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Sample records for academic pediatric hospital

  1. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thoracopaedia - An Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised ... pediatric resources: GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D' ...

  2. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  3. Development and Evaluation of the Barriers to Nurses' Participation in Research Questionnaire at a Large Academic Pediatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Joseph; Walden, Marlene

    2017-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to survey nurses at a large pediatric hospital to examine barriers to nursing research and to develop the Barriers to Nurses' Participation in Research Questionnaire (BNPRQ) in preparation for its use at other institutions. The BNPRQ was created and refined through iterative pilot testing. Exploratory factor analysis was applied, and composite scores were computed for the identified factors. The two latent factors "Research Resources" and "Personal Relevance of Research" were extracted. The independent item "lack of time to do research" represented the largest barrier to research. Factor and item scores differed according to subject characteristics. Findings from this study will be used to create targeted interventions to reduce barriers to research participation prevalent in specific groups of nurses. By using the BNPRQ developed in this study, researchers and administrators at other institutions can identify and address barriers to research among their nurses.

  4. Pain Management Following Major Intracranial Surgery in Pediatric Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study in Three Academic Children’s Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Lynne G.; Buckley, George M.; Kudchadkar, Sapna R.; Ely, Elizabeth; Stebbins, Emily L.; Dube, Christine; Morad, Athir; Jastaniah, Ebaa A.; Sethna, Navil F.; Yaster, Myron

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pain management following major intracranial surgery is often limited by a presumed lack of need and a concern that opioids will adversely affect postoperative outcome and interfere with the neurologic examination. Nevertheless, evidence in adults is accumulating that these patients suffer moderate to severe pain and this pain is often under-treated. The purpose of this prospective, clinical observational cohort study was to assess the incidence of pain, prescribed analgesics, methods of analgesic delivery, and patient/parent satisfaction in pediatric patients undergoing cranial surgery at 3 major university children’s hospitals. Methods After obtaining IRB and parental consent (and when applicable, patient assent), children who underwent cranial surgery for cancer, epilepsy, vascular malformations, and craniofacial reconstruction were studied. Neither intraoperative anesthetic management nor postoperative pain management was standardized, but were based on institutional routine. Patients were evaluated daily by a study investigator and by chart review for pain scores using age appropriate, validated tools (FLACC, Faces Pain Scale-Revised, Wong Baker Faces Scale or Self-Report on a 0–10 scale), for patient/parent satisfaction using a subset of the NRC Picker satisfaction tool and in adolescents a modified QoR-40, and for the frequency, mode of administration, and type of analgesic provided. Finally, the incidence of opioid-induced side effects, specifically nausea, vomiting, pruritus, altered level of consciousness, and need for emergency diagnostic radiologic studies for altered neurologic examination were recorded. Data are provided as mean ± SD. Results Two hundred children (98:102 M:F), averaging 7.8 ± 5.8 years old (range 2 mos to 18.5 yr) and 32.2 ± 23.0 kg (range 4.5 to 111.6 kg) undergoing craniectomy (51), craniotomy (96), and craniofacial reconstruction (53) were studied. Despite considerable variation in mode and route of analgesic

  5. 21 CFR 880.5140 - Pediatric hospital bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pediatric hospital bed. 880.5140 Section 880.5140... Devices § 880.5140 Pediatric hospital bed. (a) Identification. A pediatric hospital bed is a device intended for medical purposes that consists of a bed or crib designed for the use of a pediatric...

  6. Academic pediatric radiology in 2010: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Taylor, George A

    2010-04-01

    Academic pediatric radiology is under considerable stress as the result of ongoing financial pressures and recent health-care legislation. This article reviews the current challenges, and suggests both departmental and individual strategies important in sustaining our academic mission.

  7. An Academic Multihealth System PGY2 Pediatric Pharmacy Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Klosterman, Theresa; Siu, Anita; Shah, Pooja; Kimler, Katelin; Sturgill, Marc; Robinson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel multihealth system pediatric pharmacy residency program through the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University. Pediatric clinical pharmacy is a growing field that has seen an increase in demand for practitioners. Practice sites include freestanding children's hospitals, children's hospitals within adult hospitals, and pediatric units within adult hospitals. To accommodate a residency program in a region with no freestanding children's hospital, the pediatric faculty members at the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University developed a multihealth system postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pediatric pharmacy residency program with 6 pediatric faculty members functioning as preceptors at their 5 respective practice sites. The multihealth system setup of the program provides the resident exposure to a multitude of patient populations, pediatric specialties, and pediatric pharmacy practices. In addition, the affiliation with Rutgers University allows an emphasis on academia with opportunities for the resident to lecture in small and large classrooms, facilitate discussion periods, assist with clinical laboratory classes, and precept pharmacy students. The resident has the unique opportunity to develop a research project with a large and diverse patient population owing to the multihealth system rotation sites. A multihealth system PGY2 residency in pediatric pharmacy provides the resident a well-rounded experience in pediatric clinical practice, research, and academia that will enhance the resident's ability to build his or her own pediatric pharmacy practice. PMID:26766936

  8. Haiti earthquake 2010: a field hospital pediatric perspective.

    PubMed

    Farfel, Alon; Assa, Amit; Amir, Itzhac; Bader, Tarif; Bartal, Carmi; Kreiss, Yitshak; Sagi, Ram

    2011-04-01

    On January 12 2010, a 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck Haiti. The region had suffered an estimated 316,000 fatalities with approximately 300,000 injured and more than 1 million people who lost their houses. Following the quake, the Israeli Defense Force Medical Corps dispatched a field hospital unit to the capital city, Port au Prince. The hospital had a pediatric division which included pediatric emergency department, pediatric ward and neonatal unit. We elaborate on the various aspects of pediatric treatment that was provided by our hospital. A total of 363 pediatric patients (younger than 18 years) were admitted to our facility during its 10 days of operation. Out of this total, 272 pediatric patients were treated by the pediatric division, 79 (29%) were hospitalized and 57 (21%) required surgery. The pediatric team included seven pediatricians, one pediatric surgeon and six registered nurses. An electronic record and a hard copy file were created for each patient. Fifty-seven percent of the children presented with direct earthquake related injuries. Twelve patients required resuscitation and stabilization and three patients had died. The majority of injuries were orthopedic while infectious diseases accounted for most of the general pediatric diagnoses. In conclusion, operating a field hospital for a population affected by natural disaster is a complex mission. However, pediatric care has its own unique, challenging characteristics.

  9. Antibiotic misuse in a pediatric teaching hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Schollenberg, E.; Albritton, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    Antibiotic use at a pediatric teaching hospital was reviewed for a month. A total of 188 courses of therapy were evaluated with respect to choice of antibiotic, dosage and necessity of treatment. Errors in therapy were noted in 30% of the medical orders and 63% of the surgical orders. The most frequent error, unnecessary therapy, was found in 13% and 45% of the medical and surgical orders respectively. Error rates were highest for the most frequently ordered antibiotics, notably the penicillins. The magnitude of the problem appeared to be similar to that previously reported from general ana adult hospitals. The difficulties with solutions such as educational programs and compulsory consultation are discussed. PMID:7363195

  10. A practical guide to manuscript writing with particular relevance to the field of pediatric hospital medicine.

    PubMed

    Teufel, Ronald J; Andrews, Anne L; Williams, Derek J

    2014-11-01

    Publishing manuscripts in peer-reviewed journals, such as Hospital Pediatrics, is critical for both the academic development of practitioners in pediatric hospital medicine and the scientific advancement of our field. Understanding the purpose of scientific writing and developing a structured approach to the writing process is essential. Doing so will improve the clarity of your work and likely the ease at which your research is published and disseminated throughout the scientific community. The purposes of this article are to detail the structure of a scientific manuscript, to highlight specific writing strategies, and to provide writing tips that may help or hinder publication. Our ultimate goal is to advance the field of pediatric hospital medicine and its growing membership by promoting the dissemination of high-quality research.

  11. Understanding academic clinicians’ intent to treat pediatric obesity

    PubMed Central

    Frankfurter, Claudia; Cunningham, Charles; Morrison, Katherine M; Rimas, Heather; Bailey, Karen

    2017-01-01

    AIM To examine the extent to which the theory of planned behavior (TPB) predicts academic clinicians’ intent to treat pediatric obesity. METHODS A multi-disciplinary panel iteratively devised a Likert scale survey based on the constructs of the TPB applied to a set of pediatric obesity themes. A cross-sectional electronic survey was then administered to academic clinicians at tertiary care centers across Canada from January to April 2012. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize demographic and item agreement data. A hierarchical linear regression analysis controlling for demographic variables was conducted to examine the extent to which the TPB subscales predicted intent to treat pediatric obesity. RESULTS A total of 198 physicians, surgeons, and allied health professionals across Canada (British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec) completed the survey. On step 1, demographic factors accounted for 7.4% of the variance in intent scores. Together in step 2, demographic variables and TPB subscales predicted 56.9% of the variance in a measure of the intent to treat pediatric obesity. Perceived behavioral control, that is, confidence in one’s ability to manage pediatric obesity, and subjective norms, congruent with one’s context of practice, were the most significant predictors of the intent to treat pediatric obesity. Attitudes and barriers did not predict the intent to treat pediatric obesity in this context. CONCLUSION Enhancing self-confidence in the ability to treat pediatric obesity and the existence of supportive treatment environments are important to increase clinician’s intent to treat pediatric obesity. PMID:28224097

  12. BUILDING AN ACADEMIC PEDIATRIC HEALTH SYSTEM AS THE WORLD CONTINUES TO TURN: A CASE STUDY.

    PubMed

    Ellen, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    In 2011, All Children's Hospital (ACH) joined the Johns Hopkins Health System (JHHS) and in so doing became a member of Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM). The value proposition for the joining of ACH and JHHS/JHM was to transform ACH into an academic pediatric health system. This case study of the transformation provides evidence for the usefulness of a precision medicine framework to organize investments in programs and practices that further the tripartite mission of academic medical centers and may increase the value of the care they deliver.

  13. Malnutrition in pediatric hospital patients: current issues.

    PubMed

    Joosten, Koen F M; Hulst, Jessie M

    2011-02-01

    Malnutrition in hospitalized children is still very prevalent, especially in children with underlying disease and clinical conditions. The purpose of this review is to describe current issues that have to be taken into account when interpreting prevalence data. Weight-for-height and height-for-age standard deviation scores are used for classification for acute and chronic malnutrition, respectively. Body mass index for age can also be used for the definition of acute malnutrition but has a few advantages in the general pediatric population. The new World Health Organization child-growth charts can be used as reference but there is a risk of over- and underestimation of malnutrition rates compared with country-specific growth references. For children with specific medical conditions and syndromes, specific growth references should be used for appropriate interpretation of nutritional status. New screening tools are available to identify children at risk for developing malnutrition during admission. Because of the diversity of medical conditions and syndromes in hospitalized children, assessment of nutritional status and interpretation of anthropometric data need a tailored approach.

  14. Repetitive Pediatric Anesthesia in a Non-Hospital Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Douglas, James G.; Jackson, Jeffrey L.; Simoneaux, R. Victor; Hines, Matthew; Bratton, Jennifer; Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Repetitive sedation/anesthesia (S/A) for children receiving fractionated radiation therapy requires induction and recovery daily for several weeks. In the vast majority of cases, this is accomplished in an academic center with direct access to pediatric faculty and facilities in case of an emergency. Proton radiation therapy centers are more frequently free-standing facilities at some distance from specialized pediatric care. This poses a potential dilemma in the case of children requiring anesthesia. Methods and Materials: The records of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center were reviewed for patients requiring anesthesia during proton beam therapy (PBT) between June 1, 2008, and April 12, 2012. Results: A total of 138 children received daily anesthesia during this period. A median of 30 fractions (range, 1-49) was delivered over a median of 43 days (range, 1-74) for a total of 4045 sedation/anesthesia procedures. Three events (0.0074%) occurred, 1 fall from a gurney during anesthesia recovery and 2 aspiration events requiring emergency department evaluation. All 3 children did well. One aspiration patient needed admission to the hospital and mechanical ventilation support. The other patient returned the next day for treatment without issue. The patient who fell was not injured. No patient required cessation of therapy. Conclusions: This is the largest reported series of repetitive pediatric anesthesia in radiation therapy, and the only available data from the proton environment. Strict adherence to rigorous protocols and a well-trained team can safely deliver daily sedation/anesthesia in free-standing proton centers.

  15. A Study of Hospital Admission Rules During Pediatric Residency Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Jane; Alpert, Joel J.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of U.S. pediatric training programs to determine the role of rules in the hospital admission of pediatric patients is reported. The results support the hypothesis that rules are a widely used teaching tool. The rules relate to such factors as fevers, age, specific diseases, administrative concerns, head traumas, and poisonings. (JMD)

  16. 21 CFR 880.5140 - Pediatric hospital bed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pediatric hospital bed. 880.5140 Section 880.5140 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use...

  17. Academic general pediatric fellowships: curriculum design and educational goals and objectives.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Constance D; Dreyer, Benard P; Szilagyi, Peter G; Bell, Louis M; Baker, Raymond C; Cheng, Tina L; Coury, Daniel L; DeWitt, Thomas G; Darden, Paul M; Duggan, Anne; Ludwig, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Academic generalists are unique and important members of the pediatric landscape.(1) Academic general pediatrics (AGP) is not considered a subspecialty, because it adheres to generalist values and embraces a wide range of clinical activities. Nonetheless, academic generalists engage in important scholarly efforts, contribute extensively to the education of new pediatricians, and must be prepared to survive in academia. Academic general pediatric faculty positions are subject to the same appointment and promotion requirements as those of subspecialist faculty.

  18. Extended Outbreak of Cryptosporidiosis in a Pediatric Hospital, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Duan, Liping; Gomez-Puerta, Luis A.; Zhang, Longxian; Zhao, Xukun; Hu, Jingjing; Zhang, Nan; Xiao, Lihua

    2012-01-01

    Four Cryptosporidium spp. and 6 C. hominis subtypes were isolated from 102 of 6,284 patients in 3 pediatric hospitals in People’s Republic of China. A cryptosporidiosis outbreak was identified retrospectively. The outbreak lasted >1 year and affected 51.4% of patients in 1 hospital ward, where 2 C. hominis subtypes with different virulence were found. PMID:22305484

  19. Pediatric palliative care: starting a hospital-based program.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kaye

    2011-01-01

    The value of palliative care in pediatrics has received significant attention over the past 10 years. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Institute of Medicine published recommendations involving children who have a life-limiting diagnosis in a palliative care program early in their disease process. Palliative care is intended to assure an emphasis on quality of life in addition to the current medical treatment, which may be focused on cure, symptom management, and/or end-of-life care. This article describes one hospital's experience in planning, implementing, and managing a pediatric palliative care program. Implementing a hospital-based palliative care program in a children's hospital can be accomplished through careful planning and analysis of need. Writing an official business plan formalized the request for organizational support for this program, including the mission and vision, plans for how services would be provided, expected financial implications, and initial plans for evaluation of success.

  20. [Pediatrics at an academic medical center: organization of university pediatric services].

    PubMed

    Claris, Olivier

    2013-06-01

    Pediatric medicine is one of the most important activities of any teaching hospital. Its internal organization depends on the size of the hospital and must take into account not only its missions of advice, reference and proximity, but also economic issues. Regional networking with general hospitals, private clinics and community pediatricians is necessary, if only to regulate use of the emergency department. The activity of pediatric units fluctuates over time and is not always controllable, involving both rapid turnover and extended stays. Cost of health is often underestimated or unadapted, and many units are in financial deficit despite their best efforts. University pediatrician training is highly demanding in order to ensure the quality of recruitment, but it must be sufficiently flexible if it is to attract a suficient number of candidates. As with other specialties, research is relatively easy to evaluate, contrary to teaching and clinical activity.

  1. Recognizing Differences in Hospital Quality Performance for Pediatric Inpatient Care

    PubMed Central

    Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Toomey, Sara L.; Chien, Alyna T.; Jang, Jisun; Bryant, Maria C.; Klein, David J.; Kaplan, William J.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital quality-of-care measures are publicly reported to inform consumer choice and stimulate quality improvement. The number of hospitals and states with enough pediatric hospital discharges to detect worse-than-average inpatient care remains unknown. METHODS: This study was a retrospective analysis of hospital discharges for children aged 0 to 17 years from 3974 hospitals in 44 states in the 2009 Kids’ Inpatient Database. For 11 measures of all-condition or condition-specific quality, we assessed the number of hospitals and states that met a “power standard” of 80% power for a 5% level significance test to detect when care is 20% worse than average over a 3-year period. For this assessment, we approximated volume as 3 times actual 2009 admission volumes. RESULTS: For all-condition quality, 1380 hospitals (87% of all pediatric discharges) and all states met the power standard for the family experience-of-care measure; 1958 hospitals (95% of discharges) and all states met the standard for adverse drug events. For condition-specific quality measures of asthma, birth, and mental health, 203 to 482 hospitals (52%–90% of condition-specific discharges) met the power standard and 40 to 44 states met the standard. One hospital and 16 states met the standard for sickle cell disease. No hospital and ≤27 states met the standard for the remaining measures studied (appendectomy, cerebrospinal fluid shunt surgery, gastroenteritis, heart surgery, and seizure). CONCLUSIONS: Most children are admitted to hospitals in which all-condition measures of quality have adequate power to show modest differences in performance from average, but most condition-specific measures do not. Policies regarding incentives for pediatric inpatient quality should take these findings into account. PMID:26169435

  2. Roles for children's hospitals in pediatric collaborative improvement networks.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marlene

    2013-06-01

    Children's hospitals represent a significant opportunity to reduce morbidity, mortality, and costs, particularly for children with complex chronic conditions (CCCs) who comprise a disproportionate and growing share of admissions, readmissions, and resource use. Most children with CCCs are in some way associated with a children's hospital, and the subspecialists who care for them are primarily concentrated in the ≈ 200 children's hospitals in the United States. Children's hospitals and their associated subspecialty clinics are uniquely positioned to achieve significant outcomes and cost savings through coordinated quality-improvement efforts. However, even the largest children's hospital has relatively small volumes of patients with any given condition. Only by linking children's hospitals in networks can a sufficient "N" be achieved to build the evidence for what works for children. Large-scale pediatric collaborative network exemplars have demonstrated the ability to improve outcomes, reduce costs, and spread changes found to be effective. Substantial opportunities exist for networks to expand to additional conditions, improvement topics, and sites, but financial barriers exist. Although much of their participation has been funded as "pay to participate" efforts by the hospitals themselves, most financial benefits accrue to payers. As health care reform becomes a reality and financial pressures intensify, it will become increasingly difficult for children's hospitals to serve as the primary source of support for networks. Partnerships between children's hospitals and national payers to support collaborative networks are needed, and these partnerships have the potential to significantly improve pediatric care and outcomes, particularly for children with CCCs.

  3. Pediatric Patients' Malnutrition and Its Relation to Hospitalization Times and Causes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimarey, Luis M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Relates the nutritional status of 1,378 hospitalized pediatric patients to length of hospitalization and definitive hospitalization diagnosis. Findings indicated the length of hospitalization time increased markedly with malnutrition, especially for patients with diarrhea. (BJD)

  4. Pediatric hospital medicine: a strategic planning roundtable to chart the future.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Daniel A; Lye, Patricia S; Carlson, Douglas; Daru, Jennifer A; Narang, Steve; Srivastava, Rajendu; Melzer, Sanford; Conway, Patrick H

    2012-04-01

    Given the growing field of Pediatric Hospital Medicine (PHM) and the need to define strategic direction, the Society of Hospital Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Academic Pediatric Association sponsored a roundtable to discuss the future of the field. Twenty-one leaders were invited plus a facilitator utilizing established health care strategic planning methods. A "vision statement" was developed. Specific initiatives in 4 domains (clinical practice, quality of care, research, and workforce) were identified that would advance PHM with a plan to complete each initiative. Review of the current issues demonstrated gaps between the current state of affairs and the full vision of the potential impact of PHM. Clinical initiatives were to develop an educational plan supporting the PHM Core Competencies and a clinical practice monitoring dashboard template. Quality initiatives included an environmental assessment of PHM participation on key committees, societies, and agencies to ensure appropriate PHM representation. Three QI collaboratives are underway. A Research Leadership Task Force was created and the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) network was refocused, defining a strategic framework for PRIS, and developing a funding strategy. Workforce initiatives were to develop a descriptive statement that can be used by any PHM physician, a communications tool describing "value added" of PHM; and a tool to assess career satisfaction among PHM physicians. We believe the Roundtable was successful in describing the current state of PHM and laying a course for the near future.

  5. Bourdieu at the bedside: briefing parents in a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    LeGrow, Karen; Hodnett, Ellen; Stremler, Robyn; McKeever, Patricia; Cohen, Eyal

    2014-12-01

    The philosophy of family-centered care (FCC) promotes partnerships between families and staff to plan, deliver, and evaluate services for children and has been officially adopted by a majority of pediatric hospitals throughout North America. However, studies indicated that many parents have continued to be dissatisfied with their decision-making roles in their child's care. This is particularly salient for parents of children with chronic ongoing complex health problems. These children are dependent upon medical technology and require frequent hospitalizations during which parents must contribute to difficult decisions regarding their child's care. Given this clinical issue, an alternative theoretical perspective was explored to redress this problem. Pierre Bourdieu's theoretical concepts of field, capital, and habitus were used to analyze the hierarchical relationships in pediatric acute care hospitals and to design a briefing intervention aimed at improving parents' satisfaction with decision making in that health care setting.

  6. Risk Factors for Inpatient Hospital Admission in Pediatric Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to determine the risk factors for inpatient admission of pediatric burn patients. Materials & methods This cross-sectional study uses data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (HCUP KID) for the years of 2003, 2006, 2009, and 2012 to estimate the risk factors for inpatient admission for pediatric patients who sustained a burn injury. Patients who sustained a burn between the ages of 1 and 18 years were included. Results A total of 43,453 patients met inclusion criteria. Of those, 42.3% were Caucasian, 20.1% were African American, and 19.3% were Hispanic. Males comprised 63.5% of the studied population. The month of July was associated with a 31.8% increased chance (p=.011) of being admitted to hospital for a pediatric burn. It was found that patients being admitted had a 32.2% increased chance (p=.002) of a fluid and electrolyte abnormality and a 61.0% increased chance (p=.027) of drug abuse.  Conclusions Pediatric burn patients are more likely to be admitted to the hospital having a fluid and electrolyte abnormality, having a drug abuse status, and/or during the month of July. PMID:27335714

  7. New Century Scholars: A Mentorship Program to Increase Workforce Diversity in Academic Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Pachter, Lee M; Kodjo, Cheryl

    2015-07-01

    This article describes a program aimed to increase workforce diversity and underrepresented minority (URM) representation in academic pediatric medicine. The New Century Scholars (NCScholars) program is a core program in the Academic Pediatric Association, the largest national organization for academic pediatric generalists. The program selects URM pediatric (or medicine-pediatrics) residents who are interested in academic careers and provides each NCScholar with a junior and senior mentor, as well as travel grants to the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting where activities specific to the program are held, and provides ongoing mentorship and career counseling support.The authors discuss the origination, operation, and changes to the program over the first 10 years of its existence, as well as outcome data for the participants in the program. To date, 60 of the 63 NCScholars have finished residency and/or have made postresidency plans, and 38 of these URM pediatricians (63%) have entered academic careers. The authors suggest that this type of mentorship program for URM pediatric trainees can be used as a model for other specialties and medical organizations.

  8. Pediatrics Residents' Perspectives on Family-Centered Rounds: A Qualitative Study at 2 Children's Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Vineeta; Krieger, Evelina; Lee, Benjamin C.; Kind, Terry; McCavit, Timothy; Campbell, Joyce; Ottolini, Mary C.; Flores, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Background Many academic hospitals have incorporated family-centered rounds, yet little is known about pediatrics residents' perspectives on the educational impact of these rounds. Objective To identify pediatrics residents' knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about family-centered rounds, including perceived benefits and barriers. Methods We conducted focus groups of residents exposed to family-centered rounds at 2 university-affiliated, freestanding children's hospitals. Focus group data were analyzed using grounded theory. Results A total of 24 residents participated in 4 focus groups. Residents reported that family-centered rounds enhance education by increasing patient encounters and improving physical exam skills, direct observation, real-time feedback, and attending role modeling; improve parent satisfaction, interpersonal and communication skills, and safety; and reduce length of stay. Physical constraints (large teams and small rooms), lack of uniform approaches to family-centered rounds, variable attending teaching styles, and specific conditions (child abuse, patients on isolation) were cited barriers. Conclusions Pediatrics residents report that well-conducted family-centered rounds improve their education and the quality of patient care, including parent satisfaction, communication with families, and patients' length of stay. Standardizing family-centered rounds and reducing attending variability in teaching style might further enhance residents' educational experiences. PMID:24404232

  9. [Adverse events in patients from a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Arriaga-Dávila, José de Jesús; Domínguez-Serrano, María Isabel; Guzmán-Bihouet, Beatriz Filomena; Navarrete-Navarro, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Background: detection of adverse events is part of the safety management in hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of adverse events that occurred in a pediatric hospital. Methods: cross-sectional study of the adverse events occurred in a pediatric hospital from 2007 to 2009. Factors associated with their developmental causes were identified. The statistical analysis was descriptive and bivariate, with contingency tables to estimate the relationship between those factors. A p value = 0.05 was considered significant. Results: a total of 177 adverse events were registered. When they began, human factor occurred in 23 cases (13 %, OR = 1.41, p = 0.001), organizational factor was present in 71 cases (40 %, OR = 1.91, p = 0.236) and technical factor in 46 cases (26 %, OR = 0.87, p = 0.01). Blows or bruises from falls as a result of adverse events occurred in 71 cases (40 %, 95 % CI = 64-78). Conclusions: we found 1.84 events per 100 hospital discharges during the study period. The fall of patients ranked first of the adverse events identified.

  10. Reflections on an emerging academic discipline: the prolonged gestation of developmental and behavioral pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Shonkoff, J P

    1993-12-01

    Expertise in child development and behavior has been acknowledged as a critical prerequisite for the practice of general pediatrics since the early part of the 20th century. Recently, as the knowledge base has expanded, the concept of developmental and behavioral pediatrics as a specialized academic discipline has generated growing interest. The extent to which this emerging field achieves full recognition as a respected pediatric subspecialty will be determined by its response to three critical challenges: the process of academic acculturation, the imperative of creative collaboration and intellectual cross-fertilization, and the requirements of scientific credibility.

  11. Pediatric hospitalizations for inflammatory bowel disease based on annual case volume: results from the Kids' Inpatient Database 2012.

    PubMed

    Pant, Chaitanya; Deshpande, Abhishek; Sferra, Thomas J; Almadhoun, Osama; Batista, Daisy; Pervez, Asad; Nutalapati, Venkat; Olyaee, Mojtaba

    2017-01-01

    To study differences related to pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) care among hospitals that were stratified based on annual case volume. This is a cross-sectional study using data from the United States Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (KID). IBD-related hospitalizations were identified using International Classification of Diseases-9-Clinical Modification codes. Hospital volume was divided into low or high by assigning cut-off values of 1-20 and >20 annual IBD hospitalizations. We assessed a total of 8647 pediatric IBD discharges during 2012 from 660 hospitals in the USA. 107 of these hospitals were classified as high-volume centers (HVCs) for pediatric IBD care and 553 low-volume centers (LVCs). HVCs were more likely to be associated with an academic teaching status compared to LVCs (97.1% vs 67.6%, p<0.001). The incidence of transfer of medical care from LVCs to other hospitals was 5.5% but only 0.7% for HVCs (p<0.001). The median number of procedures (medical and surgical) performed on children admitted with IBD was higher at HVCs (2 vs 1, p<0.001). IBD admissions at HVCs were more likely to undergo surgical procedures compared to LVCs (17% vs 10%, p<0.001). The incidence of postoperative complications was not significantly different. There were significantly greater hospital costs (median US$11,000 vs US$6,000, p<0.001) and lengths of stay (median 5 days vs 4 days, p<0.001) associated with HVCs compared to LVCs. Pediatric admissions to HVCs for IBD undergo a greater number of medical and surgical procedures and are associated with higher costs and lengthier hospital stays.

  12. Pediatric hospitals' and physician strategies for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J W; Chesney, R W; Stocks, R M; Shmerling, J; Herron, P

    1999-05-01

    Changes in market-driven health care economics are rapid and of great magnitude. This report describes a study of some of these changes in regard to children's health issues. We used a survey tool to assess long-range plans (next 10 years) and marketing strategies for major free-standing children's hospitals in different regions of the United States. We then used these assessments to draw conclusions about the impact of the plans and strategies on the practice of pediatric physicians and their workforce requirements. This may allow pediatric specialists and their programs to develop strategic plans and to take actions to contend with these market-driven economic changes. The tool was a questionnaire mailed to chief executive officers of 30 randomly chosen but geographically well-distributed children's hospitals. Seventeen children's hospitals responded (57%), providing information concerning each hospital and its current medical economic environment. The data were analyzed and trends were then identified from their responses. All institutions in this study expected to have fewer physicians on staff in the future. These institutions plan: (1) to improve quality and (2) to reduce costs. Quality will be improved by utilizing Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) and/or Benchmarking to Best Practices, both of which encourage physicians to follow standardized treatment protocols. Costs will be reduced by decreasing hospital staff size. Some children's hospitals have merged or will merge with larger, full-service adult hospitals, but most plan to remain autonomous. Many expect a continued decrease in revenues, and almost all expect to downsize both bed number and staff. Restructuring will reduce the number of specialists, particularly in the fields of hematology-oncology, psychiatry, endocrinology, nephrology, and cardiology, and will also reduce the number of surgical specialists. The administrators predicted that more nurse practitioners will be employed at these

  13. [Clinic of environmental pediatric care in a high complexity hospital].

    PubMed

    Gaioli, Marisa; Amoedo, Diego; González, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Children environmental health is considered by The World Health Organization as one of the main challenges of Public Health during the Century XXI. They promote the development of programs that allow approaching, disclosure or mitigation of the impact of polluting agents on health at every level of pediatric attention. The Children Hospital "Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan" has created an Environmental Health Office in order to address the demands of those patients with suspected or verified exposure to environmental risks. An Environmental Clinical History has been elaborated with this purpose.

  14. Medical staff appointment and delineation of pediatric privileges in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    The review and verification of credentials and the granting of clinical privileges are required of every hospital to ensure that members of the medical staff are competent and qualified to provide specified levels of patient care. The credentialing process involves the following: (1) assessment of the professional and personal background of each practitioner seeking privileges; (2) assignment of privileges appropriate for the clinician's training and experience; (3) ongoing monitoring of the professional activities of each staff member; and (4) periodic reappointment to the medical staff on the basis of objectively measured performance. We examine the essential elements of a credentials review for initial and renewed medical staff appointments along with suggested criteria for the delineation of clinical privileges. Sample forms for the delineation of privileges can be found on the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Hospital Care Web site (http://www.aap.org/visit/cmte19.htm). Because of differences among individual hospitals, no 1 method for credentialing is universally applicable. The medical staff of each hospital must, therefore, establish its own process based on the general principles reviewed in this report. The issues of medical staff membership and credentialing have become very complex, and institutions and medical staffs are vulnerable to legal action. Consequently, it is advisable for hospitals and medical staffs to obtain expert legal advice when medical staff bylaws are constructed or revised.

  15. The Success Rate of Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Ahvaz Training Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Assar, Shideh; Husseinzadeh, Mohsen; Nikravesh, Abdul Hussein; Davoodzadeh, Hannaneh

    2016-01-01

    Research Objective. This study determined the outcome of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after in-hospital cardiac arrest and factors influencing it in two training hospitals in Ahvaz. Method. Patients hospitalized in the pediatric wards and exposed to CPR during hospital stay were included in the study (September 2013 to May 2014). The primary outcome of CPR was assumed to be the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and the secondary outcome was assumed to be survival to discharge. The neurological outcome of survivors was assessed using the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (PCPC) method. Results. Of the 279 study participants, 138 patients (49.4%) showed ROSC, 81 patients (29%) survived for 24 hours after the CPR, and 33 patients (11.8%) survived to discharge. Of the surviving patients, 16 (48.5%) had favorable neurological outcome. The resuscitation during holidays resulted in fewer ROSC. Multivariate analysis showed that longer CPR duration, CPR by junior residents, growth deficiency, and prearrest vasoactive drug infusion were associated with decreased survival to discharge (p < 0.05). Infants and patients with respiratory disease had higher survival rates. Conclusion. The rate of successful CPR in our study was lower than rates reported by developed countries. However, factors influencing the outcome of CPR were similar. These results reflect the necessity of paying more attention to pediatric CPR training, postresuscitation conditions, and expansion of intensive care facilities. PMID:27293983

  16. Evolution of the Pediatric and Congenital Heart Surgery Service at Texas Children's Hospital: 1954-2015.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Charles D

    2015-01-01

    Heart surgery at Texas Children's Hospital can trace its origins to the beginning of pediatric and congenital heart surgery. Pioneers in the field--Dr. Denton Cooley and Dr. Dan McNamara--started the program in 1954 at a new pediatric hospital in Houston. Over the past 60 years, what is now Texas Children's Heart Center has grown become one of the leading pediatric heart institutions.

  17. STRESS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS--THE EFFECT OF PROLONGED HOSPITALIZATION.

    PubMed

    Mîndru, Dana Elena; Stănescu, Ralnca Stefania; Mioara, Calipsoana Matei; Duceac, Letiţia Doina; Rugina, Aurica; Temneanu, Oana Raluca; Ungureanu, Monica; Florescu, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Long-term hospitalization emotionally impacts any patient, especially children, and is defined as a long period of time during which the patient is hospitalized and experiences isolation from his or her family, friends and home. Stressful situations trigger a nonspecific response that involves multiple physiological mechanisms. Currently, because of the complexity of these mechanisms, there are no laboratory markers that allow the quantification of the stress intensity felt by the patient. Laboratory determinations currently used in evaluating the response to stress are neuroendocrine, immunological and metabolic. The neuroendocrine system is the first to respond to stressful events. Stress stimulates the hypothalamus, leading to the release of CRH, which stimulates the pituitary gland to produce ACTH. Chronic stress directs the synthesis towards cortisol, which may lead to hypo secretion of the other adrenal steroid hormones. The hospital and the disease are stressors for children and caregivers, since stress can interfere with the normal development of young patients, affecting them in the long term. Admitting a child to hospital means interrupting his or her normal daily life and changing the environment that is familiar to him or her. Therefore, the involvement of the family doctor is very important, as many conditions can be solved by visiting his or her office and thus eliminating the need for hospitalization in a pediatric hospital. If, however, the nature of the condition requires that the child should be seen by a pediatrician, the period of hospitalization should not be much extended so as to prevent the appearance of other possible problems that might influence the child's state.

  18. Appropriateness of hospitalization for CAP-affected pediatric patients: report from a Southern Italy General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Fabio; De Brasi, Daniele; Siani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease, responsible for significant healthcare expenditures, mostly because of hospitalization. Many practice guidelines on CAP have been developed, including admission criteria, but a few on appropriate hospitalization in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate appropriate hospital admission for CAP in a pediatric population. Methods We evaluated appropriate admission to a Pediatric Unit performing a retrospective analysis on CAP admitted pediatric patients from a Southern Italy area. Diagnosis was made based on clinical and radiological signs. Appropriate hospital admission was evaluated following clinical and non-clinical international criteria. Family ability to care children was assessed by evaluating social deprivation status. Results In 2 winter seasons 120 pediatric patients aged 1-129 months were admitted because of CAP. Median age was 28.7 months. Raised body temperature was scored in 68.3% of patients, cough was present in 100% of cases, and abdominal pain was rarely evidenced. Inflammatory indices (ESR and CRP) were found elevated in 33.3% of cases. Anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibodies were found positive in 20.4%. Trans-cutaneous (TC) SaO2 was found lower than 92% in 14.6%. Dyspnoea was present in 43.3%. Dehydration requiring i.v. fluid supplementation was scored in 13.3%. Evaluation of familial ability to care their children revealed that 76% of families (derived from socially depressed areas) were "at social risk", thus not able to appropriately care their children. Furthermore, analysis of CAP patients revealed that "at social risk" people accessed E.D. and were hospitalized more frequently than "not at risk" patients (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% CI: 1,15 to 11,12; p = 0.01), and that admitted "at social risk" people presented without clinical signs of severity (namely dyspnoea, and/or SaO2 ≤ 92%, and/or dehydration) more frequently than "not at risk" population (p = 0.005). Conclusion

  19. School Competence and Fluent Academic Performance: Informing Assessment of Educational Outcomes in Survivors of Pediatric Medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Holland, Alice Ann; Hughes, Carroll W; Stavinoha, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    Academic difficulties are widely acknowledged but not adequately studied in survivors of pediatric medulloblastoma. Although most survivors require special education services and are significantly less likely than healthy peers to finish high school, measured academic skills are typically average. This study sought to identify potential factors associated with academic difficulties in this population and focused on school competence and fluent academic performance. Thirty-six patients (ages 7-18 years old) were recruited through the Departments of Neurosurgery and Neuro-Oncology at Children's Medical Center Dallas and Cook Children's Medical Center in Fort Worth, TX. Participants completed a neuropsychological screening battery including selected Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement subtests. Parents completed the Child Behavior Checklist. School competence was significantly correlated with measured academic skills and fluency. Basic academic skill development was broadly average, in contrast to significantly worse fluent academic performance. School competence may have utility as a measure estimating levels of educational success in this population. Additionally, academic difficulties experienced by childhood medulloblastoma survivors may be better captured by measuring deficits in fluent academic performance rather than skills. Identification of these potential factors associated with educational outcomes of pediatric medulloblastoma survivors has significant implications for research, clinical assessment, and academic services/interventions.

  20. Three distinct cases of copper deficiency in hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Dembinski, Karolina; Gargasz, Anne Elizabeth; Dabrow, Sharon; Rodriguez, Lisa

    2012-08-01

    Although copper deficiency is a rare occurrence in the developed world, attention should be given to the proper supplementation of minerals to at-risk pediatric patients. This study presents 3 distinct cases of copper deficiency in hospitalized patients aged 14 months, 6 years, and 12 years. Two patients had short bowel syndrome, requiring prolonged parenteral nutrition or complex intravenous fluid supplementation. The third patient was severely malnourished. Copper deficiency manifested in all of our patients as either microcytic anemia or pancytopenia with myelodysplastic syndrome. Copper deficiency is an important diagnosis to be considered in patients with prematurity, parenteral nutrition dependency, malabsorption, and/or those with malnutrition. More studies are needed to establish appropriate amounts of copper supplementation to replenish copper stores in deficient patients.

  1. [Experience of an Ethics Committee of a pediatric reference hospital].

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Fernanda; García, Hernán; Barraza, Norma; Ciruzzi, Susana; Ferrería, Juan Carlos; de los Ángeles Iervolino, Ma; Marín, Daniela; Mazzuccheli, Teresa; Menéndez, Célica; Novali, Luis; Ortega, Laura; Ponce, Corina; Quintana, Susana; Scrigni, Adriana; Selandari, Jorge; Shejter, Virginia; Rodríguez, Estela

    2015-01-01

    Since 1960, there has been a growing interest in the complexity of the ethical problems posed by medical practice. Ever since then, many ethical theories have attempted to support bioethics, setting the necessary grounds for decision making process. The aim of this article is to briefly present the history and working of a pediatric hospital's Assistance Ethics Committee, as well as its evolution from the very beginning. Throughout the Committee's career, progressive changes were made in the way of working. During its first years, the fulfillment of certain formalities was demanded when presenting patients, but this was modified overtime towards a less rigid and more reflexive and pluralistic presentation. Regarding our Ethics Committee, deliberation is the main and most valuable tool in the search for the best option when dealing with harsh and problematic cases that are presented.

  2. Evaluation of Educational Environment for Medical Students of a Tertiary Pediatric Hospital in Tehran, Using DREEM Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Andalib, Masoud Mohammad; Malekzadeh, Masoud Mohammad; Agharahimi, Zahra; Daryabeigi, Maede; Yaghmaei, Bahareh; Ashrafi, Mahmoud-Reza; Rabbani, Ali; Rezaei, Nima

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tertiary pediatric hospitals usually provide excellent clinical services, but such centers have a lot to do for educational perfection. Objectives: This study was performed to address under-graduate educational deficits and find feasible solutions. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done in a target population of 77 sixth year undergraduate medical students (response rate = 78%) who spent their 3-month pediatric rotation in the Children’s Medical Center, the Pediatrics Center of Excellence in Tehran, Iran. The Dundee ready educational environment measure (DREEM) instrument was used for assessing educational environment of this subspecialized pediatric hospital. Results: Among 60 students who answered the questionnaires, 24 were male (40%). Participants’ age ranged from 23 to 24 years. The mean total score was 95.8 (48%). Comparison of scores based on students’ knowledge showed no significant difference. Problematic areas were learning, academic self-perception, and social self-perception. Conclusions: Having an accurate schedule to train general practitioner, using new teaching methods, and providing a non-stressful atmosphere were suggested solutions. PMID:26495091

  3. [Pilot project of a pediatric antibiotic stewardship initiative at the Hauner children's hospital].

    PubMed

    Huebner, J; Rack-Hoch, A L; Pecar, A; Schmid, I; Klein, C; Borde, J P

    2013-07-01

    The steady increase in antimicrobial resistance is of growing concern in healthcare. Antibiotic Stewardship [ABS] Strategies are important tools to control antibiotic use and -prevent antimicrobial resistance. An increasing number of institutions are developing ABS initiatives also in pediatrics. However, few data are available assessing the implementation and efficiency of these pediatric ABS programs.At the Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilian University, a tertiary care pediatric reference center, a pediatric ABS Team has been implemented. Key structural elements were the same as for adult patients, but antimicrobials agents selected for monitoring and appropriate clinical endpoints are different in pediatrics.Key features were: 1. prospective-audit with feedback and formulary restriction and 2. pre-authorization (also referred to as prior approval). The ABS team consisted of one pediatric infectious disease specialist, one clinical fellow in pediatric infectious diseases, and one clinical pharmacist with training in infectious diseases.With the implementation of a pediatric ABS strategy we could significantly influence antimicrobial consumption in our hospital. Cost-savings are estimated to be above 330 000 € per year, and concomitantly the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and antifungal compounds was significantly reduced.Antibiotic Stewardship [ABS] Strategies may be an effective tool to control antibiotic use in the setting of a large tertiary pediatric teaching hospital. A national guideline for ABS initiatives may help to further improve rational use of antibiotics in the hospital setting.

  4. Pediatric pain: prevalence, assessment, and management in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Linhares, M.B.M.; Doca, F.N.P.; Martinez, F.E.; Carlotti, A.P.P.; Cassiano, R.G.M.; Pfeifer, L.I.; Funayama, C.A.; Rossi, L.R.G.; Finley, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the prevalence, assessment and management of pediatric pain in a public teaching hospital. The study sample consisted of 121 inpatients (70 infants, 36 children, and 15 adolescents), their families, 40 physicians, and 43 nurses. All participants were interviewed except infants and children who could not communicate due to their clinical status. The interview included open-ended questions concerning the inpatients' pain symptoms during the 24 h preceding data collection, as well as pain assessment and pharmacological/non-pharmacological management of pain. The data were obtained from 100% of the eligible inpatients. Thirty-four children/adolescents (28%) answered the questionnaire and for the other 72% (unable to communicate), the family/health professional caregivers reported pain. Among these 34 persons, 20 children/adolescents reported pain, 68% of whom reported that they received pharmacological intervention for pain relief. Eighty-two family caregivers were available on the day of data collection. Of these, 40 family caregivers (49%) had observed their child's pain response. In addition, 74% reported that the inpatients received pharmacological management. Physicians reported that only 38% of the inpatients exhibited pain signs, which were predominantly acute pain detected during clinical procedures. They reported that 66% of patients received pharmacological intervention. The nurses reported pain signs in 50% of the inpatients, which were detected during clinical procedures. The nurses reported that pain was managed in 78% of inpatients by using pharmacological and/or non-pharmacological interventions. The findings provide evidence of the high prevalence of pain in pediatric inpatients and the under-recognition of pain by health professionals. PMID:22983181

  5. Pediatric hospital dermatology: experience with inpatient and consult services at the Mayo Clinic.

    PubMed

    Storan, Eoin R; McEvoy, Marian T; Wetter, David A; el-Azhary, Rokea A; Hand, Jennifer L; Davis, Dawn M R; Bridges, Alina G; Camilleri, Michael J; Davis, Mark D P

    2013-01-01

    Data describing the management of pediatric patients admitted to a hospital under the care of a dermatologist and dermatology hospital consults for pediatric inpatients are limited. We aim to describe the role of an inpatient hospital service jointly run by dermatology and pediatrics and the activities of a pediatric dermatology hospital consult service. We retrospectively identified pediatric (age < 18 yrs) dermatology inpatients and hospital consult patients from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2010. We examined patient demographics, indications for admission, length of stay, treatment provided, consult-requesting service, and consult diagnosis. One hundred eight admissions were by a dermatologist. The mean age was 5.8 years; the median length of stay was 3 days. Indications for admission included atopic dermatitis (86.1%), psoriasis (3.7%), and eczema herpeticum (2.8%). The main treatment provided was wet dressings (97.2%). Eighty-three dermatology hospital consults were requested. The mean age was 7.4 years. The main indications for dermatology consultation included drug rash (12.1%), cutaneous infections (12.1%), contact dermatitis (9.6%), psoriasis (8.4%), atopic dermatitis (6.0%), and hemangiomas (6.0%). This study describes the utility of the hospital pediatric dermatology inpatient and consult services in treating patients with severe skin disease.

  6. Quality Improvement Initiative Reduces Serious Safety Events in Pediatric Hospital Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Annual Conferences Newsletter AHRQ News Now Search News & Events Topics Search ahrq.gov About About AHRQ Profile ... May 2013 Quality improvement initiative reduces serious safety events in pediatric hospital patients Previous Page Next Page ...

  7. Hospital Charges for Pediatric Heart Failure Related Hospitalizations from 2000 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Deipanjan; Lin, Kimberly Y; O’Connor, Matthew J; Elci, Okan U; Kim, Jeffrey J; Decker, Jamie A; Price, Jack F; Zafar, Farhan; Morales, David LS; Denfield, Susan W; Dreyer, William J; Jefferies, John L; Rossano, Joseph W

    2015-01-01

    Background Scarce data exists regarding costs of pediatric heart failure related hospitalizations (HFRH) or how costs have changed over time. Hypothesis Pediatric HFRH costs, due to advances in management, will have increased significantly over time. Methods & Results A retrospective analysis of Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids’ Inpatient Database was performed on all pediatric HFRH. Inflation-adjusted charges are used as a proxy for cost. There were a total of 33,189 HFRH captured from 2000 to 2009. Median charges per HFRH rose from $35,079 in 2000 to $72,087 in 2009 (p<0.0001). The greatest median charges were incurred in patients on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation ($442,134 vs $53,998) or ventricular assist devices ($462,647 vs $55,151). Comorbidities, including sepsis ($207,511 vs $48,995), renal failure ($180,624 vs $52,812), stroke ($198,260 vs $54,974) and respiratory failure ($146,200 vs $48,797), were associated with greater charges (p<0.0001). Comorbidities and use of mechanical support increased over time. After adjusting for these factors, later year remained associated with greater median charges per HFRH (p<0.0001). Conclusions From 2000 to 2009 there has been an almost two-fold increase in pediatric HFRH charges, after adjustment for inflation. Although comorbidities and use of mechanical support account for some of this increase, later year remained independently associated with greater charges. Further study is needed to understand potential factors driving these higher costs over time and to identify more cost-effective therapies in this population. PMID:26645995

  8. Stress factors affecting academic physicians at a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Lindfors, Sara; Eintrei, Christina; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    Research is limited regarding occupational stress in academic physicians; professionals whose work situation includes the three areas of clinical practice, research, and teaching. The aim of this study was to gain knowledge of factors experienced as stressful by academic physicians employed by a university hospital. A questionnaire assessing the frequency and intensity of 36 potentially stressful factors was sent to all 157 academic physicians who were employed at the Linköping University Hospital, Sweden. The response rate was 77%. Both a high frequency and intensity of stress was experienced by 66% of the academic physicians in relation to "time pressure" and by almost 50% in connection with both "find time for research" and having "conflict of interest between different work assignments". Moreover, physicians in the higher age group and those who had attained a higher academic position experienced less stress. The female participants experienced more stress than the males due to gender-related problems and to variables associated with relationships at work. More knowledge is needed to determine the consequences of this finding and to identify coping strategies used for handling such stress.

  9. Academic workforce trends in community hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Britta L.; Schulkin, Jay; Lawrence, Hal C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Obstetrician-gynecologist faculty workforce studies have been limited to faculty at university training programs. Not much is known about the obstetrician-gynecologist faculty workforce at community programs. Method This study assessed the obstetrician-gynecologist faculty workforce in community training programs via administering surveys to the department chairs. The questionnaire assessed number of current faculty by degree, work status (part-time/full-time), rank, and sub-specialty. Out of 125 programs, 65 responded (52% response rate). Results The mean number of full-time faculty per department in community hospitals was 17 faculty. Two-thirds of community department chairs anticipated an increase in full-time faculty and 43% anticipated an increase in part-time faculty. Like university programs, sub-specialists and Professors (compared to generalists and assistant professors) were more likely to be male. Conclusion There are similarities between the community and university faculty workforce, many of the community program faculty are involved in research. Given the evolving clinical, educational, and research demands on community faculty, it is important to continue to monitor and study community program faculty. PMID:23882350

  10. Implementation of a palliative care team in a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Hubble, Rosemary A; Ward-Smith, Peggy; Christenson, Kathy; Hutto, C J; Korphage, Rebecca M; Hubble, Christopher L

    2009-01-01

    Recommendations for best practice from the American Academy of Pediatrics include the availability of palliative care for children with life-threatening or life-limiting health care conditions. The uniqueness of the both the pediatric population and a pediatric health care setting requires changing the culture that previously has provided only curative or hospice care to these individuals. Methods to provide palliative care alongside of treatment and coordination of these efforts must be multidisciplinary and include family members.

  11. Prevalence of Multidrug-Resistant Organisms in Hospitalized Pediatric Refugees in an University Children's Hospital in Germany 2015-2016.

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Tobias; Becker, Klaus-Peter; Lange, Bettina; Martin, Anka; Schäfer, Peter; Weichert, Stefan; Schroten, Horst

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) colonizing in pediatric refugees admitted to a University Children Hospital in Germany. DESIGN Retrospective observational study. SETTING General pediatric and pediatric surgery units. PATIENTS In Germany, recommendations for MDRO screening of pediatric refugees were recently published. According to these and institutional recommendations, all hospitalized pediatric refugees were screened for MDROs between October 2015 and March 2016. METHODS Using electronic surveillance data, we performed a chart review to identify the prevalence of MDROs among and the clinical diagnoses of pediatric refugees. RESULTS Among 325 patients hospitalized for various causes, most frequently gastroenteritis (30.9%), MDROs were detected in 33.8%. Most of these patients were colonized with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative (MRGN) bacteria (113 isolates), mostly 2MRGN/ESBL (87 isolates); some patients were colonized with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, 22 isolates); and 1 patient was colonized with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Among 110 refugee patients, we detected single colonization with an MDRO in 84 patients (76.4%), co-colonization with 2 pathogens in 23 patients (20.9%), and triple colonization in 3 patients (2.7%). However, infections with MDROs occurred in only 3.6% of pediatric refugees. The peak of positive MDRO screening results in 2015 correlated with an increased hospitalization rate. CONCLUSION Implementation of infection control measures among pediatric refugees is challenging. Due to the high frequency of MDROs in these patients, current screening, isolation, and treatment strategies may have to be adapted. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;1-5.

  12. A framework of pediatric hospital discharge care informed by legislation, research, and practice.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jay G; Blaine, Kevin; Rogers, Jayne; McBride, Sarah; Schor, Edward; Birmingham, Jackie; Schuster, Mark A; Feudtner, Chris

    2014-10-01

    To our knowledge, no widely used pediatric standards for hospital discharge care exist, despite nearly 10 000 pediatric discharges per day in the United States. This lack of standards undermines the quality of pediatric hospital discharge, hinders quality-improvement efforts, and adversely affects the health and well-being of children and their families after they leave the hospital. In this article, we first review guidance regarding the discharge process for adult patients, including federal law within the Social Security Act that outlines standards for hospital discharge; a variety of toolkits that aim to improve discharge care; and the research evidence that supports the discharge process. We then outline a framework within which to organize the diverse activities that constitute discharge care to be executed throughout the hospitalization of a child from admission to the actual discharge. In the framework, we describe processes to (1) initiate pediatric discharge care, (2) develop discharge care plans, (3) monitor discharge progress, and (4) finalize discharge. We contextualize these processes with a clinical case of a child undergoing hospital discharge. Use of this narrative review will help pediatric health care professionals (eg, nurses, social workers, and physicians) move forward to better understand what works and what does not during hospital discharge for children, while steadily improving their quality of care and health outcomes.

  13. Effect of motivation on academic fluency performance in survivors of pediatric medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Holland, Alice Ann; Hughes, Carroll W; Harder, Lana; Silver, Cheryl; Bowers, Daniel C; Stavinoha, Peter L

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed previously that extrinsic motivation may enable survivors of childhood medulloblastoma to significantly improve aspects of neurocognitive performance. In healthy populations, enhanced motivation has been shown to promote academic fluency, a domain likely more relevant to the educational outcomes of pediatric medulloblastoma survivors than academic skill development. The present study investigates the effect of enhanced extrinsic motivation on fluent (i.e., accurate and efficient) academic performance in pediatric medulloblastoma survivors. Participants were 36 children, ages 7-18, who had completed treatment for medulloblastoma. Participants completed a neuropsychological battery that included administration of equivalent tasks on Forms A and B of the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Achievement. Half were randomly assigned to an incentive condition prior to the administration of Form B. Provision of a performance-based incentive resulted in statistically significant improvement, but not normalization of function, in performance on measures of academic fluency. No demographic, treatment-related, academic, neuropsychological, or self-perception variables predicted response to incentive. Findings suggest that academic performance of survivors may significantly improve under highly motivating conditions. In addition to implications for educational services, this finding raises the novel possibility that decreased motivation represents an inherent neuropsychological deficit in this population and provides a rationale for further investigation of factors affecting individual differences in motivational processes. Further, by examining effort in a context where effort is not inherently suspect, present findings also significantly contribute to the debate regarding the effects of effort and motivation on neuropsychological performance.

  14. Treating Family Violence in a Pediatric Hospital: A Program of Training, Research, and Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kathleen M.; And Others

    This monograph describes a project developed at Children's Hospital of Boston as an innovative, exemplary program of training, research, and services for the treatment of family violence in a pediatric hospital, with a particular focus on child abuse and neglect. Chapter 1 explains why it is important to study the area of family violence,…

  15. Transition from Hospital to Home Following Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant: Qualitative Findings of Parent Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lerret, Stacee M.; Weiss, Marianne E; Stendahl, Gail; Chapman, Shelley; Neighbors, Katie; Amsden, Katie; Lokar, Joan; Voit, Ashley; Menendez, Jerome; Alonso, Estella M

    2014-01-01

    Transplant providers are challenged to determine appropriate interventions for patients and families due to limited published research regarding the context of the post-discharge experience from the perspective of parents of transplanted children. The purpose of this study is to describe the parent perspective of the transition from hospital to home following their child’s solid organ transplant. Within a mixed-methods design, 37 parents of pediatric heart, kidney and liver transplant recipients from three pediatric hospitals responded to qualitative interview questions on the day of hospital discharge and three weeks following hospital discharge. Insight to the discharge preparation process revealed necessary education components. Post-discharge themes were identified for coping, knowledge and adherence. The parents’ responses provide awareness as to specific stressors and concerns parents are faced with when their child is discharged from the hospital after solid organ transplant and opportunities for ways the transplant team can provide support. PMID:24814154

  16. Early Career Development in Academic Pediatrics of Participants in the APS-SPR Medical Student Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Smith, William H.; Rogers, Jessica G.; Hansen, Thomas N.; Smith, Charles V.

    2009-01-01

    To recruit and train the next generations of pediatric clinician-scientists, the American Pediatric Society (APS) and Society for Pediatric Research (SPR) initiated a program in 1991 to support medical students with interests in research and pediatrics to conduct research at institutions other than their respective medical schools. Since 1991, the APS-SPR Medical Student Research Program (MSRP) has funded 732 of 2209 applicants from 132 U.S. or Canadian medical schools for 8 to 12 weeks of research under the direction of experienced investigators. PubMed-attributable publications tabulated in 2001 for MSRP applicants through 2000 indicated that participants had published more actively than had non-participant applicants. Male non-participants exhibited greater publication activities than did female non-participants, but female and male participants published equally. Of all MSRP participants between 1991 and 1996, as of 2008, 36% were in pediatrics, and a remarkable 29% were in academic pediatrics. PMID:19092716

  17. Implementing a pediatric obesity care guideline in a freestanding children's hospital to improve child safety and hospital preparedness.

    PubMed

    Porter, Renee M; Thrasher, Jodi; Krebs, Nancy F

    2012-12-01

    Medical and surgical care of children with severe obesity is complicated and requires recognition of the problem, appropriate equipment, and safe management. There is little literature describing patient, provider, and institutional needs for the severely obese pediatric patient. Nonetheless, the limited data suggest 3 broad categories of needs unique to this population: (a) airway management, (b) drug dosing and pharmacology, and (c) equipment and infrastructure. We describe an opportunity at the Children's Hospital Colorado to better prepare and optimize care for this patient population by creation of a Pediatric Obesity Care Guideline that focused on key areas of quality and safety.

  18. [Approach to academic detailing as a hospital pharmacist].

    PubMed

    Nishikori, Atsumi

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, a new medical fee system was introduced for the clinical activities of hospital pharmacists responsible for in-patient pharmacotherapy monitoring in medical institutions in Japan. The new medical system demands greater efforts to provide the most suitable and safest medicine for each patient. By applying the concept of academic detailing to clinical pharmacists' roles in hospitals, I present drug use evaluation in three disease states (peptic ulcer, insomnia, and osteoporosis). To analyze these from multiple aspects, we not only need knowledge of drug monographs (clinical and adverse drug effects), but also the ability to evaluate a patient's adherence and cost-effectiveness. If we combine the idea of academic detailing with a clinical pharmacist's role, it is necessary to strengthen drug information skills, such as guideline or literature search skills and journal evaluation. Simultaneously, it is important to introduce new pharmaceutical education curriculums regarding evidence-based medicine (EBM), pharmacoeconomics, and professional communication in order to explore pharmacists' roles in the future.

  19. [The prevalence of accidental poisoning in a hospital pediatric unit of Latium].

    PubMed

    Faraoni, F; Protano, C; Bini, V; Lizzi, R

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the trend of accidental poisoning among children, over a period of fifteen years, from 1990 to 2004, in the pediatric wards of a hospital in Latium (Italy). The prevalence of childhood poisoning was calculated based on the medical records of the pediatric unit of the hospital. The derived data was divided into different categories according to age, gender and types of poisoning. The results of this study show a decrease in accidental pediatric poisoning; according to the literature the frequency of poisoning was higher in males, under the age of 2 years, than females. Trends show an increase in pharmaceutical poisonings. The present study underlines the need for continuous information on prevention and educational programs organized by the Institutions, territorial sanitary services and GP with the aim of increasing the awareness of parents regarding the risk factors of poisoning.

  20. Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea in a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Spivack, Jordan G; Eppes, Stephen C; Klein, Joel D

    2003-05-01

    This retrospective cohort analysis examined the risk factors, symptoms, and severity of disease associated with C. difficile in pediatric inpatients. Risk factors for a C. difficile-positive test were an oncologic diagnosis, diarrhea of more than 2 days' duration, and gastrointestinal symptoms, especially abdominal pain. Over a 3.5-year period, there was a total of 22 C. difficile-positive patients, and most had mild, self-limiting diarrheal illness. No cases of C. difficile diarrhea were identified. Seventy-eight percent of the C. difficile-positive patients were found to have alternate risk factors for diarrhea. Our data indicate that C. difficile rarely causes severe diarrhea in pediatric inpatients and that C. difficile testing should be limited to patients with severe prolonged diarrhea and abdominal pain.

  1. Practice guidelines for music interventions with hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Janice W; Shirk, Beverly J; Polomano, Rosemary C

    2007-12-01

    Music therapy is an effective complementary approach that can achieve specific therapeutic outcomes in the clinical management of pediatric patients. Growing research on music interventions has generated scientific knowledge about how this modality benefits patients and has formed the basis for effective protocols that can be used in practice. Although it can be challenging to translate research-based protocols into routine clinical care at the bedside, it is essential that music therapy interventions be aligned with evidence-based information and that accepted standards be established by the music therapy discipline to achieve the greatest benefit. The importance of partnerships between nurses and music therapists is emphasized to enhance the success of music-based treatments. This discussion synthesizes research findings that can be used to design pediatric practice guidelines in the application of music therapy.

  2. Malnutrition in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients: Assessment, Prevalence, and Association to Adverse Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Daskalou, Efstratia; Galli-Tsinopoulou, Assimina; Karagiozoglou-Lampoudi, Thomais; Augoustides-Savvopoulou, Persefone

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is a frequent finding in pediatric health care settings in the form of undernutrition or excess body weight. Its increasing prevalence and impact on overall health status, which is reflected in the adverse outcomes, renders imperative the application of commonly accepted and evidence-based practices and tools by health care providers. Nutrition risk screening on admission and nutrition status evaluation are key points during clinical management of hospitalized pediatric patients, in order to prevent health deterioration that can lead to serious complications and growth consequences. In addition, anthropometric data based on commonly accepted universal growth standards can give accurate results for nutrition status. Both nutrition risk screening and nutrition status assessment are techniques that should be routinely implemented, based on commonly accepted growth standards and methodology, and linked to clinical outcomes. The aim of the present review was to address the issue of hospital malnutrition in pediatric settings in terms of prevalence, outline nutrition status evaluation and nutrition screening process using different criteria and available tools, and present its relationship with outcome measures. Key teaching points • Malnutrition-underweight or excess body weight-is a frequent imbalance in pediatric settings that affects physical growth and results in undesirable clinical outcomes. • Anthropometry interpretation through growth charts and nutrition screening are cornerstones for the assessment of malnutrition.To date no commonly accepted anthropometric criteria or nutrition screening tools are used in hospitalized pediatric patients. • Commonly accepted nutrition status and screening processes based on the World Health Organization's growth standards can contribute to the overall hospital nutrition care of pediatric patients.

  3. Clostridium difficile infection in the hospitalized pediatric population: increasing trend in disease incidence.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Pant, Chaitanya; Anderson, Michael P; Donskey, Curtis J; Sferra, Thomas J

    2013-10-01

    To determine whether the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection continues to increase in hospitalized pediatric patients, we evaluated data from a United States national inpatient database. For the period of 2003 to 2009, we found an increasing trend in the incidence of C. difficile infection. These data suggest greater effort be given to prevent and treat this infection in children.

  4. [ISO 9002 at the Center of Pediatric Intensive Care at the Albert Einstein Israeli Hospital].

    PubMed

    Gé Lacerda, D P; Rocha, M L; Santos, R P

    2000-01-01

    This study shows the process of implementation of a quality program in Pediatric Intensive Therapy Center of "Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein" which resulted in the certification of this service for the Standards ISO 9002/94. It points out the nurse's role as a leader in this process.

  5. Outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia complex among ventilated pediatric patients linked to hospital sinks.

    PubMed

    Lucero, Cynthia A; Cohen, Adam L; Trevino, Ingrid; Rupp, Angela Hammer; Harris, Michelle; Forkan-Kelly, Sinead; Noble-Wang, Judith; Jensen, Bette; Shams, Alicia; Arduino, Matthew J; LiPuma, John J; Gerber, Susan I; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2011-11-01

    We investigated a cluster of Burkholderia cepacia complex colonization in ventilated pediatric patients. Isolates from 15 patients, 2 sink drains, and several ventilator components were found to belong to a single B cenocepacia clone. Hospital tap water used during oral and tracheostomy care was identified as the most likely mechanism for transmission.

  6. Temporal dynamics of emergency department and hospital admissions of pediatric asthmatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, Daniel; Levine, Elissa; Timmins, Sidey; Weiss, Sheila R.; Bollinger, Mary E.; Blaisdell, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that can result in exacerbations leading to urgent care in emergency departments (EDs) and hospitals. We examined seasonal and temporal trends in pediatric asthma ED (1997-1999) and hospital (1986-1999) admission data so as to identify periods of increased risk of urgent care by age group, gender, and race. All pediatric ED and hospital admission data for Maryland residents occurring within the state of Maryland were evaluated. Distinct peaks in pediatric ED and hospital asthma admissions occurred each year during the winter-spring and autumn seasons. Although the number and timing of these peaks were consistent across age and racial groups, the magnitude of the peaks differed by age and race. The same number, timing, and relative magnitude of the major peaks in asthma admissions occurred statewide, implying that the variables affecting these seasonal patterns of acute asthma exacerbations occur statewide. Similar gross seasonal trends are observed worldwide. Although several environmental, infectious, and psychosocial factors have been linked with increases in asthma exacerbations among children, thus far they have not explained these seasonal patterns of admissions. The striking temporal patterns of pediatric asthma admissions within Maryland, as described here, provide valuable information in the search for causes.

  7. Distress among hospitalized pediatric cancer patients modified by pet-therapy intervention to improve quality of life.

    PubMed

    Urbanski, Beth L; Lazenby, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This state of the science, integrative literature review focuses on animal-facilitated therapy (AFT) and the benefits provided to quality of life in hospitalized pediatric oncology patients. Results showed physiological and psychological benefits in pediatric inpatients settings. AFT has been shown to decrease pain, change vital signs, provide distraction, decrease fear, increase socialization, increase pleasure and decrease emotional distress in hospitalized pediatric patients. AFT needs to be implemented with appropriate medical discretion, but for the appropriate high-risk patients, AFT can improve quality of life. Pain, adjustment difficulties, mood changes and symptom management can be improved in inpatient pediatric cancer patients receiving AFT, thus improving overall quality of life.

  8. Pediatric Hospital: The Paradigms of Play in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Macedo, Lino; Faria da Silva, Gláucia; Mutarelli Setúbal, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The role of play in Brazilian children’s hospitals is highlighted, as well as the perspective of humanization in Brazil. Some aspects of our culture are crucial to understanding the importance of play considering our society. Sabara Children’s Hospital (“Hospital Infantil Sabará”) in Brazil is used particularly to discuss humanization. To understand the issue of play in Brazil, it is important to discuss hospitals in their social context, their history, current roles in children’s care, humanization history and child development, according to the approaches of Piaget and Winnicott that are used in our culture. PMID:27417350

  9. Pediatric Hospital: The Paradigms of Play in Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Macedo, Lino; da Silva, Gláucia Faria; Setúbal, Sandra Mutarelli

    2015-01-29

    The role of play in Brazilian children's hospitals is highlighted, as well as the perspective of humanization in Brazil. Some aspects of our culture are crucial to understanding the importance of play considering our society. Sabara Children's Hospital ("Hospital Infantil Sabará") in Brazil is used particularly to discuss humanization. To understand the issue of play in Brazil, it is important to discuss hospitals in their social context, their history, current roles in children's care, humanization history and child development, according to the approaches of Piaget and Winnicott that are used in our culture.

  10. Modeling nurses' acceptance of bar coded medication administration technology at a pediatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Roger L; Scanlon, Matthew C; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify predictors of nurses' acceptance of bar coded medication administration (BCMA). Design Cross-sectional survey of registered nurses (N=83) at an academic pediatric hospital that recently implemented BCMA. Methods Surveys assessed seven BCMA-related perceptions: ease of use; usefulness for the job; social influence from non-specific others to use BCMA; training; technical support; usefulness for patient care; and social influence from patients/families. An all possible subset regression procedure with five goodness-of-fit indicators was used to identify which set of perceptions best predicted BCMA acceptance (intention to use, satisfaction). Results Nurses reported a moderate perceived ease of use and low perceived usefulness of BCMA. Nurses perceived moderate-or-higher social influence to use BCMA and had moderately positive perceptions of BCMA-related training and technical support. Behavioral intention to use BCMA was high, but satisfaction was low. Behavioral intention to use was best predicted by perceived ease of use, perceived social influence from non-specific others, and perceived usefulness for patient care (56% of variance explained). Satisfaction was best predicted by perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness for patient care, and perceived social influence from patients/families (76% of variance explained). Discussion Variation in and low scores on ease of use and usefulness are concerning, especially as these variables often correlate with acceptance, as found in this study. Predicting acceptance benefited from using a broad set of perceptions and adapting variables to the healthcare context. Conclusion Success with BCMA and other technologies can benefit from assessing end-user acceptance and elucidating the factors promoting acceptance and use. PMID:22661559

  11. [Clinical course and prognosis of patients with urolithiasis in a pediatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Ubillo-Sánchez, José Manuel; Bonilla-Rojas, Jesús; Peña, Luis Alberto; Zurita-Cruz, Jessie Nallely; Cárdenas-Navarrete, Rocío; Serret-Montoya, Juana; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Angel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: la litiasis renal se considera poco frecuente en pediatría. La información disponible no es suficiente para determinar con certeza su pronóstico. El objetivo de esta investigación fue describir los signos, síntomas, complicaciones y recurrencia que presentaron los pacientes pediátricos con urolitiasis. MÉTODOS: se identificaron los expedientes de pacientes pediátricos con urolitiasis atendidos en el Hospital de Pediatría del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI, en el periodo de 2003 a 2009.

  12. Code R: Redesigning Hospital-wide Peer Review for Academic Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daniel I; Au, Huy; Fargo, Ramiz; Garrison, Roger C; Thompson, Gary; Yu, Minho; Loo, Lawrence K

    2016-09-01

    In most health care institutions, physician peer review is the primary method for maintaining and measuring physician competency and quality of care issues. However, many teaching hospitals do not have a method of tracking resident trainees' involvement in adverse cases. At the study institution, Code R was introduced as a measure to capture resident trainee involvement in the hospital-wide peer review process. The authors conducted a retrospective review of all peer review cases from January 2008 to December 2011 in an academic medical center and determined the quantity and type of resident errors that occurred compared to attending faculty. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies served as a framework to categorize quality of care errors. The addition of Code R to the peer review process can be readily adopted by other institutions to help improve resident education, facilitate faculty supervision, and potentially improve patient safety.

  13. Development of a Postacute Hospital Item Bank for the New Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory-Computer Adaptive Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Helene M.

    2010-01-01

    The PEDI-CAT is a new computer adaptive test (CAT) version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI). Additional PEDI-CAT items specific to postacute pediatric hospital care were recently developed using expert reviews and cognitive interviewing techniques. Expert reviews established face and construct validity, providing positive…

  14. Use of Antibiotics in Pediatrics: 8-Years Survey in Italian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Buccellato, Elena; Melis, Mauro; Biagi, Chiara; Donati, Monia; Motola, Domenico; Vaccheri, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate antibiotic consumption in the pediatric wards of Emilia-Romagna Region, from 2004 to 2011, with a focus on the antibiotics reserved to the most serious infections, and to analyse the ADRs reported for antibiotics by the pediatric wards of Emilia-Romagna hospitals. Methods Reference population was represented by all the patients (0–14 years old) admitted to the pediatric wards of all the hospitals of Emilia-Romagna Region. Drug consumption was expressed as number of DDDs per 100 Bed-Days (BD) and data were analysed by active substance, by therapeutic subgroups or by ward type. The time trends of antibiotic consumption were statistically analysed by linear regression. All the suspected ADR reports associated with antibiotics, reported between January 2004 and December 2011 were drawn by the Italian Spontaneous Reporting Database. Results Overall antibiotic consumption showed only a slight increase (p = 0.224). Among the pediatric wards, pediatric surgery showed the highest increase from 2004 to 2011 (p = 0.011). Penicillins and β-lactamase inhibitors was the first therapeutic group with a statistically significant increase over years (p = 0.038), whereas penicillins with extended spectrum presented a statistically significant reduction (p = 0.008). Moreover, only 5 drugs out of the 8 antibiotics reserved to the most serious infections were used. Pharmacovigilance data showed 27 spontaneous ADR reports associated to ATC J01 drugs. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid had the highest number of ADR reports (n = 7). Conclusions The steadily increasing consumption in penicillins and β-lactamase inhibitors, in association with a considerable decrease of plain penicillins, raises a serious concern. Pharmacovigilance reports seem to suggest a safe use of antibiotics in the hospital setting of Emilia-Romagna. Further studies to investigate the reason for prescribing antibiotics in children inpatients are needed. PMID:26405817

  15. Primary immunodeficiency investigation in patients during and after hospitalization in a pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Suavinho, Érica; de Nápolis, Ana Carolina R.; Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze whether the patients with severe infections, admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, underwent the active screening for primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Methods: Retrospective study that assessed the data records of patients with any severe infections admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, covering a period from January 2011 to January 2012, in order to confirm if they performed an initial investigation for PID with blood count and immunoglobulin dosage. Results: In the studied period, 53 children were hospitalized with severe infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, and only in seven (13.2%) the initial investigation of PID was performed. Among these patients, 3/7 (42.8%) showed quantitative alterations in immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels, 1/7 (14.3%) had the diagnosis of cyclic neutropenia, and 1/7 (14.3%) presented thrombocytopenia and a final diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Therefore, the PID diagnosis was confirmed in 5/7 (71.4%) of the patients. Conclusions: The investigation of PID in patients with severe infections has not been routinely performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Our findings suggest the necessity of performing PID investigation in this group of patients. PMID:24676187

  16. Pain management policies and practices in pediatric emergency care: a nationwide survey of Italian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pain experienced by children in emergency departments (EDs) is often poorly assessed and treated. Although local protocols and strategies are important to ensure appropriate staff behaviours, few studies have focussed on pain management policies at hospital or department level. This study aimed at describing the policies and reported practices of pain assessment and treatment in a national sample of Italian pediatric EDs, and identifying the assocoated structural and organisational factors. Methods A structured questionnaire was mailed to all the 14 Italian pediatric and maternal and child hospitals and to 5 general hospitals with separate pediatric emergency room. There were no refusals. Information collected included the frequency and mode of pain assessment, presence of written pain management protocols, use of local anaesthetic (EMLA cream) before venipuncture, and role of parents. General data on the hospital and ED were also recorded. Multiple Correspondence Analysis was used to explore the multivariable associations between the characteristics of hospitals and EDs and their pain management policies and practices. Results Routine pain assessment both at triage and in the emergency room was carried out only by 26% of surveyed EDs. About one third did not use algometric scales, and almost half (47.4%) did not have local protocols for pain treatment. Only 3 routinely reassessed pain after treatment, and only 2 used EMLA. All EDs allowed parents’ presence and most (17, 89.9%) allowed them to stay when painful procedures were carried out. Eleven hospitals (57.9%) allowed parents to hold their child during blood sampling. Pediatric and maternal and child hospitals, those located in the North of Italy, equipped with medico-surgical-traumatological ED and short stay observation, and providing full assessment triage over 24 hours were more likely to report appropriate policies for pain management both at triage and in ER. A nurses to admissions ratio

  17. The 2015 Academic College of Emergency Experts in Indias INDO-US Joint Working Group White Paper on Establishing an Academic Department and Training Pediatric Emergency Medicine Specialists in India.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Prashant; Batra, Prerna; Shah, Binita R; Saha, Abhijeet; Galwankar, Sagar; Aggrawal, Praveen; Hassoun, Ameer; Batra, Bipin; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kalra, Om Prakash; Shah, Dheeraj

    2015-12-01

    The concept of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) is virtually nonexistent in India. Suboptimally organized prehospital services substantially hinder the evaluation, management, and subsequent transport of the acutely ill and/or injured child to an appropriate facility. Furthermore, the management of the ill child at the hospital level is often provided by overburdened providers who, by virtue of their training, lack experience in the skills required to effectively manage pediatric emergencies. Finally, the care of the traumatized child often requires the involvement of providers trained in different specialities, which further impedes timely access to appropriate care. The recent recognition of Doctor of Medicine in Emergency Medicine as an approved discipline of study as per the Indian Medical Council Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to introduce PEM as a formal academic program in India. PEM has to be developed as a 3 year superspeciality course after completion of MD Diplomate of National Board (DNB) Pediatrics or MD DNB in EM. The National Board of Examinations that accredits and administers postgraduate and postdoctoral programs in India also needs to develop an academic program DNB in PEM. The goals of such a program would be to impart theoretical knowledge, training in the appropriate skills and procedures, development of communication and counseling techniques, and research. In this paper, the Joint Working Group of the Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (JWG ACEE India) gives its recommendations for starting 3 year DM DNB in PEM, including the curriculum, infrastructure, staffing, and training in India. This is an attempt to provide an uniform framework and a set of guiding principles to start PEM as a structured superspeciality to enhance emergency care for Indian children.

  18. The 2015 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's INDO-US Joint Working Group White Paper on Establishing an Academic Department and Training Pediatric Emergency Medicine Specialists in India.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Prashant; Batra, Prerna; Shah, Binita R; Saha, Abhijeet; Galwankar, Sagar; Aggrawal, Praveen; Hassoun, Ameer; Batra, Bipin; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kalra, Om Prakash; Shah, Dheeraj

    2015-01-01

    The concept of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) is virtually nonexistent in India. Suboptimally, organized prehospital services substantially hinder the evaluation, management, and subsequent transport of the acutely ill and/or injured child to an appropriate facility. Furthermore, the management of the ill child at the hospital level is often provided by overburdened providers who, by virtue of their training, lack experience in the skills required to effectively manage pediatric emergencies. Finally, the care of the traumatized child often requires the involvement of providers trained in different specialities, which further impedes timely access to appropriate care. The recent recognition of Doctor of Medicine (MD) in Emergency Medicine (EM) as an approved discipline of study as per the Indian Medical Council Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to introduce PEM as a formal academic program in India. PEM has to be developed as a 3-year superspeciality course (in PEM) after completion of MD/Diplomate of National Board (DNB) Pediatrics or MD/DNB in EM. The National Board of Examinations (NBE) that accredits and administers postgraduate and postdoctoral programs in India also needs to develop an academic program - DNB in PEM. The goals of such a program would be to impart theoretical knowledge, training in the appropriate skills and procedures, development of communication and counseling techniques, and research. In this paper, the Joint Working Group of the Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (JWG-ACEE-India) gives its recommendations for starting 3-year DM/DNB in PEM, including the curriculum, infrastructure, staffing, and training in India. This is an attempt to provide an uniform framework and a set of guiding principles to start PEM as a structured superspeciality to enhance emergency care for Indian children.

  19. Transition of Experienced and New Graduate Nurses to a Pediatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Klingbeil, Carol; Schiffman, Rachel F; Ziebert, Carolyn; Totka, Joan P; Schmitt, Catherine A; Doyle, Lynn; Stelter, Ashley; Stonek, Alice V; Ke, Weiming; Johnson, Norah

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the 3-, 6-, 12-, and 18-month outcomes of 118 newly hired registered nurses (RNs) who completed a 12-month transition-to-practice program at a pediatric hospital. Experienced RNs (n = 42) and new graduate RNs (n = 76) showed improved organization, prioritization, communication, and leadership skills over time. The experienced RNs reported better communication and leadership skills than the new graduate nurses. Results inform transition program development for both new and experienced nurses.

  20. Impact of teaching intensity and academic status on medical resource utilization by teaching hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sato, Daisuke; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2012-11-01

    Teaching hospitals require excess medical resources to maintain high-quality care and medical education. To evaluate the appropriateness of such surplus costs, we examined the impact of teaching intensity defined as activities for postgraduate training, and academic status as functions of medical research and undergraduate teaching on medical resource utilization. Administrative data for 47,397 discharges from 40 academic and 12 non-academic teaching hospitals in Japan were collected. Hospitals were classified into three groups according to intern/resident-to-bed (IRB) ratio. Resource utilization of medical services was estimated using fee-for-service charge schedules and normalized with case mix grouping. 15-24% more resource utilization for laboratory examinations, radiological imaging, and medications were observed in hospitals with higher IRB ratios. With multivariate adjustment for case mix and academic status, higher IRB ratios were associated with 10-15% more use of radiological imaging, injections, and medications; up to 5% shorter hospital stays; and not with total resource utilization. Conversely, academic status was associated with 21-33% more laboratory examinations, radiological imaging, and medications; 13% longer hospital stays; and 10% more total resource utilization. While differences in medical resource utilization by teaching intensity may not be associated with indirect educational costs, those by academic status may be. Therefore, academic hospitals may need efficiency improvement and financial compensation.

  1. Functional Outcome Trajectories after Out-of Hospital Pediatric Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Faye S; Slomine, Beth; Christensen, James; Holubkov, Richard; Page, Kent; Dean, J. Michael; Moler, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze functional performance measures collected prospectively during the conduct of a clinical trial that enrolled children (up to age 18 years), resuscitated after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, who were at high risk for poor outcomes. Design Children with Glasgow Motor Scales <5, within 6 hours of resuscitation, were enrolled in a clinical trial that compared two targeted temperature management interventions (THAPCA-OH, NCT00878644). The primary outcome, 12-month survival with Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, second edition (VABS-II) score ≥70, did not differ between groups. Setting 38 North American pediatric ICU’s. Participants 295 children were enrolled; 270/295 had baseline VABS-II scores ≥70; 87/270 survived one year. Interventions Targeted temperatures were 33.0°C and 36.8°C for hypothermia and normothermia groups. Measurements and Main Results Baseline measures included VABS-II, Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category(PCPC), and Pediatric Overall Performance Category (POPC). PCPC and POPC were rescored at hospital discharges; all three were scored at 3 and 12 months. In survivors with baseline VABS-II scores ≥70, we evaluated relationships of hospital discharge PCPC with 3 and 12 month scores, and between 3 and 12 month VABS-II scores. Hospital discharge PCPC scores strongly predicted 3 and 12 month PCPC (r=0.82,0.79; p<0.0001) and VABS-II scores (r=−0.81,−0.77; p<0.0001) Three month VABS-II scores strongly predicted 12 month performance (r=0.95, p<0.0001). Hypothermia treatment did not alter these relationships. Conclusions In comatose children, with Glasgow Motor Scales <5 in the initial hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest resuscitation, function scores at hospital discharge and at 3 months predicted 12-month performance well in the majority of survivors. PMID:27509385

  2. Integrated care facilitation model reduces use of hospital resources by patients with pediatric asthma.

    PubMed

    Bird, Stephen R; Noronha, Michelle; Kurowski, William; Orkin, Carl; Sinnott, Helen

    2012-01-01

    This evaluation assessed a model of care for pediatric asthma patients that aimed to promote health and reduce their preventable and avoidable use of acute hospital services. Pediatric asthma patients (n=223) were allocated care facilitators who provided assistance in the promotion of carer/self-management, education and linkage to an integrated healthcare system, comprising of acute and community-based healthcare providers. Patients' use of acute hospital services (emergency department [ED] presentations, admissions, and bed-days) pre- and postrecruitment were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank tests. The pediatric asthma care givers quality of life questionnaire' was used to assess changes in health and quality of life. The patients displayed a 57% reduction in ED presentations, 74% in admissions, and a 71% reduction in bed-days. Whereas a comparator group displayed 27%, 32%, and 14% increases, respectively. Patients also reported significant improvements in quality of life domains of activity limitation (+5.6, p<.001) and emotional function (+9.1, p<.001). The reduction in the use of hospital services was attributed to the aversion of preventable presentations and admissions, via the enhancement of carer/self-management and access to community health services. These outcomes were supported by indicators of improved patient health and quality of life, and comments by the participant's carers.

  3. Improving Psychiatric Hospital Care for Pediatric Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Gabriels, Robin L.; Agnew, John A.; Beresford, Carol; Morrow, Mary Ann; Mesibov, Gary; Wamboldt, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and/or intellectual disabilities (ID) are at greater risk for psychiatric hospitalization compared to children with other disorders. However, general psychiatric hospital environments are not adapted for the unique learning styles, needs, and abilities of this population, and there are few specialized hospital-based psychiatric care programs in the United States. This paper compares patient outcomes from a specialized psychiatric hospital program developed for pediatric patients with an ASD and/or ID to prior outcomes of this patient population in a general psychiatric program at a children's hospital. Record review data indicate improved outcomes for patients in the specialized program of reduced recidivism rates (12% versus 33%) and decreased average lengths of inpatient stay (as short as 26 days versus 45 days). Available data from a subset of patients (n = 43) in the specialized program showed a decrease in irritability and hyperactivity behaviors from admission to discharge and that 35 previously undetected ASD diagnoses were made. Results from this preliminary study support specialized psychiatric care practices with this population to positively impact their health care outcomes. PMID:22934179

  4. Does research during general surgery residency correlate with academic pursuits after pediatric surgery residency?

    PubMed

    Lessin, M S; Klein, M D

    1995-09-01

    A study was designed to evaluate whether successful candidates in pediatric surgery have performed laboratory research with publication, and if such preparation leads to continued investigations. We requested a curriculum vitae from the 248 pediatric surgeons who began their pediatric surgery residencies (PSR) between 1979 and 1992. For nonresponders, data were collected from physician directories. Indicators of academic status, personal information, and publication data were obtained. Responders had more publications before, during, and after PSR. Those who published during general surgery residency (GSR) had more research years during their residency. Among responders, 59% had spent time in the laboratory, and the percentage with laboratory time increased over the study period. Those with laboratory experience had more laboratory and clinical papers before PSR. Ninety-four percent were from university-based GSRs and 6% were from community GSRs. University general surgery residents did not have more publications during GSR or PSR but had a greater number of publications after PSR. University general surgery residents had more laboratory publications during GSR and after PSR, but did not have more clinical publications. Publications during GSR and after PSR increased during the study period, but not during PSR. Time in the laboratory during GSR did not independently predict continued laboratory research. Those with laboratory papers during GSR did not publish more basic science papers after PSR. Several surgeons had basic science publications that were initiated only after their PSR. In a recent study that compared successful and unsuccessful PSR candidates, the successful candidates were found to have more publications.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Hospitalizations in pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Michael D.; Danese, Mark; Klaassen, Robert J.; Duryea, Jennifer; Eisen, Melissa; Bussel, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To examine utilization and outcomes in pediatric immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) hospitalizations, we used ICD-9 code 287.31 to identify hospitalizations in patients with ITP in the 2009 HCUP KID, an all-payer sample of pediatric hospitalizations from US community hospitals. Diagnosis and procedure codes were used to estimate rates of ITP-related procedures, comorbidity prevalence, costs, length of stay (LOS), and mortality. In 2009, there were an estimated 4499 hospitalizations in children aged 6 months–17 years with ITP; 43% in children aged 1–5 years; and 47% with emergency department encounters. The mean hospitalization cost was $5398, mean LOS 2.0 days, with 0.3% mortality (n = 13). With any bleeding (15.2%, including gastrointestinal 2.0%, hematuria 1.3%, intracranial hemorrhage [ICH] 0.6%), mean hospitalization cost was $7215, LOS 2.5 days, with 1.5% mortality. For ICH (0.6%, n = 27), mean cost was $40 209, LOS 8.5 days, with 21% mortality. With infections (14%, including upper respiratory 5.2%, viral 4.9%, bacterial 1.9%), the mean cost was $6928, LOS 2.9 days, with 0.9% mortality. Septic shock was reported in 0.3% of discharges. Utilization included immunoglobulin administration (37%) and splenectomies (2.3%). Factors associated with higher costs included age >6 years, ICH, hematuria, transfusion, splenectomy, and bone marrow diagnostics (p < 0.05). In conclusion, of the 4499 hospitalizations with ITP, mortality rates of 1.5%, 21%, and 0.9% were seen with any bleeding, ICH, and infection, respectively. Higher costs were associated with clinically significant bleeding and procedures. Future analyses may reveal effects of the implementation of more recent ITP guidelines and use of additional treatments. PMID:26941022

  6. Pattern of Pediatric Dermatoses in a Tertiary Care Hospital of Western Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Ranjit, Annu; Pathak, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric dermatoses are one of the most common presentations in a dermatology clinic and reflect the health and hygiene status of children. The incidence and severity of these skin lesions are influenced by geographical area, seasonal and cultural factors, and socioeconomic status. This study was done to show the prevalence of different pediatric dermatoses in a tertiary care hospital of Western Nepal. Chart reviews of children aged one day to 17 years, presenting to Universal Medical College Teaching Hospital, Nepal, from 1 September 2014 to 30 august 2015, were done. Descriptive analysis and two-sided chi-square test were done. Among 23992 patients visiting the dermatology outpatient department (OPD), 5398 (22.5%) were of pediatric age groups (male/female: 1.2/1); most of them belonged to young teens and teenagers (n = 3308; 61.3%). Three most common dermatoses were fungal infections (18.5%), eczema (14.4%), and acne (10.1%). Fungal infections (n = 653; 65.4%) and acne (n = 284; 51.9%) were common in males, whereas eczema (n = 402; 51.7%) was more common in females. Fungal infection (P < 0.001), eczema (P < 0.001), pigmentation disorders (P < 0.001), and acne (P < 0.01) were significantly more during summer, while scabies was more in winter (P < 0.001). Dermatophytosis, pyoderma, and warts comprised frequently occurring fungal, bacterial, and viral infections, respectively. PMID:27247564

  7. Investing in future pediatric subspecialists: a fellowship curriculum that prepares for the transition to academic careers.

    PubMed

    Rama, Jennifer A; Campbell, Judith R; Balmer, Dorene F; Turner, Teri L; Hsu, Deborah C

    2015-01-01

    Background The experience of transitioning to an academic faculty position can be improved with standardized educational interventions. Although a number of such interventions have been described, few utilize an evaluation framework, describe a robust evaluation process, and address why their interventions were successful. In this article, the authors apply a logic model to describe their efforts to develop, implement, evaluate, and revise a comprehensive academic career development curriculum among pediatric subspecialty fellows. They describe inputs, activities, outputs, and outcomes using quantitative data from fellow evaluations and qualitative data from faculty interviews. Methods Methods are described under the input and activities sections. The curriculum started with collaboration among educational leadership and conducting a needs assessment. Using the needs assessment results and targeted learning objectives, we piloted the curriculum and then implemented the full curriculum 1 year later. Results Results are described under the outputs and outcomes sections. We present immediate, short-term, and 6-month evaluation data. Cumulative data over 3 years reveal that fellows consistently acquired knowledge relevant to transitioning and that they applied acquired knowledge to prepare for finding jobs and career advancement. The curriculum also benefits faculty instructors who gain a sense of reward by filling a critical knowledge gap and fostering fellows' professional growth. Conclusion The authors relate the success and effectiveness of the curriculum to principles of adult learning, and share lessons learned, including the importance of buy-in from junior and senior fellows and faculty, collaboration, and designating the time to teach and learn.

  8. The impact of airborne particulate matter on pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia among Jinan children: a case-crossover study.

    PubMed

    Lv, Chenguang; Wang, Xianfeng; Pang, Na; Wang, Lanzhong; Wang, Yuping; Xu, Tengfei; Zhang, Yu; Zhou, Tianran; Li, Wei

    2016-12-14

    This study aims to examine the effect of short-term changes in the concentration of particulate matter ≤2.5 µm (PM2.5) and ≤ 10 µm (PM10) on pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia in Jinan, China. It explored confoundings factos of weather, season, and chemical pollutants. Information on pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia in 2014 was extracted from the database of Jinan Qilu Hospital. The relative risk of pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia was assessed using a case-crossover approach, controlling weather variables, day of the week, and seasonality. The single-pollutant model demonstrated that increased risk of pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia was significantly associated with elevated PM2.5 concentrations the day before hospital admission and elevated PM10 concentrations two days before hospital admission. An increment of 10 μg/m(3) in PM2.5 and PM10 were correlated with a 6% (95% CI 1.02-1.10) and 4% (95% CI 1.00-1.08) rise in number of admissions for pneumonia, respectively. In two pollutant models, PM2.5 and PM10 remained significant after inclusion of sulfur dioxide or nitrogen dioxide but not carbon monoxide. This study demonstrated short-term exposure to atmospheric particulate matter (PM2.5/PM10) may be an important determinant of pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia in Jinan, China. This study demonstrated short-term exposure to atmospheric particulate matter (PM2.5/PM10) may be an important determinant of pediatric hospital admissions for pneumonia in Jinan, China and suggested the relevance of pollutant exposure levels and their effects. As a specific group, children are sensitive to airborne particulate matter. This study estimated the short-term effects attribute to other air pollutants to provide references for relevant studies.

  9. AMTA Monograph Series. Effective Clinical Practice in Music Therapy Medical Music Therapy for Pediatrics in Hospital Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Music Therapy Association, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The impact of hospitalization on children and their families is becoming more clearly understood in today's changing healthcare environment. Pediatric inpatient services are focused on children with more critical illnesses, shorter hospital stays, and a culture of family-centered care. This publication clearly exemplifies the role of music…

  10. Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents Attending Pediatric Out Patient Departments of Tertiary Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jesmin, Akhter; Rahman, Khan Muhammad Zillur; Muntasir, Maruf Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Psychiatric disorders are increasingly recognized among children and adolescents in Bangladesh. Psychiatric disorders are more common in children with chronic and acute pediatric disorders. Our study was designed to determine the psychiatric disorders among children and adolescents attending pediatric outpatient departments of tertiary care hospitals. Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out from July 2012 to February 2013 in pediatric outpatient departments of three prime tertiary level hospitals of Dhaka, Bangladesh. A purposive sampling technique was used. A total of 240 male and female children aged 5 to 16 years old were included in the study. We used a semi-structured questionnaire to obtain sociodemographic and other relevant clinical information about the children and their families from their parents or caregivers and a validated parent version of the Bangla Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) for measuring psychopathology. Results The mean age of the children was 9.0± 2.6 years. The majority (71%) of children were in the 5–10 year age group. The male/female ratio was 1.2:1. Among the respondents, 18% were found to have a psychiatric disorder. Behavioral disorders, emotional disorders, and developmental disorders were found in 9.0%, 15.0% and 0.4% respectively. Hyperkinetic disorder was the single most frequent (5.0%) psychiatric disorder. Conclusions A significant number of children were found to have psychiatric disorders. Our study indicates the importance of identification and subsequent management of psychiatric conditions among the pediatric population. PMID:27403237

  11. Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) fellowship: essentials of a three-year academic curriculum. Three-Year Academic Subcommittee of the PEM Fellowship Committee of the Section of Emergency Medicine, American Academy of Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Shaw, K N; Schunk, J; Ledwith, C; Lockhart, G

    1997-02-01

    This committee of fellowship directors has proposed guidelines for an academic curriculum for training fellows in PEM. The curriculum should be modified to each unique program, but is based on current expectation of the American Board of Pediatrics and the ACGME for graduate education. This is the first PEM academic curriculum document in publication. Ongoing refinement and adaptation based on feedback from fellows and directors is essential to provide the best fellowship experience to our trainees. The proposed curriculum is also subject to further change as more details are given for ACGME approval of the fellowship programs.

  12. [Nutrition status on pediatric admissions in Spanish hospitals; DHOSPE study].

    PubMed

    Moreno Villares, José Manuel; Varea Calderón, Vicente; Bousoño García, Carlos; Lama Moré, Rosa; Redecillas Ferreiro, Susana; Peña Quintana, Luis

    2013-01-01

    La desnutrición en los pacientes hospitalizados tiene repercusiones clínicas y se asocia con peores resultados: inmunodepresión, retraso en la cicatrización de las heridas, atrofia muscular, prolongación del ingreso hospitalario y mayor mortalidad. La tasa de desnutrición al ingreso en el paciente pediátrico varía con los estudios, aunque parece inferior a lo que ocurre en el paciente adulto. Sin embargo, es una población de mayor riesgo de desarrollar desnutrición durante el ingreso. Se precisa, por tanto, encontrar una buena herramienta de cribado nutricional. Objetivo: Como primer paso para alcanzar ese objetivo se realizó un estudio de ámbito nacional para determinar la tasa de desnutrición en el ingreso. Material y métodos: Se trató de un estudio transversal, multicéntrico realizado en 32 hospitales españoles entre junio y septiembre de 2011 en pacientes < 17 años que ingresaran en el hospital por un periodo > 48 horas. Se midieron peso y talla y se pasó el cuestionario STAMP en el momento del ingreso y a los 7, 14 días o en el momento del alta. El estado nutricional se clasificó de acuerdo con el índice de Waterlow para peso y talla. El estudio fue aprobado por el Comité Ético de Investigación de cada uno de los hospitales y se requirió la firma del consentimiento informado antes de su inclusión en el estudio. Resultados: 991 pacientes participaron en el estudio. La edad media fue de 5 años (DE: 4,6), distribuidos de forma uniforme entre todas las edades. Se encontró desnutrición moderada o grave en el 7,8% y sobrepeso-obesidad en el 37,9% de los ingresados. Encontramos una situación nutricional significativamente peor para todos los grupos de edad en función de la enfermedad de base. No encontramos correlación entre la desnutrición y la edad, o los niveles de albúmina sérica. Comentarios: Esta es la primera encuesta nacional para estudiar la prevalencia de desnutrición en el momento del ingreso. La cifra encontrada, 8

  13. Evaluation of intoxicated patients hospitalized in a newly-opened level two pediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Güngörer, Vildan; Yisldırım, Nurdan Kökten

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to retrospectively examine the demographic and etiological characteristics, prognosis and length of stay in intensive care unit of intoxicated patients hospitalized in Level two Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in Maternity and Child Health Hospital of Samsun. Material and Methods: The study retrospectively examined the records of patients hospitalized between 14th March 2014 and 14th March 2015 in Level two Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in Maternity and Child Health Hospital of Samsun with respect to age, gender, cause of poisoning, time of emergency department admission, length of hospitalization and prognosis. Results: Of 82 patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit, 29 (35.3%) were male and 53 (64.6%) were female. The mean age of the male and female patients was 7.89±6.3 years and 11.2±5.7 years, respectively and the mean age of the study group was 10.04±6.1. Twenthy one (39,6%) of the female patients were at the age group of 0–14 years and 32 (60.4%) were at the age group of 14–18 years. Twenthy (68.9%) of the male patients were at the age group of 0–14 years and nine (31.1%) were at the age group of 14–18 years. The cause of poisoning was drug intoxication (antidepressants, antibiotics, painkillers and other drugs) in 64 patients (78%) and the remaining 18 patients (22%) were admitted to hospital for other causes (rat poison, mushroom, carbonmonoxide, scorpion stings, bonzai and pesticides). Thirthy eight (46.3%) of all the patients used such substances for suicidal purpose. Thirthy three (62.2%) of these were female and 32 were at the age group of 14–18 years. Fourty (48.7%) of the patients who ingested medication ingested one drug, while 24 (29.2%) ingested multiple drugs. Antidepressants were found to be the most commonly used drugs (31.2%). The mean hospital admission time was 3.41±2 hours and the mean time of intensive care unit stay was 2.89±1.04 days. No mortality was recorded. Thirthy patients (36.5%) were referred

  14. Pediatric Hospital School Programming: An Examination of Educational Services for Students Who Are Hospitalized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinke, Sarah M.; Elam, Megan; Irwin, Mary Kay; Sexton, Karen; McGraw, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to define the current functions and operations of hospital school programs nationwide. A 56-item survey was disseminated to hospital teachers across the country to examine perceptions about their work, programs, and professional practice. Quantitative findings were analyzed using descriptive statistics at the individual…

  15. Hospitalizations of Adults with Intellectual Disability in Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ailey, Sarah H.; Johnson, Tricia; Fogg, Louis; Friese, Tanya R.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) represent a small but important group of hospitalized patients who often have complex health care needs. Individuals with ID experience high rates of hospitalization for ambulatory-sensitive conditions and high rates of hospitalizations in general, even when in formal community care systems; however,…

  16. Pediatrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spackman, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The utilization of the Lixiscope in pediatrics was investigated. The types of images that can presently be obtained are discussed along with the problems encountered. Speculative applications for the Lixiscope are also presented.

  17. Infection rates following initial cerebrospinal fluid shunt placement across pediatric hospitals in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Tamara D.; Hall, Matthew; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Albert, J. Elaine; Jeffries, Howard E.; LaFleur, Bonnie; Dean, J. Michael; Kestle, John R. W.

    2010-01-01

    Object Reported rates of CSF shunt infection vary widely across studies. The study objective was to determine the CSF shunt infection rates after initial shunt placement at multiple US pediatric hospitals. The authors hypothesized that infection rates between hospitals would vary widely even after adjustment for patient, hospital, and surgeon factors. Methods This retrospective cohort study included children 0–18 years of age with uncomplicated initial CSF shunt placement performed between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2005, and recorded in the Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) longitudinal administrative database from 41 children's hospitals. For each child with 24 months of follow-up, subsequent CSF shunt infections and procedures were determined. Results The PHIS database included 7071 children with uncomplicated initial CSF shunt placement during this time period. During the 24 months of follow-up, these patients had a total of 825 shunt infections and 4434 subsequent shunt procedures. Overall unadjusted 24-month CSF shunt infection rates were 11.7% per patient and 7.2% per procedure. Unadjusted 24-month cumulative incidence rates for each hospital ranged from 4.1 to 20.5% per patient and 2.5–12.3% per procedure. Factors significantly associated with infection (p < 0.05) included young age, female sex, African-American race, public insurance, etiology of intraventricular hemorrhage, respiratory complex chronic condition, subsequent revision procedures, hospital volume, and surgeon case volume. Malignant lesions and trauma as etiologies were protective. Infection rates for each hospital adjusted for these factors decreased to 8.8–12.8% per patient and 1.4–5.3% per procedure. Conclusions Infections developed in > 11% of children who underwent uncomplicated initial CSF shunt placements within 24 months. Patient, hospital, and surgeon factors contributed somewhat to the wide variation in CSF shunt infection rates across hospitals. Additional

  18. Candidiasis in pediatric patients with cancer interned in a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    De Carvalho Parahym, Ana Maria Rabelo; De Melo, Luciana Resende Bandeira; De Morais, Vera Lúcia Lins; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Fungi are common causes of infection in immunocompromised patients. Candida species are frequently involved in these cases. In order to investigate candidiasis in pediatric patients with cancer, clinical samples were collected from one hundred and twenty two patients interned in the Oswaldo Cruz University Hospital in Recife, Brazil. Yeasts were isolated from thirty-four clinical samples. The species isolated were: Candida albicans (fourteen isolates), C. parapsilosis (nine isolates), C. guilliermondii (two isolates) and C. tropicalis (two isolates). We found that candidemia was most frequent in patients with malignant hematology and that C. parapsilosis infections caused the highest mortality. PMID:24031365

  19. Innovative solutions: Standardized concentrations facilitate the use of continuous infusions for pediatric intensive care unit nurses at a community hospital.

    PubMed

    Roman, Noemi

    2005-01-01

    The pediatric intensive care unit at a community hospital successfully implemented the use of standardized concentrations. The process included deciding the standardized concentrations, use of titration charts, and integration of smart pump technology. Since the implementation of standardized concentrations, there has been no signal or sentinel events reported. It is safe and efficacious to use standardized concentrations combined with smart pump technology and abandon the use of the rule of 6 in the pediatric population.

  20. Statewide Longitudinal Hospital Use and Charges for Pediatric and Adolescent Patients With Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaul, Sapna; Barbeau, Bree; Wright, Jennifer; Fluchel, Mark; Kirchhoff, Anne C.; Nelson, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated longitudinal hospitalization outcomes (total charges, hospital days and admissions) among pediatric and adolescent patients with cancer compared with individuals from the general population without cancer using a novel and efficient three-step regression procedure. Methods: The statewide Utah Population Database, with linkages to the Utah Cancer Registry, was used to identify 1,651 patients who were diagnosed with cancer from 1996 to 2009 at ages 0 to 21 years. A comparison group of 4,953 same-sex and -age individuals was generated from birth certificates. Claims-based hospitalization data from 1996 to 2012 were retrieved from the Utah Department of Health. Using the regression method, we estimated survival (differences due to survival) and intensity (differences due to resource accumulation) effects of the cancer diagnosis on hospitalization outcomes within 10 years after diagnosis. Results: At 10 years after diagnosis, on average, patients with cancer incurred $51,723 (95% CI, $48,100 to $58,284) more in charges, spent 30 additional days (95% CI, 27.7 to 36.1 days) in the hospital, and had 5.7 (95% CI, 5.4 to 6.4) more admissions than the comparison group. Our analyses showed that the highest hospitalization burden occurred during the first 4 years of diagnosis. Patients with leukemia incurred the greatest hospitalization burden throughout the 10 years from diagnosis. Intensity effects explained the majority of differences in hospital outcomes. Conclusion: Our results suggest that children and adolescents who were diagnosed with cancer in 2014 in the United States will incur over $800 million more in hospital charges than individuals without cancer by 2024. Interventions to reduce this burden should be explored in conjunction with improving health and survival outcomes. PMID:26105667

  1. [Learning styles in medical residents and their professors of a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Muñoz, Irina Elizabeth; Gómez-Negrete, Alonso; Varela-Ruiz, Margarita; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Mercado-Arellano, José Agustín; Sciandra-Rico, Martha Minerva; Matute-González, Mario Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background: the learning styles are cognitive, emotional, and psychological characteristics, which function as relatively stable indicators of how teachers and students perceive, interact, and respond to their learning environments. Knowing students' styles allows teachers to have tools to improve medical education. Our objective was to identify learning styles in pediatric residents and professors from a pediatric hospital. Methods: a learning styles questionnaire was applied to residents and theirs professors; data was analyzed in SPSS 12 software. Results: the dominant learning style in pediatric residents was reflexive and for professors was theoretical. There wasn't any difference between sexes or between medical or surgical specialities. There was more correlation between professors and residents when there was an increase in training time. Conclusions: the learning styles between professors and residents are different, especially at the beginning of the medical specialty courses; that's why it is necessary to realize a confrontation between the students' learning styles and teaching methods used by professors to improve significant learning. To know learning styles gives residents an important alternative to find a better study strategy.

  2. Clinical characteristics of pediatric patients hospitalized with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Canadian hospitals from 2008 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Leifso, Kirk Ryan; Gravel, Denise; Mounchili, Aboubaker; Kaldas, Sherif; Le Saux, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections were uncommon in children in Canada until the 1990s. Using a standardized case report form, treating physicians reported children hospitalized due to MRSA infections in Canadian hospitals through the Canadian Pediatric Surveillance Program in a 24-month period (2008 to 2010). Of 155 cases reported, 70% were ≤4 years of age and approximately one-third had an underlying medical condition. The most common clinical infections involved skin and soft tissue (69%), the lower respiratory tract (12%), and bone and joint (10%). Almost one-third had had contact with the health care environment in the previous year and 18% had a known household member with MRSA. Initial therapy with a beta-lactam alone occurred in 65%, while 22% included vancomycin. No child in this cohort died but 14% required admission to the intensive care unit. Of 143 reports of individual isolates, 93% were reported susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, 63% to clindamycin and 50% to mupirocin. The present study involved only children hospitalized with MRSA infections. It may not be representative of the children treated as outpatients nor children in selected areas of Canada where MRSA infections may be more endemic. Further targeted surveillance to identify risks and treatment practices in these populations may be important.

  3. The effect of systematic pediatric care on neonatal mortality and hospitalizations of infants born with oral clefts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) increase mortality and morbidity risks for affected infants especially in less developed countries. This study aimed at assessing the effects of systematic pediatric care on neonatal mortality and hospitalizations of infants with cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) in South America. Methods The intervention group included live-born infants with isolated or associated CL/P in 47 hospitals between 2003 and 2005. The control group included live-born infants with CL/P between 2001 and 2002 in the same hospitals. The intervention group received systematic pediatric care between the 7th and 28th day of life. The primary outcomes were mortality between the 7th and 28th day of life and hospitalization days in this period among survivors adjusted for relevant baseline covariates. Results There were no significant mortality differences between the intervention and control groups. However, surviving infants with associated CL/P in the intervention group had fewer hospitalization days by about six days compared to the associated control group. Conclusions Early systematic pediatric care may significantly reduce neonatal hospitalizations of infants with CL/P and additional birth defects in South America. Given the large healthcare and financial burden of CL/P on affected families and the relatively low cost of systematic pediatric care, improving access to such care may be a cost-effective public policy intervention. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00097149 PMID:22204448

  4. Parent/caregiver stress during pediatric hospitalization for chronic feeding problems.

    PubMed

    Garro, Adrienne; Thurman, S Kenneth; Kerwin, MaryLouise E; Ducette, Joseph P

    2005-08-01

    This study examined changes in stress in 37 mothers/caregivers of children with chronic feeding problems. Stress was measured by the Parenting Stress Index-Short Form at three specific stages during pediatric hospitalization for treatment of chronic feeding problems. The relationship between caregiver stress and stage of hospitalization as well as that between stress and various child and family variables were investigated. Repeated-measures analyses of variance and t tests found that stress related to social isolation and self-perception and total parenting stress changed significantly in relation to the stage of hospitalization. Correlational analyses indicated that caregiver stress was positively related to the presence of mental retardation, oral-motor dysfunction, tonal abnormalities, or a pervasive developmental disorder in the hospitalized child. Caregiver stress was negatively related to coping strategies that involved understanding the child's medical situation. These results provide a more comprehensive picture of families of children with chronic feeding problems, a population that has received little attention in the research literature. Information regarding parent/caregiver stress during a child's hospitalization can enhance nurses' understanding of the experiences of these families, thereby contributing to more effective treatment planning. In addition, the results emphasize the need to examine a variety of child and family factors that may influence parenting stress as well as family involvement in intervention services.

  5. Pharmacovigilance and pharmacoepidemiology of drugs in a Mexican pediatric hospital. A proposed guide.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Olguín, Hugo; Pérez-Guillé, Gabriela; Flores-Pérez, Janett

    2007-02-01

    We describe the procedures of pharmacovigilance (PV) and pharmacoepidemiology (PE) of drugs in a pediatric hospital. These activities contribute to the detection and registration of adverse drug reactions and to determine the patterns of drug prescription among children attended at the hospital. The PV activities show that there is a relation between an increase in incidence of adverse drug reactions and the prescription of a larger number of drugs. The PE activities reveal that antibiotics are the most frequently prescribed drugs and next are drugs used for gastrointestinal diseases. Since PV and PE activities were initiated at our hospital, they have contributed to a more adequate use of drugs in children. As a conclusion of these activities, it could be that if the PE of a hospital is known, drug consumption can be optimally planned. PV and PE demonstrate that, if polytherapy is not necessary, it must be avoided. Finally, the present guide can be adopted to initiate PV and PE at a hospital.

  6. Children with developmental disabilities at a pediatric hospital: staff education to prevent and manage challenging behaviors.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norah L; Lashley, Joel; Stonek, Alice V; Bonjour, Annette

    2012-12-01

    Children with developmental disabilities may get frustrated in unpredictable hospital environments. Frustration may escalate to challenging behaviors, which are a safety concern and may contribute to staff and patient injuries, use of restraints, and procedure delay or cancelations. The purpose of this article was to describe a pilot staff education program on preventing and managing challenging behaviors of children with developmental disabilities at a pediatric hospital. The 2-hour-long education (1 hour on-line and 1 hour instructor led) content focused on family-centered care and communication skills, including verbal judo™ modified for use in the health care setting. Participants in the instructor-led sessions reported improved knowledge and decreased fear about caring for children with developmental disabilities. Relationships of the education and fewer staff injuries, fewer canceled procedures, and decreased use of restraints merit further study.

  7. An informatics approach to assess pediatric pharmacotherapy: design and implementation of a hospital drug utilization system.

    PubMed

    Zuppa, Athena; Vijayakumar, Sundararajan; Jayaraman, Bhuvana; Patel, Dimple; Narayan, Mahesh; Vijayakumar, Kalpana; Mondick, John T; Barrett, Jeffrey S

    2007-09-01

    Drug utilization in the inpatient setting can provide a mechanism to assess drug prescribing trends, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness of hospital formularies and examine subpopulations for which prescribing habits may be different. Such data can be used to correlate trends with time-dependent or seasonal changes in clinical event rates or the introduction of new pharmaceuticals. It is now possible to provide a robust, dynamic analysis of drug utilization in a large pediatric inpatient setting through the creation of a Web-based hospital drug utilization system that retrieves source data from our accounting database. The production implementation provides a dynamic and historical account of drug utilization at the authors' institution. The existing application can easily be extended to accommodate a multi-institution environment. The creation of a national or even global drug utilization network would facilitate the examination of geographical and/or socioeconomic influences in drug utilization and prescribing practices in general.

  8. The influence of organizational context on the use of research by nurses in Canadian pediatric hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Organizational context is recognized as an important influence on the successful implementation of research by healthcare professionals. However, there is relatively little empirical evidence to support this widely held view. Methods The objective of this study was to identify dimensions of organizational context and individual (nurse) characteristics that influence pediatric nurses’ self-reported use of research. Data on research use, individual, and contextual variables were collected from registered nurses (N = 735) working on 32 medical, surgical and critical care units in eight Canadian pediatric hospitals using an online survey. We used Generalized Estimating Equation modeling to account for the correlated structure of the data and to identify which contextual dimensions and individual characteristics predict two kinds of self-reported research use: instrumental (direct) and conceptual (indirect). Results Significant predictors of instrumental research use included: at the individual level; belief suspension-implement, research use in the past, and at the hospital unit (context) level; culture, and the proportion on nurses possessing a baccalaureate degree or higher. Significant predictors of conceptual research use included: at the individual nurse level; belief suspension-implement, problem solving ability, use of research in the past, and at the hospital unit (context) level; leadership, culture, evaluation, formal interactions, informal interactions, organizational slack-space, and unit specialty. Conclusions Hospitals, by focusing attention on modifiable elements of unit context may positively influence nurses’ reported use of research. This influence of context may extend to the adoption of best practices in general and other innovative or quality interventions. PMID:24034149

  9. Mortality in a pediatric secondary-care hospital in post-conflict Liberia in 2009

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Thomaz Bittencourt; Farhat, Sylvia Costa Lima; Reid, Tony; Schvartsman, Cláudio

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe and analyze the causes of death in a pediatric secondary-care hospital (run by Médecins sans Frontières), in Monrovia, Liberia, 6 years post-civil war, to determine the quality of care and mortality in a setting with limited resources. Methods: Data were retrospectively collected from March 2009 to October 2009. Patient charts and laboratory records were reviewed to verify cause of death. Additionally, charts of patients aged over 1 month with an infectious cause of death were analyzed for decompensated septic shock, or fluid-refractory septic shock. Results: Of 8,254 admitted pediatric patients, 531 died, with a mortality rate of 6.4%. Ninety percent of deaths occurred in children <5 years old. Most deaths occurred within 24 hours of admission. The main cause of death (76%) was infectious disease. Seventy-eight (23.6%) patients >1 month old with infectious disease met the criteria for septic shock, and 28 (8.6%) for decompensated or fluid-refractory septic shock. Conclusion: Since the end of Liberia's devastating civil war, Island Hospital has improved care and mortality outcomes, despite operating with limited resources. Based on the available data, mortality in Island Hospital appears to be lower than that of other Liberian and African institutions and similar to other hospitals run by Médecins sans Frontières across Africa. This can be explained by the financial and logistic support of Médecins sans Frontières. The highest mortality burden is related to infectious diseases and neonatal conditions. The mortality of sepsis varied among different infections. This suggests that further mortality reduction can be obtained by tackling sepsis management and improving neonatal care. PMID:24488377

  10. Palliative care in pediatric hematological oncology patients: experience of a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Valadares, Maria Thereza Macedo; Mota, Joaquim Antônio César; de Oliveira, Benigna Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the approach to palliative care for hematological oncology patients in the pediatric ward of a tertiary hospital. Methods This was a retrospective, descriptive study of 29 hematological oncology patients who died between 2009 and 2011. Data regarding the approach and prevalence of pain, prevalence of other symptoms, multidisciplinary team participation, communication between staff and family and limited invasive therapy were collected from the medical records. Results Twenty-seven (93.1%) patients displayed disease progression unresponsive to curative treatment. The median age at death was ten years old. Pain was the most prevalent symptom with all patients who reported pain receiving analgesic medications. The majority took weak (55.2%) and/or strong (65.5%) opioids. The patients were followed by pediatricians and a pediatric hematologist/oncologist. Participation of other professionals was also documented: 86.2% were followed by social services and 69% by psychologists, among others. There were explicit descriptions of limitation of invasive therapy in the medical records of 26 patients who died with disease progression. All these decisions were shared with the families. Conclusion Although the hospital where this study was conducted does not have a specialized team in pediatric palliative care, it meets all the requirements for developing a specific program. The importance of approaching pain and other prevalent symptoms in children with cancer involving a comprehensive multidisciplinary team is evident. Discussions were had with most of the families on limiting invasive therapy, but no record of a well-defined and coordinated treatment plan for palliative care was found. PMID:25453649

  11. Federating clinical data from six pediatric hospitals: process and initial results for microbiology from the PHIS+ consortium.

    PubMed

    Gouripeddi, Ramkiran; Warner, Phillip B; Mo, Peter; Levin, James E; Srivastava, Rajendu; Shah, Samir S; de Regt, David; Kirkendall, Eric; Bickel, Jonathan; Korgenski, E Kent; Precourt, Michelle; Stepanek, Richard L; Mitchell, Joyce A; Narus, Scott P; Keren, Ron

    2012-01-01

    Microbiology study results are necessary for conducting many comparative effectiveness research studies. Unlike core laboratory test results, microbiology results have a complex structure. Federating and integrating microbiology data from six disparate electronic medical record systems is challenging and requires a team of varied skills. The PHIS+ consortium which is partnership between members of the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) network, the Children's Hospital Association and the University of Utah, have used "FURTHeR' for federating laboratory data. We present our process and initial results for federating microbiology data from six pediatric hospitals.

  12. If You Do Not Ask, They Will Not Tell: Evaluating Pregnancy Risk in Young Women in Pediatric Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Coles, Mandy S; Lau, May; Akers, Aletha Y

    2016-03-01

    Adolescents experience some of the highest rates of unintended pregnancy among women of all reproductive age groups. And despite the fact that adolescents often receive care in pediatric hospital settings, evaluation of pregnancy risk is inconsistent. Pregnancy risk assessments can identify opportunities to deliver reproductive health services, allow earlier pregnancy diagnoses, and reduce morbidity and mortality for medically complex adolescent patients and their pregnancies. In this commentary we discuss some of the challenges and potential solutions to performing pregnancy risk assessments in pediatric hospital settings.

  13. Annual Cost of U.S. Hospital Visits for Pediatric Abusive Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Cora; Xu, Likang; Florence, Curtis; Parks, Sharyn E

    2015-08-01

    We estimated the frequency and direct medical cost from the provider perspective of U.S. hospital visits for pediatric abusive head trauma (AHT). We identified treat-and-release hospital emergency department (ED) visits and admissions for AHT among patients aged 0-4 years in the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample and Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), 2006-2011. We applied cost-to-charge ratios and estimated professional fee ratios from Truven Health MarketScan(®) to estimate per-visit and total population costs of AHT ED visits and admissions. Regression models assessed cost differences associated with selected patient and hospital characteristics. AHT was diagnosed during 6,827 (95% confidence interval [CI] [6,072, 7,582]) ED visits and 12,533 (95% CI [10,395, 14,671]) admissions (28% originating in the same hospital's ED) nationwide over the study period. The average medical cost per ED visit and admission were US$2,612 (error bound: 1,644-3,581) and US$31,901 (error bound: 29,266-34,536), respectively (2012 USD). The average total annual nationwide medical cost of AHT hospital visits was US$69.6 million (error bound: 56.9-82.3 million) over the study period. Factors associated with higher per-visit costs included patient age <1 year, males, coexisting chronic conditions, discharge to another facility, death, higher household income, public insurance payer, hospital trauma level, and teaching hospitals in urban locations. Study findings emphasize the importance of focused interventions to reduce this type of high-cost child abuse.

  14. Global Role and Burden of Influenza in Pediatric Respiratory Hospitalizations, 1982–2012: A Systematic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lafond, Kathryn E.; Nair, Harish; Rasooly, Mohammad Hafiz; Valente, Fátima; Booy, Robert; Rahman, Mahmudur; Kitsutani, Paul; Yu, Hongjie; Guzman, Guiselle; Coulibaly, Daouda; Armero, Julio; Jima, Daddi; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Ampofo, William; Mena, Ricardo; Chadha, Mandeep; Sampurno, Ondri Dwi; Emukule, Gideon O.; Nurmatov, Zuridin; Corwin, Andrew; Heraud, Jean Michel; Noyola, Daniel E.; Cojocaru, Radu; Nymadawa, Pagbajabyn; Barakat, Amal; Adedeji, Adebayo; von Horoch, Marta; Olveda, Remigio; Nyatanyi, Thierry; Venter, Marietjie; Mmbaga, Vida; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Nguyen, Tran Hien; Theo, Andros; Whaley, Melissa; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Bresee, Joseph; Campbell, Harry; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2016-01-01

    Background The global burden of pediatric severe respiratory illness is substantial, and influenza viruses contribute to this burden. Systematic surveillance and testing for influenza among hospitalized children has expanded globally over the past decade. However, only a fraction of the data has been used to estimate influenza burden. In this analysis, we use surveillance data to provide an estimate of influenza-associated hospitalizations among children worldwide. Methods and Findings We aggregated data from a systematic review (n = 108) and surveillance platforms (n = 37) to calculate a pooled estimate of the proportion of samples collected from children hospitalized with respiratory illnesses and positive for influenza by age group (<6 mo, <1 y, <2 y, <5 y, 5–17 y, and <18 y). We applied this proportion to global estimates of acute lower respiratory infection hospitalizations among children aged <1 y and <5 y, to obtain the number and per capita rate of influenza-associated hospitalizations by geographic region and socio-economic status. Influenza was associated with 10% (95% CI 8%–11%) of respiratory hospitalizations in children <18 y worldwide, ranging from 5% (95% CI 3%–7%) among children <6 mo to 16% (95% CI 14%–20%) among children 5–17 y. On average, we estimated that influenza results in approximately 374,000 (95% CI 264,000 to 539,000) hospitalizations in children <1 y—of which 228,000 (95% CI 150,000 to 344,000) occur in children <6 mo—and 870,000 (95% CI 610,000 to 1,237,000) hospitalizations in children <5 y annually. Influenza-associated hospitalization rates were more than three times higher in developing countries than in industrialized countries (150/100,000 children/year versus 48/100,000). However, differences in hospitalization practices between settings are an important limitation in interpreting these findings. Conclusions Influenza is an important contributor to respiratory hospitalizations among young children worldwide

  15. Improving Pediatric Survival from Resuscitation Events: The Role and Organization of Hospital-based Rapid Response Systems and Code Teams.

    PubMed

    Jagt, Elise Willem van der

    2013-01-01

    During the past 10-15 years it has become evident that in spite of the sophistication of medicine, hospitalized patients frequently experience cardiac arrests from which the majority do not survive. A substantial number of these arrests occur on general inpatient units where patients begin to deteriorate but there is a failure of timely recognition so that appropriate intervention can be instituted before the arrest takes place. Much work has been done to determine how survival from adult in-hospital cardiac arrests can be improved by (1) teaching health care providers about resuscitation management using a team approach and (2) more recently, by developing rapid response systems to recognize deteriorating patients early and intervening to prevent the cardiac arrest. The purpose of this review is to outline what is known about the use and organization of resuscitation teams (code teams) and rapid response systems as they apply to pediatric patients. Effort has been made to include the most current pediatric science available as a basis for encouraging the ongoing implementation of hospital team-based systems which appear to be able to improve the outcomes of pediatric in-hospital cardiac and respiratory arrests. Practical suggestions, implementation strategies, potential barriers, and ways to integrate pediatric code teams and rapid response systems into the quality and safety fabric of the hospital are provided.

  16. Evaluation of hospital-learning environment for pediatric residency in eastern region of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: No study had been conducted to assess the hospitals’ environment for learning purposes in multicenter sites in Saudi Arabia. It aims to evaluate the environment of hospitals for learning purposes of pediatric residents. Methods: We applied Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) to measure the learning environment at six teaching hospitals in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia from September to December 2013. Results: The number of respondents was 104 (86.7%) out of 120 residents and 37 females and 67 male residents have responded. The residents’ response scored 100 out of 160 maximum score in rating of PHEEM that showed overall learning environment is favorable for training. There were some items in the social support domain suggesting improvements. There was no significant difference between male and female residents. There was a difference among the participant teaching hospitals (p<0.05). Conclusion: The result pointed an overall positive rating. Individual item scores suggested that their social life during residency could be uninspiring. They have the low satisfactory level and they feel racism, and sexual discrimination. Therefore, there is still a room for improvement. PMID:25959654

  17. Integration of modeling and simulation into hospital-based decision support systems guiding pediatric pharmacotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Jeffrey S; Mondick, John T; Narayan, Mahesh; Vijayakumar, Kalpana; Vijayakumar, Sundararajan

    2008-01-01

    Background Decision analysis in hospital-based settings is becoming more common place. The application of modeling and simulation approaches has likewise become more prevalent in order to support decision analytics. With respect to clinical decision making at the level of the patient, modeling and simulation approaches have been used to study and forecast treatment options, examine and rate caregiver performance and assign resources (staffing, beds, patient throughput). There us a great need to facilitate pharmacotherapeutic decision making in pediatrics given the often limited data available to guide dosing and manage patient response. We have employed nonlinear mixed effect models and Bayesian forecasting algorithms coupled with data summary and visualization tools to create drug-specific decision support systems that utilize individualized patient data from our electronic medical records systems. Methods Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic nonlinear mixed-effect models of specific drugs are generated based on historical data in relevant pediatric populations or from adults when no pediatric data is available. These models are re-executed with individual patient data allowing for patient-specific guidance via a Bayesian forecasting approach. The models are called and executed in an interactive manner through our web-based dashboard environment which interfaces to the hospital's electronic medical records system. Results The methotrexate dashboard utilizes a two-compartment, population-based, PK mixed-effect model to project patient response to specific dosing events. Projected plasma concentrations are viewable against protocol-specific nomograms to provide dosing guidance for potential rescue therapy with leucovorin. These data are also viewable against common biomarkers used to assess patient safety (e.g., vital signs and plasma creatinine levels). As additional data become available via therapeutic drug monitoring, the model is re-executed and projections are

  18. A Day-Hospital Approach to Treatment of Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Initial Functional Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Deirdre E.; Carpino, Elizabeth A.; Chiang, Gloria; Condon, Marianne; Firn, Emily; Gaughan, Veronica J.; Hogan, Melinda, P.T.; Leslie, David S.; Olson, Katie, P.T.; Sager, Susan; Sethna, Navil; Simons, Laura E.; Zurakowski, David; Berde, Charles B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine clinical outcomes of an interdisciplinary day hospital treatment program (comprised of physical, occupational, and cognitive-behavioral therapies with medical and nursing services) for pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Methods The study is a longitudinal case series of consecutive patients treated in a day hospital pediatric pain rehabilitation program. Participants were 56 children and adolescents ages 8–18 years (median = 14 years) with CRPS spectrum conditions who failed to progress sufficiently with a previous outpatient and/or inpatient treatments. Patients participated in daily physical therapy, occupational therapy and psychological treatment and received nursing and medical care as necessary. The model places equal emphasis on physical and cognitive-behavioral approaches to pain management. Median duration of stay was 3 weeks. Outcome measures included assessments of physical, occupational, and psychological functioning at program admission, discharge, and at post-treatment follow-up at a median of 10 months post-discharge. Scores at discharge and follow-up were compared with measures on admission by Wilcoxon tests, paired t tests, or ANOVA as appropriate, with corrections for multiple comparisons. Results Outcomes demonstrate clinically and statistically significant improvements from admission to discharge in pain intensity (p<0.001), functional disability (p<0.001), subjective report of limb function (p<0.001), timed running (p<0.001) occupational performance (p<0.001), medication use (p<0.01), use of assistive devices (p<0.001), and emotional functioning (anxiety, p<0.001; depression, p<0.01). Functional gains were maintained or further improved at follow-up. Discussion A day-hospital interdisciplinary rehabilitation approach appears effective in reducing disability and improving physical and emotional functioning and occupational performance among children and adolescents with complex regional pain syndromes that

  19. The incidence of viral-associated diarrhea after admission to a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Ford-Jones, E L; Mindorff, C M; Gold, R; Petric, M

    1990-04-01

    For determination of the incidence of viral-associated diarrhea after admission to a pediatric hospital, all patients admitted to general pediatrics, cardiology, and neurosurgery wards without diarrhea between January 1 and July 31, 1985 were followed 5 days per week for presence of diarrhea, etiologic agent, and possible risk factors. A total of 1,530 patients were followed for 3,642 days. Of these patients, 69 developed 80 nosocomial diarrhea episodes after 72 hours in hospital for a nosocomial diarrhea rate of 4.5 infected children per 100 admissions. Of 358 patients with an infected roommate, 37 (10.3%) developed nosocomial diarrhea. Etiologic agents recognized included rotavirus (43%), calicivirus (16%), astrovirus (14%), minreovirus (12%), adenovirus (8%), Salmonella sp. (4%), and parvo/picornavirus (3%). The nosocomial diarrhea rate by age was: 0-11 months, 8.8%; 12-35 months, 3.6%; and 36 months or more, 0.6%. The rate by length of stay was: 3-7 days, 8.4%; 8-14 days, 10.4%; 15-21 days, 7.9%; and 22 days or more, 8.8%, and by number of roommates/1,000 patient-days it was: 0-1, 15.7; 2 to 3, 27.7; and 4 or more, 45.2. Patients who acquired diarrhea were more likely to be diapered (9.6% vs. 1.8%, p less than 0.001). Playroom use was not significantly different in the two groups. A total of 64 patients developed diarrhea within 72 hours of admission (community diarrhea rate = 4.2). Nosocomial viral-associated diarrhea is almost exclusively a disease of diapered children less than age 36 months and occurs at any time during hospital stay. It is more common in multibed rooms, but does occur in single-bed rooms.

  20. Kids in the atrium: comparing architectural intentions and children's experiences in a pediatric hospital lobby.

    PubMed

    Adams, Annmarie; Theodore, David; Goldenberg, Ellie; McLaren, Coralee; McKeever, Patricia

    2010-03-01

    The study reported here adopts an interdisciplinary focus to elicit children's views about hospital environments. Based at the Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids), Toronto, the research explores the ways in which designers and patients understand and use the eight-storey lobby, The Atrium, a monumental addition constructed in 1993. It is a public place that never closes; hundreds of children pass through the namesake atrium every day. Combining methodological approaches from architectural history and health sociology, the intentions and uses of central features of the hospital atrium are examined. Data were collected from observations, focused interviews, and textual and visual documents. We locate the contemporary atrium in a historical context of building typologies rarely connected to hospital design, such as shopping malls, hotels and airports. We link the design of these multi-storey, glass-roofed spaces to other urban experiences especially consumption as normalizing forces in the everyday lives of Canadian children. Seeking to uncover children's self-identified, self-articulated place within contemporary pediatric hospitals, we assess how the atrium--by providing important, but difficult-to-measure functions such as comfort, socialization, interface, wayfinding, contact with nature and diurnal rhythms, and respite from adjacent medicalized spaces--contributes to the well-being of young patients. We used theoretical underpinnings from architecture and humanistic geography, and participatory methods advocated by child researchers and theorists. Our findings begin to address the significant gap in understanding about the relationship between the perceptions of children and the settings where their healthcare occurs. The study also underlines children's potential to serve as agents of architectural knowledge, reporting on and recording their observations of hospital architecture with remarkable sophistication.

  1. [Pediatric tuberculosis at a reference hospital during the 2004-2008 period].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mónica G; Patallo, Claudia P; Rizzotti, Viviana A; Moscoloni, María A; Ballester, Daniela S

    2011-01-01

    Samples of pediatric patients suspected of tuberculosis and cared for at Hospital Piñero during the 2004-2008 period were analyzed according to epidemiological and clinical criteria. The bacteriological contribution was evaluated to confirm the disease diagnosis. A descriptive retrospective analysis of the cases was done. A total of 8409 samples were received for mycobacterial culture: 1542 (18%) of which were pediatric and distributed as follows: 1407 (91%), pulmonary and 135 (9%), extra-pulmonary. The sample examination included staining for acid-fast bacilli, culture, identification and drug susceptibility testing. The following are the results of analized demographic variables: Nationality: 1218 Argentinean (79%), 247 foreigners (16%) and 77, not disclosed (5%); Gender: 787 female (51%) and 755 male (49%). Patients were grouped according to age into: Group A, 0 to 4 years 674 (45%); Group B, 5-9 years 354 (24%) and Group C, 10-15 years 464 (31%). Morbidity causes associated with the disease were mainly malnutrition and infection by Human Immunodeficiency Virus. Staining for acid-fast bacilli was positive in 41 samples (2.6%) and 84 cultures resulted positive (5.4%), 78 (93%) of which were pulmonary and 6 (7%) extra-pulmonary samples. All the strains were identified as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Isolates were susceptible to streptomycin, isoniazid, rifampicin, and ethambutol, except for one strain that was resistant both to ethambutol and streptomycin, and another one which was resistant to isoniazid. Bacteriological confirmation of pediatric tuberculosisis is rarely achieved due to the predominantly paucibacillary nature of the disease in children (5% in our study), but plays a fundamental role in diagnosis accuracy, allowing the identification and susceptibility testing of the strain.

  2. When a community hospital becomes an academic health centre.

    PubMed

    Topps, Maureen; Strasser, Roger

    2010-01-01

    With the burgeoning role of distributed medical education and the increasing use of community hospitals for training purposes, challenges arise for undergraduate and postgraduate programs expanding beyond traditional tertiary care models. It is of vital importance to encourage community hospitals and clinical faculty to embrace their roles in medical education for the 21st century. With no university hospitals in northern Ontario, the Northern Ontario School of Medicine and its educational partner hospitals identified questions of concern and collaborated to implement changes. Several themes emerged that are of relevance to any medical educational program expanding beyond its present location. Critical areas for attention include the institutional culture; human, physical and financial resources; and support for educational activities. It is important to establish and maintain the groundwork necessary for the development of thriving integrated community-engaged medical education. Done in tandem with advocacy for change in funding models, this will allow movement beyond the current educational environment. The ultimate goal is successful integration of university and accreditation ideals with practical hands-on medical care and education in new environments.

  3. Study on biofilm formation in burn wound infection in a pediatric hospital in Chennai, India.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, M; Putli Bai, S; Babu, M

    2016-12-31

    Infection is one of the major causes of death in pediatric burns in India. This work was conducted in an exclusive Children's Hospital (KKCTH) with a total of 220 beds, of which ten beds in the burn unit and two isolation beds in the 28-bed PICU are for burns patients (more than 20% TBSA burns) with sepsis. In this study, 30 burn wound swab isolates obtained from 14 pediatric burns patients (admitted to the burns ward and transferred to PICU) from November 2013 to March 2014 were investigated. Cultures were done on the first day for all patients and empirical antibiotic administration was started for those with septic burns (14 in total) with piperacillin-tazobactam and vancomycin. Antibiotics were changed according to antibiotic sensitivity reports. Cultures were repeated for culture positive cases on the fifth day. Further antibiotic treatment was based on this culture report. When the general condition of the patient did not respond to highlevel antibiotics, biofilm formation was suspected and evaluated as the possible cause of antibiotic resistance. For these patients, an enhanced method of wound debridement and albumin transfusions were used to improve their general condition. Microbial identification and antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done for all 30 isolates. The predominant bacteria were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter and Staphylococcus aureus. Most of the Acinetobacter and Staphylococcus aureus showed multidrug resistance. Biofilm formation was studied using the Tissue Culture Plate (TCP) method for all bacterial isolates, and results showed that most of the MDR isolates formed biofilm.

  4. Physicochemical and microbiological stability studies of extemporaneous antihypertensive pediatric suspensions for hospital use.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Cassiana; Costa, Ana Paula; Oliveira, Paulo Renato; Tagliari, Monika Piazzon; Silva, Marcos Antônio Segatto

    2013-01-01

    Extemporaneous suspensions of the antihypertensive agents furosemide, spironolactone and hydrochlorothiazide for pediatric use have been prepared at University Hospital (Federal University of Santa Catarina - Brazil). The aim of this work was to investigate the physicochemical and microbiological stability of these suspensions over the estimated shelf-life period of seven days and, if necessary, to optimize the formulations by improving the chemical stability. The pediatric suspensions were prepared using drug raw material and were stored at 25 ± 2°C and 5 ± 3°C. Chemical stability was evaluated by HPLC assay of the suspensions for drug content. Physical stability was evaluated by sedimentation volume, redispersibility, particle size, and zeta potential. Viable bacterial and fungal contaminations were assessed according to the official compendium. Furosemide and spironolactone suspensions as prepared herein can be stored for 7 days. However, the hydrochlorothiazide suspension formulation at pH 6.5 demonstrated poor chemical stability and was optimized by adjusting the pH to 3.3 where the drug exhibited acceptable stability. The optimized formulation demonstrated to be stable over the required period of 7 days.

  5. Study on biofilm formation in burn wound infection in a pediatric hospital in Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, M.; Putli Bai, S.; Babu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Infection is one of the major causes of death in pediatric burns in India. This work was conducted in an exclusive Children’s Hospital (KKCTH) with a total of 220 beds, of which ten beds in the burn unit and two isolation beds in the 28-bed PICU are for burns patients (more than 20% TBSA burns) with sepsis. In this study, 30 burn wound swab isolates obtained from 14 pediatric burns patients (admitted to the burns ward and transferred to PICU) from November 2013 to March 2014 were investigated. Cultures were done on the first day for all patients and empirical antibiotic administration was started for those with septic burns (14 in total) with piperacillin-tazobactam and vancomycin. Antibiotics were changed according to antibiotic sensitivity reports. Cultures were repeated for culture positive cases on the fifth day. Further antibiotic treatment was based on this culture report. When the general condition of the patient did not respond to highlevel antibiotics, biofilm formation was suspected and evaluated as the possible cause of antibiotic resistance. For these patients, an enhanced method of wound debridement and albumin transfusions were used to improve their general condition. Microbial identification and antimicrobial sensitivity testing was done for all 30 isolates. The predominant bacteria were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter and Staphylococcus aureus. Most of the Acinetobacter and Staphylococcus aureus showed multidrug resistance. Biofilm formation was studied using the Tissue Culture Plate (TCP) method for all bacterial isolates, and results showed that most of the MDR isolates formed biofilm. PMID:28289362

  6. Secondary analysis of merged American Hospital Association data and U.S. Census data: beginning to understand the supply-demand chain in pediatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Lacey, Susan R; Kilgore, Meredith; Yun, Huifeng; Hughes, Ronda; Allison, Jeroan; Cox, Karen S

    2008-06-01

    Much attention has been focused on how the nursing shortage will impact the growing number of aging Americans. This study was conducted as a first step in understanding nursing supply relative to potential pediatric demand using merged data from the American Hospital Association's annual survey and Census data by state from the year 2000. Findings indicate that there is tremendous variability among reporting states related to estimated pediatric nurses (registered nurse full-time equivalents), potential pediatric demand (persons from birth to 18 years), and allocated pediatric beds. Future research will examine how this supply-demand chain impacts clinical and cost outcomes for pediatric patients.

  7. Forty Years of Dengue Surveillance at a Tertiary Pediatric Hospital in Bangkok, Thailand, 1973-2012.

    PubMed

    Nisalak, Ananda; Clapham, Hannah E; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Klungthong, Chonticha; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Fernandez, Stefan; Reiser, Julia; Srikiatkhachorn, Anon; Macareo, Louis R; Lessler, Justin T; Cummings, Derek A T; Yoon, In-Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Long-term observational studies can provide valuable insights into overall dengue epidemiology. Here, we present analysis of dengue cases at a pediatric hospital in Bangkok, Thailand, during a 40-year period from 1973 to 2012. Data were analyzed from 25,715 hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed dengue virus (DENV) infection. Several long-term trends in dengue disease were identified including an increase in mean age of hospitalized cases from an average of 7-8 years, an increase after 1990 in the proportion of post-primary cases for DENV-1 and DENV-3, and a decrease in the proportion of dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome cases in primary and post-primary cases over time. Exploratory mechanistic analysis of these observed trends considered changes in diagnostic methods, demography, force of infection, and Japanese encephalitis vaccination as possible explanations. Thailand is an important setting for studying DENV transmission as it has a "mature" dengue epidemiology with a strong surveillance system in place since the early 1970s. We characterized changes in dengue epidemiology over four decades, and possible impact of demographic and other changes in the human population. These results may inform other countries where similar changes in transmission and population demographics may now or may soon be occurring.

  8. "Security Theater" in the Pediatric Wing: The Case for RFID Protection for Infants in Hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyld, David C.

    In a typical year, five infants are abducted by strangers from hospitals. These are devastating events for the families involved and for the health care facilities' staff and executives. This article looks at the nature of newborn and infant abductions, analyzing data on these kidnappings from the FBI and from the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children. Then, the article examines the potential for RFID (radio frequency identification) based systems to improve security in the pediatric area of hospitals, providing an overview of the technology on the market today for infant protection. The article concludes with an analysis of the ROI (return on investment) equation for health care administrators to consider in weighing their options on how to prevent a statistically unlikely, but potentially cataclysmic occurrence, at their facility. In the end, RFID-based infant protection systems can be seen as a form of "security theater," serving as a "palliative countermeasure" that will indeed work - both substantively and psychologically - to promote a more secure hospital environment for moms and their newborns.

  9. Knowing the enemy: ant behavior and control in a pediatric hospital of Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Josens, Roxana; Sola, Francisco J; Marchisio, Nahuel; Di Renzo, María Agostina; Giacometti, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Ant control is difficult in systems even where a variety of control strategies and compounds are allowed; in sensitive places such as hospitals, where there are often restrictions on the methods and toxicants to be applied, the challenge is even greater. Here we report the methods and results of how we faced this challenge of controlling ants in a pediatric hospital using baits. Our strategy was based on identifying the species present and analyzing their behavior. On the one hand, we evaluated outdoors in the green areas of the hospital, the relative abundance of ant genera, their food preferences and the behavioral dominances. On the other hand, control treatments were performed using separately two boron compounds added to sucrose solution which was not highly concentrated to avoid constrains due to the viscosity. Most of the species in the food preference test accepted sugary food; only one species was recorded to visit it less than the protein foods. This result was consistent with the efficacy of control treatments by sugary baits within the rooms. For species that showed good acceptance of sugar solutions in the preference test outdoors, sugar bait control indoors was 100& effective. Conversely, for the only species that foraged significantly less on sugar food, the bait treatment was ineffective. This work reveals the importance of considering the behavior and feeding preferences of the species to be controlled by toxic baits.

  10. Implementing a Pediatric Obesity Care Guideline in a Freestanding Children’s Hospital to Improve Child Safety and Hospital Preparedness1

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Renee M.; Thrasher, Jodi; Krebs, Nancy F.

    2013-01-01

    Medical and surgical care of children with severe obesity is complicated and requires recognition of the problem, appropriate equipment, and safe management. There is little literature describing patient, provider, and institutional needs for the severely obese pediatric patient. Nonetheless, the limited data suggest 3 broad categories of needs unique to this population: (a) airway management, (b) drug dosing and pharmacology, and (c) equipment and infrastructure. We describe an opportunity at the Children’s Hospital Colorado to better prepare and optimize care for this patient population by creation of a Pediatric Obesity Care Guideline that focused on key areas of quality and safety. PMID:22178030

  11. Trends in Clinically Significant Pain Prevalence Among Hospitalized Cancer Patients at an Academic Hospital in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Yun; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Shang-Liang; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Chun-Sung; Wang, Kwua-Yun; Liang, Chun-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Clinically significant pain (CSP) is one of the most common complaints among cancer patients during repeated hospitalizations, and the prevalence ranges from 24% to 86%. This study aimed to characterize the trends in CSP among cancer patients and examine the differences in the prevalence of CSP across repeated hospitalizations. A hospital-based, retrospective cohort study was conducted at an academic hospital. Patient-reported pain intensity was assessed and recorded in a nursing information system. We examined the differences in the prevalence of worst pain intensity (WPI) and last evaluated pain intensity (LPI) of ≥ 4 or ≥ 7 points among cancer inpatients from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. Linear mixed models were used to determine the significant difference in the WPI and LPI (≥ 4 or ≥ 7 points) at each hospitalization. We examined 88,133 pain scores from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization among cancer patients. The prevalence of the 4 CSP types showed a trend toward a reduction from the 1st to the 18th hospitalization. There was a robust reduction in the CSP prevalence from the 1st to the 5th hospitalization, except in the case of LPI ≥ 7 points. The prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points was significantly higher (0.240-fold increase) during the 1st hospitalization than during the 5th hospitalization. For the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th hospitalizations, there was a significantly higher prevalence of a WPI ≥ 4 points compared with the 5th hospitalization. We also observed significant reductions in the prevalence of a WPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 4th hospitalizations, an LPI ≥ 4 points during the 1st to the 3rd hospitalizations, and an LPI ≥ 7 points during the 1st to the 2nd hospitalization. Although the prevalence of the 4 CSP types decreased gradually, it is impossible to state the causative factors on the basis of this observational and descriptive study. The next step will examine the factors that determine the CSP prevalence among cancer

  12. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characterization of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Strains from a Pediatric Tertiary Care Hospital in Serbia

    PubMed Central

    Madi, Haowa; Lukić, Jovanka; Vasiljević, Zorica; Biočanin, Marjan; Kojić, Milan; Jovčić, Branko; Lozo, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Background Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an environmental bacterium and an opportunistic pathogen usually associated with healthcare-associated infections, which has recently been recognized as a globally multi-drug resistant organism. The aim of this study was genotyping and physiological characterization of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolated in a large, tertiary care pediatric hospital in Belgrade, Serbia, hosting the national reference cystic fibrosis (CF) center for pediatric and adult patients. Methods We characterized 42 strains of cystic fibrosis (CF) and 46 strains of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) origin isolated from 2013 to 2015 in order to investigate their genetic relatedness and phenotypic traits. Genotyping was performed using sequencing of 16S rRNA gene, Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) and Multi locus sequencing typing (MLST) analysis. Sensitivity to five relevant antimicrobial agents was determined, namely trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX), chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and tetracycline. Surface characteristics, motility, biofilm formation and adhesion to mucin were tested in all strains. Statistical approach was used to determine correlations between obtained results. Results Most of the isolates were not genetically related. Six new sequence types were determined. Strains were uniformly sensitive to all tested antimicrobial agents. The majority of isolates (89.8%) were able to form biofilm with almost equal representation in both CF and non-CF strains. Swimming motility was observed in all strains, while none of them exhibited swarming motility. Among strains able to adhere to mucin, no differences between CF and non-CF isolates were observed. Conclusions High genetic diversity among isolates implies the absence of clonal spread within the hospital. Positive correlation between motility, biofilm formation and adhesion to mucin was demonstrated. Biofilm formation and motility were more pronounced among non-CF than CF

  13. Demographic and histopathologic profile of pediatric brain tumors: A hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Harshil C.; Ubhale, Bhushan P.; Shah, Jaimin K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Very few hospital-based or population-based studies are published in the context to the epidemiologic profile of pediatric brain tumors (PBTs) in India and Indian subcontinent. Aim: To study the demographic and histopathologic profile of PBTs according to World Health Organization 2007 classification in a single tertiary health care center in India. Materials and Methods: Data regarding age, gender, topography, and histopathology of 76 pediatric patients (0–19 years) with brain tumors operated over a period of 24 months (January-2012 to December-2013) was collected retrospectively and analyzed using EpiInfo 7. Chi-square test and test of proportions (Z-test) were used wherever necessary. Results: PBTs were more common in males (55.3%) as compared to females (44.7%) with male to female ratio of 1.23:1. Mean age was 10.69 years. Frequency of tumors was higher in childhood age group (65.8%) when compared to adolescent age group (34.2%). The most common anatomical site was cerebellum (39.5%), followed by hemispheres (22.4%). Supratentorial tumors (52.6%) were predominant than infratentorial tumors (47.4%). Astrocytomas (40.8%) and embryonal tumors (29.0%) were the most common histological types almost contributing more than 2/3rd of all tumors. Craniopharyngiomas (11.8%) and ependymomas (6.6%) were the third and fourth most common tumors, respectively. Conclusion: Astrocytomas and medulloblastomas are the most common tumors among children and adolescents in our region, which needs special attention from the neurosurgical department of our institute. Demographic and histopathologic profile of cohort in the present study do not differ substantially from that found in other hospital-based and population-based studies except for slight higher frequency of craniopharyngiomas. PMID:26942148

  14. Admission Risk Score to Predict Inpatient Pediatric Mortality at Four Public Hospitals in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Sears, David; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Rubahika, Denis; Nadler, Adam; Yeka, Adoke; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rates among hospitalized children in many government hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa are high. Pediatric emergency services in these hospitals are often sub-optimal. Timely recognition of critically ill children on arrival is key to improving service delivery. We present a simple risk score to predict inpatient mortality among hospitalized children. Between April 2010 and June 2011, the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project (UMSP), in collaboration with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), set up an enhanced sentinel site malaria surveillance program for children hospitalized at four public hospitals in different districts: Tororo, Apac, Jinja and Mubende. Clinical data collected through March 2013, representing 50249 admissions were used to develop a mortality risk score (derivation data set). One year of data collected subsequently from the same hospitals, representing 20406 admissions, were used to prospectively validate the performance of the risk score (validation data set). Using a backward selection approach, 13 out of 25 clinical parameters recognizable on initial presentation, were selected for inclusion in a final logistic regression prediction model. The presence of individual parameters was awarded a score of either 1 or 2 based on regression coefficients. For each individual patient, a composite risk score was generated. The risk score was further categorized into three categories; low, medium, and high. Patient characteristics were comparable in both data sets. Measures of performance for the risk score included the receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve (AUC), both demonstrating good and comparable ability to predict deathusing both the derivation (AUC =0.76) and validation dataset (AUC =0.74). Using the derivation and validation datasets, the mortality rates in each risk category were as follows: low risk (0.8% vs. 0.7%), moderate risk (3.5% vs. 3.2%), and high risk (16.5% vs. 12.6%), respectively. Our

  15. Considerations unique to pediatrics for clinical trial design in hospital-acquired pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Bradley, John S

    2010-08-01

    Background. A need exists for new antimicrobial agents to treat neonates, infants, and children for hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) caused by nosocomial antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Current and clear guidance on approval of new agents for all pediatric age groups is lacking. Methods. Studies on HAP and VAP in the neonatal and pediatric age groups were collected using PubMed (National Library of Medicine). Published articles were reviewed for pediatric-specific definitions of HAP and VAP, diagnostic techniques, rates of disease, risk factors, characteristics, and outcomes. Results. Definitions of HAP and VAP in neonatal and pediatric age groups vary considerably. No well-studied, sensitive, and specific microbiologic testing techniques exist. Morbidity and mortality associated with VAP in neonates, infants, and children have been documented. Conclusions. Investigation and approval of new agents for HAP and VAP in all pediatric age groups is needed. A uniform definition of HAP and VAP is required that is relevant for clinical trials and balances the risks of experimental therapy and sampling procedures for study patients with potential benefits for both the patient under investigation and the hospitalized children who may develop nosocomial pneumonia.

  16. Cultural Diversity in the Curriculum: Perceptions and Attitudes of Irish Hospitality and Tourism Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Frances; Hearns, Niamh; Baum, Tom; Murray, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Academics are facing significant challenges in preparing indigenous students for employment in the multicultural working environment of hospitality and tourism organisations. In dealing with the impact of the new skills and flexibilities demanded by increasing globalisation, the indigenous workforce needs to possess a multicultural perspective and…

  17. A method for estimating vaccine-preventable pediatric influenza pneumonia hospitalizations in developing countries: Thailand as a case study.

    PubMed

    Dawood, Fatimah S; Fry, Alicia M; Muangchana, Charung; Sanasuttipun, Wiwan; Baggett, Henry C; Chunsuttiwat, Supamit; Maloney, Susan A; Simmerman, James Mark

    2011-06-10

    The burden of influenza in children is increasingly appreciated; some middle-income countries are considering support for influenza vaccine programs. To support decision-making, methods to estimate the potential impact of proposed programs are needed. Using Thailand as a case-study, we present a model that uses surveillance data, published vaccine effectiveness estimates, and vaccination coverage assumptions to estimate the impact of influenza vaccination on pediatric influenza pneumonia hospitalizations. Approximately 56,000 influenza pneumonia hospitalizations occur annually among children aged <18 years in Thailand; 23,700 (41%) may be vaccine-preventable. Vaccination of 85% of Thai children aged 7 months-4 years might prevent 30% of all pediatric influenza pneumonia hospitalizations in Thailand.

  18. Pediatric emergency care capacity in a low-resource setting: An assessment of district hospitals in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Shoveller, Jean; Tuyisenge, Lisine; Kenyon, Cynthia; Cechetto, David F.; Lynd, Larry D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Health system strengthening is crucial to improving infant and child health outcomes in low-resource countries. While the knowledge related to improving newborn and child survival has advanced remarkably over the past few decades, many healthcare systems in such settings remain unable to effectively deliver pediatric advance life support management. With the introduction of the Emergency Triage, Assessment and Treatment plus Admission care (ETAT+)–a locally adapted pediatric advanced life support management program–in Rwandan district hospitals, we undertook this study to assess the extent to which these hospitals are prepared to provide this pediatric advanced life support management. The results of the study will shed light on the resources and support that are currently available to implement ETAT+, which aims to improve care for severely ill infants and children. Methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in eight district hospitals across Rwanda focusing on the availability of physical and human resources, as well as hospital services organizations to provide emergency triage, assessment and treatment plus admission care for severely ill infants and children. Results Many of essential resources deemed necessary for the provision of emergency care for severely ill infants and children were readily available (e.g. drugs and laboratory services). However, only 4/8 hospitals had BVM for newborns; while nebulizer and MDI were not available in 2/8 hospitals. Only 3/8 hospitals had F-75 and ReSoMal. Moreover, there was no adequate triage system across any of the hospitals evaluated. Further, guidelines for neonatal resuscitation and management of malaria were available in 5/8 and in 7/8 hospitals, respectively; while those for child resuscitation and management of sepsis, pneumonia, dehydration and severe malnutrition were available in less than half of the hospitals evaluated. Conclusions Our assessment provides evidence to inform new strategies

  19. The development of pediatric critical care medicine at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: an interview with Dr. John J. 'Jack' Downes.

    PubMed

    Mai, Christine L; Schreiner, Mark S; Firth, Paul G; Yaster, Myron

    2013-07-01

    Dr. John J. 'Jack' Downes (1930-), the anesthesiologist-in-chief at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (1972-1996), has made numerous contributions to pediatric anesthesia and critical care medicine through a broad spectrum of research on chronic respiratory failure, status asthmaticus, postoperative risks of apnea in premature infants, and home-assisted mechanical ventilation. However, his defining moment was in January 1967, when The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia inaugurated its pediatric intensive care unit--the first of its kind in North America. During his tenure, he and his colleagues trained an entire generation of pediatric anesthesiologists and intensivists and set a standard of care and professionalism that continues to the present day. Based on an interview with Dr. Downes, this article reviews a career that advanced pediatric anesthesia and critical care medicine and describes the development of that first pediatric intensive care unit at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

  20. Assessment of Parents’ Perception of Quality of Pediatric Oncology Inpatient Care at Kenyatta National Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Keiza, Eunice Mmbone; Chege, Margaret Njambi; Omuga, Blasio Osogo

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Adequate knowledge of parents’ perception of quality of pediatric cancer care helps to identify the areas of care improvement which would contribute to disease outcome in regard to the quality of life and satisfaction with the care provided. The aim of the study was to assess the parents’ perception of the quality of Pediatric Oncology Inpatient Care at Kenyatta National Hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive quantitative and qualitative study was undertaken using a pretested semi-structured questionnaire and a focused group discussion guide. Assessment of parents’ perception of quality of care was done in relation to the institution's structures and care delivery processes. These included the ward environment, resources for cancer treatment, care processes, service providers, and parents’ knowledge empowerment. Participants were systematically selected. Parents’ perception was defined as satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the care provided. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.) and presented as frequencies and percentages. Chi-square was used to test the significant association between variables. Level of significance was set at a P ≤ 0.05. Results: A total of 107 respondents were interviewed and 57.9% were satisfied with the overall quality of care they received. The determinants of overall satisfaction in this study were found to be related to resources for cancer treatment (odds ratio [OR] =3.10; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.39–6.90; P = 0.005), care delivery processes (OR = 2.87; 95% CI = 1.28–6.43; P = 0.009), and the ward environment (OR = 2.59; 95% CI = 1.17–5.74; P = 0.018). Conclusions: The parents were moderately satisfied with the oncology care services their children received. The gaps identified in service delivery included those related to the availability of the required resources for efficient care delivery and also educational as well as psychosocial needs of the parents

  1. Intravenous midazolam sedation in pediatric diagnostic upper digestive endoscopy. A prospective study in a general hospital.

    PubMed

    Verhage, Jan; Mulder, Chris J J; Willekens, Frans L A

    2003-12-01

    The positive role of benzodiazepines (Midazolam) in conscious sedation in pediatric patients is widely known. However, problems concerning the role of sedation in diagnostic upper endoscopy are a matter for debate as little is known about dosage and timing. We prospectively evaluated the efficacy, safety and optimal intravenous sedation dosage of midazolam in 257 consecutive patients, aged 2 months to 18 years old, who underwent upper endoscopy of the gastrointestinal tract. The initial midazolam dosage was 0.2 mg/kg Bw (Body weight) i.v. for 1 minute and, if necessary, another 0.1 mg/kg Bw was administered 5 minutes later. If sedation was sufficient, the procedure would be started 4-5 minutes later; if not, another 0.1 - 0.2 mg/kg Bw would be administered. All procedures were performed by a pediatrician together with a gastroenterologist. No serious complications occurred in any of the procedures. Oxygen saturation (OS) was maintained at over 90%, if necessary with blowby oxygen. Flumazenil was administered to 7 children (OS < 90%). Endoscopy could not be completed in 1 child. All endoscopies were completed within 10 minutes. No unexpected hospital admissions were necessary. The mean midazolam dosage was 0.4 mg/kg Bw in patients up to 6 years, for the over 6 years-olds the mean dosage was decreased to 0,2 mg/kg Bw. Particular attention was paid to the importance of informing patients before the procedure. Endoscopic diagnostic procedures can be performed safely and effectively in children with intravenous sedation in a well equipped pediatric endoscopy unit.

  2. Comparison of Hospital Versus Rural Eye Camp Based Pediatric Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ram, Jagat; Sukhija, Jaspreet; Thapa, Babu R.; Arya, Virendra K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the outcomes of pediatric cataract surgery with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation in an eye camp setting and tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Children aged 5-16 years with visually significant cataract underwent phacoaspiration with IOL implantation in an eye camp (eye camp group) or tertiary care center (TCC group). All surgeries incorporated contemporary microsurgical techniques with implantation of polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) IOL. Major postoperative complications were managed at a tertiary care center. Postoperative complications, visual acuity and compliance were evaluated using the Chi-square test. A P value less then 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: The cohort comprised 59 children in the eye camp group and 48 children in the TCC group. Thirty two of fifty nine (54.23%) eyes in the eye camp group and 30/48 (62.5%) eyes in the TCC group achieved 20/40 or better best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) postoperatively. Postoperatively, 36 (61%) eyes in the eye camp group and 22 (45.83%) eyes in the TCC group required Nd: YAG laser capsulotomy or a pars plana membranectomy. (P> 0.05) The most striking feature was loss to follow up. In the eye camp group, loss to follow was 20% at one year, 49% at two years, 62% at 3 years and 67% at 4 years compared to 12.5, 21, 27 and 33% respectively in the TCC group (P<0.05, all cases). Conclusions: The outcomes of camp and tertiary care center (hospital) based pediatric cataract surgery were similar. However, the major drawback of camp based surgery was loss to follow up which eventually affected the management of amblyopia and postoperative complications. PMID:22346130

  3. Clinical Outcomes in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Fulminant Myocarditis Requiring Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Haolan; Xia, Bingqing; Zhu, Jingyu; Li, Binfei; Huang, Wenqi

    2017-02-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis to provide the survival rates for pediatric patients hospitalized with fulminant myocarditis requiring ECMO. The literature search was conducted using Embase, PubMed, MEDLINE and Elsevier for studies published before April 1, 2016. We focus on survival rates for pediatric patients hospitalized with fulminant myocarditis requiring ECMO, and studies that reported only on adult patients were excluded. Summary of the survival rates was obtained using fixed-effect or random-effect meta-analysis which determined by I (2). Six studies were included in the analysis, encompassing 172 patients. The minimum and maximum reported rates of survival to hospital discharge were 53.8 and 83.3%, respectively. The cumulative rate was 107/172. The calculated Cochran Q value was 3.73, which was not significant for heterogeneity (P = 0.588). The I (2) value was 0%. The pooled estimate rate was 62.9% with a 95% confidence interval of 55.3-69.8%. In pediatric patients with cardiac failure who have failed conventional therapies in FM, venoarterial ECMO should be considered. In total, 62.9% of patients with FM and either cardiogenic shock and/or cardiac arrest survived to hospital discharge with ECMO.

  4. Pulmonary Tuberculous: Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment. 19-year experience in a third level pediatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is an infectious disease that involves the lungs and can be lethal in many cases. Tuberculosis (TB) in children represents 5 to 20% of the total TB cases. However, there are few updated information on pediatric TB, reason why the objective of the present study is to know the real situation of PTB in the population of children in terms of its diagnosis and treatment in a third level pediatric hospital. Methods A retrospective study based on a revision of clinical files of patients less than 18 years old diagnosed with PTB from January 1994 to January 2013 at Instituto Nacional de Pediatria, Mexico City was carried out. A probable diagnosis was based on 3 or more of the following: two or more weeks of cough, fever, tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) +, previous TB exposure, suggestive chest X-ray, and favorable response to treatment. Definitive diagnosis was based on positive acid-fast bacilli (AFB) or culture. Results In the 19-year period of revision, 87 children were diagnosed with PTB; 57 (65.5%) had bacteriologic confirmation with ZN staining or culture positive (in fact, 22 were ZN and culture positive), and 30 (34.5%) had a probable diagnosis; 14(16.1%) were diagnosed with concomitant disease, while 69/81 were immunized. Median evolution time was 21 days (5–150). Fever was found in 94.3%, cough in 77%, and weight loss in 55.2%. History of contact with TB was established in 41.9%. Chest X-ray showed consolidation in 48.3% and mediastinal lymph node in 47.1%. PPD was positive in 59.2%, while positive AFB was found in 51.7% cases. Culture was positive in 24/79 patients (30.4%), PCR in 20/27 (74.1%). 39 (44.8%) patients were treated with rifampin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide while 6 (6.9%) received the former drugs plus streptomycin and 42 (48.3%) the former plus ethambutol. There were three deaths. Conclusions PTB in pediatric population represents a diagnostic challenge for the fact that clinical

  5. Establishing a pharmacy department for a large pediatric hospital: managerial problems, opportunities, and lessons.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, M R; Gurwitch, K D; Scholz, R L; Bagby, L M

    1991-07-01

    The process of planning and establishing a pharmacy department in a pediatric hospital is described, and lessons learned from the experience are summarized. Since its founding in 1954, Texas Children's Hospital (TCH) had shared pharmacy services with St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital. The decision to terminate the shared-services agreement in the mid-1980s made it necessary for TCH to establish an independent pharmacy department. A director of pharmacy was hired in March 1988, and November 30 of that year was set as the target for implementation of the TCH pharmacy. It was decided that six services--a decentralized unit dose distribution system, an i.v. admixture service, delivery services, ambulatory-care services, a formulatory system, and a drug information service--would be offered initially. Decisions concerning department organizational structure and staffing, space allocations, and a computer system were made. A multidisciplinary advisory committee was appointed; one of its responsibilities was to oversee inservice staff training. The pharmacy areas were to be opened on a staggered basis, beginning with the hematology-oncology clinic pharmacy. A number of problems arose immediately following the opening of the central pharmacy, including inaccurate computer profiles, lower-than-estimated productivity resulting from staff members' unfamiliarity with the new system, higher-than-estimated patient census, and orders for nonformulary drugs. Delays in drug delivery times were unacceptably high. A crisis-management plan was implemented to cover both short- and long-term problems, and within a few months operations had stabilized. The opening of the intensive-care and sixth-floor satellite pharmacies enhanced decentralized operations and had an important role in improving response times.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Viral Co-Infections in Pediatric Patients Hospitalized with Lower Tract Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cebey-López, Miriam; Herberg, Jethro; Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Salas, Antonio; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Gormley, Stuart; Sumner, Edward; Fink, Colin; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular techniques can often reveal a broader range of pathogens in respiratory infections. We aim to investigate the prevalence and age pattern of viral co-infection in children hospitalized with lower tract acute respiratory infection (LT-ARI), using molecular techniques. Methods A nested polymerase chain reaction approach was used to detect Influenza (A, B), metapneumovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza (1–4), rhinovirus, adenovirus (A—F), bocavirus and coronaviruses (NL63, 229E, OC43) in respiratory samples of children with acute respiratory infection prospectively admitted to any of the GENDRES network hospitals between 2011–2013. The results were corroborated in an independent cohort collected in the UK. Results A total of 204 and 97 nasopharyngeal samples were collected in the GENDRES and UK cohorts, respectively. In both cohorts, RSV was the most frequent pathogen (52.9% and 36.1% of the cohorts, respectively). Co-infection with multiple viruses was found in 92 samples (45.1%) and 29 samples (29.9%), respectively; this was most frequent in the 12–24 months age group. The most frequently observed co-infection patterns were RSV—Rhinovirus (23 patients, 11.3%, GENDRES cohort) and RSV—bocavirus / bocavirus—influenza (5 patients, 5.2%, UK cohort). Conclusion The presence of more than one virus in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with LT-ARI is very frequent and seems to peak at 12–24 months of age. The clinical significance of these findings is unclear but should warrant further analysis. PMID:26332375

  7. Spinal fusion for pediatric neuromuscular scoliosis: national trends, complications, and in-hospital outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rumalla, Kavelin; Yarbrough, Chester K; Pugely, Andrew J; Koester, Linda; Dorward, Ian G

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to determine if the recent changes in technology, surgical techniques, and surgical literature have influenced practice trends in spinal fusion surgery for pediatric neuromuscular scoliosis (NMS). In this study the authors analyzed recent trends in the surgical management of NMS and investigated the effect of various patient and surgical factors on in-hospital complications, outcomes, and costs, using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. METHODS The NIS was queried from 2002 to 2011 using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification codes to identify pediatric cases (age < 18 years) of spinal fusion for NMS. Several patient, surgical, and short-term outcome factors were included in the analyses. Trend analyses of these factors were conducted. Both univariate and multivariable analyses were used to determine the effect of the various patient and surgical factors on short-term outcomes. RESULTS Between 2002 and 2011, a total of 2154 NMS fusion cases were identified, and the volume of spinal fusion procedures increased 93% from 148 in 2002 to 286 in 2011 (p < 0.0001). The mean patient age was 12.8 ± 3.10 years, and 45.6% of the study population was female. The overall complication rate was 40.1% and the respiratory complication rate was 28.2%. From 2002 to 2011, upward trends (p < 0.0001) were demonstrated in Medicaid insurance status (36.5% to 52.8%), presence of ≥ 1 comorbidity (40.2% to 52.1%), and blood transfusions (25.2% to 57.3%). Utilization of posterior-only fusions (PSFs) increased from 66.2% to 90.2% (p < 0.0001) while combined anterior release/fusions and PSF (AR/PSF) decreased from 33.8% to 9.8% (< 0.0001). Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) underwent increasing utilization from 2009 to 2011 (15.5% to 20.3%, p < 0.0001). The use/harvest of autograft underwent a significant upward trend between 2002 and 2011 (31.3% to 59.8%, p < 0.0001). In univariate

  8. The Evolution of the Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario Statement of Principles--A Successful Harmonization Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Katie; Lampson, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    To improve efficiency, consistency and transparency in clinical trial contract negotiations with industry sponsors, a Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) committee facilitated the development of standard principles for member hospitals to follow during contract negotiation. Hospitals were encouraged to provide a link to the CAHO…

  9. Molecular detection of giardiasis among children at Cairo University Pediatrics Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ghieth, Marwa A; Kotb, Magd A; Abu-Sarea, Enas Y; El-Badry, Ayman A

    2016-12-01

    Giardiasis is a prevailing intestinal disease in children. This study aimed to determine molecular prevalence of Giardia intestinalis in children attending Cairo University Pediatrics Hospitals, using copro-PCR assays, conventional methods and to evaluate diagnostic effectiveness of used tests. 229 fecal samples were collected from children suffering from gastrointestinal symptoms and examined for Giardia by microscopy, Immuno-chromatographic test (ICT), copro-DNA using two PCR assays targeting tpi [nested-PCR (nPCR)] and 18S [conventional-PCR (cPCR)] genes. Out of 229 samples assessed, Giardia was diagnosed in 13.9, 17, 17.9, 4.8 % of cases using microscopy, ICT, nPCR (tpi) and cPCR (18S), respectively. Nominating both PCR assays as composite reference standard, microscopy and ICT were of reliable specificity (100 and 96.9 %) and accuracy (95.6 and 93.6 %) but of limited sensitivity (78.6 and 76.2 %). Kappa agreement showed, there was substantial agreement of ICT (0.776) and almost perfect agreement of microscopy (0.839) with PCR assays. Giardia showed a molecular prevalence of 18.3 % (42/229). ICT assay for Giardia surpassed microscopy but both couldn't be used as a consistent single detection method due to their lowered sensitivities. nPCR targeting tpi is a reliable diagnostic test aiding to determine true prevalence of Giardia.

  10. Childhood Developmental Disorders: An Academic and Clinical Convergence Point for Psychiatry, Neurology, Psychology and Pediatrics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiss, Allan L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Significant advances in understanding brain development and behavior have not been accompanied by revisions of traditional academic structure. Disciplinary isolation and a lack of meaningful interdisciplinary opportunities are persistent barriers in academic medicine. To enhance clinical practice, research, and training for the next…

  11. Field Note-Developing Suicide Risk Assessment Training for Hospital Social Workers: An Academic-Community Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharff, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Abigail M.; Lambert, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This article describes 1 large urban pediatric hospital's partnership with a university to provide suicide assessment and management training within its social work department. Social work administrators conducted a department-wide needs assessment and implemented a 2-session suicide assessment training program and evaluation. Respondents…

  12. Pediatric computed tomography practice in Japanese university hospitals from 2008–2010: did it differ from German practice?

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Koji; Krille, Lucian; Dreger, Steffen; Hoenig, Lars; Merzenich, Hiltrud; Yasui, Kiyotaka; Kumagai, Atsushi; Ohtsuru, Akira; Uetani, Masataka; Mildenberger, Peter; Takamura, Noboru; Yamashita, Shunichi; Zeeb, Hajo; Kudo, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is an essential tool in modern medicine and is frequently used to diagnose a wide range of conditions, particularly in industrial countries, such as Japan and Germany. However, markedly higher doses of ionizing radiation are delivered during CT imaging than during conventional X-ray examinations. To assess pediatric CT practice patterns, data from three university hospital databases (two in Japan and one in Germany) were analyzed. Anonymized data for patients aged 0 to 14 years who had undergone CT examinations between 2008 and 2010 were extracted. To assess CT practice, an interdisciplinary classification scheme for CT indications, which incorporated the most common examination types and radiosensitive tissues, was developed. The frequency of CT examinations was determined according to sex, age at examination, and indications. A total of 5182 CT examinations were performed in 2955 children. Overall, the frequency of CT examinations at the Japanese university hospitals did not differ significantly from that at the German hospital. However, differences were detected in the age distribution of the patients who underwent CT examinations (the proportion of patients <5 years of age was significantly higher in Japan than in Germany) and in the indications for CT. Substantial practice differences regarding the use of CT in pediatric health care were detected between the three hospitals. The results of this study point towards a need for approaches such as clinical guidelines to reduce unwarranted medical radiation exposures, particularly abdominal and head CT, in the Japanese health system. PMID:27475125

  13. Recovery in memory function, and its relationship to academic success, at 24 months following pediatric TBI.

    PubMed

    Catroppa, Cathy; Anderson, Vicki

    2007-05-01

    While a number of research papers have reported findings on memory deficits following traumatic brain injury (TBI), only limited studies have monitored the recovery of these skills over time. The present study examined memory ability and its effect on academic success in a group of children who had sustained a mild, moderate, or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Results showed that the severe TBI group exhibited greater deficits on memory tasks, irrespective of modality, in the acute, 6-, 12-, and 24-month postinjury stages, in comparison to mild and moderate TBI groups. Performance on academic measures was dependent on both injury severity and task demands. Preinjury academic ability and verbal memory indices best predicted academic success.

  14. Pediatric integrative medicine: pediatrics' newest subspecialty?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Integrative medicine is defined as relationship-centered care that focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches, healthcare professionals and disciplines to achieve optimal health and healing, including evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine. Pediatric integrative medicine (PIM) develops and promotes this approach within the field of pediatrics. We conducted a survey to identify and describe PIM programs within academic children’s hospitals across North America. Key barriers and opportunities were identified for the growth and development of academic PIM initiatives in the US and Canada. Methods Academic PIM programs were identified by email and eligible for inclusion if they had each of educational, clinical, and research activities. Program directors were interviewed by telephone regarding their clinical, research, educational, and operational aspects. Results Sixteen programs were included. Most (75%) programs provided both inpatient and outpatient services. Seven programs operated with less than 1 FTE clinical personnel. Credentialing of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers varied substantially across the programs and between inpatient and outpatient services. Almost all (94%) programs offered educational opportunities for residents in pediatrics and/or family medicine. One fifth (20%) of the educational programs were mandatory for medical students. Research was conducted in a range of topics, but half of the programs reported lack of research funding and/or time. Thirty-one percent of the programs relied on fee-for-service income. Conclusions Pediatric integrative medicine is emerging as a new subspecialty to better help address 21st century patient concerns. PMID:22894682

  15. [Workplace bullying during specialty training in a pediatric hospital in Mexico: a little-noticed phenomenon].

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda-Vildósola, Ana Carolina; Mota-Nova, Alma Rebeca; Fajardo-Dolci, Germán Enrique; Reyes-Lagunes, L Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Introducción: el acoso laboral es una conducta intimidatoria que se practica contra el trabajador e impacta negativamente en el estado de salud, el desempeño laboral y el aprendizaje. El presente trabajo investiga su magnitud y sus factores asociados en México. Métodos: metodología mixta. Se diseñó y aplicó una encuesta a los residentes de un hospital pediátrico de México que aceptaron participar. Se dividió en dos secciones: a) el residente reportó eventos de mobbing y factores asociados, b) se exploraron de manera dirigida situaciones de abuso documentadas en la literatura. Resultados: participaron 137 residentes. De ellos, 32% reportó espontáneamente haber sufrido acoso, mientras que 82.4% lo refirió en el cuestionario dirigido. Los factores personales precipitantes fueron: sexo, habilidades mentales y apariencia física. Las situaciones que predispusieron al acoso fueron jerarquía y falta de supervisión. Los profesores fueron los principales perpetradores, ocurrió más comúnmente en hospitalización. Se identificaron como factores significativos el sexo femenino, tener menos de 29 años, estudiar pediatría, ser solteros y haber reportado acoso de manera espontánea. Conclusiones: la frecuencia de acoso es similar a la reportada por otros autores. La mitad de los residentes no reportaron espontáneamente eventos de acoso pero los identificaron en el cuestionamiento dirigido, lo que sugiere que consideran estos eventos como parte de “los usos y costumbres” durante su entrenamiento médico, o los consideran irrelevantes.

  16. A Study to Determine the Impact of the PRIMUS Clinic on Patient Workload in the General Outpatient Clinic, the Emergency Room, the GYN Clinic, the Pediatric Clinic, and the Family Practice Clinic at Martin Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-07

    as obstetrics and pediatrics will be honed to a fine edge. Cherkov further suggests that construction of medical facilities outside of the hospital...ROOM, m THE OB GYN CLINIC, THE PEDIATRIC CLINIC, AND THE FAMILY o 0c C PRACTICE CLINIC AT MARTIN ARMY COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 0 0 m M xz z Baylor...Clinic on patien workload in the Outpatient, Family Practice, and Pediatrics Clinics and The Emergency Room at Martin Army Commnity Hospital. 12. PERSONAL

  17. [Participation of one children hospital residents in scientific and training activities of Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría].

    PubMed

    Davenport, María Carolina; Domínguez, Paula Alejandra; Martins, Andrea Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    The Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría, SAP (Argentine Society of Pediatrics) offers courses and scientific activities for pediatricians and residents. We evaluated the participation of Pedro de Elizalde Hospital residents in the scientific and training activities of SAP and assessed the trend of participation throughout the residency; 107 residents were surveyed; 48% were members, and the participation increased significantly throughout the residence (p <0.01). None of the surveyed residents were part of any association; 84% did not know the "Pediatricians in Training Group"; 49% participated in continued training programs, with a growing tendency to participation through-out the residency (p <0.01); 80% considered that the SAP is a friendly entity. We concluded that participation of residents in the SAP is scarce during the first two years of training, and that it shows a growth in the senior residents' group. Encouraging the interest of first and second year residents in the activities is necessary.

  18. A Pediatric Application of the STRAC Regional Hospital Trauma Registry Database: Pediatric Trauma Deaths in South Central Texas During 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Buehner, Michelle; Aden, Jay; Borgman, Mathew; Love, Preston; Wright, Brandi; Edwards, Mary

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the demographics of pediatric traumatic injuries and to understand the predictive value of injury type, prehospital, and emergency department (ED) data regarding the mortality of pediatric trauma patients (<14 years of age) in South Central Texas. We report a retrospective review of pediatric trauma patients presenting to Trauma Service Area P in South Central Texas during 2004-2013. The primary outcome was mortality; secondary outcomes were ventilator days, hospital days, and intensive care unit stay. Demographics, Abbreviated Injury Score (AIS) codes, ICD-9 codes, transport times, Emergency Medical Services (EMS) vital signs en route and on arrival to the emergency department (ED), and outcomes were evaluated. A total of 8004 traumatically injured children presented to EDs in South Central Texas during the study period; 4109 of these presented via EMS. Most patients were Hispanic and male. Distribution was even across age groups. Overall mortality was 2%, and the mortality of those arriving by EMS was 3.7%. Abnormal vital signs and Glasgow Coma Score upon presentation to both EMS and the ED were strongly associated with mortality. Increased Injury Severity Score, the need for transfusion in the ED, and increased maximal AIS were also strongly associated with mortality. African American race was associated with increased mortality, although transport time and age were not. Most injuries overall were caused by motor vehicle collisions; however, burns and falls were most common in infants. The most lethal injuries were caused by firearms (mostly seen in preteens) and assaults (mostly seen in infants). This analysis of injured children in Southwest Texas offers insight into areas of needed quality improvement in the trauma system and potential areas to focus prevention efforts.

  19. Getting published in an academic-community hospital: the success of writing groups.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Deitrick, Lynn; Mahady, Erica T; Moser, Kathleen; Gertner, Eric J; Sabino, Judith N

    2012-01-01

    Expressed barriers to writing for publication include lack of time, competing demands, anxiety about writing and a lack of knowledge about the submission process. These limitations can be magnified for practitioners in non-university environments in which there are fewer incentives or expectations regarding academic publication productivity. However, as members of professional disciplines, practitioners have both the responsibility and, oftentimes, the insights to make valuable contributions to the professional literature. Collaborative writing groups can be a useful intervention to overcome barriers, provide the necessary skills and encouragement as well as produce publications and conference presentations that make worthy additions to the professional body of knowledge. This article discusses the evolution and outcomes of writing groups at Lehigh Valley Health Network and describes how this strategy can be adopted by other academic community hospitals to promote professional development and publication.

  20. Modeling of longitudinal academic achievement scores after pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ewing-Cobbs, Linda; Barnes, Marcia; Fletcher, Jack M; Levin, Harvey S; Swank, Paul R; Song, James

    2004-01-01

    In a prospective longitudinal study, academic achievement scores were obtained from youth 5 to 15 years of age who sustained mild-moderate (n = 34) or severe (n = 43) traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Achievement scores were collected from baseline to 5 years following TBI and were subjected to individual growth curve analysis. The models fitted age at injury, years since injury, duration of impaired consciousness, and interaction effects to Reading Decoding, Reading Comprehension, Spelling, and Arithmetic standard scores. Although scores improved significantly over the follow-up relative to normative data from the standardization sample of the tests, children with severe TBI showed persistent deficits on all achievement scores in comparison to children with mild-moderate TBI. Interactions of the slope and age parameters for the Arithmetic and Reading Decoding scores indicated greater increases over time in achievement scores of the children injured at an older age, but deceleration in growth curves for the younger children with both mild-moderate and severe TBI. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that early brain injuries disrupt the acquisition of some academic skills. Hierarchical regression models revealed that indexes of academic achievement obtained 2 years following TBI had weak relations with the duration of impaired consciousness and socioeconomic status. In contrast, concurrent cognitive variables such as phonological processing and verbal memory accounted for more variability in academic scores. Given the significant and persistent decrement in basic academic skills in youth with severe TBI, it is clear that head-injured youth require intensive, long-term remediation and intervention not only of the academic skills themselves, but also of those cognitive abilities that support the development and maintenance of reading and math.

  1. A small grant funding program to promote innovation at an academic research hospital.

    PubMed

    Orrell, Kelsey; Yankanah, Rosanna; Heon, Elise; Wright, James G

    2015-10-01

    Innovation is important for the improvement of health care. A small grant innovation funding program was implemented by the Hospital for Sick Children(SickKids) for the Perioperative Services group, awarding relatively small funds (approximately $10 000) in order to stimulate innovation. Of 48 applications,26 (54.2%) different innovation projects were funded for a total allocation of $227 870. This program demonstrated the ability of small grants to stimulate many applications with novel ideas, a wide range of innovations and reasonable academic productivity.

  2. [The Health Technology Assessment Engine of the Academic Hospital of Udine: first appraisal].

    PubMed

    Vidale, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The Health Technology Assessment Engine (HTAE) of the Academic Hospital of Udine aggregates about one hundred of health technology assessment websites. It was born thanks to Google technology in 2008 and after about four years of testing it became public for everybody from the Homepage of the Italian Society of Health Technology Assessment (SIHTA). In this paper the first results obtained with this resource are reported. The role of the scientific librarian is examined not only as a support specialist in bibliographic search but also as a creative expert in managing new technologies for the community.

  3. Modifying the Toyota Production System for continuous performance improvement in an academic children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, F Bruder; Hendricks, James; Hagan, Patrick; DelBeccaro, Mark

    2009-08-01

    The Toyota Production System (TPS) has become a successful model for improving efficiency and eliminating errors in manufacturing processes. In an effort to provide patients and families with the highest quality clinical care, our academic children's hospital has modified the techniques of the TPS for a program in continuous performance improvement (CPI) and has expanded its application to educational and research programs. Over a period of years, physicians, nurses, residents, administrators, and hospital staff have become actively engaged in a culture of continuous performance improvement. This article provides background into the methods of CPI and describes examples of how we have applied these methods for improvement in clinical care, resident teaching, and research administration.

  4. High prevalence of hospital-acquired infections caused by gram-negative carbapenem resistant strains in Vietnamese pediatric ICUs

    PubMed Central

    Le, Ngai Kien; HF, Wertheim; Vu, Phu Dinh; Khu, Dung Thi Khanh; Le, Hai Thanh; Hoang, Bich Thi Ngoc; Vo, Vu Thanh; Lam, Yen Minh; Vu, Dung Tien Viet; Nguyen, Thu Hoai; Thai, Tung Quang; Nilsson, Lennart E.; Rydell, Ulf; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Nadjm, Behzad; Clarkson, Louise; Hanberger, Håkan; Larsson, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is scarce information regarding hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) among children in resource-constrained settings. This study aims to measure prevalence of HAIs in Vietnamese pediatric hospitals. Monthly point prevalence surveys (PPSs) in 6 pediatric intensive care units (ICUs) in 3 referral hospitals during 1 year. A total of 1363 cases (1143 children) were surveyed, 59.9% male, average age 11 months. Admission sources were: other hospital 49.3%, current hospital 36.5%, and community 15.3%. Reasons for admission were: infectious disease (66%), noninfectious (20.8%), and surgery/trauma (11.3%). Intubation rate was 47.8%, central venous catheter 29.4%, peripheral venous catheter 86.2%, urinary catheter 14.6%, and hemodialysis/filtration 1.7%. HAI was diagnosed in 33.1% of the cases: pneumonia (52.2%), septicemia (26.4%), surgical site infection (2%), and necrotizing enterocolitis (2%). Significant risk factors for HAI included age under 7 months, intubation and infection at admission. Microbiological findings were reported in 212 cases (43%) with 276 isolates: 50 Klebsiella pneumoniae, 46 Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 39 Acinetobacter baumannii, with carbapenem resistance detected in 55%, 71%, and 65%, respectively. Staphylococcus aureus was cultured in 18 cases, with 81% methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Most children (87.6%) received antibiotics, with an average of 1.6 antibiotics per case. Colistin was administered to 96 patients, 93% with HAI and 49% with culture confirmed carbapenem resistance. The high prevalence of HAI with carbapenem resistant gram-negative strains and common treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics and colistin suggests that interventions are needed to prevent HAI and to optimize antibiotic use. PMID:27399106

  5. Sharing Life-Altering Information: Development of Pediatric Hospital Guidelines and Team Training

    PubMed Central

    Frierdich, Sharon A.; Wish, Joel; Kilgore-Carlin, Joyce; Plotkin, Julie A.; Hoover-Regan, Margo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Despite parent and physician reports of inadequate skill development, there are few guidelines for training the pediatric care team in sharing life-altering information (SLAI), i.e., “breaking bad news.” The necessary skills for SLAI differ between pediatric and adult medical environments. Objectives: We set out to establish evidence-based guidelines and multidisciplinary team training for SLAI in pediatrics, and to demonstrate an improvement in immediate self-efficacy of training participants. Methods: A multidisciplinary task force, which included parent participation and feedback, and which received input from parents of patients in multiple pediatric subspecialties, crafted children's hospitalwide guidelines for SLAI. A one-hour training module on the guidelines was presented to several multidisciplinary pediatric team audiences; 159 voluntary pre- and post-presentation self-efficacy surveys were collected. Responses were analyzed by paired t-test (within groups) and ANOVA (between groups). Results: All evaluated groups of care team members reported significant improvements in self-efficacy among four learning objectives after the training. Medical trainees, newer physicians, and nonphysician (e.g., midlevel providers including nurses) team members reported the greatest improvements, regardless of whether they had received previous training in SLAI. Conclusions: We propose pediatric-focused SLAI guidelines based on a modified SPIKES protocol. Focus on patient- and family-centered, culturally sensitive pediatric practices should be the basis for development of training that can be periodically reinforced. Future comprehensive training will incorporate experiential learning. SLAI requires a skill set that benefits from lifelong learning. PMID:24971650

  6. The contributions of library and information services to hospitals and academic health sciences centers: a preliminary taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Abels, Eileen G.; Cogdill, Keith W.; Zach, Lisl

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: This article presents a taxonomy of the contributions of library and information services (LIS) in hospitals and academic health sciences centers. The taxonomy emerges from a study with three objectives: to articulate the value of LIS for hospitals and academic health sciences centers in terms of contributions to organizational missions and goals, to identify measures and measurable surrogates associated with each LIS contribution, and to document best practices for communicating the value of LIS to institutional administrators. Methods: The preliminary taxonomy of LIS contributions in hospitals and academic health sciences centers is based on a review of the literature, twelve semi-structured interviews with LIS directors and institutional administrators, and a focus group of administrators from five academic, teaching, and nonteaching hospitals. Results: Derived from the balanced scorecard approach, the taxonomy of LIS contributions is organized on the basis of five mission-level concepts and fifteen organizational goals. LIS contributions are included only if they have measurable surrogates. Conclusions: The taxonomy of LIS contributions offers a framework for the collection of both quantitative and qualitative data in support of communicating the value of LIS in hospitals and academic health sciences centers. PMID:12113510

  7. Does Academic Blogging Enhance Promotion and Tenure? A Survey of US and Canadian Medicine and Pediatric Department Chairs

    PubMed Central

    Varma, Manu; Adams, Martha; Jhaveri, Kenar D

    2016-01-01

    Background Electronic educational (e-learning) technology usage continues to grow. Many medical journals operate companion blogs (an application of e-learning technology) that enable rapid dissemination of scientific knowledge and discourse. Faculty members participating in promotion and tenure academic tracks spend valuable time and effort contributing, editing, and directing these medical journal blogs. Objective We sought to understand whether chairs of medicine and pediatric departments acknowledge blog authorship as academic achievement. Methods The authors surveyed 267 chairs of US and Canadian medicine and pediatric departments regarding their attitudes toward the role of faculty participation in e-learning and blogging in the promotion and tenure process. The survey completion rate was 22.8% (61/267). Results A majority of respondents (87%, 53/61) viewed educational scholarship as either important or very important for promotion. However, only 23% (14/61) perceived importance to faculty effort in producing content for journal-based blogs. If faculty were to participate in blog authorship, 72% (44/61) of surveyed chairs favored involvement in a journal-based versus a society-based or a personal (nonaffiliated) blog. We identified a “favorable group” of chairs (19/59, 32%), who rated leadership roles in e-learning tools as important or very important, and an “unfavorable group” of chairs (40/59, 68%), who rated leadership roles in e-learning tools as somewhat important or not important. The favorable group were more likely to be aware of faculty bloggers within their departments (58%, 11/19 vs 25%, 10/40), viewed serving on editorial boards of e-learning tools more favorably (79%, 15/19 vs 31%, 12/39), and were more likely to value effort spent contributing to journal-based blogs (53%, 10/19 vs 10%, 4/40). Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that although the majority of department chairs value educational scholarship, only a minority perceive value

  8. Critical values in pediatric surgical pathology: definition, implementation, and reporting in a children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Cheryl M; Spilker, Krista; Lowichik, Amy; Zhou, Holly; Nielson, Kim; Erickson, Lance; Pysher, Theodore J

    2007-12-01

    Timely communication of significant or unexpected findings in surgical pathology can significantly improve patient care. Although surgical pathology critical values have been published, no systematic assessment in pediatric surgical pathology has been published. We surveyed pediatric pathologists and pediatric subspecialists to develop pediatric surgical pathology critical values for verbal reporting before the final pathology report. A policy and process for reporting and documentation was implemented, with retrospective and prospective quality review. Critical values cases constituted 9.4% of surgical pathology accessions. Retrospective analysis revealed that 80% (73/91) had been reported and documented before policy implementation. Following implementation, 97.3% (402/413) were verbally reported and documented. A multidisciplinary group provided valuable information about critical values that might not have been obvious to pediatric pathologists but are important for patient care. Although the term critical values has become embedded in the surgical pathology literature, we would propose an alternative term for significant or unexpected findings that require timely communication and documentation.

  9. Trends in pediatric echocardiography and the yield for congenital heart disease in a major cardiac referral hospital in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Balti, Eric; Menanga, Alain; Dzudie, Anastase; Lekoubou, Alain; Kingue, Samuel; Kengne, Andre Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a common condition in children in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where it is associated with poor outcomes. Diagnosis of CHD in SSA depends essentially on echocardiography, which is available only in few urban referral centers. Our aim was to assess time changes in the pattern of referral for pediatric echocardiography and the subsequent diagnosis of structural CHD in a major SSA city. Methods All pediatric echocardiography performed between 2004 and 2013 at the echocardiography laboratory of the Yaounde General Hospital were reviewed. The primary indication of the study and the presence of structural CHD were recorded. Results Between 2004 and 2013, 9,390 echocardiograms were performed and 834 (8.9%) children aged 1 day to 15 years underwent echocardiography at the center, and 227 (27.2%) cases of definite structural CHD were diagnosed, with 123 (54.2%) in boys. The most frequent indications for echocardiography were heart murmurs (40%) and the suspicion of CHD (37.4%). The commonest CHD was ventricular septal defect (VSD) (30%) with tetralogy of Fallot being the most frequent cyanotic heart lesion (5.3%). The proportion of pediatric echocardiography decreased from 13.3% in 2004–2005 to 6.1% in 2012–2013 (P=0.001) but not in a linear fashion (P=0.072 for linear trend).The diagnosis of structural CHD increased from 25.1% in 2004–2005 to 27.1% in 2012–2013. This increase however was non-significant (P=0.523) and did not follow a linear trend (P=0.230). Conclusions The pattern of referral for pediatric echocardiography at this center has changed over time, but diagnosis of structural CHD has remained the same. Improving access to this diagnostic procedure and subsequent treatment of diagnosed CHD will help improving the outcome of the disease in this setting. PMID:28164029

  10. [Risk factors for death from severe malaria in children at the Charles de Gaulle pediatric hospital of Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Kouéta, Fla; Dao, Lassina; Yé, Diarra; Zoungrana, Alice; Kaboré, Aïssata; Sawadogo, Alphonse

    2007-01-01

    To determine the risk factors for death from severe malaria in children in Burkina Faso, we conducted a retrospective case-control study covering a period of 24 months from January 2004 through December 2005, at the Charles de Gaulle Pediatric Hospital in Ouagadougou. Cases (n=72) were defined as all children hospitalized for and dying of confirmed severe malaria. The control subjects (n=72), matched for age, sex and date of hospitalization; were children hospitalized for confirmed severe malaria who were discharged after recovery. Risk factors assessed included: place of residence, socioeconomic level, self-medication, promptness of hospitalization, nutritional status, temperature and parasitemia. Case and control children were compared with pairwise tests. Low socioeconomic level (OR=5.4), late care (OR=15.5), poor nutritional status (OR=7.9) and a parasitemia greater than or equal to 5% (OR=2.8) were associated with a significant increase in the risk of death. In contrast, the malaria deaths were not associated with place of residence (OR=0.5), self-medication (OR=1) or fever of 41 degrees C or higher (OR=1.1). These results show the need for more health education to encourage early care-seeking in the event of fever, community-based interventions, and strengthening of the technical support centers for health facilities, as part of a national poverty reduction program.

  11. Preparing an Academic Medical Center to Manage Patients Infected With Ebola: Experiences of a University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Carl H; Koenig, Kristi L; Alassaf, Wajdan

    2015-10-01

    As Ebola has spread beyond West Africa, the challenges confronting health care systems with no experience in managing such patients are enormous. Not only is Ebola a significant threat to a population's health, it can infect the medical personnel trying to treat it. As such, it represents a major challenge to those in public health, emergency medical services (EMS), and acute care hospitals. Our academic medical center volunteered to become an Ebola Treatment Center as part of the US effort to manage the threat. We developed detailed policies and procedures for Ebola patient management at our university hospital. Both the EMS system and county public health made significant contributions during the development process. This article shares information about this process and the outcomes to inform other institutions facing similar challenges of preparing for an emerging threat with limited resources. The discussion includes information about management of (1) patients who arrive by ambulance with prior notification, (2) spontaneous walk-in patients, and (3) patients with confirmed Ebola who are interfacility transfers. Hospital management includes information about Ebola screening procedures, personal protective equipment selection and personnel training, erection of a tent outside the main facility, establishing an Ebola treatment unit inside the facility, and infectious waste and equipment management. Finally, several health policy considerations are presented.

  12. [GPs' self-perception of their own role compared with hospital, ambulatory, academic, and health organisation physicians].

    PubMed

    Daghio, Maria Monica; Gaglianò, Giuseppe; Bevini, Massimo; Cadioli, Tiziano; Delvecchio, Carlo; Guidetti, Patrizia; Lorenzetti, Manuela; Fattori, Giuseppe; Ciardullo, Anna Vittoria

    2005-05-01

    Aim of the present study was to explore how the 76 general practitioners (GPs) - serving Carpi district (90,000 residents) - value their own role compared with the hospital, ambulatory, academic, and health organisation physicians'. GPs had a positive self-image only in comparison with health organisation doctors (7 vs 7 grades). GPs disappointed with themselves when comparing their role with ambulatory (-1.6 grades), academic (-1.9 grades) and hospital doctors (-2.2 grades). Secondarily, GPs perceived patients' valuing their professional role mostly 'subordinate' to the other physicians', except health organisation colleagues'.

  13. Epidemiology of Pediatric Trauma and its Pattern in Urban India: A Tertiary Care Hospital-Based Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kundal, Vijay Kumar; Debnath, Pinaki Ranjan; Sen, Amita

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To assess the epidemiology, pattern, and outcome of trauma in pediatric population. Materials and Methods: A total of 1148 pediatric patients below 15 years of age presenting in the emergency department of our hospital were studied over a period of 3 years. The patients were categorized into four age groups of <1 year, 1–5 years, 6–10 years, and 11–15 years. The data were compared regarding mode of trauma, type of injury, place of injury among different age groups and both sexes. Results: The majority of the pediatric trauma cases were seen in males 69.86%, (n = 802) and females comprised only 30.13% (n = 346). Road traffic accident (RTA) was the most common mode of trauma in male children, i.e. 59.47% (n = 477) followed by fall injuries, i.e. 29.42% (n = 236). In females, fall was the most common mode of trauma, i.e. 52.31% (n = 181) followed by RTA (36.70%, n = 127). Fall injuries occurred mostly at homes. Among RTA, hit by vehicle on road while playing was most common followed by passenger accidents on two wheelers, followed by hit by vehicle while walking to school. Among fall, fall while playing at home was the most common. Out of total 1148 patients, 304 (26.48%) comprised the polytrauma cases (involvement of more than two organ systems), followed by abdominal/pelvic trauma (20.99%, n = 241), followed by head/face trauma (19.86%, n = 228). Out of total 1148 patients admitted over a period of 36 months, 64 died (5.57%). 75 (6.5%) patients had some kind of residual deformity or disability. Conclusion: The high incidence of pediatric trauma on roads and falls indicate the need for more supervision during playing and identification of specific risk factors for these injuries in our setting. This study shows that these epidemiological parameters could be a useful tool to identify burden and research priorities for specific type of injuries. A comprehensive trauma registry in our set up seems to be important for formulating policies to reduce pediatric

  14. Everyone's business: developing an integrated model of care to respond to child abuse in a pediatric hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    In pediatric hospitals, social work plays a central role in the prevention, identification, and management of child abuse. Children who are suspected of having been abused or neglected require an evaluation of their psychosocial situation. As an integral member of the health care team, the social worker is well placed to undertake comprehensive psychosocial assessments including information on the child's development, parental capacity, family, and community supports. Current practice approaches have seen a shift away from a narrow, "expert" approach to child protection. This article describes the development of an integrated model of social work service delivery to better respond to vulnerable and at-risk children in a pediatric hospital setting. Developing a new model of service required strategic planning, consultation, and endorsement from senior hospital management. The new model aimed to ensure a high quality, responsive social work service to children at risk of physical abuse, neglect, or cumulative harm. The change necessitated understanding of current research evidence, development of best practice guidelines, and effective communication with staff and external stakeholders. Policy development, implementation of practice guidelines, staff training, data collection, and service evaluation are described. The role of social work management and leadership were central in creating change. Visionary leadership is widely regarded as key to successful organizational change. The management approach included consultation with staff, building commitment to the need for change, addressing staff concerns, and providing a vision of enhanced client outcomes as a result of the change process. This article provides a candid overview of challenges and barriers to change. Change strategies described are easily transferable to other social work settings.

  15. A comprehensive model to build improvement capability in a pediatric academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Gerry M; Schoettker, Pamela J; Alessandrini, Evaline A; Luzader, Carolyn; Kotagal, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center developed a comprehensive model to build quality improvement (QI) capability to support its goal to transform its delivery system through a series of training courses. Two online modules orient staff to basic concepts and terminology and prepare them to participate more effectively in QI teams. The basic program (Rapid Cycle Improvement Collaborative, RCIC) is focused on developing the capability to use basic QI tools and complete a narrow-scoped project in approximately 120 days. The Intermediate Improvement Science Series (I(2)S(2)) program is a leadership course focusing on improvement skills and developing a broader and deeper understanding of QI in the context of the organization and external environment. The Advanced Improvement Methods (AIM) course and Quality Scholars Program stimulate the use of more sophisticated methods and prepare Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and external faculty to undertake QI research. The Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems (AILS) sessions enable interprofessional care delivery system leadership teams to effectively lead a system of care, manage a portfolio of projects, and to deliver on CCHMC's strategic plan. Implementing these programs has shown us that 1) a multilevel curricular approach to building improvement capability is pragmatic and effective, 2) an interprofessional learning environment is critical to shifting mental models, 3) repetition of project experience with coaching and feedback solidifies critical skills, knowledge and behaviors, and 4) focusing first on developing capable interprofessional improvement leaders, versus engaging in broad general QI training across the whole organization, is effective.

  16. Treatment Planning and Delivery of External Beam Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma: The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Chiaho Gray, Jonathan M.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E.; Krasin, Matthew J.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To describe and review the radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning and delivery techniques used for pediatric sarcoma patients at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The treatment characteristics serve as a baseline for future comparison with developing treatment modalities. Patients and Methods: Since January 2003, we have prospectively treated pediatric and young-adult patients with soft-tissue and bone sarcomas on an institutional Phase II protocol evaluating local control and RT-related treatment effects from external-beam RT (conformal or intensity-modulated RT; 83.4%), low-dose-rate brachytherapy (8.3%), or both (8.3%). Here we describe the treatment dosimetry and delivery parameters of the initial 72 patients (median, 11.6 years; range, 1.4-21.6 years). Results: Cumulative doses from all RT modalities ranged from 41.4 to 70.2 Gy (median, 50.4 Gy). Median D{sub 95} and V{sub 95} of the planning target volume of external-beam RT plans were, respectively, 93.4% of the prescribed dose and 94.6% of the target volume for the primary phase and 97.8% and 99.2% for the cone-down/boost phase. The dose-volume histogram statistics for 27 critical organs varied greatly. The spinal cord in 13 of 36 patients received dose >45 Gy (up to 52 Gy in 1 cc) because of tumor proximity. Conclusions: Planning and delivery of complex multifield external beam RT is feasible in pediatric patients with sarcomas. Improvements on conformity and dose gradients are still desired in many cases with sensitive adjacent critical structures. Long-term follow-up will determine the risk of local failure and the benefit of normal tissue avoidance for this population.

  17. Time and Cost Analysis: Pediatric Dental Rehabilitation with General Anesthesia in the Office and the Hospital Settings

    PubMed Central

    Rashewsky, Stephanie; Parameswaran, Ashish; Sloane, Carole; Ferguson, Fred; Epstein, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric dental patients who cannot receive dental care in the clinic due to uncooperative behavior are often referred to receive dental care under general anesthesia (GA). At Stony Brook Medicine, dental patients requiring treatment with GA receive dental care in our outpatient facility at the Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine (SDM) or in the Stony Brook University Hospital ambulatory setting (SBUH). This study investigates the time and cost for ambulatory American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class I pediatric patients receiving full-mouth dental rehabilitation using GA in these 2 locations, along with a descriptive analysis of the patients and dental services provided. In this institutional review board–approved cross-sectional retrospective study, ICD-9 codes for dental caries (521.00) were used to collect patient records between July 2009 and May 2011. Participants were limited to ASA I patients aged 36–60 months. Complete records from 96 patients were reviewed. There were significant differences in cost, total anesthesia time, and recovery room time (P < .001). The average total time (anesthesia end time minus anesthesia start time) to treat a child at SBUH under GA was 222 ± 62.7 minutes, and recovery time (time of discharge minus anesthesia end time) was 157 ± 97.2 minutes; the average total cost was $7,303. At the SDM, the average total time was 175 ± 36.8 minutes, and recovery time was 25 ± 12.7 minutes; the average total cost was $414. After controlling for anesthesia time and procedures, we found that SBUH cost 13.2 times more than SDM. This study provides evidence that ASA I pediatric patients can receive full-mouth dental rehabilitation utilizing GA under the direction of dentist anesthesiologists in an office-based dental setting more quickly and at a lower cost. This is very promising for patients with the least access to care, including patients with special needs and lack of insurance. PMID:23241037

  18. Time and cost analysis: pediatric dental rehabilitation with general anesthesia in the office and the hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Rashewsky, Stephanie; Parameswaran, Ashish; Sloane, Carole; Ferguson, Fred; Epstein, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric dental patients who cannot receive dental care in the clinic due to uncooperative behavior are often referred to receive dental care under general anesthesia (GA). At Stony Brook Medicine, dental patients requiring treatment with GA receive dental care in our outpatient facility at the Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine (SDM) or in the Stony Brook University Hospital ambulatory setting (SBUH). This study investigates the time and cost for ambulatory American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Class I pediatric patients receiving full-mouth dental rehabilitation using GA in these 2 locations, along with a descriptive analysis of the patients and dental services provided. In this institutional review board-approved cross-sectional retrospective study, ICD-9 codes for dental caries (521.00) were used to collect patient records between July 2009 and May 2011. Participants were limited to ASA I patients aged 36-60 months. Complete records from 96 patients were reviewed. There were significant differences in cost, total anesthesia time, and recovery room time (P < .001). The average total time (anesthesia end time minus anesthesia start time) to treat a child at SBUH under GA was 222 ± 62.7 minutes, and recovery time (time of discharge minus anesthesia end time) was 157 ± 97.2 minutes; the average total cost was $7,303. At the SDM, the average total time was 175 ± 36.8 minutes, and recovery time was 25 ± 12.7 minutes; the average total cost was $414. After controlling for anesthesia time and procedures, we found that SBUH cost 13.2 times more than SDM. This study provides evidence that ASA I pediatric patients can receive full-mouth dental rehabilitation utilizing GA under the direction of dentist anesthesiologists in an office-based dental setting more quickly and at a lower cost. This is very promising for patients with the least access to care, including patients with special needs and lack of insurance.

  19. [Kingella kingae ostemyelitis and septic arthritis in paediatric patients. Six cases from the Department of Pediatrics, National University Hospital of Iceland.].

    PubMed

    Birgisson, H; Steingrímsson, O; Guðnason, T

    2000-01-01

    Kingella kingae (K. kingae) is a gram negative rod most often associated with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in children. Infections caused by K. kingae had not been reported in Iceland when six cases were diagnosed at the Pediatric Department at the National University Hospital of Iceland. In this report we describe those cases and review the literature.

  20. Impact of Infectious Diseases Society of America/Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society guidelines on treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Ross, Rachael K; Hersh, Adam L; Kronman, Matthew P; Newland, Jason G; Metjian, Talene A; Localio, A Russell; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Gerber, Jeffrey S

    2014-03-01

    We examined the impact of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines that recommend ampicillin or amoxicillin for children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. Prescribing of ampicillin/amoxicillin increased following guideline publication, but remains low. Cephalosporin and macrolide prescribing decreased but remains common. Further studies exploring outcomes of and reasons for compliance with guidelines are warranted.

  1. Assessing the similarity of surface linguistic features related to epilepsy across pediatric hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Brian; Matykiewicz, Pawel; Bretonnel Cohen, K; Standridge, Shannon M; Glauser, Tracy A; Dlugos, Dennis J; Koh, Susan; Tham, Eric; Pestian, John

    2014-01-01

    Objective The constant progress in computational linguistic methods provides amazing opportunities for discovering information in clinical text and enables the clinical scientist to explore novel approaches to care. However, these new approaches need evaluation. We describe an automated system to compare descriptions of epilepsy patients at three different organizations: Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, the Children’s Hospital Colorado, and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. To our knowledge, there have been no similar previous studies. Materials and methods In this work, a support vector machine (SVM)-based natural language processing (NLP) algorithm is trained to classify epilepsy progress notes as belonging to a patient with a specific type of epilepsy from a particular hospital. The same SVM is then used to classify notes from another hospital. Our null hypothesis is that an NLP algorithm cannot be trained using epilepsy-specific notes from one hospital and subsequently used to classify notes from another hospital better than a random baseline classifier. The hypothesis is tested using epilepsy progress notes from the three hospitals. Results We are able to reject the null hypothesis at the 95% level. It is also found that classification was improved by including notes from a second hospital in the SVM training sample. Discussion and conclusion With a reasonably uniform epilepsy vocabulary and an NLP-based algorithm able to use this uniformity to classify epilepsy progress notes across different hospitals, we can pursue automated comparisons of patient conditions, treatments, and diagnoses across different healthcare settings. PMID:24692393

  2. Prevalence of multidrug resistant uropathogenic bacteria in pediatric patients of a tertiary care hospital in eastern India.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Monali P; Sarangi, Rachita; Padhy, Rabindra N

    2016-01-01

    Today, because systemic infections such as urinary tract infection (UTI) affect even pediatric patients, antibiotic resistant bacteria have become a constant clinical challenge. In the present study, a total of 1054 urine samples were collected from pediatric patients over 18 months. From these samples, 510 isolates of pathogenic bacteria were collected using HiCrome UTI agar. Antibiotic sensitivity tests of isolates were performed using the Kirby-Bauer method. Two Gram-positive bacteria (Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus) and 7 Gram-negative bacteria (Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, K. pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were isolated. Antibiograms of isolated bacteria were ascertained using antibiotics of 4 classes: aminoglycosides, β-lactams, fluoroquinolones and 2 stand-alones (co-trimoxazole and nitrofurantoin). Based on percent values of antibiotic resistance, isolated bacteria were (in decreasing order of number of isolated isolates): E. coli (109)>S. aureus (65)>E. faecalis (82)>E. aerogenes (64)>C. freundii (41)>P. aeruginosa (32)>K. pneumoniae (45)>K. oxytoca (50)>P. vulgaris (22). Surveillance results show that MDR isolates of 9 pathogenic bacteria were prevalent in the environment around the hospital. Thus, revisions to the antimicrobial stewardship program in this area of the country are required to increase clinician confidence in empiric therapy, which is often used for UTI cases.

  3. Clinical liaison nurse model in a community hospital: a unique academic-practice partnership that strengthens clinical nursing education.

    PubMed

    Lovecchio, Catherine P; DiMattio, Mary Jane K; Hudacek, Sharon

    2012-11-01

    The necessity to help baccalaureate nursing students transition to clinical practice in a health care environment governed by change has compelled nurse educators to investigate alternative clinical instruction models that nurture academic-practice partnerships and facilitate student clinical learning. This article describes an academic-practice partnership in a community hospital using the Clinical Liaison Nurse (CLN) model as a link between students and clinical faculty and reports results of a quasi-experimental study that compared perceptions of the clinical learning environment between students participating in the CLN model (experimental group) and those in a traditional, instructor-led clinical model (control group). Students assigned to the CLN model had statistically significantly higher individualization, satisfaction, and task orientation scores on the Clinical Learning Environment Inventory. The findings provide evidence that academic-practice partnerships can be successful in community hospital settings and enhance students' perceptions in the clinical learning environment.

  4. Factors That Negatively Affect the Prognosis of Pediatric Community-Acquired Pneumonia in District Hospital in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Caggiano, Serena; Ullmann, Nicola; De Vitis, Elisa; Trivelli, Marzia; Mariani, Chiara; Podagrosi, Maria; Ursitti, Fabiana; Bertolaso, Chiara; Putotto, Carolina; Unolt, Marta; Pietravalle, Andrea; Pansa, Paola; Mphayokulela, Kajoro; Lemmo, Maria Incoronata; Mkwambe, Michael; Kazaura, Joseph; Duse, Marzia; Nieddu, Francesco; Azzari, Chiara; Cutrera, Renato

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is still the most important cause of death in countries with scarce resources. All children (33 months ± 35 DS) discharged from the Pediatric Unit of Itigi Hospital, Tanzania, with a diagnosis of CAP from August 2014 to April 2015 were enrolled. Clinical data were gathered. Dried blood spot (DBS) samples for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacterial detection were collected in all 100 children included. Twenty-four percent of patients were identified with severe CAP and 11% died. Surprisingly, 54% of patients were admitted with a wrong diagnosis, which increased complications, the need for antibiotics and chest X-rays, and the length of hospitalization. Comorbidity, found in 32% of children, significantly increased severity, complications, deaths, need for chest X-rays, and oxygen therapy. Malnourished children (29%) required more antibiotics. Microbiologically, Streptococcus pneumonia (S. p.), Haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. a.) were the bacteria more frequently isolated. Seventy-five percent of patients had mono-infection. Etiology was not correlated with severity, complications, deaths, oxygen demand, or duration of hospitalization. Our study highlights that difficult diagnoses and comorbidities negatively affect clinical evolution. S. p. and Hib still play a large role; thus, implementation of current vaccine strategies is needed. DBS is a simple and efficient diagnostic method for bacterial identification in countries with scarce resources. PMID:28335406

  5. A Survey of Pediatric CT Protocols and Radiation Doses in South Korean Hospitals to Optimize the Radiation Dose for Pediatric CT Scanning.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Yang, Dong Hyun; Cho, Young Ah; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jin Seong; Koo, Hyun Jung

    2015-12-01

    Children are at greater risk of radiation exposure than adults because the rapidly dividing cells of children tend to be more radiosensitive and they have a longer expected life time in which to develop potential radiation injury. Some studies have surveyed computed tomography (CT) radiation doses and several studies have established diagnostic reference levels according to patient age or body size; however, no survey of CT radiation doses with a large number of patients has yet been carried out in South Korea. The aim of the present study was to investigate the radiation dose in pediatric CT examinations performed throughout South Korea. From 512 CT (222 brain CT, 105 chest CT, and 185 abdominopelvic CT) scans that were referred to our tertiary hospital, a dose report sheet was available for retrospective analysis of CT scan protocols and dose, including the volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), effective dose, and size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). At 55.2%, multiphase CT was the most frequently performed protocol for abdominopelvic CT. Tube current modulation was applied most often in abdominopelvic CT and chest CT, accounting for 70.1% and 62.7%, respectively. Regarding the CT dose, the interquartile ranges of the CTDIvol were 11.1 to 22.5 (newborns), 16.6 to 39.1 (≤1 year), 14.6 to 41.7 (2-5 years), 23.5 to 44.1 (6-10 years), and 31.4 to 55.3 (≤15 years) for brain CT; 1.3 to 5.7 (≤1 year), 3.9 to 6.8 (2-5 years), 3.9 to 9.3 (6-10 years), and 7.7 to 13.8 (≤15 years) for chest CT; and 4.0 to 7.5 (≤1 year), 4.2 to 8.9 (2-5 years), 5.7 to 12.4 (6-10 years), and 7.6 to 16.6 (≤15 years) for abdominopelvic CT. The SSDE and CTDIvol were well correlated for patients <5 years old, whereas the CTDIvol was lower in patients ≥6 years old. Our study describes the various parameters and dosimetry metrics of pediatric CT in South Korea. The CTDIvol, DLP, and effective dose were generally lower than in German and UK surveys, except in

  6. Spectrum of heart diseases in children: an echocardiographic study of 1,666 subjects in a pediatric hospital, Yaounde, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Nguefack, Félicitée; Menanga, Alain P.; Ngo Um, Suzanne; Gody, Jean C.; Tatah, Sandra A.; Koki Ndombo, Paul O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Children’s health programs in Sub-Saharan Africa have always been oriented primarily to infectious diseases and malnutrition. We are witnessing in the early 21st century an epidemiological transition marked by the decline of old diseases and the identification of new diseases including heart disease. Therefore, it is necessary to describe the spectrum of these diseases in order to better prepare health workers to these new challenges. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study focused on heart disease diagnosed by echocardiography in children seen from January 2006 to December 2014 in a pediatric hospital of Yaounde. We collected socio-demographic data and the types of heart disease from registers, patients files as well as the electronic database of echocardiographic records. Results A total of 2,235 patients underwent echocardiographic examination during the study period including 1,666 subjects with heart disease. Congenital cardiopathies were found in 1,230 (73.8%) patients and acquired abnormalities in 429 (25.8%). Seven children (0.4%) had a combination of both types. Congenital heart defects (CHD) were dominated by ventricular septal defect (VSD). Acquired heart disease was mostly rheumatic valvulopathies. Dyspnea on exertion was the most frequent presenting complaint (87.6%). Discovery of a heart murmur was the principal clinical finding on physical examination (81.4%). The median age was 9 months for congenital heart disease and 132 months for acquired heart disease. Conclusions As infectious diseases recede and the diagnostic facilities are improving, pediatric heart diseases occupy a more important position in the spectrum of pediatric diseases in our context. However, the ability to evoke the diagnosis remains unsatisfactory by the majority of health personnel and therefore needs to be improved. Apart from congenital heart diseases, the impact of acquired heart diseases, rheumatic valvulopathy being the highest ranking, is remarkable in

  7. Trends in pediatric pulmonary hypertension–related hospitalizations in the United States from 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Matthew A.; Morales, David L. S.; Gerald, Ken; Hanna, Brian D.; Mallory, George B.; Rossano, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There are few data on the epidemiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH)–related hospitalizations in children in the United States. Our aim was to determine hospital mortality, length of hospitalization, and hospital charges pertaining to PH-related hospitalizations and also the effects of codiagnoses and comorbidities. A retrospective review of the Kids’ Inpatient Database during the years 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009 was analyzed for patients ≤20 years of age with a diagnosis of PH by ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) codes, along with associated diagnoses and comorbidities. Descriptive statistics, including Rao-Scott χ2, ANOVA, and logistic regression models, were utilized on weighted values with survey analysis procedures. The number of PH-related hospital admissions is rising, from an estimated 7,331 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5,556–9,106) in 2000 to 10,792 (95% CI: 8,568–13,016) in 2009. While infant age and congenital heart disease were most commonly associated with PH-related hospitalizations, they were not associated with mortality. Overall mortality for PH-related hospitalizations was greater than that for hospitalizations not associated with PH, 5.7% versus 0.4% (odds ratio: 16.22 [95% CI: 14.78%–17.8%], P < 0.001), but mortality is decreasing over time. Sepsis, respiratory failure, acute renal failure, hepatic insufficiency, arrhythmias, and the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are associated with mortality. The number of PH-related hospitalizations is increasing in the United States. The demographics of PH in this study are evolving. Despite the increasing prevalence, mortality is improving. PMID:26064460

  8. A comparison of calorie and protein intake in hospitalized pediatric oncology patients dining with a caregiver versus patients dining alone: a randomized, prospective clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ruth; Hinds, Pamela S; Ke, Weiming; Hu, X Joan

    2004-01-01

    Hospitalization and cancer therapy can contribute to decreased food intake in children and adolescents with cancer, making it a challenge to meet their nutritional needs. The affect of hospitalization and the eating environment for pediatric oncology patients has not been studied very well, and the effect of altering the social aspect of mealtime for hospitalized pediatric oncology patients has not been studied at all. The authors conducted a randomized, prospective clinical trial to determine if hospitalized pediatric oncology patients consume more protein and calories when eating with a family member or when eating alone in their room at mealtime. All food and beverage intake was recorded for 3 consecutive days, and a food service satisfaction survey was completed on Day 3. Food records were analyzed for calorie and protein intake, and surveys were analyzed for patient/parent satisfaction. The study was completed by 200 hospitalized patients and their parent/caregiver. Overall, neither calorie nor protein intake differed significantly between the two groups, but patient/parent satisfaction was significantly higher in the group of patients who dined with their caregiver. By using analysis of variance, the authors found that ideal body weight and years of sickness were significantly associated with calorie and protein intake.

  9. National survey of pediatric hospitalizations due to Kawasaki disease and coronary artery aneurysms in the USA.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Yusuke; Nochioka, Kotaro; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Testa, Marcia; Sundel, Robert P

    2017-02-01

    Several studies revealed the epidemiology of Kawasaki disease-related hospitalizations among children in the USA and other countries. However, disparities of developing coronary artery aneurysms by race/ethnicity, patient socioeconomic status, and geographic locations remain unknown in the USA. Hospital discharge record data of patients with Kawasaki disease aged 19 years or younger were obtained from the 2003, 2006, 2009, and 2012 Kid's Inpatient Database. The data were weighted to estimate the annual hospitalization rates with respect to age, gender, and race/ethnicity in the USA. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to ascertain the factors associated with the development of coronary artery aneurysms. Total annual hospitalization rates of Kawasaki disease showed a decreasing trend, ranging from 6.54 per 100,000 children in 2003 to 6.11 per 100,000 children in 2012 (p < 0.001). The proportions of coronary artery aneurysms among patients with Kawasaki disease ranged from 2.25 to 3.20%. Factor associated with the development of coronary artery aneurysms was hospitals in West (OR 2.15, 95% CI 1.42-3.26). Race/ethnicity, health insurance status, and household income were not associated with the development of coronary artery aneurysms. Total hospitalization rates of Kawasaki disease showed a decreasing trend. Children admitted to hospitals in West region were more likely to develop coronary artery aneurysms.

  10. Re-envisioning pediatric nursing education.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    A majority of children are healthy and never hospitalized in acute care settings. With the challenges faced in the delivery of pediatric nursing education, is it reasonable to continue to insist that all nursing students have an acute care pediatric nursing experience? This article presents arguments for the need to re-envision pediatric nursing education to use limited pediatric nursing faculty and pediatric clinical sites in innovative ways to maintain high-quality outcomes for undergraduate nursing students. The article outlines issues, provides ideas, and advocates for increased use of available innovations. Virtual learning communities and a wealth of other new technologies provide new and inventive ways to deliver essential content. Pediatric nursing leaders need to demonstrate new pedagogies and discourage teaching specialty content in the same manner it has been taught for more than 40 years. The challenges are important to practicing nurses as well as academic faculty because of the implications for the future nursing workforce in pediatric settings and healthcare of children.

  11. A serial cross-sectional study of pediatric inpatient hospitalizations for non-traumatic dental conditions.

    PubMed

    Chi, D L; Masterson, E E

    2013-08-01

    Investigators have examined children's dental utilization in various settings (e.g., dental offices, emergency departments, operating rooms), but no studies have examined inpatient hospitalizations for non-traumatic dental conditions (NTDCs). The authors examined NTDC-related hospitalization trends in the United States and identified the relationship between complex chronic condition (CCCs) and NTDC-related inpatient hospitalizations. We analyzed data from the U.S. Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2000-2010) for children ages 3 to 17 years (N = 3,030,970). The predictor variable was number of CCCs (0/1/2+). The outcome variable was whether the child had a NTDC-related hospitalization (no/yes). Covariate-adjusted multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate prevalence odds ratios (PORs). From 2000 to 2010, there were 17,993 NTDC-related hospitalizations (0.59%) and a slight increase in NTDC-related hospitalizations (p = .049). This increase was not significant in the final regression model. There was no difference in odds of NTDCs for children with 0 or 1 CCCs (POR = 1.08; 95%CI = 0.99, 1.18), but children with 2+ CCCs had significantly greater odds (POR = 1.61; 95%CI = 1.42, 1.83), as did non-White, publicly insured, and lower income children. NTDC-related hospitalizations for children did not increase from 2000 to 2010. Children with 2+ CCCs had the greatest odds of being hospitalized for NTDCs, which highlights the need to develop preventive interventions targeting children with 2+ CCCs.

  12. Process mapping evaluation of medication reconciliation in academic teaching hospitals: a critical step in quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Holbrook, Anne; Bowen, James M; Patel, Harsit; O'Brien, Chris; You, John J; Tahavori, Roshan; Doleweerd, Jeff; Berezny, Tim; Perri, Dan; Nieuwstraten, Carmine; Troyan, Sue; Patel, Ameen

    2016-01-01

    Background Medication reconciliation (MedRec) has been a mandated or recommended activity in Canada, the USA and the UK for nearly 10 years. Accreditation bodies in North America will soon require MedRec for every admission, transfer and discharge of every patient. Studies of MedRec have revealed unintentional discrepancies in prescriptions but no clear evidence that clinically important outcomes are improved, leading to widely variable practices. Our objective was to apply process mapping methodology to MedRec to clarify current processes and resource usage, identify potential efficiencies and gaps in care, and make recommendations for improvement in the light of current literature evidence of effectiveness. Methods Process engineers observed and recorded all MedRec activities at 3 academic teaching hospitals, from initial emergency department triage to patient discharge, for general internal medicine patients. Process maps were validated with frontline staff, then with the study team, managers and patient safety leads to summarise current problems and discuss solutions. Results Across all of the 3 hospitals, 5 general problem themes were identified: lack of use of all available medication sources, duplication of effort creating inefficiency, lack of timeliness of completion of the Best Possible Medication History, lack of standardisation of the MedRec process, and suboptimal communication of MedRec issues between physicians, pharmacists and nurses. Discussion MedRec as practised in this environment requires improvements in quality, timeliness, consistency and dissemination. Further research exploring efficient use of resources, in terms of personnel and costs, is required. PMID:28039294

  13. Provider perceptions of the social work environment and the state of pediatric care in a downsized urban public academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Tataw, David Besong

    2011-05-01

    The author's purpose through this study was to document and analyze health provider perceptions of their social work environment and the state of pediatric care at Los Angeles County King/Drew Hospital and Medical Center in 2000, after the restructuring and downsizing of the hospital and its community clinics. The research results showed nurses and physicians reporting that both the quality of pediatric care and the provider social work environment were poor. Negative factors in the social work environment included: low employee morale, poorly staffed clinical teams, lack of professional autonomy, perceptions of low quality of care for pediatric patients, and interpersonal issues of poor communication and collaboration among providers. Providers also perceived a non-supportive work environment, sense of powerlessness, poor quality of work, lack of goal clarity from leadership, lack of fairness in leadership behavior, and an organizational leadership that is abandoning its core mission and values, thereby making it difficult for providers to carry out their professional functions. The author's findings in this study suggest a relationship between intra-role conflict, social employment environment and quality of care at King/Drew Medical Center in 2000. Lessons for practice are presented.

  14. Hospitalizations for pneumonia, invasive diseases and otitis in Tuscany (Italy), 2002-2014: Which was the impact of universal pneumococcal pediatric vaccination?

    PubMed

    Boccalini, Sara; Varone, Ornella; Chellini, Martina; Pieri, Luca; Sala, Antonino; Berardi, Cesare; Bonanni, Paolo; Bechini, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main causative organism of acute media otitis in children and meningitis and bacterial pneumonia in the community. Since 2008 in Tuscany, central Italy, the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7-valent vaccine, switched to 13-valent vaccine in 2010) was actively offered free of charge to all newborns. Aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of pneumococcal pediatric vaccination in the Tuscan population on hospitalizations potentially caused by S. pneumoniae, during pre-vaccination (PVP, 2002-2007) and vaccination period (VP, 2009-2014). We analyzed hospital discharge records (HDRs) of all hospitals in Tuscany from 2002 to 2014. Hospitalizations potentially due to pneumococcal diseases were 347, 221. The general hospitalization rate was 716/100,000 inhabitants during PVP and 753/100,000 in VP, with a decrease of 29.1% in the age-group 0-9 y ("target" of the vaccination program) and an increase of 75.7% in subjects >64 y of age. During VP, admission days and hospitalization costs increased (6.2% and 24.2%, respectively), especially in patients >64 y (12.9% and 33.8%, respectively); in children <10 y decreased by 21.2% and 12.8%, respectively. The pneumococcal pediatric vaccination resulted in the decrease of hospitalizations in younger but the expected indirect effect in the elderly was not reported, justifying the Tuscan recommendation to extend the vaccination to subjects > 64 y.

  15. Pediatric and congenital heart transplant: twenty-year experience in a tertiary Brazilian Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Miana, Leonardo Augusto; Azeka, Estela; Canêo, Luiz Fernando; Turquetto, Aída Luisa; Tanamati, Carla; Penha, Juliano Gomes; Cauduro, Alexandre; Jatene, Marcelo Biscegli

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac transplantation remains the gold standard for end-stage cardiomyopathies and congenital heart defects in pediatric patients. Objective This study aims to report on 20 years of experience since the first case and evaluate our results. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of the database and outpatient follow-up. Between October 1992 and April 2012, 109 patients underwent 114 transplants. 51.8% of them being female. The age of patients ranged from 12 days to 21 years with a mean of 8.8±5.7 years and a median of 5.2 years. The underlying diagnosis was dilated cardiomyopathy in 61.5%, congenital heart disease in 26.6% and restrictive cardiomyopathy in 11.9%. All patients above 17 years old had congenital heart disease. Results Survival rate at 30 days, 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 years were 90.4%, 81.3%, 70.9%, 60.5%, 44.4% and 26.7%, respectively. Mean cold ischemic time was 187.9 minutes and it did not correlate with mortality (P>0.05). Infectious complications and rejection episodes were the most common complications (P<0.0001), occurring, respectively, in 66% and 57.4% of the survivors after 10 years. There was no incidence of graft vascular disease and lymphoproliferative disease at year one, but they affected, respectively, 7.4% and 11% of patients within 10 years. Conclusion Twenty-year pediatric heart transplant results at our institution were quite satisfactory and complication rates were acceptable. PMID:25372904

  16. Detection of Oxacillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from the Neonatal and Pediatric Units of a Brazilian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Valéria Cataneli; Martins, André; de Souza Rugolo, Lígia Maria Suppo; de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza da Cunha, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine, by phenotypic and genotypic methods, oxacillin susceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit patients seen at the University Hospital of the Botucatu School of Medicine. Methods: A total of 100 S. aureus strains isolated from the following materials were studied: 25 blood cultures, 21 secretions, 12 catheters, 3 cannulae and one chest drain from 62 patients in the neonatal unit, and 36 blood cultures, one pleural fluid sample and one peritoneal fluid sample from 38 patients in the pediatric unit. Resistance of the S. aureus isolates to oxacillin was evaluated by the disk diffusion method with oxacillin (1 μg) and cefoxitin (30 μg), agar screening test using Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 6 μg/ml oxacillin and 4% NaCl, and detection of the mecA gene by PCR. In addition, the isolates were tested for β-lactamase production using disks impregnated with Nitrocefin and hyperproduction of β-lactamase using amoxicillin (20 μg) and clavulanic acid (10 μg) disks. Results: Among the 100 S. aureus strains included in the study, 18.0% were resistant to oxacillin, with 16.1% MRSA being detected in the neonatal unit and 21.0% in the pediatric unit. The oxacillin (1 μg) and cefoxitin (30 μg) disk diffusion methods presented 94.4% and 100% sensitivity, respectively, and 98.8% specificity. The screening test showed 100% sensitivity and 98.8% specificity. All isolates produced β-lactamase and one of these strains was considered to be a hyperproducer. Conclusions: The 30 μg cefoxitin disk diffusion method presented the best result when compared to the 1 μg oxacillin disk. The sensitivity of the agar screening test was similar to that of the cefoxitin disk diffusion method and higher than that of the oxacillin disk diffusion method. We observed variations in the percentage of oxacillin-resistant isolates during the study period, with a decline over the last years which might be

  17. [Epidemiology, microbiology, and outcomes of septicemia in children treated at the Charles de Gaulle University Pediatric Hospital in Burkina Faso].

    PubMed

    Ouédraogo, Abdoul-Salam; Dakouré-Kissou, Aimée; Poda, Gandaaza Euthyme Armel; Koueta, Fla; Yé-Ouattara, Diarra; Ouédraogo-Traoré, Rasmata

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the epidemiological and microbiological characteristics and outcome of children with septicemia at the Charles de Gaulle University Pediatric Hospital of Ouagadougou to help improve probabilistic antibiotic therapy in this type of infection. This retrospective descriptive study covered all the children from 0 to 15 years old seen over a period of 7 years in any hospital department with suspected bacteriemia and for whom the bacteriology laboratory performed a blood culture. During the study period, the laboratory received 842 requests for blood cultures and found 154 (18.3%) of them to be positive. Files for 81 of the 154 patients could be found and examined. The distribution according to age showed septicemia was most frequent among those aged 6-15 years (61.7% of the cases). Microbial identification showed the dominant species to be Salmonella enterica (serovars paratyphi and typhi) (58%) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (12.3%). The salmonella isolates had a high rate of resistance to amoxicillin, chloramphenicol and cotrimoxazole. Staphylococci were always sensitive to the antibiotics with which they were tested, although to a lesser extent for penicillin G. All patients routinely received antibiotic treatment, and 81.5% (n=66) were cured (5 children died and 10 left the hospital against medical advice). This study shows that the bacterial epidemiology of septicemia in our setting is dominated by salmonella. Trends in bacterial resistance to antibiotics showed that common antibiotics such as amoxicillin and cotrimoxazole are no longer acceptable as probabilist therapy here. They should be replaced in this type of infection by injectable third generation cephalosporin alone or combined with aminoglycosides.

  18. Pediatric oncology at Hospital Infantil de Mexico: fifty-five years of accomplishment.

    PubMed

    Medina-Sanson, A; Martínez-Avalos, A; Gallegos-Castorena, S; Juárez-Villegas, L E; González-Montalvo, P; Perales-Arroyo, A; Gallegos-González, E; Ayometzi-Ouchi, M T

    2002-09-01

    The Department of Oncology at Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez (HIMFG) was the first unit in our country, and one of the first in Latin America, to specialize in the management of children with cancer. The HIMFG is part of the National Institutes of Health of Mexico, and is a reference hospital with research, educative, and tertiary care medical function. To date, the HIMFG and the Instituto Nacional de Pediatria are the principal medical centers in which children with cancer receive comprehensive care.

  19. Integrating Safe Sleep Practices into a Pediatric Hospital: Outcomes of a Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Angela D; Sisterhen, Laura L; Mallard, Ellen; Borecky, Betsy; Schmid, Barbara; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Luo, Chunqiao

    2016-01-01

    A quality improvement project for implementing safe sleep practices (SSP) was conducted at a large, U.S children's hospital. The intervention involved education of staff and standardization of infant sleep practices utilizing a multifaceted approach. Staff surveys and environmental audits were conducted pre- and post-intervention. Safe Sleep Environment (SSE) audits showed an improvement from 23% to 34% (p<0.001) post-intervention. Staff confidence to provide education to caregivers on SSP showed a significant increase. Results from this project demonstrate a successful approach to implement SSP in the hospital setting. Infant safe sleep practices have the potential to reduce infant mortality.

  20. Magic as a therapeutic intervention to promote coping in hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hart, Robyn; Walton, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Magic as a therapeutic intervention is used in an innovative, hospital-based program to address the psychosocial issues children and adolescents often experience as a result of illness and hospitalization. A child life specialist and a magician with an MBA collaborated, blending clinical expertise with business acumen and professional-level magic skills to create the program. The program has two distinct components: (1) magicians using interactive, close-up magic and humor as a technique to promote socialization, enhance self-esteem, and increase opportunities for choice and control, and (2) magicians providing the personal instruction and materials that enable chronically ill and long-term patients to learn and perform magic to promote a sense of empowerment and feelings of mastery. Positive responses from patients, families, and staff to the program at one hospital led to the creation of Open Heart Magic, a non-profit children's foundation that maintains and staffs bedside, interactive therapeutic magic programs in five hospitals in the Chicago metropolitan area.

  1. Experiences and Implications of Social Workers Practicing in a Pediatric Hospital Environment Affected by SARS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gearing, Robin Edward; Saini, Michael; McNeill, Ted

    2007-01-01

    This phenomenological study's purpose was threefold: to detail the experiences of social workers practicing in a hospital environment affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), to describe essential themes and structures of social work practices within this crisis environment, and to explore recommendations for better preparedness to…

  2. The role of rotavirus associated with pediatric gastroenteritis in a general hospital in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Anochie, Philip Ifesinachi; Onyeneke, Edwina Chinwe; Asowata, Emmanuel Osaretin; Afocha, Ebelechukwu; Onyeozirila, Anthony Chidiebere; Ogu, Angelina Chinyere; Onyeneke, Bestman Chukwuemeka

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bacterial, viral and parasitic agents have been implicated and confirmed as causative agents of gastroenteritis in children with ages below 5 years old. The major role of rotavirus as causative agent is not widely recognized within the public health community, particularly in developing countries. This study examined the role of rotavirus as a causative agent of childhood gastroenteritis in infants and young children below 5 years of age in a General Hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods Parents and caregivers of children admitted to the hospital were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Viral RNA was extracted from the stool samples collected and analyzed using RT-PCR for genotyping and agarose gel electrophoresis for identification of rotavirus electrophoretypes. Results Out of the 71 samples analyzed, 16 (22.5%) were positive for rotavirus. A total of 12 (75%) males and 4 (25%) females were positive for rotavirus gastroenteritis with most cases (7, 43.8%) distributed to the 13-24 months age group, followed closely by the 1-6 months age group, with 6 cases, 37.5%. Rotavirus G2 genotype was the most prevalent strain in the hospital (10 patients, 62.5%) followed by G1 (6 patients, 37.5%). These were the only rotavirus genotypes detected in the hospital. PMID:24432291

  3. Malaria and HIV among pediatric inpatients in two Tanzanian referral hospitals: A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Smart, Luke R; Orgenes, Neema; Mazigo, Humphrey D; Minde, Mercy; Hokororo, Adolfine; Shakir, Muhammad; Verweij, Jaco J; Downs, Jennifer A; Peck, Robert N

    2016-07-01

    Malaria remains common in sub-Saharan Africa, but it is frequently over-diagnosed and over-treated in hospitalized children. HIV is prevalent in many malaria endemic areas and may delay parasite clearance and increase mortality among children with malaria. This prospective cohort study enrolled children with suspected malaria between 3 months and 12 years of age hospitalized at two referral hospitals in Tanzania. Both a thick blood smear (BS) and a malaria rapid diagnostic test (mRDT) were performed. If discordant results were obtained, PCR was performed for Plasmodium falciparum. Malaria was confirmed if two out of three tests were positive. Malaria parasite densities were determined for two consecutive days after diagnosis and treatment of malaria. All participants were tested for HIV. Among 1492 hospitalized children, 400 (26.8%) were enrolled with suspected malaria infection. There were 196/400 (49.0%) males, and the median age was 18 [9-36] months. BS was positive in 95/400 (23.8%), and mRDT was positive in 70/400 (17.5%), with moderate agreement (Kappa=0.598). Concordant results excluded malaria in 291/400 (72.8%) and confirmed malaria in 56/400 (14.0%). PCR performed on 53 discordant results confirmed malaria in 1/39 of the BS-positive/mRDT-negative cases, and 6/14 of the BS-negative/mRDT-positive cases. The prevalence of confirmed malaria was 63/400 (15.8%). In multivariable logistic regression, malaria was associated with HIV (OR 3.45 [1.65-7.20], p=0.001). Current breastfeeding (OR 0.25 [0.11-0.56], p=0.001) and higher hemoglobin (OR 0.70 [0.60-0.81], p<0.001 per 1g/dL) were associated with decreased odds of malaria. Malaria parasite clearance was delayed in HIV-infected participants (p<0.001). Malaria is over-diagnosed even at referral centers in high transmission areas. Hospitalized HIV-infected children are more likely to have malaria and exhibit delayed clearance of parasites. Hospitals should consider using mRDTs as a first step for malaria testing

  4. Monophasic versus biphasic defibrillation for pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients: a nationwide population-based study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Conventional monophasic defibrillators for out-of-hospital cardiac-arrest patients have been replaced with biphasic defibrillators. However, the advantage of biphasic over monophasic defibrillation for pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac-arrest patients remains unknown. This study aimed to compare the survival outcomes of pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac-arrest patients who underwent monophasic defibrillation with those who underwent biphasic defibrillation. Methods This prospective, nationwide, population-based observational study included pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac-arrest patients from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2009. The primary outcome measure was survival at 1 month with minimal neurologic impairment. The secondary outcome measures were survival at 1 month and the return of spontaneous circulation before hospital arrival. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the independent association between defibrillator type (monophasic or biphasic) and outcomes. Results Among 5,628 pediatric out-of-hospital cardiac-arrest patients (1 through 17 years old), 430 who received defibrillation shock with monophasic or biphasic defibrillator were analyzed. The number of patients who received defibrillation shock with monophasic defibrillator was 127 (30%), and 303 (70%) received defibrillation shock with biphasic defibrillator. The survival rates at 1 month with minimal neurologic impairment were 17.5% and 24.4%, the survival rates at 1 month were 32.3% and 35.6%, and the rates of return of spontaneous circulation before hospital arrival were 24.4% and 27.4% in the monophasic and biphasic defibrillator groups, respectively. Hierarchic logistic regression analyses by using generalized estimation equations found no significant difference between the two groups in terms of 1-month survival with minimal neurologic impairment (odds ratio (OR), 1.57; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.87 to 2.83; P = 0.14) and 1-month survival (OR

  5. Hospital outcomes associated with guideline recommended antibiotic therapy for pediatric pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Joanna; Ambroggio, Lilliam; Kurowski, Eileen Murtagh; Statile, Angela; Graham, Camille; Courter, Joshua D.; Sheehan, Brieanne; Iyer, Srikant; White, Christine M.; Shah, Samir S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent national guidelines recommend use of narrow spectrum antibiotic therapy as empiric treatment for children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. However, clinical outcomes associated with adoption of this recommendation have not been studied. Methods This retrospective cohort study included children 3 months -18 years, hospitalized with CAP from May 2, 2011 through July 30, 2012. Primary exposure of interest was empiric antibiotic therapy, classified as guideline recommended or not. Primary outcomes were length of stay (LOS), total hospital costs, and inpatient pharmacy costs. Secondary outcomes included broadened antibiotic therapy, emergency department revisits, and readmissions. Multivariable linear regression and Fisher’s exact test were performed to determine the association of guideline recommended antibiotic therapy on outcomes. Results Empiric guideline recommended therapy was prescribed to 168 (76%) of 220 patients. Median hospital LOS was 1.3 days (IQR: 0.9-1.9 days); median total costs of index hospitalization were $4,097 (IQR: $2,657-$6,054); median inpatient pharmacy costs were $91 (IQR: $40-$183). Between patients who did and did not receive guideline recommended therapy, there were no differences in LOS (adjusted −5.8% change; 95% CI: −22.1, 12.8), total costs (adjusted −10.9% change; 95% CI: −27.4, 9.4), or inpatient pharmacy costs (adjusted 14.8% change; 95% CI: −43.4, 27.1). Secondary outcomes were rare with no difference in unadjusted analysis between patients who did and did not receive guideline recommended therapy. Conclusions Use of guideline recommended antibiotic therapy was not associated with unintended negative consequences; there were no changes in LOS, total costs, or inpatient pharmacy costs. PMID:25263758

  6. The parents', hospitalized child's, and health care providers' perceptions and experiences of family centered care within a pediatric critical care setting: a metasynthesis of qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Foster, Mandie Jane; Whitehead, Lisa; Maybee, Patricia; Cullens, Victoria

    2013-11-01

    The delivery of family centered care (FCC) occurs within varied pediatric care settings with a belief that this model of care meets the psychosocial, emotional, and physical needs of the hospitalized child and family. The aim of this review was to explore the attitudes, experiences, and implementation of FCC from many studies and to facilitate a wider and more thorough understanding of this practice from a diverse sample of parents, hospitalized children, and their health care providers within a pediatric critical care setting. A metasynthesis is an integration of qualitative research findings based on a systematic review of the literature. Thirty original research articles focusing on family-centered care experiences from the hospitalized child's, parents', and health care providers' perception published between 1998 and 2011 met the criteria for the review. Nine syntheses from 17 themes emerged from the synthesis of the literature: Prehospital, Entry into the Hospital, Journeying Through Unknown Waters, Information, Relationships, The hospital Environment, The Possibility of Death, Religion and Spirituality, and The Journey Home. The individual cultures of the critical care units helped create and reinforce the context of parental needs where satisfaction with communication, information, and relationships were interconnecting factors that helped maintain the positive or negative experiences for the parent, hospitalized child, and/or health care providers.

  7. Time trends in pediatric hospitalizations for hepatitis A in Greece (1999-2013): Assessment of the impact of universal infant immunization in 2008.

    PubMed

    Papaevangelou, V; Alexopoulou, Z; Hadjichristodoulou, C; Kourlamba, G; Katsioulis, A; Theodoridou, K; Spoulou, V; Theodoridou, M

    2016-07-02

    Hepatitis A vaccine was introduced in the Greek National Immunization Program in 2008. To estimate possible impact of the universal vaccination implementation, time trends of hospitalizations for hepatitis A at the Infectious Diseases Unit of a Tertiary Pediatric Hospital in Athens during 1999-2013 were analyzed. Hepatitis A hospitalizations were recorded from the discharge database and were expressed as frequencies and rate of annual departmental hospitalizations. Time series analysis (ARIMA) was used to explore trends and the impact of the vaccination. Moreover, changes in patient age, population group distribution and the duration of hospitalization were also examined. Hepatitis A hospitalizations rate significantly decreased between pre-vaccination (1999-2008) and post-vaccination (2009-2013) era from 50.5 to 20.8/1000 hospitalizations (p = 0.005). A 3-year periodicity and a trend of reduction on hepatitis A hospitalizations rates across years were noted. Roma children had significant higher rates of hepatitis A hospitalization, followed by immigrant children. Importantly, possibly due to preceding vaccine availability with considerable uptake in private market and unvaccinated group/pockets of children (Roma), overall vaccination effect was less apparent when compared to data from other countries that implemented universal vaccination. No significant change in patient age, population group distribution, or duration of hospitalization was observed. High risk groups such as Roma children should be targeted for vaccination to reduce future outbreaks.

  8. Impaired glucose tolerance in pediatric burn patients at discharge from the acute hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Fram, Ricki Y; Cree, Melanie G; Wolfe, Robert R; Barr, David; Herndon, David N

    2010-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response, is a common occurrence after thermal injury. This stress response has been documented to persist up to 9 months postburn. The purpose of this study was to measure insulin sensitivity in severely burned children before discharge when wounds are 95% healed. Twenty-four children, aged 4 to 17 years, with burns > or = 40% TBSA underwent a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test before discharge from the acute pediatric burn unit. Plasma glucose and insulin levels as well as the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) were compared with published oral glucose tolerance test data from healthy, nonburned children. There was a significant difference between severely burned children and nonburned, healthy children with respect to the HOMAIR. Severely burned children had a HOMAIR of 3.53 +/- 1.62 compared with the value in nonburned, healthy children of 1.28 +/- 0.16 (P < .05). Insulin resistance secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response persists in severely burned children when burn wounds are at least 95% healed. The results of this study warrant future investigations into therapeutic options for the burned child during the rehabilitative phase of their care after injury.

  9. Impaired glucose tolerance in pediatric burn patients at discharge from the acute hospital stay

    PubMed Central

    Fram, Ricki Y.; Cree, Melanie G.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Barr, David; Herndon, David N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Hyperglycemia, secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response, is a common occurrence after thermal injury. This stress response has been documented to persist up to 9 months post burn. The purpose of this study was to measure insulin sensitivity in severely burned children prior to discharge when wounds are 95% healed. Methods Twenty-four children, aged 4–17 years, with burns ≥ 40% total body surface area (TBSA) underwent a 2 hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) prior to discharge from the acute pediatric burn unit. Plasma glucose and insulin levels, as well as the Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMAIR) were compared to published OGTT data from healthy, non-burned children. Results There was a significant difference between severely burned children and non-burned, healthy children with respect to the HOMAIR. Severely burned children had a HOMAIR of 3.53±1.62 compared to the value in non-burned healthy children was 1.28±0.16 (p<0.05). Conclusion Insulin resistance secondary to the hypermetabolic stress response persists in severely burned children when burn wounds are at least 95% healed. The results of this study warrant future investigations into therapeutic options for the burned child during the rehabilitative phase of their care after injury. PMID:20634704

  10. Hospital-associated venous thromboembolism in pediatrics: a systematic review and meta-analysis of risk factors and risk-assessment models.

    PubMed

    Mahajerin, Arash; Branchford, Brian R; Amankwah, Ernest K; Raffini, Leslie; Chalmers, Elizabeth; van Ommen, C Heleen; Goldenberg, Neil A

    2015-08-01

    Hospital-associated venous thromboembolism, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is increasing in pediatric centers. The objective of this work was to systematically review literature on pediatric hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism risk factors and risk-assessment models, to inform future prevention research. We conducted a literature search on pediatric venous thromboembolism risk via PubMed (1946-2014) and Embase (1980-2014). Data on risk factors and risk-assessment models were extracted from case-control studies, while prevalence data on clinical characteristics were obtained from registries, large (n>40) retrospective case series, and cohort studies. Meta-analyses were conducted for risk factors or clinical characteristics reported in at least three studies. Heterogeneity among studies was assessed with the Cochran Q test and quantified by the I(2) statistic. From 394 initial articles, 60 met the final inclusion criteria (20 case-control studies and 40 registries/large case series/cohort studies). Significant risk factors among case-control studies were: intensive care unit stay (OR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.97-2.32); central venous catheter (OR: 2.12, 95% CI: 2.00-2.25); mechanical ventilation (OR: 1.56, 95%CI: 1.42-1.72); and length of stay in hospital (per each additional day, OR: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.03-1.03). Three studies developed/applied risk-assessment models from a combination of these risk factors. Fourteen significant clinical characteristics were identified through non-case-control studies. This meta-analysis confirms central venous catheter, intensive care unit stay, mechanical ventilation, and length of stay as risk factors. A few pediatric hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism risk scores have emerged employing these factors. Prospective validation is necessary to inform risk-stratified prevention trials.

  11. Hospital-associated venous thromboembolism in pediatrics: a systematic review and meta-analysis of risk factors and risk-assessment models

    PubMed Central

    Mahajerin, Arash; Branchford, Brian R.; Amankwah, Ernest K.; Raffini, Leslie; Chalmers, Elizabeth; van Ommen, C. Heleen; Goldenberg, Neil A.

    2015-01-01

    Hospital-associated venous thromboembolism, including deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, is increasing in pediatric centers. The objective of this work was to systematically review literature on pediatric hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism risk factors and risk-assessment models, to inform future prevention research. We conducted a literature search on pediatric venous thromboembolism risk via PubMed (1946–2014) and Embase (1980–2014). Data on risk factors and risk-assessment models were extracted from case-control studies, while prevalence data on clinical characteristics were obtained from registries, large (n>40) retrospective case series, and cohort studies. Meta-analyses were conducted for risk factors or clinical characteristics reported in at least three studies. Heterogeneity among studies was assessed with the Cochran Q test and quantified by the I2 statistic. From 394 initial articles, 60 met the final inclusion criteria (20 case-control studies and 40 registries/large case series/cohort studies). Significant risk factors among case-control studies were: intensive care unit stay (OR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.97–2.32); central venous catheter (OR: 2.12, 95% CI: 2.00–2.25); mechanical ventilation (OR: 1.56, 95%CI: 1.42–1.72); and length of stay in hospital (per each additional day, OR: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.03–1.03). Three studies developed/applied risk-assessment models from a combination of these risk factors. Fourteen significant clinical characteristics were identified through non-case-control studies. This meta-analysis confirms central venous catheter, intensive care unit stay, mechanical ventilation, and length of stay as risk factors. A few pediatric hospital-acquired venous thromboembolism risk scores have emerged employing these factors. Prospective validation is necessary to inform risk-stratified prevention trials. PMID:26001789

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of a Hospital-Associated Clone of Klebsiella pneumoniae ST340/CC258 Coproducing RmtG and KPC-2 Isolated from a Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Miriam R.; Francisco, Gabriela R.; Bueno, Maria Fernanda C.; Ienne, Susan; Souza, Tiago A.; de Oliveira Garcia, Doroti

    2016-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 1194/11, belonging to the hospital-associated sequence type 340 (ST340; clonal complex CC258), isolated from a catheter tip culture from a pediatric patient. The multidrug-resistant strain coproduced the 16S rRNA methyltransferase rRNA RmtG and β-lactamases KPC-2 and CTX-M-15. PMID:27811089

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of a Hospital-Associated Clone of Klebsiella pneumoniae ST340/CC258 Coproducing RmtG and KPC-2 Isolated from a Pediatric Patient.

    PubMed

    Cerdeira, Louise; Fernandes, Miriam R; Francisco, Gabriela R; Bueno, Maria Fernanda C; Ienne, Susan; Souza, Tiago A; de Oliveira Garcia, Doroti; Lincopan, Nilton

    2016-11-03

    We report here the draft genome sequence of a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain 1194/11, belonging to the hospital-associated sequence type 340 (ST340; clonal complex CC258), isolated from a catheter tip culture from a pediatric patient. The multidrug-resistant strain coproduced the 16S rRNA methyltransferase rRNA RmtG and β-lactamases KPC-2 and CTX-M-15.

  14. Implementation of NAP4 emergency airway management recommendations in a quaternary-level pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Long, Elliot; Cincotta, Domenic; Grindlay, Joanne; Pellicano, Anastasia; Clifford, Michael; Sabato, Stefan

    2017-02-28

    Emergency airway management, particularly outside of the operating room, is associated with a high incidence of life-threatening adverse events. Based on the recommendations of the 4th National Audit Project, we aimed to develop hospital-wide systems changes to improve the safety of emergency airway management. We describe a framework for governance in the form of a hospital airway special interest group. We describe the development and implementation of the following systems changes: 1. A local intubation algorithm modified from the Difficult Airway Society's plan A-B-C-D approach, including clear pathways for airway escalation, and emphasizing the concepts of resuscitation prior to intubation, planning for failure, and avoidance of fixation error. 2. Simplified and standardized airway equipment located in identical airway carts in all critical care areas. 3. A preintubation checklist and equipment template to standardize preparation for airway management. 4. Availability of continuous waveform endtidal capnography in all critical care areas for confirmation of correct endotracheal tube placement. 5. Multidisciplinary team training to address the technical and nontechnical aspects of nonoperating room intubation. In addition, we describe methodology for ongoing monitoring of performance through a quality assurance framework. In conclusion, changes in the process of emergency airway management at a hospital level are feasible through collaboration. Their impact on patient-based outcomes requires further study.

  15. The Effect of Availability of Manpower on Trauma Resuscitation Times in a Tertiary Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Nathaniel Xin Ern; Koh, Zhi Xiong; Nadkarni, Nivedita; Singaram, Kanageswari; Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Background For trauma patients, delays to assessment, resuscitation, and definitive care affect outcomes. We studied the effects of resuscitation area occupancy and trauma team size on trauma team resuscitation speed in an observational study at a tertiary academic institution in Singapore. Methods From January 2014 to January 2015, resuscitation videos of trauma team activated patients with an Injury Severity Score of 9 or more were extracted for review within 14 days by independent reviewers. Exclusion criteria were patients dead on arrival, inter-hospital transfers, and up-triaged patients. Data captured included manpower availability (trauma team size and resuscitation area occupancy), assessment (airway, breathing, circulation, logroll), interventions (vascular access, imaging), and process-of-care time intervals (time to assessment/intervention/adjuncts, time to imaging, and total time in the emergency department). Clinical data were obtained by chart review and from the trauma registry. Results Videos of 70 patients were reviewed over a 13-month period. The median time spent in the emergency department was 154.9 minutes (IQR 130.7–207.5) and the median resuscitation team size was 7, with larger team sizes correlating with faster process-of-care time intervals: time to airway assessment (p = 0.08) and time to disposition (p = 0.04). The mean resuscitation area occupancy rate (RAOR) was 1.89±2.49, and the RAOR was positively correlated with time spent in the emergency department (p = 0.009). Conclusion Our results suggest that adequate staffing for trauma teams and resuscitation room occupancy are correlated with faster trauma resuscitation and reduced time spent in the emergency department. PMID:27136299

  16. [Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections in the pediatric teaching hospital Charles de Gaulle of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso].

    PubMed

    Ouédraogo Yugbaré, S O; Ouédraogo, R; Nenebi, A; Traoré, B; Congo, L; Yonli, F; Kima, D; Bonané, P; Yé, D; Plantier, J-C; Vabret, A; Marguet, C; Gueudin, M

    2016-02-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections are little known in Burkina Faso. The objective of our work is to study the epidemiological and clinical aspects of RSV infections in infants in the Pediatric Teaching Hospital Charles de Gaulle of Ouagadougou. Between July 1(st) 2010 and June 30(th) 2011, we analyzed by direct immunofluorescence and PCR nasopharyngeal swabs from children from 0 to 36 months old. All in all, 210 patients among whom 74 from the external consultation (35.2%) and 136 hospitalized (64.7%) benefited from a nasopharyngeal aspiration. The motives for consultation were cough (91.7%), rhinitis (79.2%), fever (79.2%) and respiratory distress syndrome (66.7%). The evoked diagnoses were predominantly the acute bronchiolitis in 14 cases (58.3%) followed by the acute pulmonary disease in 7 patients (26.2%) then flue in 1 patient (16.7%). We detected by direct immunofluorescence the antigens of the respiratory viruses in 21 nasopharyngeal aspirations with 10 cases of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections (47.6%). The PCR realized on 208 samples allowed to identify 153 positive samples (73.2%) with 24 RSV, i.e. a global prevalence of 16.1% with a peak of 18 cases (75%). In October, all the patients benefited from an often multiple antibiotic treatment of at least 10 days which was not still necessary. The evolution was favorable for all patients. This study confirms the important place of the viruses which are detected in 70% of the cases. The PCR multiplex, certainly expensive but effective and successful, deserves to be used in our developing countries to avoid the irrational prescription of antibiotic.

  17. Association between Birth Order and Emergency Room Visits and Acute Hospital Admissions following Pediatric Vaccination: A Self-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Hawken, Steven; Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Deeks, Shelley L.; Crowcroft, Natasha S.; Ducharme, Robin; Manuel, Douglas G.; Wilson, Kumanan

    2013-01-01

    Objective We investigated the association between a child's birth order and emergency room (ER) visits and hospital admissions following 2-,4-,6- and 12-month pediatric vaccinations. Methods We included all children born in Ontario between April 1st, 2006 and March 31st, 2009 who received a qualifying vaccination. We identified vaccinations, ER visits and admissions using health administrative data housed at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences. We used the self-controlled case series design to compare the relative incidence (RI) of events among 1st-born and later-born children using relative incidence ratios (RIR). Results For the 2-month vaccination, the RIR for 1st-borns versus later-born children was 1.37 (95% CI: 1.19–1.57), which translates to 112 additional events/100,000 vaccinated. For the 4-month vaccination, the RIR for 1st-borns vs. later-borns was 1.70 (95% CI: 1.45–1.99), representing 157 additional events/100,000 vaccinated. At 6 months, the RIR for 1st vs. later-borns was 1.27 (95% CI: 1.09–1.48), or 77 excess events/100,000 vaccinated. At the 12-month vaccination, the RIR was 1.11 (95% CI: 1.02–1.21), or 249 excess events/100,000 vaccinated. Conclusions Birth order is associated with increased incidence of ER visits and hospitalizations following vaccination in infancy. 1st-born children had significantly higher relative incidence of events compared to later-born children. PMID:24324662

  18. Suicidality and hospitalization as cause and outcome of pediatric psychiatric emergency room visits.

    PubMed

    Grudnikoff, Eugene; Soto, Erin Callahan; Frederickson, Anne; Birnbaum, Michael L; Saito, Ema; Dicker, Robert; Kane, John M; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictors of suicidality in youth presenting to a pediatric psychiatric emergency room service (PPERS). To this end, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of youth aged <18 years consecutively assessed by a PPERS 01.01.2002-12.31.2002, using a 12-page semi-structured institutional evaluation form and the Columbia Classification Algorithm for Suicide Assessment. Multivariate regression analyses were conducted to identify correlates of suicidal thoughts and attempts/preparation and their relationship to outpatient/inpatient disposition. Of 1,062 youth, 265 (25.0%) presented with suicidal ideation (16.2%) or attempt/preparation (8.8%). Suicidal ideation was associated with female sex, depression, adjustment disorder, absent referral by family/friend/self, school referral, precipitant of peer conflict, and no antipsychotic treatment (p < 0.0001). Suicidal attempt/preparation was associated with female sex, depression, lower GAF score, past suicide attempt, precipitant of peer conflict, and no stimulant treatment (p < 0.0001). Compared to suicidal attempt/preparation, suicidal ideation was associated with school referral, and higher GAF score (p < 0.0001). Of the 265 patients with suicidality, 58.5% were discharged home (ideation = 72.1% vs. attempt/preparation = 33.7%, p < 0.0001). In patients with suicidal ideation, outpatient disposition was associated with higher GAF score, school referral, and adjustment disorder (p < 0.0001). In patients with suicidal attempt/preparation, outpatient disposition was associated with higher GAF score, lower acuity rating, and school referral (p < 0.0001). Suicidality is common among PPERS evaluations. Higher GAF score and school referral distinguished suicidal ideation from suicidal attempt/preparation and was associated with outpatient disposition in both presentations. Increased education of referral sources and establishment of different non-PPERS evaluation systems may improve

  19. [Epidemiological profile of snake bites in a pediatric intensive care unit at the Children's Hospital of Marrakech, Morocco].

    PubMed

    Chabli, H; Arib, S; Mouafak, Y; Younous, S

    2014-12-01

    Snake bites are a serious medical emergency. They are most commonly associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in many parts of the world. This study aimed to determine the epidemiological profile of snake bites, as well as their severity and treatment in children in the Marrakech pediatric intensive care unit. The clinicobiological picture, physiopathology, the toxicokinetics of the venom, and the risk factors are discussed. Treatment of confirmed envenomation is based on antivenom administration via the venous route as soon as possible after the bite. Its efficacy and tolerance have been established by several studies. In our context, no specific immunotherapy is available, and the management of snake bites is based on symptomatic measures. Hence, the local health institutions must ensure the availability of antivenom specific to the Moroccan snake species, the only proven specific therapy against snake bite envenomation. The administration of highly purified immunoglobulin appears to improve the prognosis of envenomation, reduce morbidity and mortality, and reduce the length of the hospital stay.

  20. Study of H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain attending the pediatrics outpatient clinic of Zagazig University Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Badr, M A; El-Saadany, Hosam F; Ali, Adel S A; Abdelrahman, D

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain attending the Outpatient Pediatric Clinic of Zagazig University Hospitals. The study was conducted on 100 children suffering from different GIT symptoms mainly recurrent abdominal pain, they were categorized into 3 categories according to their ages. First category below 5 years, second category between 5 and 10 years and last category above 10 years. All subjects underwent full history taking, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Protozoa infection was in 29% of patients, helminthes 10%, chronic constipation 4% and UTI 4%. The patients with apparent etiology were excluded. The data do not support the hypothesis that there is a direct role for H. pylori infection as a causative agent for Recurrent Abdominal Pain (RAP) in children. The mean +/- SD of age of patients were 5.7 +/- 3.7, with range of 1:18 years. Male to female ratio was 1:1.1. H. pylori serum IgG antibodies were in 26 patients (43.3%) and 24 controls (p = 0.71), and H. pylori stool Ag in stool of 22 cases and 20 controls (p = 0.7).

  1. The stress-reducing effects of art in pediatric health care: art preferences of healthy children and hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Eisen, Sarajane L; Ulrich, Roger S; Shepley, Mardelle M; Varni, James W; Sherman, Sandra

    2008-09-01

    Art is assumed to possess therapeutic benefits of healing for children, as part of patient-focused design in health care. Since the psychological and physiological well-being of children in health care settings is extremely important in contributing to the healing process, it is vitally important to identify what type of art supports stress reduction. Based on adult studies, nature art was anticipated to be the most preferred and to have stress-reducing effects on pediatric patients. Nature art refers to art images dominated by natural vegetation, flowers or water. The objective of this study was to investigate what type of art image children prefer, and what type of art image has potentially stress-reducing effects on children in hospitals. This study used a three-phase, multi-method approach with children aged 5-17 years: a focus group study (129 participants), a randomized study (48 participants), and a quasi-experimental study design (48 participants). Findings were evaluated from three phases.

  2. [Programme review of somatropin deficit in pediatrics at the Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío].

    PubMed

    Lavaredas, A; de la Puerta, R; Álvarez del Vayo, C

    2013-01-01

    Objetivo: Elaborar una revisión del programa de déficit de somatropina aplicado en pediatría en el Hospital Universitario Virgen del Rocío, utilizando dos grupos de pacientes, los diagnosticados con déficit de esta hormona y los nacidos pequeños para edad gestacional, con la intención de evaluar su efectividad en el primer año de tratamiento. Método: Realización de un estudio retrospectivo de la cohorte de pacientes en tratamiento con la hormona del crecimiento bajo los diagnósticos mencionados, con metodología observacional y transversal, a los cuales se aplicó un análisis estadístico con el programa Statistical Package for Social Sciences®. Resultados: Tras inicio del tratamiento la velocidad de crecimiento y la talla aumentaron y la edad ósea se aproximó a la edad cronológica. En los dos grupos tratados, en el primer año de tratamiento fueron los pacientes del sexo femenino con edad comprendida entre los 0 a 12 años con déficit de la hormona del crecimiento que respondieron mejor a la terapéutica establecida. Conclusiones: Pudimos observar que el tratamiento instituido se presentó altamente efectivo en ambos grupos de pacientes, permitiendo obtener un aumento favorable de estatura.

  3. Prevalence of hypoxemia in under-five children with pneumonia in an emergency pediatrics hospital in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Elmuntasir Taha; Algasim, Samah Hamadnalla; Mhamoud, Alamin Saeed; Husian, Nazik Elmalaika Obaid Seid Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Context: Hypoxemia is a common and potentially lethal complication of acute respiratory infection in children under-five, particularly among those with severe disease. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of hypoxemia in under-five Sudanese children with pneumonia. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study conducted in a pediatrics hospital in a developing country. Subjects and Methods: Data were collected using structured questionnaire and oxygen saturation was measured using a pulse oximeter. Hypoxemia was defined as arterial blood oxygen saturation <90%. Results: Of 150 studied patients, 86 (57.3%) were males and 46 (32%) were in the age group 2 to ≤12 months. Of the total number, 42.7% had hypoxemia (with pulse oximeter oxygen saturation <90%), out of them 36 (56.25%) were in the age group <2 months. Of the hypoxic patients, 30 (46.88%) had severe pneumonia, and 7 (10.94) had very severe pneumonia (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of hypoxemia was 42.7% among the studied population. There was a significant association between the hypoxemia and small age group and very severe pneumonia. In limited resource settings pulse oximeter can be used to correctly identify hypoxemia in under-five children particularly among those diagnosed clinically as very severe pneumonia. PMID:25878427

  4. [Lung disease and HIV infection in children at the Charles de Gaulle university pediatric hospital center in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Kouéta, Fla; Yé, Diarra; Dao, Lassina; Zoungrana-Kaboré, Alice; Ouédraogo, Sylvie Armelle P; Napon, M; Sawadogo, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    To compare the clinical and radiological aspects of lung diseases in HIV-positive and HIV-negative children, we conducted a retrospective case control study covering a 3-year period from January 2003 through December 2005 at Charles de Gaulle University Pediatric Hospital Center in Ouagadougou. HIV-positive patients hospitalised for lung disease were matched to HIV-negative patients controls, hospitalised for the same symptoms, by age and date of hospitalisation. The study included 186 patients (93 HIV-positive and 93 HIV-negative) and collected data on age, sex, clinical signs, radiological signs and short-term course. Of the 93 HIV-positive children suspected to have been contaminated by mother-to-child transmission, 92 had HIV1 and 1 had a double infection of HIV1 and 2. The mean age in both groups was 48 months. Clinically severe lung disease (44%) was more common in HIV-positive children. Radiology showed that interstitial syndrome was significantly more common in HIV-positive children (p=0001) with a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 60%. The case-fatality rate was 4.2% among HIV-positive children. This study allows us to remind paediatricians of the importance of lung disease in HIV-infected children. Moreover, the vertical transmission responsible for disease in all our patients shows the need to accelerate the scaling up of the program for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in our country.

  5. [Psychological violence and the family context of adolescent users of outpatient services in a public tertiary pediatric hospital].

    PubMed

    de Abranches, Cecy Dunshee; de Assis, Simone Gonçalves; Pires, Thiago de Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    The scope of this research was to investigate the association of psychological violence (PV) during adolescence with social and demographic factors, family structure/relationships and with other forms of maltreatment. A questionnaire was applied to 229 adolescents (11-18 years) in outpatient services in a state-run tertiary pediatric hospital. It was found that 26.4% of respondents suffered severe PV in the family context, and only 5 of the respondents reported they did not suffer any PV in the family context, illustrating how this kind of violence is seen as commonplace in the family relationship. The most common forms of PV behavior were: being criticized for what one does or says; not being encouraged when trying to act autonomously; being called nasty names, and having an adult saying one is wrong when one tries to act. Dissatisfaction of parents with the adolescent, the nuclear family structure, the position of the child among siblings sharing the same parents were associated with PV occurring within the family context. In order to enable it to detect signs of PV, the health sector can promote the right to comprehensive health of adolescents, confirming itself as one of the main social sectors capable of acting preventively on the forms of violence suffered and practiced by the family group.

  6. Pain prevalence, intensity, assessment and management in a hospitalized pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Lori J; Kost-Byerly, Sabine; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Thompson, Carol B; Vasquenza, Kelly J; Rothman, Sharon K; Billett, Carol; White, Elizabeth D; Yaster, Myron; Monitto, Constance L

    2014-03-01

    New research, regulatory guidelines, and practice initiatives have improved pain management in infants, children, and adolescents, but obstacles remain. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence and demographics of pain, as well as pain management practice patterns in hospitalized children in a tertiary-care university hospital. We prospectively collected data including patient demographics, presence/absence and location of pain, pain intensity, pain assessment documentation, analgesic use, side effects of analgesic therapy, and patient/family satisfaction. Two hundred male (58%) and female, medical and surgical (61%) patients, averaging 9 ± 6.2 years were studied. Pain was common (86%) and often moderate to severe (40%). Surgical patients reported pain more frequently when enrolled than did medical patients (99% vs. 65%). Female gender, age ≥ 5 years, and Caucasian race were all associated with higher mean pain scores. Furthermore, females and Caucasian children consumed more opioids than males and non-Caucasians. Identified obstacles to optimal analgesic management include lack of documented physician pain assessment (<5%), a high prevalence of "as needed" analgesic dosing, frequent opioid-induced side effects (44% nausea and vomiting, 27% pruritus), and patient/family dissatisfaction with pain management (2%-7%). The data demonstrated that despite a concentrated focus on improving pain management over the past decade, pain remains common in hospitalized children. Identification of patient populations and characteristics that predispose to increased pain (e.g., female, Caucasian, postoperative patient) as well as obstacles to analgesic management provide a focus for the development of targeted interventions and research to further improve care.

  7. Comparing Academic Library Spending with Public Libraries, Public K-12 Schools, Higher Education Public Institutions, and Public Hospitals between 1998-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regazzi, John J.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the overall spending trends and patterns of growth of Academic Libraries with Public Libraries, K-12 schools, higher education institutions, and hospitals in the period of 1998 to 2008. Academic Libraries, while showing a growth of 13% over inflation for the period, far underperformed the growth of the other public institutions…

  8. A Study of Pediatric Emergency Room Utilization and Implications at Reynolds Army Community Hospital, Fort Sill, Oklahoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    to the service. The questionnaire was given to the accompanying adult for completion in the pediatric clinic and ER waiting room. The completed...the physician’s competition. 2 2 I 5 Some researchers found that a major reason for EF utilization by adults and pediatric patients was their inability...waiting area for childr’gn. - Children should be seen before adults with same condition. II. PEDIATRIC CLINIC SURVEY. - See same physician (Peds) each visit

  9. [Epidemiology of envenomation by snakebite in pediatric intensive care unit at Children's hospital of Rabat, Morocco].

    PubMed

    El Koraichi, A; Tsala, G; El Haddoury, M; Ech-Chérif El Kettani, S

    2011-01-01

    The snakebite is the most severe form of envenomation. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe the epidemiological, diagnostic, therapeutic and evolutionary snakebites in Children in paediatric intensive care unit of the children's hospital of Rabat. The criteria of severity were studied in four grades : grade 0 (traces of hooks at the bite, no swelling or local reaction), grade 1 (local oedema, absence of constitutional symptoms), grade 2 (swelling of regional member and/or moderate symptoms), grade 3 (extensive swelling up the trunk and/or severe symptoms). The number of patients included was 17 between January 2004 and December 2009. The male predominance (59%), bites by snakes (76%), bites during the afternoons (76%) and summer (53%), bites to the lower limb (65%) were net, corroborating the data from the literature on the subject. The median period of treatment was 9.5 hours, 53% of cases of severe grade 2 and 3 versus 47% in grades 0 and 1. The median duration of hospitalization was five days. One child died (6%). No child received antivenin treatment. Our analysis calls for the availability of specific immunotherapy in local health institutions in high-risk areas, such as ours.

  10. [Professional absenteeism in the pediatric service of the general hospital of Loandjili in Pointe-Noire (Congo)].

    PubMed

    Tsiba, J B; Mabiala Babela, J R; Ngoulou, M N; Niambi Poaty, G; Moukouyou Ndombo, M; Moukassa, D

    2013-10-01

    The supply and the quality of care dispensed in a service depend on the quality of the technical and human tray, but also from effective presence of the staff during the work time. The purpose of this study is to determine the absenteeism level of the paramedical staff in General Pediatric and Neonatology of Loandjili General Hospital (Pointe Noire) and identifying causes. A cross-sectional study has been conducted from January 1(st) to June 30(th) 2011 on 21 nurses in General Pediatric and 20 in Neonatology. The absenteeism level was obtained by the link of the number of missing days out of the number of the work days x 100. The absence was justified when it relieved from a reason informed by the administrative texts of the firm; and authorized when it requested the authorization of the administration of the firm. In total, 370 absences have been unregistered, the average absenteeism level was of 8.4%. The absence was justified in 242 cases (65.4%) and authorized in 178 cases (48.1%) which 84 times in writing and 94 times verbally. When the absence was justified, it was the fact of the disease of a member of the family in 82 cases, of the death or the burial of a member of the family in 81 cases, of the agent disease, 84 cases, or other reasons in the remains of cases. The absence occurred between 7 a.m. and 14 p.m. in 57.3%, 14 p.m. and 7 p.m.in, 25.7% and between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. in 17.0%. The absenteeism was mainly observed (85.7%) for the nurses of about 30 years old and those (59.5%) whom the seniority in the service was inferior or equal 5 years. The absences justified were more observed (p< 10(-4)) for nurses of about 30 years old and those whom the seniority did not pass 5 years. The absenteeism of nurses constitutes a real social and administrative problem that deserves a particular attention considering its impact on the supply and the quality of cares.

  11. [Nosocomial infections. Trends over a 12 year-period in a pediatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Zamudio-Lugo, Irma; Espinosa-Vital, Guadalupe Judith; Rodríguez-Sing, Roberta; Gómez-González, Claudia Josefina; Miranda-Novales, María Guadalupe

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: las infecciones nosocomiales constituyen uno de los principales problemas de salud en los hospitales, por ello, los programas de prevención y control deben ser evaluados con el impacto en las tasas de incidencia. El objetivo de esta investigación fue identificar la tendencia de las infecciones nosocomiales durante un periodo de 12 años en un hospital pediátrico de tercer nivel. MÉTODOS: se llevó a cabo un estudio de cohorte retrospectivo en el que se incluyeron todos los pacientes hospitalizados que presentaron infecciones nosocomiales. El análisis estadístico de los datos incluyó frecuencias simples, proporciones y densidad de incidencia por año, sitio de infección y letalidad.

  12. Pediatric blood transfusion practices at a regional referral hospital in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Fegan, Greg; Shavadia, Jay; Denje, Douglas; Mandaliya, Kishor; Bates, Imelda; Maitland, Kathryn; Hassall, Oliver W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Severe anemia in children is a major public health problem in sub‐Saharan Africa. In this study we describe clinical and operational aspects of blood transfusion in children admitted to Coast Provincial General Hospital, Kenya. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS This was an observational study where over a 2‐year period, demographic and laboratory data were collected on all children for whom the hospital blood bank received a transfusion request. Clinical data were obtained by retrospective review of case notes over the first year. RESULTS There were 2789 requests for blood for children (median age, 1.8 years; interquartile range [IQR], 0.6‐6.6 years); 70% (1950) of the samples were crossmatched with 85% (1663/1950) issued. Ninety percent (1505/1663) were presumed transfused. Median time from laboratory receipt of request to collection of blood was 3.6 hours (IQR, 1.4‐12.8 hr). Case notes of 590 children were reviewed and median pretransfusion hemoglobin level was 6.0 g/dL (IQR, 4.2‐9.1 g/dL). Ninety‐four percent (186) were transfused “appropriately” while 52% (120) were transfused “inappropriately.” There was significant disagreement between the clinical and laboratory diagnosis of severe anemia (exact McNemar's test; p < 0.0001). Antimalarials were prescribed for 65% (259) of children who received blood transfusions but only 41% (106) of these had a positive blood film. CONCLUSION In this setting, clinicians often order blood based on the clinical impression of “severe anemia.” This has implications for laboratory workload and the blood supply itself. However, the majority of children with severe anemia were appropriately transfused. The use of antimalarials with blood transfusions irrespective of blood film results is common practice. PMID:27611471

  13. Group A rotaviruses in children with gastroenteritis in a Canadian pediatric hospital: The prevaccine era

    PubMed Central

    Chetrit, Estelle; L’Homme, Yvan; Sohal, Jagdip Singh; Quach, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A publicly funded, group A rotavirus (RVA) vaccination program was implemented in Quebec in November 2011. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate trends in RVA infections and describe circulating genotypes before the implementation of a publicly funded vaccination program. METHODS: The Montreal Children’s Hospital (Montreal, Quebec) virology laboratory database was reviewed for RVA ELISA performed between July 2006 and June 2011. A five-week moving average was used to follow the proportion of positive RVA ELISA test results. A season was defined as starting with the first two and ending with the final two consecutive weeks in which the percentage of specimens testing positive for RVA was ≥10%. Duplicate tests were excluded. A random sample of 39 RVA-positive fecal samples from the final season (2010/2011) was genetically characterized: VP4, VP6, VP7 and NSP4 gene segments were genotyped using sequence analysis. RESULTS: Of the 3403 nonduplicate tests, 433 were RVA positive: 15.1% (2006/2007) to 9.3% (2010/2011) of the samples were positive during the study period, with a proportionally larger decrease in the percentage of positive tests compared with the decrease in the number of tests performed. The most common RVA strain types detected were G9P[8]I1 (n=19) and G1P[8]I1 (n=14), followed by G2P[4]I2 (n=4), G3P[6]I1 (n=1) and G4P[8]I2 (n=1). Mixed RVA infection was observed in two samples. CONCLUSION: Before the implementation of the vaccination program, the proportion of positive RVA tests had already begun to steadily decline. The present study was the first to report the genetic makeup of human RVA collected from a Canadian hospital based on the genotyping of four gene segments. The present study provided a baseline with which to monitor the impact of the universal vaccination program. PMID:24421793

  14. Fever of Unknown Origin in Children: A 6 year- Experience in a Tertiary Pediatric Egyptian Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Rasha H; Fouda, Ashraf E; Kandil, Shaimaa M

    2014-01-01

    Background Fever of unknown origin (FUO) is among the most conditions which poses challenge in diagnosis. The presence of information on regional patterns of FUO will shorten the time for diagnosis and reduces health services costs. There are almost no previous studies describing the etiology of FUO in children of Egypt or nearby countries. Aim of the Study To determine different causes of FUO and the possible diagnostic procedures. Methods Data of patients with FUO, presented to the Infectious Diseases Unit of Mansoura University Children Hospital, were retrospectively collected in a 6 year-period from May 2006 to May 2011. The study included children with a fever of 38.3° C or more documented by a health care provider and for which the cause could not be identified after 3 weeks of evaluation as an outpatient or after a week of evaluation in hospital. Patients were then categorized into 5 groups. Results 127 patients met the diagnostic criteria. Infectious diseases were the commonest causes of FUO in 46 cases (36.22%) followed by the miscellaneous causes in 38 cases (29.9%). Meanwhile, collagen vascular diseases and malignancy were diagnosed in 13 cases (10.2%) and 10 cases (7.87%) respectively. While, 20 cases (15.75%) remained undiagnosed. Conclusions Infectious diseases are the commonest cause of FUO. The delay in diagnosis was due to atypical presentations or inappropriate use of antibiotic prior to the referral. Non infectious causes, malignancy and collagen or vascular disorders were diagnosed in rest of the patients. However, about 15% of our patients remained undiagnosed. The diagnosis was established by non-invasive means in more than two-third of the cases. PMID:24899875

  15. Neck masses in paediatric population: An experience with children attended the Central Teaching Hospital of Pediatrics in Baghdad 2008-2009

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mayoof, Ali F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pediatric neck mass is a frequent cause for surgical consultation. Neck masses can be simply classified into congenital, inflammatory, and neoplastic. Although most of the cases are due to benign processes, malignant causes must not be overlooked. The aim of this study is to assess the paediatric neck masses in Iraqi patients highlighting the distribution of cases according to their demographic characteristics and etiology. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional observed study is conducted in the Department of Pediatric Surgery, at the Central Teaching Hospital of Pediatrics in Baghdad from April 2008 to March 2009. Sixty four patients with neck masses aged 14 years and below were examined and managed. The underlying causes of the neck masses were addressed and categorized. Results: Among the 64 patients, 42 (65.6%) were male. The inflammatory group represents 57% of the cases, while the malignant neoplasm accounts for approximately 10% of the conditions mainly due to lymphoma 5 (7.8%). Sixteen patients (25%) fall in the congenital group, in which the thyroglossal duct cyst was the commonest type. Wound infection developed in two patients, while one patient with cystic hygroma showed recurrence. Conclusion: Pediatrics neck masses are distributed in categories that similar in pattern and distribution in the world except the infectious/inflammatory category that shows variation in distribution in respect to the socioeconomic status. The surgical intervention and procedures are related to the facility as well as to the experience. PMID:26168753

  16. Evaluation of performance of the Medical Research Department in ‘Research naive’ non-academic hospital: An audit

    PubMed Central

    Kuyare, Mukta Sunil; Sarve, Parag Vijayrao; Dalal, Komal S.; Tripathi, Raakhi K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Conducting medical research is not limited to academia and pharmaceutical industry but even multispeciality hospitals need to venture in this area along with patient care. To develop research culture among well-established non-acedemic hospital is always difficult and challenging task. This article attempts to evaluate the performance of the department in ‘Research naïve’ hospital in the last two years and review the strengths and challenges it faced at each step. Methods: This was a retrospective document analysis study evaluating the steps towards setting and sustaining of Medical Research Department of Bhaktivedanta Hospital during the period of January 2013 to June 2015 (30 Months). The authors developed a checklist (along with performance indicators) to assess the Preparatory phase and Activity phase of the research department which were evaluated by Institute Quality Management Team. Each step of both phases was also reviewed in terms of strengths and challenges as perceived by the authors. Results: During 2 year journey of research naïve Hospital, Institute had witnessed Hospital initiated (n=24, 59%) and sponsored projects (n=17, 41%) in all specialties. HRC reviewed (n=2.13) projects per meeting for administrative consideration while IEC reviewed (n=2.15) projects for scientific and ethical review. Challenges during preparatory phases were circumvent by immense cooperation of hospital management for initial investment, sensitization through research workshops for consultants, established procedures and trained support manpower and constant encouragement by research coordinator. Conclusion: Considering evaluation of 41 studies in very first 2 years in ‘Research naive non academic institute demonstrated successful implementation of trio model of Hospital Research Committee for administrative review, IEC for scientific-ethical review, centralized MRD for coordinating all research projects under one roof which may act as role model for

  17. The development of pediatric anesthesiology and critical care medicine at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital: an interview with Dr. Theodore Striker.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zulfiqar; Samuels, Paul J; Mai, Christine L; Rodriguez, Samuel; Iftikhar, Ahmed Raza; Yaster, Myron

    2015-08-01

    Dr. Theodore W. 'Ted' Striker (1936-), Professor of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati, has played a pioneering role in the development of pediatric anesthesiology in the United States. As a model educator, clinician, and administrator, he shaped the careers of hundreds of physicians-in-training and imbued them with his core values of honesty, integrity, and responsibility.

  18. Effects of Honey on Oral Mucositis among Pediatric Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemo/Radiotherapy Treatment at King Abdulaziz University Hospital in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al Jaouni, Soad K.; Al Muhayawi, Mohammad S.; Hussein, Abear; Elfiki, Iman; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa; Al Muhayawi, Saad M.; Almasaudi, Saad

    2017-01-01

    One of the most common complications of cancer chemotherapy is oral mucositis. This study evaluates the therapeutic effects of honey with the focus on grade III and IV oral mucositis, reduction of bacterial and fungal infections, duration of episodes of oral mucositis, and body weight in pediatric leukemic patients undergoing chemo/radiotherapy. This is an open labeled randomized controlled study conducted at our hospital on 40 pediatric cancer patients undergoing chemo/radiotherapy. All the 40 patients included in this study experienced a sum total of 390 episodes of fever and neutropenia associated with oral mucositis. A significant reduction of oral mucositis, associated Candida, and aerobic pathogenic bacterial infections was noted in patients in the honey treatment group. Also, there is a significant decrease in the duration of hospitalization for all those in the treatment group combined with a significant increase of body weight, delayed onset, and decreased severity of pain related to oral mucositis. Complications of oral mucositis can be tremendously reduced by the topical application of local Saudi honey and honey should be used as an integrative approach in prophylaxis and treatment of chemo/radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in pediatric cancer patients. Further research is needed to elucidate and better understand the underlying mechanism. PMID:28270852

  19. Hospitalizations for pneumonia, invasive diseases and otitis in Tuscany (Italy), 2002-2014: Which was the impact of universal pneumococcal pediatric vaccination?

    PubMed Central

    Varone, Ornella; Chellini, Martina; Pieri, Luca; Sala, Antonino; Berardi, Cesare; Bechini, Angela

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pneumoniae is the main causative organism of acute media otitis in children and meningitis and bacterial pneumonia in the community. Since 2008 in Tuscany, central Italy, the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7-valent vaccine, switched to 13-valent vaccine in 2010) was actively offered free of charge to all newborns. Aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of pneumococcal pediatric vaccination in the Tuscan population on hospitalizations potentially caused by S. pneumoniae, during pre-vaccination (PVP, 2002–2007) and vaccination period (VP, 2009–2014). We analyzed hospital discharge records (HDRs) of all hospitals in Tuscany from 2002 to 2014. Hospitalizations potentially due to pneumococcal diseases were 347, 221. The general hospitalization rate was 716/100,000 inhabitants during PVP and 753/100,000 in VP, with a decrease of 29.1% in the age-group 0–9 y (“target” of the vaccination program) and an increase of 75.7% in subjects >64 y of age. During VP, admission days and hospitalization costs increased (6.2% and 24.2%, respectively), especially in patients >64 y (12.9% and 33.8%, respectively); in children <10 y decreased by 21.2% and 12.8%, respectively. The pneumococcal pediatric vaccination resulted in the decrease of hospitalizations in younger but the expected indirect effect in the elderly was not reported, justifying the Tuscan recommendation to extend the vaccination to subjects > 64 y. PMID:27925848

  20. Laparoscopic Appendectomy in Children: Preliminary Study in Pediatric Hospital Albert Royer, Dakar

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Mbaye; Gueye, Doudou; Wellé, Ibrahima Bocar; Lo, Faty Balla; Sagna, Aloise; Diop, Marie; Fall, Ibrahima

    2015-01-01

    Appendiceal pathology's management has benefited in recent years from the advent of laparoscopic surgery. This study is to make a preliminary assessment of laparoscopic management of acute and complicated appendicitis in children after a few months of practice at the University Hospital Albert Royer, Dakar. This is a retrospective study of 22 cases of patients, all operated on by the same surgeon. The parameters studied were age, sex, clinical data and laboratory features, radiological data, and results of surgical treatment. The mean age of patients was 9.5 years with a male predominance. The series includes 14 cases of acute appendicitis and 8 complicated cases. Appendectomy anterograde is practiced in 81% of cases. Appendectomy was associated with peritoneal wash in 17 patients including 9 cases of acute appendicitis. Drainage of Douglas pouch is performed in 2 patients with complicated appendicitis; the average production was 300 cc of turbid liquids and any complications were not founded. An abscess of Douglas pouch is noted in 2 patients with complicated appendicitis undrained. These Douglas abscesses were treated medically. No conversion of laparotomy was performed in the series. After an average of 8 months no other problems were noted. PMID:26448743

  1. Ribotyping provides efficient differentiation of nosocomial Serratia marcescens isolates in a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Bingen, E H; Mariani-Kurkdjian, P; Lambert-Zechovsky, N Y; Desjardins, P; Denamur, E; Aujard, Y; Vilmer, E; Elion, J

    1992-01-01

    Ribotyping with a nonradioactive probing system was used for the epidemiological evaluation of 15 Serratia marcescens nosocomial strains isolated from the stools of 12 children with no apparent illness in five different hospital wards over a 20-day period. Our results indicate that the occurrence of S. marcescens colonization was the result of the spread of a single epidemiological strain in the hematology ward, the oncology ward, and the gastroenterology ward and in two neonates in the neonatology ward, suggesting cross-contamination between the patients in these four wards. This isolate was genotypically unrelated to the bacterial strain found in the three other patients in the neonatology ward. Interestingly, one patient in the neonatology ward harbored these two genotypically different strains. Finally, the patient in the intensive care unit was colonized with a different strain. We find ribotyping to be a more reliable technique than biochemical typing. The results of ribotyping are more easily interpreted than are those of total DNA analysis, with an equivalent degree of discrimination. Images PMID:1354222

  2. Off-label and unlicensed utilization of drugs in a Brazilian pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Pereira Gomes, Vanessa; Melo da Silva, Kédma; Oliveira Chagas, Suely; dos Santos Magalhães, Igor Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Objetivo: Describir los patrones de utilizacion de medicamentos off-label y sin licencia en un hospital pediatrico de Brasil. Métodos: La investigacion consistio en un estudio descriptivo, prospectivo y de corte transversal. Resultados: Un total de 1.158 medicamentos fueron prescritos para 320 pacientes, que representan 65 farmacos diferentes. En cuanto a la clasificacion de la utilizacion de medicamentos, la mayoria de los medicamentos fueron prescritos como en la ficha tecnica (57,2%), seguido off-label (36,4%) y por sin licencia (6,3%). Las prevalencias de uso sin licencia y off-label de drogas en la poblacion estudiada fueron 20,9 y 77,8%, respectivamente. La polifarmacia fue muy asociada a ambos off-label y el regimen sin licencia (OR 12,9; IC del 95%: 3,07 a 54,2 y OR 3,68; IC del 95%: 2,02 a 6,69, respectivamente), mientras que los ninos en edad preescolar fueron menos propensos a prescripcion sin licencia (OR 0,39; 95% CI 0,19-,79). El sexo y la duracion de la hospitalizacion no estaban relacionadas con estos resultados. Conclusiones: Son necesarios mas estudios para verificar el impacto de este patron en la ocurrencia de eventos adversos en los medicamentos.

  3. Addressing parental smoking in pediatric settings of chinese hospitals: a qualitative study of parents.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Abu S; Ma, Zhenyu; Liao, Jing; Huang, Kaiyong; Yang, Li; Zhang, Zhiyong; Winickoff, Jonathan P; Nong, Guang-Min

    2014-01-01

    This study explored factors associated with SHS exposure from parental smoking in Chinese families and assessed nature of antismoking discussions parents had with their children's pediatricians and how pediatricians might best engage with parents in an effort to reduce children's exposure to SHS. Six focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted among 33 Chinese parents attending six major hospitals in Guangxi province, China. Most participants (32/33) had family members who smoke, and only 21% had strict restriction on smoking at home. Some parents did not know about health consequences of smoking and effects of SHS exposure on children. Situations that made it especially hard to avoid the child's SHS exposure were having an elderly smoker at home and having a visitor who smoked. Only few parents were asked by pediatricians about child's exposure to SHS at home, but only when child's illness was related to smoking. Parents believed that suggestions coming from pediatricians about smoke-free home and parental quitting would be acceptable to parents and other household members. The findings provide insight into SHS exposure reduction effort among Chinese parents and underscore the demand for pediatrician's engagement in addressing parental tobacco use.

  4. [Health care associated multidrug-resistant bacteria in a pediatric hospital: five year experience].

    PubMed

    Mação, Patrícia; Lopes, João Casalta; Oliveira, Henrique; Oliveira, Guiomar; Rodrigues, Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: Nos últimos anos tem-se assistido a um aumento das infeções por bactérias multirresistentes. Os dados pediátricos no global, e em particular em Portugal, são escassos.Objectivos: Avaliar a evolução das infeções por bactérias multirresistentes associadas aos cuidados de saúde num hospital pediátrico.Material e Métodos: Estudo retrospetivo de incidência efetuado nas enfermarias médicas, cirúrgicas e de cuidados intensivos num hospital pediátrico nível III, entre Janeiro de 2005 e Dezembro de 2009. As bactérias multirresistentes estudadas foram Staphylococcus aureus meticilino-resistente (SAMR), bacilos gram negativos produtores de β-lactamases de espectro expandido (ESBL), Enterococcus spp resistentes à vancomicina (ERV), Pseudomonas aeruginosa multirresistentes (PAMR) e Acinetobacter baumanii resistente aos carbapenems. Foram analisados dados demográficos, clínicos, laboratoriais, terapêuticos e presença de fatores de risco.Resultados: Durante o período de estudo foram identificadas 106 bactérias multirresistentes associadas, correspondentes a 72 crianças, com predomínio do sexo masculino (65,3%). As bactérias multirresistentes mais frequentemente identificadas foram SAMR (35,8%), PAMR (29,2%) e bacilos gram negativos com fenótipo ESBL (17,9%). Destas 106 bactérias multirresistentes, 45 (42,5%) foram identificadas em infeção. Ao longo do período de estudo, a proporção anual de infeções por bactérias multirresistentes variou entre 32,0% em 2006 e 55,6% em 2009 (p = 0,376). A taxa de incidência global de infeção por estas bactérias foi de 0,400 por 1 000 dias de internamento, correspondendo a 0,274 infeções por 100 internamentos, valor que se manteve estável ao longo dos cinco anos. Predominaram as infeções da corrente sanguínea (31,1%), intra-abdominais (20,0%), associadas a cateter venoso central (17,8%) e da pele e tecidos moles (11,1%). Todas as crianças tinham fatores de risco e os mais

  5. Evaluation of efficacy of restorative dental treatment provided under general anesthesia at hospitalized pediatric dental patients of Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Alireza; Samani, Mahdi Jafarzadeh; Najafi, Naghme Feyzi; Hajiahmadi, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Background: General anesthesia (GA) allows dental treatment to be rendered under optimal conditions, theoretically ensuring ideal outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of restorative dental procedures performed under GA. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional retrospective study, 305 pediatric patients who had been treated under GA 6 to 24 months before our survey at Isfahan's hospitalized dentistry center were examined. The examination was performed on dental chair with oral mirror and dental probe. The results were recorded in a special form for each patient for statistical analysis and evaluation of restorations to be successful or failed. Statistical analysis was performed by chi-square and fisher exact tests for comparison between success rates of restorations and Kendall's tau-b test for evaluating the effect of time on success rates of them (P < 0.05). Results: Stainless steel crown restorations had significantly better results vs class I and class II amalgam and class I and class II tooth color restorations. All types of posterior tooth color restorations had statistically same results with amalgam restorations. Anterior composite resin build-up represented significantly low success rates. The failure rates of stainless steel crown and anterior composite resin build-up restorations did not correlate with the time of follow-up (P = 0.344 and P = 0.091, respectively). Conclusion: Stainless steel crown restorations had significantly better results vs other posterior restorations. The failure rates of stainless steel crown and anterior composite resin build-up restorations did not correlate with the time of follow-up in comparison of other restorations. PMID:23162592

  6. Effectiveness of 2 scavenger mask systems for reducing exposure to nitrous oxide in a hospital-based pediatric dental clinic: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Freilich, Marshall M; Alexander, Laura; Sándor, George K B; Judd, Peter

    2007-09-01

    Chronic exposure to elevated ambient air levels of nitrous oxide during nitrous oxide/ oxygen (N2O/2) sedation can result in deleterious side effects to dentists and auxiliary staff. A sampling survey was done in the outpatient dental clinic at the Hospital for Sick Children to determine whether airborne nitrous oxide (N2O) gas concentrations were within established regulatory limits. The effectiveness of 2 scavenger mask systems, the Matrix Medical single-mask system and the Porter/Brown double-mask system, for reducing airborne contamination in a clinical environment during the treatment of pediatric dental patients was compared in a pilot study. The results indicated that the double-mask system more effectively minimized N2O exposure during N2O/O2 sedation of outpatients for a variety of clinical pediatric dental procedures.

  7. Human metapneumovirus in Jordan: prevalence and clinical symptoms in hospitalized pediatric patients and molecular virus characterization.

    PubMed

    Qaisy, Lina M; Meqdam, Mamdoh M; Alkhateeb, Asem; Al-Shorman, Abdallah; Al-Rousan, Hiyam O; Al-Mogbel, Mohammed S

    2012-11-01

    Respiratory viral infections account for significant morbidity and mortality especially in young children worldwide. Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) causes illnesses ranging from mild respiratory problems to bronchiolitis and severe pneumonia. From January to December 2007, 220 nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from children younger ≤ 13 years old hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infection to detect hMPV by revese transcription-polymerase chain reaction and to clone and sequence the hMPV-positive samples. Human metapneumovirus was detected in 28 (12.7%) specimens with a median age of 7 months (range 1.3 to 24 months). Human metapneumovirus type A and type B were detected in 26 (93%) and 8 (28.6%) of specimens, respectively. Coinfection with hMPV type A and type B was detected in 6 (21.4%) specimens positive for hMPV. The major clinical diagnosis of hMPV-positive patients was bronchiolitis (75%). Human metapneumovirus and hMPV type B were found to be significantly associated with bronchiolitis (P = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively). Human metapneumovirus and hMPV type A were found to be significantly associated with pneumonia (P = 0.004 and 0.002, respectively). The main symptoms in patients infected with hMPV were cough (92.9%), fever (82.1%), and wheezing (78.6%), with a significant association of hMPV type A with fever (P = 0.018). Human metapneumovirus was seasonally distributed; most infections with hMPV were reported in the late winter and early spring. The peak of hMPV incidence was in February (10/28; 35.7%). Sequencing of purified plasmid DNA was performed in forward and reverse direction to confirm the results of hMPV-positive samples which scored 97% identity to hMPV type A genome isolate NL/17/00 and showing C-T variation that had no effect on the amino acid sequence F(Phe)-F(Phe).

  8. [Costs of appendicitis treatment by diagnosis-related groups in a third-level pediatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Tlacuilo-Parra, Alberto; Hernández-Hernández, Araceli; Venegas-Dávalos, Martha; Gutiérrez-Hermosillo, Violeta; Guevara-Gutiérrez, Elizabeth; Ambriz-González, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: los grupos relacionados con el diagnóstico se utilizan ampliamente en Europa; permiten comparar el desempeño de los hospitales y facilitan el sistema de pago hospitalario. Objetivo: clasificar mediante grupos relacionados con el diagnóstico a los niños operados por apendicitis en un hospital de tercer nivel de atención. Material y métodos: estudio transversal. Se analizaron: comorbilidad, tiempo de hospitalización, histología de la apendicitis y clasificación mediante grupos relacionados con el diagnóstico. Resultados: se incluyeron 313 pacientes, 62% hombres, con edad promedio de 8 ± 3 años, 91% llegaron referidos de otra unidad. Recibieron atención en el turno nocturno 67%, y permanecieron hospitalizados durante 4 ± 3 días. Hubo comorbilidad en 8% y complicaciones quirúrgicas en 11%. La apendicitis fue: edematosa en 11%, supurada en 36%, gangrenada en 22%, perforada en 29% y abscedada en 2%. La condición de egreso fue: con mejoría en 97%. El gasto total del grupo relacionado con el diagnóstico 343 fue 10,470,173 pesos, del grupo relacionado con el diagnóstico 342 de 1,227,592 pesos, y del grupo relacionado con el diagnóstico 340 de 511,521 pesos, lo que sumó 12,209,286 pesos mexicanos. Conclusión: el costo unitario del tratamiento de la apendicitis correspondiente al grupo relacionado con el diagnóstico 343 fue de 37,935 pesos, del grupo relacionado con el diagnóstico 342 de 49,103 pesos y del grupo relacionado con el diagnóstico 340 de 42,626 pesos. Puesto que 88% de los casos de apendicitis ocurrieron sin diagnóstico principal complicado, esos pacientes se podrían haber intervenido en un segundo nivel de atención, utilizando el reembolso obtenido del monto 343, sin necesidad de generar gastos adicionales.

  9. Changing Environment and the Academic Medical Center: The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyssel, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    Johns Hopkins Hospital expanded its health care delivery capabilities and strengthened its position in the marketplace by acquisitions of and mergers with other hospitals and a health maintenance organization. The resulting conglomerate has achieved its goals of expanding patient care, broadening the patient base, and enlarging the asset base and…

  10. Pediatric oncologists' coping strategies for dealing with patient death.

    PubMed

    Granek, Leeat; Barrera, Maru; Scheinemann, Katrin; Bartels, Ute

    2016-01-01

    This research examined pediatric oncologists coping strategies when their patients died of cancer. Twenty-one pediatric oncologists at 2 Canadian pediatric academic hospitals were interviewed about their coping strategies when patients died or were in the process of dying. The grounded theory method of data collection and data analysis were used. Line-by-line coding was used to establish codes and themes and constant comparison was used to establish relations among emerging codes and themes. Pediatric oncologists used engagement coping strategies with primary and secondary responses including emotional regulation (social support and religion), problem solving (supporting families at end of life), cognitive restructuring (making a difference and research), and distraction (breaks, physical activity, hobbies and entertainment, spending time with own children). They also used disengagement coping strategies that included voluntary avoidance (compartmentalization and withdrawing from families at end of life). Given the chronic nature of patient death in pediatric oncology and the emotionally difficult nature of this work, medical institutions such as hospitals have a responsibility to assist pediatric oncologists in coping with this challenging aspect of their work. Future research is needed to evaluate how best to implement these changes on the institutional level to help oncologists cope with patient death and the effect of using these strategies on their quality of life.

  11. Identifying and communicating the contributions of library and information services in hospitals and academic health sciences centers

    PubMed Central

    Abels, Eileen G.; Cogdill, Keith W.; Zach, Lisl

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This article introduces a systematic approach to identifying and communicating the value of library and information services (LIS) from the perspective of their contributions to achieving organizational goals. Methods: The contributions of library and information services (CLIS) approach for identifying and communicating the value of LIS draws on findings from a multimethod study of hospitals and academic health sciences centers. Results: The CLIS approach is based on the concept that an individual unit's value to an organization can be demonstrated by identifying and measuring its contributions to organizational goals. The CLIS approach involves seven steps: (1) selecting appropriate organizational goals that are meaningful in a specific setting; (2) linking LIS contributions to organizational goals; (3) obtaining data from users on the correspondence between LIS contributions and LIS services; (4) selecting measures for LIS services; (5) collecting and analyzing data for the selected measures; (6) planning and sustaining communication with administrators about LIS contributions; and (7) evaluating findings and revising selected goals, contributions, and services as necessary. Conclusions: The taxonomy of LIS contributions and the CLIS approach emerged from research conducted in hospitals and academic health sciences centers and reflect the mission and goals common in these organizations. However, both the taxonomy and the CLIS approach may be adapted for communicating the value of LIS in other settings. PMID:14762462

  12. Hospitalized but not Admitted: Characteristics of Patients with “Observation Status” at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Ann M.; Graf, Ben; Gangireddy, Sreedevi; Hoffman, Robert; Ehlenbach, Mary; Heidke, Cynthia; Fields, Sheilah; Liegel, Barbara; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)defines observation status for hospitalized patients as a “well-defined set of specific, clinically appropriate services,” usually lasting <24 hours, and that in “only rare and exceptional cases” should last > 48 hours. Although an increasing proportion of observation care occurs on hospital wards, studies of patients with observation status have focused on the efficiency of dedicated units. Objective To describe inpatient and observation care. Design and Setting Descriptive study of all inpatient and observation stays between July 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, a 566 bed tertiary academic medical center. Participants All patients with observation or inpatient stays during the study period. Main Outcome and Measures Patient demographics, length of stay, difference between cost and reimbursement per stay, and percent of patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities. Results Of 43,853 stays, 4,578 (10.4%) were observation, with 1,141 distinct diagnosis codes. Average observation length of stay was 33.3 hours, with 44.4% of stays <24 hours, and 16.5% >48 hours. Observation care had a negative margin per stay (-$331); the inpatient margin per stay was positive (+$2,163). Adult General Medicine patients accounted for 2,404 (52.5%) of all observation stays; 25.4% of the 9,453 Adult General Medicine stays were observation. The mean length of stay for general medicine observation patients was 41.1 hours, with 32.6% of stays < 24 hours, and 26.4% >48 hours. As compared to observation patients on other clinical services, Adult General Medicine had the highest percent >65 years (40.9%), highest percent female (57.9%), highest percent discharged to skilled nursing facilities (11.6%) and the most negative margin per stay (-$1,378). Conclusions and Relevance In an academic medical center, observation status for hospitalized patients differed markedly

  13. [Research in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Márquez, Julia Rocío; González-Cabello, Héctor Jaime

    2015-01-01

    In the interest of encouraging the promotion of research done by physicians of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, in this supplement we publish articles written by residents of different specialties related to critical themes on pediatrics. These residents are guided by affiliated physicians from the Hospital de Pediatría del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI.

  14. A rural cancer outreach program lowers patient care costs and benefits both the rural hospitals and sponsoring academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Desch, C E; Grasso, M A; McCue, M J; Buonaiuto, D; Grasso, K; Johantgen, M K; Shaw, J E; Smith, T J

    1999-01-01

    The Rural Cancer Outreach Program (RCOP) between two rural hospitals and the Medical College of Virginia's Massey Cancer Center (MCC) was developed to bring state-of-the-art cancer care to medically underserved rural patients. The financial impact of the RCOP on both the rural hospitals and the MCC was analyzed. Pre- and post-RCOP financial data were collected on 1,745 cancer patients treated at the participating centers, two rural community hospitals and the MCC. The main outcome measures were costs (estimated reimbursement from all sources), revenues, contribution margins and profit (or loss) of the program. The RCOP may have enhanced access to cancer care for rural patients at less cost to society. The net annual cost per patient fell from $10,233 to $3,862 associated with more use of outpatient services, more efficient use of resources, and the shift to a less expensive locus of care. The cost for each rural patient admitted to the Medical College of Virginia fell by more than 40 percent compared with only an 8 percent decrease for all other cancer patients. The rural hospitals experienced rapid growth of their programs to more than 200 new patients yearly, and the RCOP generated significant profits for them. MCC benefited from increased referrals from RCOP service areas by 330 percent for cancer patients and by 9 percent for non-cancer patients during the same time period. While it did not generate a major profit for the MCC, the RCOP generated enough revenue to cover costs of the program. The RCOP had a positive financial impact on the rural and academic medical center hospitals, provided state-of-the-art care near home for rural patients and was associated with lower overall cancer treatment costs.

  15. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  16. How will restructuring work in your hospital? The helps and hinderances of a large academic environment.

    PubMed

    Galloway, M G

    1994-01-01

    In summary, academic medical centers face the same issues as their less complex brethren. Sure there are some "downs." The high expectations that the staff bring to their jobs can decrease flexibility in role design, and the increased need to keep professionals together can make the organizational matrix more complex. But there are also some "ups." In many ways their size and specialty focus can help with the difficult decisions in the areas of patient grouping and service delivery approach. Taking advantage of the positives and working to minimize the effect of the negatives can allow even the most complex organization to restructure successfully. Academic medical centers may not be "just right" for restructuring, but they are definitely not "too big."

  17. Nursing, Pharmacy, and Prescriber Knowledge and Perceptions of High-Alert Medications in a Large, Academic Medical Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Melanie J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-alert medications pose a greater risk of causing significant harm to patients if used in error. The Joint Commission requires that hospitals define institution-specific high-alert medications and implement processes to ensure safe medication use. Method: Nursing, pharmacy, and prescribers were asked to voluntarily complete a 34-question survey to assess their knowledge, experience, and perceptions regarding high-alert medications in an academic hospital. Results: The majority of respondents identified the organization’s high-alert medications, the consequences of an error involving a high-alert medication, and the reversal agent. Most of the risk-reduction strategies within the institution were viewed as being effective by respondents. Forty-five percent of the respondents utilized a high-alert medication in the previous 24 hours. Only 14.2% had experienced an error with a high-alert medication in the previous 12 months, with 46% being near misses. The survey found the 5 rights for medication administration were not being utilized consistently. Respondents indicated that work experience or hospital orientation is the preferred learning experience for high-alert medications. Conclusions: This study assessed all disciplines involved in the medication use process. Perceptions about high-alert medications differ between disciplines. Ongoing discipline-specific education is required to ensure that individuals accept accountability in the medication use process and to close knowledge gaps on high-alert medications and risk-reduction strategies. PMID:26446747

  18. Molecular characterization of the bla(KPC-2) gene in clinical isolates of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae from the pediatric wards of a Chinese hospital.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Xiang-Yang; Wan, La-Gen; Jiang, Wei-Yan; Li, Fang-Qu; Yang, Jing-Hong

    2012-10-01

    The present study was conducted to confirm the presence of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae associated with a nosocomial outbreak in a Chinese pediatric hospital. From July 2009 to January 2011, 124 nonduplicated K. pneumoniae isolates were collected from specimens from patients of pediatric units in the hospital. Twelve of the 124 isolates possessed the bla(KPC-2) gene and showed 7 different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. Meanwhile, 16S rRNA methylase, acc(6')-Ib-cr, and several types of β-lactamases were also produced by the majority of the KPC-producing isolates. Class 1 integron-encoded intI1 integrase gene was subsequently found in all strains, and amplification, sequencing, and comparison of DNA between 5' conserved segment and 3' conserved segment region showed the presence of several known antibiotic resistance gene cassettes of various sizes. The conjugation and plasmid-curing experiments indicated some KPC-2-encoding genes were transmissible. In addition, conjugal cotransfer of multidrug-resistant phenotypes with KPC-positive phenotypes was observed in KPC-producing strains. Restriction endonuclease analysis and DNA hybridization with a KPC-specific probe showed that the bla(KPC-2) gene was carried by plasmid DNA from K. pneumoniae of PFGE pattern B. The overall results indicate that the emergence and outbreak of KPC-producing K. pneumoniae in our pediatric wards occurred in conjunction with plasmids coharboring 16S rRNA methylase and extended-spectrum β-lactamases.

  19. The pediatric intensive care unit business model.

    PubMed

    Schleien, Charles L

    2013-06-01

    All pediatric intensivists need a primer on ICU finance. The author describes potential alternate revenue sources for the division. Differentiating units by size or academic affiliation, the author describes drivers of expense. Strategies to manage the bottom line including negotiations for hospital services are covered. Some of the current trends in physician productivity and its described metrics, with particular focus on clinical FTE management is detailed. Methods of using this data to enhance revenue are discussed. Some of the other current trends in the ICU business related to changes at the federal and state level as well as in the insurance sector, moving away from fee-for-service are covered.

  20. Sedation for Pediatric Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is more difficult to achieve cooperation when conducting endoscopy in pediatric patients than adults. As a result, the sedation for a comfortable procedure is more important in pediatric patients. The sedation, however, often involves risks and side effects, and their prediction and prevention should be sought in advance. Physicians should familiarize themselves to the relevant guidelines in order to make appropriate decisions and actions regarding the preparation of the sedation, patient monitoring during endoscopy, patient recovery, and hospital discharge. Furthermore, they have to understand the characteristics of the pediatric patients and different types of endoscopy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the details of sedation in pediatric endoscopy. PMID:24749082

  1. Assigning a team-based pager for on-call physicians reduces paging errors in a large academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Lisa; Chi, Jeffrey; Kulik, Carol; Momeni, Arash; Shelton, Andrew; DePorte, Cynthia; Hopkins, Joseph

    2014-02-01

    As complexity of care of hospitalized patients has increased, the need for communication and collaboration among members of the team caring for the patient has become increasingly important. This often takes the form of a nurse's need to contact a patient's physician to discuss some aspect of care and modify treatment plans. Errors in communication delay care and can pose risk to patients. This report describes the successful implementation of a standardized team-based paging system at an academic center. Results showed a substantial improvement in nurses' perceptions of knowing how to contact the correct physician when discussion of the patient's care is needed. This improvement was found across multiple medical and surgical specialties and was particularly effective for services with the greatest communication problems.

  2. Prophylactic Antibiotic Management of Surgical Patients Noted as "Allergic" to Penicillin at Two Academic Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Richard H; Jacques, Paul St; Wanderer, Jonathan P; Bombulie, Mark R; Agarwalla, Niraj

    2016-05-01

    We studied prophylactic antibiotics administered at 2 academic medical centers during a 6-year period where a cephalosporin was indicated but an "allergy" to penicillin was noted. Another drug (typically vancomycin or clindamycin) was substituted approximately 80% of the time; this occurred frequently even when symptoms unrelated to acute hypersensitivity were listed. In >50% of cases, the reaction was either omitted or vague (e.g., simply "rash"). Given the estimated 1% cross-reactivity between penicillins and cephalosporins with similar R1 side chains, many of these patients could have received either the prescribed cephalosporin or another cephalosporin with a different R1 side chain.

  3. High-Dose, Extended-Interval Gentamicin and Tobramycin for Pediatric Inpatients: A Survey of Canadian Hospital Pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Caitlin; Gray, Carolyn; Ruda, Lisa; Bell, Ali; Bolt, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of high-dose, extended-interval aminoglycosides, a common practice in adult populations, is less well established for pediatric patients. In younger populations, these drugs are often administered according to a multiple daily dosing method. Objective To characterize prescribing practices for aminoglycosides in pediatric inpatients across Canada, with a focus on high-dose, extended-interval regimens. Methods This study was based on an electronic survey of pharmacists representing Canadian health care delivery organizations that provided pediatric inpatient services, which was distributed in March 2015. Questions focused on demographic characteristics; indications for high-dose, extended-interval tobramycin or gentamicin; use of these regimens in patients with particular comorbidities; empiric dosing; monitoring parameters; and the extent of pharmacists’ authority to independently prescribe doses and order monitoring parameters for aminoglycosides at their respective institutions. Results Forty-five (48%) of the 94 prospective participants responded to the survey. Of these 45 respondents, 35 (78%) indicated that their respective health regions used high-dose, extended-interval tobramycin or gentamicin in pediatric inpatients. The patient characteristics for use of such regimens were varied. The median reported doses were 10 mg/kg for pulmonary exacerbation in cystic fibrosis, 7 mg/kg for urinary tract infection, and 8 mg/kg for febrile neutropenia. Thirty-one (89%) of the 35 respondents using these regimens reported that they monitored serum levels, and 27 (77%) reported monitoring for nephrotoxicity. With regard to prescriptive authority, 7 (16%) of the 45 respondents indicated that pharmacists were authorized to independently adjust dosing at their institutions, and pharmacists at 14 (31%) of 45 sites were authorized to order monitoring parameters. Conclusions High-dose, extended-interval aminoglycoside therapy was frequently used for

  4. Device-associated infection rates and bacterial resistance in six academic teaching hospitals of Iran: Findings from the International Nocosomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).

    PubMed

    Jahani-Sherafat, Somayeh; Razaghi, Maryam; Rosenthal, Victor D; Tajeddin, Elahe; Seyedjavadi, Simasadat; Rashidan, Marjan; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Rostampour, Maryam; Haghi, Arezo; Sayarbayat, Masoumeh; Farazmandian, Somayeh; Yarmohammadi, Tahere; Arshadi, Fardokht K; Mansouri, Nahid; Sarbazi, Mohammad R; Vilar, Mariano; Zali, Mohammad R

    2015-01-01

    Device-associated health care-acquired infections (DA-HAIs) pose a threat to patient safety, particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, few data regarding DA-HAI rates and their associated bacterial resistance in ICUs from Iran are available. A DA-HAI surveillance study was conducted in six adult and pediatric ICUs in academic teaching hospitals in Tehran using CDC/NHSN definitions. We collected prospective data regarding device use, DA-HAI rates, and lengths of stay from 2584 patients, 16,796 bed-days from one adult ICU, and bacterial profiles and bacterial resistance from six ICUs. Among the DA-HAIs, there were 5.84 central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABs) per 1000 central line-days, 7.88 ventilator-associated pneumonias (VAPs) per 1000 mechanical ventilator-days and 8.99 catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) per 1000 urinary catheter-days. The device utilization ratios were 0.44 for central lines, 0.42 for mechanical ventilators and 1.0 for urinary catheters. The device utilization ratios of mechanical ventilators and urinary catheters were higher than those reported in the ICUs of the INICC and the CDC's NHSN reports, but central line use was lower. The DA-HAI rates in this study were higher than the CDC's NHSN report. However, compared with the INICC report, the VAP rate in our study was lower, while the CLAB rate was similar and the CAUTI rate was higher. Nearly 83% of the samples showed a mixed-type infection. The most frequent pathogens were Acinetobacter baumannii, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterococcus spp. In the S. aureus isolates, 100% were resistant to oxacillin. Overall resistances of A. baumannii and K. pneumonia to imipenem were 70.5% and 76.7%, respectively. A multiple drug resistance phenotype was detected in 68.15% of the isolates. The DA-HAI rates in Iran were shown to be higher than the CDC-NHSN rates and similar to the INICC rates

  5. The Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network (CPCCRN) Critical Pertussis Study: Collaborative Research in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Jeri S.; Jenkins, Tammara L.; Harrison, Rick; Meert, Kathleen; Anand, K.J.S.; Berger, John T.; Zimmerman, Jerry; Carcillo, Joseph; Dean, J. Michael; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Willson, Douglas F.; Sanders, Ronald C.; Pollack, Murray M.; Harvill, Eric; Nicholson, Carol E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To provide an updated overview of critical pertussis to the pediatric critical care community and describe a study of critical pertussis recently undertaken. Setting The six sites, seven hospitals of the Collaborative Pediatric Critical Care Research Network and 17 outside sites at academic medical centers with PICUs. Results Despite high coverage for childhood vaccination, pertussis causes substantial morbidity and mortality in United States children, especially among infants. In pediatric intensive care units, Bordetella pertussis is a community-acquired pathogen associated with critical illness and death. The incidence of medical and developmental sequelae in critical pertussis survivors remains unknown, and the appropriate strategies for treatment and support remain unclear. The CPCCRN Critical Pertussis Study has begun to evaluate critical pertussis in a prospective cohort. Conclusion Research is urgently needed to provide an evidence base that might optimize management for critical pertussis, a serious, disabling, and too often fatal illness for United States children, and those in the developing world. PMID:21057366

  6. Surveillance of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Pediatric Hospital in Mexico City during a 7-Year Period (1997 to 2003): Clonal Evolution and Impact of Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Velazquez-Meza, M. E.; Aires de Sousa, M.; Echaniz-Aviles, G.; Solórzano-Santos, F.; Miranda-Novales, G.; Silva-Sanchez, J.; de Lencastre, H.

    2004-01-01

    Between 1997 and 2000 a single multidrug-susceptible methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone, M (sequence type 30 [ST30]-staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec [SCCmec] type IV), was present in a pediatric hospital in Mexico City, Mexico. In 2001 the international multidrug-resistant New York-Japan clone (ST5-SCCmec type II) was introduced into the hospital, completely replacing clone M by 2002. PMID:15297554

  7. Epidemiology of pediatric community-acquired bloodstream infections in a children hospital in Paris, France, 2001 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Doit, Catherine; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Mahjoub-Messai, Farah; Bidet, Philippe; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Carol, Agnès; Varon, Emmanuelle; Bingen, Edouard

    2010-03-01

    In 2001 to 2008, we documented 483 cases of pediatric community-acquired bacteremia mostly because of Streptococcus agalactiae (< 4 days), Escherichia coli (4 days to 3 months), pneumococci (3 months to 5 years), and Staphylococcus aureus (> 5 years). Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination affected the serotype distribution of pneumococcal bacteremia but not its frequency. Serotype 19A represented 12% and 22% of pneumococci in the prevaccine and vaccine periods, respectively.

  8. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies - USP (HRAC-USP) - Part 2: Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    FREITAS, José Alberto de Souza; GARIB, Daniela Gamba; OLIVEIRA, Thais Marchini; LAURIS, Rita de Cássia Moura Carvalho; de ALMEIDA, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga; NEVES, Lucimara Teixeira; TRINDADE-SUEDAM, Ivy Kiemle; YAEDÚ, Renato Yassutaka Faria; SOARES, Simone; PINTO, João Henrique Nogueira

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the pediatric dentistry and orthodontic treatment protocol of rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate patients performed at the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies - University of São Paulo (HRAC-USP). Pediatric dentistry provides oral health information and should be able to follow the child with cleft lip and palate since the first months of life until establishment of the mixed dentition, craniofacial growth and dentition development. Orthodontic intervention starts in the mixed dentition, at 8-9 years of age, for preparing the maxillary arch for secondary bone graft procedure (SBGP). At this stage, rapid maxillary expansion is performed and a fixed palatal retainer is delivered before SBGP. When the permanent dentition is completed, comprehensive orthodontic treatment is initiated aiming tooth alignment and space closure. Maxillary permanent canines are commonly moved mesially in order to substitute absent maxillary lateral incisors. Patients with complete cleft lip and palate and poor midface growth will require orthognatic surgery for reaching adequate anteroposterior interarch relationship and good facial esthetics. PMID:22666849

  9. Development of the 24/7 Nurse Practitioner Model on the Inpatient Pediatric General Surgery Service at a Large Tertiary Care Children's Hospital and Associated Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rejtar, Marketa; Ranstrom, Lee; Allcox, Christina

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) have been providing high-quality and safe patient care for a few decades, and evidence showing the extent of their impact is emerging. This article describes the implementation of a 24/7 NP patient care model on an inpatient pediatric general surgery service in a tertiary free-standing Children's Hospital in the Northeastern United States. The literature shows that there is limited evidence regarding NP models of care and their effect on patient outcomes. In response to policy changes leading to reduction of resident work hours and a more acute and complex inpatient pediatric general surgery patient population, our existing NP model evolved into a 24/7 NP Model in June 2011. The results from two quality improvement projects showed positive registered nurse and attending surgeon staff satisfaction with the 24/7 NP Model of care and a decreased trend of unplanned intensive care unit patient transfers after the 24/7 NP Model implementation. These findings further support the evidence in the literature that NPs provide safe and quality patient care.

  10. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies-USP (HRAC-USP)--part 2: pediatric dentistry and orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Freitas, José Alberto de Souza; Garib, Daniela Gamba; Oliveira, Marchini; Lauris, Rita de Cássia Moura Carvalho; Almeida, Ana Lúcia Pompéia Fraga de; Neves, Lucimara Teixeira; Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; Yaedú, Renato Yassutaka Faria; Soares, Simone; Pinto, João Henrique Nogueira

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the pediatric dentistry and orthodontic treatment protocol of rehabilitation of cleft lip and palate patients performed at the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies-University of São Paulo (HRAC-USP). Pediatric dentistry provides oral health information and should be able to follow the child with cleft lip and palate since the first months of life until establishment of the mixed dentition, craniofacial growth and dentition development. Orthodontic intervention starts in the mixed dentition, at 8-9 years of age, for preparing the maxillary arch for secondary bone graft procedure (SBGP). At this stage, rapid maxillary expansion is performed and a fixed palatal retainer is delivered before SBGP. When the permanent dentition is completed, comprehensive orthodontic treatment is initiated aiming tooth alignment and space closure. Maxillary permanent canines are commonly moved mesially in order to substitute absent maxillary lateral incisors. Patients with complete cleft lip and palate and poor midface growth will require orthognatic surgery for reaching adequate anteroposterior interarch relationship and good facial esthetics.

  11. Nosocomial transmission of hepatitis A in a pediatric hospital traced to an anti-hepatitis A virus-negative patient with immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, B T; Coronado, V G; Brown, J; Hutto, J H; Shapiro, C N; Robertson, B; Woodruff, B A

    1995-04-01

    From July through October 1991, an outbreak of hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection involving 26 hospital staff, inpatients and household contacts occurred in a pediatric hospital. All ill staff members had cared for one inpatient who had profuse diarrhea with gross fecal contamination of the environment, negative HAV serology and idiopathic immunodeficiency. HAV infection in this patient was later confirmed by polymerase chain reaction. Among hospital staff HAV attack rates were highest in nursing personnel (15%). A retrospective cohort study of nurses found that the risk of infection was greatest in those who handled the source patient's soiled bed pad (relative risk, 6.7; 95% confidence intervals, 1.6, 27.8), diaper (relative risk, 5.4; 95% confidence intervals, 0.8, 39.2) or gown (relative risk, 2.9; 95% confidence intervals, 1.1, 7.8). Glove use during these activities was not associated with a lower risk of infection, possibly because of gross environmental contamination or less use than reported. This situation was unusual because the patient was HAV-infected but had negative serology, probably because of immunodeficiency. In situations of potentially extensive environmental contamination, such as with a diapered or incontinent patient with suspected or confirmed hepatitis A, careful attention to frequent handwashing is an essential protective measure; in addition strict glove use whenever entering the patient's room should be followed to provide additional protection.

  12. Should the "in situ" simulation become the new way in Belgium? Experience of an academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Pospiech, A; Lois, F; Van Dyck, M; Kahn, D; De Kock, M

    2013-01-01

    The place of simulation in medical education, particularly in anesthesia, appears to be more and more evident. However, the history of simulation in Belgium showed that the associated costs remain a barrier. The use of 'in situ' simulation, defined as the practice of simulation in the usual workplace, could solve the problem of providing access to this educational tool. Indeed, it allows reducing equipment and manpower costs: the needed equipment comes from the hospital, and supervision and organization are provided by staff members. It also provides access to simulation for a larger number of individuals on site. The environment is more realistic because the participants operate in their usual workplace, with their customary equipment and team. Furthermore, 'in situ' simulation allows participation of the paramedical staff. This allows developing skills related to teamwork and communication. Despite those numerous advantages, several difficulties persist. The associated logistic and organizational constraints can be cumbersome.

  13. A sporadic outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteremia in pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital in coastal Karnataka, South India.

    PubMed

    Antony, Beena; Cherian, Elizabeth Varkey; Boloor, Rekha; Shenoy, K Varadraj

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) is a significant opportunistic pathogen in hospitalized and immunocompromised patients, particularly in cystic fibrosis. It is widely distributed in natural habitats such as soil and water and frequently encountered in nosocomial outbreaks due to contaminated disinfectants and medical devices. However reports on outbreaks due to this organism are lacking from the Indian subcontinent. We report here a sporadic outbreak due to BCC which occurred in the pediatric Intensive Care Unit of our institute, the probable source being contaminated distilled water. The isolate from three babies and environmental sources including distilled water were identical and confirmed as BCC. Strict infection control measures were instituted to prevent the spread of infection. This report highlights the potential role of B.cepacia in causing sporadic outbreaks especially in ICUs, associated with water.

  14. Clinical trials in neonates and children: Report of the pulmonary hypertension academic research consortium pediatric advisory committee

    PubMed Central

    Adatia, Ian; Haworth, Sheila G.; Wegner, Max; Barst, Robyn J.; Ivy, Dunbar; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Karkowsky, Abraham; Rosenzweig, Erika; Aguilar, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Drug trials in neonates and children with pulmonary hypertensive vascular disease pose unique but not insurmountable challenges. Childhood is defined by growth and development. Both may influence disease and outcomes of drug trials. The developing pulmonary vascular bed and airways may be subjected to maldevelopment, maladaptation, growth arrest, or dysregulation that influence the disease phenotype. Drug therapy is influenced by developmental changes in renal and hepatic blood flow, as well as in metabolic systems such as cytochrome P450. Drugs may affect children differently from adults, with different clearance, therapeutic levels and toxicities. Toxicity may not be manifested until the child reaches physical, endocrine and neurodevelopmental maturity. Adverse effects may be revealed in the next generation, should the development of ova or spermatozoa be affected. Consideration of safe, age-appropriate tablets and liquid formulations is an obvious but often neglected prerequisite to any pediatric drug trial. In designing a clinical trial, precise phenotyping and genotyping of disease is required to ensure appropriate and accurate inclusion and exclusion criteria. We need to explore physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling and simulations together with statistical techniques to reduce sample size requirements. Clinical endpoints such as exercise capacity, using traditional classifications and testing cannot be applied routinely to children. Many lack the necessary neurodevelopmental skills and equipment may not be appropriate for use in children. Selection of endpoints appropriate to encompass the developmental spectrum from neonate to adolescent is particularly challenging. One possible solution is the development of composite outcome scores that include age and a developmentally specific functional classification, growth and development scores, exercise data, biomarkers and hemodynamics with repeated evaluation throughout the period of growth and

  15. [Guidelines for uniform reporting of data from out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest and resuscitation in the pediatric population: the pediatria utstein-style].

    PubMed

    Tormo Calandín, C; Manrique Martínez, I

    2002-06-01

    Children who require cardiopulmonary resuscitation present high mortality and morbidity. The few studies that have been published on this subject use different terminology and methodology in data collection, which makes comparisons, evaluation of efficacy, and the performance of meta-analyses, etc. difficult. Consequently, standardized data collection both in clinical studies on cardiorespiratory arrest and in cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the pediatric age group are required. The Spanish Group of Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation emphasizes that recommendations must be simple and easy to understand. The first step in the elaboration of guidelines on data collection is to develop uniform definitions (glossary of terms). The second step comprises the so-called time intervals that include time periods between two events. To describe the intervals of cardiorespiratory arrest different clocks are used: the patient's watch, that of the ambulance, the interval between call and response, etc.Thirdly, a series of clinical results are gathered to determine whether the efforts of cardiopulmonary resuscitation have a positive effect on the patient, the patient's family and society. With the information gathered a registry of data that includes the patient's personal details, general data of the cardiopulmonary resuscitation, treatment, times of performance and definitive patient outcome is made.

  16. Pediatric Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Rentea, Rebecca M; St Peter, Shawn D

    2017-02-01

    Appendicitis is one of the most common surgical pathologies in children. It can present with right lower quadrant pain. Scoring systems in combination with selective imaging and surgical examination will diagnose most children with appendicitis. Clinical pathways should be used. Most surgical interventions for appendicitis are now almost exclusively laparoscopic, with trials demonstrating better outcomes for children who undergo index hospitalization appendectomies when perforated. Nonoperative management has a role in the treatment of both uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. This article discusses the workup and management, modes of treatment, and continued areas of controversy in pediatric appendicitis.

  17. Neurological findings in pediatric penetrating head injury at a university teaching hospital in Durban, South Africa: a 23-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Muballe, Kadhaya David; Hardcastle, Timothy; Kiratu, Erastus

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVES Penetrating traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) can be divided into gunshot wounds or stab wounds based on the mechanisms of injury. Pediatric penetrating TBIs are of major concern as many parental and social factors may be involved in the causation. The authors describe the penetrating cranial injuries in pediatric patient subgroups at risk and presenting to the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, by assessment of the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and review of the common neurological manifestations including cranial nerve abnormalities. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective chart review of children who presented with penetrating TBIs between 1985 and 2007 at a university teaching hospital. Descriptive statistical analysis with univariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the variables. RESULTS Out of 223 children aged 16 years and younger with penetrating TBIs seen during the study period, stab wounds were causal in 127 (57%) of the patients, while gunshot injuries were causal in 96 (43%). Eighty-four percent of the patients were male. Apart from abnormal GCS scores, other neurological abnormalities were noted in 109 (48.9%) of the patients, the most common being cranial nerve deficits (22.4%) and hemiparesis. There was a strong correlation between left-sided stab wounds and development of seizures. The mean age of patients with neurological abnormalities was 11.72 years whereas that of patients with no neurological abnormalities was 8.96 years. CONCLUSIONS Penetrating head injuries in children are not as uncommon as previously thought. There was no correlation between the age group of the patients and the mechanism of injury, which implies that stab or gunshot injuries could occur in any of our pediatric population with the same frequency. While gunshot injuries accounted for 56% of the patient population, stab injuries still accounted for 44%. Following penetrating head injuries, neurological

  18. The future of pediatric research.

    PubMed

    Boat, Thomas F

    2007-11-01

    The future of pediatric research will be enhanced by strengthening traditional biomedical approaches and embracing emerging opportunities. Biomedical discovery and translation of new knowledge, concepts, and devices into better diagnostic and therapeutic options will require more pediatric physician-scientists, rapid adoption of enabling technologies, increased funding for research and research training (including the creation of federally funded pediatric translational research centers), and a broader distribution of research activities across the academic pediatric community. Rapid improvement of child health outcomes also will be realized through robust health services research in pediatrics, including the application of rigorous quality improvement science that documents and disseminates successful interventions, leading to better access and effectiveness of care. Improving the value of pediatric care is a realistic goal. Achieving better outcomes through individually tailored (personalized) care for children should be tested experimentally. The future of pediatrics is bright, but will depend on the recognition of and response to a growing array of exciting opportunities.

  19. Acute Splenic Infarction at an Academic General Hospital Over 10 Years

    PubMed Central

    Ami, Schattner; Meital, Adi; Ella, Kitroser; Abraham, Klepfish

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Few case series provide a current, comprehensive, and detailed description of splenic infarction (SI), an uncommon condition. Retrospective chart review complemented by imaging evaluation and patient follow-up. All adult patients with a confirmed diagnosis of acute SI discharged over 10 years from a single academic center were studied. A systematic literature review was done to compile a complete list of SI etiologies. SI was found in 32 patients, 0.016% of admissions. Ages ranged from 18 to 86 (median 64) years. Cardiogenic emboli were the predominant etiology (20/32, 62.5%) and atrial fibrillation was frequent. Other patients had autoimmune disease (12.5%), associated infection (12.5%), or hematological malignancy (6%). Nine of the patients (28%) had been previously healthy or with no recognized morbidity predisposing to SI. In 5 of 9 hitherto silent antiphospholipid syndrome or mitral valve disease had been identified. Two remained cryptogenic. Most patients presented with abdominal pain (84%), often felt in the left upper quadrant or epigastrium. Associated symptoms, leukocytosis or increased serum lactate dehydrogenase occurred inconsistently (∼25% each). Chest X-ray showed suggestive Lt. supra-diaphragmatic findings in 22%. Thus, the typical predisposing factors and/or clinical presentation should suggest SI to the clinician and be followed by early imaging by computed tomography (CT), highly useful also in atypical presentations. Complications were rare and patients were discharged after 6.5 days (median) on anticoagulant treatment. The systematic literature review revealed an extensive list of conditions underlying SI. In some, SI may be the first and presenting manifestation. SI is a rare event but should be considered in predisposed patients or those with any combination of suggestive clinical features, especially abdominal pain CT evaluation is diagnostic and the outcome is good. PMID:26356690

  20. A growing opportunity: Community gardens affiliated with US hospitals and academic health centers

    PubMed Central

    George, Daniel R.; Rovniak, Liza S.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Hanson, Ryan; Sciamanna, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community gardens can reduce public health disparities through promoting physical activity and healthy eating, growing food for underserved populations, and accelerating healing from injury or disease. Despite their potential to contribute to comprehensive patient care, no prior studies have investigated the prevalence of community gardens affiliated with US healthcare institutions, and the demographic characteristics of communities served by these gardens. Methods In 2013, national community garden databases, scientific abstracts, and public search engines (e.g., Google Scholar) were used to identify gardens. Outcomes included the prevalence of hospital-based community gardens by US regions, and demographic characteristics (age, race/ethnicity, education, household income, and obesity rates) of communities served by gardens. Results There were 110 healthcare-based gardens, with 39 in the Midwest, 25 in the South, 24 in the Northeast, and 22 in the West. Compared to US population averages, communities served by healthcare-based gardens had similar demographic characteristics, but significantly lower rates of obesity (27% versus 34%, P < .001). Conclusions Healthcare-based gardens are located in regions that are demographically representative of the US population, and are associated with lower rates of obesity in communities they serve. PMID:25599017

  1. Establishing a Personal Health Record System in an Academic Hospital: One Year's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ro, Hyun Jung; Jung, Se Young; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung; Baek, Hyunyoung; Lee, Kiheon; Bae, Woo Kyung; Han, Jong-Soo; Kim, Sarah; Park, Hwayeon

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal health records (PHRs) are web based tools that help people to access and manage their personalized medical information. Although needs for PHR are increasing, current serviced PHRs are unsatisfactory and researches on them remain limited. The purpose of this study is to show the process of developing Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH)'s own PHR system and to analyze consumer's use pattern after providing PHR service. Methods Task force team was organized to decide service range and set the program. They made the system available on both mobile application and internet web page. The study enrolled PHR consumers who assessed PHR system between June 2013 and June 2014. We analyzed the total number of users on a monthly basis and the using pattern according to each component. Results The PHR service named Health4U has been provided from June 2013. Every patient who visited SNUBH could register Health4U service and view their medical data. The PHR user has been increasing, especially they tend to approach via one way of either web page or mobile application. The most frequently used service is to check laboratory test result. Conclusion For paradigm shift toward patient-centered care, there is a growing interest in PHR. This study about experience of establishing and servicing the Health4U would contribute to development of interconnected PHR. PMID:26019761

  2. Comparative analysis of acute toxic poisoning in 2003 and 2011: analysis of 3 academic hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hak-Soo; Kim, Jung-Youn; Choi, Sung-Hyuk; Yoon, Young-Hoon; Moon, Sung-Woo; Hong, Yun-Sik; Lee, Sung-Woo

    2013-10-01

    Social factors may affect the available sources of toxic substances and causes of poisoning; and these factors may change over time. Additionally, understanding the characteristics of patients with acute toxic poisoning is important for treating such patients. Therefore, this study investigated the characteristics of patients with toxic poisoning. Patients visiting one of 3 hospitals in 2003 and 2011 were included in this study. Data on all patients who were admitted to the emergency departments with acute toxic poisoning were retrospectively obtained from medical records. Total 939 patients were analyzed. The average age of patients was 40.0 ± 20 yr, and 335 (36.9%) patients were men. Among the elements that did not change over time were the facts that suicide was the most common cause, that alcohol consumption was involved in roughly 1 of 4 cases, and that there were more women than men. Furthermore, acetaminophen and doxylamine remained the most common poisoning agents. In conclusion, the average patient age and psychotic drug poisoning has increased over time, and the use of lavage treatment has decreased.

  3. Using Lean Six Sigma Methodology to Improve Quality of the Anesthesia Supply Chain in a Pediatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Renée J; Wilson, Ashley E; Quezado, Zenaide

    2017-03-01

    Six Sigma and Lean methodologies are effective quality improvement tools in many health care settings. We applied the DMAIC methodology (define, measure, analyze, improve, control) to address deficiencies in our pediatric anesthesia supply chain. We defined supply chain problems by mapping existing processes and soliciting comments from those involved. We used daily distance walked by anesthesia technicians and number of callouts for missing supplies as measurements that we analyzed before and after implementing improvements (anesthesia cart redesign). We showed improvement in the metrics after those interventions were implemented, and those improvements were sustained and thus controlled 1 year after implementation.

  4. Weight-for-age standard score - distribution and effect on in-hospital mortality: A retrospective analysis in pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    George, Antony; Jagannath, Pushpa; Joshi, Shreedhar S.; Jagadeesh, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the distribution of weight for age standard score (Z score) in pediatric cardiac surgery and its effect on in-hospital mortality. Introduction: WHO recommends Standard Score (Z score) to quantify and describe anthropometric data. The distribution of weight for age Z score and its effect on mortality in congenital heart surgery has not been studied. Methods: All patients of younger than 5 years who underwent cardiac surgery from July 2007 to June 2013, under single surgical unit at our institute were enrolled. Z score for weight for age was calculated. Patients were classified according to Z score and mortality across the classes was compared. Discrimination and calibration of the for Z score model was assessed. Improvement in predictability of mortality after addition of Z score to Aristotle Comprehensive Complexity (ACC) score was analyzed. Results: The median Z score was -3.2 (Interquartile range -4.24 to -1.91] with weight (mean±SD) of 8.4 ± 3.38 kg. Overall mortality was 11.5%. 71% and 52.59% of patients had Z score < -2 and < -3 respectively. Lower Z score classes were associated with progressively increasing mortality. Z score as continuous variable was associated with O.R. of 0.622 (95% CI- 0.527 to 0.733, P < 0.0001) for in-hospital mortality and remained significant predictor even after adjusting for age, gender, bypass duration and ACC score. Addition of Z score to ACC score improved its predictability for in-hosptial mortality (δC - 0.0661 [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.0169], IDI- 3.83% [95% CI - 0.017 to 0.0595, P = 0.00042]). Conclusion: Z scores were lower in our cohort and were associated with in-hospital mortality. Addition of Z score to ACC score significantly improves predictive ability for in-hospital mortality. PMID:26139742

  5. Costs and process of in-patient tuberculosis management at a central academic hospital, Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Marais, F.; Mehtar, S.; Baltussen, R. M. P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Setting: South Africa reports more cases of tuberculosis (TB) than any other country, but an up-to-date, precise estimate of the costs associated with diagnosing, treating and preventing TB at the in-patient level is not available. Objective: To determine the costs associated with TB management among in-patients and to study the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) at a central academic hospital in Cape Town. Design: Retrospective and partly prospective cost analysis of TB cases diagnosed between May 2008 and October 2009. Results: The average daily in-patient costs were US$238; the average length of stay was 9.7 days. Mean laboratory and medication costs per stay were respectively US$26.82 and US$8.68. PPE use per day cost US$0.99. The average total TB management costs were US$2373 per patient. PPE was not always properly used. Discussion: The costs of in-patient TB management are high compared to community-based treatment; the main reason for the high costs is the high number of in-patient days. An efficiency assessment is needed to reduce costs. Cost reduction per TB case prevented was approximately US$2373 per case. PPE use accounted for the lowest costs. Training is needed to improve PPE use. PMID:26392953

  6. [Means of communication for an early detection of diabetic nephropathy among the diabetics followed in the academic hospital of Cotonou].

    PubMed

    Vigan, Jacques; Adja, Éric; Zannou, Judith; Agboton, Bruno L; Kérékou, Célestine A; Amoussou-Guenou, Daniel; Zannou, Marcel D; Djrolo, François

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the level of knowledge and the means of communication for early detection of diabetic nephropathy. This is a prospective study which took place from 6 February to 31 May 2012, in the Academic Clinics of Nephrology-Hemodialysis and the Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases. Included all patients with diabetes mellitus in two sexes, older than fifteen years and hospitalized in one of these two clinicals or received in consultation during the study period. A questionnaire is used for data collection. Statistical analysis was performed by STATA 11(®) in its English version. One hundred and sixty patients were enrolled. More than 4 out of 5 patients had reported knowledge of diabetes mellitus while only 26.67% had acknowledged that manifests itself by high glycemia. More than half of the patients (57.50%) had said that diabetes mellitus can be complicated by renal impairment. Three out of four diabetics (75.63%) didn't know that it is possible to make an early diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy. The radio and television broadcasts, and sensitizations during medical consultations represented the best means of communication for early detection of diabetic nephropathy. The combination of several means of communication will raise awareness on early detection of diabetic nephropathy.

  7. Pediatric Heart Failure, Lagging, and Sagging of Care in Low Income Settings: A Hospital Based Review of Cases in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Solmon; Moges, Tamirat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Causes of acute heart failure in children range from simple myocarditis complicating chest infection to complex structural heart diseases. Objective. To describe patterns, predictors of mortality, and management outcomes of acute heart failure in children. Methods. In retrospective review, between February 2012 and October 2015 at a tertiary center, 106 admitted cases were selected consecutively from discharge records. Data were extracted from patients chart and analyzed using SPSS software package. t-test and statistical significance at P value < 0.05 with 95% CI were used. Result. Acute heart failure accounted for 2.9% of the total pediatric admissions. The age ranged from 2 months up to 14 years with mean age of 8 years. Male to female ratio is 1 : 2.1. Rheumatic heart disease accounted for 53.7%; pneumonia, anemia, infective endocarditis, and recurrence of acute rheumatic fever were the main precipitating causes. Death occurred in 19% of cases. Younger age at presentation, low hemoglobin concentration, and undernutrition were associated with death with P value of 0.00, 0.01, and 0.02, respectively. Conclusions and Recommendation. Pediatric heart failure in our settings is diagnosed mainly in older age groups and mostly precipitated due to preventable causes. Significant mortality is observed in relation to factors that can be preventable in children with underlying structural heart disease. Early suspicion and diagnosis of cases may reduce the observed high mortality.

  8. Pediatric Heart Failure, Lagging, and Sagging of Care in Low Income Settings: A Hospital Based Review of Cases in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gebremariam, Solmon

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Causes of acute heart failure in children range from simple myocarditis complicating chest infection to complex structural heart diseases. Objective. To describe patterns, predictors of mortality, and management outcomes of acute heart failure in children. Methods. In retrospective review, between February 2012 and October 2015 at a tertiary center, 106 admitted cases were selected consecutively from discharge records. Data were extracted from patients chart and analyzed using SPSS software package. t-test and statistical significance at P value < 0.05 with 95% CI were used. Result. Acute heart failure accounted for 2.9% of the total pediatric admissions. The age ranged from 2 months up to 14 years with mean age of 8 years. Male to female ratio is 1 : 2.1. Rheumatic heart disease accounted for 53.7%; pneumonia, anemia, infective endocarditis, and recurrence of acute rheumatic fever were the main precipitating causes. Death occurred in 19% of cases. Younger age at presentation, low hemoglobin concentration, and undernutrition were associated with death with P value of 0.00, 0.01, and 0.02, respectively. Conclusions and Recommendation. Pediatric heart failure in our settings is diagnosed mainly in older age groups and mostly precipitated due to preventable causes. Significant mortality is observed in relation to factors that can be preventable in children with underlying structural heart disease. Early suspicion and diagnosis of cases may reduce the observed high mortality. PMID:27974990

  9. Clonal and Horizontal Dissemination of Klebsiella pneumoniae Expressing SHV-5 Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase in a Mexican Pediatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Guadalupe; Castro, Natividad; Leaños, Blanca; Valenzuela, Adriana; Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Rojas, Teresa; Solórzano, Fortino; Chihu, Lilia; Silva, Jesús

    2004-01-01

    One hundred eighty-four clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae were recovered from August 1996 to October 1997 at the Pediatric Hospital of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social in Mexico City, Mexico. Most of the isolates were collected from the neonatal intensive care unit and infant wards, which are located on the same floor of the hospital. Isolates were genotypically compared by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis with XbaI restriction of chromosomal DNA. Of 184 clinical isolates, 91 belonged to cluster A and comprised three subtypes (A1, A2, and A3), while 93 isolates, comprising two minor clones, B (10 isolates) and C (7 isolates), and 76 unique patterns, were considered unrelated isolates (URI). Susceptibility patterns were indistinguishable in both groups. Fifty extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing isolates, including 34 from clone A and 16 from URI, were examined for further studies. Molecular and genetic analysis showed that 47 of 50 clinical isolates expressed the SHV-5 β-lactamase. This enzyme, in combination with TEM-1, was encoded in a ≥170-kb conjugative plasmid. Results indicate that dissemination of this resistance was due to clonal and horizontal spread. PMID:14715728

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Donna L.; Hentz, Tracy A.; Friedman, Debra L.

    2005-01-01

    Pediatric palliative care provides benefit to children living with life-threatening or terminal conditions. Palliative care should be available to all seriously ill children. Palliative care includes the treatment of symptoms such as pain, nausea, dyspnea, constipation, anorexia, and sialorrhea. This care can occur in a variety of settings, from home to hospice to hospital, and must include bereavement care and follow up after the death of a child. There are many challenges in pediatric palliative care, but continued research into this important area of pediatrics will lead to improvements in the care of children with life-threatening illnesses. PMID:23118638

  11. Results of a nurse-led intervention: connecting pediatric cancer patients from the hospital to the school using videoconferencing technologies.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Sarah J; Drew, Donna; Wakefield, Claire E; Saikal, Samra L; Punch, Deborah; Cohn, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility and perceived academic/psychosocial outcomes of a pilot program using videoconferencing facilities to connect children with cancer to their home school. Eight parents, three patients, and five teachers (n = 16) participated in semistructured interviews evaluating the efficacy/feasibility of this program. Results were analyzed using the qualitative framework of Miles and Huberman. Parents reported that videoconferencing provided the family with a sense of normalcy and connection to the outside world (4/8), often boosting patients' mood (6/8). Further benefits included stronger relationships with classmates and teachers (15/16) and improved peer acceptance and school reintegration. There were no notable impacts on patients' academic progression. Reported barriers included: costs, time commitments, bureaucratic hurdles, and technical and logistical difficulties. Videoconferencing technologies provide an important tool to connect childhood cancer patients to their classrooms; however, further solution-based investigation is warranted to overcome existing barriers.

  12. Phase I Study Assessing the Pharmacokinetic Profile, Safety, and Tolerability of a Single Dose of Ceftazidime-Avibactam in Hospitalized Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Jon; Arrieta, Antonio; Bishai, Raafat; Das, Shampa; Delair, Shirley; Edeki, Timi; Holmes, William C.; Li, Jianguo; Moffett, Kathryn S.; Mukundan, Deepa; Perez, Norma; Romero, José R.; Speicher, David; Sullivan, Janice E.; Zhou, Diansong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK), safety, and tolerability of a single dose of ceftazidime-avibactam in pediatric patients. A phase I, multicenter, open-label PK study was conducted in pediatric patients hospitalized with an infection and receiving systemic antibiotic therapy. Patients were enrolled into four age cohorts (cohort 1, ≥12 to <18 years; cohort 2, ≥6 to <12 years; cohort 3, ≥2 to <6 years; cohort 4, ≥3 months to <2 years). Patients received a single 2-h intravenous infusion of ceftazidime-avibactam (cohort 1, 2,000 to 500 mg; cohort 2, 2,000 to 500 mg [≥40 kg] or 50 to 12.5 mg/kg [<40 kg]; cohorts 3 and 4, 50 to 12.5 mg/kg). Blood samples were collected to describe individual PK characteristics for ceftazidime and avibactam. Population PK modeling was used to describe characteristics of ceftazidime and avibactam PK across all age groups. Safety and tolerability were assessed. Thirty-two patients received study drug. Mean plasma concentration-time curves, geometric mean maximum concentration (Cmax), and area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0–∞) were similar across all cohorts for both drugs. Six patients (18.8%) reported an adverse event, all mild or moderate in intensity. No deaths or serious adverse events occurred. The single-dose PK of ceftazidime and avibactam were comparable between each of the 4 age cohorts investigated and were broadly similar to those previously observed in adults. No new safety concerns were identified. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01893346.) PMID:27503642

  13. Epidemiology and Burden of Bloodstream Infections Caused by Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Enterobacteriaceae in a Pediatric Hospital in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Ndir, Awa; Diop, Amadou; Faye, Pape Makhtar; Cissé, Moussa Fafa; Ndoye, Babacar; Astagneau, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Context Severe bacterial infections are not considered as a leading cause of death in young children in sub-Saharan Africa. The worldwide emergence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) could change the paradigm, especially in neonates who are at high risk of developing healthcare-associated infections. Objective To evaluate the epidemiology and the burden of ESBL-E bloodstream infections (BSI). Methods A case-case-control study was conducted in patients admitted in a pediatric hospital during two consecutive years. Cases were patients with Enterobacteriaceae BSI and included ESBL-positive (cases 1) and ESBL-negative BSI (cases 2). Controls were patients with no BSI. Multivariate analysis using a stepwise logistic regression was performed to identify risk factors for ESBL acquisition and for fatal outcomes. A multistate model was used to estimate the excess length of hospital stay (LOS) attributable to ESBL production while accounting for time of infection. Cox proportional hazards models were performed to assess the independent effect of ESBL-positive and negative BSI on LOS. Results The incidence rate of ESBL-E BSI was of 1.52 cases/1000 patient-days (95% CI: 1.2–5.6 cases per 1000 patient-days). Multivariate analysis showed that independent risk factors for ESBL-BSI acquisition were related to underlying comorbidities (sickle cell disease OR = 3.1 (95%CI: 2.3–4.9), malnutrition OR = 2.0 (95%CI: 1.7–2.6)) and invasive procedures (mechanical ventilation OR = 3.5 (95%CI: 2.7–5.3)). Neonates were also identified to be at risk for ESBL-E BSI. Inadequate initial antibiotic therapy was more frequent in ESBL-positive BSI than ESBL-negative BSI (94.2% versus 5.7%, p<0.0001). ESBL-positive BSI was associated with higher case-fatality rate than ESBL-negative BSI (54.8% versus 15.4%, p<0.001). Multistate modelling indicated an excess LOS attributable to ESBL production of 4.3 days. The adjusted end-of-LOS hazard ratio for ESBL

  14. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolated From Various Types of Hospital Infections in Pediatrics: Panton-Valentine Leukocidin, Staphylococcal Chromosomal Cassette mec SCCmec Phenotypes and Antibiotic Resistance Properties

    PubMed Central

    Dormanesh, Banafshe; Siroosbakhat, Soheila; Khodaverdi Darian, Ebrahim; Afsharkhas, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus has long been considered as a major pathogen of hospital infections. Objectives: The present investigation was carried out to study the distribution of Staphylococcal Chromosomal Cassette mec (SCCmec) types, Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) gene and antibiotic resistance properties of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from various types of infections found in Iranian pediatric patients. Patients and Methods: Two-hundred and fifty-five clinical specimens were collected from four major provinces of Iran. Samples were cultured and the MRSA strains were subjected to Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The patterns of antibiotic resistance were determined using the disk diffusion method. Results: Seventy-four out of 255 (29.01%) clinical samples were positive for MRSA. Of the 74 MRSA strains, 47 (63.51%) were PVL positive. The clinical samples of respiratory tract infections (36.36%), those from the Shiraz province (37.87%) and samples collected during the summer season (56.48%) were the most commonly infected samples. The most commonly detected antibiotic resistance genes were tetK (89.18%), mecA (71.62%), msrA (56.75%) and tetM (54.05%). Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus had the highest levels of resistance against penicillin (100%), tetracycline (98.64%), ampicillin (93.24%) and oxacillin (93.24%). The most commonly detected SCCmec types in the MRSA strains were type V (18.91%) and III (17.56%). Conclusions: Regular surveillance of hospital-associated infections and monitoring of the antibiotic sensitivity patterns are required to reduce the prevalence of MRSA. We recommend initial management of children affected by MRSA with imipenem, lincomycin and cephalothin prescriptions. PMID:26862375

  15. Effects of mental demands during dispensing on perceived medication safety and employee well being: A study of workload in pediatric hospital pharmacies

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Richard J.; Patel, Neal R.; Scanlon, Matthew C.; Shalaby, Theresa M.; Arnold, Judi M.; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2009-01-01

    Background Pharmacy workload is a modifiable work system factor believed to affect both medication safety outcomes and employee outcomes such as job satisfaction. Objectives This study sought to measure the effect of workload on safety and employee outcomes in two pediatric hospitals and to do so using a novel approach to pharmacy workload measurement. Methods Rather than measuring prescription volume or other similar indicators, this study measured the type and intensity of mental demands experienced during the medication dispensing tasks. The effects of external (interruptions, divided attention, rushing) and internal (concentration, effort) task demands on perceived medication error likelihood, adverse drug event likelihood, job dissatisfaction, and burnout were statistically estimated using multiple linear and logistic regression. Results Pharmacists and pharmacy technicians reported high levels of external and internal mental demands during dispensing. The study supported the hypothesis that external demands (interruptions, divided attention, rushing) negatively impacted medication safety and employee well being outcomes. However, as hypothesized, increasing levels of internal demands (concentration and effort) were not associated with greater perceived likelihood of error, adverse drug events, or burnout, and even had a positive effect on job satisfaction. Conclusion Replicating a prior study in nursing, this study shows that new conceptualizations and measures of workload can generate important new findings about both detrimental and beneficial effects of workload on patient safety and employee well being. This study discusses what those findings imply for policy, management, and design concerning automation, cognition, and staffing. PMID:21111387

  16. Serotyping and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Escherichia coli Isolates from Urinary Tract Infections in Pediatric Population in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Nirmaljit; Malhotra, Shalini; Madan, Preeti; Ahmad, Wasim; Hans, Charoo

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) in pediatric population are associated with high morbidity and long term complications. In recent years, there is increased prevalence of Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains producing extended spectrum β-lactamase, Amp C, and Metallo β-lactamase, making the clinical management even more difficult. This study was aimed to detect the serotypes and to determine antimicrobial susceptibility profile of E. coli isolates from urine samples of children <10 yrs old. A total of 75 pure E. coli strains isolated from patients with symptoms of UTI and colony count ≥105 organisms/mL were included in the study. Antibiotic sensitivity pattern showed maximum resistance to nalidixic acid (98.7%), followed by ampicillin (97.3%), amoxi-clavulanate (96%), and fluoroquinolones (92%) while most of the isolates were found sensitive to piperacillin-tazobactam (13.3%), nitrofurantoin (5.3%), and meropenem (1.3%). 48% of the strains were ESBL producer (extended spectrum beta lactamase). 44% strains were typable withantisera used in our study and the most common serogroup was O6 (33.3%) followed by O1 (15.1%) and O15 (15.1%). To conclude, judicious use of antibiotics according to hospital antibiotic policy and infection control measures should be implemented to prevent spread of multidrug resistant organisms. PMID:27047691

  17. Changing circulation rate of human metapneumovirus strains and types among hospitalized pediatric patients during three consecutive winter-spring seasons. Brief report.

    PubMed

    Gerna, G; Campanini, G; Rovida, F; Sarasini, A; Lilleri, D; Paolucci, S; Marchi, A; Baldanti, F; Revello, M G

    2005-11-01

    From 2001 through 2004, 808 pediatric patients admitted to hospital because of acute respiratory infections were examined for presence of respiratory viruses by either direct fluorescent staining using monoclonal antibodies or RT-PCR during three consecutive winter-spring seasons. On the whole, 336 (42%) patients were detected as positive for one or more respiratory viruses. The most widely circulating virus was human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) infecting 50% of positive patients, followed by human metapneumovirus (hMPV) found in 13% of patients, and then by influenza virus type A, human parainfluenzaviruses and coinfections. Significant variations in the circulation rate of hRSV, hMPV and influenzavirus type A were observed during the individual seasons. In addition, the circulation rates of the different types of hMPV changed yearly. In 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 hMPV circulated at a significant lower proportion than hRSV, while in 2003-2004 the circulation rates of the two viruses were closer. In conclusion, the 4 hMPV subtypes circulated yearly in Northern Italy flanking hRSV as major respiratory pathogens in the infantile patient population.

  18. Comprehensive training for the future pediatric cardiologist

    PubMed Central

    Subramanyan, Raghavan

    2016-01-01

    India faces a huge burden of pediatric and adult congenital heart diseases (CHDs). Many acquired valvar, myocardial, and vascular diseases also need treatment in childhood and adolescence. The emergence of pediatric cardiology as an independent specialty has been a relatively recent development. A few centers of excellence in pediatric cardiology have developed. However, the requirement of pediatric cardiac care and pediatric cardiologists is far in excess of what is available. There are no guidelines at present in India for uniform training in pediatric cardiology. Many training programs are nonstructured and do not focus on the regional needs. Both core training and advanced training programs are essential to provide adequate numbers of community-level pediatric cardiologists and academic leaders respectively. This article proposes a detailed plan and curriculum for comprehensive training of future pediatric cardiologists in India. PMID:27011684

  19. Hospitality and Collegial Community: An Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Explains a collegial ethic of hospitality as a cardinal academic virtue and suggests a way of building a "collegium," the covenantal community of academe. Discusses how academicians can develop hospitable teaching, hospitable scholarship, and hospitable service. (Author/SLD)

  20. [Celiac disease and its diagnostic evolution. Comparisons and experiences in a hospital pediatric department (1975-1992). I].

    PubMed

    Della Morte, M A; Sala, M R; Morelli, P; Meschi, V; Silva, A; Valli, F

    1992-01-01

    The coeliac disease (CD) or gluten-sensitive enteropathy (GSE) is a permanent intolerance to wheat gliadin and to correlated proteins inducing malabsorption and typical damages of the jejunal mucosa (total or subtotal villous atrophy = SVA) in genetically-predisposed individuals ("DQW2"). A large amount of research has been devoted to CD pathogenesis: the most recent studies, thanks to sophisticated and experimental methods, support the pathogenetic immunological theory and the one of direct cytotoxicity. The correct diagnostic procedure for CD, established in 1970 by the European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (ESPGAN), suggested three small bowel mucosal biopsies. In the last years, because of the difficulties of such a practice, the necessity of non-invasive diagnostic approaches has developed; such approaches have been verified in absorption tests (one-hour blood xylose, intestinal permeability methods) and in immunogenetic tests (antibodies antigliadin, anti-reticulin, anti-endomysium, anti 90 KD glycoprotein, anti-human jejunum, HLA I/II antigens). The specific MHC antigens establish CD's incidence in several population and in particular situations, as in first-degree relatives and in diseases associated with CD (dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and other auto-immune syndromes). The specific serum antibodies singly used as first level screening if estimated in combination with absorption tests, reach the highest levels of specificity and sensibility in CD diagnosis. It's anyway fundamental the comparison with at least a typical CD histological feature, caused by a challenge with a sufficient gluten to be carried in dubious cases and in non high auxological risk age (ESPGAN 1989). Adolescence is a period of frequent non compliance with a gluten-free diet and of particular psychological and physical problems: the apparent "gluten insensitivity", typical of teen-agers and adults, recalls the

  1. Stimulated Recall Methodology for Assessing Work System Barriers and Facilitators in Family-Centered Rounds in a Pediatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Li, Yaqiong; Kelly, Michelle M.; DuBenske, Lori L.; Xie, Anping; McCabe, Brenna; Orne, Jason; Cox, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    Human factors and ergonomics methods are needed to redesign healthcare processes and support patient-centered care, in particular for vulnerable patients such as hospitalized children. We implemented and evaluated a stimulated recall methodology for collective confrontation in the context of family-centered rounds. Five parents and five healthcare team members reviewed video records of their bedside rounds, and were then interviewed using the stimulated recall methodology to identify work system barriers and facilitators in family-centered rounds. The evaluation of the methodology was based on a survey of the participants, and a qualitative analysis of interview data in light of the work system model of Smith and Carayon (1989; 2000). Positive survey feedback from the participants was received. The stimulated recall methodology identified barriers and facilitators in all work system elements. Participatory ergonomics methods such as the stimulated recall methodology allow a range of participants, including parents and children, to participate in healthcare process improvement. PMID:24894378

  2. Stimulated recall methodology for assessing work system barriers and facilitators in family-centered rounds in a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Carayon, Pascale; Li, Yaqiong; Kelly, Michelle M; DuBenske, Lori L; Xie, Anping; McCabe, Brenna; Orne, Jason; Cox, Elizabeth D

    2014-11-01

    Human factors and ergonomics methods are needed to redesign healthcare processes and support patient-centered care, in particular for vulnerable patients such as hospitalized children. We implemented and evaluated a stimulated recall methodology for collective confrontation in the context of family-centered rounds. Five parents and five healthcare team members reviewed video records of their bedside rounds, and were then interviewed using the stimulated recall methodology to identify work system barriers and facilitators in family-centered rounds. The evaluation of the methodology was based on a survey of the participants, and a qualitative analysis of interview data in light of the work system model of Smith and Carayon (1989, 2001). Positive survey feedback from the participants was received. The stimulated recall methodology identified barriers and facilitators in all work system elements. Participatory ergonomics methods such as the stimulated recall methodology allow a range of participants, including parents and children, to participate in healthcare process improvement.

  3. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for pediatric patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases at All Children's Hospital/University of South Florida.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, A; Dorsey, M; Miotke, J; Shepherd, C; Day, N

    2009-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the transplantation outcomes of 31 patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases treated at our center (All Children's Hospital, University of South Florida) since its inception in 1986. The primary immune diseases included severe combined immunodeficiency, Wiscott-Aldrich syndrome, X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome, and chronic granulomatous disease. The age of the patient's at the time of transplant ranged from 1 month to 19 years, and conditioning regimens varied based on the patients underlying disease. In 23 patients, the graft source was bone marrow, 4 patients received umbilical cord blood grafts and 4 patients received peripheral blood stem cell grafts. Better survival rates were observed in those patients transplanted at a younger age and free of infections, demonstrating that transplantation at an early age before significant infections, autoimmune manifestation and malignant transformation have occurred is beneficial.

  4. Pediatric sedation.

    PubMed

    Daud, Yasmeen N; Carlson, Douglas W

    2014-08-01

    Pediatric sedation is an evolving field performed by an extensive list of specialties. Well-defined sedation systems within pediatric facilities are paramount to providing consistent, safe sedation. Pediatric sedation providers should be trained in the principles and practice of sedation, which include patient selection, pre-sedation assessment to determine risks during sedation, selection of optimal sedation medication, monitoring requirements, and post-sedation care. Training, credentialing, and continuing sedation education must be incorporated into sedation systems to verify and monitor the practice of safe sedation. Pediatric hospitalists represent a group of providers with extensive pediatric knowledge and skills who can safely provide pediatric sedation.

  5. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model.

    PubMed

    Moore, Julia E; Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E

    2016-05-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. Funded projects have been sustained (76% reported full sustainability) and spread to over 200 new sites. Lessons learned include the following: assess readiness, develop tailored implementation materials, consider characteristics of implementation supports, protect champion time and consider evaluation feasibility.

  6. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario (CAHO) Adopting Research to Improve Care (ARTIC) Program: Reach, Sustainability, Spread and Lessons Learned from an Implementation Funding Model

    PubMed Central

    Grouchy, Michelle; Graham, Ian D.; Shandling, Maureen; Doyle, Winnie; Straus, Sharon E.

    2016-01-01

    Despite evidence on what works in healthcare, there is a significant gap in the time it takes to bring research into practice. The Council of Academic Hospitals of Ontario's Adopting Research to Improve Care program addresses this research-to-practice gap by incorporating the following components into its funding program: strategic selection of evidence for implementation, education and training for implementation, implementation supports, executive champions and governance, and evaluation. Funded projects have been sustained (76% reported full sustainability) and spread to over 200 new sites. Lessons learned include the following: assess readiness, develop tailored implementation materials, consider characteristics of implementation supports, protect champion time and consider evaluation feasibility. PMID:27232234

  7. Pediatric MS

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Others on MSconnection.org Join a Local Support Group Ask an MS Navigator Edward M. Dowd Personal ... navigate the school system through the Pediatric MS Support Group . Treating pediatric MS Studies have shown that the ...

  8. [Celiac disease and the evolution of its diagnosis. Comparison and experience at a hospital pediatric department (1975-1993). (Second part)].

    PubMed

    Della Morte, M A; Sala, M R; Morelli, P; Meschi, V; Silva, A; Colombo, B; Malvezzi, F; Cogliati, F; Mancosu, M; Valli, F

    1993-01-01

    In a period of over 18 years the prominent medical bibliographic marks with regard to definition, diagnosis and examinations of coeliac disease (CD) have been compared and as far as possible reproduced. The results confirm the remarks derivating from wider statistics. From the beginning of 1975 to the first six months of 1993 in Merate Hospital Pediatric Division, 323 patients were submitted to a first jejunal peroral biopsy in 133 cases (41.2%) CD was diagnosed. Since 34 children (25.6%) concluded the ESPGAN diagnostic iter with 3 consecutive biopsies, the reasons why the other patients didn't finish or respect the programs are here examined. Since 1987 a specific anti-gliadin (IgA and IgG) antibodies titrimetry has been available either in the investigation of suspect symptomatology or like control mark during the assessment or after a sure CD diagnosis. Since october 1992 antiendomysium antibodies (EMA or AEA IgA) have been determined only in selected patients. From the examination of 24 subjects now checked with AGA IgA/IgG and EMA and with a first positive biopsy, it is possible to point out that only one jejunal biopsy (or at the most a second one as a control during the gluten challenge) with the guarantee of haematologic patterns doesn't raise doubts about a CD diagnosis. Analogous considerations mainly refer to the atypical CD "late onset" when a constant lack of AGA and EMA during gluten free diet (GFD) or their changes in a non compliance or in gluten challenge, can exclude a following hystological confirmation. By this experience it follows that a specific antigliadin and antiendomysium antibodies investigation is indispensable to the shortening of diagnostic times, to the reduction of an often unwelcome invasive diagnostic method and to the discovery of the "CD iceberg".

  9. Discharge Against Medical Advice in the Pediatric Wards in Boo-ali Sina Hospital, Sari, Iran 2010

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni Saravi, Benyamin; Reza Zadeh, Esmaeil; Siamian, Hasan; Yahghoobian, Mahboobeh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Since children neither comprehended nor contribute to the decision, discharge against medical advice is a challenge of health care systems in the world. Therefore, the current study was designed to determine the rate and causes of discharge against medical advice. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was done by reviewing the medical records by census method. Data was analyzed using SPSS software and x2 statistics was used to determine the relationship between variables. The value of P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: Rate of discharged against medical advice was 108 (2.2%). Mean of age and length of stay were 2.8±4 (SD).3 years old and 3.7±5.4 (SD) days, respectively. Totally, 95 patients (88.7%) had health insurance and 65 (60.2%) patients lived in urban areas. History of psychiatric disease and addiction in 22 (20.6%) of the parents were negative. In addition, 100 (92.3%) patients admitted for medical treatment and the others for surgery. The relationship of the signatory with patients (72.3%) was father. Of 108 patients discharged against medical advice, 20 (12%) were readmitted. The relationship between the day of discharge and discharge against medical advice was significant (ρ =0/03). Conclusion: Rate of discharge against medical advice in Boo-ali hospital is the same as the other studies in the same range. The form which is used for this purpose did not have suitable data elements about description of consequence of such discharge, and it has not shown the real causes of discharge against medical advice. PMID:24554800

  10. [Pediatric management of sickle cell disease: experience at the Charles de Gaulle University Children's Hospital in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    PubMed

    Yé, Diarra; Kouéta, Fla; Dao, Lassina; Kaboret, Sonia; Sawadogo, Alphonse

    2008-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a genetic disease most common in blacks. We retrospectively collected records for patients with sickle cell disease who were seen from January 2002 through September 2006 to assess the care provided for this disease at Charles de Gaulle University Children's Hospital of Ouagadougou. In all, 88 patients were monitored quarterly at outpatient visits for sickle cell disease, in the absence of any crisis. Their age ranged from 6 months to 16 years, with an average age of 7. There were more boys than girls, with a sex ratio of 1.44. The distribution according to sickle cell genotype showed that SC accounted for 62% of cases, while SS forms were more frequent until the age of 5. All children have received the immunizations in the standard Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) [diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, measles and yellow fever]. The immunization rates for non-EPI vaccines including hepatitis B, Haemophilus influenzae B, Salmonella typhi, meningitis, pneumonia and the combined vaccine against measles, mumps and rubella ranged from 94 to 100%. A prophylactic anti-anaemic agent was made with folic acid often associated with iron. In addition, patients receive malaria chemoprophylaxis. Chloroquine was initially provided, and since 2006, children have been receiving sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Our encouraging results deserve reinforcement in the short-term - at the local level by neonatal screening, the creation of an immunization unit, and the systematization of antibiotic prophylaxis, and in the medium-term by implementation of a National sickle cell disease programme to help meet the objective of a 40% reduction in mortality among affected children younger than 5 years by 2015, set by the Sickle Cell Disease International Organization.

  11. Contribution of the Activities Diary to the pediatric teaching.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Vitor de Almeida; Scucuglia, Ana Cláudia B; T Gonsaga, Ricardo Alessandro; Biscegli, Terezinha Soares

    2013-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the fifth-year medical students' self-evaluation based on the reflexive discourse of the Activities Diaries (portfolio) from the Pediatric Internship I and Child Care Rotations. METHODS Cross sectional, qualitative and descriptive study using the collective subject discourse of the diaries used during the internship of the Medical School, in Catanduva, São Paulo, from January to November, 2011. The registered students' testimonials in the portfolio sections called self-assessment and students' impression were assessed according to their central ideas (discipline organization, breastfeeding outpatient clinic, number of admissions in the pediatric hospital ward and satisfaction with the Child Health training ), related to the teaching of Pediatrics and Child Care. The portfolios with incomplete registers were excluded. RESULTS The testimonials of 47 interns (75% of the students) were analyzed, and 21.3% of them expressed satisfaction with the discipline organization and 27.7% praised the inclusion of the breastfeeding outpatient clinics in the course. For 25.5% of the academics, the number of admissions in the pediatric wards was insufficient for an ideal learning; however, 70.2% were satisfied with the Child Health training. CONCLUSIONS This critical analysis allowed a summary of the reflections, suggestions and critics registered by the interns and can be used as a tool for improvement of the professional cycle.

  12. Pediatric Observation Units in the US: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Macy, Michelle L.; Kim, Christopher S.; Sasson, Comilla; Lozon, Marie M.; Davis, Matthew M.

    2009-01-01

    Background As the United States' (US) health system seeks more efficient and value-based care models, geographically distinct observation units (OUs) may become an integral part of hospital-based care for children. Purpose To systematically review the literature and evaluate the structure and function of pediatric OUs in the US. Data Sources Searches were conducted in Medline, Web of Science, CINAHL, HCAB, Lexis Nexis, National Guideline Clearinghouse and Cochrane Reviews through February 2009, with review of select bibliographies. Study Selection English language peer-reviewed publications on pediatric OU care in the US. Data Extraction Two authors independently determined study eligibility. Studies were graded using a 5-level quality assessment tool. Data were extracted using a standardized form. Data Synthesis 21 studies met inclusion criteria: 2 randomized trials, 2 prospective observational, 12 retrospective cohort, 2 before and after, and 3 descriptive studies. Studies present data on more than 22,000 children cared for in OUs, most at large academic centers. This systematic review provides a descriptive overview of the structure and function of pediatric OUs in the US. Despite seemingly straightforward outcomes for OU care, significant heterogeneity in the reporting of length of stay, admission rates, return visit rates, and costs precluded our ability to conduct meta-analyses. We propose standard outcome measures and future directions for pediatric OU research. Conclusions Future research using consistent outcome measures will be critical to determining whether OUs can improve the quality and cost of providing care to children requiring observation-length stays. PMID:20235288

  13. Contribution of the Activities Diary to the pediatric teaching

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Vitor de Almeida; Scucuglia, Ana Cláudia B.; T.Gonsaga, Ricardo Alessandro; Biscegli, Terezinha Soares

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the fifth-year medical students' self-evaluation based on the reflexive discourse of the Activities Diaries (portfolio) from the Pediatric Internship I and Child Care Rotations. METHODS Cross sectional, qualitative and descriptive study using the collective subject discourse of the diaries used during the internship of the Medical School, in Catanduva, São Paulo, from January to November, 2011. The registered students' testimonials in the portfolio sections called self-assessment and students' impression were assessed according to their central ideas (discipline organization, breastfeeding outpatient clinic, number of admissions in the pediatric hospital ward and satisfaction with the Child Health training ), related to the teaching of Pediatrics and Child Care. The portfolios with incomplete registers were excluded. RESULTS The testimonials of 47 interns (75% of the students) were analyzed, and 21.3% of them expressed satisfaction with the discipline organization and 27.7% praised the inclusion of the breastfeeding outpatient clinics in the course. For 25.5% of the academics, the number of admissions in the pediatric wards was insufficient for an ideal learning; however, 70.2% were satisfied with the Child Health training. CONCLUSIONS This critical analysis allowed a summary of the reflections, suggestions and critics registered by the interns and can be used as a tool for improvement of the professional cycle. PMID:24142320

  14. Pediatric Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control and Prevention’s Safe Child website . What is pediatric critical care? Children who have severe or life-threatening injuries ... are staffed by physicians with specialized training in pediatric critical care medicine ("pediatric intensivists"). Because children can experience a ...

  15. [University professors in the Soviet Occupation Zone and the German Democratic Republic up to 1961: Academic alternation of generations at university psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Kumbier, E; Haack, K

    2015-05-01

    After WWII a politically guided staffing policy foresaw an exchange program for professors from the Soviet Occupation Zone and the German Democratic Republic (GDR). In the field of medicine this initiative was not successful. With respect to university psychiatric/neurological hospitals this experiment failed as a result of a shortage of personnel due to the consequences of war, denazification and people migrating into western occupation zones. Criteria for politically selecting promising young talent which had been propagated by the Socialist Unity Party of Germany (Sozialistische Einheitspartei Deutschlands, SED) were thus not relevant in academic medicine until 1961; however, the communist rulers had great interest in bringing professional and academic resources up to date. Politically implicated representatives in the field were also included in this process. At the forefront was the interest in functioning medical care and education in order to be able to train much needed health professionals. At the end of the 1950s a new generation of professors was established at the university hospitals. This generation rotation demonstrated the politically intended replacement of the "old" professor generation and the transition to a new GDR generation that had been trained after 1945. This second generation of professors inherited vacant professorships and defined and shaped research and academia until the end of the GDR much more than the previous generation had and also more than the one that followed. The generation of professors continued to feel a strong affiliation with their academic teachers and consequently continued their tradition in the sense of a school, for the most part independent of political circumstances.

  16. Development of a pediatric palliative care team.

    PubMed

    Ward-Smith, Peggy; Linn, Jill Burris; Korphage, Rebecca M; Christenson, Kathy; Hutto, C J; Hubble, Christopher L

    2007-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics has provided clinical recommendations for palliative care needs of children. This article outlines the steps involved in implementing a pediatric palliative care program in a Midwest pediatric magnet health care facility. The development of a Pediatric Advanced Comfort Care Team was supported by hospital administration and funded through grants. Challenges included the development of collaborative relationships with health care professionals from specialty areas. Pediatric Advanced Comfort Care Team services, available from the time of diagnosis, are provided by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals and individualized on the basis of needs expressed by each child and his or her family.

  17. Identifying the Unique Aspects of Adolescent and Young Adult Palliative Care: A Case Study to Propel Programmatic Changes in Pediatric Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Humphrey, Lisa; Dell, Mary Lynn

    2015-09-01

    Using a case study, in this article we seek to highlight how the distinct developmental needs of adolescent and young adult patients facing a life-threatening condition require a different approach to patient care by pediatric health care workers. The case underscores pitfalls in using a pediatric construct of care in areas of pain management, social stressors, and advanced care planning, and suggests programs to implement for improvement, including partnership with psychiatry, substance abuse, and palliative care specialists.

  18. Pediatric trauma BIG score: Predicting mortality in polytraumatized pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    El-Gamasy, Mohamed Abd El-Aziz; Elezz, Ahmed Abd El Basset Abo; Basuni, Ahmed Sobhy Mohamed; Elrazek, Mohamed El Sayed Ali Abd

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a worldwide health problem and the major cause of death and disability, particularly affecting the young population. It is important to remember that pediatric trauma care has made a significant improvement in the outcomes of these injured children. Aim of the Work: This study aimed at evaluation of pediatric trauma BIG score in comparison with New Injury Severity Score (NISS) and Pediatric Trauma Score (PTS) in Tanta University Emergency Hospital. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Tanta University Emergency Hospital to all multiple trauma pediatric patients attended to the Emergency Department for 1 year. Pediatric trauma BIG score, PTS, and NISS scores were calculated and results compared to each other and to observed mortality. Results: BIG score ≥12.7 has sensitivity 86.7% and specificity 71.4%, whereas PTS at value ≤3.5 has sensitivity 63.3% and specificity 68.6% and NISS at value ≥39.5 has sensitivity 53.3% and specificity 54.3%. There was a significant positive correlation between BIG score value and mortality rate. Conclusion: The pediatric BIG score is a reliable mortality-prediction score for children with traumatic injuries; it uses international normalization ratio (INR), Base Excess (BE), and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) values that can be measured within a few minutes of sampling, so it can be readily applied in the Pediatric Emergency Department, but it cannot be applied on patients with chronic diseases that affect INR, BE, or GCS. PMID:27994378

  19. Mentoring practices benefiting pediatric nurses.

    PubMed

    Weese, Meghan M; Jakubik, Louise D; Eliades, Aris B; Huth, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies examining predictors of pediatric nurse protégé mentoring benefits demonstrated that protégé perception of quality was the single best predictor of mentoring benefits. The ability to identify the mentoring practices that predict specific benefits for individual nurses provides a better understanding of how mentoring relationships can be leveraged within health care organizations promoting mutual mentoring benefits. This descriptive correlational, non-experimental study of nurses at a northeast Ohio, Magnet® recognized, free-standing pediatric hospital advances nursing science by demonstrating how mentoring practices benefit pediatric nurse protégés.

  20. Pediatric Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Kristen; Stoffella, Sylvia; Meyers, Rachel; Girotto, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    The frequent use of antimicrobials in pediatric patients has led to a significant increase in multidrug-resistant bacterial infections among children. Antimicrobial stewardship programs have been created in many hospitals in an effort to curtail and optimize the use of antibiotics. Pediatric-focused programs are necessary because of the differences in antimicrobial need and use among this patient population, unique considerations and dosing, vulnerability for resistance due to a lifetime of antibiotic exposure, and the increased risk of adverse events. This paper serves as a position statement of the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) who supports the implementation of antimicrobial stewardship programs for all pediatric patients. PPAG also believes that a pediatric pharmacy specialist should be included as part of that program and that services be covered by managed care organizations and government insurance entities. PPAG also recommends that states create legislation similar to that in existence in California and Missouri and that a federal Task Force for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria be permanently established. PPAG also supports post-doctoral pharmacy training programs in antibiotic stewardship.

  1. Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Prusakowski, Melanie K; Chen, Audrey P

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric sepsis is distinct from adult sepsis in its definitions, clinical presentations, and management. Recognition of pediatric sepsis is complicated by the various pediatric-specific comorbidities that contribute to its mortality and the age- and development-specific vital sign and clinical parameters that obscure its recognition. This article outlines the clinical presentation and management of sepsis in neonates, infants, and children, and highlights some key populations who require specialized care.

  2. Restructuring within an academic health center to support quality and safety: the development of the Center for Quality and Safety at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bohmer, Richard M J; Bloom, Jonathan D; Mort, Elizabeth A; Demehin, Akinluwa A; Meyer, Gregg S

    2009-12-01

    Recent focus on the need to improve the quality and safety of health care has created new challenges for academic health centers (AHCs). Whereas previously quality was largely assumed, today it is increasingly quantifiable and requires organized systems for improvement. Traditional structures and cultures within AHCs, although well suited to the tripartite missions of teaching, research, and clinical care, are not easily adaptable to the tasks of measuring, reporting, and improving quality. Here, the authors use a case study of Massachusetts General Hospital's efforts to restructure quality and safety to illustrate the value of beginning with a focus on organizational culture, using a systematic process of engaging clinical leadership, developing an organizational framework dependent on proven business principles, leveraging focus events, and maintaining executive dedication to execution of the initiative. The case provides a generalizable example for AHCs of how applying explicit management design can foster robust organizational change with relatively modest incremental financial resources.

  3. Is Survival After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests Worse During Days of National Academic Meetings in Japan? A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Matsuyama, Tasuku; Hatakeyama, Toshihiro; Shimamoto, Tomonari; Izawa, Junichi; Nishiyama, Chika; Iwami, Taku

    2016-01-01

    Background Outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) might be worse during academic meetings because many medical professionals attend them. Methods This nationwide population-based observation of all consecutively enrolled Japanese adult OHCA patients with resuscitation attempts from 2005 to 2012. The primary outcome was 1-month survival with a neurologically favorable outcome. Calendar days at three national meetings (Japanese Society of Intensive Care Medicine, Japanese Association for Acute Medicine, and Japanese Circulation Society) were obtained for each year during the study period, because medical professionals who belong to these academic societies play an important role in treating OHCA patients after hospital admission, and we identified two groups: the exposure group included OHCAs that occurred on meeting days, and the control group included OHCAs that occurred on the same days of the week 1 week before and after meetings. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for confounding variables. Results A total of 20 143 OHCAs that occurred during meeting days and 38 860 OHCAs that occurred during non-meeting days were eligible for our analyses. The proportion of patients with favorable neurologic outcomes after whole arrests did not differ during meeting and non-meeting days (1.6% [324/20 143] vs 1.5% [596/38 855]; adjusted odds ratio 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.88–1.19). Regarding bystander-witnessed ventricular fibrillation arrests of cardiac origin, the proportion of patients with favorable neurologic outcomes also did not differ between the groups. Conclusions In this population, there were no significant differences in outcomes after OHCAs that occurred during national meetings of professional organizations related to OHCA care and those that occurred during non-meeting days. PMID:26639754

  4. Contemporary roles of the pediatric psychologist in diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Kichler, Jessica C; Harris, Michael A; Weissberg-Benchell, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Important stakeholders, including the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD), recognize the need for psychologists to be an integral part of diabetes care. This review paper aims to provide a comprehensive examination of pediatric psychologists' roles in working with children and adolescents with diabetes, including during distinct phases of treatment (e.g., diagnosis, outpatient diabetes clinic visits, inpatient hospitalizations, and outpatient psychology visits) and with different modalities of psychological interventions (e.g., screening, individual, family, and group therapy). In addition, the role of the psychologist in diabetes care within various settings (e.g., private practice, academic medical centers, and community organizations) will be explored. Finally, this paper will outline other roles in which psychologists contribute to diabetes-specific efforts (e.g., translational research, program development in transition to adult care, advocacy for health care reform initiatives, health care billing/reimbursement, and alternative methods to psychosocial care delivery) as well as future directions for working with children and adolescents with diabetes. Pediatric psychologists have multiple professional roles in a wide variety of settings; however, there is more that can be done in the future to fully utilize pediatric psychologists in diabetes care for children and adolescents, such as embedding psychologists into integrated clinic visits where families receive comprehensive medical and psychological services to support overall health and well-being. Therefore, there is a need for increased advocacy to obtain even more pediatric psychology engagement in diabetes care to provide new clinical services and develop more translational research.

  5. Accelerating Best Care in Pennsylvania: adapting a large academic system's quality improvement process to rural community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Haydar, Ziad; Gunderson, Julie; Ballard, David J; Skoufalos, Alexis; Berman, Bettina; Nash, David B

    2008-01-01

    Industrial quality improvement (QI) methods such as continuous quality improvement (CQI) may help bridge the gap between evidence-based "best care" and the quality of care provided. In 2006, Baylor Health Care System collaborated with Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University to conduct a QI demonstration project in select Pennsylvania hospitals using CQI techniques developed by Baylor. The training was provided over a 6-month period and focused on methods for rapid-cycle improvement; data system design; data management; tools to improve patient outcomes, processes of care, and cost-effectiveness; use of clinical guidelines and protocols; leadership skills; and customer service skills. Participants successfully implemented a variety of QI projects. QI education programs developed and pioneered within large health care systems can be adapted and applied successfully to other settings, providing needed tools to smaller rural and community hospitals that lack the necessary resources to establish such programs independently.

  6. Whose responsibility is medication reconciliation: Physicians, pharmacists or nurses? A survey in an academic tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Al-Hashar, Amna; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Eriksson, Tommy; Al Za'abi, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medication errors occur frequently at transitions in care and can result in morbidity and mortality. Medication reconciliation is a recognized hospital accreditation requirement and designed to limit errors in transitions in care. Objectives: To identify beliefs, perceived roles and responsibilities of physicians, pharmacists and nurses prior to the implementation of a standardized medication reconciliation process. Methods: A survey was distributed to the three professions: pharmacists in the pharmacy and physicians and nurses in hospital in-patient units. It contained questions about the current level of medication reconciliation practices, as well as perceived roles and responsibilities of each profession when a standardized process is implemented. Value, barriers to implementing medication reconciliation and the role of information technology were also assessed. Analyses were performed using univariate statistics. Results: There was a lack of clarity of current medication reconciliation practices as well as lack of agreement between the three professions. Physicians and pharmacists considered their professions as the main providers while nurses considered physicians followed by themselves as the main providers with limited roles for pharmacists. The three professions recognize the values and benefits of medication reconciliation yet pharmacists, more than others, stated limited time to implement reconciliation is a major barrier. Obstacles such as unreliable sources of medication history, patient knowledge and lack of coordination and communication between the three professions were expressed. Conclusions: The three health care professions recognize the value of medication reconciliation and want to see it implemented in the hospital, yet there is a lack of agreement with regard to roles and responsibilities of each profession within the process. This needs to be addressed by the hospital administration to design clear procedures and defined roles

  7. Triumph of hope over experience: learning from interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admissions identified through an Academic Health and Social Care Network

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Internationally health services are facing increasing demands due to new and more expensive health technologies and treatments, coupled with the needs of an ageing population. Reducing avoidable use of expensive secondary care services, especially high cost admissions where no procedure is carried out, has become a focus for the commissioners of healthcare. Method We set out to identify, evaluate and share learning about interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admission across a regional Academic Health and Social Care Network (AHSN). We conducted a service evaluation identifying initiatives that had taken place across the AHSN. This comprised a literature review, case studies, and two workshops. Results We identified three types of intervention: pre-hospital; within the emergency department (ED); and post-admission evaluation of appropriateness. Pre-hospital interventions included the use of predictive modelling tools (PARR – Patients at risk of readmission and ACG – Adjusted Clinical Groups) sometimes supported by community matrons or virtual wards. GP-advisers and outreach nurses were employed within the ED. The principal post-hoc interventions were the audit of records in primary care or the application of the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) within the admission ward. Overall there was a shortage of independent evaluation and limited evidence that each intervention had an impact on rates of admission. Conclusions Despite the frequency and cost of emergency admission there has been little independent evaluation of interventions to reduce avoidable admission. Commissioners of healthcare should consider interventions at all stages of the admission pathway, including regular audit, to ensure admission thresholds don’t change. PMID:22682525

  8. The Current Status and Future of Academic Obstetrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, John Z., Ed.; Purcell, Elizabeth F., Ed.

    The state of research in academic obstetrics and its relationship to research in other academic disciplines was addressed in a 1979 conference. Participants included representatives of academic obstetrics, academic pediatrics, and public health. After an introductory discussion by Howard C. Taylor, Jr. on changes in obstetrics in the last 25…

  9. [Health professionals and hand hygiene: a question of pediatric patient safety].

    PubMed

    Botene, Daisy Zanchi de Abreu; Pedro, Eva Neri Rubim

    2014-09-01

    This paper is a qualitative descriptive study, which aims to analyze how the academic education concerning hand hygiene contributes to the pediatric patient safety. This research was developed in an university hospital in Southern Brazil, in the pediatric unit, during the period of August to December, 2012. Sixteen healthcare professionals participated (doctors, nurses and physical therapists). A semi-structured interview was used to gather information. Data was organized by the software QSR Nvivo and analyzed using the content analysis technique. The results allowed us to list two thematic categories:"Hand hygiene and healthcare professionals' academic education"; and "Hand hygiene and professional life". The first thematic category will be presented in this paper. It was identified that the academic education contributes in an ineffective way to the creation of a patient safety culture. According to the professionals, there are gaps during the educational process regarding hand hygiene. The topic is treated in an ineffective and not very significant way to the learning and adhesion of hand hygiene in the professional life. It is recommended that, for the internalization of the practice by future professionals, a transversal, continuous and systematical approach is adopted during the professional's training, evaluations concerning the hand hygiene are done throughout the academic life as well as healthcare professors bethink the topic.

  10. Care-seeking behaviour and diagnostic processes for symptomatic giardiasis in children attending an academic paediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Escobedo, Angel A; Almirall, Pedro; Ávila, Ivonne; Salazar, Yohana; Alfonso, Maydel

    2014-09-01

    Giardiasis is one of the commonest intestinal parasitic infections in Cuba. In order to determine care-seeking behaviour and diagnostic processes in paediatric in-patients with giardiasis, structured questionnaires were administered by interview mothers of children with giardiasis during January to December 2010. During the study period, 97 children were diagnosed with giardiasis, of whom 86 (88·6%) caregivers were interviewed. The median number of days from symptoms onset to the first presentation in a health unit was 2 days (range: 0-15 days). The pattern of care-seeking behaviour was variable; 41 (47·7%) of children initially visited the emergency unit in a paediatric hospital. Sixty-six children had, at least, one further contact for help before diagnosis of giardiasis was made (range: 1-5 contacts) and of the 128 contact visits, 94 (73·4%) were also targeted more to hospitals. There was a median time of 6 days between the first presentation to a health unit until diagnosis, which was mainly made by microscopic examination of duodenal aspiration. Among factors investigated in mothers, only knowing other person with giardiasis had significant association with their ability to suspect giardiasis [odds ratio (OR): 29·8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3·71-239·4, P = 0·001]. Requesting a faecal specimen or ordering duodenal aspiration for microscopic examination during the first visit appeared associated with correct diagnosis (OR: 3·84, 95% CI: 1·57-9·40, P = 0·003). Efforts should be made to increase doctors' awareness of- and diagnostic skills for childhood giardiasis. At the same time, it is necessary to improve caregivers' awareness about giardiasis.

  11. A cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of calcium metabolic disorder in malignant childhood cancers in patients admitted to the pediatric ward of Vali-Asr Hospital.

    PubMed

    Moayeri, Heshmat; Oloomi, Zohreh; Sambo, Saudatu A

    2011-01-01

    Calcium metabolic disorders, such as hypercalcemia is a potentially life-threatening disorder especially when coupled with an already compromised condition. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic calcium disorders in childhood cancers of patients admitted to the pediatric ward of Vali-Asr Hospital from the year 2001-2008. The study was carried out by reviewing hospital records of these patients from the hospital archives. Range of age was between 1 and 18 years. Inclusion criteria for the study population were the presence of total serum calcium evaluated at least once; and for the hypercalcemia subgroup, at least two occasions of elevated calcium levels. The prevalence of hypercalcemia and other metabolic abnormalities of phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, urea and creatinine; the prevalence of parameters such as age, gender, type and duration of cancer were determined within these groups. Median of elevated calcium levels was also determined to classify hypercalcemia into moderate and severe hypercalcemia. Median was 11.7 mg/dl, therefore, severe hypercalcemia was ≥11.7 mg/dl and moderate hypercalcemia, a range between the upper limit of normal, 10.8 and 10.2 mg/dl for the child and adolescent respectively, and 11.7 mg/dl. Relationship between hypercalcemia and the other metabolic disorders and parameters were analyzed by the SPSS V.17 program. The population of study consisted of 148 cases. Hypercalcemia was found in 8 (5.4%) patients. Half of the cases were associated with severe hypercalcemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Out of 148 cases, there were 92 (62%) boys and 56 (38%) girls. Mean and median ages were 10.9 and 11 years respectively. Mean duration of cancer was 12.8 and median 6 months. There were 57 (38.5%) cases of leukemia and 91 (61.5%) cases of solid tumors. The most common cancers were ALL, 44 cases (29.7%) followed by brain tumors, 19 cases (12.8%); non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 16 cases (10.8%); 13 cases of acute

  12. Academic Achievement and Minimal Brain Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, R. Philip; And Others

    1971-01-01

    The investigation provided no evidence that a diagnosis of minimal brain dysfunction based on a pediatric neurological evaluation and/or visual-motor impairment as measured by the Bender-Gestalt, is a useful predictor of academic achievement. (Author)

  13. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Survey of Its Use in Pediatric Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Valji, Rafiaa; Adams, Denise; Dagenais, Simon; Baydala, Lola; King, W. James

    2013-01-01

    Background. The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high among children and youths with chronic illnesses, including cancer. The objective of this study was to assess prevalence and patterns of CAM use among pediatric oncology outpatients in two academic clinics in Canada. Procedure. A survey was developed to ask patients (or their parents/guardians) presenting to oncology clinics at the Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) in Ottawa about current or previous use of CAM products and practices. Results. Of the 137 families approached, 129 completed the survey. Overall CAM use was 60.5% and was not significantly different between the two hospitals. The most commonly reported reason for not using CAM was lack of knowledge about it. The most common CAM products ever used were multivitamins (86.5%), vitamin C (43.2%), cold remedies (28.4%), teething remedies (27.5%), and calcium (23.0%). The most common CAM practices ever used were faith healing (51.0%), massage (46.8%), chiropractic (27.7%), and relaxation (25.5%). Many patients (40.8%) used CAM products at the same time as prescription drugs. Conclusion. CAM use was high among patients at two academic pediatric oncology clinics. Although most respondents felt that their CAM use was helpful, many were not discussing it with their physicians. PMID:24307910

  14. Do clown visits improve psychological and sense of physical well-being of hospitalized pediatric patients? A randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Pinquart, M; Skolaude, D; Zaplinski, K; Maier, R F

    2011-03-01

    The study tested whether clown visits would be associated with an increase in psychological and perceived physical well-being of pediatric patients. Patients (6-14 years old) were randomized to a clown visit (n=50) or no-visit control (n=50). Patients and parents were administered a modified version of the KINDL-R questionnaire at pretest, immediately after the clown visit (posttest), and at a 4-h follow-up. The experimental group showed an increase in self-reported and parent-reported psychological well-being at posttest. However, these effects were not maintained at follow-up. There was no effect of the clown visit on perceived physical well-being. It is concluded that clown visits appear to improve psychological well-being of pediatric patients, but the effects may only be short lived.

  15. Hospital outpatient perceptions of the physical environment of waiting areas: the role of patient characteristics on atmospherics in one academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Yen; Wang, Mu-Chia; Liao, Wei-Tsen; Lu, Jui-Heng; Sun, Pi-hung; Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Breen, Gerald-Mark

    2007-01-01

    Background This study examines hospital outpatient perceptions of the physical environment of the outpatient waiting areas in one medical center. The relationship of patient characteristics and their perceptions and needs for the outpatient waiting areas are also examined. Method The examined medical center consists of five main buildings which house seventeen primary waiting areas for the outpatient clinics of nine medical specialties: 1) Internal Medicine; 2) Surgery; 3) Ophthalmology; 4) Obstetrics-Gynecology and Pediatrics; 5) Chinese Medicine; 6) Otolaryngology; 7) Orthopedics; 8) Family Medicine; and 9) Dermatology. A 15-item structured questionnaire was developed to rate patient satisfaction covering the four dimensions of the physical environments of the outpatient waiting areas: 1) visual environment; 2) hearing environment; 3) body contact environment; and 4) cleanliness. The survey was conducted between November 28, 2005 and December 8, 2005. A total of 680 outpatients responded. Descriptive, univariate, and multiple regression analyses were applied in this study. Results All of the 15 items were ranked as relatively high with a range from 3.362 to 4.010, with a neutral score of 3. Using a principal component analysis' summated scores of four constructed dimensions of patient satisfaction with the physical environments (i.e. visual environment, hearing environment, body contact environment, and cleanliness), multiple regression analyses revealed that patient satisfaction with the physical environment of outpatient waiting areas was associated with gender, age, visiting frequency, and visiting time. Conclusion Patients' socio-demographics and context backgrounds demonstrated to have effects on their satisfaction with the physical environment of outpatient waiting areas. In addition to noticing the overall rankings for less satisfactory items, what should receive further attention is the consideration of the patients' personal characteristics when

  16. Pediatric Terminology

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is working with NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) to provide standardized terminology for coding pediatric clinical trials and other resea

  17. Pediatric Specialists

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family Life Family Life Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ... Family Life Medical Home Health Insurance Pediatric Specialists Family Dynamics Media Work & Play Getting Involved in Your Community ...

  18. Pediatric Anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinich, Kathleen D.; Reed, Matthew P.

    Anthropometry is the measurement of human size, shape, and physical capabilities. Most pediatric anthropometry data are gathered to describe child growth patterns, but data on body size, mass distribution, range of motion, and posture are used to develop crash test dummies and computational models of child occupants. Pediatric anthropometry data are also used to determine child restraint dimensions, so they will accommodate the applicable population of child occupants.

  19. Teaching Pediatric Nursing Concepts to Non-Pediatric Nurses Using an Advance Organizer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Julie Ann

    2013-01-01

    Non-pediatric nurses in rural areas often care for children in adult units, emergency departments, and procedural areas. A half-day program about pediatric nursing using constructivist teaching strategies including an advance organizer, case studies, and simulation was offered at a community hospital in Western North Carolina. Nurses reported a…

  20. Hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation.

  1. Using an evidence-based approach for system selection at a large academic medical center: lessons learned in selecting an ambulatory EMR at Mount Sinai Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kannry, Joseph; Mukani, Sonia; Myers, Kristin

    2006-01-01

    The experience of Mount Sinai Hospital is representative of the challenges and problems facing large academic medical centers in selecting an ambulatory EMR. The facility successfully revived a stalled process in a challenging financial climate, using a framework of science and rigorous investigation. The process incorporated several innovations: 1) There was a thorough review of medical informatics literature to develop a mission statement, determine practical objectives and guide the demonstration process; 2) The process involved rigorous investigation of vendor statements, industry statements and other institution's views of vendors; 3) The initiative focused on user-centric selection, and the survey instrument was scientifically and specifically designed to assess user feedback; 4) There was scientific analysis of validated findings and survey results at all steering meetings; 5) The process included an assessment of vendors' ability to support research by identifying funded and published research; 6) Selection involved meticulous total cost of ownership analysis to assess and compare real costs of implementing a vendor solution; and finally, 7) There were iterative meetings with stakeholders, executives and users to understand needs, address concerns and communicate the vision.

  2. A comparison of clinicians' access to online knowledge resources using two types of information retrieval applications in an academic hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Sevgin; Cimino, James J.; Koziol, Deloris E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The research studied whether a clinician's preference for online health knowledge resources varied with the use of two applications that were designed for information retrieval in an academic hospital setting. Methods: The researchers analyzed a year's worth of computer log files to study differences in the ways that four clinician groups (attending physicians, housestaff physicians, nurse practitioners, and nurses) sought information using two types of information retrieval applications (health resource links or Infobutton icons) across nine resources while they reviewed patients' laboratory results. Results: From a set of 14,979 observations, the authors found statistically significant differences among the 4 clinician groups for accessing resources using the health resources application (P<0.001) but not for the Infobuttons application (P = 0.31). For the health resources application, the preferences of the 4 clinical groups varied according to the specific resources examined (all P≤0.02). Conclusion: The information-seeking behavior of clinicians may vary in relation to their role and the way in which the information is presented. Studying these behaviors can provide valuable insights to those tasked with maintaining information retrieval systems' links to appropriate online knowledge resources. PMID:23405044

  3. Complete-genome sequencing elucidates outbreak dynamics of CA-MRSA USA300 (ST8-spa t008) in an academic hospital of Paramaribo, Republic of Suriname

    PubMed Central

    Sabat, Artur J.; Hermelijn, Sandra M.; Akkerboom, Viktoria; Juliana, Amadu; Degener, John E.; Grundmann, Hajo; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2017-01-01

    We report the investigation of an outbreak situation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that occurred at the Academic Hospital Paramaribo (AZP) in the Republic of Suriname from April to May 2013. We performed whole genome sequencing with complete gap closure for chromosomes and plasmids on all isolates. The outbreak involved 12 patients and 1 healthcare worker/nurse at the AZP. In total 24 isolates were investigated. spa typing, genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, ad hoc whole genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST), stable core genome MLST (cgMLST) and in silico PFGE were used to determine phylogenetic relatedness and to identify transmission. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) showed that all isolates were members of genomic variants of the North American USA300 clone. However, WGS revealed a heterogeneous population structure of USA300 circulating at the AZP. We observed up to 8 SNPs or up to 5 alleles of difference by wgMLST when the isolates were recovered from different body sites of the same patient or if direct transmission between patients was most likely. This work describes the usefulness of complete genome sequencing of bacterial chromosomes and plasmids providing an unprecedented level of detail during outbreak investigations not being visible by using conventional typing methods. PMID:28106148

  4. Complete-genome sequencing elucidates outbreak dynamics of CA-MRSA USA300 (ST8-spa t008) in an academic hospital of Paramaribo, Republic of Suriname.

    PubMed

    Sabat, Artur J; Hermelijn, Sandra M; Akkerboom, Viktoria; Juliana, Amadu; Degener, John E; Grundmann, Hajo; Friedrich, Alexander W

    2017-01-20

    We report the investigation of an outbreak situation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that occurred at the Academic Hospital Paramaribo (AZP) in the Republic of Suriname from April to May 2013. We performed whole genome sequencing with complete gap closure for chromosomes and plasmids on all isolates. The outbreak involved 12 patients and 1 healthcare worker/nurse at the AZP. In total 24 isolates were investigated. spa typing, genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, ad hoc whole genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST), stable core genome MLST (cgMLST) and in silico PFGE were used to determine phylogenetic relatedness and to identify transmission. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) showed that all isolates were members of genomic variants of the North American USA300 clone. However, WGS revealed a heterogeneous population structure of USA300 circulating at the AZP. We observed up to 8 SNPs or up to 5 alleles of difference by wgMLST when the isolates were recovered from different body sites of the same patient or if direct transmission between patients was most likely. This work describes the usefulness of complete genome sequencing of bacterial chromosomes and plasmids providing an unprecedented level of detail during outbreak investigations not being visible by using conventional typing methods.

  5. Safe medication management and use of narcotics in a Joint Commission International-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xu; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Xia, Ping; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Safe medication management and use of high-alert narcotics should arouse concern. Risk management experiences in this respect in a large-scale Joint Commission International (JCI)-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People's Republic of China during 2011-2015, focusing on organizational, educational, motivational, and information technological measures in storage, prescribing, preparing, dispensing, administration, and monitoring of medication are summarized. The intensity of use of meperidine in hospitalized patients in 2015 was one-fourth that in 2011. A 100% implementation rate of standard storage of narcotics has been achieved in the hospital since December 2012. A "Plan, Do, Check, Act" cycle was efficient because the ratio of number of inappropriate narcotics prescriptions to total number of narcotics prescriptions for inpatients decreased from August 2014 to December 2014 (28.22% versus 2.96%, P=0.0000), and it was controlled below 6% from then on. During the journey to good pain management ward accreditation by the Ministry of Health, People's Republic of China, (April 2012-October 2012), the medical oncology ward successfully demonstrated an increase in the pain screening rate at admission from 43.5% to 100%, cancer pain control rate from 85% to 96%, and degree of satisfaction toward pain nursing from 95.4% to 100% (all P-values <0.05). Oral morphine equivalent dosage in the good pain management ward increased from 2.3 mg/patient before June 2012 to 54.74 mg/patient in 2014. From 2011 to 2015, the oral morphine equivalent dose per discharged patient increased from 8.52 mg/person to 20.36 mg/person. A 100% implementation rate of independent double-check prior to narcotics dosing has been achieved since January 2013. From 2014 to 2015, the ratio of number of narcotics-related medication errors to number of discharged patients significantly decreased (6.95% versus 0.99%, P=0.0000). Taken together, continuous quality improvements have been

  6. Safe medication management and use of narcotics in a Joint Commission International-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xu; Zhu, Ling-ling; Pan, Sheng-dong; Xia, Ping; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Safe medication management and use of high-alert narcotics should arouse concern. Risk management experiences in this respect in a large-scale Joint Commission International (JCI)-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People’s Republic of China during 2011–2015, focusing on organizational, educational, motivational, and information technological measures in storage, prescribing, preparing, dispensing, administration, and monitoring of medication are summarized. The intensity of use of meperidine in hospitalized patients in 2015 was one-fourth that in 2011. A 100% implementation rate of standard storage of narcotics has been achieved in the hospital since December 2012. A “Plan, Do, Check, Act” cycle was efficient because the ratio of number of inappropriate narcotics prescriptions to total number of narcotics prescriptions for inpatients decreased from August 2014 to December 2014 (28.22% versus 2.96%, P=0.0000), and it was controlled below 6% from then on. During the journey to good pain management ward accreditation by the Ministry of Health, People’s Republic of China, (April 2012–October 2012), the medical oncology ward successfully demonstrated an increase in the pain screening rate at admission from 43.5% to 100%, cancer pain control rate from 85% to 96%, and degree of satisfaction toward pain nursing from 95.4% to 100% (all P-values <0.05). Oral morphine equivalent dosage in the good pain management ward increased from 2.3 mg/patient before June 2012 to 54.74 mg/patient in 2014. From 2011 to 2015, the oral morphine equivalent dose per discharged patient increased from 8.52 mg/person to 20.36 mg/person. A 100% implementation rate of independent double-check prior to narcotics dosing has been achieved since January 2013. From 2014 to 2015, the ratio of number of narcotics-related medication errors to number of discharged patients significantly decreased (6.95% versus 0.99%, P=0.0000). Taken together, continuous quality improvements

  7. Consultative pediatrics in the new millenium.

    PubMed

    Vellody, Kishore; Zitelli, Basil J

    2010-01-01

    The pediatric hospitalist program at the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh (CHP)-the Diagnostic Referral Service (DRS)-was first described in the pediatric literature in 1988. At that time, the group consisted of 5 members with a variety of inpatient and outpatient responsibilities. Since then, there has been a significant nationwide growth in pediatric hospital medicine. In the same time frame, the DRS has also grown significantly, with new and enhanced responsibilities in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. This work reflects on the recent trends in pediatrics that resulted in the growth of specialists in hospital medicine and in the evolution of the DRS responsibilities. A detailed description of the unique changes in the DRS is provided as a model for effective care of children in the modern era.

  8. Developing and Evaluating a Machine Learning Based Algorithm to Predict the Need of Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Transfer for Newly Hospitalized Children

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Haijun; Brady, Patrick; Li, Qi; Lingren, Todd; Ni, Yizhao; Wheeler, Derek S.; Solti, Imre

    2014-01-01

    Background Early warning scores (EWS) are designed to identify early clinical deterioration by combining physiologic and/or laboratory measures to generate a quantified score. Current EWS leverage only a small fraction of Electronic Health Record (EHR) content. The planned widespread implementation of EHRs brings the promise of abundant data resources for prediction purposes. The three specific aims of our research are: (1) to develop an EHR-based automated algorithm to predict the need for Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) transfer in the first 24 hours of admission; (2) to evaluate the performance of the new algorithm on a held-out test data set; and (3) to compare the effectiveness of the new algorithm's with those of two published Pediatric Early Warning Scores (PEWS). Methods The cases were comprised of 526 encounters with 24-hour Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) transfer. In addition to the cases, we randomly selected 6,772 control encounters from 62,516 inpatient admissions that were never transferred to the PICU. We used 29 variables in a logistic regression and compared our algorithm against two published PEWS on a held-out test data set. Results The logistic regression algorithm achieved 0.849 (95% CI 0.753–0.945) sensitivity, 0.859 (95% CI 0.850–0.868) specificity and 0.912 (95% CI 0.905–0.919) area under the curve (AUC) in the test set. Our algorithm’s AUC was significantly higher, by 11.8 percent and 22.6 percent in the test set, than two published PEWS. Conclusion The novel algorithm achieved higher sensitivity, specificity, and AUC than the two PEWS reported in the literature. PMID:24813568

  9. The importance of educating postgraduate pediatric physicians about food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Adeli, Mehdi; Hendaus, Mohamed A; Abdurrahim, Lukman I; Alhammadi, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Background Food allergy is an increasing public health burden, and is considered among the most common chronic noncommunicable diseases in children. Proper diagnosis and management of food allergy by a health care provider is crucial in keeping affected children safe while simultaneously averting unnecessary avoidance. Objective The rationale of the study was to estimate the knowledge of pediatric residents and academic general pediatric fellows with regard to food allergies in children. Methods A cross-sectional and prospective study was carried out at Hamad Medical Corporation, the only tertiary care, academic and teaching hospital in the State of Qatar. The study took place between January 1, 2015 and September 30, 2015. Results Out of the 68 questionnaires distributed, 68 (100%) were returned by the end of the study. Among the participants, 15 (22%) were in post-graduate year-1 (PGY-1), 16 (23.5%) in PGY-2, 17 (25%) in PGY-3, 12 (16%) in PGY-4, and 8 (12%) were academic general pediatric fellows. Our trainees answered 60.14% of knowledge based questions correctly. In the section of treatment and management of food allergy in childhood, 23 (34%) of respondents’ main concern when taking care of a patient with food allergies was making sure the patient is not exposed to food allergen, while 22 (33%) reported no concerns. In the section of treatment and management of food allergy in childhood, 22 (33%) of participants reported no concerns in taking care of a child with food allergy, while 23 (34%) of respondents’ main concern was making sure the patient is not exposed to food allergen. In the teaching and training section, 56% of participants stated that they have not received formal education on how to recognize and treat food allergies, while 59% claimed not being trained on how to administer injectable epinephrine. Furthermore, approximately 60% of all participants expressed the need of additional information about recognizing and treating food allergies and

  10. Japan-Russia Pediatric Society.

    PubMed

    Nihei, K; Thunemathu, Y; Kobayashi, N

    1993-12-01

    In March 1990, medical interchange between Japan and the Soviet Union began with a letter from the local health bureau of Khabarovsk. We visited Khabarovsk three times and Kamchatka once, and saw many hospitals and patients. Russian doctors of pediatrics visited Japan. Medical information was exchanged and discussed. The Japan-Russia Pediatric Society was established to perform interchange of medical information, technology and staff such as doctors, nurses and technicians between Japan and Russia, especially the Far East district of Russia. The Society meeting has been held three times: Tokyo (1991), Khabarovsk (1992) and Niigata (1993). It is necessary to continue the interchange between the two countries.

  11. Pediatric Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Williams, Regan F; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Gosain, Ankush

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors accounting for approximately 10% of childhood solid tumors. Treatment is focused on multimodality therapy, which has improved the prognosis over the past two decades. Current regimens focus on decreasing treatment for low-risk patients to decrease the long-term side effects while maximizing therapy for patients with metastatic disease to improve survival. Pediatric sarcomas can be divided into soft tissue sarcomas and osseous tumors. Soft tissue sarcomas are further delineated into rhabdomyosarcomas, which affect young children and nonrhabdomyosarcomas, which are most common in adolescents. The most common bone sarcomas are osteosarcomas and Ewing's sarcoma.

  12. Multi-View Interaction Modelling of human collaboration processes: a business process study of head and neck cancer care in a Dutch academic hospital.

    PubMed

    Stuit, Marco; Wortmann, Hans; Szirbik, Nick; Roodenburg, Jan

    2011-12-01

    In the healthcare domain, human collaboration processes (HCPs), which consist of interactions between healthcare workers from different (para)medical disciplines and departments, are of growing importance as healthcare delivery becomes increasingly integrated. Existing workflow-based process modelling tools for healthcare process management, which are the most commonly applied, are not suited for healthcare HCPs mainly due to their focus on the definition of task sequences instead of the graphical description of human interactions. This paper uses a case study of a healthcare HCP at a Dutch academic hospital to evaluate a novel interaction-centric process modelling method. The HCP under study is the care pathway performed by the head and neck oncology team. The evaluation results show that the method brings innovative, effective, and useful features. First, it collects and formalizes the tacit domain knowledge of the interviewed healthcare workers in individual interaction diagrams. Second, the method automatically integrates these local diagrams into a single global interaction diagram that reflects the consolidated domain knowledge. Third, the case study illustrates how the method utilizes a graphical modelling language for effective tree-based description of interactions, their composition and routing relations, and their roles. A process analysis of the global interaction diagram is shown to identify HCP improvement opportunities. The proposed interaction-centric method has wider applicability since interactions are the core of most multidisciplinary patient-care processes. A discussion argues that, although (multidisciplinary) collaboration is in many cases not optimal in the healthcare domain, it is increasingly considered a necessity to improve integration, continuity, and quality of care. The proposed method is helpful to describe, analyze, and improve the functioning of healthcare collaboration.

  13. Myocarditis - pediatric

    MedlinePlus

    ... enable JavaScript. Pediatric myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle in an infant or young child. Causes Myocarditis is rare in ... the infection. This can lead to symptoms of heart failure. ... to detect. However, in newborns and infants, symptoms may sometimes appear suddenly. Symptoms may include: ...

  14. Pediatric ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.K. Jr.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two leading experts explore the benefits and limitations of pediatric ultrasonography, explaining the latest techniques for optimal imaging of specific body regions: the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, extremities, and soft tissues. Numerous illustrations emphasize significant points and combine with the text to show specifically what to look for when imaging children.

  15. Pediatric Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Skin changes are common in children. Common concerns are birthmarks (e.g., hemangiomas and port wine stains), atopic and contact dermatitis, acne, and alopecia areata. The authors review advances in common and not so common skin changes in pediatric patients. PMID:28360970

  16. Pediatric Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your child’s sinuses are not fully developed until late in the teen years. Although small, the maxillary (behind the cheek) and ethmoid (between the eyes) sinuses are present at birth. Unlike in adults, pediatric sinusitis is difficult to ...

  17. [How are Pediatric Hospitals in North-Rhine Westfalia Prepared to Overcome Language Barriers? A Pilot Study Exploring The Structural Quality of Inpatient Care].

    PubMed

    Langer, T; Zapf, T; Wirth, S; Meyer, B; Wiegand, A; Timmen, H; Gupta, S J; Schuster, S; Geraedts, M

    2016-05-04

    Background: In Germany, 35% of all children are considered to have a "migration background", and in the state of North-Rhine-Westfalia 43%. Frequently, one or both parents of a patient with a migration background have limited German language proficiency. Communication barriers due to a language difference can have a negative impact on quality of care, patient safety and costs of care. In this study, we investigate how children's hospitals are prepared to meet the challenges associated with language barriers. Methods: We surveyed all children's hospitals in the state of North-Rhine-Westfalia, Germany. The questionnaire was based on the "Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Health Care (CLAS)" and was adapted to circumstances in Germany. Results: Thirty-eight hospitals participated (51%) in this survey. Language barriers occurred frequently (75% of respondents mentioned language difficulties in more than 10% of the patient population). 82% of respondents rated their hospital to be "less than well prepared" to overcome language barriers. In the majority of hospitals (62%), the need for an interpreter was determined on a case-to-case basis and not according to any set protocol. In most cases bilingual staff was used for interpreting. However, only 38% of respondents found a list of available bilingual staff to be a sufficient resource. 42% of respondents did not know the monthly costs for professional interpreting services. In the remaining cases, costs were less than € 500/month. Conclusion: To overcome language barriers, hospitals rely on local resources. The majority of respondents did not find them to be appropriate and sufficient. The development of quality standards and the provision of financial resources are necessary to mobilize this potential for improvement. Therefore, other disciplines and sectors of healthcare need to be analyzed in order to provide the evidence for a constructive discussion with decision

  18. Contributions of pediatrics and pediatric pathology to the body of knowledge regarding human disease.

    PubMed

    Nezelof, Christian; Seemayer, Thomas A; Bridge, Julia A

    2010-03-01

    A century or so ago, pediatrics and pediatric pathology did not exist. Then, many fetuses/newborns died in utero or shortly after birth. With time, the issue of sepsis was addressed, and a greater number of newborns survived. Gradually, in this soil, the disciplines of pediatrics and pediatric nursing arose, as some recognized that infants were not merely small adults but were, in fact, quite different. Years later, pediatric pathology developed as a field of exploration. Today, pediatric pathology is a specialty, as witnessed by training programs, societies devoted to research and education, an expanding number of textbooks and innovative research. Pediatric pathology is distinct from adult pathology, as seen by the diversity of malformations and metabolic diseases stemming from mutations, the immaturity of the newborn's immune system, and the types of neoplasms germane to infants and children. Much of the progress in these areas was facilitated by the simultaneous emergence of cytogenetics and molecular biology and their powerful tools of investigation. The latter were applied in a synergistic fashion to a major extent in maternity clinics and children's hospitals by, among others, molecular biologists, clinical geneticists, cytogeneticists, pediatricians, and pediatric pathologists. This article describes a select but small number of the many contributions of pediatrics and pediatric pathology to the current body of medical knowledge.

  19. [Pediatrics. Screening for nutritional deficiencies in hospitalized children: new practices at the Hôpital de I'Enfance in Lausanne].

    PubMed

    Dony, C; Ranson, M O; Gerdy, P; Gehri, M; Coti, Bertrand P

    2013-01-16

    Screening for undernutrition among hospitalized children requires a systematic assessment of dietary intake. The development of a new tool for quick and playful assessment of dietary intake, called "Fleur" ("Flower"), at the Hôpital de l'Enfance in Lausanne allows to identify children at risk of undernutrition and to adapt their nutrition to their specific needs.

  20. Is it possible to collect medicalized data in Africa? An experience in the pediatrics service in the University Hospital in Yopougon, Abidjan, Ivory Coast.

    PubMed

    Digbeu, Hippolyte; Heerengt, Gilles; Aké-Assi, Marie Hélène; Timité-Konan, Marguerite; Mallol, Nathalie; Kohler, François

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate that it can be relevant to implement medicalized data in the African hospitals in order to establish morbidity statistics and economical evaluation. A retrospective survey has been carried out on 300 children hospitalized in the paediatrics service in the Yopougon University Hospital from January 1st to December 31st 1999. Data have been collected on forms similar to the ones used in France for discharge summaries. The file batching used for these 300 files is the French DRG named GHM: it shows that, once the files have been divided up in main categories(CMD), CMD 18 (infectious and parasitic diseases) amounts to nearly half of the stays (43.7%). Likewise, in the Case Mix, GHM 611 (others infectious or parasitic diseases) represents, with 38%, more than one third of the stays. The most frequent diagnosis is the B50.9, plasmodium falciparum malaria without precision, with 24.3% of the stays. The patients' stays are shorter than in France. But according to the quality of the collected data, the inadequacy of the tools used and the category of the patients taken into consideration, these results have to be interpreted with restriction. However, this survey shows that it is possible to collect medicalized data in the African hospitals. Other services should feel concerned and more appropriate classifications that would reckon with epidemiological specificities should be applied.

  1. [Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Molina Moguel, J L; Ruiz Illezcas, R; Forsbach Sánchez, S; Carreño Alvarez, S; Picco Díaz, I

    1990-12-01

    The object of this study was to determine how many of the patients treated at the Pediatric Odontology Clinic, a branch of the Maxillo-Facial Surgery Service at the Veinte de Noviembre Regional Hospital, ISSSTE, are VIH-positive of show serious manifestations of Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). For such purpose, 100 pediatric patients suffering from different systemic or local diseases were evaluated, the most common being hematological alterations. Results evidenced the presence of VIH in the blood of five of the pediatric subjects, all suffering from Hemophilia.

  2. [Pediatric emergencies in the emergency medical service].

    PubMed

    Silbereisen, C; Hoffmann, F

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-hospital pediatric emergencies occur rarely but are feared among medical personnel. The particular characteristics of pediatric cases, especially the unaccustomed anatomy of the child as well as the necessity to adapt the drug doses to the little patient's body weight, produce high cognitive and emotional pressure. In an emergency standardized algorithms can facilitate a structured diagnostic and therapeutic approach. The aim of this article is to provide standardized procedures for the most common pediatric emergencies. In Germany, respiratory problems, seizures and analgesia due to trauma represent the most common emergency responses. This article provides a practical approach concerning the diagnostics and therapy of emergencies involving children.

  3. Pediatric sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... During sleep, all of the muscles in the body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  5. Pediatric tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Paolo; Forte, Vito

    2016-06-01

    Tracheotomy refers to a surgical incision made into a trachea. Tracheostomy, on the other hand, refers to a surgical procedure whereby the tracheal lumen is positioned in close proximity to the skin surface. Tracheostomy is an uncommon procedure in the pediatric population. When required tracheostomy is typically performed as an open surgical procedure under general anesthesia with the patient intubated. However, it may need to be performed under local anesthesia or over a rigid bronchoscope in the patient with a precarious airway. Over the past half century, the primary indication for pediatric tracheostomy has shifted from acute infectious airway compromise to the need for prolonged ventilatory support in neurologically compromised children. The surgical technique, choice of tracheostomy tube, and post-operative care requires a nuanced approach in infants and young children. This article will review these topics in a comprehensive fashion.

  6. Pediatric parasomnias.

    PubMed

    Mason, Thornton B A; Pack, Allan I

    2007-02-01

    Parasomnias in childhood are common, and often more frequent than in adults. The large number of parasomnias underscore that sleep is not simply a quiescent state, but can involve complex episodes of movement, ranging from subtle to dramatic and complex. Clinicians should be aware that many pediatric parasomnias are benign, self-limited, and may not persist into late childhood or adolescence. Importantly, parasomnias in childhood often differ in type from adults. Nevertheless, parasomnias across ages can be classified as: 1) disorders of arousal (from non-rapid eye movement, or NREM, sleep); 2) parasomnias usually associated with REM sleep; and 3) other parasomnias. We detail here issues in the clinical diagosis, evaluation, and management of multiple pediatric parasomnias. The further study of parasomnias in children may help elucidate the multi-factorial etiologies of these fascinating conditions, shedding light on the potential genetic bases as well as environmental contributions.

  7. Pediatric stridor.

    PubMed

    Ida, Jonathan B; Thompson, Dana Mara

    2014-10-01

    Pediatric stridor is an important symptom of upper airway obstruction, and must be recognized early by evaluating physicians. Proper evaluation and management, both acutely and chronically, can provide improved outcomes and better quality of life for patients. This article discusses the physiology of stridor and its intimate relation to airway anatomy, the work-up of the stridorous child, and recent advances in treatment, and provides illustrative examples of common lesions.

  8. Pediatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2014-03-01

    This article discusses pediatric nutrition in puppies and kittens. Supplementation of basic nutrients such as fat, protein, minerals, vitamins, and essential fatty acids of the bitch is essential for the proper growth and development of puppies during the lactation period. Milk replacers are compared for use in puppies and kittens. Supplements such as colostrum and probiotics for promotion of a healthy immune system and prevention or treatment of stress-induced and weaning diarrhea are also discussed.

  9. Pediatric Virology

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, Bernard

    1965-01-01

    Pediatric virology is not an isolàted discipline. Rather, the syndromes associated with viral infection are modified by the unique characteristics of infancy and childhood. Fortunately for the pediatrician, and certainly for children, viral infections in childhood are rarely fatal, and are almost never serious. Future efforts of the pediatrician and virologist should be directed toward increased fetal salvage as with rubella and the prevention of severe, viral lower respiratory tract disease. PMID:14298871

  10. Pediatric sialendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Bruch, Jean M; Setlur, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Sialendoscopy was introduced in the early 1990s as a minimally invasive alternative to standard methods for diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory and obstructive salivary gland disease. The technique was pioneered in adults; however, advances in instrumentation have allowed this to be adapted to the smaller salivary ductal anatomy found in the pediatric population. In this chapter, the technique of sialendoscopy for parotid and submandibular glands is described.

  11. Financing of Pediatric Home Health Care.

    PubMed

    Simpser, Edwin; Hudak, Mark L

    2017-03-01

    Pediatric home health care is an effective and holistic venue of treatment of children with medical complexity or developmental disabilities who otherwise may experience frequent and/or prolonged hospitalizations or who may enter chronic institutional care. Demand for pediatric home health care is increasing while the provider base is eroding, primarily because of inadequate payment or restrictions on benefits. As a result, home care responsibilities assumed by family caregivers have increased and imposed financial, physical, and psychological burdens on the family. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act set forth 10 mandated essential health benefits. Home care should be considered as an integral component of the habilitative and rehabilitative services and devices benefit, even though it is not explicitly recognized as a specific category of service. Pediatric-specific home health care services should be defined clearly as components of pediatric services, the 10th essential benefit, and recognized by all payers. Payments for home health care services should be sufficient to maintain an adequate provider work force with the pediatric-specific expertise and skills to care for children with medical complexity or developmental disability. Furthermore, coordination of care among various providers and the necessary direct patient care from which these care coordination plans are developed should be required and enabled by adequate payment. The American Academy of Pediatrics advocates for high-quality care by calling for development of pediatric-specific home health regulations and the licensure and certification of pediatric home health providers.

  12. Development of a Pediatric Adverse Events Terminology

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Debbie S.; Kirkendall, Eric S.; Gumbs-Petty, Brenda; Quinn, Theresa; Steen, A.; Hicks, Amanda; McMahon, Ann; Nicholas, Savian; Zhao-Wong, Anna; Taylor-Zapata, Perdita; Turner, Mark; Herreshoff, Emily; Jones, Charlotte; Davis, Jonathan M.; Haber, Margaret; Hirschfeld, Steven

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) established the Pediatric Terminology Harmonization Initiative to establish a core library of terms to facilitate the acquisition and sharing of knowledge between pediatric clinical research, practice, and safety reporting. A coalition of partners established a Pediatric Terminology Adverse Event Working Group in 2013 to develop a specific terminology relevant to international pediatric adverse event (AE) reporting. Pediatric specialists with backgrounds in clinical care, research, safety reporting, or informatics, supported by biomedical terminology experts from the National Cancer Institute’s Enterprise Vocabulary Services participated. The multinational group developed a working definition of AEs and reviewed concepts (terms, synonyms, and definitions) from 16 pediatric clinical domains. The resulting AE terminology contains >1000 pediatric diseases, disorders, or clinical findings. The terms were tested for proof of concept use in 2 different settings: hospital readmissions and the NICU. The advantages of the AE terminology include ease of adoption due to integration with well-established and internationally accepted biomedical terminologies, a uniquely temporal focus on pediatric health and disease from conception through adolescence, and terms that could be used in both well- and underresourced environments. The AE terminology is available for use without restriction through the National Cancer Institute’s Enterprise Vocabulary Services and is fully compatible with, and represented in, the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities. The terminology is intended to mature with use, user feedback, and optimization. PMID:28028203

  13. Development of a Pediatric Adverse Events Terminology.

    PubMed

    Gipson, Debbie S; Kirkendall, Eric S; Gumbs-Petty, Brenda; Quinn, Theresa; Steen, A; Hicks, Amanda; McMahon, Ann; Nicholas, Savian; Zhao-Wong, Anna; Taylor-Zapata, Perdita; Turner, Mark; Herreshoff, Emily; Jones, Charlotte; Davis, Jonathan M; Haber, Margaret; Hirschfeld, Steven

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) established the Pediatric Terminology Harmonization Initiative to establish a core library of terms to facilitate the acquisition and sharing of knowledge between pediatric clinical research, practice, and safety reporting. A coalition of partners established a Pediatric Terminology Adverse Event Working Group in 2013 to develop a specific terminology relevant to international pediatric adverse event (AE) reporting. Pediatric specialists with backgrounds in clinical care, research, safety reporting, or informatics, supported by biomedical terminology experts from the National Cancer Institute's Enterprise Vocabulary Services participated. The multinational group developed a working definition of AEs and reviewed concepts (terms, synonyms, and definitions) from 16 pediatric clinical domains. The resulting AE terminology contains >1000 pediatric diseases, disorders, or clinical findings. The terms were tested for proof of concept use in 2 different settings: hospital readmissions and the NICU. The advantages of the AE terminology include ease of adoption due to integration with well-established and internationally accepted biomedical terminologies, a uniquely temporal focus on pediatric health and disease from conception through adolescence, and terms that could be used in both well- and underresourced environments. The AE terminology is available for use without restriction through the National Cancer Institute's Enterprise Vocabulary Services and is fully compatible with, and represented in, the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities. The terminology is intended to mature with use, user feedback, and optimization.

  14. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Clinical features and outcome.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Amy; Ness, Jayne; Pohl, Daniela; Simone, Isabella Laura; Anlar, Banu; Amato, Maria Pia; Ghezzi, Angelo

    2016-08-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) in children manifests with a relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) disease course. Acute relapses consist of new neurologic deficits persisting greater than 24 hours, in the absence of intercurrent illness, and occur with a higher frequency early in the disease as compared to adult-onset RRMS. Most pediatric patients with MS recover well from these early relapses, and cumulative physical disability is rare in the first 10 years of disease. Brainstem attacks, poor recovery from a single attack, and a higher frequency of attacks portend a greater likelihood of future disability. Although prospective pediatric-onset MS cohorts have been established in recent years, there remains very limited prospective data detailing the longer-term clinical outcome of pediatric-onset MS into adulthood. Whether the advent of MS therapies, and the largely off-label access to such therapies in pediatric MS, has improved prognosis is unknown. MS onset during the key formative academic years, concurrent with active cognitive maturation, is an important determinant of long-term outcome, and is discussed in detail in another article in this supplement. Finally, increasing recognition of pediatric MS worldwide, recent launch of phase III trials for new agents in the pediatric MS population, and the clear imperative to more fully appreciate health-related quality of life in pediatric MS through adulthood highlight the need for standardized, validated, and robust outcome measures.

  15. A Pediatric Approach to Ventilator-Associated Events Surveillance.

    PubMed

    Cocoros, Noelle M; Priebe, Gregory P; Logan, Latania K; Coffin, Susan; Larsen, Gitte; Toltzis, Philip; Sandora, Thomas J; Harper, Marvin; Sammons, Julia S; Gray, James E; Goldmann, Donald; Horan, Kelly; Burton, Michael; Checchia, Paul A; Lakoma, Matthew; Sims, Shannon; Klompas, Michael; Lee, Grace M

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Adult ventilator-associated event (VAE) definitions include ventilator-associated conditions (VAC) and subcategories for infection-related ventilator-associated complications (IVAC) and possible ventilator-associated pneumonia (PVAP). We explored these definitions for children. DESIGN Retrospective cohort SETTING Pediatric, cardiac, or neonatal intensive care units (ICUs) in 6 US hospitals PATIENTS Patients ≤18 years old ventilated for ≥1 day METHODS We identified patients with pediatric VAC based on previously proposed criteria. We applied adult temperature, white blood cell count, antibiotic, and culture criteria for IVAC and PVAP to these patients. We matched pediatric VAC patients with controls and evaluated associations with adverse outcomes using Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS In total, 233 pediatric VACs (12,167 ventilation episodes) were identified. In the cardiac ICU (CICU), 62.5% of VACs met adult IVAC criteria; in the pediatric ICU (PICU), 54.2% of VACs met adult IVAC criteria; and in the neonatal ICU (NICU), 20.2% of VACs met adult IVAC criteria. Most patients had abnormal white blood cell counts and temperatures; we therefore recommend simplifying surveillance by focusing on "pediatric VAC with antimicrobial use" (pediatric AVAC). Pediatric AVAC with a positive respiratory diagnostic test ("pediatric PVAP") occurred in 8.9% of VACs in the CICU, 13.3% of VACs in the PICU, and 4.3% of VACs in the NICU. Hospital mortality was increased, and hospital and ICU length of stay and duration of ventilation were prolonged among all pediatric VAE subsets compared with controls. CONCLUSIONS We propose pediatric AVAC for surveillance related to antimicrobial use, with pediatric PVAP as a subset of AVAC. Studies on generalizability and responsiveness of these metrics to quality improvement initiatives are needed, as are studies to determine whether lower pediatric VAE rates are associated with improvements in other outcomes. Infect Control

  16. Resistance profile for pathogens causing urinary tract infection in a pediatric population, and antibiotic treatment response at a University Hospital, 2010-2011

    PubMed Central

    Vélez Echeverri, Catalina; Serrano, Ana Katherina; Ochoa-García, Carolina; Rojas Rosas, Luisa; María Bedoya, Ana; Suárez, Margarita; Hincapié, Catalina; Henao, Adriana; Ortiz, Diana; Vanegas, Juan José; Zuleta, John Jairo; Espinal, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections in childhood and causes acute and chronic morbidity and long-term hypertension and chronic kidney disease. Objectives: To describe the demographic characteristics, infectious agents, patterns of antibiotic resistance, etiologic agent and profile of susceptibility and response to empirical treatment of UTI in a pediatric population. Methods: This is a descriptive, retrospective study. Results: Included in the study were 144 patients, 1:2.06 male to female ratio. The most common symptom was fever (79.9%) and 31.3% had a history of previous UTI. 72.0% of the patients had positive urine leukocyte count (>5 per field), urine gram was positive in 85.0% of samples and gram negative bacilli accounted for 77.8% for the total pathogens isolated. The most frequent uropathogens isolated were Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our E.coli isolates had a susceptibility rate higher than 90% to most of the antibiotics used, but a resistance rate of 42.6% to TMP SMX and 45.5% to ampicillin sulbactam. 6.3% of E. coli was extended-spectrum beta-lactamases producer strains. The most frequent empirical antibiotic used was amikacin, which was used in 66.0% of the patients. 17 of 90 patients who underwent voiding cistouretrography (VCUG) had vesicoureteral reflux. Conclusion: This study revealed that E. coli was the most frequent pathogen of community acquired UTI. We found that E. coli and other uropathogens had a high resistance rate against TMP SMX and ampicillin sulbactam. In order to ensure a successful empirical treatment, protocols should be based on local epidemiology and susceptibility rates. PMID:24970958

  17. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric (NSQIP) and the Quality of Surgical Care in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the safety, quality, and value of surgical care have become increasingly important to surgeons and hospitals. Quality improvement in surgical care requires the ability to collect, measure, and act upon reliable and clinically relevant data. One example of a large-scale quality effort is the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric (ACS NSQIP-Pediatric), the only nationwide, risk-adjusted, outcomes-based program evaluating pediatric surgical care.

  18. The APA and the rise of pediatric generalist network research.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Richard; Serwint, Janet R; Kuppermann, Nathan; Srivastava, Rajendu; Dreyer, Benard

    2011-01-01

    The Academic Pediatric Association (APA, formerly the Ambulatory Pediatric Association) first encouraged multi-institutional collaborative research among its members over 30 years ago. Individual APA members subsequently went on to figure prominently in establishing formal research networks. These enduring collaborations have been established to conduct investigations in a variety of generalist contexts. At present, 4 generalist networks--Pediatric Research in Office Settings (PROS), the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN), the COntinuity Research NETwork (CORNET), and Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS)--have a track record of extensive achievement in generating new knowledge aimed at improving the health and health care of children. This review details the history, accomplishments, and future directions of these networks and summarizes the common themes, strengths, challenges, and opportunities inherent in pediatric generalist network research.

  19. The APA and the Rise of Pediatric Generalist Network Research

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Richard; Serwint, Janet R.; Kuppermann, Nathan; Srivastava, Rajendu; Dreyer, Benard

    2010-01-01

    The Academic Pediatric Association (APA – formerly the Ambulatory Pediatric Association) first encouraged multi-institutional collaborative research among its members over thirty years ago. Individual APA members went on subsequently to figure prominently in establishing formal research networks. These enduring collaborations have been established to conduct investigations in a variety of generalist contexts. At present, four generalist networks – Pediatric Research in Office Settings (PROS), the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Network (PECARN), the COntinuity Research NETwork (CORNET), and Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) – have a track record of extensive achievement in generating new knowledge aimed at improving the health and health care of children. This review details the history, accomplishments, and future directions of these networks and summarizes the common themes, strengths, challenges and opportunities inherent in pediatric generalist network research. PMID:21282083

  20. The US pediatric nephrology workforce: a report commissioned by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Primack, William A; Meyers, Kevin E; Kirkwood, Suzanne J; Ruch-Ross, Holly S; Radabaugh, Carrie L; Greenbaum, Larry A

    2015-07-01

    The US pediatric nephrology workforce is poorly characterized. This report describes clinical and nonclinical activities, motivations and disincentives to a career in pediatric nephrology, future workforce needs, trainee recruitment, and possible explanations for personnel shortages. An e-mail survey was sent in 2013 to all identified US-trained or -practicing pediatric nephrologists. Of 504 respondents, 51% are men, 66% are US graduates, and 73% work in an academic setting. About 20% of trained pediatric nephrologists no longer practice pediatric nephrology. Among the 384 respondents practicing pediatric nephrology full or part-time in the United States, the mean work week was 56.1±14.3 hours, with time divided between patient care (59%), administration (13%), teaching (10%), clinical research (9%), basic research (6%), and other medical activities (3%). Most (>85%) care for dialysis and transplantation patients. The median number of weeks annually on call is 16, and 29% work with one or no partner. One-third of US pediatric nephrologists (n=126) plan to reduce or stop clinical nephrology practice in the next 5 years, and 53% plan to fully or partially retire. Almost half the division chiefs (47%) report inadequate physician staffing. Ongoing efforts to monitor and address pediatric nephrology workforce issues are needed.

  1. A Study to Determine the Impact of the Recently Established Primus Clinics on the Patient Workload in the Pediatric Clinic, General Outpatient Clinic and Emergency Room at Darnall Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-03

    pediatric clinic, general outpatient clinic, and emergency room at Darnall. 4. The present organization and resources for primary medical care at...specialty (e.g. family practice, internal medicine, pediatrics , emergency medicine, or obstetrics/gynecology). The medical director of the PRIMUS...Germantown, MD. < m zCallahan, Charles W. Jr. 1988. " Pediatric Clinic Briefing." KM z 12 September. CHAMPUS (Civilian Health and Medical Program of the

  2. Impact of pre-hospital care on the outcome of children arriving with agonal breathing to a pediatric emergency service in South India

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Debasis Das; Mahathi, Krishna; Ghosh, Urmi; Agarwal, Indira; Chacko, Anila; Jacob, Ebor; Ebenezer, Kala

    2016-01-01

    Background: Data on the prehospital interventions received by critically ill children at arrival to Paediatric Emergency Services (PES) is limited in developing countries. This study aims to describe the pre-hospital care scenario, transport and their impact on outcome in non-traumatic, acutely ill children presenting in PES with agonal breathing. Methods: Prospective observational study done on children aged below 15 years arriving in PES with agonal breathing due to non-trauma related causes. Results: Out of 75 children studied, 69% were infants. The duration of illness among 65% of them (75) was less than 3 days. Majority of them (81%) had received treatment prior to arrival. Government sector physicians (72%), half of them (51%) being pediatricians were the major treating doctors. 37% of the children had arrived to the Emergency in an ambulance. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) was given to 27% on arrival in PES. Other interventions included fluid boluses to correct shock (92%) and inotrope infusion (56%). Sepsis (24%) and pneumonia (24%) were the most common diagnoses. Out of 75, 57 (76%) children who were stabilized and shifted to PICU and among them 27 (47%) survived to discharge. Normal blood pressure (p=0.0410) and non-requirement of CPR (0.0047) and inotropic infusion (0.0459) in PES were associated with a higher chance of survival. Conclusion: 36% (27/75) of children who arrived to our PES with agonal breathing survived to hospital discharge. Survival was significantly better among those who did not need CPR. PMID:28217595

  3. Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae as leading causes of pediatric bacterial meningitis in nine Mexican hospitals following 3 years of active surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Cruz, Enrique; Martinez-Longoria, Cesar Adrian; Llausas-Magana, Eduardo; Luevanos-Velazquez, Antonio; Vazquez-Narvaez, Jorge Alejandro; Beltran, Sandra; Limon-Rojas, Ana Elena; Urtiz-Jeronimo, Fernando; Castaneda-Narvaez, Jose Luis; Otero-Mendoza, Francisco; Aguilar-Del Real, Fernando; Rodriguez-Chagoyan, Jesus; Rivas-Landeros, Rosa Maria; Volker-Soberanes, Maria Luisa; Hinojosa-Robles, Rosa Maria; Arzate-Barbosa, Patricia; Aviles-Benitez, Laura Karina; Elenes-Zamora, Fernando Ivan; Becka, Chandra M.; Ruttimann, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Meningococcal meningitis is reported as a rare condition in Mexico. There are no internationally published studies on bacterial causes of meningitis in the country based on active surveillance. This study focuses on finding the etiology of bacterial meningitis in children from nine Mexican Hospitals. Methods: From January 2010 to February 2013, we conducted a three years of active surveillance for meningitis in nine hospitals throughout Mexico. Active surveillance started at the emergency department for every suspected case, and microbiological studies confirmed/ruled out all potentially bacterial pathogens. We diagnosed based on routine cultures from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (not polymerase chain reaction or other molecular diagnostic tests), and both pneumococcal serotyping and meningococcal serogrouping by using standard methods. Results: Neisseria meningitidis was the leading cause, although 75% of cases occurred in the northwest of the country in Tijuana on the US border. Serogroup C was predominant. Streptococcus pneumoniae followed Neisseria meningitides, but was uniformly distributed throughout the country. Serotype 19A was the most incident but before universal implementation of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Other bacteria were much less common, including Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcus agalactiae (these two affecting mostly young infants). Conclusions: Meningococcal meningitis is endemic in Tijuana, Mexico, and vaccination should be seriously considered in that region. Continuous universal vaccination with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine should be nationally performed, and polymerase chain reaction should be included for bacterial detection in all cultures – negative but presumably bacterial meningitis cases. PMID:27551428

  4. The impact of environmental and climatic variation on the spatiotemporal trends of hospitalized pediatric diarrhea in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Corinne N; Zelner, Jonathan L; Nhu, Tran Do Hoang; Phan, My Vt; Hoang Le, Phuc; Nguyen Thanh, Hung; Vu Thuy, Duong; Minh Nguyen, Ngoc; Ha Manh, Tuan; Van Hoang Minh, Tu; Lu Lan, Vi; Nguyen Van Vinh, Chau; Tran Tinh, Hien; von Clemm, Emmiliese; Storch, Harry; Thwaites, Guy; Grenfell, Bryan T; Baker, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    It is predicted that the integration of climate-based early warning systems into existing action plans will facilitate the timely provision of interventions to diarrheal disease epidemics in resource-poor settings. Diarrhea remains a considerable public health problem in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam and we aimed to quantify variation in the impact of environmental conditions on diarrheal disease risk across the city. Using all inpatient diarrheal admissions data from three large hospitals within HCMC, we developed a mixed effects regression model to differentiate district-level variation in risk due to environmental conditions from the overarching seasonality of diarrheal disease hospitalization in HCMC. We identified considerable spatial heterogeneity in the risk of all-cause diarrhea across districts of HCMC with low elevation and differential responses to flooding, air temperature, and humidity driving further spatial heterogeneity in diarrheal disease risk. The incorporation of these results into predictive forecasting algorithms will provide a powerful resource to aid diarrheal disease prevention and control practices in HCMC and other similar settings.

  5. The impact of environmental and climatic variation on the spatiotemporal trends of hospitalized pediatric diarrhea in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Corinne N.; Zelner, Jonathan L.; Nhu, Tran Do Hoang; Phan, My VT; Hoang Le, Phuc; Nguyen Thanh, Hung; Vu Thuy, Duong; Minh Nguyen, Ngoc; Ha Manh, Tuan; Van Hoang Minh, Tu; Lu Lan, Vi; Nguyen Van Vinh, Chau; Tran Tinh, Hien; von Clemm, Emmiliese; Storch, Harry; Thwaites, Guy; Grenfell, Bryan T.; Baker, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    It is predicted that the integration of climate-based early warning systems into existing action plans will facilitate the timely provision of interventions to diarrheal disease epidemics in resource-poor settings. Diarrhea remains a considerable public health problem in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam and we aimed to quantify variation in the impact of environmental conditions on diarrheal disease risk across the city. Using all inpatient diarrheal admissions data from three large hospitals within HCMC, we developed a mixed effects regression model to differentiate district-level variation in risk due to environmental conditions from the overarching seasonality of diarrheal disease hospitalization in HCMC. We identified considerable spatial heterogeneity in the risk of all-cause diarrhea across districts of HCMC with low elevation and differential responses to flooding, air temperature, and humidity driving further spatial heterogeneity in diarrheal disease risk. The incorporation of these results into predictive forecasting algorithms will provide a powerful resource to aid diarrheal disease prevention and control practices in HCMC and other similar settings. PMID:26402922

  6. Ethics consultation in pediatrics: long-term experience from a pediatric oncology center.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Liza-Marie; Church, Christopher L; Metzger, Monika; Baker, Justin N

    2015-01-01

    There is little information about the content of ethics consultations (EC) in pediatrics. We sought to describe the reasons for consultation and ethical principles addressed during EC in pediatrics through retrospective review and directed content analysis of EC records (2000-2011) at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. Patient-based EC were highly complex and often involved evaluation of parental decision making, particularly consideration of the risks and benefits of a proposed medical intervention, and the physician's fiduciary responsibility to the patient. Nonpatient consultations provided guidance in the development of institutional policies that would broadly affect patients and families. This is one of the few existing reviews of the content of pediatric EC and indicates that the distribution of ethical issues and reasons for moral distress are different than with adults. Pediatric EC often facilitates complex decision making among multiple stakeholders, and further prospective research is needed on the role of ethics consultation in pediatrics.

  7. Pediatric vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-04-01

    Vitiligo is a disease of pigment loss. Most investigators currently consider vitiligo to be a disorder that occurs as a result of autoimmune destruction of melanocytes, supported by identification of antimelanocyte antibodies in many patients, and the presence of comorbid autoimmune disease in patients with and family members of individuals with vitiligo. One-half of vitiligo cases are of childhood onset. This article presents a current overview of pediatric vitiligo including comorbidities of general health, psychological factors, therapeutic options, and long-term health considerations.

  8. Pediatric urticaria.

    PubMed

    Tsakok, Teresa; Du Toit, George; Flohr, Carsten

    2014-02-01

    Although urticaria is not a life-threatening disease, its impact on quality of life in children should not be overlooked. A systematic search of online databases, including Medline, was performed to inform a review aiming to equip clinicians with an evidence-based approach to all aspects of pediatric urticaria. This review hinges on an illustrative case and includes a summary table of studies pertaining to disease management in children. The multiple issues faced by patients, their families, and treating clinicians are highlighted, and the current literature on the presentation, natural history, investigation, and management of this poorly understood condition is assessed.

  9. Pediatric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Pamela F

    2012-04-01

    Childhood vasculitis is a challenging and complex group of conditions that are multisystem in nature and often require integrated care from multiple subspecialties, including rheumatology, dermatology, cardiology, nephrology, neurology, and gastroenterology. Vasculitis is defined as the presence of inflammation in the blood vessel wall. The site of vessel involvement, size of the affected vessels, extent of vascular injury, and underlying pathology determine the disease phenotype and severity. This article explores the classification and general features of pediatric vasculitis, as well as the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and therapeutic options for the most common vasculitides.

  10. Wanted: pediatric nephrologists! - why trainees are not choosing pediatric nephrology.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Maria; Iglesia, Edward; Ko, Zion; Amamoo, Ahinee; Mahan, John; Desai, Tejas; Gibson, Keisha; Jhaveri, Kenar; Primack, William

    2014-09-01

    A workforce crisis for many pediatric specialties, particularly nephrology, is due to growing retirement rates, attrition during training, and retention difficulties. To obtain specific information regarding pediatric nephrology trainee shortages, we administered two cross-sectional surveys to non-renal pediatric subspecialty fellows and pediatric nephrology program directors. We characterized the fellows' experiences with nephrology and the program directors' experiences with their fellows as well as their outcomes in the last 10 years. We analyzed responses from 531 non-renal fellows (14.4% response rate). Overall, 317 (60%) fellows rated nephrology as difficult, particularly women (65.4% vs. 49.5%, p < 0.001), with American women medical graduates rating nephrology as more difficult compared to all others (p = 0.001). More men than women (24% vs. 8%, p < 0.001) considered the monetary benefit as not adequate. Program directors (25; 64% response rate) represented 57% of all USA fellows in training, and 15 (60%) found it difficult to recruit qualified applicants. Of the 183 graduates in the past 10 years, 35 (19%) were reported as not in the USA pediatric nephrology workforce. These findings support our belief that a strong effort needs to be made by the academic community to teach nephrology in more interesting and understandable formats. While these are national samples, we were unable to contact non-nephrology fellows directly and program directors from larger programs were underrepresented. Difficulties in attracting/retaining trainees (particularly women) to nephrology must be addressed systematically, identifying incentives to practice in this field. Bold concerted efforts are required and we propose seven steps to achieve this goal.

  11. Using media to improve the informed consent process for youth undergoing pediatric endoscopy and their parents

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Debra M.; Chun, Stanford; Terrones, Laura; Huang, Jeannie S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims Youth undergoing pediatric endoscopic procedures and their parents demonstrate suboptimal comprehension of the informed consent (IC) process. We developed informational videos discussing key IC elements for pediatric endoscopy and evaluated their effects on youth and parental comprehension of the IC process. Patients and methods A randomized controlled trial of the video intervention was performed among youth undergoing endoscopy and their parents at an academic children’s hospital. Randomization occurred at the time of enrollment using permutated blocks. Following the IC process with the proceduralist, subjects underwent structured interviews to assess IC comprehension. An Informed Consent Overall Score (ICOS: range 0 – 4) for comprehension was calculated. Results Seventy-seven pairs of children and their parents participated. Intervention recipients (N = 37 pairs) demonstrated higher ICOS scores as compared to control counterparts (mean (standard deviation): 3.6 (0.7) v. 2.9 (0.9), intervention v. control parents, P < 0.0001 and 2.7 (1.1) v. 1.7 (1.1), intervention v. control youth, P < 0.0001). Conclusions A media intervention addressing key elements of the IC process for pediatric endoscopy was effective in improving comprehension of IC for youth undergoing endoscopic procedures and their parents. PMID:28191495

  12. Engaging Pediatricians in Developmental Screening: The Effectiveness of Academic Detailing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honigfeld, Lisa; Chandhok, Laura; Spiegelman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Use of formal developmental screening tools in the pediatric medical home improves early identification of children with developmental delays and disorders, including Autism Spectrum Disorders. A pilot study evaluated the impact of an academic detailing module in which trainers visited 43 pediatric primary care practices to provide education about…

  13. [Focus of childhood obesity from pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Hurtado-López, Erika F; Macías-Rosales, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    The prevalences of overweight and obesity have increased dramatically in the last two decades in the adult and children population. The Organization for Cooperation and Economic Development reported in 2010 that Mexico ranks first worldwide in childhood obesity. The 2006 National Health and Nutrition Survey reported that one of every three teenagers are overweight and obese. In the last decades, pediatric hospitals in different parts of the world reported the prevalence of secondary malnutrition, since in those days overweight and obesity did not represent health problems. Currently, the prevalence of overweight and obesity has been scarcely studied in pediatric hospitals. In the Hospital de Pediatría (Children's Hospital) of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social's Centro Médico Nacional de Occidente it is reported a prevalence of overweight of 15.4 % and obesity of 12.2 %, which reflects a nutritional transition.Due to the high prevalence of overweight and obesity in this pediatric hospital of reference, one could conclude that the pediatrician should be able to make a correct evaluation of the nutritional state, because, if he does not detect these problems, we will be condemning children to suffer from a chronic disease for the rest of their lives, and with all the implications in the short, medium and long term.

  14. Alternative funding plans: is there a place in academic medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Haslam, R H; Walker, N E

    1993-01-01

    Because of shrinking resources and the resulting threat to its academic vitality the Department of Paediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, entered into an agreement on alternative funding with the Ontario Ministry of Health in 1990. The department developed a set of principles that guided the negotiations, which ultimately led to a budget that formed the basis of the agreement. The contract with the ministry provides a global budget to the department; this budget funds faculty members, administrative staff and the educational and research programs formerly supported by fee-for-service billing to the Ontario Health Insurance Plan. The alternative funding plan has provided financial stability to the department and affords an opportunity to develop innovative and cost-effective models of pediatric care. PMID:8457954

  15. Pediatric Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Badr, Dana T; Gaffin, Jonathan M; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2016-09-01

    Rhinosinusitis, is defined as an inflammation of the paranasal and nasal sinus mucosae. Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)is a common problem in the pediatric age group and the diagnosis and treatment are challenging due to the chronicity and similarity of symptoms with allergic rhinitis and adenoid hypertrophy. Although it is less common than acute rhinosinusitis, CRS is becoming more frequent and significantly affects the quality of life in children and can substantially impair daily function. CRS is characterized by sinus symptoms lasting more than 3 months despite medical therapy. Many factors are involved in the pathogenesis of this disease and include a primary insult with a virus followed bybacterial infection and mucosal inflammation, along with predisposition to allergies. The standard treatment of pediatricacute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) is nasal irrigation and antibiotic use. Medical treatment of pediatric CRS includes avoidance of allergens in allergic patients (environmental or food) and therapy with nasal irrigation, nasal corticosteroids sprays, nasal decongestants, and antibiotics directed at the most common sinonasalorganisms (Haemophilusinfluenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis). Surgical therapy is rarely needed after appropriate medical therapy. Referral to an otolaryngologist and allergy specialist is recommended in case of failure of medical treatment.

  16. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel.

    PubMed

    Geller-Bernstein, Carmi; Etzioni, Amos

    2013-03-01

    After the geographic and sociodemographic settings as well as the health care in Israel are briefly described, the scope of pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel is presented. This includes specific disorders commonly encountered, the environment that induces symptoms, the specialists who treat them, and the common challenges of patients, parents, doctors, and allied health personnel who collaborate to manage the maladies and patient care. Allergies usually affect some overall 15-20% of the pediatric population. The main allergens are inhaled, ingested, or injected (insects stings). Generally, the incidence of the various allergens affecting children in Israel, is similar to other parts of the Western world. Owing to the high consanguinity rate in the Israeli population, the prevalence of the various immunodeficiency conditions (in the adaptive as well as the innate system) is higher than that reported worldwide. Pediatric allergists/immunologists also treat autoimmune disorders affecting the pediatric group. Pediatric allergy and clinical immunology are not separate specialties. The 25 specialists who treat children with allergic/immunologic diseases have undergone a basic training in Pediatrics. They also received an additional 2-yr training in allergy and clinical immunology and then have to pass the board examinations. They work mainly in pediatric allergy units, in several hospitals that are affiliated to the five medical schools in the country. Aside from clinical work, most of the centers are also heavily involved in clinical and basic research in allergy and immunology.

  17. Hypothermia for pediatric refractory status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Guilliams, Kristin; Rosen, Max; Buttram, Sandra; Zempel, John; Pineda, Jose; Miller, Barbara; Shoykhet, Michael

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) is a life-threatening emergency, demonstrating, by definition, significant pharmacoresistance. We describe five cases of pediatric RSE treated with mild hypothermia. Methods Retrospective chart review was performed of records of children who received hypothermia for RSE at two tertiary-care pediatric hospitals between 2009 and 2012. Key Findings Five children with RSE received mild hypothermia (32–35°C). Hypothermia reduced seizure burden during and after treatment in all cases. Prior to initiation of hypothermia, four children (80%) received pentobarbital infusions to treat RSE, but relapsed after pentobarbital discontinuation. No child relapsed after treatment with hypothermia. One child died after redirection of care. Remaining four children were discharged. Significance This is the largest pediatric case series reporting treatment of RSE with mild hypothermia. Hypothermia decreased seizure burden during and after pediatric RSE and may prevent RSE relapse. PMID:23906244

  18. International Pediatric MS Study Group Clinical Trials Summit

    PubMed Central

    Tardieu, Marc; Amato, Maria Pia; Banwell, Brenda; Bar-Or, Amit; Ghezzi, Angelo; Kornberg, Andrew; Krupp, Lauren B.; Pohl, Daniela; Rostasy, Kevin; Tenembaum, Silvia; Waubant, Emmanuelle; Wassmer, Evangeline

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pediatric studies for new biological agents are mandated by recent legislation, necessitating careful thought to evaluation of emerging multiple sclerosis (MS) therapies in children with MS. Challenges include a small patient population, the lack of prior randomized clinical trials, and ethical concerns. The goal of this meeting was to assess areas of consensus regarding clinical trial design and outcome measures among academic experts involved in pediatric MS care and research. Methods: The Steering Committee of the International Pediatric MS Study Group identified key focus areas for discussion. A total of 69 meeting attendees were assembled, including 35 academic experts. Regulatory and pharmaceutical representatives also attended, and provided input, which informed academic expert consensus decisions. Results: The academic experts agreed that clinical trials were necessary in pediatric MS to obtain pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy data, and regulatory approval allowing for greater medication access. The academic experts agreed that relapse was an appropriate primary outcome measure for phase III pediatric trials. An international standardized cognitive battery was identified. The pros and cons of various trial designs were discussed. Guidelines surrounding MRI studies, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and registries were developed. The academic experts agreed that given the limited subject pool, a stepwise approach to the launch of clinical trials for the most promising medications is necessary in order to ensure study completion. Alternative approaches could result in unethical exposure of patients to trial conditions without gaining knowledge. Conclusion: Consensus points for conduct of clinical trials in the rare disease pediatric MS were identified amongst a panel of academic experts, informed by regulatory and industry stakeholders. PMID:23509048

  19. Academic Blogging: Academic Practice and Academic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkup, Gill

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale study which investigates the role of blogging in professional academic practice in higher education. It draws on interviews with a sample of academics (scholars, researchers and teachers) who have blogs and on the author's own reflections on blogging to investigate the function of blogging in academic practice…

  20. Music therapy services in pediatric oncology: a national clinical practice review.

    PubMed

    Tucquet, Belinda; Leung, Maggie

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national clinical practice review conducted in Australia of music therapy services in pediatric oncology hospitals. Literature specifically related to music therapy and symptom management in pediatric oncology is reviewed. The results from a national benchmarking survey distributed to all music therapists working with children with cancer in Australian pediatric hospitals are discussed. Patient and family feedback provided from a quality improvement activity conducted at a major pediatric tertiary hospital is summarized, and considerations for future growth as a profession and further research is proposed.

  1. Persistent pharmacokinetic challenges to pediatric drug development

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Daniel P.; Kulczar, Christopher; Roth, Wyatt; Liu, Wanqing; Knipp, Gregory T.

    2014-01-01

    The development of new therapeutic agents for the mitigation of pediatric disorders is largely hindered by the inability for investigators to assess pediatric pharmacokinetics (PK) in healthy patients due to substantial safety concerns. Pediatric patients are a clinical moving target for drug delivery due to changes in absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) and the potential for PK related toxicological (T) events to occur throughout development. These changes in ADMET can have profound effects on drug delivery, and may lead to toxic or sub-therapeutic outcomes. Ethical, economical, logistical, and technical barriers have resulted in insufficient investigation of these changes by industrial, regulatory, and academic bodies, leading to the classification of pediatric patients as therapeutic orphans. In response to these concerns, regulatory agencies have incentivized investigation into these ontogenic changes and their effects on drug delivery in pediatric populations. The intent of this review is to briefly present a synopsis of the development changes that occur in pediatric patients, discuss the effects of these changes on ADME and drug delivery strategies, highlight the hurdles that are still being faced, and present some opportunities to overcome these challenges. PMID:25221567

  2. Pediatric tracheomalacia.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Jose Carlos; Jennings, Russell W; Kim, Peter C W

    2016-06-01

    Tracheomalacia (TM) is defined as an increased collapsibility of the trachea due to structural anomalies of the tracheal cartilage and/or posterior membrane. Tracheomalacia has a wide range of etiologies but is most commonly present in children born with esophageal atresia and tracheal esophageal fistula. Clinical symptoms can range from minor expiratory stridor with typical barking cough to severe respiratory distress episodes to acute life-threatening events (ALTE). Although the majority of children have mild-to-moderate symptoms and will not need surgical intervention, some will need life-changing surgical treatment. This article examines the published pediatric literature on TM, discusses the details of clinical presentation, evaluation, diagnosis, and a variety of treatments.

  3. Recommendations on pre-hospital & early hospital management of acute heart failure: a consensus paper from the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology, the European Society of Emergency Medicine and the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Mebazaa, Alexandre; Yilmaz, M Birhan; Levy, Phillip; Ponikowski, Piotr; Peacock, W Frank; Laribi, Said; Ristic, Arsen D; Lambrinou, Ekaterini; Masip, Josep; Riley, Jillian P; McDonagh, Theresa; Mueller, Christian; deFilippi, Christopher; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Thiele, Holger; Piepoli, Massimo F; Metra, Marco; Maggioni, Aldo; McMurray, John; Dickstein, Kenneth; Damman, Kevin; Seferovic, Petar M; Ruschitzka, Frank; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Bellou, Abdelouahab; Anker, Stefan D; Filippatos, Gerasimos

    2015-06-01

    Acute heart failure is a fatal syndrome. Emergency physicians, cardiologists, intensivists, nurses and other health care providers have to cooperate to provide optimal benefit. However, many treatment decisions are opinion-based and few are evidenced-based. This consensus paper provides guidance to practicing physicians and nurses to manage acute heart failure in the pre-hospital and hospital setting. Criteria of hospitalization and of discharge are described. Gaps in knowledge and perspectives in the management of acute heart failure are also detailed. This consensus paper on acute heart failure might help enable contiguous practice.

  4. Clinically-important brain injury and CT findings in pediatric mild traumatic brain injuries: a prospective study in a Chinese reference hospital.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huiping; Gao, Qi; Xia, Xin; Xiang, Joe; Yao, Hongli; Shao, Jianbo

    2014-03-26

    This study investigated injury patterns and the use of computed tomography (CT) among Chinese children with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). We enrolled children with MTBI who were treated within 24 hours of head trauma in the emergency department of Wuhan Medical Care Center for Women and Children in Wuhan, China. Characteristics of MTBIs were analyzed by age and gender. Results of cranial CT scan and clinically-important brain injury (ciTBI) for children were obtained. The definition of ciTBI was: death from TBI, intubation for more than 24 h for TBI, neurosurgery, or hospital admission of 2 nights or more. Of 455 eligible patients with MTBI, ciTBI occurred in two, and no one underwent neurosurgical intervention. CT scans were performed for 441 TBI patients (96.9%), and abnormal findings were reported for 147 patients (33.3%, 95% CI 29.0-37.8). Falls were the leading cause of MTBI (61.5%), followed by blows (18.9%) and traffic collisions (14.1%) for children in the 0-2 group and 10-14 group. For children aged between 3 and 9, the top three causes of TBI were falls, traffic collisions and blows. Leisure activity was the most reported activity when injuries occurred for all age groups. Sleeping/resting and walking ranked in the second and third place for children between 0 and 2 years of age, and walking and riding for the other two groups. The places where the majority injuries occurred were the home for the 0-2 and 3-9 years of age groups, and school for the 10-14 years of age group. There was no statistical difference between boys and girls with regard to the activity that caused the MTBI. This study highlights the important roles that parents and school administrators in the development of preventive measures to reduce the risk of traumatic brain injury in children. Also, identifying children who had a head trauma at very low risk of clinically important TBI for whom CT might be unnecessary is a priority area of research in China.

  5. Discovering knowledge on pediatric fluid therapy and dysnatremias from quantitative data found in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Pham, Steve L; Bickel, Jonathan P; Moritz, Michael L; Levin, James E

    2010-11-13

    It is accepted that intravenous fluid (IVF) therapy can result in hospital-acquired dysnatremias in pediatric patients, with associated morbidity and mortality. There is interest in improving IVF therapy to prevent dysnatremias, but the optimal approach is controversial. In this study, we develop Natremia Deviation and Intravenous Renderer (NaDIR), a tool that preprocesses large volumes of electronic medical record data obtained from an academic pediatric hospital in order to analyze (1) IVF therapy, (2) the epidemiology of dysnatremias, and (3) the impact of IVFs on changes in serum sodium (ΔS(Na)). We then applied NaDIR to 3,256 inpatient records over a 3 month period, which revealed (1) a 19.9% incidence of dysnatremias, (2) a significant increase in lengths of stay associated with dysnatremias, and (3) a novel linear relationship between ΔS(Na) and IVF tonicity. This demonstrates that EMR data that can be readily analyzed to discover epidemiologic and predictive knowledge.

  6. Pediatric Feeding: A Transdisciplinary Team's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooster, Donna M.; Brady, Nancy R.; Mitchell, Amy; Grizzle, Mary H.; Barnes, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    Applies principles of the transdisciplinary team approach to the needs of children with feeding disorders and describes a pediatric feeding team at the University of South Alabama Children's and Women's Hospital. Case studies illustrate the principles. Advantages and challenges in the transdisciplinary approach to feeding disorders are discussed.…

  7. Pediatric Social Illnesses and Black Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Robert L.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examines the concept of "pediatric social illness" (child abuse, neglect, accidents, ingestions, and failure to thrive) in a sample of 94 Black families whose children were admitted to Children's Hospital Medical Center (Boston). Explores economic, social, and environmental causes of the phenomenon. (GC)

  8. The First Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt International Scientific Conference.

    PubMed

    Zaghloul, Mohamed S

    2009-10-01

    A wide gathering of scientists, clinicians, pharmacists and nurses specialized in pediatric oncology practice met to celebrate the second anniversary of Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt (CCHE). The celebration was in the form of high-brow teaching lectures and reports presented by international experts in the fields of pediatric CNS tumors, solid tumors (neuroblastoma, nephroblastoma, soft tissue and bone tumors, lymphoma, leukemia and pediatric oncology nursing. The conference extends its activities to hospital management, clinical pharmacy and telemedicine. Furthermore, CCHE experts presented the efforts performed to establish a state-of-the-art pediatric oncology hospital equipped with all needed facilities to raise the standard of care to the highest levels.

  9. NHLBI training workshop report: The vanishing pediatric pulmonary investigator and recommendations for recovery.

    PubMed

    Ferkol, Thomas; Zeitlin, Pamela; Abman, Steven; Blaisdell, Carol J; O'Brodovich, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    The adequacy of the pipeline of advanced pulmonary fellows to supply appropriately trained and committed researchers to enter academic careers was the major topic of a recently held National Heart Lung and Blood Institute NHLBI Workshop: Respiratory Medicine-Related Research Training for Adult and Pediatric Fellows. The special challenges and opportunities for the academic pediatric pulmonary trainee were discussed as part of this workshop and are discussed as a companion paper to the report by the full workshop. Surveys were conducted of pediatric chairs of academic departments and pediatric pulmonary training directors in the United States to examine the current status and opportunities for the pediatric pulmonary trainee. Strategies for recruitment and retention of talented young trainees and junior faculty are proposed.

  10. Social Media Use in Pediatric Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Alexander L; Teng, Joyce M C

    2016-01-01

    Social media is predicted to become increasingly important in dermatology because of its potential to serve as a platform for public health campaigns, aid in participant recruitment for clinical trials, increase public engagement in health care, and facilitate scientific discourse. No study of social media use in pediatric dermatology has been performed, so we analyzed the use of the seven leading social media platforms in pediatric dermatology, with a focus on patient advocacy groups, professional societies, research journals, and research institutions. We observed that 89% of patient advocacy groups, 100% of professional societies, 62.5% of research journals, and 0% of academic pediatric dermatology departments maintained one or more social media accounts. Our observations suggest that all stakeholder groups, and in particular members of the research community, have the potential to further their engagement, connections, and communications through social media.

  11. Geospatial Analysis of Pediatric EMS Run Density and Endotracheal Intubation

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Matthew; Loker, William; Warden, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The association between geographic factors, including transport distance, and pediatric emergency medical services (EMS) run clustering on out-of-hospital pediatric endotracheal intubation is unclear. The objective of this study was to determine if endotracheal intubation procedures are more likely to occur at greater distances from the hospital and near clusters of pediatric calls. Methods This was a retrospective observational study including all EMS runs for patients less than 18 years of age from 2008 to 2014 in a geographically large and diverse Oregon county that includes densely populated urban areas near Portland and remote rural areas. We geocoded scene addresses using the automated address locator created in the cloud-based mapping platform ArcGIS, supplemented with manual address geocoding for remaining cases. We then use the Getis-Ord Gi spatial statistic feature in ArcGIS to map statistically significant spatial clusters (hot spots) of pediatric EMS runs throughout the county. We then superimposed all intubation procedures performed during the study period on maps of pediatric EMS-run hot spots, pediatric population density, fire stations, and hospitals. We also performed multivariable logistic regression to determine if distance traveled to the hospital was associated with intubation after controlling for several confounding variables. Results We identified a total of 7,797 pediatric EMS runs during the study period and 38 endotracheal intubations. In univariate analysis we found that patients who were intubated were similar to those who were not in gender and whether or not they were transported to a children’s hospital. Intubated patients tended to be transported shorter distances and were older than non-intubated patients. Increased distance from the hospital was associated with reduced odds of intubation after controlling for age, sex, scene location, and trauma system entry status in a multivariate logistic regression. The

  12. Update on Pediatric Overuse.

    PubMed

    Coon, Eric R; Young, Paul C; Quinonez, Ricardo A; Morgan, Daniel J; Dhruva, Sanket S; Schroeder, Alan R

    2017-02-01

    As concerns over health care-related harms and costs continue to mount, efforts to identify and combat medical overuse are needed. Although much of the recent attention has focused on health care for adults, children are also harmed by overuse. Using a structured PubMed search and manual tables of contents review, we identified important articles on pediatric overuse published in 2015. These articles were evaluated according to the quality of the methods, the magnitude of clinical effect, and the number of patients potentially affected and were categorized into overdiagnosis, overtreatment, and overutilization. Overdiagnosis: Findings included evidence for overdiagnosis of hypoxemia in children with bronchiolitis and skull fractures in children suffering minor head injuries. Overtreatment: Findings included evidence that up to 85% of hospitalized children with radiographic pneumonia may not have a bacterial etiology; many children are receiving prolonged intravenous antibiotic therapy for osteomyelitis although oral therapy is equally effective; antidepressant medication for adolescents and nebulized hypertonic saline for bronchiolitis appear to be ineffective; and thresholds for treatment of hyperbilirubinemia may be too low. Overutilization: Findings suggested that the frequency of head circumference screening could be relaxed; large reductions in abdominal computed tomography testing for appendicitis appear to have been safe and effective; and overreliance on C-reactive protein levels in neonatal early onset sepsis appears to extend hospital length-of-stay.

  13. Chiari malformation Type I surgery in pediatric patients. Part 1: validation of an ICD-9-CM code search algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, Travis R.; Greenberg, Jacob K.; Guerrero, Nicole; Olsen, Margaret A.; Shannon, Chevis N.; Yarbrough, Chester K.; Piccirillo, Jay F.; Anderson, Richard C. E.; Feldstein, Neil A.; Wellons, John C.; Smyth, Matthew D.; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Administrative billing data may facilitate large-scale assessments of treatment outcomes for pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). Validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code algorithms for identifying CM-I surgery are critical prerequisites for such studies but are currently only available for adults. The objective of this study was to validate two ICD-9-CM code algorithms using hospital billing data to identify pediatric patients undergoing CM-I decompression surgery. Methods The authors retrospectively analyzed the validity of two ICD-9-CM code algorithms for identifying pediatric CM-I decompression surgery performed at 3 academic medical centers between 2001 and 2013. Algorithm 1 included any discharge diagnosis code of 348.4 (CM-I), as well as a procedure code of 01.24 (cranial decompression) or 03.09 (spinal decompression or laminectomy). Algorithm 2 restricted this group to the subset of patients with a primary discharge diagnosis of 348.4. The positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of each algorithm were calculated. Results Among 625 first-time admissions identified by Algorithm 1, the overall PPV for CM-I decompression was 92%. Among the 581 admissions identified by Algorithm 2, the PPV was 97%. The PPV for Algorithm 1 was lower in one center (84%) compared with the other centers (93%–94%), whereas the PPV of Algorithm 2 remained high (96%–98%) across all subgroups. The sensitivity of Algorithms 1 (91%) and 2 (89%) was very good and remained so across subgroups (82%–97%). Conclusions An ICD-9-CM algorithm requiring a primary diagnosis of CM-I has excellent PPV and very good sensitivity for identifying CM-I decompression surgery in pediatric patients. These results establish a basis for utilizing administrative billing data to assess pediatric CM-I treatment outcomes. PMID:26799412

  14. Chiari malformation Type I surgery in pediatric patients. Part 1: validation of an ICD-9-CM code search algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ladner, Travis R; Greenberg, Jacob K; Guerrero, Nicole; Olsen, Margaret A; Shannon, Chevis N; Yarbrough, Chester K; Piccirillo, Jay F; Anderson, Richard C E; Feldstein, Neil A; Wellons, John C; Smyth, Matthew D; Park, Tae Sung; Limbrick, David D

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Administrative billing data may facilitate large-scale assessments of treatment outcomes for pediatric Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). Validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code algorithms for identifying CM-I surgery are critical prerequisites for such studies but are currently only available for adults. The objective of this study was to validate two ICD-9-CM code algorithms using hospital billing data to identify pediatric patients undergoing CM-I decompression surgery. METHODS The authors retrospectively analyzed the validity of two ICD-9-CM code algorithms for identifying pediatric CM-I decompression surgery performed at 3 academic medical centers between 2001 and 2013. Algorithm 1 included any discharge diagnosis code of 348.4 (CM-I), as well as a procedure code of 01.24 (cranial decompression) or 03.09 (spinal decompression or laminectomy). Algorithm 2 restricted this group to the subset of patients with a primary discharge diagnosis of 348.4. The positive predictive value (PPV) and sensitivity of each algorithm were calculated. RESULTS Among 625 first-time admissions identified by Algorithm 1, the overall PPV for CM-I decompression was 92%. Among the 581 admissions identified by Algorithm 2, the PPV was 97%. The PPV for Algorithm 1 was lower in one center (84%) compared with the other centers (93%-94%), whereas the PPV of Algorithm 2 remained high (96%-98%) across all subgroups. The sensitivity of Algorithms 1 (91%) and 2 (89%) was very good and remained so across subgroups (82%-97%). CONCLUSIONS An ICD-9-CM algorithm requiring a primary diagnosis of CM-I has excellent PPV and very good sensitivity for identifying CM-I decompression surgery in pediatric patients. These results establish a basis for utilizing administrative billing data to assess pediatric CM-I treatment outcomes.

  15. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation Board Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  16. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses Print Share Celiac Disease Many kids have sensitivities to certain foods, ... protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, consuming ...

  17. Find a Pediatric Dentist

    MedlinePlus

    ... Litch's Law Log HIPAA Forms Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Webinar Materials Member Resources 2017 General Assembly ... Archives Access Pediatric Dentistry Today Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Pediatric Dentistry Journal Open Access Articles Policies & ...

  18. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  19. Pediatric diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gyll, C.; Blake, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book treats the practical problems of pediatric radiography and radiological procedures. Written jointly by a radiographer and a radiologist, it covers pediatric positioning and procedures. An extended chapter covers neonatal radiography and radiology.

  20. Nuances in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Kenefake, Mary Ella; Swarm, Matthew; Walthall, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    Pediatric trauma evaluation mimics adult stabilization in that it is best accomplished with a focused and systematic approach. Attention to developmental differences, anatomic and physiologic nuances, and patterns of injury equip emergency physicians to stabilize and manage pediatric injury.

  1. Integrative Care Therapies and Pain in Hospitalized Children and Adolescents: A Retrospective Database Review

    PubMed Central

    Luberto, Christina M.; Bogenschutz, Lois H.; Pelley, Terri J.; Dusek, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Complementary or integrative care therapies are promising adjunctive approaches to pain management for pediatric inpatients that are currently underused and understudied. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential benefits of integrative care therapies delivered to hospitalized children and adolescents at a large Midwestern academic pediatric medical center over a 1-year period. Methods: A retrospective chart review of an inpatient clinical database maintained by integrative care therapists over a 1-year period was used for the current study. Pre/post pain and relaxation scores associated with the delivery of inpatient integrative care therapies (primarily massage therapy and healing touch) were examined. Results: Five-hundred nineteen hospitalized children and adolescents were treated by integrative care therapists for primarily pain or anxiety needs. Patients had a mean age of 10.2 years (standard deviation, 7.0), 224 were female (43%), 383 were white (74%), and most (393 [77%]) received massage therapy. Mean pain and relaxation scores decreased significantly from pre- to post-therapy across all demographic and clinical subgroups (p≤.001). Conclusions: Although integrative care therapies are increasingly requested and offered in children's hospitals, provision of these approaches is driven primarily by consumer demand rather than evidence-informed practice. Future controlled studies should examine the incremental effects of integrative care therapies as an adjunct to conventional treatment, assess how these therapies work mechanistically, and determine whether they improve outcomes, such as pain and cost, for hospitalized children and adolescents. PMID:24175871

  2. [Role of pediatric medical home care].

    PubMed

    Garrec, N; Patte, R

    2004-02-01

    According to the decree of 1992, the Paris hospitals (AP-HP) pediatric medical home care network offers care for all children irrespective of their pathology within the framework of a medico-psycho-social therapeutic project provided as an in alternative to traditional hospitalization. 30% of the admissions occur during the neonatal period. We studied the files of 249 newborn or preterm infants given in medical home care between January and September 2003. 71% were preterm infants. 46.4% of the children had been admitted at least once in an intensive care unit. At their admission in the pediatric medical home care unit, the median corrected gestational age was 39 weeks 6 days; 43% weighed less than 2500g, 9% less than 2000g, 22.5% of the preterm infants had a corrected gestational age less than 37 weeks, 65% of the infants presented gastrointestinal and/or feeding disorders. The average duration of stay in the pediatric medical home care unit was 20.5 days. The competence of pediatric nurses working in an integrated multidisciplinary team including psychologists and social workers is the key to success of pediatric medical home care.

  3. Nuclear imaging in pediatrics

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author's intent is to familiarize practicing radiologists with the technical aspects and interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures in children and to illustrate the indications for nuclear medicine procedures in pediatric problems. Pediatric doses, dosimetry, sedation, and injection techniques, organ systems, oncology and infection, testicular scanning and nuclear crystography, pediatric endocrine and skeletal systems, ventilation and perfusion imaging of both congenital and acquired pediatric disorders, cardiovascular problems, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, reticuloendothelial studies, and central nervous system are all topics which are included and discussed.

  4. Pediatric electrocardiographic imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jennifer N A

    2015-03-01

    Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) has been used in pediatric and congenital heart patients to better understand their electrophysiologic substrates. In this article we focus on the 4 subjects related to pediatric ECGI: (1) ECGI in patients with congenital heart disease and Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, (2) ECGI in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and preexcitation, (3) ECGI in pediatric patients with Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, and (4) ECGI for pediatric cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  5. Academic writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  6. Psychiatric pharmacogenomics in pediatric psychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Wall, Christopher A; Croarkin, Paul E; Swintak, Cosima; Koplin, Brett A

    2012-10-01

    This article provides an overview of where psychiatric pharmacogenomic testing stands as an emerging clinical tool in modern psychotropic prescribing practice, specifically in the pediatric population. This practical discussion is organized around the state of psychiatric pharmacogenomics research when choosing psychopharmacologic interventions in the most commonly encountered mental illnesses in youth. As with the rest of the topics on psychopharmacology for children and adolescents in this publication, a clinical vignette is presented, this one highlighting a clinical case of a 16 year old genotyped during hospitalization for recalcitrant depression.

  7. Medical ethics in pediatric critical care.

    PubMed

    Orioles, Alberto; Morrison, Wynne E

    2013-04-01

    Ethically charged situations are common in pediatric critical care. Most situations can be managed with minimal controversy within the medical team or between the team and patients/families. Familiarity with institutional resources, such as hospital ethics committees, and national guidelines, such as publications from the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Medical Association, or Society of Critical Care Medicine, are an essential part of the toolkit of any intensivist. Open discussion with colleagues and within the multidisciplinary team can also ensure that when difficult situations arise, they are addressed in a proactive, evidence-based, and collegial manner.

  8. [The history of pediatric plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Glicenstein, J

    2016-10-01

    The history of pediatric plastic surgery is linked to that of paediatrics. Until the early 19th century, there was no children's hospital. Only some operations were performed before the discovery of anesthesia, aseptic and antisepsis: cleft lip repair, amputation for polydactyly. Many operations were described in the 19th century for cleft lip and palate repair, hypospadias, syndactylies. The first operation for protruding ears was performed in 1881. Pediatric plastic surgery is diversified in the 2nd half of the 20th century: cleft lip and palate, burns, craniofacial surgery, hand surgery become separate parts of the speciality.

  9. The Best of Both Worlds: Resident Experiences of Urban and Regional Contexts in a Hybrid Pediatrics Residency Program

    PubMed Central

    Topps, Maureen; Ellaway, Rachel H.; Baron, Tara; Peek, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Background The context for specialty residency training in pediatrics has broadened in recent decades to include distributed community sites as well as academic health science centers. Rather than creating parallel, community-only programs, most programs have expanded to include both community and large urban tertiary health center experiences. Despite these changes, there has been relatively little research looking at residents' experiences in these distributed graduate medical education programs. Objective A longitudinal case study was undertaken to explore the experiences of residents in a Canadian pediatrics residency program that involved a combination of clinical placements in a large urban tertiary health center and in regional hospitals. Methods The study drew on 2 streams of primary data: 1-on-1 interviews with residents at the end of each block rotation and annual focus groups with residents. Results A thematic analysis (using grounded theory techniques) of transcripts of the interviews and focus groups identified 6 high-level themes: access to training, quality of learning, patient mix, continuity of care, learner roles, and residents as teachers. Conclusions Rather than finding that certain training contexts were “better” than others when comparing residents' experiences of the various training contexts in this pediatrics residency, what emerged was an understanding that the different settings complemented each other. Residents were adamant that this was not a matter of superiority of one context over any other; their experiences in different contexts each made a valuable contribution to the quality of their training. PMID:26692967

  10. 21 CFR 880.5680 - Pediatric position holder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pediatric position holder. 880.5680 Section 880.5680 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES General Hospital and Personal Use...

  11. Occurrence and molecular characteristics of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in an academic veterinary hospital.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Kanako; Shimokubo, Natsumi; Sakagami, Akie; Ueno, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Yasukazu; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Yanagisawa, Chie; Hanaki, Hideaki; Nakajima, Chie; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Tamura, Yutaka

    2010-08-01

    Recently, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) have been increasingly isolated from veterinarians and companion animals. With a view to preventing the spread of MRSA and MRSP, we evaluated the occurrence and molecular characteristics of each in a veterinary college. MRSA and MRSP were isolated from nasal samples from veterinarians, staff members, and veterinary students affiliated with a veterinary hospital. Using stepwise logistic regression, we identified two factors associated with MRSA carriage: (i) contact with an identified animal MRSA case (odds ratio [OR], 6.9; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 2.2 to 21.6) and (ii) being an employee (OR, 6.2; 95% CI, 2.0 to 19.4). The majority of MRSA isolates obtained from individuals affiliated with the veterinary hospital and dog patients harbored spa type t002 and a type II staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), similar to the hospital-acquired MRSA isolates in Japan. MRSA isolates harboring spa type t008 and a type IV SCCmec were obtained from one veterinarian on three different sampling occasions and also from dog patients. MRSA carriers can also be a source of MRSA infection in animals. The majority of MRSP isolates (85.2%) carried hybrid SCCmec type II-III, and almost all the remaining MRSP isolates (11.1%) carried SCCmec type V. MRSA and MRSP were also isolated from environmental samples collected from the veterinary hospital (5.1% and 6.4%, respectively). The application of certain disinfection procedures is important for the prevention of nosocomial infection, and MRSA and MRSP infection control strategies should be adopted in veterinary medical practice.

  12. Robotic Surgery may Not “Make the Cut” in Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Nicholas E.; Soldes, Oliver S.; Ponsky, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Since the introduction of robotic surgery in children in 2001, it has been employed by select pediatric laparoscopic surgeons, but not to the degree of adult surgical specialists. It has been suggested that the technical capabilities of the robot may be ideal for complex pediatric surgical cases that require intricate dissection. However, due to the size constraints of the robot for small pediatric patients, the tight financial margins that pediatric hospitals face, and the lack of high level data displaying patient benefit when compared to conventional laparoscopic surgery, it may be some time before the robotic surgical platform is widely embraced in pediatric surgical practice. PMID:25729745

  13. Gender and generational influences on the pediatric workforce and practice.

    PubMed

    Spector, Nancy D; Cull, William; Daniels, Stephen R; Gilhooly, Joseph; Hall, Judith; Horn, Ivor; Marshall, Susan G; Schumacher, Daniel J; Sectish, Theodore C; Stanton, Bonita F

    2014-06-01

    In response to demographic and other trends that may affect the future of the field of pediatrics, the Federation of Pediatric Organizations formed 4 working groups to participate in a year's worth of research and discussion preliminary to a Visioning Summit focusing on pediatric practice, research, and training over the next 2 decades. This article, prepared by members of the Gender and Generations Working Group, summarizes findings relevant to the 2 broad categories of demographic trends represented in the name of the group and explores the interface of these trends with advances in technology and social media and the impact this is likely to have on the field of pediatrics. Available data suggest that the trends in the proportions of men and women entering pediatrics are similar to those over the past few decades and that changes in the overall ratio of men and women will not substantially affect pediatric practice. However, although women may be as likely to succeed in academic medicine and research, fewer women than men enter research, thereby potentially decreasing the number of pediatric researchers as the proportion of women increases. Complex generational differences affect both the workforce and interactions in the workplace. Differences between the 4 generational groups comprising the pediatric workforce are likely to result in an evolution of the role of the pediatrician, particularly as it relates to aspects of work-life balance and the use of technology and social media.

  14. How Academic Is Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    University provision for academic development is well established in the USA, UK and many other countries. However, arrangements for its provision and staffing vary. In Australia, there has been a trend towards professional rather than academic staff appointments. Is this appropriate? In this paper, the domains of academic development work are…

  15. Cost-Minimization Model of a Multidisciplinary Antibiotic Stewardship Team Based on a Successful Implementation on a Urology Ward of an Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dik, Jan-Willem H.; Hendrix, Ron; Friedrich, Alex W.; Luttjeboer, Jos; Nannan Panday, Prashant; Wilting, Kasper R.; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R.; Postma, Maarten J.; Sinha, Bhanu

    2015-01-01

    Background In order to stimulate appropriate antimicrobial use and thereby lower the chances of resistance development, an Antibiotic Stewardship Team (A-Team) has been implemented at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Focus of the A-Team was a pro-active day 2 case-audit, which was financially evaluated here to calculate the return on investment from a hospital perspective. Methods Effects were evaluated by comparing audited patients with a historic cohort with the same diagnosis-related groups. Based upon this evaluation a cost-minimization model was created that can be used to predict the financial effects of a day 2 case-audit. Sensitivity analyses were performed to deal with uncertainties. Finally, the model was used to financially evaluate the A-Team. Results One whole year including 114 patients was evaluated. Implementation costs were calculated to be €17,732, which represent total costs spent to implement this A-Team. For this specific patient group admitted to a urology ward and consulted on day 2 by the A-Team, the model estimated total savings of €60,306 after one year for this single department, leading to a return on investment of 5.9. Conclusions The implemented multi-disciplinary A-Team performing a day 2 case-audit in the hospital had a positive return on investment caused by a reduced length of stay due to a more appropriate antibiotic therapy. Based on the extensive data analysis, a model of this intervention could be constructed. This model could be used by other institutions, using their own data to estimate the effects of a day 2 case-audit in their hospital. PMID:25955494

  16. Antibiotic Resistance in Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Stultz, Jeremy S; Doern, Christopher D; Godbout, Emily

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem in pediatric patients. Resistance to common antibiotic agents appears to be increasing over time, although resistance rates may vary based on geographic region or country. Prior antibiotic exposure is a pertinent risk factor for acquiring resistant organisms during a first UTI and recurrent UTI. Judicious prescribing of antibiotics for common pediatric conditions is needed to prevent additional resistance from occurring. Complex pediatric patients with histories of hospitalizations, prior antibiotic exposure, and recurrent UTIs are also at high risk for acquiring UTIs due to extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organisms. Data regarding the impact of in vitro antibiotic susceptibility testing interpretation on UTI treatment outcomes is lacking.

  17. Pediatric Interventional Radiology: Non-Vascular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR), which includes variety of procedures done under image guidance has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions, plays a significant role in the delivery of safe and effective care by reducing surgical risks, decreasing the length of hospital stay and reducing costs. The application of interventional techniques in children has been delayed over years as compared to adults due to lack of special hardwares/equipments, lack of adequately trained physicians and also the lack of awareness among the pediatric practitioners. This situation is gradually changing now owing to the advancements in technology. In this review, authors will discuss various non-vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients.

  18. The African Pediatric Fellowship Training Program in Pediatric Pulmonology: A Model for Growing African Capacity in Child Lung Health.

    PubMed

    Zar, Heather J; Vanker, Aneesa; Gray, Diane; Zampoli, Marco

    2017-01-26

    Childhood respiratory diseases are the major cause of mortality and morbidity in African children. However, there is limited expertise in pediatric pulmonology in Africa. The African Pediatric Fellowship Program (APFP) was developed in the Department of Pediatrics and Child Health at the University of Cape Town in partnership with African academic institutions beyond South Africa to promote training of African child health professionals and build capacity. From 2008 to 2016, 11 fellows have completed APFP training in pediatric pulmonology. Fellows have come from Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana and Uganda. All but one returned to his or her home institution, where they are building academic departments, improving clinical service delivery, growing research, and advancing advocacy and policies to improve child lung health. In parallel, training of South African pediatric pulmonologists has been strengthened with a further 9 South African fellows trained during this period. The African Pediatric Pulmonology program provides a highly successful model, with high retention of graduates in their home countries. The long-term goal is to grow African clinical capacity and strengthen services, research, training and advocacy for child lung health in Africa.

  19. Pediatric oncology in Morocco: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hessissen, Laila; Madani, Abdellah

    2012-03-01

    Cancer in children is quickly becoming one of the leading causes of non traumatic death among children. In pediatric oncology, palliative care is a primary component of the cancer control plan. In low income countries also known as emerging nations or developing countries access to adequate care remains a challenge for most pediatric oncology patients. In Morocco the situation has dramatically improved in the last few years as both the government and NGOs have become more aware of the importance and urgency of the issue. The incidence of cancer in patients under 15 years of age in Morocco is estimated to be 1000 new cases per year and the incidence of leukemia to be 100 new cases diagnosed per year. Pediatric cancer patients are mostly managed by public hospitals. Thus they are highly influenced by the Moroccan public health system, which is now considering cancer management a priority. Since health cover is very limited, most chemotherapy drugs were purchased by local parent associations. Recently, a new large Moroccan NGO (ALSC) provides anti-cancer drugs to all government-run oncology units. Despite all the progress, Morocco has witnessed in the pediatric oncology field, the palliative aspect of the care is not yet organized. Pediatric oncology is supported by the work of the National Society of Pediatric Oncolgy. The opioide therapy is available. However its use is strongly limited by the current restrictive and obsolete legislation which represents a major barrier to care. Despite the latest progress, pediatric oncology in Morocco still needs to improve in order to achieve performances comparable to those of the developed world. These improvements include better survival rates, less treatment abandonment, developing new techniques, improving quality of life and creating data collection teams. In order for this action to succeed all the stakeholders (government, NGOs, medical societies, oncology teams) must work together and coordinate their efforts.

  20. The role of telemedicine in pediatric critical care.

    PubMed

    Ellenby, Miles S; Marcin, James P

    2015-04-01

    Telemedicine technologies involve real-time, live, interactive video and audio communication and allow pediatric critical care physicians to have a virtual presence at the bedsides of critically ill children. Telemedicine use is increasing and will be a common in remote emergency departments, inpatient wards, and intensive care units for pediatric care. Hospitals and physicians that use telemedicine technologies provide higher quality of care, are more efficient in resource use with improved cost-effectiveness, and have higher satisfaction among patients, parents, and remote providers. More research will result in improved access to pediatric critical care expertise.

  1. Development and implementation of a pediatric palliative care program.

    PubMed

    Pelant, Diane; McCaffrey, Terri; Beckel, Jean

    2012-08-01

    Palliative care, long-used in the adult setting, is new to the pediatric setting. Research indicates that palliative care reduces length of stay and use of aggressive end-of-life interventions, improves quality of life, and provides hope. It balances provision of coordinated care with building of family memories and preparation for the child's death with celebration of the child's life. We advocate implementation of pediatric palliative care in any hospital that cares for children. This article provides a model outlining critical steps and considerations for establishing a successful pediatric palliative care program.

  2. Clinical Pathway Improves Pediatrics Asthma Management in the Emergency Department and Reduces Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Bekmezian, Arpi; Fee, Christopher; Weber, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Poor adherence to NIH Asthma Guidelines may result in unnecessary admissions for children presenting to the emergency department (ED) with exacerbations. We determine the effect of implementing an evidence-based ED clinical pathway on corticosteroid and bronchodilator administration and imaging utilization, and the subsequent effect on hospital admissions in a US ED. Methods Prospective, interventional study of pediatric (≤21 years) visits to an academic ED between 2011 and 2013 with moderate-severe asthma exacerbations. A multidisciplinary team designed a one-page clinical pathway based on NIH guidelines. Nurses, respiratory therapists, and physicians attended educational sessions prior to pathway implementation. Adjusting for demographics, acuity, and ED volume, we compared timing and appropriateness of corticosteroid and bronchodilator administration, and chest radiograph (CXR) utilization with historical controls from 2006–2011. Subsequent hospital admission rates were also compared. Results 379 post-intervention visits were compared with 870 controls. Corticosteroids were more likely to be administered during post-intervention visits (96% vs. 78%, adjusted OR 6.35; 95%CI 3.17–12.73). Post-intervention, median time to corticosteroid administration was 45 minutes faster (RR 0.74; 95%CI 0.67–0.81) and more patients received corticosteroids within 1 hour of arrival (45% vs 18%, OR 3.5; 95%CI 2.50–4.90). More patients received >1 bronchodilator dose within 1 hour (36% vs 24%, OR 1.65; 95%CI 1.23–2.21) and fewer received CXRs (27% vs 42%, OR 0.7; 95%CI 0.52–0.94). There were fewer admissions post-intervention (13% vs. 21%, OR 0.53; 95%CI 0.37–0.76). Conclusion A clinical pathway is associated with improved adherence to NIH guidelines and, subsequently, fewer hospital admissions for pediatric ED patients with asthma exacerbations. PMID:25985707

  3. Epidemiology of pediatric burn in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tsai-Ming; Wang, Kai-Hung; Lai, Cheng-Sheng; Lin, Sin-Daw

    2005-03-01

    A 5-year retrospective review of 157 pediatric patients admitted to burn center of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital (Kaohsiung, Taiwan) was undertaken to identify the incidence, mechanism, and agents of pediatric burn. The highest incidence of pediatric burn was in children aged 1-6 years (57.3%), followed by age group 6-14 years (31.8%). Scald burn (75.2%) made up the major cause of this injury and was dominant in each age group compared to non-scald burn. The kitchen/dining area (57.3%) and living room (29.9%) accounted for the most frequent places where pediatric burns occurred. Among the agents of scald burn, hot drink (49.2%) and soup (32.2%) were the two leading causes. There were more pediatric burns reported in colder seasons (38.2% and 33.1% in winter and fall respectively) and during dining time (19.7% in 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and 35.0% in 5 p.m.-8 p.m.). The results of this report may be closely related to special culinary habits (use of chafing-dish and making hot tea) in the south of Taiwan.

  4. Community-Academic Partnership to Investigate Low Birth Weight Deliveries and Improve Maternal and Infant Outcomes at a Baltimore City Hospital.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Elizabeth M; Strobino, Donna; Sherrod, Leslie; Webb, Mary Catherine; Anderson, Caroline; White, Jennifer Arice; Atlas, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Purpose Mercy Medical Center (MMC), a community hospital in Baltimore Maryland, has undertaken a community initiative to reduce low birth weight (LBW) deliveries by 10 % in 3 years. MMC partnered with a School of Public Health to evaluate characteristics associated with LBW deliveries and formulate collaborations with obstetricians and community services to improve birth outcomes. Description As part of the initiative, a case control study of LBW was undertaken of all newborns weighing <2500 grams during June 2010-June 2011 matched 2:1 with newborns ≥2500 grams (n = 862). Assessment Logistic regression models including maternal characteristics prior to and during pregnancy showed an increased odds of LBW among women with a previous preterm birth (aOR 2.48; 95 % CI: 1.49-4.13), chronic hypertension (aOR: 2.53; 95 % CI: 1.25-5.10), hospitalization during pregnancy (aOR: 2.27; 95 % CI:1.52-3.40), multiple gestation (aOR:12.33; 95 % CI:5.49-27.73) and gestational hypertension (aOR: 2.81; 95 % CI: 1.79-4.41). Given that both maternal pre-existing conditions and those occurring during pregnancy were found to be associated with LBW, one strategy to address pregnant women at risk of LBW infants is to improve the intake and referral system to better triage women to appropriate services in the community. Meetings were held with community organizations and feedback was operationalized into collaboration strategies which can be jointly implemented. Conclusion Education sessions with providers about the referral system are one ongoing strategy to improve birth outcomes in Baltimore City, as well as provision of timely home visits by nurses to high-risk women.

  5. Comorbidities in Chronic Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Report of the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Alicia M.; Sander, Anja; Borzych-Dużałka, Dagmara; Watson, Alan R.; Vallés, Patricia G.; Ha, Il Soo; Patel, Hiren; Askenazi, David; Balasz-Chmielewska, Irena; Lauronen, Jouni; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Feber, Janusz; Schaefer, Franz; Warady, Bradley A.

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Background, Objectives, and Methods: Hospitalization and mortality rates in pediatric dialysis patients remain unacceptably high. Although studies have associated the presence of comorbidities with an increased risk for death in a relatively small number of pediatric dialysis patients, no large-scale study had set out to describe the comorbidities seen in pediatric dialysis patients or to evaluate the impact of those comorbidities on outcomes beyond the newborn period. In the present study, we evaluated the prevalence of comorbidities in a large international cohort of pediatric chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) patients from the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network registry and began to assess potential associations between those comorbidities and hospitalization rates and mortality. ♦ Results: Information on comorbidities was available for 1830 patients 0 - 19 years of age at dialysis initiation. Median age at dialysis initiation was 9.1 years [interquartile range (IQR): 10.9], median follow-up for calculation of hospitalization rates was 15.2 months (range: 0.2 - 80.9 months), and total follow-up time in the registry was 2095 patient-years. At least 1 comorbidity had been reported for 602 of the patients (32.9%), with 283 (15.5%) having cognitive impairment; 230 (12.6%), motor impairment; 167 (9.1%), cardiac abnormality; 76 (4.2%), pulmonary abnormality; 212 (11.6%), ocular abnormality; and 101 (5.5%), hearing impairment. Of the 150 patients (8.2%) that had a defined syndrome, 85% had at least 1 nonrenal comorbidity, and 64% had multiple comorbidities. The presence of at least 1 comorbidity was associated with a higher hospitalization rate [hospital days per 100 observation days: 1.7 (IQR: 5.8) vs 1.2 (IQR: 3.9), p = 0.001] and decreased patient survival (4-year survival rate: 73% vs 90%, p < 0.0001). ♦ Conclusions: Nearly one third of pediatric CPD patients in a large international cohort had at least 1 comorbidity, and multiple

  6. Laser gingivectomy for pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Michelle M; Poiman, David J; Jacobson, Barry L

    2010-01-01

    Traditional gingivectomy procedures have been a challenge for pediatric dentists who confront issues of patient cooperation and discomfort. Treatment of pediatric patients must involve minimal operative and postoperative discomfort. Laser soft-tissue surgery has been shown to be well accepted by children. For the pediatric patient, the greatest advantage of the laser is the lack of local anesthesia injection and the associated pre- and postoperative discomfort. The following case report describes a gingivectomy procedure performed on a 14-year-old female.

  7. Use of Simulation to Enhance Learning in a Pediatric Elective

    PubMed Central

    Benner, Kim W.; Worthington, Mary A.; Zinkan, Lynn; White, Marjorie Lee

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess the impact on learning of adding a pediatric human patient simulation to a pharmacy course. Design Pharmacy students enrolled in a pediatric elective participated in 1 inpatient and 1 outpatient scenario using a pediatric patient simulator. Immediately following each case, reflective debriefing occurred. Assessment Forty-two students participated in the simulation activity over 2 academic years. A pretest and posttest study design was used, with average scores 4.1 ± 1.2 out of 9 on pretest and average 7.0 ± 1.5 out of 9 on posttest (p < 0.0001). Ninety-five percent (40/42) of students' scores improved. Students felt the learning experiences were positive and realistic. Conclusions Pharmacy students' knowledge and application skills improved through use of pediatric simulation exercises. PMID:20414434

  8. Pediatric priority in kidney allocation: challenging its acceptability.

    PubMed

    Capitaine, Laura; Van Assche, Kristof; Pennings, Guido; Sterckx, Sigrid

    2014-06-01

    Any organ which is allocated to one individual represents a missed opportunity for someone else. Given the important repercussions which organ allocation policies inevitably have for certain people, any prioritization policy should rest on a solid argumentative basis. In this study, we analyze the widespread practice of prioritizing pediatric patients in the allocation of kidneys. While official policy documents offer no arguments in support of pediatric priority, such arguments can be found in the academic literature on pediatric renal transplantation. Our study is the first to bring together and critically analyze these. We identify five commonly cited arguments and show that none of these succeeds in justifying pediatric priority policies. We argue that the legitimacy of such policies may be further undermined by their potential adverse effects on both adults and children.

  9. Food insecure families: description of access and barriers to food from one pediatric primary care center.

    PubMed

    DeMartini, Tori L; Beck, Andrew F; Kahn, Robert S; Klein, Melissa D

    2013-12-01

    Despite evidence that food insecurity negatively impacts child health, health care providers play little role in addressing the issue. To inform potential primary care interventions, we sought to assess a range of challenges faced by food insecure (FI) families coming to an urban, pediatric primary care setting. A cross-sectional study was performed at a hospital-based, urban, academic pediatric primary care clinic that serves as a medical home for approximately 15,000 patients with 35,000 annual visits. Subjects included a convenience sample of caregivers of children presenting for either well child or ill care over a 4 months period in 2012. A self-administered survey assessed household food security status, shopping habits, transportation access, budgeting priorities, and perceptions about nutrition access in one's community. Bivariate analyses between food security status and these characteristics were performed using Chi square statistics or Fisher's exact test. The survey was completed by 199 caregivers. Approximately 33% of families were FI; 93% received food-related governmental assistance. FI families were more likely to obtain food from a corner/convenience store, utilize food banks, require transportation other than a household car, and prioritize paying bills before purchasing food. FI families perceived less access to healthy, affordable foods within their community. Thus, FI families may face unique barriers to accessing food. Knowledge of these barriers could allow clinicians to tailor in-clinic screening and create family-centered interventions.

  10. Extracorporeal-Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (E-CPR) During Pediatric In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest is Associated with Improved Survival to Discharge: A Report from the American Heart Association’s Get With the Guidelines® - Resuscitation Registry (GWTG-R)

    PubMed Central

    Lasa, Javier J.; Rogers, Rachel S.; Localio, Russell; Shults, Justine; Raymond, Tia; Gaies, Michael; Thiagarajan, Ravi; Laussen, Peter C.; Kilbaugh, Todd; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Topjian, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Background Although extracorporeal CPR (E-CPR) can result in survival after failed conventional CPR (C-CPR), no large, systematic comparison of pediatric E-CPR versus continued C-CPR has been reported. Methods and Results Consecutive patients <18 years old with CPR events ≥ 10 minutes duration reported to GWTG-R between January 2000 and December 2011 were identified. Hospitals were grouped by teaching status and location. Primary outcome was survival to discharge. Regression modeling was performed conditioning on hospital groups. A secondary analysis was performed using propensity-score matching. Of 3,756 evaluable patients, 591 (16%) received E-CPR and 3,165 (84%) received C-CPR only. Survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurologic outcome (Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category score of 1–3 or unchanged from admission) were greater for E-CPR [40% (237/591) and 27% (133/496)] versus C-CPR patients [27% (862/3,165) and 18% (512/2,840)]. Odds ratios for survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurologic outcome were greater for E-CPR versus C-CPR. After adjusting for covariates, patients receiving E-CPR had higher odds of survival to discharge [OR 2.80, 95% CI 2.13–3.69, p <0.001] and survival with favorable neurologic outcome [OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.91–3.64, p < 0.001] than patient who received C-CPR. This association persisted when analyzed by propensity-score matched cohorts [OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.33–2.18, p < 0.001 and OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.31–2.41, p < 0.001 respectively]. Conclusions For children with in-hospital CPR ≥ 10 minutes duration, E-CPR was associated with improved survival to hospital discharge and survival with favorable neurologic outcome when compared to C-CPR. PMID:26635402

  11. Alternative careers in pediatric dentistry: a survey of pediatric dental residents.

    PubMed

    Chinn, Courtney H; Edelstein, Burton L

    2010-10-01

    Pediatric dentistry has enjoyed growing popularity in recent years, yet there remains a need for leadership in academe, research, and public health. In November 2008, the first Maternal and Child Health Bureau-sponsored regional Leadership in Pediatric Dentistry convocation was held at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine. Seventy-two pediatric dentistry trainees from thirteen programs in the New York City area participated in interactive presentations and exercises. Of the sixty- seven participants who completed a pre-event survey, 93 percent stated they would likely or very likely pursue careers that involved, at least in part, private practice, 55 percent in care of children in Medicaid, 51 percent academics, 36 percent dental public health, and 12 percent research. Barriers related to finances, competence, or work environment/location were perceived by 83 percent for careers involving research, 73 percent for dental public health, 66 percent for providing care to children in Medicaid, 46 percent for academics, and 9 percent for private practice. Results of a pair of pre-event and post-event surveys completed by sixty-three attendees showed no change in reported likelihood to pursue a career alternative except for an increase in the likelihood of working in a practice that accepts Medicaid. The challenge before dental educators is to provide consistent and meaningful opportunities throughout training that encourage residents to consider all career options and to discover how their individual interests mesh with their clinical learning.

  12. CHOA concussion consensus: establishing a uniform policy for academic accommodations.

    PubMed

    Popoli, David Michael; Burns, Thomas G; Meehan, William P; Reisner, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Concussion research generally centers on physical challenges, though aspects such as social functioning and returning to school also warrant attention in pediatric populations. Restoring academic performance postconcussion remains a challenge. Here we provide recommendations addressing a uniform policy for pediatric concussion patients in academic institutions. Tools that may minimize difficulty with academic re-entry include independent educational evaluations, individualized educational programs (IEPs), student support teams (SSTs), letters of academic accommodation, time off, and 504 Plans. Recognition and treatment is crucial for symptom relief and prevention of functional disruption, as is specialist referral during the acute window. We recommend early intervention with a letter of academic accommodation and SST and suggest that 504 Plans and IEPs be reserved for protracted or medically complicated cases. Students with concussion should be observed for anxiety and depression because these symptoms can lead to prolonged recovery, decreased quality of life, and other social challenges.

  13. PROMIS® Pediatric Self Report Scales Distinguish Subgroups of Children Within and Across Six Common Pediatric Chronic Health Conditions

    PubMed Central

    DeWalt, Darren A.; Gross, Heather E.; Gipson, Debbie S.; Selewski, David T.; DeWitt, Esi Morgan; Dampier, Carlton D.; Hinds, Pamela S.; Huang, I-Chan; Thissen, David; Varni, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a comparative analysis of eight pediatric self-report scales for ages 8-17 years from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) in six pediatric chronic health conditions, using indicators of disease severity. Methods Pediatric patients (N = 1,454) with asthma, cancer, chronic kidney disease, obesity, rheumatic disease, and sickle cell disease completed items from the PROMIS pediatric mobility, upper extremity functioning, depressive symptoms, anxiety, anger, peer relationships, pain interference, and fatigue self-report scales. Comparisons within the six pediatric chronic health conditions were conducted by examining differences in groups based on disease severity using markers of severity that were specific to characteristics of each disease. A comparison was also made across diseases between children who had been recently hospitalized and those who had not. Results In general, there were differences in self-reported health outcomes within each chronic health condition, with patients who had higher disease severity showing worse outcomes. Across health conditions, when children with recent hospitalizations were compared with those who had not been hospitalized in the past six months, we found significant differences in the expected directions for all PROMIS domains, except anger. Conclusions PROMIS measures discriminate between different clinically meaningful subgroups within several chronic illnesses. Further research is needed to determine the responsiveness of the PROMIS pediatric scales to change over time. PMID:25715946

  14. Training and practice of pediatric surgery in Africa: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Elhalaby, Essam A; Uba, Francis A; Borgstein, Eric S; Rode, Heinz; Millar, Alastair J W

    2012-05-01

    The evolution and recognition of pediatric surgery as a specialty in Africa can be divided into 4 distinct phases, starting from early 1920s till the present. The pace of development has been quite variable in different parts of Africa. Despite all recent developments, the practice of pediatric surgery in Africa continues to face multiple challenges, including limited facilities, manpower shortages, the large number of sick children, disease patterns specific to the region, late presentation and advanced pathology, lack of pediatric surgeons outside the tertiary hospitals, and inadequate governmental support. Standardization of pediatric surgery training across the continent is advocated. Collaboration with well-established pediatric surgical training centers in Africa and other developed countries is necessary. The problems of delivery of pediatric surgical services need to be addressed urgently, if the African child is to have access to essential pediatric surgical services like his or her counterpart in the high-income parts of the world.

  15. Barriers to effective pediatric asthma care.

    PubMed

    Swartz, Martha K; Banasiak, Nancy Cantey; Meadows-Oliver, Mikki

    2005-01-01

    Although progress has been made in understanding the pathophysiology of asthma and identifying key features of quality asthma care, the prevalence of childhood asthma remains high. Barriers to effective asthma care that currently exist include the persistence of environmental risk factors, disparities in care that stem from poverty and cultural differences, and inconsistencies in the quality of asthma care provided by clinicians. Pediatric nurse practitioners at Yale New Haven Children's Hospital have actively implemented the recommended guidelines for asthma care and addressed causes for some of the disparities in asthma health care. Two major initiatives are described: the Asthma Care Coordination Project at Yale New Haven Hospital Pediatric Primary Care Center, and the establishment of an Asthma Outreach Program. Recommended resources and Web sites for the practitioner are also provided.

  16. Pediatric Oral/Maxillofacial Soft Tissue Sarcomas: A Clinicopathologic Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Joel C.; Woods, Gary M.; Arnold, Michael A.; Elmaraghy, Charles; Kahwash, Samir B.; Cripe, Timothy P.; Setty, Bhuvana A.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric soft tissue sarcomas of the oral/maxillofacial region are rare neoplasms that present significant difficulty with respect to treatment and local control measures. We report four cases of pediatric oral/maxillofacial soft tissue sarcomas from our tertiary care pediatric hospital and emphasize the rarity of these malignancies and the challenges encountered in treating these lesions, and suggest areas for further research. We conclude that multimodal therapy and interdisciplinary cooperation are paramount to successful management of these lesions. PMID:27721766

  17. Commentary: the use of health and behavior codes in pediatric psychology: where are we now?

    PubMed

    McAuliffe Lines, Meghan; Tynan, W Douglas; Angalet, Gwendoline B; Shroff Pendley, Jennifer

    2012-06-01

    This article focuses on the current status of the use of Health and Behavior (H&B) codes by pediatric psychologists. We address the rationale for the use of these codes in a pediatric psychology setting, practice updates since the codes were initiated, and our experience with utilizing these codes in one pediatric hospital. We conclude with a summary of our assertions and future directions for policy and practice.

  18. Academic Bullies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    Many professors have been traumatized by academic bullies. Unlike bullies at school, the academic bully plays a more subtle game. Bullies may spread rumors to undermine a colleague's credibility or shut their target out of social conversations. The more aggressive of the species cuss out co-workers, even threatening to get physical. There is…

  19. Daptomycin Use in United States Children's Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Larru, Beatriz; Cowden, Carter L; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Gerber, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-01

    We described 1035 pediatric hospitalizations with daptomycin use in 794 patients since 2004. Daptomycin use was uncommon but increased over time. A minority of hospitals accounted for the majority of use. This variability of daptomycin use highlights the need for future studies to assess the efficacy and safety of daptomycin in children.

  20. Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for Alcohol and Other Drug Use among Adolescents: Evaluation of a Pediatric Residency Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Sheryl A.; Martel, Shara; Pantalon, Michael; Martino, Steve; Tetrault, Jeanette; Thung, Stephen F.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Auinger, Peggy; Green, Michael L.; Fiellin, David A.; O'Connor, Patrick G.; D'Onofrio, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the integration of a screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) curriculum for alcohol and other drug use into a pediatric residency program. Pediatric and medicine/pediatric residents in an adolescent medicine rotation located in an urban teaching hospital participated in the…

  1. Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De George, Richard T.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that Martin Michaelson's proposal in "Should Untenured as Well as Tenured Faculty Be Guaranteed Academic Freedom? A Few Observations," despite its good intentions, is seriously flawed and if adopted in preference to existing standards will weaken rather than strengthen academic freedom. (EV)

  2. Implementation and performance of the BioFire FilmArray® Blood Culture Identification panel with antimicrobial treatment recommendations for bloodstream infections at a midwestern academic tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Southern, Timothy R; VanSchooneveld, Trevor C; Bannister, Dianna L; Brown, TeAnne L; Crismon, Amy S; Buss, Sarah N; Iwen, Peter C; Fey, Paul D

    2015-02-01

    The FilmArray® Blood Culture Identification (BCID) panel was recently implemented at a midwestern academic tertiary care hospital to provide rapid identification (ID) of common pathogens from positive blood cultures. This study evaluated the clinical performance of the BCID panel compared to culture-based ID methods. One hundred thirty-eight monomicrobial and 8 polymicrobial blood cultures were evaluated during the 30-day study resulting in the ID of 152 total organisms by culture with 115 organisms correctly identified using the BCID panel. The BCID panel had sensitivities of 80.4% (115/152) for all organisms identified during the study and 94.6% (115/122) when considering only on-panel organisms. BCID panel specificity was 100%. Implementation of the BCID panel was coupled with the development of empiric therapy recommendations for bloodstream infections by the antimicrobial stewardship team. Based on this study, the FilmArray® BCID panel is a rapid and reliable test for the detection of common bloodstream pathogens, and therapeutic decisions can be based upon panel results.

  3. Predictors of direct cost of diabetes care in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examines factors that predict elevated direct costs of pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. Methods: A cohort of 784 children with type 1 diabetes at least 6 months postdiagnosis and managed by pediatric endocrinologists at Texas Children's Hospital were included in this study. Actual...

  4. Length of Stay of Pediatric Mental Health Emergency Department Visits in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Sarah D.; Case, Brady G.; Olfson, Mark; Linakis, James G.; Laska, Eugene M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare pediatric mental health emergency department visits to other pediatric emergency department visits, focusing on length of stay. Method: We analyzed data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a nationally representative sample of US emergency department visits from 2001 to 2008, for patients aged less than…

  5. The Development of an Education Program in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCllelland, Charles; Vanek, Eugenia

    1975-01-01

    A model educational program for third-year pediatric clinical clerkss and pediatric level I and II house officers is presented. Learning is defined in three areas: patient management, behavioral care needs, and hospital and community health care needs. Information on goals, objectives, learning experiences, and evaluation methods is provided.…

  6. Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, J P

    1983-04-01

    Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation refers to those measures used to restore ventilation and circulation in children. This article defines how cardiopulmonary resuscitation in infants, children, and adolescents differs from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults and delineates the drugs and dosages to be used in the resuscitation of pediatric patients.

  7. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... get enough calories to heal and grow. After heart surgery, most babies and infants (younger than 12 to 15 months) can take ... valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... open heart surgery References Bernstein D. General principles ...

  8. Pediatric intensive care.

    PubMed

    Macintire, D K

    1999-07-01

    To provide optimal care, a veterinarian in a pediatric intensive care situation for a puppy or kitten should be familiar with normal and abnormal vital signs, nursing care and monitoring considerations, and probable diseases. This article is a brief discussion of the pediatric intensive care commonly required to treat puppies or kittens in emergency situations and for canine parvovirus type 2 enteritis.

  9. Teaching Prevention in Pediatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Tina L.; Greenberg, Larrie; Loeser, Helen; Keller, David

    2000-01-01

    Reviews methods of teaching preventive medicine in pediatrics and highlights innovative programs. Methods of teaching prevention in pediatrics include patient interactions, self-directed learning, case-based learning, small-group learning, standardized patients, computer-assisted instruction, the Internet, student-centered learning, and lectures.…

  10. Expressive arts in pediatric orientation groups.

    PubMed

    Basso, Robert

    2010-12-01

    Children admitted to a pediatric unit experience separation or loss from everyday supports while undergoing medical tests or procedures in an environment that children characterize as distressing. A Canadian multidisciplinary hospital team conducted a pilot project that provided children experiencing unplanned admissions to come together to explore, discuss, enact, and make sense of the stress in the hospital environment. The children participated in postadmission orientation groups engaging in improvised skits in which they shared experiences, listened to each other's feelings, and began to problem solve. Primary care staff provided scaled responses and clinical judgements before and after the groups. Staff report that children's fears, anger, and withdrawal improved after the shared group activities.

  11. Pediatric Care Online: A Pediatric Point-of-Care Tool.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric Care Online is the American Academy of Pediatrics' point-of-care tool designed for health care providers. Pediatric Care Online builds on content from Red Book Online and Pediatric Patient Education and features Quick Reference topic pages for more than 250 pediatric health care topics. The multitude of resources available within Pediatric Care Online will be reviewed in this column, and a sample search will be used to illustrate the type of information available within this point-of-care pediatric resource.

  12. Autopsy of Adult Patients Deceased in an Academic Hospital: Considerations of Doctors and Next-of-Kin in the Consent Process

    PubMed Central

    Weustink, Annick C.; Hunink, M. G. Myriam; Oosterhuis, J. Wolter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hospital autopsies, vanishing worldwide, need to be requested by clinicians and consented to by next-of-kin. The aim of this prospective observational study was to examine how often and why clinicians do not request an autopsy, and for what reasons next-of-kin allow, or refuse it. Methods Clinicians at the Erasmus University Medical Centre were asked to complete a questionnaire when an adult patient had died. Questionnaires on 1000 consecutive naturally deceased adults were collected. If possible, missing data in the questionnaires were retrieved from the electronic patient record. Results Data from 958 (96%) questionnaires was available for analysis. In 167/958 (17·4%) cases clinicians did not request an autopsy, and in 641/791 (81·0%) cases next-of-kin did not give consent. The most important reason for both clinicians (51·5%) and next-of-kin (51·0%) to not request or consent to an autopsy was an assumed known cause of death. Their second reason was that the deceased had gone through a long illness (9·6% and 29·5%). The third reason for next-of-kin was mutilation of the deceased’s body by the autopsy procedure (16·1%). Autopsy rates were highest among patients aged 30–39 years, Europeans, suddenly and/or unexpectedly deceased patients, and tissue and/or organ donors. The intensive care and emergency units achieved the highest autopsy rates, and surgical wards the lowest. Conclusion The main reason for not requesting or allowing an autopsy is the assumption that the cause of death is known. This is a dangerous premise, because it is a self-fulfilling prophecy. Clinicians should be aware, and communicate with the next of kin, that autopsies not infrequently disclose unexpected findings, which might have changed patient management. Mutilation of the deceased’s body seems a minor consideration of next-of-kin, though how it really affects autopsy rates, should be studied by offering minimally or non-invasive autopsy methods. PMID:27736974

  13. Achieving Success Connecting Academic and Practicing Clinicians Through Telemedicine

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson J.; Hall-Barrow, Julie; Hall, R. Whit; Burke, Bryan L.; Smith, Christopher E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Practicing clinicians, especially in rural areas, are often isolated from learning opportunities and interaction with subspecialty providers. The Pediatric Physician Learning and Collaborative Education (Peds PLACE), an interactive educational telemedicine program, was developed to address this need. We evaluated the success of this program through surveys with practicing and academic physicians. Methods Peds PLACE was assessed using two evaluation forms collected from October 2007 to May 2008. One of them was completed by 197 attendees from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) and 172 from remote sites. Another form was completed by 131 participants from Arkansas Children's Hospital (ACH), an academic free standing children's hospital. Both evaluation forms asked participants to use a 5-point Likert scale to rank a number of criteria and included a section for participants to write comments and recommendations. Additional data was collected through an open-response email survey of participants. Results 95% of the participants agreed that the presentations related to their professional needs, 98% agreed that it increased their subject matter knowledge, 81% evaluated the presentations as some of the best they have attended, and 93% agreed that the information would translate into professional practice, enhancing patient care. Health personnel from UAMS evaluated the presentations significantly higher than remote participants. Nursing staff evaluated the presentations significantly higher than medical staff. Comments were generally positive and correlated with the Likert scale data. Conclusion Participants reported being highly satisfied with Peds PLACE and considered it an effective way to address the continuing education needs of practitioners throughout Arkansas, especially in rural and underserved areas. PMID:19204057

  14. Multidrug resistance in pediatric urinary tract infections.

    PubMed

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Dickson, Eric; Karlowsky, James; Doern, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a common infection in the pediatric population. Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen in children, and antimicrobial resistance in this species complicates the treatment of pediatric UTIs. Despite the impact of resistance on empiric antibiotic choice, there is little data on multidrug resistance in pediatric patients. In this paper, we describe characteristics of multidrug-resistant E. coli in pediatric patients using a large national database of uropathogens antimicrobial sensitivities. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to commonly prescribed antibiotics were performed on uropathogens isolated from children presenting to participating hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data were analyzed separately for four pediatric age groups. Single and multidrug resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were performed on all specimens. There were a total of 11,341 E. coli urine cultures from 343 infants (0-4 weeks), 1,801 toddlers (5 weeks-24 months), 6,742 preteens (2-12 years), and 2,455 teens (13-17 years). E. coli resistance to ampicillin peaked in toddlers (52.8%) but was high in preteens (52.1%), infants (50.4%), and teens (40.6%). Resistance to two or more antibiotics varied across age groups, with toddlers (27%) leading preteens (23.1%), infants (21%), and teens (15.9%). Resistance to three or more antibiotics was low in all age groups (range 3.1-5.2%). The most common co-resistance in all age groups was ampicillin/TMP-SMZ. In conclusion, less than half of all pediatric UTIs are susceptible to all commonly used antibiotics. In some age groups, there is a significant percentage of co-resistance between the two most commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin and TMP-SMZ).

  15. Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Our Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Basturk, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Aygen; Sayar, Ersin; Dinçhan, Ayhan; Aliosmanoğlu, İbrahim; Erbiş, Halil; Aydınlı, Bülent; Artan, Reha

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of our study was to evaluate our liver transplant pediatric patients and to report our experience in the complications and the long-term follow-up results. Materials and Methods: Patients between the ages of 0 and 18 years, who had liver transplantation in the organ transplantation center of our university hospital between 1997 and 2016, were included in the study. The age, sex, indications for the liver transplantation, complications after the transplantation, and long-term follow-up findings were retrospectively evaluated. The obtained results were analyzed with statistical methods. Results: In our organ transplantation center, 62 pediatric liver transplantations were carried out since 1997. The mean age of our patients was 7.3 years (6.5 months–17 years). The 4 most common reasons for liver transplantation were: Wilson’s disease (n=10; 16.3%), biliary atresia (n=9; 14.5%), progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (n=8; 12.9%), and cryptogenic cirrhosis (n=7; 11.3%). The mortality rate after transplantation was 19.6% (12 of the total 62 patients). The observed acute and chronic rejection rates were 34% and 4.9%, respectively. Thrombosis (9.6%) was observed in the hepatic artery (4.8%) and portal vein (4.8%). Bile leakage and biliary stricture rates were 31% and 11%, respectively. 1-year and 5-year survival rates of our patients were 87% and 84%, respectively. Conclusion: The morbidity and mortality rates in our organ transplantation center, regarding pediatric liver transplantations, are consistent with the literature. PMID:28149148

  16. Challenges in contemporary academic neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Black, Peter M

    2006-03-01

    Traditionally, the ideal academic neurosurgeon has been a "quadruple threat," with excellence in clinical work, teaching, research, and administration. This tradition was best exemplified in Harvey Cushing, who developed the field of neurosurgery 90 years ago. This paradigm will probably have to change as academic neurosurgeons face major challenges. In patient care, these include increasing regulatory control, increasing malpractice costs, consolidation of expensive care in academic centers, and decreasing reimbursement; in resident teaching, work hour limitations and a changing resident culture; in research, the increasing dominance of basic scientists in governmental funding decisions and decreased involvement of neurosurgeons in scientific review committees; and in administration, problems of relationships in the workplace, patient safety, and employment compliance in an increasingly bureaucratic system. To meet these challenges, the new academic neurosurgeon will probably not be a quadruple threat personally but will be part of a quadruple threat in a department and institution. Neurosurgeons in such a setting will have to work with hospital, medical school, and national and international groups to address malpractice, reimbursement, subspecialization, and training problems; find supplemental sources of income through grants, development funds, and hospital support; lead in the development of multidisciplinary centers for neuroscience, brain tumor, spine, and other initiatives; and focus on training leaders for hospital, regional, and national groups to reconfigure neurosurgery. Collaboration, flexibility, and leadership will be characteristic of the academic neurosurgeon in this new era.

  17. Medication Repurposing in Pediatric Patients: Teaching Old Drugs New Tricks

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gaps in pediatric therapeutics often result in off-label use and specifically, novel uses for existing medications, termed “drug repurposing.” Drug Information (DI) queries to a Pediatric Medication Resource Center of a large metropolitan pediatric hospital in New York and inherent difficulties in retrieving evidence-based information prompted a review of current medication repurposing for pediatric patients. The objective included characterization of innovative off-label use of medications Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for 1 or more indications to treat a totally different disorder or indication in pediatric patients. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted to retrieve publications describing repurposed medications in pediatric patients. Excluded was FDA-approved indications used off-label in pediatric patients (e.g., different dose), preclinical data, adult use only, and experimental use. Evidence quality was classified using a modified American Academy of Neurology Level of Evidence. Results were analyzed using χ2 at p < 0.05. RESULTS: Over 2000 references were retrieved and reviewed. A total of 101 medications repurposed for novel off-label uses for pediatric patients were identified: 38 for neonates, 74 for children, and 52 for adolescents. Neonates and infants were least likely to receive a medication for a repurposed use. Strong or intermediate evidence existed in 80.2% of cases. The evidence was weak in 19.8%. No significant relationship was observed between the pediatric age group and strength of the literature. Most repurposed uses pertained to generic or widely used medications. Less than 5% of medications were first marketed after 2011. CONCLUSIONS: While not exhaustive, the present study represents the most comprehensive listing of novel uses exclusive to pediatric patients. Further research is needed to identify the frequency of repurposed uses. The valuable DI role of pharmacists in assessing repurposed

  18. Management of the Hospital Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Alvis G.

    1976-01-01

    Hospital studies indicate the need for an environmental/sanitarian specialist for control of nosocomial infection and maintenance of a quality environment. The author recommends these requirements for certification as a hospital environmentalist: academic studies including toxicology, epidemiology, hygiene, management, and an internship in…

  19. A pediatric civil war burn victim: the patient's and caregivers' stress and coping.

    PubMed

    Fette, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    A patient's and the caregivers' threats and reliefs during nursing of a pediatric civil war burn victim, treated through a charity grant in a Western hospital, are discussed and supported by a literature review.

  20. Family Presence and Participation: Pediatrics Leading the Way ... And Still Evolving.

    PubMed

    Dokken, Deborah; Parent, Kelly; Ahmann, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Patient- and family-centered care began in pediatrics more than two decades ago, and pediatric care has continued to lead the way in acknowledging and supporting family presence and participation in patient care and decision-making. However, many adult hospitals still have "visiting" policies that restrict the potential for true partnerships with families and other care partners. A national campaign, Better Together: Partnering with Families, developed by the Institute for Patient- and Families-Centered Care (IPFCC), urges all hospitals--pediatric and adult--to welcome families 24/7. Despite the leadership of pediatrics in family-centered care, even in children's hospitals, policy and practice must continue to evolve to strengthen partnerships with families, as described in a profile of C.S. Mott Children's Hospital and the University of Michigan Health System.

  1. Academic Village.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Renner Middle School (Plano, Texas) where the sprawling suburbs have been kept at bay while creating the atmosphere of an academic village. Photos and a floor plan are provided. (GR)

  2. Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Building data is given for the following academic libraries: (1) Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois; (2) Abilene Christian College, Abilene, Texas; (3) University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. (MF)

  3. Starting a new residency program: a step-by-step guide for institutions, hospitals, and program directors.

    PubMed

    Barajaz, Michelle; Turner, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Although our country faces a looming shortage of doctors, constraints of space, funding, and patient volume in many existing residency programs limit training opportunities for medical graduates. New residency programs need to be created for the expansion of graduate medical education training positions. Partnerships between existing academic institutions and community hospitals with a need for physicians can be a very successful means toward this end. Baylor College of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of San Antonio were affiliated in 2012, and subsequently, we developed and received accreditation for a new categorical pediatric residency program at that site in 2014. We share below a step-by-step guide through the process that includes building of the infrastructure, educational development, accreditation, marketing, and recruitment. It is our hope that the description of this process will help others to spur growth in graduate medical training positions.

  4. Starting a new residency program: a step-by-step guide for institutions, hospitals, and program directors

    PubMed Central

    Barajaz, Michelle; Turner, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Although our country faces a looming shortage of doctors, constraints of space, funding, and patient volume in many existing residency programs limit training opportunities for medical graduates. New residency programs need to be created for the expansion of graduate medical education training positions. Partnerships between existing academic institutions and community hospitals with a need for physicians can be a very successful means toward this end. Baylor College of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of San Antonio were affiliated in 2012, and subsequently, we developed and received accreditation for a new categorical pediatric residency program at that site in 2014. We share below a step-by-step guide through the process that includes building of the infrastructure, educational development, accreditation, marketing, and recruitment. It is our hope that the description of this process will help others to spur growth in graduate medical training positions. PMID:27507541

  5. Academic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Vivian E; Horner, Keith

    2008-07-01

    Since 1988, thirteen dental schools have provided dental undergraduate programmes within the United Kingdom (UK). In 2006, two new dental schools were created supporting dental education in the community. A further new dental school in Scotland will be accepting students in autumn 2008. In the past 25 years, extensive reorganisation of the NHS has resulted in long-term implications for the training of medical and dental academic staff. The number of academic clinicians is below the minimum viable level and external constraints, combined with a lack of suitable applicants, have led to a moratorium on academic recruitment within some Dental Schools. A detailed review of the historical and associated factors which have led to the problems presently besetting academic dentistry are discussed along with the initiatives introduced in the last 10 years to revitalise the speciality. Also, the present and future outlook for academic dentistry in other countries are discussed. Opinion is divided as to the appropriate setting for the training of undergraduate students between those who support community-based dental education and those who believe dental education should remain within research led dental establishments. External factors are moulding an unsatisfactory situation that is proving increasingly unattractive to the potential dental academic and the case for reform is obvious.

  6. The Pediatric Risk of Mortality Score: Update 2015

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Murray M.; Holubkov, Richard; Funai, Tomohiko; Dean, J. Michael; Berger, John T.; Wessel, David L.; Meert, Kathleen; Berg, Robert A.; Newth, Christopher J. L.; Harrison, Rick E.; Carcillo, Joseph; Dalton, Heidi; Shanley, Thomas; Jenkins, Tammara L.; Tamburro, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Severity of illness measures have long been used in pediatric critical care. The Pediatric Risk of Mortality is a physiologically based score used to quantify physiologic status, and when combined with other independent variables, it can compute expected mortality risk and expected morbidity risk. Although the physiologic ranges for the Pediatric Risk of Mortality variables have not changed, recent Pediatric Risk of Mortality data collection improvements have been made to adapt to new practice patterns, minimize bias, and reduce potential sources of error. These include changing the outcome to hospital survival/death for the first PICU admission only, shortening the data collection period and altering the Pediatric Risk of Mortality data collection period for patients admitted for “optimizing” care before cardiac surgery or interventional catheterization. This analysis incorporates those changes, assesses the potential for Pediatric Risk of Mortality physiologic variable subcategories to improve score performance, and recalibrates the Pediatric Risk of Mortality score, placing the algorithms (Pediatric Risk of Mortality IV) in the public domain. Design Prospective cohort study from December 4, 2011, to April 7, 2013. Measurements and Main Results Among 10,078 admissions, the unadjusted mortality rate was 2.7% (site range, 1.3–5.0%). Data were divided into derivation (75%) and validation (25%) sets. The new Pediatric Risk of Mortality prediction algorithm (Pediatric Risk of Mortality IV) includes the same Pediatric Risk of Mortality physiologic variable ranges with the subcategories of neurologic and nonneurologic Pediatric Risk of Mortality scores, age, admission source, cardiopulmonary arrest within 24 hours before admission, cancer, and low-risk systems of primary dysfunction. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the development and validation sets was 0.88 ± 0.013 and 0.90 ± 0.018, respectively. The Hosmer

  7. Ethics Consultation in Pediatrics: Long-Term Experience from a Pediatric Oncology Center

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Liza-Marie; Church, Christopher L.; Metzger, Monika; Baker, Justin N.

    2015-01-01

    There is little information about the content of ethics consultations (EC) in pediatrics. We sought to describe the reasons for consultation and ethical principles addressed during EC in pediatrics through retrospective review and directed content analysis of EC records (2000–2011) at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Patient-based EC were highly complex and often involved evaluation of parental decision making, particularly consideration of the risks and benefits of a proposed medical intervention, and the physician’s fiduciary responsibility to the patient. Non-patient consultations provided guidance in the development of institutional policies that would broadly affect patients and families. This is one of the few existing reviews of the content of pediatric EC and indicates the distribution of ethical issues and reasons for moral distress are different than with adults. Pediatric EC often facilitates complex decision-making among multiple stakeholders and further prospective research is needed on the role of ethics consultation in pediatrics. PMID:25970382

  8. Pediatric ventricular assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Burki, Sarah; Zafar, Farhan; Morales, David Luis Simon

    2015-01-01

    The domain of pediatric ventricular assist device (VAD) has recently gained considerable attention. Despite the fact that, historically, the practice of pediatric mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has lagged behind that of adult patients, this gap between the two groups is narrowing. Currently, the Berlin EXCOR VAD is the only pediatric-specific durable VAD approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The prospective Berlin Heart trial demonstrated a successful outcome, either bridge to transplantation (BTT), or in rare instances, bridge to recovery, in approximately 90% of children. Also noted during the trial was, however, a high incidence of adverse events such as embolic stroke, bleeding and infection. This has incentivized some pediatric centers to utilize adult implantable continuous-flow devices, for instance the HeartMate II and HeartWare HVAD, in children. As a result of this paradigm shift, the outlook of pediatric VAD support has dramatically changed: Treatment options previously unavailable to children, including outpatient management and even destination therapy, have now been becoming a reality. The sustained demand for continued device miniaturization and technological refinements is anticipated to extend the range of options available to children—HeartMate 3 and HeartWare MVAD are two examples of next generation VADs with potential pediatric application, both of which are presently undergoing clinical trials. A pediatric-specific continuous-flow device is also on the horizon: the redesigned Infant Jarvik VAD (Jarvik 2015) is undergoing pre-clinical testing, with a randomized clinical trial anticipated to follow thereafter. The era of pediatric VADs has begun. In this article, we discuss several important aspects of contemporary VAD therapy, with a particular focus on challenges unique to the pediatric population. PMID:26793341

  9. A comparison of Canadian general pediatric dosing publications.

    PubMed

    Dayneka, Natalie

    2003-01-01

    A comparison of the general pediatric dosing guidelines published in Canada was conducted. Institutions that publish pediatric dosing guidelines as a separate publication or as part of the hospital formulary were mailed a survey of questions to describe their publication. Publications that met the inclusion criteria were evaluated using 12 assessment criteria: approval or submissions by medical specialty groups, drug inclusion, dosing guidelines, dosing in organ failure, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic parameters, therapeutic guidelines, intravenous and oral administration guidelines, adverse drug reactions/drug interactions, referencing, drug acquisition costs, organization and readability. Four Canadian pediatric centres satisfied the criteria for publishing general pediatric dosing guidelines. These were reviewed by the process of formulary selection (in alphabetical order by city): Formulary of Drugs and Dosing Manual (Halifax), Formulary of Drugs (Toronto), Drug Dosage Guidelines and Formulary (Vancouver), and Pediatric Drug Dosage Handbook (Winnipeg). Dosing guidelines from published pediatric drug trials have been collated with institutional experience and historical practice to produce a practical source of pediatric dosing information.

  10. Nosocomial Infections among Pediatric Patients with Neoplastic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oberdorfer, Peninnah; Pongwilairat, Natthida; Washington, Charles H.

    2009-01-01

    Background. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop nosocomial infections (NIs). NIs may prolong their hospital stay, and increase morbidity and mortality. Objectives. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the incidence of NIs, (2) sites of NIs, (3) causal organisms, and (4) outcomes of NIs among pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases. Methods. This study was a prospective cohort study of pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases who were admitted to the Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand. Results. A total of 707 pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases were admitted. Forty-six episodes of NIs in 30 patients were reported (6.5 NIs/100 admission episodes and 7 NIs/1000 days of hospitalization). Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had the highest number of NIs (41.3%). The most common causal organisms were gram-negative bacteria (47.1%). Patients who had undergone invasive procedures were more likely to develop NIs than those who had not (P < .05). The mortality rate of patients with NIs was 19.6%. Conclusion. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop NIs after having un