Science.gov

Sample records for academic pediatric centres

  1. Transitional and Transformational Spaces: Mentoring Young Academics through Writing Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Arlene; Parker, Shabnam

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of writing centre interventions on student writing in higher education has been well-documented in academic literacies studies. This paper changes the focus of investigation from student to consultant and, consequently, explores the way in which an academic writing centre can function as a mentoring environment for young…

  2. Academic pediatric radiology in 2010: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Taylor, George A

    2010-04-01

    Academic pediatric radiology is under considerable stress as the result of ongoing financial pressures and recent health-care legislation. This article reviews the current challenges, and suggests both departmental and individual strategies important in sustaining our academic mission.

  3. Understanding academic clinicians’ intent to treat pediatric obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frankfurter, Claudia; Cunningham, Charles; Morrison, Katherine M; Rimas, Heather; Bailey, Karen

    2017-01-01

    AIM To examine the extent to which the theory of planned behavior (TPB) predicts academic clinicians’ intent to treat pediatric obesity. METHODS A multi-disciplinary panel iteratively devised a Likert scale survey based on the constructs of the TPB applied to a set of pediatric obesity themes. A cross-sectional electronic survey was then administered to academic clinicians at tertiary care centers across Canada from January to April 2012. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize demographic and item agreement data. A hierarchical linear regression analysis controlling for demographic variables was conducted to examine the extent to which the TPB subscales predicted intent to treat pediatric obesity. RESULTS A total of 198 physicians, surgeons, and allied health professionals across Canada (British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec) completed the survey. On step 1, demographic factors accounted for 7.4% of the variance in intent scores. Together in step 2, demographic variables and TPB subscales predicted 56.9% of the variance in a measure of the intent to treat pediatric obesity. Perceived behavioral control, that is, confidence in one’s ability to manage pediatric obesity, and subjective norms, congruent with one’s context of practice, were the most significant predictors of the intent to treat pediatric obesity. Attitudes and barriers did not predict the intent to treat pediatric obesity in this context. CONCLUSION Enhancing self-confidence in the ability to treat pediatric obesity and the existence of supportive treatment environments are important to increase clinician’s intent to treat pediatric obesity. PMID:28224097

  4. Academic general pediatric fellowships: curriculum design and educational goals and objectives.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Constance D; Dreyer, Benard P; Szilagyi, Peter G; Bell, Louis M; Baker, Raymond C; Cheng, Tina L; Coury, Daniel L; DeWitt, Thomas G; Darden, Paul M; Duggan, Anne; Ludwig, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Academic generalists are unique and important members of the pediatric landscape.(1) Academic general pediatrics (AGP) is not considered a subspecialty, because it adheres to generalist values and embraces a wide range of clinical activities. Nonetheless, academic generalists engage in important scholarly efforts, contribute extensively to the education of new pediatricians, and must be prepared to survive in academia. Academic general pediatric faculty positions are subject to the same appointment and promotion requirements as those of subspecialist faculty.

  5. Burnout among faculty physicians in an academic health science centre

    PubMed Central

    Wright, James Gardner; Khetani, Nicole; Stephens, Derek

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Burnout experienced by physicians is concerning because it may affect quality of care. OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of burnout among physicians at an academic health science centre and to test the hypothesis that work hours are related to burnout. METHODS: All 300 staff physicians, contacted through their personal e-mail, were provided an encrypted link to an anonymous questionnaire. The primary outcome measure, the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory, has three subscales: personal, work related and patient related. RESULTS: The response rate for the questionnaire was 70%. Quantitative demands, insecurity at work and job satisfaction affected all three components of burnout. Of 210 staff physicians, 22% (n=46) had scores indicating personal burnout, 14% (n=30) had scores indicating work-related burnout and 8% (n=16) had scores indicating patient-related burnout. The correlation between total hours worked and total burnout was only 0.10 (P=0.14) DISCUSSION: Up to 22% of academic paediatric physicians had scores consistent with mild to severe burnout. A simple reduction in work hours is unlikely to be successful in reducing burnout and, therefore, quantitative demands, job satisfaction and work insecurity may require attention to address burnout among academic physicians. PMID:22851895

  6. The Invisible Developers? Academic Coordinators in the UK Subject Centre Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, John

    2010-01-01

    Staff of subject centres have been largely invisible from discussions about the nature of Educational Development in the UK, which has largely focused on the institutional context. This article seeks to enhance the visibility and identity of subject centre academic coordinators who provide discipline-based teaching and learning support across the…

  7. New Century Scholars: A Mentorship Program to Increase Workforce Diversity in Academic Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Pachter, Lee M; Kodjo, Cheryl

    2015-07-01

    This article describes a program aimed to increase workforce diversity and underrepresented minority (URM) representation in academic pediatric medicine. The New Century Scholars (NCScholars) program is a core program in the Academic Pediatric Association, the largest national organization for academic pediatric generalists. The program selects URM pediatric (or medicine-pediatrics) residents who are interested in academic careers and provides each NCScholar with a junior and senior mentor, as well as travel grants to the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting where activities specific to the program are held, and provides ongoing mentorship and career counseling support.The authors discuss the origination, operation, and changes to the program over the first 10 years of its existence, as well as outcome data for the participants in the program. To date, 60 of the 63 NCScholars have finished residency and/or have made postresidency plans, and 38 of these URM pediatricians (63%) have entered academic careers. The authors suggest that this type of mentorship program for URM pediatric trainees can be used as a model for other specialties and medical organizations.

  8. Reflections on an emerging academic discipline: the prolonged gestation of developmental and behavioral pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Shonkoff, J P

    1993-12-01

    Expertise in child development and behavior has been acknowledged as a critical prerequisite for the practice of general pediatrics since the early part of the 20th century. Recently, as the knowledge base has expanded, the concept of developmental and behavioral pediatrics as a specialized academic discipline has generated growing interest. The extent to which this emerging field achieves full recognition as a respected pediatric subspecialty will be determined by its response to three critical challenges: the process of academic acculturation, the imperative of creative collaboration and intellectual cross-fertilization, and the requirements of scientific credibility.

  9. An Academic Multihealth System PGY2 Pediatric Pharmacy Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Klosterman, Theresa; Siu, Anita; Shah, Pooja; Kimler, Katelin; Sturgill, Marc; Robinson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel multihealth system pediatric pharmacy residency program through the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University. Pediatric clinical pharmacy is a growing field that has seen an increase in demand for practitioners. Practice sites include freestanding children's hospitals, children's hospitals within adult hospitals, and pediatric units within adult hospitals. To accommodate a residency program in a region with no freestanding children's hospital, the pediatric faculty members at the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University developed a multihealth system postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pediatric pharmacy residency program with 6 pediatric faculty members functioning as preceptors at their 5 respective practice sites. The multihealth system setup of the program provides the resident exposure to a multitude of patient populations, pediatric specialties, and pediatric pharmacy practices. In addition, the affiliation with Rutgers University allows an emphasis on academia with opportunities for the resident to lecture in small and large classrooms, facilitate discussion periods, assist with clinical laboratory classes, and precept pharmacy students. The resident has the unique opportunity to develop a research project with a large and diverse patient population owing to the multihealth system rotation sites. A multihealth system PGY2 residency in pediatric pharmacy provides the resident a well-rounded experience in pediatric clinical practice, research, and academia that will enhance the resident's ability to build his or her own pediatric pharmacy practice. PMID:26766936

  10. Embracing a family-centred response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic for the elimination of pediatric AIDS.

    PubMed

    DeGennaro, V; Zeitz, P

    2009-01-01

    There are 2.1 million children under the age of 15 living with HIV/AIDS, and 290,000 children died of AIDS in 2007. Despite recent increases in the number of adults on antiretroviral therapy (ART), the number of children receiving treatment remains inappropriately small, and prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) efforts have been grossly inadequate. In sub-Saharan Africa, 14% of those in need of treatment are children, but only 6% of those are receiving treatment. Globally, only 23% of HIV-positive pregnant women have access to PMTCT programmes, which led to 420,000 new pediatric infections last year. Countries with comprehensive, integrated family-centred care programmes are better equipped to prevent and treat pediatric HIV/AIDS. True family-centred care offers prompt maternal and pediatric HIV diagnosis, antiretroviral prophylaxis, cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, and long-term ART for the entire family, as appropriate. Simple child health interventions, prompt treatment of opportunistic infections, nutritional supplementation and infant replacement feeding, as well as malaria treatment and prevention have been proven to synergistically improve pediatric HIV care and increase service uptake. To eliminate pediatric HIV/AIDS, national governments must embrace family-centred care, implement pediatric-friendly infrastructure, and train healthcare workers to treat children.

  11. Supporting New Academics' Use of Student Centred Strategies in Traditional University Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plush, Sally E.; Kehrwald, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the perceived advantages of student centred learning (SCL) in higher education, novice teaching academics' attempts to implement such approaches may be thwarted by a lack of experience with teaching in general and with SCL in particular, difficulties locating suitable practical advice on SCL, and the demands of early career academic…

  12. The Space Between: Pedagogic Collaboration between a Writing Centre and an Academic Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mckay, Tracey Morton; Simpson, Zachary

    2013-01-01

    The expectations placed on students with respect to appropriate academic writing may hinder successful participation in Higher Education. Full participation is further complicated by the fact that each discipline within the University constitutes its own community of practice, with its own set of literacy practices. While Writing Centres aim to…

  13. School Competence and Fluent Academic Performance: Informing Assessment of Educational Outcomes in Survivors of Pediatric Medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Holland, Alice Ann; Hughes, Carroll W; Stavinoha, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    Academic difficulties are widely acknowledged but not adequately studied in survivors of pediatric medulloblastoma. Although most survivors require special education services and are significantly less likely than healthy peers to finish high school, measured academic skills are typically average. This study sought to identify potential factors associated with academic difficulties in this population and focused on school competence and fluent academic performance. Thirty-six patients (ages 7-18 years old) were recruited through the Departments of Neurosurgery and Neuro-Oncology at Children's Medical Center Dallas and Cook Children's Medical Center in Fort Worth, TX. Participants completed a neuropsychological screening battery including selected Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement subtests. Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist. School competence was significantly correlated with measured academic skills and fluency. Basic academic skill development was broadly average, in contrast to significantly worse fluent academic performance. School competence may have utility as a measure estimating levels of educational success in this population. Additionally, academic difficulties experienced by childhood medulloblastoma survivors may be better captured by measuring deficits in fluent academic performance rather than skills. Identification of these potential factors associated with educational outcomes of pediatric medulloblastoma survivors has significant implications for research, clinical assessment, and academic services/interventions.

  14. Improving accountability through alignment: the role of academic health science centres and networks in England

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As in many countries around the world, there are high expectations on academic health science centres and networks in England to provide high-quality care, innovative research, and world-class education, while also supporting wealth creation and economic growth. Meeting these expectations increasingly depends on partnership working between university medical schools and teaching hospitals, as well as other healthcare providers. However, academic-clinical relationships in England are still characterised by the “unlinked partners” model, whereby universities and their partner teaching hospitals are neither fiscally nor structurally linked, creating bifurcating accountabilities to various government and public agencies. Discussion This article focuses on accountability relationships in universities and teaching hospitals, as well as other healthcare providers that form core constituent parts of academic health science centres and networks. The authors analyse accountability for the tripartite mission of patient care, research, and education, using a four-fold typology of accountability relationships, which distinguishes between hierarchical (bureaucratic) accountability, legal accountability, professional accountability, and political accountability. Examples from North West London suggest that a number of mechanisms can be used to improve accountability for the tripartite mission through alignment, but that the simple creation of academic health science centres and networks is probably not sufficient. Summary At the heart of the challenge for academic health science centres and networks is the separation of accountabilities for patient care, research, and education in different government departments. Given that a fundamental top-down system redesign is now extremely unlikely, local academic and clinical leaders face the challenge of aligning their institutions as a matter of priority in order to improve accountability for the tripartite mission from

  15. The academic medical centre and nongovernmental organisation partnership following a natural disaster.

    PubMed

    Sarani, Babak; Mehta, Samir; Ashburn, Michael; Nakashima, Koji; Gupta, Rajan; Dombroski, Derek; Schwab, C William

    2012-10-01

    The global response to the 12 January 2010 earthquake in Haiti revealed the ability to mobilise medical teams quickly and effectively when academic medical centres partner non-governmental organisations (NGO) that already have a presence in a zone of devastation. Most established NGOs based in a certain region are accustomed to managing the medical conditions that are common to that area and will need additional and specialised support to treat the flux of myriad injured persons. Furthermore, an NGO with an established presence in a region prior to a disaster appears better positioned to provide sustained recovery and rehabilitation relief. Academic medical centres can supply these essential specialised resources for a prolonged time. This relationship between NGOs and academic medical centres should be further developed prior to another disaster response. This model has great potential with regard to the rapid preparation and worldwide deployment of skilled medical and surgical teams when needed following a disaster, as well as to the subsequent critical recovery phase.

  16. Effect of motivation on academic fluency performance in survivors of pediatric medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Holland, Alice Ann; Hughes, Carroll W; Harder, Lana; Silver, Cheryl; Bowers, Daniel C; Stavinoha, Peter L

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed previously that extrinsic motivation may enable survivors of childhood medulloblastoma to significantly improve aspects of neurocognitive performance. In healthy populations, enhanced motivation has been shown to promote academic fluency, a domain likely more relevant to the educational outcomes of pediatric medulloblastoma survivors than academic skill development. The present study investigates the effect of enhanced extrinsic motivation on fluent (i.e., accurate and efficient) academic performance in pediatric medulloblastoma survivors. Participants were 36 children, ages 7-18, who had completed treatment for medulloblastoma. Participants completed a neuropsychological battery that included administration of equivalent tasks on Forms A and B of the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement. Half were randomly assigned to an incentive condition prior to the administration of Form B. Provision of a performance-based incentive resulted in statistically significant improvement, but not normalization of function, in performance on measures of academic fluency. No demographic, treatment-related, academic, neuropsychological, or self-perception variables predicted response to incentive. Findings suggest that academic performance of survivors may significantly improve under highly motivating conditions. In addition to implications for educational services, this finding raises the novel possibility that decreased motivation represents an inherent neuropsychological deficit in this population and provides a rationale for further investigation of factors affecting individual differences in motivational processes. Further, by examining effort in a context where effort is not inherently suspect, present findings also significantly contribute to the debate regarding the effects of effort and motivation on neuropsychological performance.

  17. BUILDING AN ACADEMIC PEDIATRIC HEALTH SYSTEM AS THE WORLD CONTINUES TO TURN: A CASE STUDY.

    PubMed

    Ellen, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, All Children's Hospital (ACH) joined the Johns Hopkins Health System (JHHS) and in so doing became a member of Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM). The value proposition for the joining of ACH and JHHS/JHM was to transform ACH into an academic pediatric health system. This case study of the transformation provides evidence for the usefulness of a precision medicine framework to organize investments in programs and practices that further the tripartite mission of academic medical centers and may increase the value of the care they deliver.

  18. [Pediatrics at an academic medical center: organization of university pediatric services].

    PubMed

    Claris, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Pediatric medicine is one of the most important activities of any teaching hospital. Its internal organization depends on the size of the hospital and must take into account not only its missions of advice, reference and proximity, but also economic issues. Regional networking with general hospitals, private clinics and community pediatricians is necessary, if only to regulate use of the emergency department. The activity of pediatric units fluctuates over time and is not always controllable, involving both rapid turnover and extended stays. Cost of health is often underestimated or unadapted, and many units are in financial deficit despite their best efforts. University pediatrician training is highly demanding in order to ensure the quality of recruitment, but it must be sufficiently flexible if it is to attract a suficient number of candidates. As with other specialties, research is relatively easy to evaluate, contrary to teaching and clinical activity.

  19. Early Career Development in Academic Pediatrics of Participants in the APS-SPR Medical Student Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Smith, William H.; Rogers, Jessica G.; Hansen, Thomas N.; Smith, Charles V.

    2009-01-01

    To recruit and train the next generations of pediatric clinician-scientists, the American Pediatric Society (APS) and Society for Pediatric Research (SPR) initiated a program in 1991 to support medical students with interests in research and pediatrics to conduct research at institutions other than their respective medical schools. Since 1991, the APS-SPR Medical Student Research Program (MSRP) has funded 732 of 2209 applicants from 132 U.S. or Canadian medical schools for 8 to 12 weeks of research under the direction of experienced investigators. PubMed-attributable publications tabulated in 2001 for MSRP applicants through 2000 indicated that participants had published more actively than had non-participant applicants. Male non-participants exhibited greater publication activities than did female non-participants, but female and male participants published equally. Of all MSRP participants between 1991 and 1996, as of 2008, 36% were in pediatrics, and a remarkable 29% were in academic pediatrics. PMID:19092716

  20. Social contract of academic medical centres to the community: Dr Howard Atwood Kelly (1858-1943), a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Allen, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Academic medical centres have traditionally been bastions of teaching and research. Outreach to the community at large and involvement in community affairs have sometimes been lacking in the overall mission and activities of academic medical centres. This paper provides an historical perspective first on the numerous achievements of a physician and surgeon and then on the topic of involvement in community affairs by reviewing the many contributions of America's pioneer gynaecological surgeon and one of the four physician founders of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine in 1889 - Dr Howard Atwood Kelly.

  1. Academic collaborative centres for health promotion in the Netherlands: building bridges between research, policy and practice.

    PubMed

    Molleman, Gerard; Fransen, Gerdine

    2012-04-01

    A logical and promising next step for the development of an effective infrastructure for health promotion in the Netherlands are Academic Collaborative Centres (ACCs). Their aims are to bridge the gap between research, policy and practice; make better use of available knowledge and strengthen the evidence base for health promotion practice. To understand their position, they must be seen in light of the strong growth in health promotion in the Netherlands. Since the 1970s, the emphasis in health promotion has shifted from simple unidimensional interventions to much more comprehensive and integrated programmes. Comprehensive research programmes, which explicitly involve actual practice and policy, are also thus called for. These developments are described in this article. There is considerable and widespread enthusiasm about the establishment of ACCs in the Netherlands. Experiences from the first 5 years of collaboration between research, policy and practice within the ACCs, however, shows research to still have the dominant position. The different groups of stakeholders in the public health infrastructure are also shown to perceive and appreciate the current infrastructure rather differently. These findings are similar to results found in the USA. The predominance of research has recently led the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw) to impose stricter criteria and guidelines for the funding of such centres. These measures are aimed at eliciting a shift of power from science to practice. They seem to be a promising contribution to bridging the gap between research, policy and practice.

  2. Educating for the Internet in an Academic Library: The Scholars' Centre at the University of Western Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrows, Toby

    1995-01-01

    Describes services offered by the University of Western Australia's Scholars' Centre to academic staff and postgraduate students in the arts and social sciences. Highlights include study facilities; collection development; interlibrary loan and document delivery services; access to electronic resources, including CD-ROMs and the Internet; Internet…

  3. Amulets, Bands and Other Traditional Applications seen among Emergency and Neonatal Pediatric Admissions in a Tertiary Centre, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adeboye, Muhammed A.N.; Adegboye, Olasunkanmi A.; Abdulkarim, Aishatu A.; Eze, Edith C.; Saka, Mohammed J.; Usman, Abdullahi; Solomon, Amos; Rotimi, Bosede F.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to investigate the types and indications of amulets, bands and traditional applications among pediatric emergencies and neonatal admissions into the Federal Medical Centre, Bida, Nigeria. Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted between January and July, 2008. Children admitted into the emergency and neonatal units of the institution with traditional applications were recruited. Information on demography, time the application was introduced, the reason, cost implication and belief about the efficacy were obtained using a semi-structured questionnaire. Socio-Economic Class was defined using the Oyedeji Classification. Results The study was based at Federal Medical Centre, Bida and consisted of 666 children admitted into the hospital via the Emergency pediatric and the Neonatal Unit, with a seven-month period prevalence of 11.4% (76 patients). Of the 76 cases screened for the use traditional applications, only 64 (84.2%) were recruited, the remaining did not agree to participate in the study. The mean age was 493.1±528.5 days. The study group included 37 males and 27 females (sex ratio 1.4:1) aged 11 days to 2920 days. The applications used included neck band (54.7%), ankle band (15.6%) and head paste (15.6%). Reasons for the applications included prevention of childhood illnesses (17.2%), sutures closure (15.6%), as well as warding off evil spirits and convulsions (12.5%). The socio-economic classification was I (1.6%), II (7.8%), III (15.6%), IV (45.3%), and V (29.7%). Sixty (93.0%) parents believed the applications cannot be used with conventional medicine, while 53.1% of the participants, obtained them free of charge. Conclusion The use of traditional applications, often for preventive purposes, is common among pediatric patients, especially of low socio-economic classifications. The majority of users considered them incompatible with simultaneous conventional medical care. This has adverse implications for time to

  4. Does research during general surgery residency correlate with academic pursuits after pediatric surgery residency?

    PubMed

    Lessin, M S; Klein, M D

    1995-09-01

    A study was designed to evaluate whether successful candidates in pediatric surgery have performed laboratory research with publication, and if such preparation leads to continued investigations. We requested a curriculum vitae from the 248 pediatric surgeons who began their pediatric surgery residencies (PSR) between 1979 and 1992. For nonresponders, data were collected from physician directories. Indicators of academic status, personal information, and publication data were obtained. Responders had more publications before, during, and after PSR. Those who published during general surgery residency (GSR) had more research years during their residency. Among responders, 59% had spent time in the laboratory, and the percentage with laboratory time increased over the study period. Those with laboratory experience had more laboratory and clinical papers before PSR. Ninety-four percent were from university-based GSRs and 6% were from community GSRs. University general surgery residents did not have more publications during GSR or PSR but had a greater number of publications after PSR. University general surgery residents had more laboratory publications during GSR and after PSR, but did not have more clinical publications. Publications during GSR and after PSR increased during the study period, but not during PSR. Time in the laboratory during GSR did not independently predict continued laboratory research. Those with laboratory papers during GSR did not publish more basic science papers after PSR. Several surgeons had basic science publications that were initiated only after their PSR. In a recent study that compared successful and unsuccessful PSR candidates, the successful candidates were found to have more publications.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Traumatic spinal injuries in children at a single level 1 pediatric trauma centre: report of a 23-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Christopher; Vassilyadi, Michael; Forbes, Jason K.; Moroz, Nicholas W.P.; Camacho, Alexandra; Moroz, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Background With a reported incidence of up to 10% compared to all spinal trauma, spinal injuries in children are less common than in adults. Children can have spine fractures with or without myelopathy, or spinal cord injuries without radiological abnormalities (SCIWORA). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of children with spinal injuries treated at a level 1 pediatric trauma centre between 1990 and 2013. Results A total of 275 children were treated during the study period. The mean age at admission was 12 ± 4.5 years, and the male:female ratio was 1.4:1. Spinal injuries were more common in children of ages 12–16 years, with most injuries among ages 15–16 years. The top 3 mechanisms of spinal injury were motor vehicle–related trauma (53%), sports (28%) and falls (13%). Myelopathy occurred in 12% and SCIWORA occurred in 6%. The most common spine levels injured were L2–sacrum, followed by O–C2. Associated injuries, including head injuries (29%), and fractures/dislocations (27%) occurred in 55% of children. Overall mortality was 3%. Surgical intervention was required in 14%. Conclusion The creation of a pediatric spinal injury database using this 23-year retrospective review helped identify important clinical concepts; we found that active adolescent boys had the highest risk of spine injury, that noncontiguous spine injuries occured at a rate higher than reported previously and that nonaccidental spine injuries in children are under-reported. Our findings also emphasize the importance of maintaining a higher index of suspicion with trauma patients with multiple injuries and of conducting detailed clinical and radiographic examinations of the entire spine in children with a known spinal injury. PMID:27240286

  6. Investing in future pediatric subspecialists: a fellowship curriculum that prepares for the transition to academic careers.

    PubMed

    Rama, Jennifer A; Campbell, Judith R; Balmer, Dorene F; Turner, Teri L; Hsu, Deborah C

    2015-01-01

    Background The experience of transitioning to an academic faculty position can be improved with standardized educational interventions. Although a number of such interventions have been described, few utilize an evaluation framework, describe a robust evaluation process, and address why their interventions were successful. In this article, the authors apply a logic model to describe their efforts to develop, implement, evaluate, and revise a comprehensive academic career development curriculum among pediatric subspecialty fellows. They describe inputs, activities, outputs, and outcomes using quantitative data from fellow evaluations and qualitative data from faculty interviews. Methods Methods are described under the input and activities sections. The curriculum started with collaboration among educational leadership and conducting a needs assessment. Using the needs assessment results and targeted learning objectives, we piloted the curriculum and then implemented the full curriculum 1 year later. Results Results are described under the outputs and outcomes sections. We present immediate, short-term, and 6-month evaluation data. Cumulative data over 3 years reveal that fellows consistently acquired knowledge relevant to transitioning and that they applied acquired knowledge to prepare for finding jobs and career advancement. The curriculum also benefits faculty instructors who gain a sense of reward by filling a critical knowledge gap and fostering fellows' professional growth. Conclusion The authors relate the success and effectiveness of the curriculum to principles of adult learning, and share lessons learned, including the importance of buy-in from junior and senior fellows and faculty, collaboration, and designating the time to teach and learn.

  7. The role of torovirus in nosocomial viral gastroenteritis at a large tertiary pediatric centre

    PubMed Central

    Gubbay, JB; Al-Rezqi, A; Hawkes, M; Williams, L; Richardson, SE; Matlow, A

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the viral etiology and epidemiology of nosocomial viral gastroenteritis (NVG) at a tertiary care pediatric hospital and identify any changes over the past two decades. METHODS: Retrospective review of all patients with laboratory-confirmed NVG at The Hospital for Sick Children (Toronto, Ontario), from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2005. RESULTS: One hundred forty-two episodes of NVG were found among 133 patients, occurring in 0.48 of 100 admissions. The median age was two years; 42% were <1 year of age and 41% were immunocompromised. The most commonly detected pathogen was torovirus (67% of episodes), followed by rotavirus (19%) and adenovirus (9%). Seventy-five cases (53%) were epidemiologically linked in 32 separate clusters (median cluster size two, range two to four). The NVG rate fell from 0.63 of 100 to 0.22 of 100 admissions after March 2005 (P<0.001) when enhanced infection control precautions were instituted in response to an outbreak of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. CONCLUSIONS: Torovirus remains the most commonly identified cause of NVG at The Hospital for Sick Children. Most NVG cases were epidemiologically linked, and a significant reduction in cases occurred after the institution of enhanced infection control practices following an outbreak of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Improved education and surveillance for NVG should lead to further reduction in this problem. PMID:23730313

  8. Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) fellowship: essentials of a three-year academic curriculum. Three-Year Academic Subcommittee of the PEM Fellowship Committee of the Section of Emergency Medicine, American Academy of Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Shaw, K N; Schunk, J; Ledwith, C; Lockhart, G

    1997-02-01

    This committee of fellowship directors has proposed guidelines for an academic curriculum for training fellows in PEM. The curriculum should be modified to each unique program, but is based on current expectation of the American Board of Pediatrics and the ACGME for graduate education. This is the first PEM academic curriculum document in publication. Ongoing refinement and adaptation based on feedback from fellows and directors is essential to provide the best fellowship experience to our trainees. The proposed curriculum is also subject to further change as more details are given for ACGME approval of the fellowship programs.

  9. Pediatrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spackman, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The utilization of the Lixiscope in pediatrics was investigated. The types of images that can presently be obtained are discussed along with the problems encountered. Speculative applications for the Lixiscope are also presented.

  10. Patient safety culture and leadership within Canada's Academic Health Science Centres: towards the development of a collaborative position paper.

    PubMed

    Nicklin, Wendy; Mass, Heather; Affonso, Dyanne D; O'Connor, Patricia; Ferguson-Paré, Mary; Jeffs, Lianne; Tregunno, Deborah; White, Peggy

    2004-03-01

    Currently, the Academy of Canadian Executive Nurses (ACEN) is working with the Association of Canadian Academic Healthcare Organizations (ACAHO) to develop a joint position paper on patient safety cultures and leadership within Academic Health Science Centres (AHSCs). Pressures to improve patient safety within our healthcare system are gaining momentum daily. Because AHSCs in Canada are the key organizations that are positioned regionally and nationally, where service delivery is the platform for the education of future healthcare providers, and where the development of new knowledge and innovation through research occurs, leadership for patient safety logically must emanate from them. As a primer, ACEN provides an overview of current patient safety initiatives in AHSCs to date. In addition, the following six key areas for action are identified to ensure that AHSCs continue to be leaders in delivering quality, safe healthcare in Canada. These include: (1) strategic orientation to safety culture and quality improvement, (2) open and transparent disclosure policies, (3) health human resources integral to ensuring patient safety practices, (4) effective linkages between AHSCs and academic institutions, (5) national patient safety accountability initiatives and (6) collaborative team practice.

  11. The respiratory presentation of severe combined immunodeficiency in two Mennonite children at a tertiary centre highlighting the importance of recognizing this pediatric emergency

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Simon; Kavadas, Fotini D; Haider, Seemab; Noseworthy, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is considered to be a pediatric emergency, with respiratory distress being the most common presenting symptom. The authors present two cases of SCID in children <4 months of age with respiratory distress at a tertiary care centre due to a recently described homozygous CD3 delta mutation found only in the Mexican Mennonite population. Failure to respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics prompted investigation for possible SCID. Bronchial alveolar lavage fluid from both patients grew Pneumocystis jiroveci, and flow cytometry revealed absent T cells. The CD3 delta gene is believed to be important in T cell differentiation and maturation. The present article reminds pediatricians and pediatric respirologists that the key to diagnosing SCID is to have a high index of suspicion if there is poor response to conventional therapies. PMID:24288697

  12. The respiratory presentation of severe combined immunodeficiency in two Mennonite children at a tertiary centre highlighting the importance of recognizing this pediatric emergency.

    PubMed

    Lam, Simon; Kavadas, Fotini Dimitriou; Haider, Seemab; Noseworthy, Mary Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is considered to be a pediatric emergency, with respiratory distress being the most common presenting symptom. The authors present two cases of SCID in children <4 months of age with respiratory distress at a tertiary care centre due to a recently described homozygous CD3 delta mutation found only in the Mexican Mennonite population. Failure to respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics prompted investigation for possible SCID. Bronchial alveolar lavage fluid from both patients grew Pneumocystis jiroveci, and flow cytometry revealed absent T cells. The CD3 delta gene is believed to be important in T cell differentiation and maturation. The present article reminds pediatricians and pediatric respirologists that the key to diagnosing SCID is to have a high index of suspicion if there is poor response to conventional therapies.

  13. Warning Letters to Sponsor-Investigators at Academic Health Centres – The Regulatory “Canaries in a Coal Mine”

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Erin K; Blair Holbein, M. E.; Berglund, Jelena P.; Parrish, Amanda B.; Roth, Mary-Tara; Burnett, Bruce K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study highlights Warning Letters (WL) findings issued to sponsor-investigators (S-Is) by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Methods The online index of WLs issued from October 1, 2007 through September 30, 2012 was reviewed [1]. Through a manual screening process, letters were evaluated if specifically issued to ‘clinical investigators’, ‘sponsors’ or ‘sponsor-investigators’. A particular focus was given to S-Is at Academic Health Centres (AHCs). Each letter was scored for the presence of violations in 40 general regulatory categories. Results A review of FDA WLs issued over a five year period (FDA Fiscal Years 2008–2012) revealed that WLs to S-Is represent half of the WLs issued to all sponsors (16 of 32 letters). A review of these letters indicates that S-Is are not aware, or simply do not meet, their regulatory responsibilities as either investigators or sponsors. In comparing total sponsor letters to those of S-Is, the most cited violation was the same: a lack of monitoring. A review of publicly available inspection data indicates that these 16 letters merely represent the tip of the iceberg. Conclusion This review of the WL database reveals the potential for serious regulatory violations among S-Is at AHCs. Recent translational funding initiatives may serve to increase the number of S-Is, especially among Academic Health Centres (AHCs) [2]. Thus, AHCs must become aware of this S-I role and work to support investigators who assume both roles in the course of their research. PMID:24309225

  14. Brain drain in sub-Saharan Africa: contributing factors, potential remedies and the role of academic medical centres.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Jennifer; Bajunirwe, Francis

    2012-11-01

    A double jeopardy exists in resource-limited settings (RLS) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA): there are a disproportionately greater number of acutely ill patients, but a paucity of healthcare workers (HCW) to care for them. SSA has 25% of the global disease burden but only 3% of the world's HCW. Thirty-two SSA countries do not meet the WHO minimum of 23 HCW per 10000 population. Contributing factors include insufficient supply, inadequate distribution and migration. Potential remedies include international workforce policies, non-governmental organisations, national and international medical organisations' codes of conduct, inter-country collaborations, donor-directed policies and funding to train more people in-country, and health system strengthening and task-shifting. Collaborations among academic institutions from resource-rich and poor countries can help address HCW supply, distribution and migration. It is now opportune to harness bright, committed people from academic centres in resource-rich and poor settings to create long-term, collaborative relationships focused on training, clinical skills and locally relevant research endeavours, who mutually strive for HCW retention, less migration, and ultimately sufficient HCW to provide optimal care in all RLS.

  15. The international spread of Academic Health Science Centres: a scoping review and the case of policy transfer to England.

    PubMed

    French, Catherine E; Ferlie, Ewan; Fulop, Naomi J

    2014-09-01

    Academic Health Science Centres (AHSCs) have been a key feature of the North American healthcare landscape for many years, and the term is becoming more widely used internationally. The defining feature of these complex organisations is a tripartite mission of delivering high quality research, medical education and clinical care. The biomedical innovations developed in AHSCs are often well documented, but less is known about the policy and organisational processes which enable the translation of research into patient care. This paper has two linked purposes. Firstly, we present a scoping review of the literature which explores the managerial, political and cultural perspectives of AHSCs. The literature is largely normative with little social science theory underpinning commentary and descriptive case studies. Secondly, we contribute to addressing this gap by applying a policy transfer framework to the English case to examine how AHSC policy has spread internationally. We conclude by suggesting a research agenda on AHSCs using the relevant literatures of policy transfer, professional/managerial relations and boundary theory, and highlighting three key messages for policy makers: (1) competing policy incentives for AHSCs should be minimised; (2) no single AHSC model will fit all settings; (3) AHSC networks operate internationally and this should be encouraged.

  16. Childhood Developmental Disorders: An Academic and Clinical Convergence Point for Psychiatry, Neurology, Psychology and Pediatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, Allan L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Significant advances in understanding brain development and behavior have not been accompanied by revisions of traditional academic structure. Disciplinary isolation and a lack of meaningful interdisciplinary opportunities are persistent barriers in academic medicine. To enhance clinical practice, research, and training for the next…

  17. Outcome of pediatric head injury patients admitted as unknown at a level-i apex trauma centre

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Haradhan Deb; Tandon, Vivek; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar; Gupta, Deepak Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Patients with head injury who are not identified at admission are a challenge to manage and in this backdrop we decided to analyze our data of such pediatric patients for their outcome. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective study conducted at the level-I trauma center. A total of 12 consecutive pediatric (<20 years) age group patients whose identities were not known at the time of admission were included in the study. Results: All 12 patients were male. The road traffic accident was the most common cause of injury (8, 67%). Mean age of the patients were 16.75 ± 4.45 years. Computerized tomography (CT) scan showed cerebral contusion in four (33%) patients. Six (50%) patients needed surgery and others were treated conservatively. During the course of hospital treatment, one (8%) patient died, two (16%) had good recovery, and four (33%) were moderately disabled. Among the 12 patients identity, eight (67%) could be ascertained. Seven (58%) patients were sent home with their relatives, one (8%) was referred to a district hospital and three (25%) remained as unknown and were referred to destitute home for rehabilitation. Conclusion: Unidentified patients of pediatric age group have better outcome if proper care is provided in time. PMID:26396599

  18. Recovery in memory function, and its relationship to academic success, at 24 months following pediatric TBI.

    PubMed

    Catroppa, Cathy; Anderson, Vicki

    2007-05-01

    While a number of research papers have reported findings on memory deficits following traumatic brain injury (TBI), only limited studies have monitored the recovery of these skills over time. The present study examined memory ability and its effect on academic success in a group of children who had sustained a mild, moderate, or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Results showed that the severe TBI group exhibited greater deficits on memory tasks, irrespective of modality, in the acute, 6-, 12-, and 24-month postinjury stages, in comparison to mild and moderate TBI groups. Performance on academic measures was dependent on both injury severity and task demands. Preinjury academic ability and verbal memory indices best predicted academic success.

  19. Is Student-Centred Learning a Western Concept? Lessons from an Academic Development Programme to Support Student-Centred Learning in Iraq

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, L.; Bovill, C.; Othman, S. M.; Saleh, A. M.; Shabila, N. P.; Watters, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the idea that student-centred learning (SCL) is a concept and an approach that is internationally useful and transferable to a range of higher education settings. We present details of a British Council funded collaborative project between Hawler Medical University (HMU), in Erbil in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq and…

  20. Comparing physical assessment with administrative data for detecting pressure ulcers in a large Canadian academic health sciences centre

    PubMed Central

    Vanderloo, Saskia E; Miller, Toba B; Freeman, Lisa; Forster, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to compare classification of pressure ulcers from administrative data with a gold standard assessment, specifically; pressure ulcers confirmed by an independent physical assessment performed by trained nurse surveyors. Setting A retrospective analysis of pooled cross-sectional samples of inpatients assessed across 3 consecutive prevalence surveys in a large academic health sciences centre between 2012 and 2013. Participants There were 2001 patients for whom physical and chart assessments were completed, and for whom a discharge abstract was also available at the time of analysis. The cohort's mean age was 65 years and 55% were women. Results Based on the physical assessment findings, 14.6% of patients (n=292) had at least 1 pressure ulcer, with a total of 345 pressure ulcers documented among these patients: (stage I=162; stage II=120; stage III=22; stage IV=22 and unstageable=19). Based on coded information, 78 (3.9%) of patients had a pressure ulcer. Of patients with a pressure ulcer determined by the physical assessment, only 21% also had a pressure ulcer captured in the administrative data. Furthermore, only 6% of the patients with a hospital-acquired pressure ulcer, stage II or greater determined by the physical assessment were coded in the Discharge Abstract Database (DAD). Conclusions The results of this study demonstrate that coding in the DAD may under-report and fail to accurately reflect the true burden of pressure ulcers in hospitalised patients. This may occur because the presence of pressure ulcers is currently documented in the health record by nurses and not by physicians, yet the administrative data recorded in the DAD only includes physician documented pressure ulcers. We recommend enhancements to the coding methods to monitor and report on pressure ulcers. PMID:27707831

  1. Modeling of longitudinal academic achievement scores after pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Barnes, Marcia; Fletcher, Jack M; Levin, Harvey S; Swank, Paul R; Song, James

    2004-01-01

    In a prospective longitudinal study, academic achievement scores were obtained from youth 5 to 15 years of age who sustained mild-moderate (n = 34) or severe (n = 43) traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Achievement scores were collected from baseline to 5 years following TBI and were subjected to individual growth curve analysis. The models fitted age at injury, years since injury, duration of impaired consciousness, and interaction effects to Reading Decoding, Reading Comprehension, Spelling, and Arithmetic standard scores. Although scores improved significantly over the follow-up relative to normative data from the standardization sample of the tests, children with severe TBI showed persistent deficits on all achievement scores in comparison to children with mild-moderate TBI. Interactions of the slope and age parameters for the Arithmetic and Reading Decoding scores indicated greater increases over time in achievement scores of the children injured at an older age, but deceleration in growth curves for the younger children with both mild-moderate and severe TBI. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that early brain injuries disrupt the acquisition of some academic skills. Hierarchical regression models revealed that indexes of academic achievement obtained 2 years following TBI had weak relations with the duration of impaired consciousness and socioeconomic status. In contrast, concurrent cognitive variables such as phonological processing and verbal memory accounted for more variability in academic scores. Given the significant and persistent decrement in basic academic skills in youth with severe TBI, it is clear that head-injured youth require intensive, long-term remediation and intervention not only of the academic skills themselves, but also of those cognitive abilities that support the development and maintenance of reading and math.

  2. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy of bilateral staghorn renal calculi in pediatric patients: 12 years experience in a tertiary care centre.

    PubMed

    Purkait, Bimalesh; Kumar, Manoj; Sokhal, Ashok Kumar; Bansal, Ankur; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Gupta, Ashok Kumar

    2016-09-15

    To assess the outcomes of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in bilateral staghorn calculi in pediatric patients, we have performed a retrospective analysis. Staghorn calculus is defined as stone that fills a greater part of the pelvic-caliceal system. Still, in developing countries, patients may present with staghorn calculus. PCNL is the preferred treatment modality for staghorn calculus both in adult and children. Our study included fifty-one pediatric patients (<15 years) of bilateral staghorn calculi from 2004 to 2015. Staged PCNL was done after 2-3 days if needed and opposite side PCNL was performed after 10-14 days. Fifty-one patients with bilateral staghorn renal calculi underwent PCNL. The mean age of the study group was 10.25 ± 2.13 (range 3-15). Mean stone burden was 778.3 + 613.4 (range 231-3850 mm(2)). Forty-five patients underwent single puncture, twenty-two patients underwent double punctures whereas six patients underwent triple punctures during first session PCNL procedure. Most common puncture location was through the superior calyx (58.82 %). The mean operating time was 77.25 + 30.21 (range 58-145). After the first session PCNL, the success rate was 76.47 %. Thirteen patients (17 renal units) underwent relook PCNL and seven patients underwent ESWL. Overall complication noted in twenty-four (47.05 %) cases. Most of the complications were minor grade. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy for staghorn calculus in children needs expertise. PCNL in B/L staghorn renal calculus in children is safe and effective. B/L staghorn renal calculi with compromised renal function have higher chance of complications including bleeding.

  3. Does Academic Blogging Enhance Promotion and Tenure? A Survey of US and Canadian Medicine and Pediatric Department Chairs

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Manu; Adams, Martha; Jhaveri, Kenar D

    2016-01-01

    Background Electronic educational (e-learning) technology usage continues to grow. Many medical journals operate companion blogs (an application of e-learning technology) that enable rapid dissemination of scientific knowledge and discourse. Faculty members participating in promotion and tenure academic tracks spend valuable time and effort contributing, editing, and directing these medical journal blogs. Objective We sought to understand whether chairs of medicine and pediatric departments acknowledge blog authorship as academic achievement. Methods The authors surveyed 267 chairs of US and Canadian medicine and pediatric departments regarding their attitudes toward the role of faculty participation in e-learning and blogging in the promotion and tenure process. The survey completion rate was 22.8% (61/267). Results A majority of respondents (87%, 53/61) viewed educational scholarship as either important or very important for promotion. However, only 23% (14/61) perceived importance to faculty effort in producing content for journal-based blogs. If faculty were to participate in blog authorship, 72% (44/61) of surveyed chairs favored involvement in a journal-based versus a society-based or a personal (nonaffiliated) blog. We identified a “favorable group” of chairs (19/59, 32%), who rated leadership roles in e-learning tools as important or very important, and an “unfavorable group” of chairs (40/59, 68%), who rated leadership roles in e-learning tools as somewhat important or not important. The favorable group were more likely to be aware of faculty bloggers within their departments (58%, 11/19 vs 25%, 10/40), viewed serving on editorial boards of e-learning tools more favorably (79%, 15/19 vs 31%, 12/39), and were more likely to value effort spent contributing to journal-based blogs (53%, 10/19 vs 10%, 4/40). Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that although the majority of department chairs value educational scholarship, only a minority perceive value

  4. Clinicoepidemiological and Mycological Study of Tinea Capitis in the Pediatric Population of Kashmir Valley: A Study from a Tertiary Care Centre

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Yasmeen J.; Zeerak, Sumaya; Kanth, Farhat; Yaseen, Atiya; Hassan, Iffat; Hakak, Rubina

    2017-01-01

    Background: Tinea capitis is a superficial fungal infection that predominantly affects the pediatric population. The etiological factors vary from region to region, and the exact incidence remains obscure. The clinicoepidemiological and mycological aspects of this dermatophytosis were studied in a tertiary care centre in Kashmir valley. Aim: To determine the clinicoepidemiological aspects and mycological findings of dermatophytes involved in tinea capitis cases in Kashmir valley. Materials and Methods: Wood's lamp examination, KOH examination, and fungal culture were performed in one hundred fifty clinically diagnosed cases of tinea capitis with patients’ age upto 14 years over a period of 6 months. The epidemiological factors associated with the disease were also evaluated. Results: Tinea capitis was predominant in the 3–6 and 6–9 years age groups with a male preponderance. Grey patch tinea capitis was the most common variant. KOH positivity was 76%, and Trichophyton tonsurans was the most common fungal isolate. Conclusion: Tinea capitis is a very common fungal infection in our setting. Early detection and diagnosis is mandatory to prevent its spread in the community as well as the development of scarring alopecia in the affected individual.

  5. Facilities Offered by the University of Ibadan (Nigeria) Distance Learning Centre towards Learners' Academic Goal--An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adegbile, J. A.; Oyekanmi, J. O.

    2011-01-01

    Distance learners in the University of Ibadan, Nigeria unlike other distance learners of different parts of the world are faced with various educational, social and psychological problems associated with the code of distance learning. The facilities offered by the University of Ibadan distance learning centre towards the users' multifarious needs…

  6. Academic Values under Pressure. Centre for the Study of Higher Education Research Working Papers, 93.3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInnis, Craig

    This paper provides an account of individual and collective academic values under the pressure of government policy for social equity in selective admissions at one Australian university. A survey of faculty (N=93) from Law, Social Work, Science, and Architecture identified their goals related to the goals of the university and fairness in…

  7. The 2015 Academic College of Emergency Experts in Indias INDO-US Joint Working Group White Paper on Establishing an Academic Department and Training Pediatric Emergency Medicine Specialists in India.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Prashant; Batra, Prerna; Shah, Binita R; Saha, Abhijeet; Galwankar, Sagar; Aggrawal, Praveen; Hassoun, Ameer; Batra, Bipin; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kalra, Om Prakash; Shah, Dheeraj

    2015-12-01

    The concept of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) is virtually nonexistent in India. Suboptimally organized prehospital services substantially hinder the evaluation, management, and subsequent transport of the acutely ill and/or injured child to an appropriate facility. Furthermore, the management of the ill child at the hospital level is often provided by overburdened providers who, by virtue of their training, lack experience in the skills required to effectively manage pediatric emergencies. Finally, the care of the traumatized child often requires the involvement of providers trained in different specialities, which further impedes timely access to appropriate care. The recent recognition of Doctor of Medicine in Emergency Medicine as an approved discipline of study as per the Indian Medical Council Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to introduce PEM as a formal academic program in India. PEM has to be developed as a 3 year superspeciality course after completion of MD Diplomate of National Board (DNB) Pediatrics or MD DNB in EM. The National Board of Examinations that accredits and administers postgraduate and postdoctoral programs in India also needs to develop an academic program DNB in PEM. The goals of such a program would be to impart theoretical knowledge, training in the appropriate skills and procedures, development of communication and counseling techniques, and research. In this paper, the Joint Working Group of the Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (JWG ACEE India) gives its recommendations for starting 3 year DM DNB in PEM, including the curriculum, infrastructure, staffing, and training in India. This is an attempt to provide an uniform framework and a set of guiding principles to start PEM as a structured superspeciality to enhance emergency care for Indian children.

  8. The 2015 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's INDO-US Joint Working Group White Paper on Establishing an Academic Department and Training Pediatric Emergency Medicine Specialists in India.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Prashant; Batra, Prerna; Shah, Binita R; Saha, Abhijeet; Galwankar, Sagar; Aggrawal, Praveen; Hassoun, Ameer; Batra, Bipin; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kalra, Om Prakash; Shah, Dheeraj

    2015-01-01

    The concept of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) is virtually nonexistent in India. Suboptimally, organized prehospital services substantially hinder the evaluation, management, and subsequent transport of the acutely ill and/or injured child to an appropriate facility. Furthermore, the management of the ill child at the hospital level is often provided by overburdened providers who, by virtue of their training, lack experience in the skills required to effectively manage pediatric emergencies. Finally, the care of the traumatized child often requires the involvement of providers trained in different specialities, which further impedes timely access to appropriate care. The recent recognition of Doctor of Medicine (MD) in Emergency Medicine (EM) as an approved discipline of study as per the Indian Medical Council Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to introduce PEM as a formal academic program in India. PEM has to be developed as a 3-year superspeciality course (in PEM) after completion of MD/Diplomate of National Board (DNB) Pediatrics or MD/DNB in EM. The National Board of Examinations (NBE) that accredits and administers postgraduate and postdoctoral programs in India also needs to develop an academic program - DNB in PEM. The goals of such a program would be to impart theoretical knowledge, training in the appropriate skills and procedures, development of communication and counseling techniques, and research. In this paper, the Joint Working Group of the Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (JWG-ACEE-India) gives its recommendations for starting 3-year DM/DNB in PEM, including the curriculum, infrastructure, staffing, and training in India. This is an attempt to provide an uniform framework and a set of guiding principles to start PEM as a structured superspeciality to enhance emergency care for Indian children.

  9. Academic writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  10. Research and development in haematology. A report on international congresses and visit to academic centres in Europe.

    PubMed

    Wood, L

    1990-01-01

    Haematology is one of the most rapidly expanding disciplines in medicine and nursing. As occurs in other highly specialised areas, optimum care is now largely of a multidisciplinary nature. In this context there are literally unlimited opportunities for the involvement of professional nurses and, as I have attempted to illustrate in this report, integration in all aspects of research and development and active participation in presentation of research data and discussion at international meetings is one direction in which fulfillment of academic aspirations can be achieved. It is my viewpoint, based on more than a decade of direct involvement in all the activities of our department in Cape Town that these are entirely attainable goals. There is currently, in our country, a concerted move afoot to develop an improved career structure for the professional nurse along the lines of the American clinical nurse specialist. Much of this experience overseas would strongly support that commitment. It was my privilege to enjoy the confidence of the department, university and medical school sufficient for me to present research data at international meetings and to be a welcome visitor at some of the world's premier academic and research institutions. That this was possible reflects the uncompromising commitment in Haematology to the position of the professional nurse as an integral and equal part of the multidisciplinary health care team.

  11. Ability of preoperative falls to predict postsurgical outcomes in non-selected patients undergoing elective surgery at an academic medical centre: protocol for a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ben Abdallah, Arbi; McKinnon, Sherry L; Wildes, Troy S; Avidan, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Falls are increasingly recognised for their ability to herald impending health decline. Despite the likely susceptibility of postsurgical patients to falls, a detailed description of postoperative falls in an unselected surgical population has never been performed. One study suggests that preoperative falls may forecast postoperative complications. However, a larger study with non-selected surgical patients and patient-centred outcomes is needed to provide the generalisability and justification necessary to implement preoperative falls assessment into routine clinical practice. The aims of this study are therefore twofold. First, we aim to describe the main features of postoperative falls in a population of unselected surgical patients. Second, we aim to test the hypothesis that a history of falls in the 6 months prior to surgery predicts postoperative falls, poor quality of life, functional dependence, complications and readmission. Methods and analysis To achieve these goals, we study adult patients who underwent elective surgery at our academic medical centre and were recruited to participate in a prospective, survey-based cohort study called Systematic Assessment and Targeted Improvement of Services Following Yearlong Surgical Outcomes Surveys (SATISFY-SOS) (NCT02032030). Patients who reported falling in the 6 months prior to surgery will be considered ‘exposed.’ The primary outcome of interest is postoperative falls within 30 days of surgery. Secondary outcomes include postoperative functional dependence, quality of life (both physical and mental), in-hospital complications and readmission. Regression models will permit controlling for important confounders. Ethics and dissemination The home institution's Institutional Review Board approved this study (IRB ID number 201505035). The authors will publish the findings, regardless of the results. PMID:27655260

  12. Development and Evaluation of the Barriers to Nurses' Participation in Research Questionnaire at a Large Academic Pediatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Joseph; Walden, Marlene

    2017-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to survey nurses at a large pediatric hospital to examine barriers to nursing research and to develop the Barriers to Nurses' Participation in Research Questionnaire (BNPRQ) in preparation for its use at other institutions. The BNPRQ was created and refined through iterative pilot testing. Exploratory factor analysis was applied, and composite scores were computed for the identified factors. The two latent factors "Research Resources" and "Personal Relevance of Research" were extracted. The independent item "lack of time to do research" represented the largest barrier to research. Factor and item scores differed according to subject characteristics. Findings from this study will be used to create targeted interventions to reduce barriers to research participation prevalent in specific groups of nurses. By using the BNPRQ developed in this study, researchers and administrators at other institutions can identify and address barriers to research among their nurses.

  13. Impact on health-related quality of life and costs of managing chronic neuropathic pain in academic pain centres: Results from a one-year prospective observational Canadian study

    PubMed Central

    Tarride, J-E; Moulin, DE; Lynch, M; Clark, AJ; Stitt, L; Gordon, A; Morley-Forster, PK; Nathan, H; Smyth, C; Toth, C; Ware, MA

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The management of chronic pain, including neuropathic pain (NeP), is a major public health issue. However, there is a paucity of data evaluating pain management strategies in real-life settings. OBJECTIVE: To inform policy makers about the economic value of managing chronic NeP in academic centres by conducting a subeconomic assessment of a Canadian multicentre cohort study aimed at determining the long-term outcomes of the management of chronic NeP in academic pain centres. Specific questions regarding the economic value of this type of program were answered by a subset of patients to provide further information to policy makers. METHODS: Baseline demographic information and several pain-related measurements were collected at baseline, three, six and 12 months in the main study. A resource use questionnaire aimed at determining NeP-related costs and the EuroQoL-5 Dimension were collected in the subset study from consenting patients. Statistical analyses were conducted to compare outcomes over time and according to responder status. RESULTS: A total of 298 patients were evaluated in the present economic evaluation. The mean (± SD) age of the participants was 53.7±14.0 years, and 56% were female. At intake, the mean duration of NeP was >5 years. Statistically significant improvements in all pain and health-related quality of life outcomes were observed between the baseline and one-year visits. Use decreased over time for many health care resources (eg, visits to the emergency room decreased by one-half), which resulted in overall cost savings. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that increased access to academic pain centres should be facilitated in Canada. PMID:26474381

  14. Pain Management Following Major Intracranial Surgery in Pediatric Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study in Three Academic Children’s Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Lynne G.; Buckley, George M.; Kudchadkar, Sapna R.; Ely, Elizabeth; Stebbins, Emily L.; Dube, Christine; Morad, Athir; Jastaniah, Ebaa A.; Sethna, Navil F.; Yaster, Myron

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pain management following major intracranial surgery is often limited by a presumed lack of need and a concern that opioids will adversely affect postoperative outcome and interfere with the neurologic examination. Nevertheless, evidence in adults is accumulating that these patients suffer moderate to severe pain and this pain is often under-treated. The purpose of this prospective, clinical observational cohort study was to assess the incidence of pain, prescribed analgesics, methods of analgesic delivery, and patient/parent satisfaction in pediatric patients undergoing cranial surgery at 3 major university children’s hospitals. Methods After obtaining IRB and parental consent (and when applicable, patient assent), children who underwent cranial surgery for cancer, epilepsy, vascular malformations, and craniofacial reconstruction were studied. Neither intraoperative anesthetic management nor postoperative pain management was standardized, but were based on institutional routine. Patients were evaluated daily by a study investigator and by chart review for pain scores using age appropriate, validated tools (FLACC, Faces Pain Scale-Revised, Wong Baker Faces Scale or Self-Report on a 0–10 scale), for patient/parent satisfaction using a subset of the NRC Picker satisfaction tool and in adolescents a modified QoR-40, and for the frequency, mode of administration, and type of analgesic provided. Finally, the incidence of opioid-induced side effects, specifically nausea, vomiting, pruritus, altered level of consciousness, and need for emergency diagnostic radiologic studies for altered neurologic examination were recorded. Data are provided as mean ± SD. Results Two hundred children (98:102 M:F), averaging 7.8 ± 5.8 years old (range 2 mos to 18.5 yr) and 32.2 ± 23.0 kg (range 4.5 to 111.6 kg) undergoing craniectomy (51), craniotomy (96), and craniofacial reconstruction (53) were studied. Despite considerable variation in mode and route of analgesic

  15. Clinical trials in neonates and children: Report of the pulmonary hypertension academic research consortium pediatric advisory committee

    PubMed Central

    Adatia, Ian; Haworth, Sheila G.; Wegner, Max; Barst, Robyn J.; Ivy, Dunbar; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Karkowsky, Abraham; Rosenzweig, Erika; Aguilar, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Drug trials in neonates and children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease pose unique but not insurmountable challenges. Childhood is defined by growth and development. Both may influence disease and outcomes of drug trials. The developing pulmonary vascular bed and airways may be subjected to maldevelopment, maladaptation, growth arrest, or dysregulation that influence the disease phenotype. Drug therapy is influenced by developmental changes in renal and hepatic blood flow, as well as in metabolic systems such as cytochrome P450. Drugs may affect children differently from adults, with different clearance, therapeutic levels and toxicities. Toxicity may not be manifested until the child reaches physical, endocrine and neurodevelopmental maturity. Adverse effects may be revealed in the next generation, should the development of ova or spermatozoa be affected. Consideration of safe, age-appropriate tablets and liquid formulations is an obvious but often neglected prerequisite to any pediatric drug trial. In designing a clinical trial, precise phenotyping and genotyping of disease is required to ensure appropriate and accurate inclusion and exclusion criteria. We need to explore physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and simulations together with statistical techniques to reduce sample size requirements. Clinical endpoints such as exercise capacity, using traditional classifications and testing cannot be applied routinely to children. Many lack the necessary neurodevelopmental skills and equipment may not be appropriate for use in children. Selection of endpoints appropriate to encompass the developmental spectrum from neonate to adolescent is particularly challenging. One possible solution is the development of composite outcome scores that include age and a developmentally specific functional classification, growth and development scores, exercise data, biomarkers and hemodynamics with repeated evaluation throughout the period of growth and

  16. The future of pediatric research.

    PubMed

    Boat, Thomas F

    2007-11-01

    The future of pediatric research will be enhanced by strengthening traditional biomedical approaches and embracing emerging opportunities. Biomedical discovery and translation of new knowledge, concepts, and devices into better diagnostic and therapeutic options will require more pediatric physician-scientists, rapid adoption of enabling technologies, increased funding for research and research training (including the creation of federally funded pediatric translational research centers), and a broader distribution of research activities across the academic pediatric community. Rapid improvement of child health outcomes also will be realized through robust health services research in pediatrics, including the application of rigorous quality improvement science that documents and disseminates successful interventions, leading to better access and effectiveness of care. Improving the value of pediatric care is a realistic goal. Achieving better outcomes through individually tailored (personalized) care for children should be tested experimentally. The future of pediatrics is bright, but will depend on the recognition of and response to a growing array of exciting opportunities.

  17. Comprehensive training for the future pediatric cardiologist

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    India faces a huge burden of pediatric and adult congenital heart diseases (CHDs). Many acquired valvar, myocardial, and vascular diseases also need treatment in childhood and adolescence. The emergence of pediatric cardiology as an independent specialty has been a relatively recent development. A few centers of excellence in pediatric cardiology have developed. However, the requirement of pediatric cardiac care and pediatric cardiologists is far in excess of what is available. There are no guidelines at present in India for uniform training in pediatric cardiology. Many training programs are nonstructured and do not focus on the regional needs. Both core training and advanced training programs are essential to provide adequate numbers of community-level pediatric cardiologists and academic leaders respectively. This article proposes a detailed plan and curriculum for comprehensive training of future pediatric cardiologists in India. PMID:27011684

  18. Pediatric integrative medicine: pediatrics' newest subspecialty?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Integrative medicine is defined as relationship-centered care that focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches, healthcare professionals and disciplines to achieve optimal health and healing, including evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine. Pediatric integrative medicine (PIM) develops and promotes this approach within the field of pediatrics. We conducted a survey to identify and describe PIM programs within academic children’s hospitals across North America. Key barriers and opportunities were identified for the growth and development of academic PIM initiatives in the US and Canada. Methods Academic PIM programs were identified by email and eligible for inclusion if they had each of educational, clinical, and research activities. Program directors were interviewed by telephone regarding their clinical, research, educational, and operational aspects. Results Sixteen programs were included. Most (75%) programs provided both inpatient and outpatient services. Seven programs operated with less than 1 FTE clinical personnel. Credentialing of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers varied substantially across the programs and between inpatient and outpatient services. Almost all (94%) programs offered educational opportunities for residents in pediatrics and/or family medicine. One fifth (20%) of the educational programs were mandatory for medical students. Research was conducted in a range of topics, but half of the programs reported lack of research funding and/or time. Thirty-one percent of the programs relied on fee-for-service income. Conclusions Pediatric integrative medicine is emerging as a new subspecialty to better help address 21st century patient concerns. PMID:22894682

  19. Pediatric sedation.

    PubMed

    Daud, Yasmeen N; Carlson, Douglas W

    2014-08-01

    Pediatric sedation is an evolving field performed by an extensive list of specialties. Well-defined sedation systems within pediatric facilities are paramount to providing consistent, safe sedation. Pediatric sedation providers should be trained in the principles and practice of sedation, which include patient selection, pre-sedation assessment to determine risks during sedation, selection of optimal sedation medication, monitoring requirements, and post-sedation care. Training, credentialing, and continuing sedation education must be incorporated into sedation systems to verify and monitor the practice of safe sedation. Pediatric hospitalists represent a group of providers with extensive pediatric knowledge and skills who can safely provide pediatric sedation.

  20. The Impact of Angelina Jolie (AJ)'s Story on Genetic Referral and Testing at an Academic Cancer Centre in Canada.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Jacques; Verma, Sunil; Hewitt, Paul; Eisen, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    In May 2013, Angelina Jolie revealed to the media that she had undergone preventive double mastectomy after testing positive for a BRCA1 gene mutation. Media coverage has been extensive, but it is not clear how such a personal story affected the public and cancer genetics clinics. We conducted a retrospective review using data from the clinical database of the Familial Cancer Program at our centre. The impact of Ms. Jolie's story on genetic counseling referrals and the appropriateness of such referrals were assessed and reported. The number of women referred for genetic counseling increased by 90 % after 6 months and remained high one year after AJ's story with an increase of 88 % from baseline. The number of women who qualified for genetic testing increased by 105 % after 6 months; this increase persisted but was somewhat lower after one year with an increase of 68 % from baseline. Furthermore the number of BRCA1/2 carriers identified increased by 110 % after 6 months and by 42 % after one year.The effect of Mrs. Jolie's story persisted one year after its release; however in the latter half of the year, the hereditary cancer risk of referred women was significantly lower than initially observed. The next challenge for our health care system will not only be to meet the increased demand for cancer genetic services in our region, but also to ensure that referrals and hence use of genetic counseling resources are appropriate.

  1. The Irish Centre for Talented Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilheany, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    Conducting potency tests on penicillin, discussing rocket technology with a NASA astronaut, analysing animal bone fragments from medieval times, these are just some of the activities which occupy the time of students at The Irish Centre for Talented Youth. The Centre identifies young students with exceptional academic ability and then provides…

  2. Pediatric MS

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Others on MSconnection.org Join a Local Support Group Ask an MS Navigator Edward M. Dowd Personal ... navigate the school system through the Pediatric MS Support Group . Treating pediatric MS Studies have shown that the ...

  3. Pediatric Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control and Prevention’s Safe Child website . What is pediatric critical care? Children who have severe or life-threatening injuries ... are staffed by physicians with specialized training in pediatric critical care medicine ("pediatric intensivists"). Because children can experience a ...

  4. Provider perceptions of the social work environment and the state of pediatric care in a downsized urban public academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Tataw, David Besong

    2011-05-01

    The author's purpose through this study was to document and analyze health provider perceptions of their social work environment and the state of pediatric care at Los Angeles County King/Drew Hospital and Medical Center in 2000, after the restructuring and downsizing of the hospital and its community clinics. The research results showed nurses and physicians reporting that both the quality of pediatric care and the provider social work environment were poor. Negative factors in the social work environment included: low employee morale, poorly staffed clinical teams, lack of professional autonomy, perceptions of low quality of care for pediatric patients, and interpersonal issues of poor communication and collaboration among providers. Providers also perceived a non-supportive work environment, sense of powerlessness, poor quality of work, lack of goal clarity from leadership, lack of fairness in leadership behavior, and an organizational leadership that is abandoning its core mission and values, thereby making it difficult for providers to carry out their professional functions. The author's findings in this study suggest a relationship between intra-role conflict, social employment environment and quality of care at King/Drew Medical Center in 2000. Lessons for practice are presented.

  5. Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Prusakowski, Melanie K; Chen, Audrey P

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric sepsis is distinct from adult sepsis in its definitions, clinical presentations, and management. Recognition of pediatric sepsis is complicated by the various pediatric-specific comorbidities that contribute to its mortality and the age- and development-specific vital sign and clinical parameters that obscure its recognition. This article outlines the clinical presentation and management of sepsis in neonates, infants, and children, and highlights some key populations who require specialized care.

  6. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thoracopaedia - An Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised ... pediatric resources: GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D' ...

  7. Patterns of domestic migrations and access to childhood cancer care centres in Italy: a report from the hospital based registry of the Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP).

    PubMed

    Dama, Elisa; Rondelli, Roberto; De Rosa, Marisa; Aricò, Maurizio; Carli, Modesto; Bellani, Franca Fossati; Magnani, Corrado; Merletti, Franco; Pastore, Guido; Pession, Andrea

    2008-10-01

    Tertiary care centres, grouped in the Italian Association of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology (AIEOP) are unevenly distributed across the country. In an attempt to describe their perceived efficacy, we matched the residence and the location of the treatment centre in 18,441 patients aged centres located in the central and southern regions were less appealing than those located in the North, although this trend decreased over the study period. Patients with solid tumours migrated more frequently than those with leukaemia or lymphoma. Information resulting from better knowledge of the non-random migrations for treatment of children with cancer will be useful to refine planning of the national paediatric haematology-oncology network with social and economic implications.

  8. The Current Status and Future of Academic Obstetrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, John Z., Ed.; Purcell, Elizabeth F., Ed.

    The state of research in academic obstetrics and its relationship to research in other academic disciplines was addressed in a 1979 conference. Participants included representatives of academic obstetrics, academic pediatrics, and public health. After an introductory discussion by Howard C. Taylor, Jr. on changes in obstetrics in the last 25…

  9. Academic Achievement and Minimal Brain Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, R. Philip; And Others

    1971-01-01

    The investigation provided no evidence that a diagnosis of minimal brain dysfunction based on a pediatric neurological evaluation and/or visual-motor impairment as measured by the Bender-Gestalt, is a useful predictor of academic achievement. (Author)

  10. The Symbolic Role of Academic Boards in University Academic Quality Assurance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowlands, Julie

    2013-01-01

    While much research on quality assurance in higher education has centred on issues related to the impact on teaching and learning and academic staff, there is a significant gap in the area of quality assurance and academic governance. Within Australia the roles of university academic boards (also known as academic senates or faculty senates) have…

  11. Pediatric Terminology

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is working with NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) to provide standardized terminology for coding pediatric clinical trials and other resea

  12. Pediatric Specialists

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Family Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  13. Pediatric Anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinich, Kathleen D.; Reed, Matthew P.

    Anthropometry is the measurement of human size, shape, and physical capabilities. Most pediatric anthropometry data are gathered to describe child growth patterns, but data on body size, mass distribution, range of motion, and posture are used to develop crash test dummies and computational models of child occupants. Pediatric anthropometry data are also used to determine child restraint dimensions, so they will accommodate the applicable population of child occupants.

  14. Pediatric Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Williams, Regan F; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Gosain, Ankush

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors accounting for approximately 10% of childhood solid tumors. Treatment is focused on multimodality therapy, which has improved the prognosis over the past two decades. Current regimens focus on decreasing treatment for low-risk patients to decrease the long-term side effects while maximizing therapy for patients with metastatic disease to improve survival. Pediatric sarcomas can be divided into soft tissue sarcomas and osseous tumors. Soft tissue sarcomas are further delineated into rhabdomyosarcomas, which affect young children and nonrhabdomyosarcomas, which are most common in adolescents. The most common bone sarcomas are osteosarcomas and Ewing's sarcoma.

  15. Investigating Teachers' Views of Student-Centred Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seng, Ernest Lim Kok

    2014-01-01

    Conventional learning is based on low levels of students' participation where students are rarely expected to ask questions or to challenge the theories of the academic. A paradigm shift in curriculum has resulted in implementing student-centred learning (SCL) approach, putting students as the centre of the learning process. This mode of…

  16. A Comprehensive Placement Test Tool for Language Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaime Pastor, Asuncion; Perez Guillot, Cristina; Candel-Mora, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the main problems relating to language courses offered at language centres is measuring the students' entry-level skills in a fast, efficient and reliable way. This problem is particularly acute in language centres with large numbers of students, especially at the beginning of the academic year, as a mechanism has to be implemented which…

  17. Myocarditis - pediatric

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. Pediatric myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle in an infant or young child. Causes Myocarditis is rare in ... the infection. This can lead to symptoms of heart failure. ... to detect. However, in newborns and infants, symptoms may sometimes appear suddenly. Symptoms may include: ...

  18. Pediatric ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.K. Jr.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two leading experts explore the benefits and limitations of pediatric ultrasonography, explaining the latest techniques for optimal imaging of specific body regions: the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, extremities, and soft tissues. Numerous illustrations emphasize significant points and combine with the text to show specifically what to look for when imaging children.

  19. Pediatric Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Skin changes are common in children. Common concerns are birthmarks (e.g., hemangiomas and port wine stains), atopic and contact dermatitis, acne, and alopecia areata. The authors review advances in common and not so common skin changes in pediatric patients. PMID:28360970

  20. Pediatric Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your child’s sinuses are not fully developed until late in the teen years. Although small, the maxillary (behind the cheek) and ethmoid (between the eyes) sinuses are present at birth. Unlike in adults, pediatric sinusitis is difficult to ...

  1. Academic Counselling in ODL: Information System for Capacity Building of Academic Counselors' in IGNOU

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kishore, S.

    2014-01-01

    Indira Gandhi national Open University (IGNOU) is an apex body for open and distance learning (ODL) system in India. The university has nation-wide operation and pioneer in distance education. IGNOU has an hqrs, 67 Regional Centres and about 3400 Study Centres throughout India. The study centres are the academic contact point for distance learners…

  2. Pediatric sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... During sleep, all of the muscles in the body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  4. Pediatric tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Paolo; Forte, Vito

    2016-06-01

    Tracheotomy refers to a surgical incision made into a trachea. Tracheostomy, on the other hand, refers to a surgical procedure whereby the tracheal lumen is positioned in close proximity to the skin surface. Tracheostomy is an uncommon procedure in the pediatric population. When required tracheostomy is typically performed as an open surgical procedure under general anesthesia with the patient intubated. However, it may need to be performed under local anesthesia or over a rigid bronchoscope in the patient with a precarious airway. Over the past half century, the primary indication for pediatric tracheostomy has shifted from acute infectious airway compromise to the need for prolonged ventilatory support in neurologically compromised children. The surgical technique, choice of tracheostomy tube, and post-operative care requires a nuanced approach in infants and young children. This article will review these topics in a comprehensive fashion.

  5. Pediatric parasomnias.

    PubMed

    Mason, Thornton B A; Pack, Allan I

    2007-02-01

    Parasomnias in childhood are common, and often more frequent than in adults. The large number of parasomnias underscore that sleep is not simply a quiescent state, but can involve complex episodes of movement, ranging from subtle to dramatic and complex. Clinicians should be aware that many pediatric parasomnias are benign, self-limited, and may not persist into late childhood or adolescence. Importantly, parasomnias in childhood often differ in type from adults. Nevertheless, parasomnias across ages can be classified as: 1) disorders of arousal (from non-rapid eye movement, or NREM, sleep); 2) parasomnias usually associated with REM sleep; and 3) other parasomnias. We detail here issues in the clinical diagosis, evaluation, and management of multiple pediatric parasomnias. The further study of parasomnias in children may help elucidate the multi-factorial etiologies of these fascinating conditions, shedding light on the potential genetic bases as well as environmental contributions.

  6. Pediatric stridor.

    PubMed

    Ida, Jonathan B; Thompson, Dana Mara

    2014-10-01

    Pediatric stridor is an important symptom of upper airway obstruction, and must be recognized early by evaluating physicians. Proper evaluation and management, both acutely and chronically, can provide improved outcomes and better quality of life for patients. This article discusses the physiology of stridor and its intimate relation to airway anatomy, the work-up of the stridorous child, and recent advances in treatment, and provides illustrative examples of common lesions.

  7. Pediatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2014-03-01

    This article discusses pediatric nutrition in puppies and kittens. Supplementation of basic nutrients such as fat, protein, minerals, vitamins, and essential fatty acids of the bitch is essential for the proper growth and development of puppies during the lactation period. Milk replacers are compared for use in puppies and kittens. Supplements such as colostrum and probiotics for promotion of a healthy immune system and prevention or treatment of stress-induced and weaning diarrhea are also discussed.

  8. Pediatric Virology

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, Bernard

    1965-01-01

    Pediatric virology is not an isolàted discipline. Rather, the syndromes associated with viral infection are modified by the unique characteristics of infancy and childhood. Fortunately for the pediatrician, and certainly for children, viral infections in childhood are rarely fatal, and are almost never serious. Future efforts of the pediatrician and virologist should be directed toward increased fetal salvage as with rubella and the prevention of severe, viral lower respiratory tract disease. PMID:14298871

  9. Pediatric sialendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Bruch, Jean M; Setlur, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Sialendoscopy was introduced in the early 1990s as a minimally invasive alternative to standard methods for diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory and obstructive salivary gland disease. The technique was pioneered in adults; however, advances in instrumentation have allowed this to be adapted to the smaller salivary ductal anatomy found in the pediatric population. In this chapter, the technique of sialendoscopy for parotid and submandibular glands is described.

  10. Re-envisioning pediatric nursing education.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    A majority of children are healthy and never hospitalized in acute care settings. With the challenges faced in the delivery of pediatric nursing education, is it reasonable to continue to insist that all nursing students have an acute care pediatric nursing experience? This article presents arguments for the need to re-envision pediatric nursing education to use limited pediatric nursing faculty and pediatric clinical sites in innovative ways to maintain high-quality outcomes for undergraduate nursing students. The article outlines issues, provides ideas, and advocates for increased use of available innovations. Virtual learning communities and a wealth of other new technologies provide new and inventive ways to deliver essential content. Pediatric nursing leaders need to demonstrate new pedagogies and discourage teaching specialty content in the same manner it has been taught for more than 40 years. The challenges are important to practicing nurses as well as academic faculty because of the implications for the future nursing workforce in pediatric settings and healthcare of children.

  11. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Clinical features and outcome.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Amy; Ness, Jayne; Pohl, Daniela; Simone, Isabella Laura; Anlar, Banu; Amato, Maria Pia; Ghezzi, Angelo

    2016-08-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) in children manifests with a relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) disease course. Acute relapses consist of new neurologic deficits persisting greater than 24 hours, in the absence of intercurrent illness, and occur with a higher frequency early in the disease as compared to adult-onset RRMS. Most pediatric patients with MS recover well from these early relapses, and cumulative physical disability is rare in the first 10 years of disease. Brainstem attacks, poor recovery from a single attack, and a higher frequency of attacks portend a greater likelihood of future disability. Although prospective pediatric-onset MS cohorts have been established in recent years, there remains very limited prospective data detailing the longer-term clinical outcome of pediatric-onset MS into adulthood. Whether the advent of MS therapies, and the largely off-label access to such therapies in pediatric MS, has improved prognosis is unknown. MS onset during the key formative academic years, concurrent with active cognitive maturation, is an important determinant of long-term outcome, and is discussed in detail in another article in this supplement. Finally, increasing recognition of pediatric MS worldwide, recent launch of phase III trials for new agents in the pediatric MS population, and the clear imperative to more fully appreciate health-related quality of life in pediatric MS through adulthood highlight the need for standardized, validated, and robust outcome measures.

  12. The APA and the rise of pediatric generalist network research.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Richard; Serwint, Janet R; Kuppermann, Nathan; Srivastava, Rajendu; Dreyer, Benard

    2011-01-01

    The Academic Pediatric Association (APA, formerly the Ambulatory Pediatric Association) first encouraged multi-institutional collaborative research among its members over 30 years ago. Individual APA members subsequently went on to figure prominently in establishing formal research networks. These enduring collaborations have been established to conduct investigations in a variety of generalist contexts. At present, 4 generalist networks--Pediatric Research in Office Settings (PROS), the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN), the COntinuity Research NETwork (CORNET), and Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS)--have a track record of extensive achievement in generating new knowledge aimed at improving the health and health care of children. This review details the history, accomplishments, and future directions of these networks and summarizes the common themes, strengths, challenges, and opportunities inherent in pediatric generalist network research.

  13. The APA and the Rise of Pediatric Generalist Network Research

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Richard; Serwint, Janet R.; Kuppermann, Nathan; Srivastava, Rajendu; Dreyer, Benard

    2010-01-01

    The Academic Pediatric Association (APA – formerly the Ambulatory Pediatric Association) first encouraged multi-institutional collaborative research among its members over thirty years ago. Individual APA members went on subsequently to figure prominently in establishing formal research networks. These enduring collaborations have been established to conduct investigations in a variety of generalist contexts. At present, four generalist networks – Pediatric Research in Office Settings (PROS), the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Network (PECARN), the COntinuity Research NETwork (CORNET), and Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) – have a track record of extensive achievement in generating new knowledge aimed at improving the health and health care of children. This review details the history, accomplishments, and future directions of these networks and summarizes the common themes, strengths, challenges and opportunities inherent in pediatric generalist network research. PMID:21282083

  14. The US pediatric nephrology workforce: a report commissioned by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Primack, William A; Meyers, Kevin E; Kirkwood, Suzanne J; Ruch-Ross, Holly S; Radabaugh, Carrie L; Greenbaum, Larry A

    2015-07-01

    The US pediatric nephrology workforce is poorly characterized. This report describes clinical and nonclinical activities, motivations and disincentives to a career in pediatric nephrology, future workforce needs, trainee recruitment, and possible explanations for personnel shortages. An e-mail survey was sent in 2013 to all identified US-trained or -practicing pediatric nephrologists. Of 504 respondents, 51% are men, 66% are US graduates, and 73% work in an academic setting. About 20% of trained pediatric nephrologists no longer practice pediatric nephrology. Among the 384 respondents practicing pediatric nephrology full or part-time in the United States, the mean work week was 56.1±14.3 hours, with time divided between patient care (59%), administration (13%), teaching (10%), clinical research (9%), basic research (6%), and other medical activities (3%). Most (>85%) care for dialysis and transplantation patients. The median number of weeks annually on call is 16, and 29% work with one or no partner. One-third of US pediatric nephrologists (n=126) plan to reduce or stop clinical nephrology practice in the next 5 years, and 53% plan to fully or partially retire. Almost half the division chiefs (47%) report inadequate physician staffing. Ongoing efforts to monitor and address pediatric nephrology workforce issues are needed.

  15. Bringing together the academic drug discovery community

    PubMed Central

    Slusher, Barbara S.; Conn, P. Jeffrey; Frye, Stephen; Glicksman, Marcie; Arkin, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The newly formed Academic Drug Discovery Consortium (ADDC) aims to support the growing numbers of university centres engaged in drug discovery that have emerged in response to recent changes in the drug discovery ecosystem. PMID:24172316

  16. Pediatric vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-04-01

    Vitiligo is a disease of pigment loss. Most investigators currently consider vitiligo to be a disorder that occurs as a result of autoimmune destruction of melanocytes, supported by identification of antimelanocyte antibodies in many patients, and the presence of comorbid autoimmune disease in patients with and family members of individuals with vitiligo. One-half of vitiligo cases are of childhood onset. This article presents a current overview of pediatric vitiligo including comorbidities of general health, psychological factors, therapeutic options, and long-term health considerations.

  17. Pediatric Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Rentea, Rebecca M; St Peter, Shawn D

    2017-02-01

    Appendicitis is one of the most common surgical pathologies in children. It can present with right lower quadrant pain. Scoring systems in combination with selective imaging and surgical examination will diagnose most children with appendicitis. Clinical pathways should be used. Most surgical interventions for appendicitis are now almost exclusively laparoscopic, with trials demonstrating better outcomes for children who undergo index hospitalization appendectomies when perforated. Nonoperative management has a role in the treatment of both uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. This article discusses the workup and management, modes of treatment, and continued areas of controversy in pediatric appendicitis.

  18. Pediatric urticaria.

    PubMed

    Tsakok, Teresa; Du Toit, George; Flohr, Carsten

    2014-02-01

    Although urticaria is not a life-threatening disease, its impact on quality of life in children should not be overlooked. A systematic search of online databases, including Medline, was performed to inform a review aiming to equip clinicians with an evidence-based approach to all aspects of pediatric urticaria. This review hinges on an illustrative case and includes a summary table of studies pertaining to disease management in children. The multiple issues faced by patients, their families, and treating clinicians are highlighted, and the current literature on the presentation, natural history, investigation, and management of this poorly understood condition is assessed.

  19. Pediatric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Pamela F

    2012-04-01

    Childhood vasculitis is a challenging and complex group of conditions that are multisystem in nature and often require integrated care from multiple subspecialties, including rheumatology, dermatology, cardiology, nephrology, neurology, and gastroenterology. Vasculitis is defined as the presence of inflammation in the blood vessel wall. The site of vessel involvement, size of the affected vessels, extent of vascular injury, and underlying pathology determine the disease phenotype and severity. This article explores the classification and general features of pediatric vasculitis, as well as the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and therapeutic options for the most common vasculitides.

  20. Effect of intracranial bleeds on the neurocognitive, academic, behavioural and adaptive functioning of boys with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Miles, B S; Anderson, P; Agostino, A; Golomb, M R; Achonu, C; Blanchette, V; Feldman, B M; McLimont, M; Revel-Vilk, S; Stain, A; Barnes, M A

    2012-03-01

    Brain insults are a risk factor for neuropsychological and academic deficits across several paediatric conditions. However, little is known about the specific effects of intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) in boys with haemophilia. The study compared neurocognitive, academic and socio-emotional/behavioural outcomes of boys with haemophilia with and without a history of ICH. Of 172 consecutive patients seen at a Pediatric Comprehensive Care Hemophila Centre, 18 had a history of ICH. Sixteen boys between the ages of 3 and 17 years were available for study and were matched to controls with haemophilia of the same age and disease severity and on the basis of maternal education. Groups were compared on neuropsychological and academic outcomes. Attention, socio-emotional function and executive skills were compared using data from parent questionnaires. Differences were found in intellectual function, visual-spatial skill, fine motor dexterity and particularly language-related skills, including vocabulary, word reading and applied math problem solving. Despite these group differences, outcomes were within the average range for most boys with ICH. No group differences were found in behavioural and socio-emotional functioning. Although ICH in haemophilia is not benign, it was not associated with significant cognitive and academic consequences for most boys. Early neuropsychological assessment may be indicated when there is a history of ICH. Investigation of age at ICH and quantitative measures of brain in relation to neurocognitive outcomes in larger groups of boys with ICH would be useful.

  1. Wanted: pediatric nephrologists! - why trainees are not choosing pediatric nephrology.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Maria; Iglesia, Edward; Ko, Zion; Amamoo, Ahinee; Mahan, John; Desai, Tejas; Gibson, Keisha; Jhaveri, Kenar; Primack, William

    2014-09-01

    A workforce crisis for many pediatric specialties, particularly nephrology, is due to growing retirement rates, attrition during training, and retention difficulties. To obtain specific information regarding pediatric nephrology trainee shortages, we administered two cross-sectional surveys to non-renal pediatric subspecialty fellows and pediatric nephrology program directors. We characterized the fellows' experiences with nephrology and the program directors' experiences with their fellows as well as their outcomes in the last 10 years. We analyzed responses from 531 non-renal fellows (14.4% response rate). Overall, 317 (60%) fellows rated nephrology as difficult, particularly women (65.4% vs. 49.5%, p < 0.001), with American women medical graduates rating nephrology as more difficult compared to all others (p = 0.001). More men than women (24% vs. 8%, p < 0.001) considered the monetary benefit as not adequate. Program directors (25; 64% response rate) represented 57% of all USA fellows in training, and 15 (60%) found it difficult to recruit qualified applicants. Of the 183 graduates in the past 10 years, 35 (19%) were reported as not in the USA pediatric nephrology workforce. These findings support our belief that a strong effort needs to be made by the academic community to teach nephrology in more interesting and understandable formats. While these are national samples, we were unable to contact non-nephrology fellows directly and program directors from larger programs were underrepresented. Difficulties in attracting/retaining trainees (particularly women) to nephrology must be addressed systematically, identifying incentives to practice in this field. Bold concerted efforts are required and we propose seven steps to achieve this goal.

  2. Engaging Pediatricians in Developmental Screening: The Effectiveness of Academic Detailing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honigfeld, Lisa; Chandhok, Laura; Spiegelman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Use of formal developmental screening tools in the pediatric medical home improves early identification of children with developmental delays and disorders, including Autism Spectrum Disorders. A pilot study evaluated the impact of an academic detailing module in which trainers visited 43 pediatric primary care practices to provide education about…

  3. Pediatric Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Badr, Dana T; Gaffin, Jonathan M; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2016-09-01

    Rhinosinusitis, is defined as an inflammation of the paranasal and nasal sinus mucosae. Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)is a common problem in the pediatric age group and the diagnosis and treatment are challenging due to the chronicity and similarity of symptoms with allergic rhinitis and adenoid hypertrophy. Although it is less common than acute rhinosinusitis, CRS is becoming more frequent and significantly affects the quality of life in children and can substantially impair daily function. CRS is characterized by sinus symptoms lasting more than 3 months despite medical therapy. Many factors are involved in the pathogenesis of this disease and include a primary insult with a virus followed bybacterial infection and mucosal inflammation, along with predisposition to allergies. The standard treatment of pediatricacute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) is nasal irrigation and antibiotic use. Medical treatment of pediatric CRS includes avoidance of allergens in allergic patients (environmental or food) and therapy with nasal irrigation, nasal corticosteroids sprays, nasal decongestants, and antibiotics directed at the most common sinonasalorganisms (Haemophilusinfluenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis). Surgical therapy is rarely needed after appropriate medical therapy. Referral to an otolaryngologist and allergy specialist is recommended in case of failure of medical treatment.

  4. International Pediatric MS Study Group Clinical Trials Summit

    PubMed Central

    Tardieu, Marc; Amato, Maria Pia; Banwell, Brenda; Bar-Or, Amit; Ghezzi, Angelo; Kornberg, Andrew; Krupp, Lauren B.; Pohl, Daniela; Rostasy, Kevin; Tenembaum, Silvia; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Wassmer, Evangeline

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pediatric studies for new biological agents are mandated by recent legislation, necessitating careful thought to evaluation of emerging multiple sclerosis (MS) therapies in children with MS. Challenges include a small patient population, the lack of prior randomized clinical trials, and ethical concerns. The goal of this meeting was to assess areas of consensus regarding clinical trial design and outcome measures among academic experts involved in pediatric MS care and research. Methods: The Steering Committee of the International Pediatric MS Study Group identified key focus areas for discussion. A total of 69 meeting attendees were assembled, including 35 academic experts. Regulatory and pharmaceutical representatives also attended, and provided input, which informed academic expert consensus decisions. Results: The academic experts agreed that clinical trials were necessary in pediatric MS to obtain pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy data, and regulatory approval allowing for greater medication access. The academic experts agreed that relapse was an appropriate primary outcome measure for phase III pediatric trials. An international standardized cognitive battery was identified. The pros and cons of various trial designs were discussed. Guidelines surrounding MRI studies, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and registries were developed. The academic experts agreed that given the limited subject pool, a stepwise approach to the launch of clinical trials for the most promising medications is necessary in order to ensure study completion. Alternative approaches could result in unethical exposure of patients to trial conditions without gaining knowledge. Conclusion: Consensus points for conduct of clinical trials in the rare disease pediatric MS were identified amongst a panel of academic experts, informed by regulatory and industry stakeholders. PMID:23509048

  5. Academic Blogging: Academic Practice and Academic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkup, Gill

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale study which investigates the role of blogging in professional academic practice in higher education. It draws on interviews with a sample of academics (scholars, researchers and teachers) who have blogs and on the author's own reflections on blogging to investigate the function of blogging in academic practice…

  6. Persistent pharmacokinetic challenges to pediatric drug development

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Daniel P.; Kulczar, Christopher; Roth, Wyatt; Liu, Wanqing; Knipp, Gregory T.

    2014-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic agents for the mitigation of pediatric disorders is largely hindered by the inability for investigators to assess pediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) in healthy patients due to substantial safety concerns. Pediatric patients are a clinical moving target for drug delivery due to changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) and the potential for PK related toxicological (T) events to occur throughout development. These changes in ADMET can have profound effects on drug delivery, and may lead to toxic or sub-therapeutic outcomes. Ethical, economical, logistical, and technical barriers have resulted in insufficient investigation of these changes by industrial, regulatory, and academic bodies, leading to the classification of pediatric patients as therapeutic orphans. In response to these concerns, regulatory agencies have incentivized investigation into these ontogenic changes and their effects on drug delivery in pediatric populations. The intent of this review is to briefly present a synopsis of the development changes that occur in pediatric patients, discuss the effects of these changes on ADME and drug delivery strategies, highlight the hurdles that are still being faced, and present some opportunities to overcome these challenges. PMID:25221567

  7. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  8. Pediatric tracheomalacia.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Jose Carlos; Jennings, Russell W; Kim, Peter C W

    2016-06-01

    Tracheomalacia (TM) is defined as an increased collapsibility of the trachea due to structural anomalies of the tracheal cartilage and/or posterior membrane. Tracheomalacia has a wide range of etiologies but is most commonly present in children born with esophageal atresia and tracheal esophageal fistula. Clinical symptoms can range from minor expiratory stridor with typical barking cough to severe respiratory distress episodes to acute life-threatening events (ALTE). Although the majority of children have mild-to-moderate symptoms and will not need surgical intervention, some will need life-changing surgical treatment. This article examines the published pediatric literature on TM, discusses the details of clinical presentation, evaluation, diagnosis, and a variety of treatments.

  9. Hegemony, Big Money and Academic Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This article considers whether a threat is posed to academic independence in corporate universities by the United States Studies Centre (USSC) at the University of Sydney. The USSC rapidly worked its way into Australia's oldest university, building a unique governance structure in which a private business lobby vets senior academics and controls…

  10. NHLBI training workshop report: The vanishing pediatric pulmonary investigator and recommendations for recovery.

    PubMed

    Ferkol, Thomas; Zeitlin, Pamela; Abman, Steven; Blaisdell, Carol J; O'Brodovich, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    The adequacy of the pipeline of advanced pulmonary fellows to supply appropriately trained and committed researchers to enter academic careers was the major topic of a recently held National Heart Lung and Blood Institute NHLBI Workshop: Respiratory Medicine-Related Research Training for Adult and Pediatric Fellows. The special challenges and opportunities for the academic pediatric pulmonary trainee were discussed as part of this workshop and are discussed as a companion paper to the report by the full workshop. Surveys were conducted of pediatric chairs of academic departments and pediatric pulmonary training directors in the United States to examine the current status and opportunities for the pediatric pulmonary trainee. Strategies for recruitment and retention of talented young trainees and junior faculty are proposed.

  11. Mitigating risk in academic preclinical drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Inglese, James; Walters, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    The number of academic drug discovery centres has grown considerably in recent years, providing new opportunities to couple the curiosity-driven research culture in academia with rigorous preclinical drug discovery practices used in industry. To fully realize the potential of these opportunities, it is important that academic researchers understand the risks inherent in preclinical drug discovery, and that translational research programmes are effectively organized and supported at an institutional level. In this article, we discuss strategies to mitigate risks in several key aspects of preclinical drug discovery at academic drug discovery centres, including organization, target selection, assay design, medicinal chemistry and preclinical pharmacology.

  12. Social Media Use in Pediatric Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Alexander L; Teng, Joyce M C

    2016-01-01

    Social media is predicted to become increasingly important in dermatology because of its potential to serve as a platform for public health campaigns, aid in participant recruitment for clinical trials, increase public engagement in health care, and facilitate scientific discourse. No study of social media use in pediatric dermatology has been performed, so we analyzed the use of the seven leading social media platforms in pediatric dermatology, with a focus on patient advocacy groups, professional societies, research journals, and research institutions. We observed that 89% of patient advocacy groups, 100% of professional societies, 62.5% of research journals, and 0% of academic pediatric dermatology departments maintained one or more social media accounts. Our observations suggest that all stakeholder groups, and in particular members of the research community, have the potential to further their engagement, connections, and communications through social media.

  13. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation Board Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  14. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Celiac Disease Many kids have sensitivities to certain foods, ... protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, consuming ...

  15. Find a Pediatric Dentist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Litch's Law Log HIPAA Forms Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Webinar Materials Member Resources 2017 General Assembly ... Archives Access Pediatric Dentistry Today Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Pediatric Dentistry Journal Open Access Articles Policies & ...

  16. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  17. Pediatric diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gyll, C.; Blake, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book treats the practical problems of pediatric radiography and radiological procedures. Written jointly by a radiographer and a radiologist, it covers pediatric positioning and procedures. An extended chapter covers neonatal radiography and radiology.

  18. Nuances in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Kenefake, Mary Ella; Swarm, Matthew; Walthall, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    Pediatric trauma evaluation mimics adult stabilization in that it is best accomplished with a focused and systematic approach. Attention to developmental differences, anatomic and physiologic nuances, and patterns of injury equip emergency physicians to stabilize and manage pediatric injury.

  19. Nuclear imaging in pediatrics

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author's intent is to familiarize practicing radiologists with the technical aspects and interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures in children and to illustrate the indications for nuclear medicine procedures in pediatric problems. Pediatric doses, dosimetry, sedation, and injection techniques, organ systems, oncology and infection, testicular scanning and nuclear crystography, pediatric endocrine and skeletal systems, ventilation and perfusion imaging of both congenital and acquired pediatric disorders, cardiovascular problems, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, reticuloendothelial studies, and central nervous system are all topics which are included and discussed.

  20. Pediatric electrocardiographic imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jennifer N A

    2015-03-01

    Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) has been used in pediatric and congenital heart patients to better understand their electrophysiologic substrates. In this article we focus on the 4 subjects related to pediatric ECGI: (1) ECGI in patients with congenital heart disease and Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, (2) ECGI in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and preexcitation, (3) ECGI in pediatric patients with Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, and (4) ECGI for pediatric cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  1. Gender and generational influences on the pediatric workforce and practice.

    PubMed

    Spector, Nancy D; Cull, William; Daniels, Stephen R; Gilhooly, Joseph; Hall, Judith; Horn, Ivor; Marshall, Susan G; Schumacher, Daniel J; Sectish, Theodore C; Stanton, Bonita F

    2014-06-01

    In response to demographic and other trends that may affect the future of the field of pediatrics, the Federation of Pediatric Organizations formed 4 working groups to participate in a year's worth of research and discussion preliminary to a Visioning Summit focusing on pediatric practice, research, and training over the next 2 decades. This article, prepared by members of the Gender and Generations Working Group, summarizes findings relevant to the 2 broad categories of demographic trends represented in the name of the group and explores the interface of these trends with advances in technology and social media and the impact this is likely to have on the field of pediatrics. Available data suggest that the trends in the proportions of men and women entering pediatrics are similar to those over the past few decades and that changes in the overall ratio of men and women will not substantially affect pediatric practice. However, although women may be as likely to succeed in academic medicine and research, fewer women than men enter research, thereby potentially decreasing the number of pediatric researchers as the proportion of women increases. Complex generational differences affect both the workforce and interactions in the workplace. Differences between the 4 generational groups comprising the pediatric workforce are likely to result in an evolution of the role of the pediatrician, particularly as it relates to aspects of work-life balance and the use of technology and social media.

  2. Chalcogenide centred gold complexes.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, M Concepción; Laguna, Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Chalcogenide-centred gold complexes are an important class of compounds in which a central chalcogen is surrounded by several gold atoms or gold and other metals. They have special characteristics such as unusual geometries, electron deficiency and properties such as luminescence or non-linear optical properties. The best known species are the trinuclear [E(AuPR3)3]+, 'oxonium' type species, that have high synthetic applicability, not only in other chalcogen-centred species, but in many other organometallic derivatives. The aurophilic interactions play an important role in the stability, preference for a particular geometry and luminescence properties in this type of derivatives (critical review, 117 references).

  3. Lidar Calibration Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Freudenthaler, Volker; Nicolae, Doina; Mona, Lucia; Belegante, Livio; D'Amico, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the newly established Lidar Calibration Centre, a distributed infrastructure in Europe, whose goal is to offer services for complete characterization and calibration of lidars and ceilometers. Mobile reference lidars, laboratories for testing and characterization of optics and electronics, facilities for inspection and debugging of instruments, as well as for training in good practices are open to users from the scientific community, operational services and private sector. The Lidar Calibration Centre offers support for trans-national access through the EC HORIZON2020 project ACTRIS-2.

  4. How Academic Is Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    University provision for academic development is well established in the USA, UK and many other countries. However, arrangements for its provision and staffing vary. In Australia, there has been a trend towards professional rather than academic staff appointments. Is this appropriate? In this paper, the domains of academic development work are…

  5. Winnipeg Centre Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    The Winnipeg Centre Project is a field-based, work-study program that attempts to create more appropriate education for the inner-city child. Sponsored by the Planning and Research Branch of the Department of Colleges and Universities Affairs and administered by Brandon University in consultation with the Winnipeg School Division, the project is…

  6. Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Molly; Gunton, Ric

    2000-01-01

    Maple Leaf Outdoor Centre (Ontario) has added year-round outdoor education facilities and programs to help support its summer camp for disadvantaged children. Schools, youth centers, religious groups, and athletic teams conduct their own programs, collaborate with staff, or use staff-developed programs emphasizing adventure education and personal…

  7. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  8. Wycheproof Education Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetnam and Godfrey, Melbourne (Australia).

    The Wycheproof township in New South Wales (Australia) is the regional center for a grain farming community. The Wycheproof Education Centre was formed by the merger of a separate primary and secondary school (on one site with existing buildings), into a single governing body that is educationally structured into junior, middle, and senior…

  9. Discovering a Discovery Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCullagh, John; Stewart, James; Greenwood, Julian

    2007-01-01

    There has recently been a growth in the popularity of "science centres" and this development provides an excellent opportunity to support the primary science curriculum. Their use is therefore well worth including within initial teacher education courses. Hence, undergraduate student teachers at Stranmillis University College Belfast may…

  10. The Iranian Documentation Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, John F.

    The purpose of the Iranian Documentation Centr (Irandoc) was to collect that portion of the world's literature which was pertinent to Iran's research interests, to organize that material, and to promote its use by Iranian researchers. Stated more succinctly, Irandoc's purpose was to obtain ready access to the world's scientific literature in order…

  11. Cost factors in Canadian pediatric trauma

    PubMed Central

    Dueck, Andrew; Poenaru, Dan; Pichora, David R.

    2001-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the costs of Canadian pediatric trauma and identify cost predictors. Design A chart review. Setting A regional trauma centre. Study material The charts of all 221 children who suffered traumatic injuries with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 4 or more seen over 6 years at a regional trauma centre. Main outcome measures Patient data, injury data, all hospital-based costs, excluding nursing, food and medication costs. Results Mean (and standard deviation) patient age was 12.8 (5) years. Sixty percent were boys. Motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) accounted for 71% of the injuries, followed by falls (11%). The mean (and SD) total cost of care was Can$7582 (Can$12 370), and the cost of media was Can$2666. Total cost correlated directly with age (r = 0.29, p < 0.001) and Injury Severity Score (ISS) (r = 0.34, p < 0.001) and inversely with the Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS) (r = −0.20, p = 0.003). The presence of extremity injuries correlated significantly with total cost (r = 0.22, p = 0.001) and PTS (r = −0.25, p < 0.001) but not with the ISS. Logistic regression analysis identified runk injury, ISS and PTS as the main determinants of survival. Conclusions The cost of pediatric trauma in Canada can be predicted from admission data and trauma scores. The cost of extremity injuries is significant and can be predicted by the PTS but not the ISS. PMID:11308233

  12. Challenges and Potentials for Writing Centres in South African Tertiary Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, A.

    2010-01-01

    There are many challenges involved in developing and running Writing Centres in tertiary contexts in South Africa. These challenges include recognizing the role Writing Centres need to play in the redress of basic academic literacies. They also involve emphasizing writing as a mode of learning where higher cognitive functions such as analysis and…

  13. Business Models of High Performance Computing Centres in Higher Education in Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eurich, Markus; Calleja, Paul; Boutellier, Roman

    2013-01-01

    High performance computing (HPC) service centres are a vital part of the academic infrastructure of higher education organisations. However, despite their importance for research and the necessary high capital expenditures, business research on HPC service centres is mostly missing. From a business perspective, it is important to find an answer to…

  14. What a Difference a Writing Centre Makes: A Small Scale Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeats, Rowena; Reddy, Peter; Wheeler, Anne; Senior, Carl; Murray, John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Academic writing is often considered to be a weakness in contemporary students, while good reporting and writing skills are highly valued by graduate employers. A number of universities have introduced writing centres aimed at addressing this problem; however, the evaluation of such centres is usually qualitative. The paper seeks to…

  15. A comparison of Canadian general pediatric dosing publications.

    PubMed

    Dayneka, Natalie

    2003-01-01

    A comparison of the general pediatric dosing guidelines published in Canada was conducted. Institutions that publish pediatric dosing guidelines as a separate publication or as part of the hospital formulary were mailed a survey of questions to describe their publication. Publications that met the inclusion criteria were evaluated using 12 assessment criteria: approval or submissions by medical specialty groups, drug inclusion, dosing guidelines, dosing in organ failure, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters, therapeutic guidelines, intravenous and oral administration guidelines, adverse drug reactions/drug interactions, referencing, drug acquisition costs, organization and readability. Four Canadian pediatric centres satisfied the criteria for publishing general pediatric dosing guidelines. These were reviewed by the process of formulary selection (in alphabetical order by city): Formulary of Drugs and Dosing Manual (Halifax), Formulary of Drugs (Toronto), Drug Dosage Guidelines and Formulary (Vancouver), and Pediatric Drug Dosage Handbook (Winnipeg). Dosing guidelines from published pediatric drug trials have been collated with institutional experience and historical practice to produce a practical source of pediatric dosing information.

  16. The African Pediatric Fellowship Training Program in Pediatric Pulmonology: A Model for Growing African Capacity in Child Lung Health.

    PubMed

    Zar, Heather J; Vanker, Aneesa; Gray, Diane; Zampoli, Marco

    2017-01-26

    Childhood respiratory diseases are the major cause of mortality and morbidity in African children. However, there is limited expertise in pediatric pulmonology in Africa. The African Pediatric Fellowship Program (APFP) was developed in the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health at the University of Cape Town in partnership with African academic institutions beyond South Africa to promote training of African child health professionals and build capacity. From 2008 to 2016, 11 fellows have completed APFP training in pediatric pulmonology. Fellows have come from Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana and Uganda. All but one returned to his or her home institution, where they are building academic departments, improving clinical service delivery, growing research, and advancing advocacy and policies to improve child lung health. In parallel, training of South African pediatric pulmonologists has been strengthened with a further 9 South African fellows trained during this period. The African Pediatric Pulmonology program provides a highly successful model, with high retention of graduates in their home countries. The long-term goal is to grow African clinical capacity and strengthen services, research, training and advocacy for child lung health in Africa.

  17. Extracorporeal life support in pediatric cardiac dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Low cardiac output (LCO) after corrective surgery remains a serious complication in pediatric congenital heart diseases (CHD). In the case of refractory LCO, extra corporeal life support (ECLS) extra corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) or ventricle assist devices (VAD) is the final therapeutic option. In the present study we have reviewed the outcomes of pediatric patients after corrective surgery necessitating ECLS and compared outcomes with pediatric patients necessitating ECLS because of dilatated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Methods A retrospective single-centre cohort study was evaluated in pediatric patients, between 1991 and 2008, that required ECLS. A total of 48 patients received ECLS, of which 23 were male and 25 female. The indications for ECLS included CHD in 32 patients and DCM in 16 patients. Results The mean age was 1.2 ± 3.9 years for CHD patients and 10.4 ± 5.8 years for DCM patients. Twenty-six patients received ECMO and 22 patients received VAD. A total of 15 patients out of 48 survived, 8 were discharged after myocardial recovery and 7 were discharged after successful heart transplantation. The overall mortality in patients with extracorporeal life support was 68%. Conclusion Although the use of ECLS shows a significantly high mortality rate it remains the ultimate chance for children. For better results, ECLS should be initiated in the operating room or shortly thereafter. Bridge to heart transplantation should be considered if there is no improvement in cardiac function to avoid irreversible multiorgan failure (MFO). PMID:21083896

  18. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  19. Elderly Care Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagiman, Aliani; Haja Bava Mohidin, Hazrina; Ismail, Alice Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The demand for elderly centre has increased tremendously abreast with the world demographic change as the number of senior citizens rose in the 21st century. This has become one of the most crucial problems of today's era. As the world progress into modernity, more and more people are occupied with daily work causing the senior citizens to lose the care that they actually need. This paper seeks to elucidate the best possible design of an elderly care centre with new approach in order to provide the best service for them by analysing their needs and suitable activities that could elevate their quality of life. All these findings will then be incorporated into design solutions so as to enhance the living environment for the elderly especially in Malaysian context.

  20. Laser gingivectomy for pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Michelle M; Poiman, David J; Jacobson, Barry L

    2010-01-01

    Traditional gingivectomy procedures have been a challenge for pediatric dentists who confront issues of patient cooperation and discomfort. Treatment of pediatric patients must involve minimal operative and postoperative discomfort. Laser soft-tissue surgery has been shown to be well accepted by children. For the pediatric patient, the greatest advantage of the laser is the lack of local anesthesia injection and the associated pre- and postoperative discomfort. The following case report describes a gingivectomy procedure performed on a 14-year-old female.

  1. Use of Simulation to Enhance Learning in a Pediatric Elective

    PubMed Central

    Benner, Kim W.; Worthington, Mary A.; Zinkan, Lynn; White, Marjorie Lee

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact on learning of adding a pediatric human patient simulation to a pharmacy course. Design Pharmacy students enrolled in a pediatric elective participated in 1 inpatient and 1 outpatient scenario using a pediatric patient simulator. Immediately following each case, reflective debriefing occurred. Assessment Forty-two students participated in the simulation activity over 2 academic years. A pretest and posttest study design was used, with average scores 4.1 ± 1.2 out of 9 on pretest and average 7.0 ± 1.5 out of 9 on posttest (p < 0.0001). Ninety-five percent (40/42) of students' scores improved. Students felt the learning experiences were positive and realistic. Conclusions Pharmacy students' knowledge and application skills improved through use of pediatric simulation exercises. PMID:20414434

  2. Pediatric priority in kidney allocation: challenging its acceptability.

    PubMed

    Capitaine, Laura; Van Assche, Kristof; Pennings, Guido; Sterckx, Sigrid

    2014-06-01

    Any organ which is allocated to one individual represents a missed opportunity for someone else. Given the important repercussions which organ allocation policies inevitably have for certain people, any prioritization policy should rest on a solid argumentative basis. In this study, we analyze the widespread practice of prioritizing pediatric patients in the allocation of kidneys. While official policy documents offer no arguments in support of pediatric priority, such arguments can be found in the academic literature on pediatric renal transplantation. Our study is the first to bring together and critically analyze these. We identify five commonly cited arguments and show that none of these succeeds in justifying pediatric priority policies. We argue that the legitimacy of such policies may be further undermined by their potential adverse effects on both adults and children.

  3. Sedation for Pediatric Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is more difficult to achieve cooperation when conducting endoscopy in pediatric patients than adults. As a result, the sedation for a comfortable procedure is more important in pediatric patients. The sedation, however, often involves risks and side effects, and their prediction and prevention should be sought in advance. Physicians should familiarize themselves to the relevant guidelines in order to make appropriate decisions and actions regarding the preparation of the sedation, patient monitoring during endoscopy, patient recovery, and hospital discharge. Furthermore, they have to understand the characteristics of the pediatric patients and different types of endoscopy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the details of sedation in pediatric endoscopy. PMID:24749082

  4. Alternative careers in pediatric dentistry: a survey of pediatric dental residents.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Courtney H; Edelstein, Burton L

    2010-10-01

    Pediatric dentistry has enjoyed growing popularity in recent years, yet there remains a need for leadership in academe, research, and public health. In November 2008, the first Maternal and Child Health Bureau-sponsored regional Leadership in Pediatric Dentistry convocation was held at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine. Seventy-two pediatric dentistry trainees from thirteen programs in the New York City area participated in interactive presentations and exercises. Of the sixty- seven participants who completed a pre-event survey, 93 percent stated they would likely or very likely pursue careers that involved, at least in part, private practice, 55 percent in care of children in Medicaid, 51 percent academics, 36 percent dental public health, and 12 percent research. Barriers related to finances, competence, or work environment/location were perceived by 83 percent for careers involving research, 73 percent for dental public health, 66 percent for providing care to children in Medicaid, 46 percent for academics, and 9 percent for private practice. Results of a pair of pre-event and post-event surveys completed by sixty-three attendees showed no change in reported likelihood to pursue a career alternative except for an increase in the likelihood of working in a practice that accepts Medicaid. The challenge before dental educators is to provide consistent and meaningful opportunities throughout training that encourage residents to consider all career options and to discover how their individual interests mesh with their clinical learning.

  5. CHOA concussion consensus: establishing a uniform policy for academic accommodations.

    PubMed

    Popoli, David Michael; Burns, Thomas G; Meehan, William P; Reisner, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Concussion research generally centers on physical challenges, though aspects such as social functioning and returning to school also warrant attention in pediatric populations. Restoring academic performance postconcussion remains a challenge. Here we provide recommendations addressing a uniform policy for pediatric concussion patients in academic institutions. Tools that may minimize difficulty with academic re-entry include independent educational evaluations, individualized educational programs (IEPs), student support teams (SSTs), letters of academic accommodation, time off, and 504 Plans. Recognition and treatment is crucial for symptom relief and prevention of functional disruption, as is specialist referral during the acute window. We recommend early intervention with a letter of academic accommodation and SST and suggest that 504 Plans and IEPs be reserved for protracted or medically complicated cases. Students with concussion should be observed for anxiety and depression because these symptoms can lead to prolonged recovery, decreased quality of life, and other social challenges.

  6. Academic Bullies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    Many professors have been traumatized by academic bullies. Unlike bullies at school, the academic bully plays a more subtle game. Bullies may spread rumors to undermine a colleague's credibility or shut their target out of social conversations. The more aggressive of the species cuss out co-workers, even threatening to get physical. There is…

  7. An International Journal's Attempts to Address Inequalities in Academic Publishing: Developing a Writing for Publication Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillis, Theresa; Magyar, Anna; Robinson-Pant, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Scholars around the world are under increasing pressure to publish in English, in Anglophone centre journals. At the same time, research on professional academic writing indicates that scholars from outside Anglophone centre contexts face considerable obstacles in getting their academic work published in such journals, relating to material and…

  8. Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De George, Richard T.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that Martin Michaelson's proposal in "Should Untenured as Well as Tenured Faculty Be Guaranteed Academic Freedom? A Few Observations," despite its good intentions, is seriously flawed and if adopted in preference to existing standards will weaken rather than strengthen academic freedom. (EV)

  9. Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, J P

    1983-04-01

    Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation refers to those measures used to restore ventilation and circulation in children. This article defines how cardiopulmonary resuscitation in infants, children, and adolescents differs from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults and delineates the drugs and dosages to be used in the resuscitation of pediatric patients.

  10. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... get enough calories to heal and grow. After heart surgery, most babies and infants (younger than 12 to 15 months) can take ... valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... open heart surgery References Bernstein D. General principles ...

  11. [Research in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Márquez, Julia Rocío; González-Cabello, Héctor Jaime

    2015-01-01

    In the interest of encouraging the promotion of research done by physicians of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, in this supplement we publish articles written by residents of different specialties related to critical themes on pediatrics. These residents are guided by affiliated physicians from the Hospital de Pediatría del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI.

  12. Pediatric intensive care.

    PubMed

    Macintire, D K

    1999-07-01

    To provide optimal care, a veterinarian in a pediatric intensive care situation for a puppy or kitten should be familiar with normal and abnormal vital signs, nursing care and monitoring considerations, and probable diseases. This article is a brief discussion of the pediatric intensive care commonly required to treat puppies or kittens in emergency situations and for canine parvovirus type 2 enteritis.

  13. Teaching Prevention in Pediatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Tina L.; Greenberg, Larrie; Loeser, Helen; Keller, David

    2000-01-01

    Reviews methods of teaching preventive medicine in pediatrics and highlights innovative programs. Methods of teaching prevention in pediatrics include patient interactions, self-directed learning, case-based learning, small-group learning, standardized patients, computer-assisted instruction, the Internet, student-centered learning, and lectures.…

  14. Pediatric Care Online: A Pediatric Point-of-Care Tool.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric Care Online is the American Academy of Pediatrics' point-of-care tool designed for health care providers. Pediatric Care Online builds on content from Red Book Online and Pediatric Patient Education and features Quick Reference topic pages for more than 250 pediatric health care topics. The multitude of resources available within Pediatric Care Online will be reviewed in this column, and a sample search will be used to illustrate the type of information available within this point-of-care pediatric resource.

  15. When a community hospital becomes an academic health centre.

    PubMed

    Topps, Maureen; Strasser, Roger

    2010-01-01

    With the burgeoning role of distributed medical education and the increasing use of community hospitals for training purposes, challenges arise for undergraduate and postgraduate programs expanding beyond traditional tertiary care models. It is of vital importance to encourage community hospitals and clinical faculty to embrace their roles in medical education for the 21st century. With no university hospitals in northern Ontario, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine and its educational partner hospitals identified questions of concern and collaborated to implement changes. Several themes emerged that are of relevance to any medical educational program expanding beyond its present location. Critical areas for attention include the institutional culture; human, physical and financial resources; and support for educational activities. It is important to establish and maintain the groundwork necessary for the development of thriving integrated community-engaged medical education. Done in tandem with advocacy for change in funding models, this will allow movement beyond the current educational environment. The ultimate goal is successful integration of university and accreditation ideals with practical hands-on medical care and education in new environments.

  16. Academic Village.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Renner Middle School (Plano, Texas) where the sprawling suburbs have been kept at bay while creating the atmosphere of an academic village. Photos and a floor plan are provided. (GR)

  17. Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Building data is given for the following academic libraries: (1) Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois; (2) Abilene Christian College, Abilene, Texas; (3) University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. (MF)

  18. Academic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Vivian E; Horner, Keith

    2008-07-01

    Since 1988, thirteen dental schools have provided dental undergraduate programmes within the United Kingdom (UK). In 2006, two new dental schools were created supporting dental education in the community. A further new dental school in Scotland will be accepting students in autumn 2008. In the past 25 years, extensive reorganisation of the NHS has resulted in long-term implications for the training of medical and dental academic staff. The number of academic clinicians is below the minimum viable level and external constraints, combined with a lack of suitable applicants, have led to a moratorium on academic recruitment within some Dental Schools. A detailed review of the historical and associated factors which have led to the problems presently besetting academic dentistry are discussed along with the initiatives introduced in the last 10 years to revitalise the speciality. Also, the present and future outlook for academic dentistry in other countries are discussed. Opinion is divided as to the appropriate setting for the training of undergraduate students between those who support community-based dental education and those who believe dental education should remain within research led dental establishments. External factors are moulding an unsatisfactory situation that is proving increasingly unattractive to the potential dental academic and the case for reform is obvious.

  19. The pediatric intensive care unit business model.

    PubMed

    Schleien, Charles L

    2013-06-01

    All pediatric intensivists need a primer on ICU finance. The author describes potential alternate revenue sources for the division. Differentiating units by size or academic affiliation, the author describes drivers of expense. Strategies to manage the bottom line including negotiations for hospital services are covered. Some of the current trends in physician productivity and its described metrics, with particular focus on clinical FTE management is detailed. Methods of using this data to enhance revenue are discussed. Some of the other current trends in the ICU business related to changes at the federal and state level as well as in the insurance sector, moving away from fee-for-service are covered.

  20. [The primary healthcare centres].

    PubMed

    Brambilla, Antonio; Maciocco, Gavino

    2014-04-01

    The central attributes of primary care are: first contact (accessibility), longitudinality (person- focused preventive and curative care overtime), patient-oriented comprehensiveness and coordination (including navigation towards secondary and tertiary care). Besides taking care of the needs of the individuals, primary health care teams are also looking at the community, especially when addressing social determinants of health. The rationale for the benefits for primary care for health has been found in: 1) greater access to needed services; 2) better quality of care; 3) a greater focus on prevention; 4) early management of health problems; 5) organizing and delivering high quality care for chronic non-communicable diseases. This paper describes the role of primary healthcare centres in strengthening community primary services and in reducing health inequalities. Furthemore, the experiences of Regional Health Services from Tuscany and Emilia-Romagna are discussed, with a brief overview of the literature.

  1. Pediatric ventricular assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Burki, Sarah; Zafar, Farhan; Morales, David Luis Simon

    2015-01-01

    The domain of pediatric ventricular assist device (VAD) has recently gained considerable attention. Despite the fact that, historically, the practice of pediatric mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has lagged behind that of adult patients, this gap between the two groups is narrowing. Currently, the Berlin EXCOR VAD is the only pediatric-specific durable VAD approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The prospective Berlin Heart trial demonstrated a successful outcome, either bridge to transplantation (BTT), or in rare instances, bridge to recovery, in approximately 90% of children. Also noted during the trial was, however, a high incidence of adverse events such as embolic stroke, bleeding and infection. This has incentivized some pediatric centers to utilize adult implantable continuous-flow devices, for instance the HeartMate II and HeartWare HVAD, in children. As a result of this paradigm shift, the outlook of pediatric VAD support has dramatically changed: Treatment options previously unavailable to children, including outpatient management and even destination therapy, have now been becoming a reality. The sustained demand for continued device miniaturization and technological refinements is anticipated to extend the range of options available to children—HeartMate 3 and HeartWare MVAD are two examples of next generation VADs with potential pediatric application, both of which are presently undergoing clinical trials. A pediatric-specific continuous-flow device is also on the horizon: the redesigned Infant Jarvik VAD (Jarvik 2015) is undergoing pre-clinical testing, with a randomized clinical trial anticipated to follow thereafter. The era of pediatric VADs has begun. In this article, we discuss several important aspects of contemporary VAD therapy, with a particular focus on challenges unique to the pediatric population. PMID:26793341

  2. [Robotics in pediatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Camps, J I

    2011-10-01

    Despite the extensive use of robotics in the adult population, the use of robotics in pediatrics has not been well accepted. There is still a lack of awareness from pediatric surgeons on how to use the robotic equipment, its advantages and indications. Benefit is still controversial. Dexterity and better visualization of the surgical field are one of the strong values. Conversely, cost and a lack of small instruments prevent the use of robotics in the smaller patients. The aim of this manuscript is to present the controversies about the use of robotics in pediatric surgery.

  3. Pediatric Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Donna L.; Hentz, Tracy A.; Friedman, Debra L.

    2005-01-01

    Pediatric palliative care provides benefit to children living with life-threatening or terminal conditions. Palliative care should be available to all seriously ill children. Palliative care includes the treatment of symptoms such as pain, nausea, dyspnea, constipation, anorexia, and sialorrhea. This care can occur in a variety of settings, from home to hospice to hospital, and must include bereavement care and follow up after the death of a child. There are many challenges in pediatric palliative care, but continued research into this important area of pediatrics will lead to improvements in the care of children with life-threatening illnesses. PMID:23118638

  4. Promoting education, mentorship, and support for pediatric research.

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    Pediatricians play a key role in advancing child health research to best attain and improve the physical, mental, and social health and well-being of all infants, children, adolescents, and young adults. Child health presents unique issues that require investigators who specialize in pediatric research. In addition, the scope of the pediatric research enterprise is transdisciplinary and includes the full spectrum of basic science, translational, community-based, health services, and child health policy research. Although most pediatricians do not directly engage in research, knowledge of research methodologies and approaches promotes critical evaluation of scientific literature, the practice of evidence-based medicine, and advocacy for evidence-based child health policy. This statement includes specific recommendations to promote further research education and support at all levels of pediatric training, from premedical to continuing medical education, as well as recommendations to increase support and mentorship for research activities. Pediatric research is crucial to the American Academy of Pediatrics' goal of improving the health of all children. The American Academy of Pediatrics continues to promote and encourage efforts to facilitate the creation of new knowledge and ways to reduce barriers experienced by trainees, practitioners, and academic faculty pursuing research.

  5. Pediatric oncologists' coping strategies for dealing with patient death.

    PubMed

    Granek, Leeat; Barrera, Maru; Scheinemann, Katrin; Bartels, Ute

    2016-01-01

    This research examined pediatric oncologists coping strategies when their patients died of cancer. Twenty-one pediatric oncologists at 2 Canadian pediatric academic hospitals were interviewed about their coping strategies when patients died or were in the process of dying. The grounded theory method of data collection and data analysis were used. Line-by-line coding was used to establish codes and themes and constant comparison was used to establish relations among emerging codes and themes. Pediatric oncologists used engagement coping strategies with primary and secondary responses including emotional regulation (social support and religion), problem solving (supporting families at end of life), cognitive restructuring (making a difference and research), and distraction (breaks, physical activity, hobbies and entertainment, spending time with own children). They also used disengagement coping strategies that included voluntary avoidance (compartmentalization and withdrawing from families at end of life). Given the chronic nature of patient death in pediatric oncology and the emotionally difficult nature of this work, medical institutions such as hospitals have a responsibility to assist pediatric oncologists in coping with this challenging aspect of their work. Future research is needed to evaluate how best to implement these changes on the institutional level to help oncologists cope with patient death and the effect of using these strategies on their quality of life.

  6. Issues impacting therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Atin; Goindi, Shishu

    2014-01-01

    The quest for achieving optimal therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients has evaded the healthcare professionals for long and often lack of child specific dosage forms and the associated events that follow with it have been considered to be major contributor towards suboptimal outcomes. Consequently, there have been sustained efforts over the years to address this issue with the enactment of legislations like Best Pharmaceutical for Children Act (BPCA), Pediatric Research Equity Act (PREA) and Pediatric Regulation by European Union (EU) to incentivise the participation of pharmaceutical industry towards development of child friendly dosage forms. Initiatives taken in past by organisations like World Health Organisation (WHO) and Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi) to spur the development of child friendly dosage forms has helped to address issues pertaining to management of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and malaria in pediatric patients. Present efforts aimed at developing child friendly dosage forms include oro-dispersible platforms including thin films and mini-tablets. Despite these leaps and advancements in developing better dosage forms for children, lower therapeutic outcomes in pediatric patients continue to remain an unresolved issue because of detrimental effects of additional factors such as parents understanding of label instructions and complexities involved in executing pediatric clinical studies thus requiring a concerted effort from pharmaceutical companies, academic researchers, parents and healthcare providers to work for better treatment outcomes in children.

  7. How Can Academics Stay in Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijhuis, Gerard Gervedink; Collis, Betty

    2005-01-01

    As universities transform into enterprises, academics are facing new challenges, especially in their teaching. This is because of the demands for student-centred programmes that offer more flexibility, the use of Course Management Systems such as "Blackboard," and the expectation that instructors will perform (more) efficiently and effectively. In…

  8. Should "Teacher Centred Teaching" Replace "Student Centred Learning"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Patrick D.

    2008-01-01

    Mission statements of most HEIs across the UK support "student centred learning". In this paper, it is suggested that "teacher centred teaching" should also have a major role to play, improving the quality of the learning experience in higher education. Students are extremely diverse in their skills, weaknesses, and learning…

  9. Snapshot of Pediatric Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... and other central nervous system (CNS) tumors , and neuroblastoma , which are expected to account for more than ... in clinical trials in children with ALL and neuroblastoma. Selected Advances in Pediatric Cancers Research A comprehensive ...

  10. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Karen A; Breuer, Christopher K

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an important cause of gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents. The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing; therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of the presentation of this disease in the pediatric population. Laboratory tests, radiology studies, and endoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and differentiating between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Once diagnosed, the goal of medical management is to induce remission of disease while minimizing the side effects of the medication. Specific attention needs to be paid to achieving normal growth in this susceptible population. Surgical management is usually indicated for failure of medical management, complication, or malignancy. Algorithms for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease are presented. The specific psychosocial issues facing these patients are also discussed in this review as are the future goals of research in the complex problem of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16718840

  11. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  12. American Board of Pediatrics

    MedlinePlus

    ... QUICK LINKS Search form Search LOG OUT ABP PORTFOLIO LOG IN ABP PORTFOLIO THE AMERICAN BOARD of PEDIATRICS Certifying excellence in ... Overview MOCA-Peds Pilot MOC for Residents ABP Portfolio FAQs APPLY FOR EXAM How to Apply Certification ...

  13. Referral to pediatric surgical specialists.

    PubMed

    Klein, Michael D

    2014-02-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics, with the collaboration of the Surgical Sections of the American Academy of Pediatrics, has created referral recommendations intended to serve as voluntary practice parameters to assist general pediatricians in determining when and to whom to refer their patients for pediatric surgical specialty care. It is recognized that these recommendations may be difficult to implement, because communities vary in terms of access to major pediatric medical centers. Limited access does not negate the value of the recommendations, however, because the child who needs specialized surgical and anesthetic care is best served by the skills of the appropriate pediatric surgical team. Major congenital anomalies, malignancies, major trauma, and chronic illnesses (including those associated with preterm birth) in infants and children should be managed by pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical specialists at pediatric referral centers that can provide expertise in many areas, including the pediatric medical subspecialties and surgical specialties of pediatric radiology, pediatric anesthesiology, pediatric pathology, and pediatric intensive care. The optimal management of the child with complex problems, chronic illness, or disabilities requires coordination, communication, and cooperation of the pediatric surgical specialist with the child's primary care pediatrician or physician.

  14. Pediatric hydrocephalus outcomes: a review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The outcome of pediatric hydrocephalus, including surgical complications, neurological sequelae and academic achievement, has been the matter of many studies. However, much uncertainty remains, regarding the very long-term and social outcome, and the determinants of complications and clinical outcome. In this paper, we review the different facets of outcome, including surgical outcome (shunt failure, infection and independence, and complications of endoscopy), clinical outcome (neurological, sensory, cognitive sequels, epilepsy), schooling and social integration. We then provide a brief review of the English-language literature and highlighting selected studies that provide information on the outcome and sequelae of pediatric hydrocephalus, and the impact of predictive variables on outcome. Mortality caused by hydrocephalus and its treatments is between 0 and 3%, depending on the duration of follow-up. Shunt event-free survival (EFS) is about 70% at one year and 40% at ten years. The EFS after endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) appears better but likely benefits from selection bias and long-term figures are not available. Shunt infection affects between 5 and 8% of surgeries, and 15 to 30% of patients according to the duration of follow-up. Shunt independence can be achieved in 3 to 9% of patients, but the definition of this varies. Broad variations in the prevalence of cognitive sequelae, affecting 12 to 50% of children, and difficulties at school, affecting between 20 and 60%, attest of disparities among studies in their clinical evaluation. Epilepsy, affecting 6 to 30% of patients, has a serious impact on outcome. In adulthood, social integration is poor in a substantial number of patients but data are sparse. Few controlled prospective studies exist regarding hydrocephalus outcomes; in their absence, largely retrospective studies must be used to evaluate the long-term consequences of hydrocephalus and its treatments. This review aims to help to establish

  15. Engaging Academics in Developing Excellence: Releasing Creativity through Reward and Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluteau, Patricia; Krumins, Marie Anne

    2008-01-01

    This article explores the importance of giving academics the space to be creative in developing new teaching materials in the context of a government drive to increase the quality of the student experience, and what this means for "academic staff development". Academics who have engaged with a UK Centre for Excellence in Teaching and…

  16. Pediatric oncology in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kebudi, Rejin

    2012-03-01

    The survival of children with cancer has increased dramatically in the last decades, as a result of advances in diagnosis, treatment and supportive care. Each year in Turkey, 2500-3000 new childhood cancer cases are expected. According to the Turkish Pediatric Oncology Group and Turkish Pediatric Hematology Societies Registry, about 2000 new pediatric cancer cases are reported each year. The population in Turkey is relatively young. One fourth of the population is younger than 15 years of age. According to childhood mortality, cancer is the fourth cause of death (7.2%) after infections, cardiac deaths and accidents. The major cancers in children in Turkey are leukemia (31%), lymphoma (19%), central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms (13%), neuroblastomas (7%), bone tumors (6.1%), soft tissue sarcomas (6%), followed by renal tumors, germ cell tumors, retinoblastoma, carcinomas-epithelial neoplasms, hepatic tumors and others. Lymphomas rank second in frequency as in many developing countries in contrast to West Europe or USA, where CNS neoplasms rank second in frequency. The seven-year survival rate in children with malignancies in Turkey is 65.8%. The history of modern Pediatric Oncology in Turkey dates back to the 1970's. Pediatric Oncology has been accepted as a subspecialty in Turkey since 1983. Pediatric Oncologists are all well trained and dedicated. All costs for the diagnosis and treatment of children with cancer is covered by the government. Education and infrastructure for palliative care needs improvement.

  17. Pediatric enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, David; Kazmerski, Kimberly; Iyer, Kishore

    2006-01-01

    Common to all pediatric patients receiving enteral nutrition is the inability to consume calories orally. This is often secondary to issues of inadequate weight gain, inadequate growth, prolonged feeding times, weight loss, a decrease in weight/age or weight/height ratios, or a persistent triceps skinfold thickness <5% for age. Enteral nutrition requires enteral access. In the neonatal period the nasoenteric route is usually used. In pediatric patients requiring long-term enteral access, surgically, endoscopically, or radiologically placed percutaneous feeding tubes are common. Jejunal feeding tubes are used in pediatric patients with gastric feeding intolerance or persistent gastroesophageal reflux. Low-profile enteral access devices are preferred by most pediatric patients because of their cosmetic appearance. For most children, a standard pediatric polypeptide enteral formula is well tolerated. There are specialized pediatric enteral formulas available for patients with decreased intestinal length, altered intestinal absorptive capacity, or altered pancreatic function. Weaning patients from tube feeding to oral nutrition is the ultimate nutrition goal. A multidisciplinary approach to patients with short bowel syndrome will maximize the use of enteral nutrition while preserving parenteral nutrition for patients with true enteral nutrition therapy failure.

  18. State-of-the-Art Pediatric Hypnosis Training: Remodeling Curriculum and Refining Faculty Development.

    PubMed

    Kohen, Daniel P; Kaiser, Pamela; Olness, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Training in pediatric hypnosis has been part of clinical hypnosis education in the United States since 1976. Workshops expanded over time and are now taught by highly experienced pediatric clinicians across the globe. In 1987, a small vanguard of North American faculty, academic pediatricians, and pediatric psychologists taught a 3-day pediatric hypnosis workshop at the national meeting of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (SDBP). This model of annual tri-level concurrent workshops (introductory, intermediate, and advanced) was sponsored by the SDBP for 24 years. In 2009, the National Pediatric Hypnosis Training Institute (NPHTI) assembled, and in 2010, offered its first annual workshops. This article documents this history of pediatric hypnosis education and describes NPHTI's remodeling and ongoing refinement toward a state-of-the-art curriculum with innovative methodology based upon (1) current research about adult experiential and small group learning; (2) design principles for presentations that maximize adult learning and memory; and (3) evaluations by participants and faculty. These underpinnings-including clinical training videos, individualized learning choices, emphasis on personalized, goal-oriented sessions, and advances in faculty selection, and ongoing development-are applicable to adult training models. Integration of developmental and self-regulation strategies may be more unique to pediatric hypnosis skills training programs. The conclusion proposes expansion of pediatric hypnosis education and elimination of related barriers toward goals that all children learn self-hypnosis (SH) for mind-body health.

  19. The Tripartite Mission of an Academic Psychiatry Department and the Roles of the Chair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Roger E.

    2006-01-01

    Within academic medical centers, psychiatry, pediatrics, and certain other specialties of internal medicine carry a disproportionate responsibility for teaching but are least able to support teaching and research through clinical income. This article reviews the educational, research and clinical missions of an academic psychiatry department and…

  20. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Cognition and mood.

    PubMed

    Amato, Maria Pia; Krupp, Lauren B; Charvet, Leigh E; Penner, Iris; Till, Christine

    2016-08-30

    In comparison with the large body of evidence on cognitive functioning in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS), there is limited information on cognition in pediatric-onset MS (POMS). Unique vulnerabilities in POMS can derive from having a disease that occurs during key periods of age-expected brain growth, active myelination in the CNS, and maturation of neural networks during the learning curve and key formative years in the academic career of the patient. Therefore, the consequences of MS on developing cognitive faculties can be assessed only in the pediatric population and cannot be simply extrapolated from studies carried on in the adult population. Until the last decade, research in the pediatric population was mainly represented by small clinical series, often limited by the narrow scope of neuropsychological assessment and lack of adequate control groups. Over the last decade, however, cognitive functioning and mood-related difficulties have become an increasing concern as awareness of this population has grown. A few specialized MS centers have begun performing more systematic research in the field in order to assess the prevalence of cognitive impairments and mood-related difficulties in patients with POMS, to better characterize the neuropsychological pattern and determine the functional consequences of these problems. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of cognitive and mood-related difficulties in POMS and highlights perceived gaps in knowledge and priorities for future research.

  1. Leading Academics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middlehurst, Robin

    This book aims to increase the level of interest and understanding of leadership within the academic context and to demonstrate the relevance of leadership for contemporary United Kingdom universities. The book considers the concept of leadership and its appropriateness and usefulness for nonprofit professional organizations such as universities,…

  2. Academic Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durant, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As colleges and universities become even more complex organizations, advancement professionals need to have the skills, experience, and academic credentials to succeed in this ever-changing environment. Advancement leaders need competencies that extend beyond fundraising, alumni relations, and communications and marketing. The author encourages…

  3. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  4. CMCC Data Distribution Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisio, Giovanni; Fiore, Sandro; Negro, A.

    2010-05-01

    The CMCC Data Distribution Centre (DDC) is the primary entry point (web gateway) to the CMCC. It is a Data Grid Portal providing a ubiquitous and pervasive way to ease data publishing, climate metadata search, datasets discovery, metadata annotation, data access, data aggregation, sub-setting, etc. The grid portal security model includes the use of HTTPS protocol for secure communication with the client (based on X509v3 certificates that must be loaded into the browser) and secure cookies to establish and maintain user sessions. The CMCC DDC is now in a pre-production phase and it is currently used only by internal users (CMCC researchers and climate scientists). The most important component already available in the CMCC DDC is the Search Engine which allows users to perform, through web interfaces, distributed search and discovery activities by introducing one or more of the following search criteria: horizontal extent (which can be specified by interacting with a geographic map), vertical extent, temporal extent, keywords, topics, creation date, etc. By means of this page the user submits the first step of the query process on the metadata DB, then, she can choose one or more datasets retrieving and displaying the complete XML metadata description (from the browser). This way, the second step of the query process is carried out by accessing to a specific XML document of the metadata DB. Finally, through the web interface, the user can access to and download (partially or totally) the data stored on the storage device accessing to OPeNDAP servers and to other available grid storage interfaces. Requests concerning datasets stored in deep storage will be served asynchronously.

  5. Resident education curriculum in pediatric and adolescent gynecology: the short curriculum.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Nathalie; Amies Oelschlager, Anne-Marie; Browner-Elhanan, Karen J; Huguelet, Patricia S; Kaul, Paritosh; Talib, Hina J; Wheeler, Carol; Loveless, Meredith

    2014-04-01

    The degree of exposure to Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology (PAG) varies across academic programs in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, and Adolescent Medicine. Nevertheless, these programs are responsible to train residents and provide opportunities within their training programs to fulfill PAG learning objectives. To that end, North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology has taken a leadership role in PAG resident education by disseminating the Short Curriculum with specific learning objectives and list of essential resources where key concepts in PAG can be covered.

  6. Psychosocial perspectives in the treatment of pediatric chronic pain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pain in children and adolescents is associated with major disruption to developmental experiences crucial to personal adjustment, quality of life, academic, vocational and social success. Caring for these patients involves understanding cognitive, affective, social and family dynamic factors associated with persistent pain syndromes. Evaluation and treatment necessitate a comprehensive multimodal approach including psychological and behavioral interventions that maximize return to more developmentally appropriate physical, academic and social activities. This article will provide an overview of major psychosocial factors impacting on pediatric pain and disability, propose an explanatory model for conceptualizing the development and maintenance of pain and functional disability in medically difficult-to-explain pain syndromes, and review representative evidence-based cognitive behavioral and systemic treatment approaches for improving functioning in this pediatric population. PMID:22676345

  7. The Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN) Critical Pertussis Study: Collaborative Research in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Jeri S.; Jenkins, Tammara L.; Harrison, Rick; Meert, Kathleen; Anand, K.J.S.; Berger, John T.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Carcillo, Joseph; Dean, J. Michael; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Willson, Douglas F.; Sanders, Ronald C.; Pollack, Murray M.; Harvill, Eric; Nicholson, Carol E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To provide an updated overview of critical pertussis to the pediatric critical care community and describe a study of critical pertussis recently undertaken. Setting The six sites, seven hospitals of the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network and 17 outside sites at academic medical centers with PICUs. Results Despite high coverage for childhood vaccination, pertussis causes substantial morbidity and mortality in United States children, especially among infants. In pediatric intensive care units, Bordetella pertussis is a community-acquired pathogen associated with critical illness and death. The incidence of medical and developmental sequelae in critical pertussis survivors remains unknown, and the appropriate strategies for treatment and support remain unclear. The CPCCRN Critical Pertussis Study has begun to evaluate critical pertussis in a prospective cohort. Conclusion Research is urgently needed to provide an evidence base that might optimize management for critical pertussis, a serious, disabling, and too often fatal illness for United States children, and those in the developing world. PMID:21057366

  8. American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry

    MedlinePlus

    ... Litch's Law Log HIPAA Forms Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Webinar Materials Member Resources 2017 General Assembly ... Archives Access Pediatric Dentistry Today Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Pediatric Dentistry Journal Open Access Articles Policies & ...

  9. RTEMS CENTRE - Support and Maintenance CENTRE to RTEMS Operating System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, H.; Constantino, A.; Mota, M.; Freitas, D.; Zulianello, M.

    2007-08-01

    Real Time Operating System for Multiprocessor Systems (RTEMS) CENTRE is a project under the ESA-Portugal Task Force aiming to develop a support and maintenance centre to RTEMS operating system. The project can be summarized in two main streams, first one related to design, development, maintenance and integration of tools to augment and sustain RTEMS operating system and second stream linked to the creation of technical competences with a support site to RTEMS operating system in Europe. RTEMS CENTRE intends to minimize the cost of the incorporation/integration of airborne and space applications in this Real Time Operating System. The centre started officially in the 15th of November 2006 and is currently in the study definition and system engineering phase.

  10. [History of pediatric anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Simić, Dusica; Dragović, Simon; Budić, Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Among advances in medicine during the past 150 years, certainly the introduction of surgical anesthesia must be considered the greatest gifts of medical profession to mankind, especially to children. Pediatric anesthesia has progressed rapidly throughout the years. Since the first recorded case of pediatric anesthesia in 1842 to the latest advancement in training, technology, medicine and equipment in the last decades of this century, many historic moments have been following each other. Throughout the first decades of 20th century, most physicians treated children as miniature adults. It is believed that the development of modern pediatric anesthesia started in 1930. To offer a historic perspective, the evolution of new field through its rapid growth was divided into two chronologic categories: first (1930-1950) and second (1950-present). During the first period (1930-1950), the anesthesia techniques and equipment adjusted to different children's age were developed. In the second, together with further technique and equipment refinement, modern anesthetics and vital system surveillance (monitoring) were introduced into everyday practice. The keyto the advances in pediatric anesthesiology was difficulties leading to new inventions with consequent improvement of techniques and methods. This article reviews the origins and development of anesthesia for infants and children in the world and Serbia, emphasizing the contributions of many devoted physicians that represented the major force leading to inevitable evolution of pediatric anesthesia.

  11. Pediatric Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E.; Redline, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the prevalence of overweight across all pediatric age groups and ethnicities has increased substantially, with the current prevalence of overweight among adolescents estimated to be approximately 30%. Current evidence suggests that overweight is modestly associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) among young children, but strongly associated with OSAS in older children and adolescents. The rising incidence of pediatric overweight likely will impact the prevalence, presentation, and treatment of childhood OSAS. The subgroup of children who may be especially susceptible include ethnic minorities and those from households with caregivers from low socioeconomic groups. OSAS, by exposing children to recurrent intermittent hypoxemia or oxidative stress, may amplify the adverse effects of adiposity on systemic inflammation and metabolic perturbations associated with vascular disease and diabetes. When these conditions manifest early in life, they have the potential to alter physiology at critical developmental stages, or, if persistent, provide cumulative exposures that may powerfully alter long-term health profiles. An increased prevalence of overweight also may impact the response to adenotonsillectomy as a primary treatment for childhood OSAS. The high and anticipated increased prevalence of pediatric OSAS mandates assessment of optimal approaches for preventing and treating both OSAS and overweight across the pediatric age range. In this Pulmonary Perspective, the interrelationships between pediatric OSAS and overweight are reviewed, and the implications of the overweight epidemic on childhood OSAS are discussed. PMID:17158283

  12. Pediatric Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Kristen; Stoffella, Sylvia; Meyers, Rachel; Girotto, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    The frequent use of antimicrobials in pediatric patients has led to a significant increase in multidrug-resistant bacterial infections among children. Antimicrobial stewardship programs have been created in many hospitals in an effort to curtail and optimize the use of antibiotics. Pediatric-focused programs are necessary because of the differences in antimicrobial need and use among this patient population, unique considerations and dosing, vulnerability for resistance due to a lifetime of antibiotic exposure, and the increased risk of adverse events. This paper serves as a position statement of the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) who supports the implementation of antimicrobial stewardship programs for all pediatric patients. PPAG also believes that a pediatric pharmacy specialist should be included as part of that program and that services be covered by managed care organizations and government insurance entities. PPAG also recommends that states create legislation similar to that in existence in California and Missouri and that a federal Task Force for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria be permanently established. PPAG also supports post-doctoral pharmacy training programs in antibiotic stewardship.

  13. Minister unveils new nanotech centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumé, Belle

    2009-06-01

    Three new nanotechnology research centres are to be set up in France as part of a €70m government plan to help French companies in the sector. Researchers at the new centres, which will be located in Grenoble, Saclay (near Paris) and Toulouse, will be encouraged to collaborate with industry to develop new nanotech-based products. Dubbed NANO-INNOV, the new plan includes €46m for two new buildings at Saclay, with the rest being used to buy new equipment at the three centres and to fund grant proposals from staff to the French National Research Agency (ANR).

  14. What's new in pediatric orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Sanders, James O; Otsuka, Norman Y; Martus, Jeffrey E

    2015-02-18

    This past year has seen an increase in the quality of studies in pediatric orthopaedics, and the completion of BrAIST demonstrated that high-level studies of important questions can be addressed in pediatric orthopaedics. The current commitment of improving quality of care for children promises a healthy future for pediatric orthopaedics.

  15. Health-related quality of life outcomes and level of evidence in pediatric neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Daniel; Vedantam, Aditya; Briceño, Valentina; Lam, Sandi K; Luerssen, Thomas G; Jea, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The emphasis on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes is increasing, along with an emphasis on evidence-based medicine. However, there is a notable paucity of validated HRQOL instruments for the pediatric population. Furthermore, no standardization or consensus currently exists concerning which HRQOL outcome measures ought to be used in pediatric neurosurgery. The authors wished to identify HRQOL outcomes used in pediatric neurosurgery research over the past 10 years, their frequency, and usage trends. METHODS Three top pediatric neurosurgical journals were reviewed for the decade from 2005 to 2014 for clinical studies of pediatric neurosurgical procedures that report HRQOL outcomes. Similar studies in the peer-reviewed journal Pediatrics were also used as a benchmark. Publication year, level of evidence, and HRQOL outcomes were collected for each article. RESULTS A total of 31 HRQOL studies were published in the pediatric neurosurgical literature over the study period. By comparison, there were 55 such articles in Pediatrics. The number of publications using HRQOL instruments showed a significant positive trend over time for Pediatrics (B = 0.62, p = 0.02) but did not increase significantly over time for the 3 neurosurgical journals (B = 0.12, p = 0.5). The authors identified a total of 46 different HRQOL instruments used across all journals. Within the neurosurgical journals, the Hydrocephalus Outcome Questionnaire (HOQ) (24%) was the most frequently used, followed by the Health Utilities Index (HUI) (16%), the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) (12%), and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) (12%). Of the 55 articles identified in Pediatrics, 22 (40%) used a version of the PedsQL. No neurosurgical study reached above Level 4 on the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (OCEBM) system. However, multiple studies from Pediatrics achieved OCEBM Level 3, several were categorized as Level 2, and one reached Level 1

  16. Sleeping beauties in pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Završnik, Jernej; Kokol, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping beauties (SBs) in science have been known for few decades; however, it seems that only recently have they become popular. An SB is a publication that “sleeps” for a long time and then almost suddenly awakes and becomes highly cited. SBs present interesting findings in science. Pediatrics research literature has not yet been analyzed for their presence, and 5 pediatrics SBs were discovered in this research. Their prevalence was approximately 0.011%. Some environments or periods are more “SB fertile” than others: 3 of 5 SBs were published in the journal Pediatrics, 4 originated from the United States, and 4 were published in the period from 1992 to 1993. No institutions or authors published more than 1 SB. PMID:27822155

  17. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  18. Integrative Pediatrics: Looking Forward

    PubMed Central

    McClafferty, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    Increase in the prevalence of disease and illness has dramatically altered the landscape of pediatrics. As a result, there is a demand for pediatricians with new skills and a sharper focus on preventative health. Patient demand and shifting pediatric illness patterns have accelerated research in the field of pediatric integrative medicine. This emerging field can be defined as healing-oriented medicine that considers the whole child, including all elements of lifestyle and family health. It is informed by evidence and carefully weighs all appropriate treatment options. This Special Issue of Children, containing a collection of articles written by expert clinicians, represents an important educational contribution to the field. The goal of the edition is to raise awareness about integrative topics with robust supporting evidence, and to identify areas where more research is needed. PMID:27417349

  19. Pediatric considerations in homecare.

    PubMed

    Petit de Mange, E A

    1998-09-01

    "If I had known beforehand how difficult, demanding, time consuming, and exhausting it would be--having my child home on a ventilator--I would never have agreed to bring her home" (personal communication with a parent, 1994). This mother's statement strikes at the heart of pediatric high-tech homecare. Parents assume caregiver roles that professional health providers have taken years to develop. Nurses, as strangers, intrude into intimate family relationships that have cultivated over years. Pioneering agencies attempt to fill a gap in pediatric care using guidelines that have been entrenched in the medical and economic models for years. The multiple dimensions of high-tech pediatric homecare require more than provision of technical nursing services. In homecare, nurses are challenged by cultural differences, language barriers, loss of control, family dynamics, practicing in unfamiliar environments, and new technology. To ensure quality nursing care, all professional dimensions need to be considered to be of equal importance.

  20. What is the degree of innovation routinely implemented in Dutch radiotherapy centres? A multicentre cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, Liesbeth; Dekker, Andre; Bosmans, Geert; van Merode, Frits; Verhaegen, Frank; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Swart, Rachelle; Kengen, Cindy; Lambin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the implementation of innovation activities in Dutch radiotherapy (RT) centres in a broad sense (product, technological, market and organizational innovations). Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 15 Dutch RT centres. A list of innovations implemented from 2011 to 2013 was drawn up for each centre using semi-structured interviews. These innovations were classified into innovation categories according to previously defined innovation indicators. Where applicable, each innovation was rated by each centre on the effort required to implement it and on its expected effects, to get an impression of how far reaching and radical the innovations were and to be able to compare the number of innovations between centres. Results: The participating RT centres in the Netherlands implemented 12 innovations per year on average (range 5–25); this number was not significantly different for academic (n = 13) or non-academic centres (n = 10). Several centres were dealing with the same innovations at the same time. The average required effort and expected output did not differ significantly between product, technological and organizational innovation or between academic and non-academic centres. Conclusion: The number of innovations observed per centre varied across a large range, with a large overlap in terms of the type of innovations that were implemented. Registering innovations using the innovation indicators applied in our study would make it possible to improve collaboration between centres, e.g. with common training modules, to avoid duplication of work. Advances in knowledge: This study is the first of its kind investigating innovation implementation in RT in a broad sense. PMID:27660890

  1. Pediatric thoracoabdominal biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Kent, Richard; Salzar, Robert; Kerrigan, Jason; Parent, Daniel; Lessley, David; Sochor, Mark; Luck, Jason F; Loyd, Andre; Song, Yin; Nightingale, Roger; Bass, Cameron R; Maltese, Matthew R

    2009-11-01

    No experimental data exist quantifying the force-deformation behavior of the pediatric chest when subjected to non-impact, dynamic loading from a diagonal belt or a distributed loading surface. Kent et al. (2006) previously published juvenile abdominal response data collected using a porcine model. This paper reports on a series of experiments on a 7-year-old pediatric post-mortem human subject (PMHS) undertaken to guide the scaling of existing adult thoracic response data for application to the child and to assess the validity of the porcine abdominal model. The pediatric PMHS exhibited abdominal response similar to the swine, including the degree of rate sensitivity. The upper abdomen of the PMHS was slightly stiffer than the porcine behavior, while the lower abdomen of the PMHS fit within the porcine corridor. Scaling of adult thoracic response data using any of four published techniques did not successfully predict the pediatric behavior. All of the scaling techniques intrinsically reduce the stiffness of the adult response, when in reality the pediatric subject was as stiff as, or slightly more stiff than, published adult corridors. An assessment of age-related changes in thoracic stiffness indicated that for both a CPR patient population and dynamic diagonal belt loading on a PMHS population, the effective stiffness of the chest increases through the fourth decade of life and then decreases, resulting in stiffness values approximately the same for children and for elderly adults. Additional research is needed to elucidate the generality of this finding and to assess its significance for scaling adult data to represent pediatric responses.

  2. Pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Moody, Karen; Siegel, Linda; Scharbach, Kathryn; Cunningham, Leslie; Cantor, Rabbi Mollie

    2011-06-01

    Progress in pediatric palliative care has gained momentum, but there remain significant barriers to the appropriate provision of palliative care to ill and dying children, including the lack of properly trained health care professionals, resources to finance such care, and scientific research, as well as a continued cultural denial of death in children. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric palliative care, special communication concerns, decision making, ethical and legal considerations, symptom assessment and management, psychosocial issues, provision of care across settings, end-of-life care, and bereavement. Educational and supportive resources for health care practitioners and families, respectively, are included.

  3. Pediatric Gastric Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela-Ramos, Marco Cesar; Mendizábal-Méndez, Ana Luisa; Ríos-Contreras, Carlos Alberto; Rodríguez-Montes, Claudia Esther

    2010-01-01

    Neoplasms from germ cell origin are a heterogeneous group of tumors rarely seen in the pediatric population, teratoma is the most frequent among them. They can occur in either gonadal or extragonadal locations. Extragonadal teratoma arising from abdominal viscera is very unusual. There are less than a hundred reported cases of gastric teratoma in the worldwide literature. Since the occurrence of this pathology in the pediatric age group is quite rare, we describe a case of a teratoma located in the lesser curvature of the stomach in an infant with an emphasis in radiologic-pathologic correlation. PMID:22470691

  4. Tracheostomy: pediatric considerations.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Ellen S

    2010-08-01

    Pediatric patients for whom tracheotomy is a consideration have different anatomy, medical conditions, and prognoses than adults; even the tracheotomy tubes are different. Indications for pediatric tracheotomy generally include bypassing airway obstruction, providing access for prolonged mechanical ventilation, and facilitating tracheobronchial toilet. Subglottic stenosis is an important indication for tracheotomy in children; its etiology, prevention, and alternative options for management are presented. Discussion includes the benefits, risks, impact on families, techniques for tracheotomy tube changes, and alternatives to tracheotomy, with illustrative photographs and diagrams.

  5. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  6. Update on pediatric hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jennifer R S; Hill, Samantha E

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a common and under-recognized disease in the pediatric population that has a significant impact on quality of life. Focal and generalized forms of hyperhidrosis exist, which can be idiopathic or secondary to underlying medical conditions or medications. Treatment is tailored to the specific patient needs, characteristics and goals. These include topical preparations, iontophoresis, botulinum toxin and anticholinergic medications.

  7. Pediatric sleep pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Pelayo, Rafael; Yuen, Kin

    2012-10-01

    This article reviews common sleep disorders in children and pharmacologic options for them. Discussions of pediatric sleep pharmacology typically focus on treatment of insomnia. Although insomnia is a major concern in this population, other conditions of concern in children are presented, such as narcolepsy, parasomnias, restless legs syndrome, and sleep apnea.

  8. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  9. Pediatric primary gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harris, G J; Laszewski, M J

    1992-04-01

    Primary gastric lymphoma in the pediatric population is rare. We have described a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Burkitt's type) manifested as a gastric mass. Despite its rarity in children, this tumor should be treated aggressively, since long-term survival has been reported.

  10. Pharmacotherapy of Pediatric Insomnia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    General guidelines for the use of medication to treat pediatric insomnia are presented. It should be noted that medication is not the first treatment choice and should be viewed within the context of a more comprehensive treatment plan. The pharmacological and clinical properties of over the counter medications and FDA-approved insomnia drugs are…

  11. Pediatric Glaucoma: Pharmacotherapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Samant, Monica; Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2016-06-01

    Childhood glaucoma is a major therapeutic challenge for pediatric ophthalmologists and glaucoma specialists worldwide. Management depends on the etiology and age at presentation. A variety of drugs are available for the control of intraocular pressure in children; however, none of these drugs have been licensed by the regulatory agencies for use in children. Furthermore, evidence gained from randomized controlled trials in the pediatric population is sparse, and little is known regarding the use of newer anti-glaucoma preparations. This evidence-based review aims to discuss the available pharmacotherapeutic options for glaucoma in children. Topical adrenoceptor blockers, topical and systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, prostaglandin (PG) analogs, adrenoceptor agonists, parasympathomimetics, and combined preparations are available for use in children, but usually as an off-label indication. Therefore, it is important to recognize that serious side effects have been reported, even with topical drops, and measures to reduce systemic absorption should be taken. Most drugs have been shown to have comparable ocular hypotensive effects, with the lowest occurrence of systemic side effects with PG analogs. Whereas a newly introduced prostaglandin analog, tafluprost, and some other preservative-free preparations have shown promising results in adult glaucoma patients, no pediatric reports are available as yet. Future studies may describe their role in treating pediatric glaucoma. This review also shares some suggested treatment pathways for primary congenital glaucoma (PCG), juvenile open angle glaucoma (JOAG), developmental glaucoma, aphakic/pseudophakic glaucoma, and uveitic glaucoma.

  12. Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100165.htm Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  13. Pediatric Cervicofacial Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    King, Ericka; Chun, Robert; Sulman, Cecille

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present a case of a pediatric cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (NF), a rapidly progressive infection, and a review of a 10-year pediatric inpatient database. Design Case report and review. Setting Pediatric intensive care unit. Patients A healthy 5-year-old male who developed NF of the lower lip 36 hours following minor trauma. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code 728.86 (NF), was the inclusion criteria for the Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID) in 1997 and 2006. Results A pediatric case is presented with a thorough photographic record demonstrating the need for rapid diagnosis and treatment. In a review of the KID from 1997 and 2006, the relative risk of being discharged with NF in 2006 vs 1997 was 1.4 (95% CI, 9.95-2.28). Age at diagnosis of NF was older in 2006 compared with 1997 (11.5 years vs 8.05 years; P<.001). Deaths with a diagnosis of NF increased from 1997 compared with 2006: from 3.9% to 5.4%. In 2006, the odds of death were 15.1 times higher in pediatric discharges with a diagnosis of NF compared with discharges without a diagnosis of NF (P<.001; 95% CI, 9.3-23.1). Conclusions Even with the advent of new treatments and antibiotics, the incidence and death rates of NF have changed little over the past 10 years. While it is still a rare diagnosis, knowledge and awareness of necrotizing fasciitis with aggressive medical and surgical treatment are still the foundation in disease survival. PMID:22508620

  14. The digital eczema centre utrecht.

    PubMed

    van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; van Veelen, Carien; Hover, Maaike; Eland-de Kok, Petra; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla; Sonnevelt, Gert-Jan; Mensing, Geert; Pasmans, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    The University Medical Centre Utrecht (UMC Utrecht) has developed an eczema portal that combines e-consulting, monitoring and self-management training by a dermatology nurse online for patients and parents of young children with atopic dermatitis (AD). Patient satisfaction with the portal was high. It could be extended to become a Digital Eczema Centre for multidisciplinary collaboration between health-care providers from different locations and the patient. Before starting the construction of the Digital Eczema Centre, the feasibility was examined by carrying out a business case analysis. The purposes, strength and weaknesses showed that the Digital Eczema Centre offered opportunities to improve care for patients with AD. The financial analysis resulted in a medium/best case scenario with a positive result of euro50-240,000 over a period of five years. We expect that the Digital Eczema Centre will increase the accessibility and quality of care. The web-based patient record and the digital chain-of-care promote the involvement of patients, parents and multidisciplinary teams as well as the continuity and coordination of care.

  15. Toward enteral nutrition for the treatment of pediatric Crohn disease in Canada: a workshop to identify barriers and enablers.

    PubMed

    Van Limbergen, Johan; Haskett, Jennifer; Griffiths, Anne M; Critch, Jeff; Huynh, Hien; Ahmed, Najma; deBruyn, Jennifer C; Issenman, Robert; El-Matary, Wael; Walters, Thomas D; Kluthe, Cheryl; Roy, Marie-Eve; Sheppard, Elizabeth; Crandall, Wallace V; Cohen, Stan; Ruemmele, Frank M; Levine, Arie; Otley, Anthony R

    2015-10-01

    The treatment armamentarium in pediatric Crohn disease (CD) is very similar to adult-onset CD with the notable exception of the use of exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN [the administration of a liquid formula diet while excluding normal diet]), which is used more frequently by pediatric gastroenterologists to induce remission. In pediatric CD, EEN is now recommended by the pediatric committee of the European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation and the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition as a first-choice agent to induce remission, with remission rates in pediatric studies consistently >75%. To chart and address enablers and barriers of use of EEN in Canada, a workshop was held in September 2014 in Toronto (Ontario), inviting pediatric gastroenterologists, nurses and dietitians from most Canadian pediatric IBD centres as well as international faculty from the United States and Europe with particular research and clinical expertise in the dietary management of pediatric CD. Workshop participants ranked the exclusivity of enteral nutrition; the health care resources; and cost implications as the top three barriers to its use. Conversely, key enablers mentioned included: standardization and sharing of protocols for use of enteral nutrition; ensuring sufficient dietetic resources; and reducing the cost of EEN to the family (including advocacy for reimbursement by provincial ministries of health and private insurance companies). Herein, the authors report on the discussions during this workshop and list strategies to enhance the use of EEN as a treatment option in the treatment of pediatric CD in Canada.

  16. Person-centred reflective practice.

    PubMed

    Devenny, Bob; Duffy, Kathleen

    Person-centred health and person-centred care have gained prominence across the UK following the publication of reports on public inquiries exploring failings in care. Self-awareness and participation in reflective practice are recognised as vital to supporting the person-centred agenda. This article presents an education framework for reflective practice, developed and used in one NHS board in Scotland, and based on the tenets of the clinical pastoral education movement. Providing an insight into the usefulness of a spiritual component in the reflective process, the framework provides an opportunity for nurses and other healthcare professionals to examine the spiritual dimensions of patient encounters, their own values and beliefs, and the effect these may have on their practice.

  17. Comparison of prescribing indicators of academic versus non-academic specialist physicians in Urmia, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sadigh-Rad, Laya; Majdi, Leila; Javaezi, Mehrnush; Delirrad, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: As chief prescribers, physicians could have a key role in rational drug use. Core prescribing indicators of all physicians have been evaluated in the Islamic Republic of Iran for several years, but no study has assessed the effects of academic status of doctors on their prescribing behaviors. We aimed to compare prescribing indicators of two groups of academic and non-academic specialist physicians working in Urmia, Iran. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, prescribing indicators of the total number of 37 academic and 104 non-academic specialist physicians in six medical specialties (infectious diseases, psychiatry, otorhinolaryngology, gynecology, pediatrics and general surgery) were studied during 2012 using Rx-analyzer, a dedicated computer application. A set of five quality indicators was used based on the World Health Organization and International Network for Rational Use of Drugs recommendations. Findings: Totally, 709,771 medications in 269,660 prescriptions were studied. For academic and non-academic specialist physicians, the average number of medications per prescription was 2.26 and 2.65, respectively. Similarly, patients’ encounters with injectable pharmaceuticals were 17.37% and 26.76%, respectively. The corresponding figures for antimicrobial agents were 33.12% and 45.46%, respectively. The average costs of every prescription were 6.53 and 3.30 United States Dollar for academic and non-academic specialist physicians, respectively. All the above-mentioned differences were statistically significant. Conclusion: Better prescribing patterns were observed in academic specialist physicians. However, they prescribed medications that were more expensive, while the reason was not investigated in this study. Further studies may reveal the exact causes of these differences. PMID:25984540

  18. The Manitoba Centre for Health Policy: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Marchessault, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Context: The Manitoba Centre for Health Policy (MCHP) is a university research centre with a long-standing contractual arrangement with government. Objective: The purpose of this project was to examine the facilitators and challenges in the development, establishment and continuation of MCHP. Methods: In-depth, semi-structured interviews with 28 participants selected purposefully and a document review were conducted and analyzed using qualitative methods. Results: Although a unique confluence of factors facilitated MCHP's establishment, participants viewed safeguards to credibility (arm's-length from government; guaranteed academic freedom) along with powerful advocates as key to longevity. Other factors that participants discussed as important to sustainability included excellence in scholarship; thorough protection of privacy; stable funding; incremental growth; teamwork; leadership; nurturing of relationships; and authentic partnerships. Conclusions: MCHP has demonstrated that using local administrative data to address policy-related research questions is of enduring value to local and provincial communities, and also has national and international relevance. PMID:24933371

  19. Nursing Students' Perceptions of the Educational Learning Environment in Pediatric and Maternity Courses Using DREEM Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abusaad, Fawzia El Sayed; Mohamed, Hanan El-Sayed; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady

    2015-01-01

    Background: Educational surroundings is one of the most vital factors in figuring out the fulfillment of an powerful curriculum and gaining of knowledge. Aim: To compare students' perceptions of the academic learning environment in Pediatric and Maternity courses using DREEM Questionnaire. Design: This is a comparative study. Subjects: Five…

  20. Pediatric Sleep Disorders: Validation of the Sleep Disorders Inventory for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luginbuehl, Marsha; Bradley-Klug, Kathy L.; Ferron, John; Anderson, W. McDowell; Benbadis, Selim R.

    2008-01-01

    Approximately 20%-25% of the pediatric population will likely develop a sleep disorder sometime during childhood or adolescence. Studies have shown that untreated sleep disorders can negatively affect cognitive abilities, and academic and behavior performance. The Sleep Disorders Inventory for Students (SDIS) is a screening instrument designed to…

  1. Collaborative Consultation to Support Children with Pediatric Health Issues: A Review of the Biopsychoeducational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grier, Betsy Chesno; Bradley-Klug, Kathy L.

    2011-01-01

    Medical technology continues to improve, increasing life expectancies and capabilities of children with chronic illnesses and disabilities. Pediatric health issues have an impact on children's academic, emotional, behavioral, and social functioning. This article reviews a consultative Biopsychoeducational Model, based on a problem-solving process,…

  2. The Captains of Lives: Kaki Bukit Centre Prison School in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Errol; Goh, Terrence; Tam, Kai Yung (Brian); Heng, Mary Anne

    2005-01-01

    Kaki Bukit Centre Prison School (KBC) in Singapore is a bold and innovative initiative which brings together in a centralized location in one institution, different categories of inmates from both penal and drug institutions who attend academic and vocational classes. The creation of a learning environment within a prison setting is derived from…

  3. A National Benchmarking Survey of Student Counselling Centres/Units in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cilliers, C. D.; Pretorius, K.; van der Westhuizen, L. R.

    2010-01-01

    Students experience various challenges during their studies, such as personal problems, academic difficulties and mental health problems. Therefore, student counselling centres/units play a valuable role in providing support systems for students in need. The most frequent problems South African students experience are relationship problems and…

  4. Fostering Collaboration in CALL: Benefits and Challenges of Using Virtual Language Resource Centres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, Liliana Cuesta; Alvarez, Claudia Patricia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a qualitative study on collaborative CALL design and implementation carried out with two groups of postgraduate language-teacher trainees who designed and piloted nine virtual language resource centres (VLRC) at 16 educational institutions of different levels and contents for an academic year. The project was…

  5. Cooperative Working towards Family-Centred Health Education in Acute Care: Improvement in Client Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastani, Farideh; Golaghaie, Farzaneh; Farahani, Mansoureh A.; Rafeie, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish family-centred health education for patients in a neurosurgery unit and to evaluate its impact on patients' and families' satisfaction. Design: Cooperative participatory research through which a group of clinical nurses and an academic researcher engaged in cycles of action and reflection. Setting: The study was conducted…

  6. How Learning English Facilitates Integration for Adult Migrants: The Jarrah Language Centre Experience. Occasional Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leith, Meaghan

    2012-01-01

    Building the research capacity of the vocational education and training (VET) sector is a key concern for the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER). To assist with this objective, NCVER supported an academic scholarship program, whereby VET practitioners are sponsored to undertake university study at honours, master's, or…

  7. Student-Centred Learning and Disciplinary Enculturation: An Exploration through Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sin, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    This study argues that student-centred methods in the teaching of physics can be beneficial for students' enculturation into the discipline and into a physicist's profession. Interviews conducted with academics and students from six master degrees in physics in three different European countries suggest that student-driven classroom activities,…

  8. What Is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... teens. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialists Have? Pediatric sports medicine specialists are medical ...

  9. What Is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... PICU. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Critical Care Specialists Have? Pediatric critical care specialists are medical ...

  10. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery-2014.

    PubMed

    Kearns, James T; Gundeti, Mohan S

    2014-07-01

    We seek to provide a background of the current state of pediatric urologic surgery including a brief history, procedural outcomes, cost considerations, future directions, and the state of robotic surgery in India. Pediatric robotic urology has been shown to be safe and effective in cases ranging from pyeloplasty to bladder augmentation with continent urinary diversion. Complication rates are in line with other methods of performing the same procedures. The cost of robotic surgery continues to decrease, but setting up pediatric robotic urology programs can be costly in terms of both monetary investment and the training of robotic surgeons. The future directions of robot surgery include instrument and system refinements, augmented reality and haptics, and telesurgery. Given the large number of children in India, there is huge potential for growth of pediatric robotic urology in India. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery has been established as safe and effective, and it will be an important tool in the future of pediatric urologic surgery worldwide.

  11. Pediatric obesity. An introduction.

    PubMed

    Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children's health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children's environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail.

  12. Pediatric Stroke: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tsze, Daniel S.; Valente, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is relatively rare in children, but can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Understanding that children with strokes present differently than adults and often present with unique risk factors will optimize outcomes in children. Despite an increased incidence of pediatric stroke, there is often a delay in diagnosis, and cases may still remain under- or misdiagnosed. Clinical presentation will vary based on the child's age, and children will have risk factors for stroke that are less common than in adults. Management strategies in children are extrapolated primarily from adult studies, but with different considerations regarding short-term anticoagulation and guarded recommendations regarding thrombolytics. Although most recommendations for management are extrapolated from adult populations, they still remain useful, in conjunction with pediatric-specific considerations. PMID:22254140

  13. Pediatric rhinitis risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yaofeng; Liu, Yin; Yang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common global disorder that impacts on the quality of life of the sufferer and caregivers. Treatment for pediatric rhinitis is empirical and does not include a detailed history of the allergy triggers or allergy testing. Thus, allergen avoidance advice is not tailored to the child's sensitivities, which may result in adenoid hypertrophy. However, infant onset rhinitis, especially its relationship with respiratory viruses, remains to be further clarified. Rhinitis basically involves inflammation of the upper nasal lining, presenting typically with symptoms of runny nose (rhinorrhea), nasal blockage, and/or sneezing. While not typically fatal, it does impose significant health, psychological, and monetary burden to its sufferers, and is thus considered a global health problem. Previous findings showed that immunotherapy had significant clinical efficacy in children with allergic rhinitis. The present review article aims to highlight recent perspectives pertaining to the rhinitis risk factors especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27698737

  14. Pediatric Palatal Fibroma

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tayyeb S; Ajaz, Tarannum; Agarwal, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    Fibroma is one of the most common soft tissue benign tumors of the oral cavity. These masses represent hyperplasias instead of true neoplasm, which develop due to irritation to the mucosal tissue resulting in proliferation of the cells. Although so common in the oral cavity, its occurrence on the palate is rare, mainly due to fewer chances of trauma. Here, we report a case of palatal fibroma in a child diagnosed on the basis of clinical, radiological, and histological features. The case represents an extremely rare occurrence as unusual trauma due to thumb sucking seemed to be the only apparent traumatic factor in the palatal region. How to cite this article Mishra R, Khan TS, Ajaz T, Agarwal M. Pediatric Palatal Fibroma. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017; 10(1):96-98. PMID:28377663

  15. Hippocrates on Pediatric Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sgantzos, Markos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Giatsiou, Styliani; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos is well known in medicine, but his contributions to pediatric dermatology have not previously been examined. A systematic study of Corpus Hippocraticum was undertaken to document references of clinical and historical importance of pediatric dermatology. In Corpus Hippocraticum, a variety of skin diseases are described, along with proposed treatments. Hippocrates rejected the theory of the punishment of the Greek gods and supported the concept that dermatologic diseases resulted from a loss of balance in the body humors. Many of the terms that Hippocrates and his pupils used are still being used today. Moreover, he probably provided one of the first descriptions of skin findings in smallpox, Henoch-Schönlein purpura (also known as anaphylactoid purpura, purpura rheumatica, allergic purpura), and meningococcal septicemia.

  16. Pediatric head injury.

    PubMed

    Tulipan, N

    1998-01-01

    Pediatric head injury is a public health problem that exacts a high price from patients, their families and society alike. While much of the brain damage in head-injured patients occurs at the moment of impact, secondary injuries can be prevented by aggressive medical and surgical intervention. Modern imaging devices have simplified the task of diagnosing intracranial injuries. Recent advances in monitoring technology have made it easier to assess the effectiveness of medical therapy. These include intracranial pressure monitoring devices that are accurate and safe, and jugular bulb monitoring which provides a continuous, qualitative measure of cerebral blood flow. The cornerstones of treatment remain hyperventilation and osmotherapy. Despite maximal treatment, however, the mortality and morbidity associated with pediatric head injury remains high. Reduction of this mortality and morbidity will likely depend upon prevention rather than treatment.

  17. [Pediatric adamantinoma. Case report].

    PubMed

    Cafferata, Constanza; Galluzzo, Laura; Cacciavillano, Walter; Innocenti, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Adamantinoma is a primary tumor of long bones, which affects mainly the shaft of the tibia, and is extremely rare in pediatrics. It frequently presents during the second decade of life, with a slight predominance in males. It is a low grade tumor, with local aggressiveness and low rate of metastasis and recurrence once it is completely removed. Its diagnosis is difficult, not only because it is a rare disease in children, but also because of the difficulty in the differential diagnosis with other benign lesions. We report the case of a 15-year-old patient with a painless swelling of the distal tibia, whose diagnosis was confirmed with the piece of amputation, as imaging features and both initial biopsies were not enough to achieve diagnosis. Though most of the literature consists of case reports, and very few in pediatric patients, they all agree on the difficulty in achieving the diagnosis of adamantinoma.

  18. Introduction to pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, W.R.; Masel, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the varied and complex aspects of management in pediatric oncology. Emphasis is placed on a team approach and on establishing and maintaining an individualized, humanistic relationships with the patient. Numerous illustrations show modern imaging techniques that are proving most valuable in the investigation of suspected or confirmed childhood cancer. Physical and psychological side effects of short-term and long-term treatment are also discussed.

  19. [Ultrasound in pediatric dermatology].

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, F J; Muñoz-Garza, F Z; Hernández-Martín, A

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous ultrasound is particularly useful in pediatric dermatology to diagnose numerous diseases without the need to use invasive tests. The present articles reviews some frequent dermatological entities in children whose study can be simplified through cutaneous ultrasound. This article also provides practical recommendations reported in the literature that may facilitate ultrasound examination, with special mention of benign tumoural disease, both congenital and acquired, and vascular anomalies.

  20. MR in pediatric neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wolpert, S.M. ); Barnes, P.; Strand, R. )

    1990-01-01

    The multitude of modern imaging techniques has made pediatric neuroradiology increasingly complex. The practitioner must have a thorough understanding of each possible diagnostic study in order to achieve the best results at the least expense and with minimal risk. In this book, MRI is emphasized; correlative CT, ultrasound, angiographic, and conventional x-ray studies assist in establishing effective diagnostic protocols and reaching accurate diagnoses.

  1. Moral Dilemmas in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, John J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2015-12-01

    All orthopedic surgeons face moral dilemmas on a regular basis; however, little has been written about the moral dilemmas that are encountered when providing orthopedic care to pediatric patients and their families. This article aims to provide surgeons with a better understanding of how bioethics and professionalism apply to the care of their pediatric patients. First, several foundational concepts of both bioethics and professionalism are summarized, and definitions are offered for 16 important terms within the disciplines. Next, some of the unique aspects of pediatric orthopedics as a subspecialty are reviewed before engaging in a discussion of 5 common moral dilemmas within the field. Those dilemmas include the following: (1) obtaining informed consent and assent for either surgery or research from pediatric patients and their families; (2) performing cosmetic surgery on pediatric patients; (3) caring for pediatric patients with cognitive or physical impairments; (4) caring for injured pediatric athletes; and (5) meeting the demand for pediatric orthopedic care in the United States. Pertinent considerations are reviewed for each of these 5 moral dilemmas, thereby better preparing surgeons for principled moral decision making in their own practices. Each of these dilemmas is inherently complex with few straightforward answers; however, orthopedic surgeons have an obligation to take the lead and better define these kinds of difficult issues within their field. The lives of pediatric patients and their families will be immeasurably improved as a result.

  2. Nutrition in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Tracie L.; Neri, Daniela; Extein, Jason; Somarriba, Gabriel; Strickman-Stein, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are heterogeneous groups of serious disorders of the heart muscle and are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality among children who have the disease. While enormous improvements have been made in the treatment and survival of children with congenital heart disease, parallel strides have not been made in the outcomes for cardiomyopathies. Thus, ancillary therapies, such as nutrition and nutritional interventions, that may not cure but may potentially improve cardiac function and quality of life, are imperative to consider in children with all types of cardiomyopathy. Growth failure is one of the most significant clinical problems of children with cardiomyopathy with nearly one-third of children with this disorder manifesting some degree of growth failure during the course of their illness. Optimal intake of macronutrients can help improve cardiac function. In addition, several specific nutrients have been shown to correct myocardial abnormalities that often occur with cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, antioxidants that can protect against free radical damage that often occurs in heart failure and nutrients that augment myocardial energy production are important therapies that have been explored more in adults with cardiomyopathy than in the pediatric population. Future research directions should pay particular attention to the effect of overall nutrition and specific nutritional therapies on clinical outcomes and quality of life in children with pediatric cardiomyopathy. PMID:18159216

  3. Functional foods in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Van den Driessche, M; Veereman-Wauters, G

    2002-01-01

    The philosophy that food can be health promoting beyond its nutritional value is gaining acceptance. Known disease preventive aspects of nutrition have led to a new science, the 'functional food science'. Functional foods, first introduced in Japan, have no universally accepted definition but can be described as foods or food ingredients that may provide health benefits and prevent diseases. Currently, there is a growing interest in these products. However, not all regulatory issues have been settled yet. Five categories of foods can be classified as functional foods: dietary fibers, vitamins and minerals, bioactive substances, fatty acids and pro-, pre- and symbiotics. The latter are currently the main focus of research. Functional foods can be applied in pediatrics: during pregnancy, nutrition is 'functional' since it has prenatal influences on the intra-uterine development of the baby, after birth, 'functional' human milk supports adequate growth of infants and pro- and prebiotics can modulate the flora composition and as such confer certain health advantages. Functional foods have also been studied in pediatric diseases. The severity of necrotising enterocolitis (NEC), diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, intestinal allergy and lactose intolerance may be reduced by using functional foods. Functional foods have proven to be valuable contributors to the improvement of health and the prevention of diseases in pediatric populations.

  4. Nutritional assessment in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, M R; Zemel, B; Stallings, V A

    1998-01-01

    Nutritional status affects every pediatric patient's response to illness. Good nutrition is important for achieving normal growth and development. Nutritional assessment therefore should be an integral part of the care for every pediatric patient. Routine screening measures for abnormalities of growth should be performed on all pediatric patients. Those patients with chronic illness and those at risk for malnutrition should have detailed nutritional assessments done. Components of a complete nutritional assessment include a medical history, nutritional history including dietary intake, physical examination, anthropometrics (weight, length or stature, head circumference, midarm circumference, and triceps skinfold thickness), pubertal staging, skeletal maturity staging, and biochemical tests of nutritional status. Alternative measures for linear growth assessment (e.g., lower leg and upper arm measures) can be performed on patients unable to stand or who have musculoskeletal deformities. Bone densitometry can be used to assess bone mineralization and the risk of fracture. Nutritionally at risk patients may benefit from determination of resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. The use of age, gender, and disease-specific growth charts is essential in assessing nutritional status and monitoring nutrition interventions. The importance of accurate measurements using trained personnel and appropriate equipment cannot be overemphasized.

  5. Invasive procedures carried out in conscious children: contrast between North American and European paediatric oncology centres

    PubMed Central

    Hain, R; Campbell, C; SPACE, S; KHARASCH, S; BAUCHNER, H

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To define practice in managing repeated invasive procedures in selected paediatric oncology centres in North America and Europe, especially the United Kingdom; to define and contrast concerns that shape policy making, and to contrast practice, particularly regarding procedures performed on conscious patients.
METHODS—Postal survey: 118 centres of the Pediatric Oncology Group and the United Kingdom Children's Cancer Study Group received questionnaires.
RESULTS—68 questionnaires (58%) were returned (52 from North America, 12 from Europe). For all procedures, North American centres tended to use less effective techniques than European, especially for bone marrow procedures. Many North American centres reported performing these on conscious patients on at least three quarters (25%) or half (30%) the occasions. In contrast, corresponding figures for the European centres were 6% and 0%.
CONCLUSIONS—Many bone marrow procedures are still carried out in the conscious patient despite the safety and effectiveness of modern anaesthetic and deep sedation techniques. There appears to be a greater reluctance to offer these to patients in North American centres than in European ones. This may reflect a misperception that the risks of adverse effects are high. Several non-pharmacological techniques are used, but they remain uncommon.

 PMID:11420188

  6. Contribution of the Activities Diary to the pediatric teaching.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Vitor de Almeida; Scucuglia, Ana Cláudia B; T Gonsaga, Ricardo Alessandro; Biscegli, Terezinha Soares

    2013-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the fifth-year medical students' self-evaluation based on the reflexive discourse of the Activities Diaries (portfolio) from the Pediatric Internship I and Child Care Rotations. METHODS Cross sectional, qualitative and descriptive study using the collective subject discourse of the diaries used during the internship of the Medical School, in Catanduva, São Paulo, from January to November, 2011. The registered students' testimonials in the portfolio sections called self-assessment and students' impression were assessed according to their central ideas (discipline organization, breastfeeding outpatient clinic, number of admissions in the pediatric hospital ward and satisfaction with the Child Health training ), related to the teaching of Pediatrics and Child Care. The portfolios with incomplete registers were excluded. RESULTS The testimonials of 47 interns (75% of the students) were analyzed, and 21.3% of them expressed satisfaction with the discipline organization and 27.7% praised the inclusion of the breastfeeding outpatient clinics in the course. For 25.5% of the academics, the number of admissions in the pediatric wards was insufficient for an ideal learning; however, 70.2% were satisfied with the Child Health training. CONCLUSIONS This critical analysis allowed a summary of the reflections, suggestions and critics registered by the interns and can be used as a tool for improvement of the professional cycle.

  7. The African Pediatric Fellowship Program: Training in Africa for Africans.

    PubMed

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Morrow, Brenda; du Preez, Avril; Githanga, David; Kennedy, Neil; Zar, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    Africa has a significant burden of childhood disease, with relatively few skilled health care professionals. The African Paediatric Fellowship Programme was developed by the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health at the University of Cape Town to provide relevant training for African child health professionals, by Africans, within Africa. Trainees identified by partner academic institutions spend 6 months to 2 years training in the Department of Pediatrics and allied disciplines. They then return to their home institution to build practice, training, research, and advocacy. From 2008 to 2015, 73 physicians have completed or are completing training in general pediatrics or a pediatric subspecialty. At 1 year posttraining, 98% to 100% are practicing back in their home institution. The impact of the returning fellows is evident from their practice interventions, research collaborations, and positions as stakeholders who can change health care policies. Thirty-three centers in 13 African countries are partners with the program, and the program template is now followed by other partner sites in Africa. Increasing and retaining the skills pool of African child health specialists is building a network of motivated, highly skilled clinicians who are equipped to advance child health in Africa.

  8. Insomnia: the Sleeping Giant of Pediatric Public Health.

    PubMed

    Badin, Emily; Haddad, Cynthia; Shatkin, Jess Parker

    2016-05-01

    Insomnia among children and adolescents is ubiquitous and takes a great toll on youth and their families, impacting academic achievement, mood, social functioning, and a variety of developmental outcomes. Unfortunately, however, pediatric insomnia most often remains unidentified and untreated. When treatment is provided, it is most often in the form of medications, which are not FDA approved for that indication in children and adolescents. A comprehensive literature review was employed to establish the recommendations in this report. This article provides a review of sleep physiology and both current and recommended approaches to assessing and treating pediatric insomnia. Comprehensive assessment, accurate diagnosis, and evidence-based treatment of insomnia is imperative to the healthy development of children and adolescents. While clinicians often prescribe a variety of medications to treat pediatric insomnia, there is insufficient data to demonstrate efficacy and endorse their routine use. At this time, behavioral techniques, such as cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia and sleep hygiene education, should remain the first line of treatment. As a second-line consideration, melatonin, a dietary supplement, may be effective. Pediatric insomnia has an enormous impact on children, adolescents, and their families that requires adequate attention from clinicians and parents alike.

  9. Translational research in pediatrics: tissue sampling and biobanking.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Alayne R; Matsui, Doreen; Rieder, Michael J; Fraser, Douglas D

    2012-01-01

    Translational research is expanding and has become a focus of National Research funding agencies, touted as the primary avenue to improve health care practice. The use of human tissues for research on disease etiology is a pillar of translational research, particularly with innovations in research technologies to investigate the building blocks of disease. In pediatrics, translational research using human tissues has been hindered by the many practical and ethical considerations associated with tissue procurement from children and also by a limited population base for study, by the increasing complexities in conducting clinical research, and by a lack of dedicated child-health research funding. Given these obstacles, pediatric translational research can be enhanced by developing strategic and efficient biobanks that will provide scientists with quality tissue specimens to render accurate and reproducible research results. Indeed, tissue sampling and biobanking within pediatric academic settings has potential to impact child health by promoting bidirectional interaction between clinicians and scientists, helping to maximize research productivity, and providing a competitive edge for attracting and maintaining high-quality personnel. The authors of this review outline key issues and practical solutions to optimize pediatric tissue sampling and biobanking for translational research, activities that will ultimately reduce the burden of childhood disease.

  10. Pediatric Observation Units in the US: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Macy, Michelle L.; Kim, Christopher S.; Sasson, Comilla; Lozon, Marie M.; Davis, Matthew M.

    2009-01-01

    Background As the United States' (US) health system seeks more efficient and value-based care models, geographically distinct observation units (OUs) may become an integral part of hospital-based care for children. Purpose To systematically review the literature and evaluate the structure and function of pediatric OUs in the US. Data Sources Searches were conducted in Medline, Web of Science, CINAHL, HCAB, Lexis Nexis, National Guideline Clearinghouse and Cochrane Reviews through February 2009, with review of select bibliographies. Study Selection English language peer-reviewed publications on pediatric OU care in the US. Data Extraction Two authors independently determined study eligibility. Studies were graded using a 5-level quality assessment tool. Data were extracted using a standardized form. Data Synthesis 21 studies met inclusion criteria: 2 randomized trials, 2 prospective observational, 12 retrospective cohort, 2 before and after, and 3 descriptive studies. Studies present data on more than 22,000 children cared for in OUs, most at large academic centers. This systematic review provides a descriptive overview of the structure and function of pediatric OUs in the US. Despite seemingly straightforward outcomes for OU care, significant heterogeneity in the reporting of length of stay, admission rates, return visit rates, and costs precluded our ability to conduct meta-analyses. We propose standard outcome measures and future directions for pediatric OU research. Conclusions Future research using consistent outcome measures will be critical to determining whether OUs can improve the quality and cost of providing care to children requiring observation-length stays. PMID:20235288

  11. Contribution of the Activities Diary to the pediatric teaching

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Vitor de Almeida; Scucuglia, Ana Cláudia B.; T.Gonsaga, Ricardo Alessandro; Biscegli, Terezinha Soares

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the fifth-year medical students' self-evaluation based on the reflexive discourse of the Activities Diaries (portfolio) from the Pediatric Internship I and Child Care Rotations. METHODS Cross sectional, qualitative and descriptive study using the collective subject discourse of the diaries used during the internship of the Medical School, in Catanduva, São Paulo, from January to November, 2011. The registered students' testimonials in the portfolio sections called self-assessment and students' impression were assessed according to their central ideas (discipline organization, breastfeeding outpatient clinic, number of admissions in the pediatric hospital ward and satisfaction with the Child Health training ), related to the teaching of Pediatrics and Child Care. The portfolios with incomplete registers were excluded. RESULTS The testimonials of 47 interns (75% of the students) were analyzed, and 21.3% of them expressed satisfaction with the discipline organization and 27.7% praised the inclusion of the breastfeeding outpatient clinics in the course. For 25.5% of the academics, the number of admissions in the pediatric wards was insufficient for an ideal learning; however, 70.2% were satisfied with the Child Health training. CONCLUSIONS This critical analysis allowed a summary of the reflections, suggestions and critics registered by the interns and can be used as a tool for improvement of the professional cycle. PMID:24142320

  12. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

  13. Academic detailing.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations.

  14. Drug repurposing in pediatrics and pediatric hematology oncology.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Julie; Corey, Seth J

    2013-01-01

    Drug 'repurposing', that is, using old drugs for new indications, has been proposed as a more efficient strategy for drug development than the current standard of beginning with novel agents. In this review, we explore the scope of drug repurposing in pediatric hematology oncology and in pediatrics in general. Drugs commonly used in children were identified using the Harriet Lane Handbook (HLH) and searched in PubMed for different uses. Additional drugs were identified by searching PubMed and Google.com for 'drug repurposing' or 'drug repositioning'. Almost 10% of drugs with primary uses in pediatrics have been repurposed in pediatric hematology oncology or pediatrics. The observant clinician, pharmacologist and translational bioinformatician, as well as structural targeting, will have a role in discovering new repurposing opportunities.

  15. Academic voices and the challenges of tutoring.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes grounded theory research conducted amongst postregistration learners completing an undergraduate programme in nursing studies by distance learning at a UK higher education institute. The focus of enquiry was upon student support and learning. Research was conducted between 1996 and 2001 and included 41 interviews with students, 22 interviews with tutors, 24 tutorial observations and 69 field observations conducted within the distance learning centre. A key theme developing within the research was the use of 'academic voices' by students to help manage their support relationship with tutors. Academic voices describe the ways in which students asked for helped and admitted the tutor in varying degrees to their learning. Students adopted a 'voice' that they believed enabled them to manage learning and to determine just what sorts of help the tutor would be permitted to supply. The paper discusses the implications of the use of academic voices' by students for the support work of tutors.

  16. Group Intervention in Pediatric Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaForme Fiss, Alyssa

    2012-01-01

    Group intervention in pediatric physical and occupational therapy is an alternative to individual intervention allowing the therapist to meet the needs of multiple children at one time. Survey research indicates that approximately 40% to 60% of pediatric physical and occupational therapists use group intervention at least occasionally in practice,…

  17. Educational Preparation of Pediatric Audiologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roush, Jackson

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric audiologists play a vital role in detection, diagnosis, and intervention for young children with hearing loss and their families. Preparing the next generation of pediatric audiologists necessitates a creative approach that balances the requirements of a broad curriculum with the special skills needed to serve a unique and varied…

  18. Pediatric imaging for the technologist

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmot, D.M.; Sharko, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    This manual provides an accessible store of information on pediatric imaging procedures, with clearly described techniques and instructions. The aim is to simplify the pediatric examination. Extensively illustrated, this work describes in detail correct positioning, radiation protection, and methods of immobilization. The concluding chapters clarify what is required in the final image for accurate diagnosis.

  19. Rapid Service/Prediction Centre

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    respect to the 05 C04 system of the IERS Earth Orientation Centre (EOC) at the Paris Observatory by way of a robust linear estimator. Statistical...of each individual data point. The software computes the spline coefficients for every data point, which are then used to interpolate the Earth ...between daily rapid solutions at each daily solution epoch for 2008 and the Earth orientation parameters available in 05 C04 series produced in March 2009

  20. National Centre for Radio Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    India's National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA), located on the Pune University Campus, is part of the TATA INSTITUTE OF FUNDAMENTAL RESEARCH. At Khodad, 80 km from Pune, NCRA has set up the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), the world's largest telescope operating at meter wavelengths. GMRT consists of 30 fully steerable dishes of 45 m diameter, spread over a 25 km area. Another meter...

  1. New Academics Negotiating Communities of Practice: Learning to Swim with the Big Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jawitz, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the use of situated cognition theory to investigate how new academics learn to judge complex student performance in an academic department at a South African university. The analysis revealed the existence of two largely separate communities of practice within the department, one centred on the provision of undergraduate…

  2. Genre-Based Curricula: Multilingual Academic Literacy in Content and Language Integrated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses academic literacy in content and language integrated learning (CLIL) secondary education. More precisely, this paper focuses on attempts to meet modern standards for language competences set in areas like Europe, where the notion involves multilingual academic competence. The study centres on new proposals for language…

  3. Realizing Partnership Potential: A Report on a Formal Collaboration between a Teaching and Learning Centre and Libraries at the University of Toronto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolan, John; Bellamy, Patricia; Rolheiser, Carol; Szurmak, Joanna; Vine, Rita

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, the University of Toronto's Centre for Teaching Support & Innovation (CTSI) and University of Toronto Libraries (UTL) jointly launched Partnering for Academic Student Success (PASS), a partnership to foster new opportunities for collaboration between academic librarians and those involved in developing excellence in university…

  4. Controversies in Pediatric Perioperative Airways

    PubMed Central

    Klučka, Jozef; Štourač, Petr; Štoudek, Roman; Ťoukálková, Michaela; Harazim, Hana; Kosinová, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric airway management is a challenge in routine anesthesia practice. Any airway-related complication due to improper procedure can have catastrophic consequences in pediatric patients. The authors reviewed the current relevant literature using the following data bases: Google Scholar, PubMed, Medline (OVID SP), and Dynamed, and the following keywords: Airway/s, Children, Pediatric, Difficult Airways, and Controversies. From a summary of the data, we identified several controversies: difficult airway prediction, difficult airway management, cuffed versus uncuffed endotracheal tubes for securing pediatric airways, rapid sequence induction (RSI), laryngeal mask versus endotracheal tube, and extubation timing. The data show that pediatric anesthesia practice in perioperative airway management is currently lacking the strong evidence-based medicine (EBM) data that is available for adult subpopulations. A number of procedural steps in airway management are derived only from adult populations. However, the objective is the same irrespective of patient age: proper securing of the airway and oxygenation of the patient. PMID:26759809

  5. Pediatric brain tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Margol, Ashley; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors as a group, including medulloblastomas, gliomas, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT) are the most common solid tumors in children and the leading cause of death from childhood cancer. Brain tumor-derived cell lines are critical for studying the biology of pediatric brain tumors and can be useful for initial screening of new therapies. Use of appropriate brain tumor cell lines for experiments is important, as results may differ depending on tumor properties, and can thus affect the conclusions and applicability of the model. Despite reports in the literature of over 60 pediatric brain tumor cell lines, the majority of published papers utilize only a small number of these cell lines. Here we list the approximately 60 currently-published pediatric brain tumor cell lines and summarize some of their central features as a resource for scientists seeking pediatric brain tumor cell lines for their research.

  6. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.

    PubMed

    Evans, Roger

    2014-11-04

    The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control was set up in 2005 to strengthen Europe's defences against infectious diseases. The centre is an independent agency of the European Union and is based in Stockholm, Sweden.

  7. Pediatric lymphomas in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Klumb, Claudete E; Barber, Glen N; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study provides the clinical pathological characteristics of 1301 cases of pediatric/adolescent lymphomas in patients from different geographic regions of Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analyses of diagnosed pediatric lymphoma cases in a 10‐year period was performed. We believe that it represents the largest series of pediatric lymphomas presented from Brazil. RESULTS: Non‐Hodgkin lymphomas represented 68% of the cases, including those of precursor (36%) and mature (64%) cell origin. Mature cell lymphomas comprised 81% of the B‐cell phenotype and 19% of the T‐cell phenotype. Hodgkin lymphomas represented 32% of all cases, including 87% of the classical type and 13% of nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The geographic distribution showed 38.4% of the cases in the Southeast region, 28.7% in the Northeast, 16.1% in the South, 8.8% in the North, and 8% in the Central‐west region. The distribution by age groups was 15–18 years old, 33%; 11–14 years old, 26%; 6–10 years old, 24%; and 6 years old or younger, 17%. Among mature B‐cell lymphomas, most of the cases were Burkitt lymphomas (65%), followed by diffuse large B‐cell lymphomas (24%). In the mature T‐cell group, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK‐positive was the most prevalent (57%), followed by peripheral T‐cell lymphoma, then not otherwise specified (25%). In the group of classic Hodgkin lymphomas, the main histological subtype was nodular sclerosis (76%). Nodular lymphocyte predominance occurred more frequently than in other series. CONCLUSION: Some of the results found in this study may reflect the heterogeneous socioeconomical status and environmental factors of the Brazilian population in different regions. PMID:21340214

  8. Engaging pediatricians in developmental screening: the effectiveness of academic detailing.

    PubMed

    Honigfeld, Lisa; Chandhok, Laura; Spiegelman, Kenneth

    2012-06-01

    Use of formal developmental screening tools in the pediatric medical home improves early identification of children with developmental delays and disorders, including Autism Spectrum Disorders. A pilot study evaluated the impact of an academic detailing module in which trainers visited 43 pediatric primary care practices to provide education about implementing developmental screening tools in well-child services. Attendees responded to a post presentation survey stating that they planned to implement screening in their practices. Medicaid billing data showed an increase in the state's overall rate of screening. An audit of medical charts in five practices that received the training and five that did not showed higher screening rates in practices that received the training as well as higher rates after the training than before. These pilot study results indicate the potential of academic detailing as an effective strategy for improving rates of developmental screening.

  9. Pediatric environmental health.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Bailus

    2005-01-01

    The links between environmental agents, environmental conditions, and disease and disability among children are receiving increasing attention. Evidence abounds that children are more susceptible than adults to the damaging effects of environmental agents and conditions. This evidence is illuminated by the much-publicized and expanding research agenda on the prevention, recognition, diagnosis and treatment of environmentally related disease in the pediatric population. Encouragingly, advances in molecular biology and other sciences are providing important tools to aid pediatricians and other healthcare professionals in meeting the environmental health needs of children. PMID:15712790

  10. Procedural pediatric dermatology.

    PubMed

    Metz, Brandie J

    2013-04-01

    Due to many factors, including parental anxiety, a child's inability to understand the necessity of a procedure and a child's unwillingness to cooperate, it can be much more challenging to perform dermatologic procedures in children. This article reviews pre-procedural preparation of patients and parents, techniques for minimizing injection-related pain and optimal timing of surgical intervention. The risks and benefits of general anesthesia in the setting of pediatric dermatologic procedures are discussed. Additionally, the surgical approach to a few specific types of birthmarks is addressed.

  11. Pediatric Genitourinary Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Dénes, Francisco Tibor; Duarte, Ricardo Jordão; Cristófani, Lílian Maria; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias

    2013-01-01

    Tumors of the kidney, bladder, prostate, testis, and adrenal represent a large part of the adult urologic practice, but are relatively infrequent in children. The natural history and management of these tumors in the pediatric age is different from that of the adults. As result of the successful work of several clinical trial groups in recent decades, there has been a significant improvement in their cure rates. The aim of this article is to review their most significant clinical aspects, as well as to present an update in their management. PMID:24400293

  12. Pediatric Testicular Torsion.

    PubMed

    Bowlin, Paul R; Gatti, John M; Murphy, J Patrick

    2017-02-01

    The pediatric patient presenting with acute scrotal pain requires prompt evaluation and management given the likelihood of testicular torsion as the underlying cause. Although other diagnoses can present with acute testicular pain, it is important to recognize the possibility of testicular torsion because the best chance of testicular preservation occurs with expeditious management. When testicular torsion is suspected, prompt surgical exploration is warranted. A delay in surgical management should not occur in an effort to obtain confirmatory imaging. When torsion is discovered, the contralateral testicle should undergo fixation to reduce the risk of asynchronous torsion.

  13. Pediatric cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Gemmete, Joseph J; Toma, Ahmed K; Davagnanam, Indran; Robertson, Fergus; Brew, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Childhood intracranial aneurysms differ from those in the adult population in incidence and gender prevalence, cause, location, and clinical presentation. Endovascular treatment of pediatric aneurysms is the suggested approach because it offers both reconstructive and deconstructive techniques and a better clinical outcome compared with surgery; however, the long-term durability of endovascular treatment is still questionable, therefore long-term clinical and imaging follow-up is necessary. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of intracranial aneurysms in children are discussed, and data from endovascular treatments are presented.

  14. Pediatric trauma BIG score: Predicting mortality in polytraumatized pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Gamasy, Mohamed Abd El-Aziz; Elezz, Ahmed Abd El Basset Abo; Basuni, Ahmed Sobhy Mohamed; Elrazek, Mohamed El Sayed Ali Abd

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a worldwide health problem and the major cause of death and disability, particularly affecting the young population. It is important to remember that pediatric trauma care has made a significant improvement in the outcomes of these injured children. Aim of the Work: This study aimed at evaluation of pediatric trauma BIG score in comparison with New Injury Severity Score (NISS) and Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS) in Tanta University Emergency Hospital. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Tanta University Emergency Hospital to all multiple trauma pediatric patients attended to the Emergency Department for 1 year. Pediatric trauma BIG score, PTS, and NISS scores were calculated and results compared to each other and to observed mortality. Results: BIG score ≥12.7 has sensitivity 86.7% and specificity 71.4%, whereas PTS at value ≤3.5 has sensitivity 63.3% and specificity 68.6% and NISS at value ≥39.5 has sensitivity 53.3% and specificity 54.3%. There was a significant positive correlation between BIG score value and mortality rate. Conclusion: The pediatric BIG score is a reliable mortality-prediction score for children with traumatic injuries; it uses international normalization ratio (INR), Base Excess (BE), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) values that can be measured within a few minutes of sampling, so it can be readily applied in the Pediatric Emergency Department, but it cannot be applied on patients with chronic diseases that affect INR, BE, or GCS. PMID:27994378

  15. Academic Counsellors' Awareness of Distance Education Instructional Concepts and Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sukumar, B.

    2000-01-01

    Presents the results of a survey among academic counselors at Indira Gandhi National Open University Regional Centre (IGNOU) (India) that was conducted to ascertain their awareness about instructional concepts of distance education and counseling practices. Concludes that counselors need training to be effective and make distance education a…

  16. Predictors of Academic Achievement and Their Possible Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockshin, Jeffrey; Zamkov, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    A significant amount of attention has been given to the predictors of academic achievement in higher education. However, the vast majority of articles have centred on entrance criteria and the learning approaches or personal habits of students. Investigations into how achievement depends on student efforts, being almost invariably based on…

  17. Pediatric Hand Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nellans, Kate W.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Pediatric hand fractures are common childhood injuries. Identification of the fractures in the emergency room setting can be challenging owing to the physes and incomplete ossification of the carpus that are not revealed in the xrays. Most simple fractures can be treated with appropriate immobilization through buddy taping, finger splints, or casting. If correctly diagnosed, reduced and immobilized, these fractures usually result in excellent clinical outcomes. However, fractures may require operative stabilization if they have substantial angulation or rotation, extend into the joint, or cannot be held in a reduced position with splinting alone. Most fractures can be treated operatively with closed reduction and percutaneous pinning if addressed within the first week following the injury. In children, the thick, vascular-rich periosteum and bony remodeling potential make anatomic reductions and internal fixation rarely necessary. Most fractures complete bony healing in 3-4 weeks, with the scaphoid being a notable exception. Following immobilization, children rarely develop hand stiffness and formal occupational therapy is usually not necessary. Despite the high potential for excellent outcomes in pediatric hand fractures, some fractures remain difficult to diagnose and treat. PMID:24209954

  18. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition.

  19. [New horizons in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Grossman, Zachi

    2012-06-01

    The profession of pediatrics is constantLy changing. New morbidities are replacing old ones, as a reflection of the changes in society. Even today, old and rare morbidities, like scurvy or acute urinary retention, can be encountered in special settings and populations such as handicapped and developmentally delayed children. The availability of ever newer genetic tests highlights the duty of pediatricians to constantly update families for carrier detection, but also raises questions on the cLinical significance of asymptomatic mutations. Vaccination is one of the most effective pubLic health measures, but failure of medical staff to follow self vaccination recommendations might jeopardize protecting the children. Anti vaccination movement is rapidly growing due to the Internet. However, we must acknowledge the benefits inherent in Internet forums, for example, adolescents consulting anonymously regarding pubertal issues. A new and most needed aspect of care is treatment of pain in children. Increased staff awareness concerning anaLgesia is needed as well as promoting the use of medical clowns for anxiety and pain provoking procedures. Delivering appropriate healthcare to different societal demographic sectors is a challenge for pediatricians. The approach to fever phobia among ultra orthodox parents and advocacy for safety recommendations in the Arab population are two such exampLes. Finally, we shouLd always strive for innovative approaches in pediatric diseases affecting quality of life, and celiac disease is certainly promising in this direction.

  20. Pediatric Hypovitaminosis D

    PubMed Central

    Ariganjoye, Rafiu

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D, a secosteroid, is essential for the development and maintenance of healthy bone in both the adult and pediatric populations. Low level of 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25-(OH)-D) is highly prevalent in children worldwide and has been linked to various adverse health outcomes including rickets, osteomalacia, osteomalacic myopathy, sarcopenia, and weakness, growth retardation, hypocalcemia, seizure and tetany, autism, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, cancers (prostate, colon, breast), infectious diseases (viral, tuberculosis), and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Risk factors for hypovitaminosis D are people with darker skin pigmentation, use of sunscreen, insufficient ultraviolet B exposure, prematurity, living in northern latitudes, malnutrition, obesity, exclusive breastfeeding, low maternal vitamin D level, certain medications, drinking unfortified cow’s milk, liver failure, chronic renal insufficiency, cystic fibrosis, asthma, and sickle cell hemoglobinopathy. This review highlights and summarizes the molecular perspectives of vitamin D deficiency and its potential adverse health outcomes in pediatric age groups. The recommended treatment regimen is beyond the scope of this review. PMID:28229097

  1. Contemporary roles of the pediatric psychologist in diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Kichler, Jessica C; Harris, Michael A; Weissberg-Benchell, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Important stakeholders, including the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD), recognize the need for psychologists to be an integral part of diabetes care. This review paper aims to provide a comprehensive examination of pediatric psychologists' roles in working with children and adolescents with diabetes, including during distinct phases of treatment (e.g., diagnosis, outpatient diabetes clinic visits, inpatient hospitalizations, and outpatient psychology visits) and with different modalities of psychological interventions (e.g., screening, individual, family, and group therapy). In addition, the role of the psychologist in diabetes care within various settings (e.g., private practice, academic medical centers, and community organizations) will be explored. Finally, this paper will outline other roles in which psychologists contribute to diabetes-specific efforts (e.g., translational research, program development in transition to adult care, advocacy for health care reform initiatives, health care billing/reimbursement, and alternative methods to psychosocial care delivery) as well as future directions for working with children and adolescents with diabetes. Pediatric psychologists have multiple professional roles in a wide variety of settings; however, there is more that can be done in the future to fully utilize pediatric psychologists in diabetes care for children and adolescents, such as embedding psychologists into integrated clinic visits where families receive comprehensive medical and psychological services to support overall health and well-being. Therefore, there is a need for increased advocacy to obtain even more pediatric psychology engagement in diabetes care to provide new clinical services and develop more translational research.

  2. The DEMETER Science Mission Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoutte, D.; Brochot, J. Y.; de Carvalho, D.; Elie, F.; Harivelo, F.; Hobara, Y.; Madrias, L.; Parrot, M.; Pinçon, J. L.; Berthelier, J. J.; Peschard, D.; Seran, E.; Gangloff, M.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Lebreton, J. P.; Stverak, S.; Travnicek, P.; Grygorczuk, J.; Slominski, J.; Wronowski, R.; Barbier, S.; Bernard, P.; Gaboriaud, A.; Wallut, J. M.

    2006-04-01

    The DEMETER Scientific Mission Centre (SMC) has been developed and is operated by the Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l'Environnement (LPCE). The SMC commands the instruments of the scientific payload, collects and distributes DEMETER data and associated products to the DEMETER international community. The SMC has been designed to maximize scientific return and to reduce development and exploitation costs for the DEMETER project. This paper describes the SMC's data processing system, data server and methods of payload operation, and presents associated hardware and software architectures.

  3. Challenges in pediatric chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Haliloğlu, Göknur; Yüksel, Deniz; Temoçin, Cağri Mesut; Topaloğlu, Haluk

    2016-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy, a treatable immune-mediated disease of the peripheral nervous system is less common in childhood compared to adults. Despite different sets of diagnostic criteria, lack of a reliable biologic marker leads to challenges in diagnosis, follow-up and treatment. Our first aim was to review clinical presentation, course, response to treatment, and prognosis in our childhood patients. We also aimed to document diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls and challenges at the bedside. Our original cohort consisted of 23 pediatric patients who were referred to us with a clinical diagnosis of chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy. Seven patients reaching to an alternative diagnosis were excluded. In the remaining patients, diagnostic, treatment and follow-up data were compared in typical patients who satisfied both clinical and electrodiagnostic criteria and atypical patients who failed to meet minimal research chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy electrodiagnostic requirements. Eight of 16 patients (50%) met the minimal chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy research diagnostic requirements. There was only a statistically significant difference (p = 0.010) in terms of European Neuromuscular Centre childhood chronic inflammatory diagnostic mandatory clinical criteria between the two groups. Misdiagnosis due to errors in electrophysiological interpretation (100%, n = 8), cerebrospinal fluid cytoalbuminologic dissociation (100%, n = 4 and/or subjective improvement on any immunotherapy modality (80 ± 19.27%)) was frequent. Pediatric CIDP is challenging in terms of diagnostic and therapeutic pitfalls at the bedside. Diagnostic errors due to electrophysiological interpretation, cerebrospinal fluid cytoalbuminologic dissociation, and/or subjective improvement on immunotherapy should be considered.

  4. Pediatric facial transplantation: Ethical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jennifer; Shaul, Randi Zlotnik; Hanson, Mark D; Borschel, Gregory H; Zuker, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Facial transplantation is becoming increasingly accepted as a method of reconstructing otherwise unreconstructable adult faces. As this modality is made more available, we must turn our attention to pediatric patients who may benefit from facial transplantation. In the current article, the authors present and briefly examine the most pressing ethical challenges posed by the possibility of performing facial transplantation on pediatric patients. Furthermore, they issue a call for a policy statement on pediatric facial transplantation. The present article may serve as a first step in that direction, highlighting ethical issues that would need to be considered in the creation of such a statement. PMID:25114614

  5. Pharmacologic Therapies for Pediatric Concussions

    PubMed Central

    Halstead, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Pediatric concussions are common, and emphasis on correct diagnosis and management is stressed in consensus guidelines. Medications may have a role in management of concussion, but no consensus exists regarding appropriate pharmacologic therapy. Evidence Acquisition: Nonsystematic review. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: There is limited evidence for hypertonic saline to improve posttraumatic headache in the emergency department setting. There is essentially no evidence for the use of any other medication in management of pediatric sport-related concussion. Conclusion: Further research is necessary to determine whether there is benefit to the use of any pharmacotherapy in the management of pediatric-aged athletes with concussions. PMID:26660460

  6. Adalimumab in pediatric Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashish S; Suarez, Lisbet D; Rosh, Joel R

    2016-02-01

    Adalimumab, a human monoclonal antibody to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), was initially approved for the treatment of moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis in 2002. In the subsequent years, its anti-inflammatory properties were applied to the treatment of psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, adult Crohn's disease (CD), plaque psoriasis, polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, adult ulcerative colitis and most recently in 2014, pediatric CD. The biologic era in pediatric CD has changed and redefined the therapeutic approach to this challenging lifelong disease. This article summarizes the clinical legacy of adalimumab with a focus on its most recent expanded indication, pediatric CD.

  7. Pediatric neuropsychology: toward subspecialty designation.

    PubMed

    Baron, Ida Sue; Wills, Karen; Rey-Casserly, Celiane; Armstrong, Kira; Westerveld, Michael

    2011-08-01

    Clinical neuropsychology is a rapidly expanding field of study in the psychological sciences whose practitioners are expert in the assessment, treatment, and research of individuals with known or suspected central nervous system disease or disorder. Pediatric neuropsychology has emerged as a distinct subspecialty area with related education, training, and clinical expertise for a growing number of neuropsychologists. This paper details the numerous steps taken by two affiliated organizations, the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology and its membership organization, the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology, in the interest of the larger pediatric neuropsychology community and in pediatric neuropsychology subspecialty development.

  8. Radiation Safety in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Caird, Michelle S

    2015-01-01

    Patients, surgeons, and staff are exposed to ionizing radiation in pediatric orthopaedic surgery from diagnostic studies and imaging associated with procedures. Estimating radiation dose to pediatric patients is based on complex algorithms and dose to surgeons and staff is based on dosimeter monitoring. Surgeons can decrease radiation exposure to patients with careful and thoughtful ordering of diagnostic studies and by minimizing exposure intraoperatively. Surgeon and staff radiation exposure can be minimized with educational programs, proper shielding and positioning intraoperatively, and prudent use of intraoperative imaging. Overall, better awareness among pediatric orthopaedic surgeons of our role in radiation exposure can lead to improvements in radiation safety.

  9. Mentoring practices benefiting pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Weese, Meghan M; Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Huth, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies examining predictors of pediatric nurse protégé mentoring benefits demonstrated that protégé perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations promoting mutual mentoring benefits. This descriptive correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet® recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital advances nursing science by demonstrating how mentoring practices benefit pediatric nurse protégés.

  10. Identifying challenges for academic leadership in medical universities in Iran.

    PubMed

    Bikmoradi, Ali; Brommels, Mats; Shoghli, Alireza; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Masiello, Italo

    2010-05-01

    CONTEXT The crucial role of academic leadership in the success of higher education institutions is well documented. Medical education in Iran has been integrated into the health care system through a complex organisational change. This has called into question the current academic leadership, making Iranian medical universities and schools a good case for exploring the challenges of academic leadership. OBJECTIVES This study explores the leadership challenges perceived by academic managers in medical schools and universities in Iran. METHODS A qualitative study using 18 face-to-face, in-depth interviews with academic managers in medical universities and at the Ministry of Health and Medical Education in Iran was performed. All interviews were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim and analysed by qualitative content analysis. RESULTS The main challenges to academic leadership could be categorised under three themes, each of which included three sub-themes: organisational issues (inefficacy of academic governance; an overly extensive set of missions and responsibilities; concerns about the selection of managers); managerial issues (management styles; mismatch between authority and responsibilities; leadership capabilities), and organisational culture (tendency towards governmental management; a boss-centred culture; low motivation). CONCLUSIONS This study emphasises the need for academic leadership development in Iranian medical schools and universities. The ability of Iranian universities to grow and thrive will depend ultimately upon the application of leadership skills. Thus, it is necessary to better designate authorities, roles of academic staff and leaders at governance.

  11. Profile and scientific production of Brazilian National Council of Technological and Scientific Development researchers in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Maria Christina L.; Martelli, Daniella Reis B.; Pinheiro, Sergio Veloso; Miranda, Debora Marques; Quirino, Isabel Gomes; Leite, Barbara Gusmão L.; Colosimo, Enrico Antonio; Silva, Ana Cristina S. e; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; Oliveira, Eduardo Araujo

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the profile and the scientific production of researchers in Pediatrics with scholarship from the National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development. METHODS: The Lattes curricula of 34 researchers in Pediatrics with active scholarships, from 2006 to 2008 were included in the analysis. The variables of interest were: gender, affiliation, time since PHD, tutoring of undergraduate students, mentorship of masters and doctors, scientific production and the papers' impact. RESULTS: In a total of 411 researchers in Medicine, 34 (8%) belonged to Pediatrics. Males (77%) and scholars in the category 2 of productivity (62%) prevailed. Three states of Brazil were responsible for approximately 90% of the researchers: São Paulo (53%), Minas Gerais (21%), and Rio Grande do Sul (15%). During their academic career, the Pediatrics researchers have published 3,122 articles with a median of 89 articles per researcher (interquartile range - IQ=51-119). Of the total, 40 and 59% articles were indexed in the Web of Science and Scopus databases, respectively. The Pediatrics researchers have published papers in 599 journals with a median impact factor of 2.35 (IQ=1.37-3.73) for the 323 indexed journals. CONCLUSIONS: The Pediatrics researchers have a relevant scientific output from the quantity point of the view, but there is a need to improve quality. PMID:24142308

  12. Perceptual centres in speech - an acoustic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Sophie Kerttu

    Perceptual centres, or P-centres, represent the perceptual moments of occurrence of acoustic signals - the 'beat' of a sound. P-centres underlie the perception and production of rhythm in perceptually regular speech sequences. P-centres have been modelled both in speech and non speech (music) domains. The three aims of this thesis were toatest out current P-centre models to determine which best accounted for the experimental data bto identify a candidate parameter to map P-centres onto (a local approach) as opposed to the previous global models which rely upon the whole signal to determine the P-centre the final aim was to develop a model of P-centre location which could be applied to speech and non speech signals. The first aim was investigated by a series of experiments in which a) speech from different speakers was investigated to determine whether different models could account for variation between speakers b) whether rendering the amplitude time plot of a speech signal affects the P-centre of the signal c) whether increasing the amplitude at the offset of a speech signal alters P-centres in the production and perception of speech. The second aim was carried out by a) manipulating the rise time of different speech signals to determine whether the P-centre was affected, and whether the type of speech sound ramped affected the P-centre shift b) manipulating the rise time and decay time of a synthetic vowel to determine whether the onset alteration was had more affect on P-centre than the offset manipulation c) and whether the duration of a vowel affected the P-centre, if other attributes (amplitude, spectral contents) were held constant. The third aim - modelling P-centres - was based on these results. The Frequency dependent Amplitude Increase Model of P-centre location (FAIM) was developed using a modelling protocol, the APU GammaTone Filterbank and the speech from different speakers. The P-centres of the stimuli corpus were highly predicted by attributes of

  13. Academic Probation Intervention through Academic Assistance Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preuss, Michael; Switalski, Rachael

    2008-01-01

    Retaining and aiding students on academic probation is a concern for all institutions of higher education. Students placed on academic probation by Rockingham Community College (RCC) have been encouraged to participate in an intervention program since the summer of 2006. When treated as an aggregate, the data regarding the program indicates that…

  14. Esophageal eosinophilia in pediatric patients with cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    de Nápolis, Ana Carolina Ramos; Alves, Flavia Araujo; Rezende, Erica Rodrigues Mariano de Almeida; Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues Silva

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the clinical picture, test results, and clinical evolution of patients with cerebral palsy associated with diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, monitored at tertiary centre. Methods: Cross-sectional, retrospective and descriptive study that evaluated the medical records data of pediatric patients with diagnosis of cerebral palsy and eosinophilic esophagitis in a tertiary center of pediatric gastroenterology between August 2005 and August 2013. Results: Seven out of 131 patients with cerebral palsy had the diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis. The mean age at diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis was 52.3 months and the mean number of eosinophils in esophagus was 35 per high-power field. Symptoms more frequent were recurrent vomiting and disphagia. Endoscopic alterations found were mucosal thickening, vertical lines, mucosal opacificacion and white plaques. Conclusion: The frequency of eosinophilic esophagitis found was higher than in general pediatric population. The investigation of eosinophilic esophagitis should be done regularly in those patients, once this entity could overlap other gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:26154544

  15. Association of Academic Physiatrists

    MedlinePlus

    Donate Member Portal Search Search » Donate | Member Portal | Sign In | Join Membership Join the AAP Coming Home Member Benefits Top 5 Reasons to Join Categories & Dues Academic Partnership Program Current Academic ...

  16. [Pediatric multiple trauma].

    PubMed

    Auner, B; Marzi, I

    2014-05-01

    Multiple trauma in children is rare so that even large trauma centers will only treat a small number of cases. Nevertheless, accidents are the most common cause of death in childhood whereby the causes are mostly traffic accidents and falls. Head trauma is the most common form of injury and the degree of severity is mostly decisive for the prognosis. Knowledge on possible causes of injury and injury patterns as well as consideration of anatomical and physiological characteristics are of great importance for treatment. The differences compared to adults are greater the younger the child is. Decompression and stopping bleeding are the main priorities before surgical fracture stabilization. The treatment of a severely injured child should be carried out by an interdisciplinary team in an approved trauma center with expertise in pediatrics. An inadequate primary assessment involves a high risk of early mortality. On the other hand children have a better prognosis than adults with comparable injuries.

  17. Introduction to Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Derek S

    2011-10-07

    Sepsis is a significant health problem in both critically ill children and adults. While the mortality rate from sepsis is much lower in children, sepsis is directly responsible for over 4,000 childhood deaths per year in the United States alone. At face value, this number suggests that more children die per year in the United States from sepsis as the primary cause than from cancer. Unfortunately, there are few studies on the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of sepsis in children. Moreover, extrapolation of adult data to critically ill children is probably not appropriate due to several key developmental differences in the host response to infection and response to therapy. Therefore, additional studies targeting sepsis in the pediatric population are urgently required.

  18. Pediatric Suprasellar Tumors.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Heather J; George, Emilie; Settler, Allison; Schwartz, Theodore H; Greenfield, Jeffrey P

    2016-10-01

    The various childhood suprasellar tumors, while pathologically distinct, present similar clinical and surgical challenges as a result of their common anatomic location. These lesions are in close proximity to or may invade the optic nerve and chiasm, pituitary gland and infundibulum, hypothalamus, and third ventricle, leading to presenting features including visual field loss, impairment in visual acuity, endocrine dysfunction, and hydrocephalus. Though many suprasellar lesions are relatively benign in pathology, treatment may be complicated by high surgical morbidity resulting from damage to the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Here we review the most frequent pediatric lesions occurring in the suprasellar region: craniopharyngioma, chiasmatic glioma, germ cell tumor, Rathke cleft and arachnoid cysts, pituitary adenoma, and histiocytosis. This review outlines both common presenting features and differentiating aspects of these lesions. It also includes classic radiographic presentations and treatment considerations for each lesion.

  19. Pediatric radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Halperin, E.C.; Kun, L.E.; Constine, L.S.; Tarbell, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    This text covers all aspects of radiation therapy for treatment of pediatric cancer. The book describes the proper use of irradiation in each of the malignancies of childhood, including tumors that are rarely encountered in adult practice. These include acute leukemia; supratentorial brain tumors; tumors of the posterior fossa of the brain and spinal canal; retinoblastoma and optic nerve glioma; neuroblastoma; Hodgkin's disease; malignant lymphoma; Ewing's sarcoma; osteosarcoma; rhabdomyosarcoma; Desmoid tumor; Wilms' tumor; liver and biliary tumors; germ cell and stromal cell tumors of the gonads; endocrine, aerodigestive tract, and breast tumors; Langerhans' cell histiocytosis; and skin cancer and hemangiomas. For each type of malignancy, the authors describe the epidemiology, common presenting signs and symptoms, staging, and proper diagnostic workup. Particular attention is given to the indications for radiation therapy and the planning of a course of radiotherapy, including the optimal radiation dose, field size, and technique.

  20. Childhood obesity for pediatric gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jeannie S; Barlow, Sarah E; Quiros-Tejeira, Ruben E; Scheimann, Ann; Skelton, Joseph; Suskind, David; Tsai, Patrika; Uko, Victor; Warolin, Joshua P; Xanthakos, Stavra A

    2013-01-01

    Obesity in childhood is one of the major health issues in pediatric health care today. As expected, the prevalence of obesity-related comorbidities has risen in parallel with that of obesity. Consultation regarding these concomitant diseases and subsequent management by subspecialists, including pediatric gastroenterologists, is now common and has resulted in obesity being recognized as a chronic disease requiring coordination of care. Although medications and even surgery may provide effective, though often temporary, treatments for obesity and its comorbidities, behavioral interventions addressing healthy dietary and physical activity habits remain a mainstay in the obesity treatment paradigm. Therefore, the issue of weight management must be addressed by both general practitioner and subspecialist alike. In this report, we review select aspects of pediatric obesity and obesity-related management issues because it relates in particular to the field of pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology.

  1. Childhood Obesity for Pediatric Gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jeannie S.; Barlow, Sarah E.; Quiros-Tejeira, Ruben E.; Scheimann, Ann; Skelton, Joseph; Suskind, David; Tsai, Patrika; Uko, Victor; Warolin, Joshua P.; Xanthakos, Stavra A.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity in childhood is one of the major health issues in pediatric health care today. As expected, the prevalence of obesity-related comorbidities has risen in parallel with that of obesity. Consultation regarding these concomitant diseases and subsequent management by subspecialists, including pediatric gastroenterologists, is now common and has resulted in obesity being recognized as a chronic disease requiring coordination of care. Although medications and even surgery may provide effective, though often temporary, treatments for obesity and its comorbidities, behavioral interventions addressing healthy dietary and physical activity habits remain a mainstay in the obesity treatment paradigm. Therefore, the issue of weight management must be addressed by both general practitioner and subspecialist alike. In this report, we review select aspects of pediatric obesity and obesity-related management issues because it relates in particular to the field of pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology. PMID:23282941

  2. What Is a Pediatric Rheumatologist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Family Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  3. What Is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Family Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  4. What Is a Pediatric Urologist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Family Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  5. What Is a Pediatric Endocrinologist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Family Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  6. Advances in pediatrics. Volume 32

    SciTech Connect

    Barness, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on pediatrics. Topics include: the biological role and clinical implications of taurine; human milk nonprotein nitrogen; monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis and treatment of childhood diseases; and human immune responses to polysaccharide antigens.

  7. Genetics of pediatric obesity.

    PubMed

    Manco, Melania; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2012-07-01

    Onset of obesity has been anticipated at earlier ages, and prevalence has dramatically increased worldwide over the past decades. Epidemic obesity is mainly attributable to modern lifestyle, but family studies prove the significant role of genes in the individual's predisposition to obesity. Advances in genotyping technologies have raised great hope and expectations that genetic testing will pave the way to personalized medicine and that complex traits such as obesity will be prevented even before birth. In the presence of the pressing offer of direct-to-consumer genetic testing services from private companies to estimate the individual's risk for complex phenotypes including obesity, the present review offers pediatricians an update of the state of the art on genomics obesity in childhood. Discrepancies with respect to genomics of adult obesity are discussed. After an appraisal of findings from genome-wide association studies in pediatric populations, the rare variant-common disease hypothesis, the theoretical soil for next-generation sequencing techniques, is discussed as opposite to the common disease-common variant hypothesis. Next-generation sequencing techniques are expected to fill the gap of "missing heritability" of obesity, identifying rare variants associated with the trait and clarifying the role of epigenetics in its heritability. Pediatric obesity emerges as a complex phenotype, modulated by unique gene-environment interactions that occur in periods of life and are "permissive" for the programming of adult obesity. With the advent of next-generation sequencing techniques and advances in the field of exposomics, sensitive and specific tools to predict the obesity risk as early as possible are the challenge for the next decade.

  8. Innovation in pediatric surgical education.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Matthew S; Wulkan, Mark L

    2015-06-01

    Pediatric surgical training in the United States remained basically unchanged from the model developed by Ladd and Gross in the 1930s until recently. Standardized curriculum and novel evaluation methods are now being implemented. Pediatric Surgical education is currently undergoing a transition to competency-based evaluation and promotion. Unfortunately, there is little data on the efficacy of these changes. This presents an opportunity for further study of how we conduct training, and how we evaluate and promote our trainees.

  9. Academic Inbreeding in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael H.

    1977-01-01

    Academic inbreeding, the employment for faculty positions of persons who receive their graduate training at the same academic institution, is considered detrimental to an institution's academic environment. Results of a study conducted at 54 universities revealed that almost half the faculty (48 percent) in collegiate nursing programs are drawn…

  10. The Academic Adviser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    In this essay, I explore the idea that "academic" advisers are "academics" who play a major role in connecting the general education curriculum to the students' experience as well as connecting the faculty to the students' holistic experience of the curriculum. The National Academic Advising Association Concept of Academic…

  11. What Is Academic Vocabulary?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, James F.; Graves, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors address the construct of "academic vocabulary." First, they attempt to bring some clarity to a constellation of terms surrounding academic vocabulary. Second, they compare and contrast definitions of academic vocabulary. Third, they review typologies that researchers and writers have proposed to organize academic…

  12. Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, G.; Potukuchi, P.; Roy, A.

    1995-08-01

    Argonne is collaborating with the Nuclear Science Centre (NSC), New Delhi, to develop a new type of superconducting accelerating structure for low-velocity heavy ions. A copper model has been evaluated and tests on the niobium prototype are currently in progress. Some technical details of this project are described in the Superconducting Linac Development section of this report. All funding for the prototype has come from the NSC, and they have also stationed two staff members at ATLAS for the past two years to gain experience and work on this project. Additional NSC personnel visited ATLAS for extended periods during 1994 for electronics and cryogenics experience and training. Two NSC staff members are scheduled to spend several months at ANL during 1995 to continue tests and developments of the prototype resonators and to initiate fabrication of the production models for their linac project.

  13. What’s the best minimal invasive approach to pediatric nephrectomy and heminephrectomy: conventional laparoscopy (CL), single-site (LESS) or robotics (RAS)?

    PubMed Central

    Basharkhah, Ali; Hock, Andras

    2016-01-01

    Background Conventional laparoscopy (CL) using 3–5 mm ports has become the goldstandard for pediatric nephrectomy (N), heminephrectomy (HN) and heminephrecto-ureterectomy (HNU) for many years now. Recently the spectrum of minimal invasive surgery (MIS) has been extended by variants like laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS) or robot-assisted surgery (RAS). However such technical developments tend to drive surgical euphoria and feasibility studies, but may miss adequate academic research about function and proven patients’ benefits. This article delivers a comprehensive analysis of present pediatric studies comparing at least two MIS approaches to N, HN and HNU. Methods A systematic literature-based search for studies published between 2011–2016 about CL versus LESS or RAS for pediatric N, HN, and HNU was performed using multiple electronic databases and sources. The level of evidence was determined using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine (OCEBM) criteria. Single arm observational studies about N, HN or HNU using CL, LESS or RAS as well as publications including adult patients were excluded. Results A total of 11 studies met defined inclusion criteria, reporting on CL versus LESS or RAS. No studies of OCEBM Level 1 or 2 were identified. Performing CL for N and HN limited evidence indicated reduced analgesic requirements and shorter hospital stay over open surgery, but longer operating time. Preservation of renal function of the remaining moiety after CL-HN was 95%. Importantly, of patients losing their remaining moiety, median age at surgery was 9 months (range, 4–42 months), and all except 1 (6/7) had an upper pole HN. Several authors compared TNP versus RPN access for CL and confirmed a longer operating time for RPN versus TPN-NU. Moreover one study reported a longer ureteric stump in RPN versus TPN-HNU (range, 2–5 cm vs. 3–7 mm). Disadvantages of LESS or RAS over CL were longer operative time and higher total costs (RAS). There were

  14. Determinants of Health and Pediatric Primary Care Practices.

    PubMed

    Beck, Andrew F; Tschudy, Megan M; Coker, Tumaini R; Mistry, Kamila B; Cox, Joanne E; Gitterman, Benjamin A; Chamberlain, Lisa J; Grace, Aimee M; Hole, Michael K; Klass, Perri E; Lobach, Katherine S; Ma, Christine T; Navsaria, Dipesh; Northrip, Kimberly D; Sadof, Matthew D; Shah, Anita N; Fierman, Arthur H

    2016-03-01

    More than 20% of children nationally live in poverty. Pediatric primary care practices are critical points-of-contact for these patients and their families. Practices must consider risks that are rooted in poverty as they determine how to best deliver family-centered care and move toward action on the social determinants of health. The Practice-Level Care Delivery Subgroup of the Academic Pediatric Association's Task Force on Poverty has developed a roadmap for pediatric providers and practices to use as they adopt clinical practice redesign strategies aimed at mitigating poverty's negative impact on child health and well-being. The present article describes how care structures and processes can be altered in ways that align with the needs of families living in poverty. Attention is paid to both facilitators of and barriers to successful redesign strategies. We also illustrate how such a roadmap can be adapted by practices depending on the degree of patient need and the availability of practice resources devoted to intervening on the social determinants of health. In addition, ways in which practices can advocate for families in their communities and nationally are identified. Finally, given the relative dearth of evidence for many poverty-focused interventions in primary care, areas that would benefit from more in-depth study are considered. Such a focus is especially relevant as practices consider how they can best help families mitigate the impact of poverty-related risks in ways that promote long-term health and well-being for children.

  15. Pharmacological management of narcolepsy and cataplexy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lecendreux, Michel

    2014-10-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder frequently occurring from childhood and persisting through adolescence and adulthood. Individuals suffering from narcolepsy exhibit excessive daytime somnolence, sleep attacks, cataplexy, dysomnia, metabolic perturbations including weight gain, and problems in social interaction and academic performance. The prevalence of narcolepsy in childhood is not known but can be estimated from adult studies to be greater than 20-60 per 100,000 in Western countries. The 2009 (A) H1N1 vaccination campaign led to an increase of narcoleptic cases both in children and in adults, supporting the autoimmune hypothesis of the disease. This article focuses on the epidemiology, etiology, and particularities of treatment in pediatric narcolepsy and details the effects of the drugs used to treat this condition, including recent trends in the field. Future therapeutic directions are also discussed. At present, medications used to treat children or adolescents have shown efficacy mostly based on clinical experience, given the lack of level 1 evidence-based studies in the pediatric population. Therefore, most compounds used in adult narcolepsy to target clinical symptoms such as wake-promoting or anticataplectic agents are prescribed off-label in pediatric patients. Published research shows the benefit of drug therapy for narcoleptic children, but these must be dispensed with caution in the absence of well conducted clinical trials.

  16. A practical guide to manuscript writing with particular relevance to the field of pediatric hospital medicine.

    PubMed

    Teufel, Ronald J; Andrews, Anne L; Williams, Derek J

    2014-11-01

    Publishing manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals, such as Hospital Pediatrics, is critical for both the academic development of practitioners in pediatric hospital medicine and the scientific advancement of our field. Understanding the purpose of scientific writing and developing a structured approach to the writing process is essential. Doing so will improve the clarity of your work and likely the ease at which your research is published and disseminated throughout the scientific community. The purposes of this article are to detail the structure of a scientific manuscript, to highlight specific writing strategies, and to provide writing tips that may help or hinder publication. Our ultimate goal is to advance the field of pediatric hospital medicine and its growing membership by promoting the dissemination of high-quality research.

  17. Real Learning in a Virtual World: A Case Study of the School of Information Studies' Learning Centre in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Lyn; Pymm, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Following a review of the online delivery of distance education programs within the School of Information Studies (SIS) program at Charles Sturt University, a team of academics worked with an external consultant to design a purpose built SIS Learning Centre in Second Life (SL), a 3D virtual world environment in which people (via their avatars) may…

  18. The International Centre for Theoretical Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Faheem

    2008-07-01

    This talk traces in brief the genesis of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, as one of Prof. Abdus Salam's major achievements. It outlines why Salam felt the necessity for establishing such a centre to help physicists in the developing world. It situates the founding of the Centre within Salam's broader vision of the causes of underdevelopment and of science as an engine for scientific, technological, economic and social development. The talk reviews the successes and failures of the ICTP and gives a brief overall view of the current status of the Centre.

  19. The importance of educating postgraduate pediatric physicians about food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Adeli, Mehdi; Hendaus, Mohamed A; Abdurrahim, Lukman I; Alhammadi, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Background Food allergy is an increasing public health burden, and is considered among the most common chronic noncommunicable diseases in children. Proper diagnosis and management of food allergy by a health care provider is crucial in keeping affected children safe while simultaneously averting unnecessary avoidance. Objective The rationale of the study was to estimate the knowledge of pediatric residents and academic general pediatric fellows with regard to food allergies in children. Methods A cross-sectional and prospective study was carried out at Hamad Medical Corporation, the only tertiary care, academic and teaching hospital in the State of Qatar. The study took place between January 1, 2015 and September 30, 2015. Results Out of the 68 questionnaires distributed, 68 (100%) were returned by the end of the study. Among the participants, 15 (22%) were in post-graduate year-1 (PGY-1), 16 (23.5%) in PGY-2, 17 (25%) in PGY-3, 12 (16%) in PGY-4, and 8 (12%) were academic general pediatric fellows. Our trainees answered 60.14% of knowledge based questions correctly. In the section of treatment and management of food allergy in childhood, 23 (34%) of respondents’ main concern when taking care of a patient with food allergies was making sure the patient is not exposed to food allergen, while 22 (33%) reported no concerns. In the section of treatment and management of food allergy in childhood, 22 (33%) of participants reported no concerns in taking care of a child with food allergy, while 23 (34%) of respondents’ main concern was making sure the patient is not exposed to food allergen. In the teaching and training section, 56% of participants stated that they have not received formal education on how to recognize and treat food allergies, while 59% claimed not being trained on how to administer injectable epinephrine. Furthermore, approximately 60% of all participants expressed the need of additional information about recognizing and treating food allergies and

  20. High-risk medical devices, children and the FDA: regulatory challenges facing pediatric mechanical circulatory support devices.

    PubMed

    Almond, Christopher S D; Chen, Eric A; Berman, Michael R; Less, Joanne R; Baldwin, J Timothy; Linde-Feucht, Sarah R; Hoke, Tracey R; Pearson, Gail D; Jenkins, Kathy; Duncan, Brian W; Zuckerman, Bram D

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric mechanical circulatory support is a critical unmet need in the United States. Infant- and child-sized ventricular assist devices are currently being developed largely through federal contracts and grants through the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). Human testing and marketing of high-risk devices for children raises epidemiologic and regulatory issues that will need to be addressed. Leaders from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), NHLBI, academic pediatric community, and industry convened in January 2006 for the first FDA Workshop on the Regulatory Process for Pediatric Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices. The purpose was to provide the pediatric community with an overview of the federal regulatory process for high-risk medical devices and to review the challenges specific to the development and regulation of pediatric mechanical circulatory support devices. Pediatric mechanical circulatory support present significant epidemiologic, logistic, and financial challenges to industry, federal regulators, and the pediatric community. Early interactions with the FDA, shared appreciation of challenges, and careful planning will be critical to avoid unnecessary delays in making potentially life-saving devices available for children. Collaborative efforts to address these challenges are warranted.

  1. Transnasal endoscopic repair of pediatric meningoencephalocele

    PubMed Central

    Keshri, Amit Kumar; Shah, Saurin R.; Patadia, Simple D.; Sahu, Rabi N.; Behari, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Encephaloceles in relation to the nose are rare lesions affecting the skull base. In the pediatric population, majority are congenital lesions manifesting as nasal masses requiring surgical intervention. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of 6 consecutive patients below 12 years of age with intranasal meningoencephalocele treated by endonasal endoscopic approach at our tertiary centre was done. The follow up period ranged from 6 months to 2 years. A detailed clinical and radiological evaluation of these cases was done. Endonasal endoscopic repair (gasket seal/fat plug) was carried out in all cases. Results: Out of 6 patients, 4 patients had post-traumatic and rest 2 cases had congenital meningo-encephaloceles. All patients were asymptomatic in post-operative follow up period. One patient had minor complication of nasal alar collapse due to intra-operative adherence of encephalocele to cartilaginous framework. Conclusion: Transnasal endoscopic repair of anterior skull base meningoencephalocele is a minimally invasive single stage surgery, and has advantage in terms of lesser hospital stay, cost of treatment, and better cosmesis. The repair technique should be tailored to the size of defect to provide a water-tight seal for better outcome. PMID:27195032

  2. Academic Self-Concept, Autonomous Academic Motivation, and Academic Achievement: Mediating and Additive Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guay, Frederic; Ratelle, Catherine F.; Roy, Amelie; Litalien, David

    2010-01-01

    Three conceptual models were tested to examine the relationships among academic self-concept, autonomous academic motivation, and academic achievement. This allowed us to determine whether 1) autonomous academic motivation mediates the relation between academic self-concept and achievement, 2) academic self-concept mediates the relation between…

  3. Impact of minimally invasive surgery on the pediatric surgical profession.

    PubMed

    Jones, Vinci S; Biesheuvel, Cornelis J; Cohen, Ralph C

    2008-12-01

    We conducted a survey among pediatric surgeons to examine the impact of the advent of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) on the pediatric surgical profession with respect to job satisfaction and training challenges. An invitation to participate in a web-based questionnaire was sent out to 306 pediatric surgeons. Apart from demographic details and training recommendations, parameters relevant to job satisfaction, including patient interaction, peer pressure, ethical considerations, academic progress, ability to train residents, and financial remuneration, were studied. The response rate was 38.2%. Working in a unit performing MIS was identified by 71% of respondents as the most effective and feasible modality of training in MIS. Inability to get away from a busy practice was the most common reason cited for inability to acquire MIS training. The overall responses to the job satisfaction parameters showed a positive trend in the current MIS era for patient interaction, ethical considerations, academic progress, and training residents, with a negative trend for peer pressure and financial remuneration. The enthusiastic minimally invasive surgeons (EMIS) were defined as those having more than 5 years of MIS experience and also performing more than 10% of their work using MIS. Of the 113 responses analyzed, 67 belonged to the EMIS category. Those belonging to the EMIS group were less likely to feel inadequate in training their residents, in meeting the felt needs of the patients, or to complain about peer pressure. They were more likely to consider MIS to be as relevant and beneficial in children as in adults. Embracing MIS, as represented by the EMIS group, correlated with an overall greater job satisfaction.

  4. Issues in the Articulation of "Impact": The Responses of UK Academics to "Impact" as a New Measure of Research Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watermeyer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This paper reflects on the emergence of an impact agenda and its incorporation as a feature of the academic contract in UK universities. It focuses on the depositions of senior academic managers across a range of social science research centres, as they critically reflect upon their organizational strategy for capturing and communicating the…

  5. Endocurietherapy in pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Cherlow, J M; Syed, A M; Puthawala, A; Asch, M; Finklestein, J Z

    1990-01-01

    Endocurietherapy (brachytherapy) is the placing of radioactive sources directly into or near a solid tumor. This technique delivers a concentrated dose of radiation to a restricted volume while minimizing radiation effects on normal tissue. We have treated 11 patients (nine sarcomas, one carcinoma, and one Wilms') with endocurietherapy procedures as part of their multimodality treatment program. Six were treated as part of the primary management, and the other five were treated for recurrent or metastatic disease. Temporary afterloaded implants using ribbons embedded with radioactive iridium192 (Ir192) seeds delivered typical tumor doses of 4,000 cGy. Six patients, including four primary cases and two recurrent cases, are currently classified as no evidence of disease (NED) without further local regional treatment (follow-up of 11-62 months; median, 38 months), and one patient treated for metastasis also remains locally controlled. Two patients are classified as alive with disease (AWD), two died of disease (DOD), and one is now NED after surgical salvage. Special considerations were given to gonadal shielding, radioprotection techniques, and psychosocial issues in this pediatric population.

  6. Pediatric cranial computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, H.

    1984-01-01

    The introduction of CT in the investigation of intercranial pathology has revolutionized the approach to clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. This book applies the advances of cranial CT to the pediatric patient. The test is divided into two sections. The first portion describes the practical methodology, anatomy and normal and abnormal CT scan appearance, including high or low density lesions, cystic lesions and ventricular or subarachnoid space dilation. The characteristic scans for various neurological diseases are presented and discussed. The author has given special attention to the CT diagnosis of congenital malformations and cerebral neoplasms. Partial Contents: Normal Computed Tomographic Anatomy/ High Density Lesions/Low Density Lesions/Cystic Lesions; Supratentorial/Cystic Lesions; Infratentorial/Increased Head Circumference/Increased Ventricular Size/Small Ventricular Size/Cranial Lesions/Spinal Lesions/CT Cisternography/Part II CT in Neonates/Congenital Craniocerebral Malformations/Hydrocephalus/Craniosynostosis/Head Trauma/Cerebrovascular Lesions/Intracranial Lesions/Seizure Disorders/Intracranial and Other Chronic Neurological Disorders.

  7. Update on Pediatric Overuse.

    PubMed

    Coon, Eric R; Young, Paul C; Quinonez, Ricardo A; Morgan, Daniel J; Dhruva, Sanket S; Schroeder, Alan R

    2017-02-01

    As concerns over health care-related harms and costs continue to mount, efforts to identify and combat medical overuse are needed. Although much of the recent attention has focused on health care for adults, children are also harmed by overuse. Using a structured PubMed search and manual tables of contents review, we identified important articles on pediatric overuse published in 2015. These articles were evaluated according to the quality of the methods, the magnitude of clinical effect, and the number of patients potentially affected and were categorized into overdiagnosis, overtreatment, and overutilization. Overdiagnosis: Findings included evidence for overdiagnosis of hypoxemia in children with bronchiolitis and skull fractures in children suffering minor head injuries. Overtreatment: Findings included evidence that up to 85% of hospitalized children with radiographic pneumonia may not have a bacterial etiology; many children are receiving prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy for osteomyelitis although oral therapy is equally effective; antidepressant medication for adolescents and nebulized hypertonic saline for bronchiolitis appear to be ineffective; and thresholds for treatment of hyperbilirubinemia may be too low. Overutilization: Findings suggested that the frequency of head circumference screening could be relaxed; large reductions in abdominal computed tomography testing for appendicitis appear to have been safe and effective; and overreliance on C-reactive protein levels in neonatal early onset sepsis appears to extend hospital length-of-stay.

  8. Magnetoencephalography in pediatric epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hunmin; Chung, Chun Kee

    2013-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) records the magnetic field generated by electrical activity of cortical neurons. The signal is not distorted or attenuated, and it is contactless recording that can be performed comfortably even for longer than an hour. It has excellent and decent temporal resolution, especially when it is combined with the patient's own brain magnetic resonance imaging (magnetic source imaging). Data of MEG and electroencephalography are not mutually exclusive and it is recorded simultaneously and interpreted together. MEG has been shown to be useful in detecting the irritative zone in both lesional and nonlesional epilepsy surgery. It has provided valuable and additive information regarding the lesion that should be resected in epilepsy surgery. Better outcomes in epilepsy surgery were related to the localization of the irritative zone with MEG. The value of MEG in epilepsy surgery is recruiting more patients to epilepsy surgery and providing critical information for surgical planning. MEG cortical mapping is helpful in younger pediatric patients, especially when the epileptogenic zone is close to the eloquent cortex. MEG is also used in both basic and clinical research of epilepsy other than surgery. MEG is a valuable diagnostic modality for diagnosis and treatment, as well as research in epilepsy. PMID:24244211

  9. Debriefing in pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Debriefing is a conversational session that revolves around the sharing and examining of information after a specific event has taken place. Debriefing may follow a simulated or actual experience and provides a forum for the learners to reflect on the experience and learn from their mistakes. Originating from the military and aviation industry, it is used on a daily basis to reflect and improve the performance in other high-risk industries. Expert debriefers may facilitate the reflection by asking open-ended questions to probe into the framework of the learners and apply lessons learned to future situations. Debriefing has been proven to improve clinical outcomes such as the return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest and the teaching of teamwork and communication in pediatrics. Incorporating debriefing into clinical practice would facilitate the cultural change necessary to talk more openly about team performance and learn from near misses, errors, and successes that will improve not only clinical outcome but also patient safety. PMID:25774195

  10. Pediatric guidelines for dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Stephen R

    2015-01-01

    Clinical guidelines are developed to assist clinicians in complex clinical decision making. Modern guideline development includes a systematic review and grading of relevant literature and then using the evidence review to construct recommendations for clinical care which are also graded regarding the level of evidence supporting them. Pediatric guidelines for dyslipidemia were first published in 1992. There was then a gap during which no formal guidelines were developed. In 2011, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction in Children were published. This included an evidence review and clinical recommendations regarding dyslipidemia. This review process began in 2006. The evidence review ended in 2008, and they were published in 2011 because of an extensive and prolonged review process. These guidelines recommend universal screening for dyslipidemia at age 9 to 11 y with a focus on identifying young individuals with genetic dyslipidemia such as familial hypercholesterolemia. The guidelines also include lifestyle recommendations and recommendations for pharmacologic treatment for children with markedly elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The guideline process should include review of the implementation of guidelines in practice and should also include ongoing review of the guidelines with respect to a growing evidence base with new research findings.

  11. Pediatric brain death determination.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Mudit; Ashwal, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Clinical guidelines for the determination of brain death in children were first published in 1987. These guidelines were revised in 2011 under the auspices of the Society of Critical Care Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Child Neurology Society, and provide the minimum standards that must be satisfied before brain death can be declared in infants and children. After achieving physiologic stability and exclusion of confounders, two examinations including apnea testing separated by an observation period (24 hours for term newborns up to 30 days of age, and 12 hours for infants and children from 31 days up to 18 years) are required to establish brain death. Apnea testing should demonstrate a final arterial PaCO2 20 mm Hg above the baseline and ≥ 60 mm Hg with no respiratory effort during the testing period. Ancillary studies (electroencephalogram and radionuclide cerebral blood flow) are not required to establish brain death and are not a substitute for the neurologic examination. The committee concluded that ancillary studies may be used (1) when components of the examination or apnea testing cannot be completed, (2) if uncertainty about components of the neurologic examination exists, (3) if a medication effect may be present, or (4) to reduce the interexamination observation period. When ancillary studies are used, a second clinical examination and apnea test should still be performed and components that can be completed must remain consistent with brain death.

  12. Variation in seizure prophylaxis in severe pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ostahowski, Paige J; Kannan, Nithya; Wainwright, Mark S; Qiu, Qian; Mink, Richard B; Groner, Jonathan I; Bell, Michael J; Giza, Christopher C; Zatzick, Douglas F; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Boyle, Linda Ng; Mitchell, Pamela H; Vavilala, Monica S

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Posttraumatic seizure is a major complication following traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to determine the variation in seizure prophylaxis in select pediatric trauma centers. The authors hypothesized that there would be wide variation in seizure prophylaxis selection and use, within and between pediatric trauma centers. METHODS In this retrospective multicenter cohort study including 5 regional pediatric trauma centers affiliated with academic medical centers, the authors examined data from 236 children (age < 18 years) with severe TBI (admission Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 8, ICD-9 diagnosis codes of 800.0-801.9, 803.0-804.9, 850.0-854.1, 959.01, 950.1-950.3, 995.55, maximum head Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥ 3) who received tracheal intubation for ≥ 48 hours in the ICU between 2007 and 2011. RESULTS Of 236 patients, 187 (79%) received seizure prophylaxis. In 2 of the 5 centers, 100% of the patients received seizure prophylaxis medication. Use of seizure prophylaxis was associated with younger patient age (p < 0.001), inflicted TBI (p < 0.001), subdural hematoma (p = 0.02), cerebral infarction (p < 0.001), and use of electroencephalography (p = 0.023), but not higher Injury Severity Score. In 63% cases in which seizure prophylaxis was used, the patients were given the first medication within 24 hours of injury, and 50% of the patients received the first dose in the prehospital or emergency department setting. Initial seizure prophylaxis was most commonly with fosphenytoin (47%), followed by phenytoin (40%). CONCLUSIONS While fosphenytoin was the most commonly used medication for seizure prophylaxis, there was large variation within and between trauma centers with respect to timing and choice of seizure prophylaxis in severe pediatric TBI. The heterogeneity in seizure prophylaxis use may explain the previously observed lack of relationship between seizure prophylaxis and outcomes.

  13. Pediatric neurosurgery: pride and prejudice.

    PubMed

    Winston, K R

    2000-02-01

    Pediatric neurosurgery now exists as a member of the family of neurosurgery with its own training programs, process of accreditation, national and international conferences and scientific journals. The relentless expansion of science relevant to the practice of neurosurgery and the changing patterns of neurosurgical practice have driven and continue to drive the juggernaut of evolutionary process which sometimes necessitates the birth of new specialties of practice. The history and the development of neurosurgery as they relate to children are presented. There is no more reason to think that the established specialty of pediatric neurosurgery or the patients under the care of pediatric neurosurgeons would benefit from the collapsing of pediatric neurosurgery back into the general neurosurgical fold than to think that all of neurosurgery, and hence all patients cared for by neurosurgeons, would benefit from the return of organized neurosurgery to its general surgical parent. Just as mankind benefits from the steady advancement of all aspects of neurosurgery, children benefit from the existence and steady advancement of pediatric neurosurgery.

  14. Pediatric Interventional Radiology: Vascular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR) comprises a range of minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are performed using image guidance. PIR has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions. Over the years, technology has undergone dramatic and continuous evolution, making this speciality grow. In this review, the authors will discuss various vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. It is challenging for the interventional radiologist to accomplish a successful interventional procedure. There are many vascular interventional radiology procedures which are being performed and have changed the way the diseases are managed. Some of the procedures are life saving and have become the treatment of choice in those patients. The future is indeed bright for the practice and practitioners of pediatric vascular and non-vascular interventions. As more and more of the procedures that are currently being performed in adults get gradually adapted for use in the pediatric population, it may be possible to perform safe and successful interventions in many of the pediatric vascular lesions that are otherwise being referred for surgery.

  15. Personalized assent for pediatric biobanks.

    PubMed

    Giesbertz, Noor A A; Melham, Karen; Kaye, Jane; van Delden, Johannes J M; Bredenoord, Annelien L

    2016-10-12

    Pediatric biobanking is considered important for generating biomedical knowledge and improving (pediatric) health care. However, the inclusion of children's samples in biobanks involves specific ethical issues. One of the main concerns is how to appropriately engage children in the consent procedure. We suggest that children should be involved through a personalized assent procedure, which means that both the content and the process of assent are adjusted to the individual child. In this paper we provide guidance on how to put personalized assent into pediatric biobanking practice and consider both the content and process of personalized assent. In the discussion we argue that the assent procedure itself is formative. Investing in the procedure should be a requirement for pediatric biobank research. Although personalized assent will require certain efforts, the pediatric (biobank) community must be aware of its importance. The investment and trust earned can result in ongoing engagement, important longitudinal information, and stability in/for the research infrastructure, as well as increased knowledge among its participants about research activity. Implementing personalized assent will both respect the child and support biobank research.

  16. The Press Research Centre, 1956-1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press Research Centre, Krakow (Poland).

    In 1956, the Press Research Centre was established in Cracow, Poland by a group of journalists and publishers, for the purpose of instituting press research that would have practical applications. The aims of the Centre were to conduct studies on the history of the Polish press, the contemporary press, press readership, and editorial techniques.…

  17. The European standards of Haemophilia Centres

    PubMed Central

    Giangrande, Paul; Calizzani, Gabriele; Menichini, Ivana; Candura, Fabio; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Makris, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The European haemophilia community of professionals and patients has agreed on the principles of haemophilia care to address comprehensive optimal delivery of care which is nowadays scattered throughout Europe. Many of the health facilities call themselves Haemophilia Centres despite their variation in size, expertise and services provided. Only a small number of countries have Haemophilia Centre accreditation systems in place. Methods In the framework of the European Haemophilia Network project, following an inclusive process of stakeholder involvement, the European Guidelines for the certification of haemophilia centres have been developed in order to set quality standards for European Haemophilia Centres and criteria for their certification. Results The Guidelines define the standards and criteria for the designation of two levels of care delivery: European Haemophilia Treatment Centres, providing local routine care, and European Haemophilia Comprehensive Care Centres, providing specialised and multi-disciplinary care and functioning as tertiary referral centres. Additionally, they define standards about general requirements, patient care, provision of an advisory service and establishment of network of clinical and specialised services. Conclusions The implementation of the European Guidelines for the certification of Haemophilia Centres will contribute to the reduction of health inequalities through the standardisation of quality of care in European Union Member States and could represent a model to be taken into consideration for other rare disease groups. PMID:24922293

  18. Promotion in Call Centres: Opportunities and Determinants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorjup, Maria Tatiana; Valverde, Mireia; Ryan, Gerard

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the quality of jobs in call centres by focusing on the opportunities for promotion in this sector. More specifically, the research questions focus on discovering whether promotion is common practise in the call centre sector and on identifying the factors that affect this.…

  19. Japanese consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. Part 1: Pediatric radiopharmaceutical administered doses (JSNM pediatric dosage card). Part 2: Technical considerations for pediatric nuclear medicine imaging procedures.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Masaki, Hidekazu; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Mayuki; Okuno, Mitsuo; Oguma, Eiji; Onuma, Hiroshi; Kanegawa, Kimio; Kanaya, Shinichi; Kamiyama, Hiroshi; Karasawa, Kensuke; Kitamura, Masayuki; Kida, Tetsuo; Kono, Tatsuo; Kondo, Chisato; Sasaki, Masayuki; Terada, Hitoshi; Nakanishi, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Teisuke; Hataya, Hiroshi; Hamano, Shin-ichiro; Hirono, Keishi; Fujita, Yukihiko; Hoshino, Ken; Yano, Masayuki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2014-06-01

    The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine has recently published the consensus guidelines for pediatric nuclear medicine. This article is the English version of the guidelines. Part 1 proposes the dose optimization in pediatric nuclear medicine studies. Part 2 comprehensively discusses imaging techniques for the appropriate conduct of pediatric nuclear medicine procedures, considering the characteristics of imaging in children.

  20. Translating the medical home into patient-centred language

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Camille; Zittleman, Linda; Ringel, Marc; Felzien, Maret; Bennett, Christopher; Cowart, Shirley; Flores, Martha; Flores, Rafael; Hernandez, Mike; Norman, Ned; Rodriquez, Mary; Sanchez, Norah; Sanchez, Sergio; Winkelman, Kathryn; Winkelman, Steve; Sutter, Christin; Gale, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Background The patient-centred medical home (PCMH) is a healthcare delivery model that aims to make health care more effective and affordable and to curb the rise in episodic care resulting from increasing costs and sub-specialisation of health care. Although the PCMH model has been implemented in many different healthcare settings, little is known about the PCMH in rural or underserved settings. Further, less is known about patients' understanding of the PCMH and its effect on their care. Aims The goal of this project was to ascertain the patient perspective of the PCMH and develop meaningful language around the PCMH to help inform and promote patients' participation with the PCMH. Method The High Plains Research Network Community Advisory Council (CAC) is comprised of a diverse group of individuals from rural eastern Colorado. The CAC and its academic partners started this project by receiving a comprehensive education on the PCMH. Using a community-based participatory research approach, the CAC translated technical medical jargon on the PCMH into a core message that the ‘Medical Home is Relationship’. Results The PCMH should focus on the relationship of the patient with their personal physician. Medical home activities should be used to support and strengthen this relationship. Conclusion The findings serve as a reminder of the crucial elements of the PCMH that make it truly patient centred and the importance of engaging local patients in developing and implementing the medical home. PMID:25949733

  1. Pediatric obesity & type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dea, Tara L

    2011-01-01

    This article focuses on (a) identifying obesity and other risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes, (b) differentiating between pediatric type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes, and (c) treating pediatric type 2 diabetes. Obesity has significant implications on a child's health, including an increased risk for insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes in children, characterized by insulin resistance and relative pancreatic b-cell failure due to the increased demand for insulin production, has now reached epidemic proportions. Longitudinal research on pediatric type 2 diabetes, however, is lacking because this epidemic is relatively new. Treatment of type 2 diabetes in children is focused on lifestyle modification with weight management/increased physical activity, and pharmacological management through oral medication or insulin therapy. Because children with type 2 diabetes are at risk for developing diabetes-related complications earlier in life, they need to be closely monitored for comorbidities.

  2. Tropical pediatrics: 2002 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Santos Ocampo, Perla D; Santos Ocampo-Padilla, Cynthia

    2003-01-01

    It also presents the challenges that confront children in the tropics and their effects on the health of these children. These challenges include the technology divide, economic disparity, ecological changes, urbanization and industrialization, globalization, political instability, population explosion, and gender inequality. The paper paints a scenario of tropical pediatrics into the year 2015. Problems brought about by both underdevelopment and modernization, with urbanization and industrialization, will persist. Infectious diseases will continue to be the leading causes of deaths. The paper presents some significant achievements in the fight against tropical diseases and tries to predict what future progress will contribute to the alleviation of such diseases. The paper also outlines the commitment of the International Society of Tropical Pediatrics (ISTP) to improve the state of tropical pediatrics in the next 15 years.

  3. Simulation in Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bae, Donald S

    2015-01-01

    Surgical simulation has become an increasingly important means of improving skills acquisition, optimizing clinical outcomes, and promoting patient safety. While there have been great strides in other industries and other fields of medicine, simulation training is in its relative infancy within pediatric orthopaedics. Nonetheless, simulation has the potential to be an important component of Quality-Safety-Value Initiative of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA). The purpose of this article will be to review some definitions and concepts related to simulation, to discuss how simulation is beneficial both for trainee education as well as value-based health care, and to provide an update on current initiatives within pediatric orthopaedic surgery.

  4. Pediatric cardiac surgery in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Asou, T; Rachmat, J

    1998-10-01

    Pediatric cardiac surgery in Indonesia first developed thanks to the cooperation of various cardiac centers abroad. The establishment of the 'Harapan Kita' National Cardiac Center in 1985 was one of the most important initial steps. Thereafter, the discipline advanced remarkably in terms of the number of the operations performed and the variety of the diseases treated and, as a result, the surgical outcome also improved. Numerous problems remain to be solved. Only 1% of the children with congenital heart disease are today properly treated in Indonesia. Some of the underlying problems responsible for this situation include a shortage of pediatric cardiac professionals, the lack of the information and education on the part of the patients, and a shortage of funding, both privately and publicly. It would thus be welcome for pediatric cardiac surgeons, cardiologists and nurses in Indonesia to learn about congenital heart disease from doctors and nurses in advanced countries in order to improve the outlook at home.

  5. The Genetics of Pediatric Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Chesi, Alessandra; Grant, Struan F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity among children and adults has notably escalated over recent decades and represents a global major health problem. We now know that both genetics and environmental factors contribute to its complex etiology. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed compelling genetic signals influencing obesity risk in adults. Recent reports for childhood obesity revealed that many adult loci also play a role in the pediatric setting. Childhood GWAS have uncovered novel loci below the detection range in adult studies, suggesting that obesity genes may be more easily uncovered in the pediatric setting. Shedding light on the genetic architecture of childhood obesity will facilitate prevention and treatment of pediatric cases and will have fundamental implications for diseases that present later in life. PMID:26439977

  6. The Academic Structure in Japan: Institutional Hierarchy and Academic Mobility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arimoto, Akira

    The characteristics of the Japanese academic structure are examined with attention to the evolution of institutional hierarchy, the closed academic structure, and the effects of the academic structure upon academic research. The evolution of Japan's institutional hierarchy in academics has been tightly related to factors of nationalism,…

  7. Publishing and academic promotion.

    PubMed

    Dixon, A K

    2009-09-01

    Clearly, academic endeavour has to be the single most important criterion for appointment to an academic position and for subsequent promotion. It is rare for excellence either in teaching or clinical practice to offset a poor publication record. However, the pressure to publish and gain related grant income can lead to problems in the normal academic pursuits of a department or institution. These and other related issues will be explored in this editorial.

  8. Interactive Palliative and End-of-Life Care Modules for Pediatric Residents

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Ami; Carrasca, London; Pian, Patricia; Auger, JoAnne; Baker, Amira; Proudfoot, James A.; Pian, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Background. There is a need for increased palliative care training during pediatric residency. Objective. In this pilot study, we created a comprehensive experiential model to teach palliative care skills to pediatric residents. Our Comfort Care Modules (CCMs) address pediatric palliative care (PPC) topics of breaking bad news, dyspnea, anxiety, pain management, and the dying child. We also evaluated a scoring system and gathered qualitative data. Methods. The CCMs are part of the University of California San Diego pediatric residency's second-year curriculum. Comparisons were made for statistical trends between residents exposed to the modules (n = 15) and those not exposed (n = 4). Results. Nineteen of 36 residents (52%) completed surveys to self-rate their preparedness, knowledge, and confidence about PPC before and after the intervention. Resident scores increased in all areas. All improvements reached statistical significance except confidence when breaking bad news. Overall, the resident feedback about the CCMs was positive. Conclusions. This study demonstrates that the CCMs can be performed effectively in an academic setting and can benefit residents' self-perception of preparedness, confidence, and knowledge about pediatric palliative care. In the future, we plan to implement the modules on a larger scale. We encourage their use in interprofessional settings and across institutions. PMID:28286527

  9. Partnerships with Academic Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes how professional and continuing higher education units can develop and sustain successful partnerships with academic departments in order to deliver educational programs effectively to students.

  10. Pediatric Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Talwalkar, Yeshawant B.; Harner, Marvin H.; Musgrave, James E.; Lawson, Russell K.; Campbell, Robert A.

    1975-01-01

    Thirty-one children received 38 kidney transplants from 22 live and 16 cadaver donors. Among the 31 patients, 25 received one transplant each, 5 received two transplants each and 1 received three transplants. Peritoneal or hemodialysis (or both) was carried out in 22 patients, with an average dialytic maintenance of 12 weeks before transplantation. Posttransplant immunosuppressive therapy included prednisone and azathioprine. Antilymphocyte globulin was administered to 33 recipients as adjunctive immunosuppressive therapy. At present, 23 patients have functioning allografts, 3 are on hemodialysis and 5 are dead. Of 22 live kidney transplants, 18 are presently functioning two months to 14 years after transplantation with an average of 36 months. Of 16 cadaver kidney transplants, 5 are presently functioning 9 to 57 months after transplantation with an average of 32 months. Actuarial live donor allograft survival for one year was 76 percent, for two years was 66 percent and for three years was 64 percent. Cadaver allograft survival was 50 percent, 40 percent and 40 percent, respectively. Complications were urologic and infection related. Of nine recipients with sustained hypertension, in six the condition was due to chronic rejection, while in one it was due to recurrence of the original disease in the allograft. Linear growth was measured in 15 children who were less than 14 years of age at the time of transplantation and in whom allografts survived more than one year. Maximum average linear growth velocity occurred during the first year after transplantation. Our experience indicates pediatric renal transplantation can be successfully used in the treatment of terminal renal failure. PMID:1098288

  11. Pediatrics: diagnosis of neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Susan E; Gelfand, Michael J; Shulkin, Barry L

    2011-09-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common pediatric extracranial soft-tissue tumor, accounting for approximately 8% of childhood malignancies. Its prognosis is widely variable, ranging from spontaneous regression to fatal disease despite multimodality therapy. Multiple imaging and clinical tests are needed to accurately assess patient risk with risk groups based on disease stage, patient age, and biological tumor factors. Approximately 60% of patients with neuroblastoma have metastatic disease, most commonly involving bone marrow or cortical bone. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) scintigraphy plays an important role in the assessment of neuroblastoma, allowing whole-body disease assessment. mIBG is used to define extent of disease at diagnosis, assess disease response during therapy, and detect residual and recurrent disease during follow-up. mIBG is highly sensitive and specific for neuroblastoma, concentrating in >90% of tumors. mIBG was initially labeled with (131)I, but (123)I-mIBG yields higher quality images at a lower patient radiation dose. (123)I-mIBG (AdreView; GE Healthcare, Arlington Heights, IL) was approved for clinical use in children by the Food and Drug Administration in 2008 and is now commercially available throughout the United States. The use of single-photon emission computed tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in (123)I-mIBG imaging has improved certainty of lesion detection and localization. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography has recently been compared with mIBG and found to be most useful in neuroblastomas which fail to or weakly accumulate mIBG.

  12. Pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Klick, Jeffrey C; Hauer, Julie

    2010-07-01

    Palliative care has always been a part of the care of children. It includes any intervention that focuses on relieving suffering, slowing the progression of disease, and improving quality of life at any stage of disease. In addition, for even the child with the most unpredictable disease, there are predictable times in this child's life when the child, family, and care team will be suffering in ways that can be mitigated by specific interventions. Rather than defining pediatric palliative care in terms of a patient base, severity of disease, or even a general philosophy of care, palliative care can best be understood as a specific set of tasks directed at mitigating suffering. By understanding these tasks; learning to identify predictable times and settings of suffering; and learning to collaborate with multidisciplinary specialists, use communication skills, and identify clinical resources, the pediatrician can more effectively support children with life-threatening illnesses and their families. In this article, we define palliative care as a focus of care integrated in all phases of life and as a set of interventions aimed at easing suffering associated with life-threatening conditions. We detail an approach to these interventions and discuss how they can be implemented by the pediatrician with the support of specialists in hospice and palliative medicine. We discuss common and predictable times of suffering when these interventions become effective ways to treat suffering and improve quality of life. Finally, we discuss those situations that pediatricians most commonly and intensely interface with palliative care-the care of the child with complex, chronic conditions and severe neurologic impairment (SNI).

  13. The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Nicholas M.; Schade, D.; Astronomy Data Centre, Canadian

    2011-01-01

    The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC) is the world's largest astronomical data center, holding over 0.5 Petabytes of information, and serving nearly 3000 astronomers worldwide. Its current data collections include BLAST, CFHT, CGPS, FUSE, Gemini, HST, JCMT, MACHO, MOST, and numerous other archives and services. It provides extensive data archiving, curation, and processing expertise, via projects such as MegaPipe, and enables substantial day-to-day collaboration between resident astronomers and computer specialists. It is a stable, powerful, persistent, and properly supported environment for the storage and processing of large volumes of data, a condition that is now absolutely vital for their science potential to be exploited by the community. Through initiatives such as the Common Archive Observation Model (CAOM), the Canadian Virtual Observatory (CVO), and the Canadian Advanced Network for Astronomical Research (CANFAR), the CADC is at the global forefront of advancing astronomical research through improved data services. The CAOM aims to provide homogeneous data access, and hence viable interoperability between a potentially unlimited number of different data collections, at many wavelengths. It is active in the definition of numerous emerging standards within the International Virtual Observatory, and several datasets are already available. The CANFAR project is an initiative to make cloud computing for storage and data-intensive processing available to the community. It does this via a Virtual Machine environment that is equivalent to managing a local desktop. Several groups are already processing science data. CADC is also at the forefront of advanced astronomical data analysis, driven by the science requirements of astronomers both locally and further afield. The emergence of 'Astroinformatics' promises to provide not only utility items like object classifications, but to directly enable new science by accessing previously undiscovered or intractable

  14. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  15. The Future of Pediatric Obesity.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Jeff; Emerick, Jill; Saxena, Harshita

    2016-03-01

    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports a steady increase in obesity over the last 30 years. The greatest increase was seen in 15 to 19 year olds, whose obesity prevalence almost doubled from 10.5% to 19.4%. The solution to pediatric obesity requires a multidisciplinary approach addressing cultural norms, technologic advances, and family engagement. Future treatment strategies to combat the obesity epidemic will have to extend beyond the health care provider's office. Behavior modification remains the key component to pediatric obesity prevention and treatment.

  16. Pharmacologic Treatment of Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dhull, Rachita S; Baracco, Rossana; Jain, Amrish; Mattoo, Tej K

    2016-04-01

    Prevalence of hypertension is increasing in children and adolescents. Uncontrolled hypertension in children not only causes end organ damage but also increases the risk of adult hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Clinical trials have proven efficacy of antihypertensive medications in children. These medications are well tolerated by children with acceptable safety profile. The choice of agent is usually driven by underlying etiology of hypertension, profile of its side effects, and clinician's preference. This article will review currently available pediatric data on mechanism of action, common adverse effects, pediatric indication, recent clinical trial, and newer drugs in the common classes of antihypertensive medications.

  17. Treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Amy; Dodds, Alice; Walkup, John T; Rynn, Moira

    2013-11-01

    This article provides a brief review of the current available data concerning present treatment and potential new treatment advances for pediatric anxiety disorders, such as generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Disorder-specific treatment methods and innovations, particularly computer-assisted methods of delivery for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) will be reviewed. Additionally, the paper will discuss novel psychopharmacological compounds (e.g., D-cycloserine, riluzole, memantine, and anticonvulsant medications). Available evidence for the efficacy of novel medication strategies in adult studies and implications for their use in pediatrics will be discussed.

  18. Japan-Russia Pediatric Society.

    PubMed

    Nihei, K; Thunemathu, Y; Kobayashi, N

    1993-12-01

    In March 1990, medical interchange between Japan and the Soviet Union began with a letter from the local health bureau of Khabarovsk. We visited Khabarovsk three times and Kamchatka once, and saw many hospitals and patients. Russian doctors of pediatrics visited Japan. Medical information was exchanged and discussed. The Japan-Russia Pediatric Society was established to perform interchange of medical information, technology and staff such as doctors, nurses and technicians between Japan and Russia, especially the Far East district of Russia. The Society meeting has been held three times: Tokyo (1991), Khabarovsk (1992) and Niigata (1993). It is necessary to continue the interchange between the two countries.

  19. Measuring Quality in Pediatric Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lightdale, Jenifer R

    2016-01-01

    Measuring quality in endoscopy includes the assessment of appropriateness of a procedure and the skill with which it is performed. High-quality pediatric endoscopy is safe and efficient, used effectively to make proper diagnoses, is useful for excluding other diagnoses, minimizes adverse events, and is accompanied by appropriate documentation from beginning through end of the procedure. There are no standard quality metrics for pediatric endoscopy, but proposed candidates are both process and outcomes oriented. Both are likely to be used in the near future to increase transparency about patient outcomes, as well as to influence payments for the procedure.

  20. Psychoneuroimmunology and the pediatric surgeon.

    PubMed

    Tagge, Edward P; Natali, Elizabeth Lee; Lima, Evan; Leek, Dustin; Neece, Cameron L; Randall, Kiti Freier

    2013-08-01

    The mind-body connection is receiving increasing scrutiny in a large number of clinical settings, although research has lagged in the pediatric specialties. Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) is a novel interdisciplinary scientific field that examines the relationship of the mind to the patient's neurologic, endocrine, and immune systems by examining critical parameters such as the effects of mental stress on wound healing and infection rates. Techniques that modify a patient's emotional and mental responses to illness and surgery have positive effects on their physiology resulting in improved recoveries and higher patient satisfaction rates. In the appropriate clinical settings, an awareness of PNI can enhance outcomes for pediatric surgical patients.

  1. Diagnostic imaging in pediatric emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, R.M.; Coulam, C.M.; Allen, J.H.; Fleischer, A.; Lee, G.S.; Kirchner, S.G.; James A.E. Jr.

    1980-07-01

    Evaluation of pediatric emergencies by diagnostic imaging technics can involve both invasive and noninvasive procedures. Nuclear medicine, conventional radiography, ultrasound, computerized axial tomography, and xeroradiography are the major nonangiographic diagnostic technics available for patient evaluation. We will emphasize the use of computerized axial tomography, nuclear medicine, xeroradiography, and ultrasound in the evaluation of emergencies in the pediatric age group. Since the radiologist is the primary consultant with regard to diagnostic imaging, his knowledge of these modulities can greatly influence patient care and clinical results.

  2. Pediatric dermatology: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Prindaville, Brea; Antaya, Richard J; Siegfried, Elaine C

    2015-01-01

    Up to 30% percent of pediatric primary care visits include a skin-related problem, and referrals are hampered by appointment wait times among the longest of any pediatric subspecialty. Despite the clear demand for pediatric dermatologists, there has been a long-standing shortage of providers, leaving dermatology as one of the most underserved pediatric subspecialties. Another consequence of the workforce shortage is the limited opportunity for pediatric dermatology training for residents and postgraduate general pediatricians and dermatologists. This review includes the evolution of the subspecialty from conception through the present, along with obstacles to workforce expansion and potential solutions to improve access to care for children with skin diseases.

  3. Development of a pediatric palliative care team.

    PubMed

    Ward-Smith, Peggy; Linn, Jill Burris; Korphage, Rebecca M; Christenson, Kathy; Hutto, C J; Hubble, Christopher L

    2007-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics has provided clinical recommendations for palliative care needs of children. This article outlines the steps involved in implementing a pediatric palliative care program in a Midwest pediatric magnet health care facility. The development of a Pediatric Advanced Comfort Care Team was supported by hospital administration and funded through grants. Challenges included the development of collaborative relationships with health care professionals from specialty areas. Pediatric Advanced Comfort Care Team services, available from the time of diagnosis, are provided by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals and individualized on the basis of needs expressed by each child and his or her family.

  4. The pediatric surgeon and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Feudtner, Chris; Blinman, Thane A

    2013-08-01

    Palliative care is now a core component of pediatric care for children and families who are confronting serious illness with a low likelihood of survival. Pediatric surgeons, in partnership with pediatric palliative care teams, can play a pivotal role in assuring that these patients receive the highest possible quality of care. This article outlines a variety of definitions and conceptual frameworks, describes decision-making strategies and communication techniques, addresses issues of interdisciplinary collaboration and personal self-awareness, and illustrates these points through a series of case vignettes, all of which can help the pediatric surgeon perform the core tasks of pediatric palliative care.

  5. WITHDRAWN: A Descriptive Review Article for Pump Initiation in a Pediatric Diabetes Centre.

    PubMed

    Roode, Angela; Smith, Monica

    2013-06-27

    The Publisher regrets that this article is an accidental duplication of an article that has already been published, DOI of original article:10.1016/j.pedn.2013.01.005. The duplicate article has therefore been withdrawn.

  6. Pediatric critical care--a new frontier.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chu-Chuan; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2009-10-01

    Pediatric intensive care is now a subspecialty of pediatric medicine. Different pathologic and physiologic processes occur in pediatric patients who require intensive care. Thus, the faculty and staffing requirement differ in many aspects from those of adult intensive care units (ICUs). In Taiwan, pediatric intensive care is relatively less developed than adult care. However, thanks to the implementation of national health insurance and increasing emphasis of children's health, the scope and quality of pediatric intensive care has widened and rapidly improved. Research has shown that full time in-ICU staffing and patient care will result in improved outcomes for critically ill pediatric patients. In this article, we review the literature and recent advances in pediatric intensive care; we also outline the challenges arising. Special emphasis was made to the clinical context of Taiwan.

  7. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Bell, T.; van Eldik, J.; McCance, G.; Panzer-Steindel, B.; Coelho dos Santos, M.; Traylen and, S.; Schwickerath, U.

    2012-12-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project's motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  8. Planetary Radars Operating Centre PROC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catallo, C.; Flamini, E.; Seu, R.; Alberti, G.

    2007-12-01

    Planetary exploration by means of radar systems, mainly using Ground Penetrating Radars (GPR) plays an important role in Italy. Numerous scientific international space programs are currently carried out jointly with ESA and NASA by Italian Space Agency, the scientific community and the industry. Three important experiments under Italian leadership ( designed and manufactured by the Italian industry), provided by ASI either as contribution to ESA programs either within a NASA/ASI joint venture framework, are now operating: MARSIS on-board Mars Express, SHARAD on-board Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and CASSINI Radar on-board Cassini spacecraft. In order to support all the scientific communities, institutional customers and experiment teams operation three Italian dedicated operational centers have been realized, namely SHOC, (Sharad Operating Centre), MOC (Marsis Operating Center) and CASSINI PAD ( Processing Altimetry Data). Each center is dedicated to a single instrument management and control, data processing and distribution. Although they had been conceived to operate autonomously and independently one from each other, synergies and overlaps have been envisaged leading to the suggestion of a unified center, the Planetary Radar Processing Center (PROC). PROC is conceived in order to include the three operational centers, namely SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD, either from logistics point of view and from HW/SW capabilities point of view. The Planetary Radar Processing Center shall be conceived as the Italian support facility to the scientific community for on-going and future Italian planetary exploration programs. Therefore, scalability, easy use and management shall be the design drivers. The paper describes how PROC is designed and developed, to allow SHOC, MOC and CASSINI PAD to operate as before, and to offer improved functionalities to increase capabilities, mainly in terms of data exchange, comparison, interpretation and exploitation. Furthermore, in the frame of

  9. The transition process of spina bifida patients to adult-centred care: An assessment of the Canadian urology landscape

    PubMed Central

    Wajchendler, Amy; Anderson, Peter; Koyle, Martin A.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Due to medical advances over the past three decades, the vast majority of children with spina bifida (SB) now survive into adulthood. As a result, there is a need to implement a well-defined urological transition process for these patients from the pediatric to adult environment. The objective of this study was to identify and analyze the current medical practices employed and the attitudes regarding transition by Canadian pediatric urologists caring for the SB population. Methods: A survey consisting of 14 questions pertaining to physician demographics, current practice, and attitudes towards the transition process of SB patients was distributed at the 2015 annual Pediatric Urologists of Canada (PUC) conference. The survey respondents remained anonymous, and the data were collected and analyzed. Results: A total of 28 surveys were collected from urologists across Canada (25 full-time pediatric, three also providing adult care), representing a >75% response rate. The transition process was suggested to begin at the age of 18 or older by 43% (12/28) of pediatric urologists. The majority, 86% (24/28), do not currently use a questionnaire or a checklist to determine transition readiness of patients. Forty-six percent (13/28) of pediatric urologists do not provide ongoing urological care to their patients after referral has been made to adult-centred care. In the province of Ontario, in which 39% (11/28) of the pediatric urologists practice, 82% (9/11) are full-time pediatric urologists and 78% (7/9) do not provide ongoing care to SB patients after the age of 18. Conclusions: A significant minority of Canadian pediatric urologists perceive that the transition process should begin at the age of 18 or older. As such, it can be inferred that transfer of care and transition are synonymous, not independent. Simplistically, this suggests that transition represents an event rather than a longitudinal process. The fact there is no defined ongoing urological care

  10. Academic Women in Protest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodore, Athena

    This paper is an exploratory inquiry into some aspects of protest for sex equality by academic women. The analysis is based on published and unpublished information on sex discrimination in academia, as well as a sample of 65 cases of academic women obtained from a pilot survey. Following introductory material, Part II emphasizes patterns of…

  11. Thinking Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Lis

    2016-01-01

    This lecture argues that the politicisation and instrumentalisation of the university caused by neoliberal frames has as a result the depoliticisation of knowledge and of the academic as individual. This depoliticisation has turned academic freedom into a right to disengage not only from the political fight around these issues but also from the…

  12. Leaving the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luzius, Jeff; Ard, Allyson

    2006-01-01

    A survey was distributed to former academic librarians to determine why they left the field and which career they pursued afterward. Results suggest that former academic librarians are unhappy with administration, image, and salary. Time spent as librarians helped individuals in their new careers.

  13. Impulsivity and Academic Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderman, Eric M.; Cupp, Pamela K.; Lane, Derek

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relations between academic cheating and impulsivity in a large sample of adolescents enrolled in high school health education classes. Results indicated that impulsivity predicts academic cheating for students who report extensive involvement in cheating. However, students who engage in extensive cheating are less likely…

  14. Understanding Academic Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Paul; Sanders, Lalage

    2006-01-01

    This paper draws on the psychological theories of self-efficacy and the self-concept to understand students' self-confidence in academic study in higher education as measured by the Academic Behavioural Confidence scale (ABC). In doing this, expectancy-value theory and self-efficacy theory are considered and contrasted with self-concept and…

  15. Marketing Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallon, Melissa, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Ask any academic librarian if marketing their library and its services is an important task, and the answer will most likely be a resounding "yes!" Particularly in economically troubled times, librarians are increasingly called upon to promote their services and defend their library's worth. Since few academic libraries have in-house marketing…

  16. Academic Freedom Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the author's enduring concerns about the concept of academic freedom is with semantics. It has seemed to him that one of the biggest difficulties with discussions of academic freedom (as with many conversations about "value-laden" terms such as "democracy," "equity," and "justice") is that people begin from different positions and with…

  17. The Academic Generation Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dronzek, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The current generation gap in academia is different--fundamentally shaped by the structural problems of academic employment. The job market has especially exacerbated tensions between senior and junior faculty by ratcheting up expectations and requirements at every stage of the academic career. The disparities have been mentioned often enough to…

  18. Becoming an Academic Researcher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angervall, Petra; Gustafsson, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The neo-liberal restructuring of academia justifies research concerning what constitutes academic work, what it means to be an academic researcher and how researchers manoeuvre in academia. The aim of this article is to investigate how this reshaping of higher education affects how research careers are formed and impacts on "becoming…

  19. Recalibrating Academic Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yancey, George

    2012-01-01

    Whether political and/or religious academic bias exists is a question with important ramifications for the educational institutions. Those arguing for the presence of such bias contend that political conservatives and the highly religious in academia are marginalized and face discrimination. The question of academic bias tends to be cast in a…

  20. Reconceptualizing Academic Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vantine, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, more and more independent schools have established academic support programs and learning centers to address their students' individual learning needs. Perhaps not surprisingly, as the number of students being evaluated has increased, even more families have requested academic accommodations and services for their children.…

  1. The effect of health care reform on academic medicine in Canada. Editorial Committee of the Canadian Institute for Academic Medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, C H

    1996-01-01

    Although Canadian health care reform has constrained costs and improved efficiency, it has had a profound and mixed effect on Canadian academic medicine. Teaching hospitals have been reduced in number and size, and in patient programs have shifted to ambulatory and community settings. Specialized care programs are now multi-institutional and multidisciplinary. Furthermore, the influence of regional planning bodies has grown markedly. Although these changes have likely improved clinical service, their impact on the quality of clinical education is uncertain. Within the academic clinical department, recruitment of young faculty has been greatly complicated by constraints on licensing, billing numbers, fee-for-service income and research funding. The departmental practice plan based on university funds and fee-for-service income is being replaced by less favourable funding arrangements. However, emphasis on multidisciplinary programs has rendered these departments more flexible in structure. The future of Canadian academic medicine depends on an effective alliance with government. Academia and government must agree, particularly on human-resource requirements, research objectives and the delivery of clinical and academic programs in regional and community settings. The establishment of focal points for academic health sciences planning within academic health sciences centres and within governments would assist in these developments. Finally, government and the academic health sciences sector must work together to remove the current impediments to the recruitment of highly qualified young faculty. PMID:8624998

  2. Family Functioning in Pediatric Trichotillomania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Phoebe S.; Franklin, Martin E.; Keuthen, Nancy J.; Flessner, Christopher A.; Woods, Douglas W.; Piacentini, John A.; Stein, Dan J.; Loew, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about how pediatric trichotillomania (TTM), a clinically significant and functionally impairing disorder, is impacted by, and impacts, family functioning. We explored dimensions of family functioning and parental attitudes in a sample of children and adolescents who participated in an Internet-based survey and satisfied…

  3. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  4. Pulse oximetry in pediatric practice.

    PubMed

    Fouzas, Sotirios; Priftis, Kostas N; Anthracopoulos, Michael B

    2011-10-01

    The introduction of pulse oximetry in clinical practice has allowed for simple, noninvasive, and reasonably accurate estimation of arterial oxygen saturation. Pulse oximetry is routinely used in the emergency department, the pediatric ward, and in pediatric intensive and perioperative care. However, clinically relevant principles and inherent limitations of the method are not always well understood by health care professionals caring for children. The calculation of the percentage of arterial oxyhemoglobin is based on the distinct characteristics of light absorption in the red and infrared spectra by oxygenated versus deoxygenated hemoglobin and takes advantage of the variation in light absorption caused by the pulsatility of arterial blood. Computation of oxygen saturation is achieved with the use of calibration algorithms. Safe use of pulse oximetry requires knowledge of its limitations, which include motion artifacts, poor perfusion at the site of measurement, irregular rhythms, ambient light or electromagnetic interference, skin pigmentation, nail polish, calibration assumptions, probe positioning, time lag in detecting hypoxic events, venous pulsation, intravenous dyes, and presence of abnormal hemoglobin molecules. In this review we describe the physiologic principles and limitations of pulse oximetry, discuss normal values, and highlight its importance in common pediatric diseases, in which the principle mechanism of hypoxemia is ventilation/perfusion mismatch (eg, asthma exacerbation, acute bronchiolitis, pneumonia) versus hypoventilation (eg, laryngotracheitis, vocal cord dysfunction, foreign-body aspiration in the larynx or trachea). Additional technologic advancements in pulse oximetry and its incorporation into evidence-based clinical algorithms will improve the efficiency of the method in daily pediatric practice.

  5. Current concepts in pediatric endocrinology

    SciTech Connect

    Styne, D.M.; Brook, C.G.D.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains seven chapters. They are: Recombinant DNA Technology; The HLA System in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia; Neuroendocrinology; Circadian Rhythms; Basic Aspects and Pediatric Implications; New Treatment Methods in Diabetes Mellitus; The Insulin-Like Growth Factors; and Hypopituitarism: Review of Behavioral Data.

  6. Advances in pediatrics. Volume 31

    SciTech Connect

    Barness, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the advances made in pediatrics. The topics discussed are--Molecular biology of thalassemia; genetic mapping of humans; technology of recombinant-DNA; DNA-sequencing and human chromosomes and etiology of hereditary diseases; acne; and T-cell abnormalities.

  7. Update on pediatric bone health.

    PubMed

    Henwood, Maria J; Binkovitz, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Osteoporosis has long been considered a health problem unique to older adults. Children and adolescents with chronic illness, primary bone disease, or poor nutrition, however, are also predisposed to impaired skeletal health. The present review discusses normal skeletal development, risk factors for low bone mineral density, and prevention and treatment strategies that can help optimize bone health in the pediatric population.

  8. Pediatric imaging for the technologist

    SciTech Connect

    Sharko, G.; Wilmont, D.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the diagnostic techniques of radiology in pediatric patients. The topics discussed are: Computed tomography; radiography of skull, face, abdomen, skeleton; nuclear medicine; quality control of image processing and radiation doses of patients and standards of radiation protection of patients.

  9. Pediatric isolated bilateral iliac aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Chithra, R; Sundar, R Ajai; Velladuraichi, B; Sritharan, N; Amalorpavanathan, J; Vidyasagaran, T

    2013-07-01

    Aneurysms are rare in children. Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are very rare, especially bilateral aneurysms. Pediatric aneurysms are usually secondary to connective tissue disorders, arteritis, or mycotic causes. We present a case of a 3-year-old child with bilateral idiopathic common iliac aneurysms that were successfully repaired with autogenous vein grafts.

  10. Towards Human-Centred Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannon, Liam J.

    The field of HCI has evolved and expanded dramatically since its origin in the early 1980’s. The HCI community embraces a large community of researchers and practitioners around the world, from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds in the human and social sciences, engineering and informatics, and more recently, the arts and design disciplines. This kaleidoscope of cultures and disciplines as seen at INTERACT Conferences provides a rich pool of resources for examining our field. Applications are increasingly exploring our full range of sensory modalities, and merging the digital and physical worlds. WiFi has opened up a huge design space for mobile applications. A focus on usability of products and services has been complemented by an emphasis on engagement, enjoyment and experience. With the advent of ubiquitous computing, and the emergence of “The Internet of Things”, new kinds of more open infrastructures make possible radically new kinds of applications. The sources of innovation have also broadened, to include human and social actors outside of the computing and design organizations. The question is to what extent is our mainstream thinking in the HCI field ready for the challenges of this Brave New World? Do the technological and social innovations that we see emerging require us to re-shape, or even, re-create, our field, or is it a case of a more gradual evolution and development of that which we already know? In this closing Keynote, I will provide a perspective on the evolution and development of the HCI field, looking backwards as well as forwards, in order to determine what are some of the changes of significance in the field. This “broad-brush” approach to what I term “ human-centred design” will be complemented by the examination of specific projects and applications, to help anchor some of the discussion. Areas such as user-centred design, participatory design, computer-supported cooperative work and learning, and interaction design, in

  11. Management of Pediatric Malignant Germ Cell Tumors: ICMR Consensus Document.

    PubMed

    Agarwala, Sandeep; Mitra, Aparajita; Bansal, Deepak; Kapoor, Gauri; Vora, Tushar; Prasad, Maya; Chinnaswamy, Girish; Arora, Brijesh; Radhakrishnan, Venkatraman; Laskar, Siddharth; Kaur, Tanvir; Dhaliwal, Rupinder Singh; Rath, G K; Bakhshi, Sameer

    2017-04-01

    With the introduction of cisplatin, the outcome of children with malignant germ cell tumors (MGCT) has improved to nearly 90% 5 year survival. Over the years, through the results of various multinational co-operative trials, the chemotherapy and surgical guidelines for both the gonadal and extra-gonadal MGCTs have been refined to decrease the early and late morbidities and at the same time improve survival. Introduction of risk categorization has further added to this effort. There has been no recommendation on how the children with malignant germ cell tumors should be treated in India. The current manuscript is written with the objective of developing a consensus guideline for practitioners at a National level. Based on extensively reviewed literature and personal experience of the major pediatric oncology centres in India, the ICMR Expert group has made recommendations for management of children with MGCT India.

  12. Identity Theft: A Study in Contact Centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moir, Iain; Weir, George R. S.

    This paper explores the recent phenomenon of identity theft. In particular, it examines the contact centre environment as a mechanism for this to occur. Through a survey that was conducted amongst forty-five contact centre workers in the Glasgow area we determined that contact centres can and do provide a mechanism for identity theft. Specifically, we found a particularly high incidence of agents who had previously dealt with phone calls that they considered suspicious. Furthermore, there are agents within such environments who have previously been offered money in exchange for customers' details, or who know of fellow workers who received such offers. Lastly, we identify specific practices within contact centres that may contribute to the likelihood of identity theft.

  13. Does Academic Work Make Australian Academics Happy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Roderick; Tilbrook, Kerry; Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka

    2015-01-01

    Happiness research is a rapidly-growing area in social psychology and has emphasised the link between happiness and workplace productivity and creativity for knowledge workers. Recent articles in this journal have raised concerns about the level of happiness and engagement of Australian academics with their work, however there is little research…

  14. [Health professionals and hand hygiene: a question of pediatric patient safety].

    PubMed

    Botene, Daisy Zanchi de Abreu; Pedro, Eva Neri Rubim

    2014-09-01

    This paper is a qualitative descriptive study, which aims to analyze how the academic education concerning hand hygiene contributes to the pediatric patient safety. This research was developed in an university hospital in Southern Brazil, in the pediatric unit, during the period of August to December, 2012. Sixteen healthcare professionals participated (doctors, nurses and physical therapists). A semi-structured interview was used to gather information. Data was organized by the software QSR Nvivo and analyzed using the content analysis technique. The results allowed us to list two thematic categories:"Hand hygiene and healthcare professionals' academic education"; and "Hand hygiene and professional life". The first thematic category will be presented in this paper. It was identified that the academic education contributes in an ineffective way to the creation of a patient safety culture. According to the professionals, there are gaps during the educational process regarding hand hygiene. The topic is treated in an ineffective and not very significant way to the learning and adhesion of hand hygiene in the professional life. It is recommended that, for the internalization of the practice by future professionals, a transversal, continuous and systematical approach is adopted during the professional's training, evaluations concerning the hand hygiene are done throughout the academic life as well as healthcare professors bethink the topic.

  15. School Nurses' Familiarity and Perceptions of Academic Accommodations for Student-Athletes Following Sport-Related Concussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Michelle L.; Welch, Cailee E.; Parsons, John T.; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate school nurses' familiarity and perceptions regarding academic accommodations for student-athletes following sport-related concussion. School nurses (N = 1,246) accessed the survey School Nurses' Beliefs, Attitudes and Knowledge of Pediatric Athletes with Concussions (BAKPAC-SN). The BAKPAC-SN contained…

  16. Perspectives on recycling centres and future developments.

    PubMed

    Engkvist, I-L; Eklund, J; Krook, J; Björkman, M; Sundin, E

    2016-11-01

    The overall aim of this paper is to draw combined, all-embracing conclusions based on a long-term multidisciplinary research programme on recycling centres in Sweden, focussing on working conditions, environment and system performance. A second aim is to give recommendations for their development of new and existing recycling centres and to discuss implications for the future design and organisation. Several opportunities for improvement of recycling centres were identified, such as design, layout, ease with which users could sort their waste, the work environment, conflicting needs and goals within the industry, and industrialisation. Combining all results from the research, which consisted of different disciplinary aspects, made it possible to analyse and elucidate their interrelations. Waste sorting quality was recognized as the most prominent improvement field in the recycling centre system. The research identified the importance of involving stakeholders with different perspectives when planning a recycling centre in order to get functionality and high performance. Practical proposals of how to plan and build recycling centres are given in a detailed checklist.

  17. The Imperial College Thermophysical Properties Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, S.; Cole, W. A.; Craven, R.; de Reuck, K. M.; Trengove, R. D.; Wakeham, W. A.

    1986-07-01

    The IUPAC Thermodynamic Tables Project Centre in London has at its disposal considerable expertise on the production and utilization of high-accuracy equations of state which represent the thermodynamic properties of substances. For some years they have been content to propagate this information by the traditional method of book production, but the increasing use of the computer in industry for process design has shown that an additional method was needed. The setting up of the IUPAC Transport Properties Project Centre, also at Imperial College, whose products would also be in demand by industry, afforded the occasion for a new look at the problem. The solution has been to set up the Imperial College Thermophysical Properties Data Centre, which embraces the two IUPAC Project Centres, and for it to establish a link with the existing Physical Properties Data Service of the Institution of Chemical Engineers, thus providing for the dissemination of the available information without involving the Centres in problems such as those of marketing and advertising. This paper outlines the activities of the Centres and discusses the problems in bringing their products to the attention of industry in suitable form.

  18. Simulation-based medical education in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Lopreiato, Joseph O; Sawyer, Taylor

    2015-01-01

    The use of simulation-based medical education (SBME) in pediatrics has grown rapidly over the past 2 decades and is expected to continue to grow. Similar to other instructional formats used in medical education, SBME is an instructional methodology that facilitates learning. Successful use of SBME in pediatrics requires attention to basic educational principles, including the incorporation of clear learning objectives. To facilitate learning during simulation the psychological safety of the participants must be ensured, and when done correctly, SBME is a powerful tool to enhance patient safety in pediatrics. Here we provide an overview of SBME in pediatrics and review key topics in the field. We first review the tools of the trade and examine various types of simulators used in pediatric SBME, including human patient simulators, task trainers, standardized patients, and virtual reality simulation. Then we explore several uses of simulation that have been shown to lead to effective learning, including curriculum integration, feedback and debriefing, deliberate practice, mastery learning, and range of difficulty and clinical variation. Examples of how these practices have been successfully used in pediatrics are provided. Finally, we discuss the future of pediatric SBME. As a community, pediatric simulation educators and researchers have been a leading force in the advancement of simulation in medicine. As the use of SBME in pediatrics expands, we hope this perspective will serve as a guide for those interested in improving the state of pediatric SBME.

  19. Opening up Academic Biomedical Research

    NASA Video Gallery

    Eva Guinan, MD, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Associate Direction, Center for Clinical and Translational Research at Harvard Medical School, was featured during the September 7, 2011 Innovatio...

  20. Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Cristina; Niccoli Asabella, Artor; Merenda, Nunzio; Altini, Corinna; Fanelli, Margherita; Muggeo, Paola; De Leonardis, Francesco; Perillo, Teresa; Santoro, Nicola; Rubini, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the prognostic value of interim 18F-FDG PET/CT (PET-2) in pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (pHL), evaluating both visual and semiquantitative analysis. Thirty pHL patients (age ≤16) underwent serial 18F-FDG PET/CT: at baseline (PET-0), after 2 cycles of chemotherapy (PET-2) and at the end of first-line chemotherapy (PET-T). PET response assessment was carried out visually according to the Deauville Score (DS), as well as semiquantitatively by using the semiquantitative parameters reduction from PET-0 to PET-2 (ΔΣSUVmax0–2, ΔΣSUVmean0–2). Final clinical response assessment (outcome) at the end of first-line chemotherapy was the criterion standard, considering patients as responders (R) or nonresponders (NR). Disease status was followed identifying patients with absence or relapsed/progression disease (mean follow-up: 24 months, range 3–78). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and accuracy of visual and semiquantitative assessment were calculated; furthermore, Fisher exact test was performed to evaluate the association between both visual and semiquantitative assessment and outcome at the end of the first-line chemotherapy. The prognostic capability of PET-2 semiquantitative parameters was calculated by ROC analysis and expressed as area under curve (AUC). Finally, progression-free survival (PFS) was analyzed according to PET-2 results based on the 5-point scale and semiquantitative criteria, using the Kaplan–Meier method. Based on the outcome at the end of first-line chemotherapy, 5 of 30 patients were NR, the remnant 25 of 30 were R. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of visual analysis were 60%,72%,30%,90%,70%; conversely, sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of semiquantitative assessment were 80%, 92%, 66.7%, 95.8%, 90%. The highest AUC resulted for ΔΣSUVmax0–2 (0.836; cut-off <12.5; sensitivity 80%; specificity 91%). The association between

  1. Correlates of Pediatric CPAP Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Stephen M.M.; Jensen, Emily L.; Simon, Stacey L.; Friedman, Norman R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common pediatric condition characterized by recurrent partial or complete cessation of airflow during sleep, typically due to inadequate upper airway patency. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a therapeutic option that reduces morbidity. Despite efforts to promote use, CPAP adherence is poor in both pediatric and adult populations. We sought to determine whether demographics, insurance status, OSA severity, therapeutic pressure, or comorbid conditions were associated with pediatric CPAP adherence. Methods: A retrospective review of adherence download data was performed on all pediatric patients with initiation or adjustment of CPAP treatment over a one-year period with documented in-laboratory CPAP titration. Patients were grouped as CPAP adherent or non-adherent, where adherence was defined as > 70% nightly use and average usage ≥ 4 hours per night. Differences between the groups were analyzed by χ2 test. Results: Overall, nearly half of participants were CPAP adherent (49%, 69/140). Of the demographic data collected (age, ethnicity, sex, insurance status), only female sex was associated with better adherence (60.9% vs 39.5% of males adherent; odds ratio [OR] = 2.41, 95%CI = 1.20–4.85; p = 0.01). Severity of OSA (diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and degree of hypoxemia), therapeutic pressure, and residual AHI did not impact CPAP adherence (p > 0.05). Patients with developmental delay (DD) were more likely to be adherent with CPAP than those without a DD diagnosis (OR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.27–5.13; p = 0.007). Female patients with trisomy 21 tended to be more adherent, but this did not reach significance or account for the overall increased adherence associated with female sex. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that adherence to CPAP therapy is poor but suggests that female sex and developmental delay are associated with better adherence. These findings support efforts to understand the

  2. Academic Capitalism and Academic Culture: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar; Berger, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    This case study investigated the impact of academic capitalism on academic culture by examining the perspectives of faculty members in an American academic department with significant industrial funding. The results of this study indicate that faculty members believe that the broad integrity of the academic culture remains unaffected in this…

  3. An Academic Curriculum Will Close the Academic Achievement Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palumbo, Anthony; Kramer-Vida, Louisa

    2012-01-01

    America's unyielding academic achievement gap has been a national priority for a long time; yet, some schools have succeeded with academically disadvantaged youth. Usually, these institutions embrace a culture of success and follow an academic curriculum that is grounded in core knowledge and scholastic vocabulary. Academically disadvantaged…

  4. 78 FR 20665 - Pediatric Device Consortia Grant Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    .... This program is intended to further the development of multiple pediatric devices; thus, grants are not... The Pediatric Device Consortia Grant Program aims to fund networks of pediatric medical...

  5. [The "quality house pediatric oncology" as an instrument for improving the performance of the trial centers].

    PubMed

    Creutzig, U; Hannemann, J; Krämer, I; Zimmermann, M; Herold, R; Marx, J F

    2005-01-01

    The project group "Central Trial Support" of the German Competence Network Pediatric Oncology and Haematology supports the members of the Society of Pediatric Oncology and Haematology in their effort to cope with the growing statutory, ethical and administrative requirements for therapy optimization studies (investigator-initiated, non-profit clinical trials). By these quality improvement measures the studies will become more revisable and reliable, but at the same time their processing will become more and more complex. The basic instrument of the project group "Central Trial Support" will be the so-called "Quality House" which has been built up in order to improve the performance of the associated study centres and to help put a systematic quality management system into practice. The "Quality House Pediatric Oncology" comprises detailed descriptions of the activities of all trial center co-workers. Its process map details all operational sequences which constitute an efficiently performing trial center. The so-called value adding processes are explained step by step, and the associated specific tasks are assigned to each respective co-worker. At each process step, the person in charge will have explanatory descriptions at her/his disposal and - if necessary - further problem solving means as well as references to possible optimization measures (e. g. Standard Operating Procedures and other documents). The German Competence Network Pediatric Oncology and Haematology will be implementing this electronic quality management system in trial centers which will convince both sponsors and authorities of the compliance with requirements and standards.

  6. The Effect of Hemoglobin Levels on Mortality in Pediatric Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Yee, Kevin F; Walker, Andrew M; Gilfoyle, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Objective. There is increasing evidence of adverse outcomes associated with blood transfusions for adult traumatic brain injury patients. However, current evidence suggests that pediatric traumatic brain injury patients may respond to blood transfusions differently on a vascular level. This study examined the influence of blood transfusions and anemia on the outcome of pediatric traumatic brain injury patients. Design. A retrospective cohort analysis of severe pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients was undertaken to investigate the association between blood transfusions and anemia on patient outcomes. Measurements and Main Results. One hundred and twenty patients with severe traumatic brain injury were identified and included in the analysis. The median Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was 6 and the mean hemoglobin (Hgb) on admission was 115.8 g/L. Forty-three percent of patients (43%) received at least one blood transfusion and the mean hemoglobin before transfusion was 80.1 g/L. Multivariable regression analysis revealed that anemia and the administration of packed red blood cells were not associated with adverse outcomes. Factors that were significantly associated with mortality were presence of abusive head trauma, increasing PRISM score, and low GCS after admission. Conclusion. In this single centre retrospective cohort study, there was no association found between anemia, blood transfusions, and hospital mortality in a pediatric traumatic brain injury patient population.

  7. Biopharmaceutic planning in pediatric drug development.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Vivek S

    2012-09-01

    Pediatric drug development is a required consideration for all drug development programs. Age-appropriate formulations such as suspensions, chewable tablets, oral disintegrating tablets, etc., are typically developed and used in the pediatric clinical studies. However, it is not uncommon to use enabling formulations in the pivotal pediatric clinical study followed by bridging bioavailability and/or bioequivalence studies. Development of age-appropriate formulations is an essential part of pediatric drug development and adds additional biopharmaceutical considerations to an already complex problem. Careful planning of biopharmaceutic data collection during the adult and pediatric development program can contribute significantly to the biopharmaceutic risk assessment and planning of appropriate clinical studies leading to successful development of pediatric formulations.

  8. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    PubMed

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out case reports), the publication rate is less than 1 percent--completely out of proportion to the size of the problem dental trauma impose in children.

  9. Child Neurology Education for Pediatric Residents.

    PubMed

    Albert, Dara V F; Patel, Anup D; Behnam-Terneus, Maria; Sautu, Beatriz Cunill-De; Verbeck, Nicole; McQueen, Alisa; Fromme, H Barrett; Mahan, John D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current state of child neurology education during pediatric residency provides adequate preparation for pediatric practice. A survey was sent to recent graduates from 3 pediatric residency programs to assess graduate experience, perceived level of competence, and desire for further education in child neurology. Responses from generalists versus subspecialists were compared. The response rate was 32%, half in general pediatric practice. Only 22% feel very confident in approaching patients with neurologic problems. This may represent the best-case scenario as graduates from these programs had required neurology experiences, whereas review of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency curricula revealed that the majority of residencies do not. Pediatric neurologic problems are common, and pediatric residency graduates do encounter such problems in practice. The majority of pediatricians report some degree of confidence; however, some clear areas for improvement are apparent.

  10. Academic freedom and academic-industry relationships in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Streiffer, Robert

    2006-06-01

    Commercial academic-industry relationships (AIRs) are widespread in biotechnology and have resulted in a wide array of restrictions on academic research. Objections to such restrictions have centered on the charge that they violate academic freedom. I argue that these objections are almost invariably unsuccessful. On a consequentialist understanding of the value of academic freedom, they rely on unfounded empirical claims about the overall effects that AIRs have on academic research. And on a rights-based understanding of the value of academic freedom, they rely on excessively lavish assumptions about the kinds of activities that academic freedom protects.

  11. The state of academic cancer surgery in the UK.

    PubMed

    Eckhouse, S; Sullivan, R

    2008-10-01

    Despite media and public perception to the contrary cancer surgery is the most important modality for the control and cure of cancer. However, after years of underinvestment by research funders and increasing service delivery demands the academic cancer surgeon is an endangered species. In an effort to improve evidence-based policymaking in this critical domain of cancer research the ECRM has conducted a semi-quantitative assessment of the state of academic cancer surgery in the UK. We have found that the percentage of investment in cancer surgical technologies R&D is less than 1% and even when this is extended to other diseases then this figure is still less than 1%. A decline in the overall numbers of academic surgical staff is paralleled by our finding that over 50% of the academic cancer surgeons in this survey had insufficient time for research. With clinical trials and surgical technology development identified as key research domains the majority (60-80%) did not perceive any benefit for surgical research in these areas as a result of the creation of the UK National Cancer Research Institute. We also found high support for academic surgery from colleagues but medium-low support from many institutions. Key policy conclusions are: (1) greater hypothecated investment by research funders, particularly for the development of surgical technologies as well as clinical trials, and (2) the creation of cancer surgery centres of excellence which have sufficient staffing and institutional support to engendered a creative academic environment.

  12. Does private tutoring increase students' academic performance? Evidence from Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berberoğlu, Giray; Tansel, Aysit

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigates the effectiveness of private tutoring in Turkey. The authors introduce their study by providing some background information on the two major national examinations and three different kinds of tutoring. They then describe how they aimed to analyse whether attending private tutoring centres (PTCs) enhances Turkish students' academic performance. By way of multiple linear regression analysis, their study sought to evaluate whether the impact of private tutoring varies in different subject areas, taking into account several student-related characteristics such as family and academic backgrounds as well as interest in and perception of academic success. In terms of subject areas, the results indicate that while private tutoring does have a positive impact on academic performance in mathematics and Turkish language, this is not the case in natural sciences. However, as evidenced by the effect sizes, these impacts are rather small compared to the impacts of other variables such as interest in and perception of academic success, high school graduation fields of study, high school cumulative grade point average (CGPA), parental education and students' sociocultural background. While the authors point out that more research on the impact of further important variables needs to be done, their view is that school seems to be an important factor for determining students' academic performance.

  13. Complications in common general pediatric surgery procedures.

    PubMed

    Linnaus, Maria E; Ostlie, Daniel J

    2016-12-01

    Complications related to general pediatric surgery procedures are a major concern for pediatric surgeons and their patients. Although infrequent, when they occur the consequences can lead to significant morbidity and psychosocial stress. The purpose of this article is to discuss the common complications encountered during several common pediatric general surgery procedures including inguinal hernia repair (open and laparoscopic), umbilical hernia repair, laparoscopic pyloromyotomy, and laparoscopic appendectomy.

  14. Advances in pediatric pharmacology, therapeutics, and toxicology.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Paul, Ian M; Benjamin, Daniel K; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael

    2014-08-01

    In the United States, passage of the FDASIA legislation made BPCA and PREA permanent, no longer requiring reauthorization every 5 years. This landmark legislation also stressed the importance of performing clinical trials in neonates when appropriate. In Europe the Pediatric Regulation, which went into effect in early 2007, also provides a framework for expanding pediatric clinical research. Although much work remains, as a result of greater regulatory guidance more pediatric data are reaching product labels.

  15. Laser gingivectomy for pediatrics. A case report.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Michelle M; Poiman, David J; Jacobson, Barry L

    2009-01-01

    Traditional gingivectomy procedures have been a challenge for pediatric dentists who confront issues of patient cooperation and discomfort. Treatment of pediatric patients must involve minimal operative and postoperative discomfort. Laser soft-tissue surgery has been shown to be well accepted by children. For the pediatric patient, the greatest advantage of the laser is the lack of local anesthesia injection and the associated pre- and postoperative discomfort. The following case report describes a gingivectomy procedure performed on a 14-year-old female.

  16. Learning From Errors in Ambulatory Pediatrics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    355 Learning from Errors in Ambulatory Pediatrics Julie J. Mohr, Carole M. Lannon, Kathleen A. Thoma, Donna Woods, Eric J. Slora, Richard C...Wasserman, Lynne Uhring Abstract Background: Approximately 70 percent of pediatric care occurs in ambulatory settings, yet there has been little...research on errors and harm in these settings. Given the importance of understanding harm in ambulatory pediatrics , this study was funded by the Agency

  17. Variation in computed tomography imaging for pediatric injury-related emergency visits

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Jennifer R.; Wang, Li; Winger, Daniel G.; Mannix, Rebekah C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess variation in the use of computed tomography (CT) for pediatric injury-related emergency department (ED) visits. Study design Retrospective cohort study of visits to 14 network-affiliated EDs from November 2010 through February 2013. Visits were identified by International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes. Primary outcome was CT use. We used descriptive statistics and performed multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association of patient and ED covariates on any and body region-specific CT use. Results Of the 80,868 injury-related visits, 11.4% included CT, and 28.4% of those had more than one study. Across EDs, CT use ranged from 7.6%- 25.5% of visits and did not correlate with institutional injury severity score (P=0.33) or admission/transfer rates (P=0.07). In multivariable analysis of non-pediatric EDs, trauma centers and non-academic EDs were associated with CT use. Higher pediatric volume was associated with any CT use, however, there was an inverse relationship between volume and non-head CT use. When the pediatric ED was included in multivariable modeling, the effect of level 1-3 trauma center designation remained, and the pediatric level 1 trauma center was less likely to use most body region-specific CTs. Conclusions There is wide variation in CT imaging for pediatric injury-related visits not solely attributable to case mix. Future work to optimize CT utilization should focus on additional factors contributing to imaging practices and interventions. PMID:26233603

  18. Repetitive Pediatric Anesthesia in a Non-Hospital Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Douglas, James G.; Jackson, Jeffrey L.; Simoneaux, R. Victor; Hines, Matthew; Bratton, Jennifer; Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Repetitive sedation/anesthesia (S/A) for children receiving fractionated radiation therapy requires induction and recovery daily for several weeks. In the vast majority of cases, this is accomplished in an academic center with direct access to pediatric faculty and facilities in case of an emergency. Proton radiation therapy centers are more frequently free-standing facilities at some distance from specialized pediatric care. This poses a potential dilemma in the case of children requiring anesthesia. Methods and Materials: The records of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center were reviewed for patients requiring anesthesia during proton beam therapy (PBT) between June 1, 2008, and April 12, 2012. Results: A total of 138 children received daily anesthesia during this period. A median of 30 fractions (range, 1-49) was delivered over a median of 43 days (range, 1-74) for a total of 4045 sedation/anesthesia procedures. Three events (0.0074%) occurred, 1 fall from a gurney during anesthesia recovery and 2 aspiration events requiring emergency department evaluation. All 3 children did well. One aspiration patient needed admission to the hospital and mechanical ventilation support. The other patient returned the next day for treatment without issue. The patient who fell was not injured. No patient required cessation of therapy. Conclusions: This is the largest reported series of repetitive pediatric anesthesia in radiation therapy, and the only available data from the proton environment. Strict adherence to rigorous protocols and a well-trained team can safely deliver daily sedation/anesthesia in free-standing proton centers.

  19. Forms of interdisciplinarity in four sport science research centres in Europe.

    PubMed

    Camy, Jean; Fargier, Patrick; Perrin, Claire; Belli, Alain

    2017-02-01

    Interdisciplinarity is often presented as a significant element of sport science. We present here the results of an investigation conducted in four European Sport Science Research Centres applying interdisciplinarity. Four main dimensions, that we have called "forms", have been investigated. The "scientific", "organisational", "academic" and "societal" forms cover a wide range of activities run by these Centres. We have compared their situations using indicators. Globally they present quite similar combinations of forms, with dominant roles in the construction of interdisciplinarity played by the organisational and societal forms. The scientific form is never quite supported by an epistemological setting and the academic form, mostly characterised by the position of the university, plays an influential role when it is hostile to that kind of research. Following Klein classification, all of them remain at a multidisciplinary stage, one of them exploring interdisciplinary tracks in some research projects. The development of a common culture and a curiosity regarding disciplines other than its own is a key factor for a sustainable situation, as is the capacity to secure long-term financial resources, often linked to a high academic recognition for the director(s).

  20. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) has emerged as an indispensible tool among physicians involved in musculoskeletal medicine in the last two decades, only recently has it become more attractive to pediatric rheumatologists. Thereafter, the use of MSUS in pediatric rheumatology has started to increase. Yet, an ever-growing body of literature shows parity and even superiority of MSUS when compared to physical examination and other imaging modalities. MSUS is suitable for examination of children of all ages and it has certain advantages over other imaging modalities; as it is cheaper, mobile, instantly accessible bedside, easy to combine with clinical assessment (interactivity) and non-invasive. It does not require sedation, which facilitates repetitive examinations. Assessment of multiple locations is possible during the same session. Agitation is rarely a problem and small children can be seated in their parents' lap or they can even play while being examined. PMID:21910870

  1. Pediatric obesity. An introduction ☆

    PubMed Central

    Yanovski, Jack A.

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children’s health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children’s environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail. PMID:25836737

  2. Lasers and pediatric dental care.

    PubMed

    Kotlow, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    There are several types of lasers that will allow pediatric dentists to remove soft tissue (such as diode or Neodynium:Yttrium-Aluminum-Garnet (Nd:YAG) lasers) or remove both hard and soft tissue (such as the Erbium:YAG laser), in addition to photobiostimulation or therapeutic lasers that produce their healing benefits without producing heat. Lasers allow pediatric dentists to provide optimal care without many of the fear factors that result from conventional dental techniques. Lasers are extremely safe and effective when the user has a proper understanding of laser physics. Using lasers for caries removal, bone removal, and soft tissue treatment can reduce postoperative discomfort and infection and make it possible for dentists to provide safe, simple treatments.

  3. Physical rehabilitation of pediatric burns

    PubMed Central

    Atiyeh, B.; Janom, H.H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Significant improvements have been made in the acute treatment of pediatric burn injuries over the past 3 decades which have significantly decreased mortality. Each year, more burned children are necessitating serious medical attention during their convalescence. For children with serious consequences resulting from burns that can persist from childhood through adolescence into adulthood, the value of long-term rehabilitation cannot be over stated. Burn injury management should not focus only on the immediate treatment. Long-term functional outcome and the required rehabilitation that burn victims must go through should be given equal if not more attention. The present is a review of the available modalities utilized for the physical rehabilitation of convalescent pediatric burns in order to overcome the catabolic state, improve muscle power and fitness, reduce disfiguring scars and prevent contractures. PMID:25249846

  4. Physical rehabilitation of pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Atiyeh, B; Janom, H H

    2014-03-31

    Significant improvements have been made in the acute treatment of pediatric burn injuries over the past 3 decades which have significantly decreased mortality. Each year, more burned children are necessitating serious medical attention during their convalescence. For children with serious consequences resulting from burns that can persist from childhood through adolescence into adulthood, the value of long-term rehabilitation cannot be over stated. Burn injury management should not focus only on the immediate treatment. Long-term functional outcome and the required rehabilitation that burn victims must go through should be given equal if not more attention. The present is a review of the available modalities utilized for the physical rehabilitation of convalescent pediatric burns in order to overcome the catabolic state, improve muscle power and fitness, reduce disfiguring scars and prevent contractures.

  5. [What's new in pediatric cardiology?].

    PubMed

    Bonnet, D; Sidi, D

    1999-07-01

    In recent years, close collaborations have been established between pediatric cardiology, medical and molecular genetics, fetal cardiology and pediatric radiology. As a consequence, several congenital heart defects and syndromes including cardiovascular malformations have been related to microdeletions such as 22q11 in Di George syndrome and 7q in Williams syndrome. Prenatal detection of heart malformations has become a crucial part of the management of life-threatening malformations of the neonate such as the transposition of the great arteries or the coarctation of the aorta. We are at the dawn of a new era of the development of preventive cardiovascular medicine starting from childhood thanks to new techniques of echo-tracking. Finally, three-dimensional reconstruction of heart defects by using ultrasound, X-ray or MRI have dramatically improved the diagnosis and the therapeutic strategies of cardiac diseases.

  6. Pediatric Mixed Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Berard, Roberta A; Laxer, Ronald M

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric-onset mixed connective tissue disease is among the rare disease entities in pediatric rheumatology and includes features of arthritis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis. Accurate recognition and diagnosis of the disease is paramount to prevent long-term morbidity. Advances in the genetic and immunologic understanding of the factors involved in the etiopathogenesis provide an opportunity for improvements in prognostication and targeted therapy. The development of a multinational cohort of patients with mixed connective tissue disease would be invaluable to provide more updated data regarding the clinical presentation, to develop a standardized treatment approach, disease activity and outcome tools, and to provide data on long-term outcomes and comorbidities.

  7. Gender and Sexuality in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Merens, Teri A

    2016-05-01

    The terms gender and sexuality, once rarely discussed in a public forum, are now dominant topics of conversation on social media, in all forms of entertainment, politics, law, and medicine. The pediatric primary care physician, like all people and institutions involved in the delivery of health care, must be diligent about providing compassionate and competent care to patients and families contending with gender issues. The complex variety of obstacles these patients may face require a well-informed, sensitive clinician who can offer sound medical advice and appropriate referral. This article guides pediatricians through some of the challenges related to gender identity so they can assist their patients in navigating through any difficulties. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(5):e158-e161.].

  8. Mechanical circulatory support in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Robert J; Miletic, Kyle G; Schraufnagel, Dean P; Vargo, Patrick R; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Stewart, Robert D; Moazami, Nader

    2016-05-01

    End-stage heart failure affects thousands of children yearly and mechanical circulatory support is used at many points in their care. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation supports both the failing heart and lungs, which has led to its use as an adjunct to cardiopulmonary resuscitation as well as in post-operative cardiogenic shock. Continuous-flow ventricular assist devices (VAD) have replaced pulsatile-flow devices in adults and early studies have shown promising results in children. The Berlin paracorporeal pulsatile VAD recently gained U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval and remains the only VAD approved in pediatrics. Failing univentricular hearts and other congenitally corrected lesions are new areas for mechanical support. Finding novel uses, improving durability, and minimizing complications are areas of growth in pediatric mechanical circulatory support.

  9. Quo vadis pediatric nuclear medicine.

    PubMed

    Conway, James J

    2007-07-01

    What has happened to the nuclear medicine subspecialty since those earlier issues of the Seminars in Nuclear Medicine? The earliest issues in 1972 presented topics in vogue at the time that included brain "scanning," cisternography, whole body counting, and abdominal imaging with (99m)Tc pertechnetate. The second pediatric subspecialty issues in 1993 reflected a 21-year evolution of the subspecialty and included the topics of renal scintigraphy, labeled cells for abdominal imaging, metaiodobenzylguanidine imaging, single photon emission computed tomography, and bone scintigraphy for benign disorders. The current issues will address diverse topics that cover the spectrum of the current practice of pediatric nuclear medicine. They include radiation exposure and absorbed dose reduction, positron emission tomography/computed tomography in children, neuroblastoma and other neuroendocrine tumors, thyroid cancer and therapy, bone density studies and, of course, the most prevalent studies in children, renal and bone. Brain, heart, and lung studies complete the spectrum.

  10. Pediatric home healthcare: a paradox.

    PubMed

    Krepper, R; Young, A; Cummings, E

    1994-01-01

    Although parents may welcome having their ill child cared for at home, they are not prepared to compromise privacy and family rituals, nor share control of their child. The purpose of this article is to provide a snapshot of problems that parents have encountered with pediatric home healthcare. Home care parents offer suggestions for other parents and home healthcare nurses and agencies, encouraging them to be proactive in preventing potential problems.

  11. Pediatric hypertension: a growing problem.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Debra; Dixon, Emily

    2015-03-01

    Hypertension in children and adolescents, once thought to be rare, has been estimated at a current prevalence of between 1% and 5% in the United States. The prevalence of primary hypertension continues to increase with the increasing body mass index of the pediatric population. Who is at risk? If and when to screen? When and how to treat? These controversial questions are important to the physician in primary care practice.

  12. Imaging of pediatric neck masses.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Elliott R; John, Susan D

    2011-07-01

    Palpable neck masses are a common indication for pediatric imaging. Such lesions may be caused by infectious, inflammatory, tumoral, traumatic, lymphovascular, immunologic, or congenital etiologies. Radiological assessment of neck masses in young children should be tailored based on patient presentation and physical examination, as well as clinical suspicion. The goal of imaging should be to help arrive at a diagnosis or limited differential in an efficient manner while minimizing radiation exposure.

  13. Mushroom keratoplasty in pediatric patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Busin, Massimo; Beltz, Jacqueline; Scorcia, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the outcome of mushroom keratoplasty for the treatment of full thickness corneal disease in pediatric patients with healthy endothelium. Methods A retrospective analysis of pediatric patients who underwent mushroom keratoplasty. The medical records of pediatric patients suffering from full thickness corneal stromal disease with normal endothelium who underwent mushroom keratoplasty at our Institution were included. A two-piece donor graft consisting of a large anterior stromal lamella (9.0 mm in diameter and ±250 μm in thickness) and a small posterior lamella (5–6.5 mm in diameter) including deep stroma and endothelium, prepared with the aid of a microkeratome had been transplanted in all cases. Ophthalmic examination including slit lamp examination, best corrected visual acuity, and corneal topography was performed preoperatively and at each postoperative visit on all patients. The endothelial cells were assessed by specular microscopy in these patients. Results Six eyes of six patients (five males and one female) were included. The mean age was 9.3 years (range 5–15 years). Average follow-up was 17.8 months (range 9–48 months). There were no early or late complications recorded. All corneas were clear at the last follow up visit. Preoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was worse than 20/70 in all six eyes. Postoperatively, four eyes achieved BCVA of 20/40 or better. Endothelial cell loss (n eyes = 3 averaged 24% (range 19–31%). The mean endothelial cell loss was 24% (range 19–31%) among these patients. Conclusions Microkeratome assisted mushroom keratoplasty is a viable surgical option for pediatric eyes with full thickness corneal stromal disease and healthy endothelium. Mushroom keratoplasty combines the refractive advantage of a large penetrating keratoplasty with the survival advantage of a small penetrating keratoplasty. Furthermore, mushroom keratoplasty exhibits the mechanical advantage of a shaped

  14. The Rewards of Academic Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Christina

    2003-01-01

    Recent studies of academic leadership confirm what many academic leaders know from personal experience: academic leadership is a complex and demanding role with significant stress and high burnout and turnover rates (Brown, 2002; Brown and Moshavi, 2002). In the light of these issues, an exploration of the nature of academic leadership and its…

  15. Academic Writing and Tacit Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elton, Lewis

    2010-01-01

    The genre of academic writing is discipline dependent, so that neither specialists in academic writing nor practising academics in a discipline can, independently of each other, provide students with the necessary help to develop the ability to write in their academic disciplines. Furthermore, the rules are largely tacit, i.e. they are not…

  16. Evidence-based Assessment of Cognitive Functioning in Pediatric Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ronald T.; Cavanagh, Sarah E.; Vess, Sarah F.; Segall, Mathew J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To review the evidence base for measures of cognitive functioning frequently used within the field of pediatric psychology. Methods From a list of 47 measures identified by the Society of Pediatric Psychology (Division 54) Evidence-Based Assessment Task Force Workgroup, 27 measures were included in the review. Measures were organized, reviewed, and evaluated according to general domains of functioning (e.g., attention/executive functioning, memory). Results Twenty-two of 27 measures reviewed demonstrated psychometric properties that met “Well-established” criteria as set forth by the Assessment Task Force. Psychometric properties were strongest for measures of general cognitive ability and weakest for measures of visual-motor functioning and attention. Conclusions We report use of “Well-established” measures of overall cognitive functioning, nonverbal intelligence, academic achievement, language, and memory and learning. For several specific tests in the domains of visual-motor functioning and attention, additional psychometric data are needed for measures to meet criteria as “Well established.” PMID:18194973

  17. Blog and Podcast Watch: Pediatric Emergency Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zaver, Fareen; Hansen, Michael; Leibner, Evan; Little, Andrew; Lin, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Introduction By critically appraising open access, educational blogs and podcasts in emergency medicine (EM) using an objective scoring instrument, this installment of the ALiEM (Academic Life in Emergency Medicine) Blog and Podcast Watch series curated and scored relevant posts in the specific areas of pediatric EM. Methods The Approved Instructional Resources – Professional (AIR-Pro) series is a continuously building curriculum covering a new subject area every two months. For each area, six EM chief residents identify 3–5 advanced clinical questions. Using FOAMsearch.net to search blogs and podcasts, relevant posts are scored by eight reviewers from the AIR-Pro Board, which is comprised of EM faculty and chief residents at various institutions. The scoring instrument contains five measurement outcomes based on 7-point Likert scales: recency, accuracy, educational utility, evidence based, and references. The AIR-Pro label is awarded to posts with a score of ≥26 (out of 35) points. An “Honorable Mention” label is awarded if Board members collectively felt that the posts were valuable and the scores were > 20. Results We included a total of 41 blog posts and podcasts. Key educational pearls from the 10 high quality AIR-Pro posts and four Honorable Mentions are summarized. Conclusion The WestJEM ALiEM Blog and Podcast Watch series is based on the AIR and AIR-Pro series, which attempts to identify high quality educational content on open-access blogs and podcasts. Until more objective quality indicators are developed for learners and educators, this series provides an expert-based, crowdsourced approach towards critically appraising educational social media content for EM clinicians. PMID:27625713

  18. MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy.

    PubMed

    Gulko, Edwin; Collins, Lee K; Murphy, Robyn C; Thornhill, Beverly A; Taragin, Benjamin H

    2015-02-01

    In modern times scurvy is a rarely encountered disease caused by ascorbic acid (vitamin C) deficiency. However, sporadic cases of scurvy persist, particularly within the pediatric population. Recent individual case reports highlight an increased incidence of scurvy among patients with autism or developmental delay, with isolated case reports detailing the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of scurvy in these pediatric populations. We present the MRI findings of scurvy in four patients with autism or developmental delay, and review the literature on MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy. Despite its rarity, the radiologist must consider scurvy in a pediatric patient with a restricted diet presenting with arthralgia or myalgia.

  19. Pediatric insomnia: clinical, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Miano, Silvia; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric insomnia is an extrinsic sleep disorder subdivided into two categories: behavioral insomnia and insomnia related to medical, neurological, and psychiatric diseases. This review will cover several types of insomnia, comorbidities and specific pediatric therapies according to clinical characteristics and age. Behavioral insomnia should be differentiated from pediatric insomnia due to medical conditions, mostly occurring during the first year of life. Multiple night awakenings and diurnal hypersomnolence are strong indicators of insomnia due to medical conditions. Insomnia during adolescence and pediatric insomnia associated with psychiatric comorbidity, cognitive disabilities and epilepsy, will be discussed in terms of diagnosis, clinical features and implications for treatment.

  20. Pediatric Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; Barker, Kristen; Brown, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Research on pediatric Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) is reviewed in this article. Many recent articles in this area highlight the existence of key differences between the adult and pediatric forms of the illness. This review article provides an overview of pediatric ME/CFS, including epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, treatment, and prognosis. Challenges to the field are identified with the hope that in the future pediatric cases of ME/CFS can be more accurately diagnosed and successfully managed. PMID:24340168

  1. CMS centres worldwide: A new collaborative infrastructure

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Lucas; Gottschalk, Erik; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC is establishing a global network of inter-connected 'CMS Centres' for controls, operations and monitoring. These support: (1) CMS data quality monitoring, detector calibrations, and analysis; and (2) computing operations for the processing, storage and distribution of CMS data. We describe the infrastructure, computing, software, and communications systems required to create an effective and affordable CMS Centre. We present our highly successful operations experiences with the major CMS Centres at CERN, Fermilab, and DESY during the LHC first beam data-taking and cosmic ray commissioning work. The status of the various centres already operating or under construction in Asia, Europe, Russia, South America, and the USA is also described. We emphasise the collaborative communications aspects. For example, virtual co-location of experts in CMS Centres Worldwide is achieved using high-quality permanently-running 'telepresence' video links. Generic Web-based tools have been developed and deployed for monitoring, control, display management and outreach.

  2. Clinical services in environmental pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Paulson, Jerome A; Gordon, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric healthcare providers are confronted with environmental health problems frequently: the child with asthma exacerbated by the odor of paint in school or mouse antigen at home, the family who wants to know the risks and benefits of using different types of sunblock, or the community that asks the provider for advice on the potential health impacts of building the new elementary school next to the on-ramp to the interstate highway. Pediatric providers have not been well trained to deal with these questions in medical or nursing schools, residency training, or continuing-education settings. This article provides guidance on history taking, the physical examination, laboratory evaluations of patients and the environment, and making an assessment about and managing environmental health problems. Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units are discussed as a source of consultation and referral. The identification and utilization of evidence-based resources are stressed and clinicians are cautioned about non-evidence-based assessments such as clinical ecology and hair analysis and non-evidence-based management strategies such as chelation for autism.

  3. Sedoanalgesia in pediatric daily surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ozkan, Aybars; Okur, Mesut; Kaya, Murat; Kaya, Ertugrul; Kucuk, Adem; Erbas, Mesut; Kutlucan, Leyla; Sahan, Leyla

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The present report was focused on clinical advantages of sedoanalgesia in the pediatric outpatient surgical cases. Method: Sedoanalgesia has been used to sedate patients for a variety of pediatric procedures in our department between 2007 and 2010. This is a retrospective review of 2720 pediatric patients given ketamine for sedation with midazolam premedication. Ketamine was given intravenously (1-2 mg/kg) together with atropine (0.02 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.1 mg/kg) + a local infiltration anesthetic 2 mg/kg 0.5% bupivacaine hydrochloride. Result: Median age of the patients included in the study was 5.76 ± 2.12 (0-16 years). The main indications for ketamine include circumcision (69%), inguinal pathologies (inguinal hernia (17%), orchidopexy (2.68%), hydrocele (3.38%), hypospadias (1.94%), urethral fistula repair (0.33%), urethral dilatation (0.25%), and other conditions. All of our patients were discharged home well. In this regard, we have the largest group of patients ever given ketamine. Conclusion: Sedoanalgesia might be used as a quite effective method for daily surgical procedures in children. PMID:23936597

  4. Pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Bozic, Molly A; Subbarao, Girish; Molleston, Jean P

    2013-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in the pediatric population. Increased recognition of this form of liver disease parallels the dramatic rise in childhood and adolescent obesity over the past 2 decades. Like adults, most children with NAFLD are obese, and comorbidities include insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Unfortunately, pediatric NAFLD is not always a benign condition, with some children progressing to hepatic fibrosis and even cirrhosis in severe cases. The etiology of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is not yet fully understood; however, hepatic steatosis in the context of insulin resistance and increased oxidative stress may lead to progressive disease. Although physical examination, laboratory evaluation, and radiographic findings provide clues to the potential presence of fatty liver disease, liver biopsy remains the gold standard for diagnosis. Lifestyle modification, including slow and steady weight loss, improved dietary habits, and increased daily, aerobic physical activity, remains the first-line approach in treating pediatric fatty liver disease. Antioxidant pharmacologic therapy such as use of vitamin E has shown some benefit in patients with biopsy-proven steatohepatitis. Nutrition plays an essential role not only in the development of fatty liver disease but also potentially in the treatment and prevention of progression to more severe disease.

  5. Utilizing peer academic detailing to improve childhood immunization coverage levels.

    PubMed

    Boom, Julie A; Nelson, Cynthia S; Kohrt, Alan E; Kozinetz, Claudia A

    2010-05-01

    Interventions that utilize academic detailing to improve childhood immunization have been implemented across the country. This study evaluates the effectiveness of an academic detailing intervention to increase childhood immunization rates in pediatric and family medicine practices in a major metropolitan area. Educational teams of one physician, nurse, and office manager delivered 83 peer education sessions at practices in the intervention group. Postintervention immunization rates for children 12-23 months of age increased 1% in the intervention group and decreased 3% in the control group. Postintervention coverage levels for children 12-23 months of age did not differ between the intervention and control groups. Results indicated this office-based intervention was not sufficient to effect measurable changes in immunization coverage levels after 1 year of participation. Future interventions need to provide initial feedback regarding practice immunization coverage levels prior to the educational interventions and include multiple encounters.

  6. Determining the Effects of Using Different Writing Activities on the Academic Achievements Secondary School 7th Grade Students and Their Attitudes Towards the Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uzoglu, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to determine the effects of using writing activities with different learning purposes by the secondary school 7th grade students on their academic achievement and attitudes towards the course. The study was carried out in a secondary school located in the centre of Erzurum in 2012-2013 academic year; the study is a…

  7. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  8. Optimizing Data Centre Energy and Environmental Costs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikema, David Hendrik

    Data centres use an estimated 2% of US electrical power which accounts for much of their total cost of ownership. This consumption continues to grow, further straining power grids attempting to integrate more renewable energy. This dissertation focuses on assessing and reducing data centre environmental and financial costs. Emissions of projects undertaken to lower the data centre environmental footprints can be assessed and the emission reduction projects compared using an ISO-14064-2-compliant greenhouse gas reduction protocol outlined herein. I was closely involved with the development of the protocol. Full lifecycle analysis and verifying that projects exceed business-as-usual expectations are addressed, and a test project is described. Consuming power when it is low cost or when renewable energy is available can be used to reduce the financial and environmental costs of computing. Adaptation based on the power price showed 10--50% potential savings in typical cases, and local renewable energy use could be increased by 10--80%. Allowing a fraction of high-priority tasks to proceed unimpeded still allows significant savings. Power grid operators use mechanisms called ancillary services to address variation and system failures, paying organizations to alter power consumption on request. By bidding to offer these services, data centres may be able to lower their energy costs while reducing their environmental impact. If providing contingency reserves which require only infrequent action, savings of up to 12% were seen in simulations. Greater power cost savings are possible for those ceding more control to the power grid operator. Coordinating multiple data centres adds overhead, and altering at which data centre requests are processed based on changes in the financial or environmental costs of power is likely to increase this overhead. Tests of virtual machine migrations showed that in some cases there was no visible increase in power use while in others power use

  9. PEDIATRIC DELIRIUM AND ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS: A SINGLE-CENTER PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Linda M.; Sun, Xuming; Kearney, Julia; Patel, Anita; Greenwald, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe a single-institution pilot study regarding prevalence and risk factors for delirium in critically ill children. Design A prospective observational study, with secondary analysis of data collected during the validation of a pediatric delirium screening tool, the Cornell Assessment of Pediatric Delirium (CAPD). Setting This study took place in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at an urban academic medical center. Patients 99 consecutive patients, ages newborn to 21 years. Intervention Subjects underwent a psychiatric evaluation for delirium based on the DSM-IV criteria. Measurements and Main Results Prevalence of delirium in this sample was 21%. In multivariate analysis, risk factors associated with the diagnosis of delirium were presence of developmental delay, need for mechanical ventilation, and age 2-5 years. Conclusions In our institution, pediatric delirium is a prevalent problem, with identifiable risk factors. Further large-scale prospective studies are required to explore multi-institutional prevalence, modifiable risk factors, therapeutic interventions, and effect on long-term outcomes. PMID:25647240

  10. Recommendations for the Use of Common Outcome Measures in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury Research

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Elisabeth A.; Anderson, Vicki A.; Bedell, Gary; Beers, Sue R.; Campbell, Thomas F.; Chapman, Sandra B.; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Gerring, Joan P.; Gioia, Gerard A.; Levin, Harvey S.; Michaud, Linda J.; Prasad, Mary R.; Swaine, Bonnie R.; Turkstra, Lyn S.; Wade, Shari L.; Yeates, Keith O.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This article addresses the need for age-relevant outcome measures for traumatic brain injury (TBI) research and summarizes the recommendations by the inter-agency Pediatric TBI Outcomes Workgroup. The Pediatric Workgroup's recommendations address primary clinical research objectives including characterizing course of recovery from TBI, prediction of later outcome, measurement of treatment effects, and comparison of outcomes across studies. Consistent with other Common Data Elements (CDE) Workgroups, the Pediatric TBI Outcomes Workgroup adopted the standard three-tier system in its selection of measures. In the first tier, core measures included valid, robust, and widely applicable outcome measures with proven utility in pediatric TBI from each identified domain including academics, adaptive and daily living skills, family and environment, global outcome, health-related quality of life, infant and toddler measures, language and communication, neuropsychological impairment, physical functioning, psychiatric and psychological functioning, recovery of consciousness, social role participation and social competence, social cognition, and TBI-related symptoms. In the second tier, supplemental measures were recommended for consideration in TBI research focusing on specific topics or populations. In the third tier, emerging measures included important instruments currently under development, in the process of validation, or nearing the point of published findings that have significant potential to be superior to measures in the core and supplemental lists and may eventually replace them as evidence for their utility emerges. PMID:21644810

  11. Pediatric hospital medicine: a strategic planning roundtable to chart the future.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Daniel A; Lye, Patricia S; Carlson, Douglas; Daru, Jennifer A; Narang, Steve; Srivastava, Rajendu; Melzer, Sanford; Conway, Patrick H

    2012-04-01

    Given the growing field of Pediatric Hospital Medicine (PHM) and the need to define strategic direction, the Society of Hospital Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Academic Pediatric Association sponsored a roundtable to discuss the future of the field. Twenty-one leaders were invited plus a facilitator utilizing established health care strategic planning methods. A "vision statement" was developed. Specific initiatives in 4 domains (clinical practice, quality of care, research, and workforce) were identified that would advance PHM with a plan to complete each initiative. Review of the current issues demonstrated gaps between the current state of affairs and the full vision of the potential impact of PHM. Clinical initiatives were to develop an educational plan supporting the PHM Core Competencies and a clinical practice monitoring dashboard template. Quality initiatives included an environmental assessment of PHM participation on key committees, societies, and agencies to ensure appropriate PHM representation. Three QI collaboratives are underway. A Research Leadership Task Force was created and the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) network was refocused, defining a strategic framework for PRIS, and developing a funding strategy. Workforce initiatives were to develop a descriptive statement that can be used by any PHM physician, a communications tool describing "value added" of PHM; and a tool to assess career satisfaction among PHM physicians. We believe the Roundtable was successful in describing the current state of PHM and laying a course for the near future.

  12. Bureaucracy, professionalization and school centred innovation strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Paul

    1990-03-01

    This paper examines an attempt to promote a school centred innovation strategy within a highly centralized educational system. The School Based Curriculum Project Scheme, which was introduced into Hong Kong in 1988, is analysed in terms of a professional-bureaucratic dichotomy. It is argued that the operational details of the scheme are designed to satisfy a range of bureaucratic concerns and these are not conducive to promoting the professional work ethic which is required for school centred innovation. Finally the paper identifies the implications which arise for policies designed to promote curriculum innovation.

  13. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory as Cultural Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    NAS RA V. Ambartsumian Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory is presented as a cultural centre for Armenia and the Armenian nation in general. Besides being scientific and educational centre, the Observatory is famous for its unique architectural ensemble, rich botanical garden and world of birds, as well as it is one of the most frequently visited sightseeing of Armenia. In recent years, the Observatory has also taken the initiative of the coordination of the Cultural Astronomy in Armenia and in this field, unites the astronomers, historians, archaeologists, ethnographers, culturologists, literary critics, linguists, art historians and other experts.

  14. A short history of the Science and Mathematics Education Centre at Curtin University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treagust, David F.

    2011-09-01

    This article is presented in four parts. In the first part, I describe the foundation of the Science and Mathematics Education Centre (SMEC) at Curtin University. In the second part, I explain the development of SMEC's teaching and research capacity under its three directors. In the third section, I describe how federal government support of SMEC as a national Key Centre for Teaching and Research in School Science and Mathematics provided enhanced postgraduate study opportunities for science and mathematics teachers throughout Australia by offering degree programs through distance education and face-to-face contact, short courses, and seminars. At the same time, research and teaching capacity of the academic staff was enhanced through the internationalisation of the programs being offered. In the final section, I describe current and future developments at SMEC.

  15. Rates of Mental Illness and Associated Academic Impacts in Ontario's College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Alana; Silvestri, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Staff at campus-based counselling and disability centres in 15 of Ontario's 24 community colleges completed 3,536 surveys on 1,964 individual students querying the presence of mental illness and academic challenges as reported by students accessing these services. Survey data were analyzed to determine prevalence rates of mental disorders and…

  16. The Genealogy of Judgement: Towards a Deep History of Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The classical conception of academic freedom associated with Wilhelm von Humboldt and the rise of the modern university has a quite specific cultural foundation that centres on the controversial mental faculty of "judgement". This article traces the roots of "judgement" back to the Protestant Reformation, through its heyday as the signature…

  17. The National Year of Reading: Celebrating the Role of Literature in an Academic Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    2012, the National Year of Reading (NYR), was celebrated in libraries, schools and community centres throughout Australia. At the University of Adelaide, we celebrated our academic culture of literary teaching and research with a range of programmes and initiatives based in the humanities faculty. The Barr Smith Library played an integral part in…

  18. Case Meetings for Teaching English for Specific Academic Purposes in a Tertiary Aeronautical Engineering Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatzl, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an innovative adaptation of the case method to teaching English for specific academic purposes. Widespread in its traditional form in various content disciplines, the case method bears the potential for truly student-centred language instruction. The current application transforms learners from case analysts to case authors…

  19. Effects of Soldiers’ Deployment on Children’s Academic Performance and Behavioral Health

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Activity Schools,” Economics of Education Review, Vol. 29, Issue. 1, 2010, pp. 73–82. Ensminger, M., and A. Slusarcick, “Paths to High School Graduation or...and Behavioral Health Complaints,” Pediatrics, November 8, 2010. Hill, Carolyn J., Howard S. Bloom, Alison Rebeck Black, and Mark W. Lipsey ...Parental Absences and Household Relocations on Children’s Academic Achievement,” Journal of Labor Economics , Vol. 24, No. 2, 2006. Margolin, Gayla, and

  20. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  1. Development of a One Health National Capacity in Africa : the Southern African Centre for Infectious Disease Surveillance (SACIDS) One Health Virtual Centre Model.

    PubMed

    Rweyemamu, Mark; Kambarage, Dominic; Karimuribo, Esron; Wambura, Philemon; Matee, Mecky; Kayembe, Jean-Marie; Mweene, Aaron; Neves, Luis; Masumu, Justin; Kasanga, Christopher; Hang'ombe, Bernard; Kayunze, Kim; Misinzo, Gerald; Simuunza, Martin; Paweska, Janusz T

    2013-01-01

    Among the many challenges to health, infectious diseases stand out for their ability to have a profound impact on humans and animals. The recent years have witnessed an increasing number of novel infectious diseases. The numerous examples of infections which originated from animals suggest that the zoonotic pool is an important and potentially rich source of emerging diseases. Since emergence and re-emergence of pathogens, and particularly zoonotic agents, occur at unpredictable rates in animal and human populations, infectious diseases will constitute a significant challenge for the public health and animal health communities in the twenty-first century. The African continent suffers from one of the highest burdens of infectious diseases of humans and animals in the world but has the least capacity for their detection, identification and monitoring. Lessons learnt from recent zoonotic epidemics in Africa and elsewhere clearly indicate the need for coordinated research, interdisciplinary centres, response systems and infrastructures, integrated surveillance systems and workforce development strategies. More and stronger partnerships across national and international sectors (human health, animal health, environment) and disciplines (natural and social sciences) involving public, academic and private organisations and institutions will be required to meet the present and future challenges of infectious diseases. In order to strengthen the efficiency of early warning systems, monitoring trends and disease prediction and timely outbreak interventions for the benefit of the national and international community, it is essential that each nation improves its own capacity in disease recognition and laboratory competence. The SACIDS, a One Health African initiative linking southern African academic and research institutions in smart partnership with centres of science excellence in industrialised countries as well as international research centres, strives to strengthen

  2. Pandemic Influenza Pediatric Office Plan Template

    SciTech Connect

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    This is a planning tool developed by pediatric stakeholders that is intended to assist pediatric medical offices that have no pandemic influenza plan in place, but may experience an increase in patient calls/visits or workload due to pandemic influenza.

  3. Audiovisual Instruction in Pediatric Pharmacy Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutchie, Kelly D.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A pharmacy practice program added to the core baccalaureate curriculum at the University of Utah College of Pharmacy which includes a practice in pediatrics is described. An audiovisual program in pediatric diseases and drug therapy was developed. This program allows the presentation of more material without reducing clerkship time. (Author/MLW)

  4. Prescription-Writing by Pediatric House Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walson, Philip D.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    An examination to evaluate prescription writing was administered to a group of pediatric house officers and faculty at the University of Arizona. The data indicate that prescription writing should be taught to house officers, and that the therapeutic knowledge of beginning pediatric interns cannot be assumed to be adequate. (Author/MLW)

  5. 21 CFR 601.27 - Pediatric studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... each pediatric age group, if data from one age group can be extrapolated to another. Assessments... treatments must be carried out using appropriate formulations for the age group(s) for which the assessment... therapeutic benefit over existing therapies for pediatric patients and is not likely to be used in...

  6. 21 CFR 601.27 - Pediatric studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... each pediatric age group, if data from one age group can be extrapolated to another. Assessments... treatments must be carried out using appropriate formulations for the age group(s) for which the assessment... therapeutic benefit over existing therapies for pediatric patients and is not likely to be used in...

  7. 21 CFR 601.27 - Pediatric studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... each pediatric age group, if data from one age group can be extrapolated to another. Assessments... treatments must be carried out using appropriate formulations for the age group(s) for which the assessment... therapeutic benefit over existing therapies for pediatric patients and is not likely to be used in...

  8. 21 CFR 601.27 - Pediatric studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... each pediatric age group, if data from one age group can be extrapolated to another. Assessments... treatments must be carried out using appropriate formulations for the age group(s) for which the assessment... therapeutic benefit over existing therapies for pediatric patients and is not likely to be used in...

  9. Financing of Pediatric Home Health Care.

    PubMed

    Simpser, Edwin; Hudak, Mark L

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric home health care is an effective and holistic venue of treatment of children with medical complexity or developmental disabilities who otherwise may experience frequent and/or prolonged hospitalizations or who may enter chronic institutional care. Demand for pediatric home health care is increasing while the provider base is eroding, primarily because of inadequate payment or restrictions on benefits. As a result, home care responsibilities assumed by family caregivers have increased and imposed financial, physical, and psychological burdens on the family. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act set forth 10 mandated essential health benefits. Home care should be considered as an integral component of the habilitative and rehabilitative services and devices benefit, even though it is not explicitly recognized as a specific category of service. Pediatric-specific home health care services should be defined clearly as components of pediatric services, the 10th essential benefit, and recognized by all payers. Payments for home health care services should be sufficient to maintain an adequate provider work force with the pediatric-specific expertise and skills to care for children with medical complexity or developmental disability. Furthermore, coordination of care among various providers and the necessary direct patient care from which these care coordination plans are developed should be required and enabled by adequate payment. The American Academy of Pediatrics advocates for high-quality care by calling for development of pediatric-specific home health regulations and the licensure and certification of pediatric home health providers.

  10. A Method for Defining Competency in Pediatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burg, Fredric D.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In 1972 the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) initiated studies leading to a report that identifies the important components of competency needed in pediatrics. Three dimensions of competence were identified: subject matter, abilities, and tasks. Each of these is discussed. (LBH)

  11. Nursing 436A: Pediatric Oncology for Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackman, Cynthia L.

    A description is provided of "Pediatric Oncology for Nurses," the first in a series of three courses offered to fourth-year nursing students in pediatric oncology. The first section provides a course overview, discusses time assignments, and describes the target student population. Next, a glossary of terms, and lists of course goals, long-range…

  12. Pediatric Home Sleep Studies: A Prospective Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-19

    Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects 1-5% of pediatric patients. Untreated pediatric OSA is associated with neurocognitive impairment...not always available, and is inconvenient for patients. Therefore, 90% of children undergo adenotonsillectomy without confirmatory diagnostic testing. Home sleep testing for OSA may alleviate these issues.

  13. Development of a Pediatric Adverse Events Terminology

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Debbie S.; Kirkendall, Eric S.; Gumbs-Petty, Brenda; Quinn, Theresa; Steen, A.; Hicks, Amanda; McMahon, Ann; Nicholas, Savian; Zhao-Wong, Anna; Taylor-Zapata, Perdita; Turner, Mark; Herreshoff, Emily; Jones, Charlotte; Davis, Jonathan M.; Haber, Margaret; Hirschfeld, Steven

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) established the Pediatric Terminology Harmonization Initiative to establish a core library of terms to facilitate the acquisition and sharing of knowledge between pediatric clinical research, practice, and safety reporting. A coalition of partners established a Pediatric Terminology Adverse Event Working Group in 2013 to develop a specific terminology relevant to international pediatric adverse event (AE) reporting. Pediatric specialists with backgrounds in clinical care, research, safety reporting, or informatics, supported by biomedical terminology experts from the National Cancer Institute’s Enterprise Vocabulary Services participated. The multinational group developed a working definition of AEs and reviewed concepts (terms, synonyms, and definitions) from 16 pediatric clinical domains. The resulting AE terminology contains >1000 pediatric diseases, disorders, or clinical findings. The terms were tested for proof of concept use in 2 different settings: hospital readmissions and the NICU. The advantages of the AE terminology include ease of adoption due to integration with well-established and internationally accepted biomedical terminologies, a uniquely temporal focus on pediatric health and disease from conception through adolescence, and terms that could be used in both well- and underresourced environments. The AE terminology is available for use without restriction through the National Cancer Institute’s Enterprise Vocabulary Services and is fully compatible with, and represented in, the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities. The terminology is intended to mature with use, user feedback, and optimization. PMID:28028203

  14. Development of a Pediatric Adverse Events Terminology.

    PubMed

    Gipson, Debbie S; Kirkendall, Eric S; Gumbs-Petty, Brenda; Quinn, Theresa; Steen, A; Hicks, Amanda; McMahon, Ann; Nicholas, Savian; Zhao-Wong, Anna; Taylor-Zapata, Perdita; Turner, Mark; Herreshoff, Emily; Jones, Charlotte; Davis, Jonathan M; Haber, Margaret; Hirschfeld, Steven

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) established the Pediatric Terminology Harmonization Initiative to establish a core library of terms to facilitate the acquisition and sharing of knowledge between pediatric clinical research, practice, and safety reporting. A coalition of partners established a Pediatric Terminology Adverse Event Working Group in 2013 to develop a specific terminology relevant to international pediatric adverse event (AE) reporting. Pediatric specialists with backgrounds in clinical care, research, safety reporting, or informatics, supported by biomedical terminology experts from the National Cancer Institute's Enterprise Vocabulary Services participated. The multinational group developed a working definition of AEs and reviewed concepts (terms, synonyms, and definitions) from 16 pediatric clinical domains. The resulting AE terminology contains >1000 pediatric diseases, disorders, or clinical findings. The terms were tested for proof of concept use in 2 different settings: hospital readmissions and the NICU. The advantages of the AE terminology include ease of adoption due to integration with well-established and internationally accepted biomedical terminologies, a uniquely temporal focus on pediatric health and disease from conception through adolescence, and terms that could be used in both well- and underresourced environments. The AE terminology is available for use without restriction through the National Cancer Institute's Enterprise Vocabulary Services and is fully compatible with, and represented in, the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities. The terminology is intended to mature with use, user feedback, and optimization.

  15. Screening and Identification in Pediatric Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonian, Susan J.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews issues related to behavioral screening in pediatric primary care settings. Structural-organizational issues affecting the use of pediatric primary care screening are discussed. This study also reviewed selected screening instruments that have utility for use in the primary care setting. Clinical and research issues related to…

  16. From cradle to adolescence: the development of Research in European Pediatric Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mintegi, Santiago; Lyttle, Mark D; Maconochie, Ian K; Benito, Javier; Gervaix, Alain; Moll, Henriette; Shavit, Itai; Da Dalt, Liviana; Waisman, Yehezkel

    2014-02-01

    Pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) has been developing rapidly but heterogeneously in many European countries in recent years, and many national PEM societies have been founded to improve the quality of care of ill and injured children and adolescents. Key facets of any such improvement are the development, delivery and translation of high-quality research. Research in European Pediatric Emergency Medicine (REPEM) has developed a robust international structure involving clinicians, academics and national PEM research networks. This structure facilitates research collaboration within Europe and with PEM research networks from other continents. Multicentre research carried out in this way will bring about improvements in the quality of emergency care for children in European emergency departments, and result in a better quality of life for children and adolescents. This paper outlines the background and achievements of REPEM to date and describes the current structure and next steps.

  17. The transition to competency-based pediatric training in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Halah; Al Tatari, Hossam; Holmboe, Eric S

    2015-04-01

    Although competency-based medical education has become the standard for physician training in the West, many developing countries have not yet adopted competency-based training. In 2009 in the United Arab Emirates, the government regulatory and operational authorities for healthcare in Abu Dhabi mandated a wide-scale reform of the emirate's postgraduate residency programs to the competency-based framework of the newly formed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-International (ACGME-I). This article briefly describes the rationale for competency-based medical education and provides an overview of the transition from traditional, time-based residency training to competency-based postgraduate medical education for the Pediatrics residency programs in Abu Dhabi. We will provide data on the initial impact of this transition on resident performance and patient outcomes in a Pediatrics residency program in an academic medical center in the United Arab Emirates.

  18. Writing Centre Tutoring Sessions: Addressing Students' Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winder, Roger; Kathpalia, Sujata S.; Koo, Swit Ling

    2016-01-01

    The guiding principle behind university writing centres is to focus on the process of writing rather than the finished product, prioritising higher order concerns related to organisation and argumentation of texts rather than lower order concerns of grammar and punctuation. Using survey-based data, this paper examines students' concerns regarding…

  19. Person-Centred (Deictic) Expressions and Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, R. Peter; Garcia-Perez, Rosa M.; Lee, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    We employed semi-structured tests to determine whether children with autism produce and comprehend deictic (person-centred) expressions such as "this"/"tilde" "here"/"there" and "come"/"go", and whether they understand atypical non-verbal gestural deixis in the form of directed head-nods to indicate location. In Study 1, most participants…

  20. Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) draws up, proposes and conducts France's space policy. Its role is to develop the uses of space, to meet the civilian and military needs of public bodies and of the scientific community, and to foster the development and dissemination of new applications, designed to create wealth and jobs....

  1. Crystallographic Data Centre Services and Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cambridge Univ. (England). Chemical Lab.

    The Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre is concerned with the retrieval, evaluation, synthesis, and dissemination of structural data based on diffraction methods. The source of input is almost entirely primary journals. Bibliographic information and numeric data on crystal and molecular structures are on magnetic tapes. The bibliographic file…

  2. Examining Whiteness in a Children's Centre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Verity; Watson, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    This article utilises critical whiteness theory to explore the ethnic discourses observed in a children's centre in South London. Whilst critical whiteness has been used as a framework to understand race, racism and multiculturalism in a number of settings, including education, there are few studies that have sought to understand ethnicity in…

  3. Visiting a science centre: what's on offer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Ian

    1990-09-01

    Science centres are a valuable resource, used more frequently by family groups and primary school parties than by secondary schools. The importance of affective learning, involving attitude changes, is stressed. Provided the right approach is used, accompanying adults can help children get the most out of a visit.

  4. Cactus: The Centres of a Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2009-01-01

    This is the first of two articles which describe how to use "JavaSketchPad" to explore the centres of a triangle. This introductory exercise is suggested in the GSP "Workshop Guide". Students can use "JavaSketchPad Interactive Geometry" (JSP) at home at no cost. They are likely to impress their parents with their enthusiasm for geometry and all…

  5. Oo-Za-We-Kwun Centre Incorporated

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlay, P. R.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Centre is described as being designed to help native people participate more effectively in a modern Canadian environment. The residential family program includes a five-week Life Skills course followed by a two-year transfer of learning period during which counseling, paid employment, and community activities are available. (Author/MS)

  6. Industry Restructuring: Extracts from Centre Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, William C., Ed.

    This document contains excerpts from material previously published by Australia's TAFE (Technical and Further Education) National Centre for Research and Development on the subjects of industry restructuring, the reasons for restructuring, revising curricula, and providing a service to business and industry. Its contents are "Industry…

  7. Self Assessment and Student-Centred Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Betty

    2012-01-01

    This paper seeks to show how self assessment facilitates student-centred learning (SCL) and fills a gap in the literature. Two groups of students were selected from a single class in a tertiary educational institution. The control group of 25 was selected randomly by the tossing of an unbiased coin (heads = control group). They were trained in the…

  8. In the Field: The Canadian Ecology Centre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magee, Clare

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Ecology Centre (Ontario) offers year-round residential and day programs in outdoor and environmental education for secondary students, field placement and internship opportunities for college students, and ecotourism programs, while providing employment and tax revenues to the local community. Dubbed consensus environmentalism, the…

  9. Centring the Subject in Order to Educate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott

    2007-01-01

    It is important for educators to recognise that the various calls to decentre the subject--or self--should not be interpreted as necessarily requiring the removal of the subject altogether. Through the individualism of the Enlightenment the self was centred. This highly individualistic notion of the sovereign self has now been decentred especially…

  10. Myanmar: The Community Learning Centre Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middelborg, Jorn; Duvieusart, Baudouin, Ed.

    A community learning centre (CLC) is a local educational institution outside the formal education system, usually set up and managed by local people. CLCs were first introduced in Myanmar in 1994, and by 2001 there were 71 CLCs in 11 townships. The townships are characterized by remoteness, landlessness, unemployment, dependency on one cash crop,…

  11. Early Childhood Centre Administrator Certification. Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, E. Elaine

    This document presents the process for obtaining certification for the position of early childhood centre administrator (ECCA) in Nova Scotia, Canada. Following an introduction describing the development of the process and its pilot testing, Chapter 1 of the document details the four-step process: (1) application, including training in the ECCA…

  12. Defining Service and Education in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Debra; Gagne, Josh; Kesselheim, Jennifer C

    2016-12-01

    Program directors (PDs) and trainees are often queried regarding the balance of service and education during pediatric residency training. We aimed to use qualitative methods to learn how pediatric residents and PDs define service and education and to identify activities that exemplify these concepts. Focus groups of pediatric residents and PDs were performed and the data qualitatively analyzed. Thematic analysis revealed 4 themes from focus group data: (1) misalignment of the perceived definition of service; (2) agreement about the definition of education; (3) overlapping perceptions of the value of service to training; and (4) additional suggestions for improved integration of education and service. Pediatric residents hold positive definitions of service and believe that service adds value to their education. Importantly, the discovery of heterogeneous definitions of service between pediatric residents and PDs warrants further investigation and may have ramifications for Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and those responsible for residency curricula.

  13. The proteomics of pediatric brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, Athanasios K; Tsangaris, George T

    2014-10-01

    Pediatric tumors of the CNS are the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in children. In pediatric pathology, brain tumors constitute the most frequent solid malignancy. An unparalleled outburst of information in pediatric neuro-oncology research has been witnessed over the last few years, largely due to increased use of high-throughput technologies such as genomics, proteomics and meta-analysis tools. Input from these technologies gives scientists the advantage of early prognosis assessment, more accurate diagnosis and prospective curative intent in the pediatric brain tumor clinical setting. The present review aims to summarize current knowledge on research applying proteomics techniques or proteomics-based approaches performed on pediatric brain tumors. Proteins that can be used as potential disease markers or molecular targets, and their biological significance, are herein listed and discussed. Furthermore, future perspectives that proteomics technologies may offer regarding this devastating disorder are presented.

  14. Pediatric papillary thyroid cancer: current management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Verburg, Frederik A; Van Santen, Hanneke M; Luster, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Although with a standardized incidence of 0.54 cases per 100,000 persons, differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is a rare disease in children and adolescents, it nonetheless concerns ~1.4% of all pediatric malignancies. Furthermore, its incidence is rising. Due to the rarity and long survival of pediatric DTC patients, in most areas of treatment little evidence exists. Treatment of pediatric DTC is therefore littered with controversies, many questions therefore remain open regarding the optimal management of pediatric papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), and many challenges remain unsolved. In the present review, we aim to provide an overview of these challenging areas of patient and disease management in pediatric PTC patients. Data on diagnosis, surgery, radionuclide, and endocrine therapy are discussed, and the controversies therein are highlighted. PMID:28096684

  15. Bioethics and academic freedom.

    PubMed

    Singer, Peter

    1990-01-01

    The author describes the events surrounding his attempts to lecture on the subject of euthanasia in West Germany in June 1989. Singer, who defends the view that active euthanasia for some newborns with handicaps may be ethically permissible, had been invited to speak to professional and academic groups. Strong public protests against Singer and his topic led to the cancellation of some of his engagements, disruptions during others, and harrassment of the German academics who had invited him to speak. These incidents and the subject of euthanasia became matters of intense national debate in West Germany, but there was little public or academic support for Singer's right to be heard. Singer argues that bioethics and bioethicists must have the freedom to challenge conventional moral beliefs, and that the events in West Germany illustrate the grave danger to that freedom from religious and political intolerance.

  16. Measurement of academic entitlement.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian K

    2013-10-01

    Members of Generation Y, or Millennials, have been accused of being lazy, whiny, pampered, and entitled, particularly in the college classroom. Using an equity theory framework, eight items from a measure of work entitlement were adapted to measure academic entitlement in a university setting in three independent samples. In Study 1 (n = 229), confirmatory factor analyses indicated good model fit to a unidimensional structure for the data. In Study 2 (n = 200), the questionnaire predicted unique variance in university satisfaction beyond two more general measures of dispositional entitlement. In Study 3 (n = 161), the measure predicted unique variance in perceptions of grade fairness beyond that which was predicted by another measure of academic entitlement. This analysis provides evidence of discriminant, convergent, incremental, concurrent criterion-related, and construct validity for the Academic Equity Preference Questionnaire.

  17. Peripheral doses from pediatric IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric E.; Maserang, Beth; Wood, Roy; Mansur, David

    2006-07-15

    Peripheral dose (PD) data exist for conventional fields ({>=}10 cm) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivery to standard adult-sized phantoms. Pediatric peripheral dose reports are limited to conventional therapy and are model based. Our goal was to ascertain whether data acquired from full phantom studies and/or pediatric models, with IMRT treatment times, could predict Organ at Risk (OAR) dose for pediatric IMRT. As monitor units (MUs) are greater for IMRT, it is expected IMRT PD will be higher; potentially compounded by decreased patient size (absorption). Baseline slab phantom peripheral dose measurements were conducted for very small field sizes (from 2 to 10 cm). Data were collected at distances ranging from 5 to 72 cm away from the field edges. Collimation was either with the collimating jaws or the multileaf collimator (MLC) oriented either perpendicular or along the peripheral dose measurement plane. For the clinical tests, five patients with intracranial or base of skull lesions were chosen. IMRT and conventional three-dimensional (3D) plans for the same patient/target/dose (180 cGy), were optimized without limitation to the number of fields or wedge use. Six MV, 120-leaf MLC Varian axial beams were used. A phantom mimicking a 3-year-old was configured per Center for Disease Control data. Micro (0.125 cc) and cylindrical (0.6 cc) ionization chambers were appropriated for the thyroid, breast, ovaries, and testes. The PD was recorded by electrometers set to the 10{sup -10} scale. Each system set was uniquely calibrated. For the slab phantom studies, close peripheral points were found to have a higher dose for low energy and larger field size and when MLC was not deployed. For points more distant from the field edge, the PD was higher for high-energy beams. MLC orientation was found to be inconsequential for the small fields tested. The thyroid dose was lower for IMRT delivery than that predicted for conventional (ratio of IMRT/cnventional ranged

  18. Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Our Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Basturk, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Aygen; Sayar, Ersin; Dinçhan, Ayhan; Aliosmanoğlu, İbrahim; Erbiş, Halil; Aydınlı, Bülent; Artan, Reha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate our liver transplant pediatric patients and to report our experience in the complications and the long-term follow-up results. Materials and Methods: Patients between the ages of 0 and 18 years, who had liver transplantation in the organ transplantation center of our university hospital between 1997 and 2016, were included in the study. The age, sex, indications for the liver transplantation, complications after the transplantation, and long-term follow-up findings were retrospectively evaluated. The obtained results were analyzed with statistical methods. Results: In our organ transplantation center, 62 pediatric liver transplantations were carried out since 1997. The mean age of our patients was 7.3 years (6.5 months–17 years). The 4 most common reasons for liver transplantation were: Wilson’s disease (n=10; 16.3%), biliary atresia (n=9; 14.5%), progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (n=8; 12.9%), and cryptogenic cirrhosis (n=7; 11.3%). The mortality rate after transplantation was 19.6% (12 of the total 62 patients). The observed acute and chronic rejection rates were 34% and 4.9%, respectively. Thrombosis (9.6%) was observed in the hepatic artery (4.8%) and portal vein (4.8%). Bile leakage and biliary stricture rates were 31% and 11%, respectively. 1-year and 5-year survival rates of our patients were 87% and 84%, respectively. Conclusion: The morbidity and mortality rates in our organ transplantation center, regarding pediatric liver transplantations, are consistent with the literature. PMID:28149148

  19. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Spain.

    PubMed

    Nieto, Antonio; Mazon, Angel; Martin-Mateos, Maria Anunciacion; Plaza, Ana-Maria; Garde, Jesus; Alonso, Elena; Martorell, Antonio; Boquete, Manuel; Lorente, Felix; Ibero, Marcel; Bone, Javier; Pamies, Rafael; Garcia, Juan Miguel; Echeverria, Luis; Nevot, Santiago; Martinez-Cañavate, Ana; Fernandez-Benitez, Margarita; Garcia-Marcos, Luis

    2011-11-01

    The data of the ISAAC project in Spain show a prevalence of childhood asthma ranging from 7.1% to 15.3%, with regional differences; a higher prevalence, 22.6% to 35.8%, is described for rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis is found in 4.1% to 7.6% of children. The prevalence of food allergy is 3%. All children in Spain have the right to be visited in the National Health System. The medical care at the primary level is provided by pediatricians, who have obtained their titles through a 4-yr medical residency training program. The education on pediatric allergy during that period is not compulsory and thus very variable. There are currently 112 certified European pediatric allergists in Spain, who have obtained the accreditation of the European Union of Medical Specialist for proven skills and experience in pediatric allergy. Future specialists in pediatric allergy should obtain their titles through a specific education program to be developed in one of the four accredited training units on pediatric allergy, after obtaining the title on pediatrics. The Spanish Society of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology (SEICAP) gathers over 350 pediatric allergists and pediatricians working in this field. SEICAP has a growing activity including yearly congresses, continued education courses, elaboration of technical clinical documents and protocols, education of patients, and collaboration with other scientific societies and associations of patients. The official journal of SEICAP is Allergologia et Immunophatologia, published every 2 months since 1972. The web site of SEICAP, http://www.seicap.es, open since 2004, offers information for professionals and extensive information on pediatric allergic and immunologic disorders for the lay public; the web site is receiving 750 daily visits during 2011. The pediatric allergy units are very active in clinical work, procedures as immunotherapy or induction of oral tolerance in food allergy, contribution to scientific literature, and

  20. A study protocol testing the implementation, efficacy, and cost effectiveness of the ezParent program in pediatric primary care

    PubMed Central

    Schoeny, Michael; Risser, Heather; Johnson, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Up to 20% of children demonstrate behavior problems that interfere with relationship development and academic achievement. Parent participation in behavioral parent training programs has been shown to decrease child problem behaviors and promote positive parent-child relationships. However, attendance and parent involvement in face-to-face parent training remain low. Testing the implementation, efficacy, and cost of alternative delivery models is needed to (a) increase the reach and sustainability of parent training interventions and (b) address the barriers to parent participation and implementation of such programs, specifically in primary health care settings. The purpose of this paper is to describe the study protocol evaluating the implementation, efficacy, and cost-effectiveness of delivering the tablet-based ezParent program in pediatric primary care sites. Methods The implementation of the ezParent in four pediatric primary care sites will be evaluated using a descriptive design and cost-effectiveness analysis. The efficacy of the ezParent will be tested using a randomized controlled trial design with 312 parents of 2 to 5 year old children from pediatric primary care settings. Data on parenting and child behavior outcomes will be obtained from all participants at baseline, and 3, 6, and 12 months post baseline. Discussion Integrating and evaluating the implementation of the ezParent in pediatric primary care is an innovative opportunity to promote positive parenting with potential for universal access to the preschool population and for low cost by building on existing infrastructure in pediatric primary care. PMID:27592122