource settings. Model 1 is based on programs to be offered in large research-intensive universities with multiple focus areas. The focus areas depend on the institution's research expertise and training mission. Model 2 has basic segments similar to those of Model 1, but the focus areas are limited due to resource constraints. In this model, co-op/internship in hospitals or medical companies is included which prepares the graduates for the work place. In Model 3, students are trained to earn an Associate Degree in the initial two years and they are trained for two more years to be BME's or BME Technologists. This model is well suited for the resource-poor countries. All three models must be designed to meet applicable accreditation requirements. The challenges in designing undergraduate BME programs include manpower, facility and funding resource requirements and time constraints. Each academic institution has to carefully analyze its short term and long term requirements. In conclusion, three models for BME programs are described based on large universities, colleges, and

  9. The Good-Enough Mentoring Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Laurel L.; Levine, John B.; Malhotra, Seema; Holtzheimer, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to describe the state of mentoring in today's academic environment. Methods: Resident focus groups from across the nation discussed their opinions about mentoring and experiences with mentoring, and individual faculty members were videotaped discussing the same. Results: Sixty-six residents and five faculty members…

  10. A Developmental Model of Research Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revelo, Renata A.; Loui, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    We studied mentoring relationships between undergraduate and graduate students in a summer undergraduate research program, over three years. Using a grounded theory approach, we created a model of research mentoring that describes how the roles of the mentor and the student can change. Whereas previous models of research mentoring ignored student…

  11. "When You Fail, You Feel Like a Failure": One Student's Experience of Academic Probation and an Academic Support Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcand, Isabelle; LeBlanc, Raymond N.

    2012-01-01

    This in-depth, qualitative study explored the experience of academic probation. It recounts the story of Mark, an undergraduate student on academic probation who participated in an academic support program to attain good academic standing. His story is contrasted to the current literature on academic probation and is considered in light of Dewey's…

  12. Mentoring for women and underrepresented minority faculty and students: experience at two institutions of higher education.

    PubMed Central

    Kosoko-Lasaki, Omofolasade; Sonnino, Roberta E.; Voytko, Mary Lou

    2006-01-01

    Women and minority faculty and students are seriously underrepresented in university and academic healthcare institutions. The role of mentoring has been identified as one of the significant factors in addressing this underrepresentation. We have described the mentoring efforts at two institutions of higher learning in assisting women and minority students and faculty in being accomplished in their academic pursuits. One-hundred-thirty students and >50 women and minority faculty have participated in the mentoring programs described. The number of participants has increased dramatically over the years and continues to evolve positively. These programs appear to be quite successful in the short term. Further evaluation of measurable outcomes will be necessary to fully determine their true impact. The mentoring models for women and underrepresented minority faculty and students at Creighton University Health Sciences Schools and Wake Forest University School of Medicine will serve as a guide for other Health Sciences Schools. PMID:17019912

  13. Mentoring for women and underrepresented minority faculty and students: experience at two institutions of higher education.

    PubMed

    Kosoko-Lasaki, Omofolasade; Sonnino, Roberta E; Voytko, Mary Lou

    2006-09-01

    Women and minority faculty and students are seriously underrepresented in university and academic healthcare institutions. The role of mentoring has been identified as one of the significant factors in addressing this underrepresentation. We have described the mentoring efforts at two institutions of higher learning in assisting women and minority students and faculty in being accomplished in their academic pursuits. One-hundred-thirty students and >50 women and minority faculty have participated in the mentoring programs described. The number of participants has increased dramatically over the years and continues to evolve positively. These programs appear to be quite successful in the short term. Further evaluation of measurable outcomes will be necessary to fully determine their true impact. The mentoring models for women and underrepresented minority faculty and students at Creighton University Health Sciences Schools and Wake Forest University School of Medicine will serve as a guide for other Health Sciences Schools.

  14. Project SMART: an interdisciplinary collaboration to design and test a mentored health promotion program for school children.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Marianne T; Taylor, Wendell C; Walker, Thomas; Carroll, Deidra D; Cron, Stanley G; Marcus-Mendoza, Susan T; Liehr, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Interdisciplinary collaborations and effective community partnerships can be important in advancing public health initiatives in economically disadvantaged communities. This community-based participatory research pilot study determined the feasibility of designing and implementing Project SMART, a mentored after-school health promotion program for school children in an underserved neighborhood. Interdisciplinary faculty and their students collaborated with community stakeholders to provide a program tailored to address community identified health risks. Preassessment and postassessment of study participants revealed a significant increase in nutrition knowledge among the children and a significant increase in the general health subscale of Short-Form Health Survey for the mentors. Content analysis of interviews conducted with the mentors revealed four themes on the meaning of the experience for them: being present; having purpose; raising personal health consciousness; and transferring life experiences. University faculty and students strengthened their relationships in the community and their ability to conduct community-based participatory research. The program was a catalyst for other important ongoing changes in the community. The Project SMART program is an initiative that may be applied successfully in other communities where it is important to address environmental health disparities and promote health.

  15. Professional Growth through Online Mentoring: A Study of Mathematics Mentor Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAleer, DeAnna; Bangert, Art

    2011-01-01

    This article explores how patterns of engagement and program design impact professional learning and development of mathematics mentor teachers as they participate in an asynchronous mentoring program, e-Mentoring for Student Success (eMSS). In specific, this study: 1) sought to determine if activity level was related to mentors' perceived…

  16. Peer-mentoring junior surgical trainees in the United Kingdom: a pilot program.

    PubMed

    Vulliamy, Paul; Junaid, Islam

    2013-01-01

    Background Peer-mentoring has attracted substantial interest in various healthcare professions, but has not been formally integrated into postgraduate surgical training. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a peer-mentor scheme among junior surgical trainees in the United Kingdom. Method Trainees entering the first year of core surgical training (CST) in a single postgraduate school of surgery were allocated a mentor in the second year of CST. Allocation was based on location of the initial clinical placement. An anonymised questionnaire regarding the mentorship scheme was sent to all participants in the third month following its introduction. Results 18 trainees participated in the scheme, of whom 12 (67%) responded to the questionnaire. All respondents had made contact with their allocated mentor or mentee, and no trainees had opted out of the scheme. Areas in which the mentees received guidance included examinations (83%), CV development (67%), and workplace-based assessments (67%). All respondents felt that the mentor scheme was a good addition to CST. Suggestions for improvement of the scheme included introduction of structured meetings and greater engagement with allocated mentors. Conclusions A pilot peer-mentoring scheme was well received by junior surgical trainees. Consideration should be given to expansion of this scheme and more rigorous assessment of its value.

  17. Academic Skills Center Program: Peer Tutoring, Study Skills Classes, Academic Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Betty Marie; And Others

    The Academic Skills Center at Black Hills State University provides a peer assistance program comprising both individual tutoring in classes offered in each academic division and credit classes in study skills. The goal of the Center is to respond effectively and quickly to individual educational needs of students and faculty through a…

  18. Mentoring At-Risk Youth in Schools: Can Small Doses Make a Big Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolar, David W.; McBride, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of length of the match and age of the child was evaluated in a site-based mentoring program. At-risk children ranging in age from 7 to 12 were matched with an adult mentor and met approximately once a week at school during the academic year. Results indicated that neither the length of the match nor the age of the child influenced the…

  19. A Practice Improvement Education Program Using a Mentored Approach to Improve Nursing Facility Depression Care-Preliminary Data.

    PubMed

    Chodosh, Joshua; Price, Rachel M; Cadogan, Mary P; Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn; Osterweil, Dan; Czerwinski, Alfredo; Tan, Zaldy S; Merkin, Sharon S; Gans, Daphna; Frank, Janet C

    2015-11-01

    Depression is common in nursing facility residents. Depression data obtained using the Minimum Data Set (MDS) 3.0 offer opportunities for improving diagnostic accuracy and care quality. How best to integrate MDS 3.0 and other data into quality improvement (QI) activity is untested. The objective was to increase nursing home (NH) capability in using QI processes and to improve depression assessment and management through focused mentorship and team building. This was a 6-month intervention with five components: facilitated collection of MDS 3.0 nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and medication data for diagnostic interpretation; education and modeling on QI approaches, team building, and nonpharmacological depression care; mentored team meetings; educational webinars; and technical assistance. PHQ-9 and medication data were collected at baseline and 6 and 9 months. Progress was measured using team participation measures, attitude and care process self-appraisal, mentor assessments, and resident depression outcomes. Five NHs established interprofessional teams that included nursing (44.1%), social work (20.6%), physicians (8.8%), and other disciplines (26.5%). Members participated in 61% of eight offered educational meetings (three onsite mentored team meetings and five webinars). Competency self-ratings improved on four depression care measures (P = .05 to <.001). Mentors observed improvement in team process and enthusiasm during team meetings. For 336 residents with PHQ-9 and medication data, depression scores did not change while medication use declined, from 37.2% of residents at baseline to 31.0% at 9 months (P < .001). This structured mentoring program improved care processes, achieved medication reductions, and was well received. Application to other NH-prevalent syndromes is possible.

  20. The development of a diversity mentoring program for faculty and trainees: A program at the Brown Clinical Psychology Training Consortium

    PubMed Central

    de Dios, Marcel A.; Kuo, Caroline; Hernandez, Lynn; Clark, Uraina S.; Wenze, Susan J.; Boisseau, Christina L.; Hunter, Heather L.; Reddy, Madhavi K.; Tolou-Shams, Marina; Zlotnick, Caron

    2013-01-01

    There is a critical need for increasing the diversity representation among clinicians and researchers in academic medicine, including departments of psychiatry and psychology. Mentorship of under-represented groups has been identified as an important way to remediate diversity-related barriers in the field. This paper outlines the early development and pilot implementation of a diversity mentorship program at Brown University. In an effort to inform and guide future diversity programs, we discuss the challenges faced in creating the program, the successes experienced during the first year, and the future directions undertaken as a means for improving the program. PMID:25346563

  1. An Innovative Educational and Mentorship Program for Emergency Medicine Women Residents to Enhance Academic Development and Retention.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Kriti; Takayesu, James Kimo; Arbelaez, Christian; Peak, David; Nadel, Eric S

    2015-11-01

    Given the discrepancy between men and women's equal rates of medical school matriculation and their rates of academic promotion and leadership role acquisition, the need to provide mentorship and education to women in academic medicine is becoming increasingly recognized. Numerous large-scale programs have been developed to provide support and resources for women's enrichment and retention in academic medicine. Analyses of contributory factors to the aforementioned discrepancy commonly cite insufficient mentoring and role modeling as well as challenges with organizational navigation. Since residency training has been shown to be a critical juncture for making the decision to pursue an academic career, there is a need for innovative and tailored educational and mentorship programs targeting residents. Acknowledging residents' competing demands, we designed a program to provide easily accessible mentorship and contact with role models for our trainees at the departmental and institutional levels. We believe that this is an important step towards encouraging women's pursuit of academic careers. Our model may be useful to other emergency medicine residencies looking to provide such opportunities for their women residents.

  2. Mentoring Graduate Students of Color: Myths, Models, and Modes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, M. Christopher, II; Davis, Guy L.; McClendon, Shederick A.

    1999-01-01

    Explores requirements for mentoring graduate students of color, debunking five myths about such mentoring, examining mentoring models, and recommending three modalities for individuals who wish to mentor minority graduate students ("academic midwifery,""role modeling," and "frientoring"). Each of the three modalities requires care and support,…

  3. Thinking Thrice: A Feminist Response to "Mentoring" That Marginalizes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schramm, Susan

    Although mentoring is a popular practice in academia, mentor-protegee relationships are, for women faculty, problematic in several areas including power dynamics and cross-gender interactions. This paper discusses mentoring among academic faculty in the context of a feminist analysis of mentor-protegee relations, and suggests a feminist mentoring…

  4. Reconceptualizing Faculty Mentoring within a Community of Practice Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Emily R.; Calderwood, Patricia E.; Dohm, Faith A.; Gill Lopez, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Despite the growing knowledge base on mentoring in academia, providing effective mentoring for faculty presents several complex dilemmas for academic units charged with facilitating mentoring. How do we institutionalize voluntary and spontaneous mentoring interaction? How do we support a collaborative climate in an inherently individual and…

  5. Utilizing Peer Mentor Roles in Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieske, Laura Jo; Benjamin, Mimi

    2015-01-01

    For a number of learning community programs, peer mentors provide an additional layer of staffing support. This chapter highlights peer mentor roles from a sample of programs and suggests important components for the construction of these roles.

  6. Promoting Inclusivity in STEM through Active Recruiting and Mentoring: The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) at the University of Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, Edward; Binder, Breanna A.; Pre-Major in Astronomy Program

    2016-01-01

    The Pre-Major in Astronomy Program (Pre-MAP) is a research and mentoring program for entering undergraduate students offered by the University of Washington Astronomy Department since 2005. The primary goal of Pre-MAP is to recruit and retain students from groups traditionally underrepresented in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through early exposure to guided research projects. The Pre-MAP seminar is the core component of the program and offers instruction in computing skills, data manipulation, science writing, statistical analysis, and scientific speaking and presentation skills. Students choose research projects proposed by faculty, post-docs and graduate students in areas related to astrophysics, planetary science, and astrobiology. Pre-MAP has been successful in retaining underrepresented students in STEM fields relative to the broader UW population, and we've found these students are more likely to graduate and excel academically than their peers. As of fall 2015, more than one hundred students have taken the Pre-MAP seminar, and both internal and external evaluations have shown that all groups of participating students report an increased interest in astronomy and science careers at the end of the seminar. This talk will provide an overview of the program and the structure of the core seminar. In particular, the talk will focus on additions and revisions to the seminar course over the last few years, such as the introduction of a public speaking coach, career and internship modules, and the formalization of external lab tours.

  7. 48 CFR 1552.219-71 - Procedures for Participation in the EPA Mentor-Protege Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... mutually beneficial relationship between these concerns and EPA's large business prime contractors (although small businesses may participate as Mentors); to develop the technical and corporate administrative expertise of these concerns, which will ultimately lead to greater success in competition...

  8. Understanding the Organizational Context of Academic Program Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dee, Jay R.; Heineman, William A.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides a conceptual model that academic leaders can use to navigate the complex, and often contentious, organizational terrain of academic program development. The model includes concepts related to the institution's external environment, as well as internal organizational structures, cultures, and politics. Drawing from the…

  9. Bibliographic Instruction Programs in Louisiana Academic Libraries. A Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dantin, Doris B., Comp.

    A survey of 33 academic libraries in Louisiana was conducted in the spring of 1983 to determine the techniques used during the 1981/82 academic year to impart bibliographic or library instruction to students and faculty. A total of 27 responses were received. It was found that all but five of the respondents had a library instruction program; the…

  10. Directory of Academic Library Instruction Programs in Virginia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince, William W., Ed.

    This directory of academic library instruction programs in Virginia reflects data compiled from 82 academic libraries that responded to a questionnaire sent out in August 1977. The institution libraries are listed with addresses, the name(s) of contact person(s), and a telephone number. The survey results are organized by the format and the type…

  11. Multi-Institution Academic Programs: Dealmakers and Dealbreakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dawn; Moxley, Virginia; Maes, Sue; Reinert, Dana

    2008-01-01

    Higher education institutions are confronted with increasing demand for electronic access to educational opportunities, improved academic quality and accountability, and new academic programs that address societal workforce and economic development needs. Collaboration allows institutions to combine resources to respond efficiently and effectively…

  12. Academic Writing Programs. Case Studies in TESOL Practice Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leki, Ilona, Ed.

    This edited volume explores the international role of written English in the academic context and clearly demonstrates how writing is integrated in all aspects of academic communication in English. The 12 programs described in this book differ in context but share basic assumptions about how best to teach second language (L2) writing. In addition…

  13. Students’ views of mentoring at Bahria University Medical and Dental College

    PubMed Central

    Usmani, Ambreen; Omaeer, Quratulain

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mentoring program on a subset of Pakistani medical students in a private medical college. Method: Total students targeted were 300 MBBS students of 1st Year (group B), 2nd Year (group C) and 3rd Year (group D), of these 256 students filled the self-reported questionnaire. The questionnaire was based on Likert Scale. The statements in the questionnaire are designed in a positive manner so that if the students agree to them the level of satisfaction with the mentoring program was considered significantly good. Open-ended questionnaires were also given so as to have a clearer concept of the students’ perception. This study is a mixed method study catering to both quantitative and qualitative domains. Results : The overall results reported that the junior students of group B and group C showed higher satisfaction in being mentored as compared group D (p-value=0.001). All three groups were compared with each other to check the response of every statement by applying Tukey’s test. Analysis of the result showed that majority of the students considered mentoring program a beneficial tool for their academic and non-academic lives. The students of all three years have reported that the mentor is mostly available and helps to reconcile internal conflicts. They also confirmed that their mentor keeps records but most of the students have reported that communication via email is limited. Conclusion: Majority of students of Bahria University Medical and Dental College are able to carry on with their academic and non-academic routine due to the presence of mentoring. The medical students appreciated the presence of a mentor during thick and thin; they have also accepted that it is due to the presence of this guide that they are able to continue with their difficult studies in these difficult times. PMID:28083051

  14. Administrative substance. A mentoring experience.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, K S

    2001-01-01

    Leadership is an essential skill that must be passed on to the next generation of nursing leaders, if nursing is to continue to flourish. While some may argue that leadership ability is innate, certain acquired skills can enhance one's leadership abilities. Additionally, opportunities and appropriate experiences are essential to the development of effective leadership potential. The purpose of this article is to present a method of mentoring that allows the new academician to gain valuable leadership experience. This method encompasses an advanced doctoral student working with and under the leadership of an experienced nursing academic leader. The mentorship program attempts to fill the gap for needed leadership and administrative experiences in the academic setting among doctoral students and new doctoral graduates.

  15. Student Mentoring Program 1989-1992. Program Report. Lewis and Clark College, Reed College, University of Portland, Warner Pacific College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huisman, Cate

    This report, one of a set of three, examines the initial 3 years of a student mentoring project in Portland, Oregon, that brought together college students from four private universities and a number of eighth grade students from four middle schools in mentoring relationships. During the first year of the project the students were described as…

  16. Teacher Mentoring as a Community Effort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley-Levine, Jill; Lee, Jean Sangmin; Mosier, Gina

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a study of a mentoring program for novice mathematics and science teachers, which was provided by their teacher education program. This study reports the findings of interviews with novice math and science teachers, their mentors, and the mentoring program administrators to explore stakeholder perceptions of…

  17. A literature review of mentoring for RN-to-FNP transition.

    PubMed

    Poronsky, Cathlin Buckingham

    2012-11-01

    Making the transition from RN to family nurse practitioner (FNP) can be challenging and stressful. The transition may begin during graduate school. As FNP students struggle to balance the multitude of academic, personal, and professional demands, they may also struggle with how to make the transition in role and practice. Nurse faculty may aid FNP students by mentoring them. However, information is limited regarding successful mentoring programs and faculty mentoring of FNP students. A literature review of mentoring was conducted, and findings are presented and discussed in this article, including recommendations for additional research. This information may assist faculty, students, and academic institutions seeking to better facilitate the RN-to-FNP transition during graduate school.

  18. A Directory of Library Instruction Programs in Indiana Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Jane, Comp.; Violette, Judith, Comp.

    A survey of 40 reporting academic libraries in Indiana developed this directory of library user instruction programs which provides an index profile of library resources and types of programs within the state. Entries are alphabetical in outline form and provide a library contact person, capsule information about the library instruction program,…

  19. A mentor-protégé program for new faculty, part I: stories of protégés.

    PubMed

    White, Anne; Brannan, Jane; Wilson, Carol B

    2010-11-01

    With the projected shortage of nursing faculty, formalized programs are needed to provide mentorship programs that will encourage and support faculty as they move from the role of novice to expert educator. The purpose of this qualitative study is to explore the experience of protégés participating in a mentorship program for novice faculty. An interpretive phenomenological research study was conducted to illuminate the meaning of the experiences of the protégés participating in the program. The study of the experience of protégés participating in a mentor-protégé program led to the emergence of three main themes: Creating a Meaningful Mentor-Protégé Relationship, Transitioning as a New Nurse Educator, and the Mentor-Protégé Program-Lessons Learned. Data from the study will provide insight into the meaning of receiving mentorship in the role of novice nurse educator.

  20. Mentoring Highly Aggressive Children: Pre-Post Changes in Mentors' Attitudes, Personality, and Attachment Tendencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faith, Melissa A.; Fiala, Samuel E.; Cavell, Timothy A.; Hughes, Jan N.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the degree to which mentoring highly aggressive children was associated with changes in mentors' attitudes, personality, and attachment tendencies. Participants were 102 college students who each mentored an aggressive, high-risk child across three academic semesters (spring, fall, spring). We examined pre- to post-mentoring…