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Sample records for academic referral center

  1. Impact of Institution of a Stroke Program upon Referral Bias at a Rural Academic Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Jack E.; Libell, David P.; Brooks, Claudette E.; Hobbs, Gerald R.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Referral bias reflecting the preferential hospital transfer of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has been demonstrated as the major contributing factor for an observed high nonrisk-adjusted in-hospital crude acute stroke mortality rate at a rural academic medical center. Purpose: This study was done to assess the impact of a…

  2. Impact of Institution of a Stroke Program Upon Referral Bias at a Rural Academic Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Jack E.; Libell, David P.; Brooks, Claudette E.; Hobbs, Gerald R.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Referral bias reflecting the preferential hospital transfer of patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) has been demonstrated as the major contributing factor for an observed high nonrisk-adjusted in-hospital crude acute stroke mortality rate at a rural academic medical center. Purpose: This study was done to assess the impact of a…

  3. Interdisciplinary expert consultation via a teleradiology platform--influence on therapeutic decision-making and patient referral rates to an academic tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Helck, A; Matzko, M; Trumm, C G; Grosse, C; Piltz, S; Reiser, M; Ertl-Wagner, B

    2009-12-01

    In addition to teleradiological reporting as a nighthawking or a regular service, teleradiological communication can be used for interdisciplinary expert consultation. We intended to evaluate an interdisciplinary consultation system based on a teleradiology platform with regard to its impact on therapeutic decision-making, directed patient referrals to an academic tertiary care center and the economic benefit for the hospital providing the service. Therefore, consultations from five secondary care centers and consecutive admissions to an academic tertiary care center were prospectively evaluated over a time period of six months. A total of 69 interdisciplinary expert consultations were performed. In 54 % of the cases the patients were consecutively referred to the university hospital for further treatment. In all acutely life-threatening emergencies (n = 9), fast and focused treatment by referral to the academic tertiary care center was achieved (average time to treat 130 min). The admissions to the academic tertiary care center led to improved utilization of its facilities with additional revenue of more than 1,000000 euro p. a. An interdisciplinary expert consultation via a teleradiology platform enables fast and efficient expert care with improved and accelerated patient management and improved utilization of the service providing hospital.

  4. Behavior Analytic Consultation for Academic Referral Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Brad A.; Zoder-Martell, Kimberly A.; Dieringe, Shannon Titus; Labrot, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis provides a technology of human behavior that demonstrates great potential for improving socially important outcomes for individuals. School-based consultation may provide a vehicle for delivering applied behavior analysis services in schools to address academic referral concerns. In this article, we propose that…

  5. 42 CFR 412.96 - Special treatment: Referral centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special treatment: Referral centers. 412.96 Section... MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Special Treatment of Certain Facilities Under the Prospective Payment System for Inpatient Operating Costs § 412.96 Special...

  6. Disruptive innovation in academic medical centers: balancing accountable and academic care.

    PubMed

    Stein, Daniel; Chen, Christopher; Ackerly, D Clay

    2015-05-01

    Numerous academic medicine leaders have argued that academic referral centers must prepare for the growing importance of accountability-driven payment models by adopting population health initiatives. Although this shift has merit, execution of this strategy will prove significantly more problematic than most observers have appreciated. The authors describe how successful implementation of an accountable care health strategy within a referral academic medical center (AMC) requires navigating a critical tension: The academic referral business model, driven by tertiary-level care, is fundamentally in conflict with population health. Referral AMCs that create successful value-driven population health systems within their organizations will in effect disrupt their own existing tertiary care businesses. The theory of disruptive innovation suggests that balancing the push and pull of academic and accountable care within a single organization is achievable. However, it will require significant shifts in resource allocation and changes in management structure to enable AMCs to make the inherent difficult choices and trade-offs that will ensue. On the basis of the theories of disruptive innovation, the authors present recommendations for how academic health systems can successfully navigate these issues as they transition toward accountability-driven care.

  7. Academic Health Centers and Health Care Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miles, Stephen H.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the role of academic health centers in health care reform efforts looks at the following issues: balancing academic objectivity and social advocacy; managing sometimes divergent interests of centers, faculty, and society; and the challenge to develop infrastructure support for reform. Academic health centers' participation in…

  8. Teachers' Academic Appraisals and Referral Decisions: The Effect of Sharing Health Information when Diabetes Is Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Melissa M.; Wodrich, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Two prior studies showed that giving teachers more information about a student's illness led them to make better attributions about that student's classroom problems and better classroom accommodations. In this study, 235 teachers appraised academic competence and judged whether to seek help or make a referral for a hypothetical student with type…

  9. Reinventing the academic health center.

    PubMed

    Kirch, Darrell G; Grigsby, R Kevin; Zolko, Wayne W; Moskowitz, Jay; Hefner, David S; Souba, Wiley W; Carubia, Josephine M; Baron, Steven D

    2005-11-01

    Academic health centers have faced well-documented internal and external challenges over the last decade, putting pressure on organizational leaders to develop new strategies to improve performance while simultaneously addressing employee morale, patient satisfaction, educational outcomes, and research growth. In the aftermath of a failed merger, new leaders of The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine and Milton S. Hershey Medical Center encountered a climate of readiness for a transformational change. In a case study of this process, nine critical success factors are described that contributed to significant performance improvement: performing a campus-wide cultural assessment and acting decisively on the results; making values explicit and active in everyday decisions; aligning corporate structure and governance to unify the academic enterprise and health system; aligning the next tier of administrative structure and function; fostering collaboration and accountability-the creation of unified campus teams; articulating a succinct, highly focused, and compelling vision and strategic plan; using the tools of mission-based management to realign resources; focusing leadership recruitment on organizational fit; and "growing your own" through broad-based leadership development. Outcomes assessment data for academic, research, and clinical performance showed significant gains between 2000 and 2004. Organizational transformation as a result of the nine factors is possible in other institutional settings and can facilitate a focus on crucial quality initiatives.

  10. [Correct and timely referral of patients to centers of reference].

    PubMed

    Costa, Joana; Valença-Filipe, Rita; Rodrigues, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The correct and timely referral of patients, from peripheral hospitals, without specialized surgical care, namely in hand surgery, like Plastic Surgery or Orthopedics is of crucial importance. The authors report the case of a patient that presents in the Plastic Surgery Department with a chronic infection of the hypothenar eminence of the right hand. The clinical history suggests the persistence of a foreign body, despite two previous surgical procedures for removal, performed in the residence hospital. Surgical exploration was performed and the foreign body was removed without complications. The intent of this presentation is to alert for the importance of the timely referral of patients that can benefit of specialized care, namely of plastic surgery, when this is no possible in the residence hospital, in view of better health care and better patient treatment.

  11. Malpractice Issues in the Academic Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Ben A.

    1986-01-01

    A discussion of legal issues in the academic medical center focuses on standards of care applicable to practitioners, special problems of patient care delivery, and the special status of public academic medical centers. Informed consent to care, relations with affiliated institutions, and private/non-private patient status are also considered.…

  12. Establishing a multidisciplinary academic cosmetic center.

    PubMed

    Rao, Venkat K; Schmid, Daniel B; Hanson, Summer E; Bentz, Michael L

    2011-12-01

    The demand for cosmetic services has risen rapidly in recent years, but has slowed down with the current economic downturn. Managed care organizations and Medicare have been steadily reducing their reimbursements for physician services. The payment for reconstructive surgical procedures has been decreasing and is likely to worsen with healthcare reform, and many plastic surgery residency programs are facing fiscal challenges. An adequate volume of patients needing cosmetic services is necessary to recruit and train the best candidates to the residency programs. Self-pay patients will help ensure the fiscal viability of plastic surgery residency programs. Attracting patients to an academic healthcare center will become more difficult in a recession without the appropriate facilities, programs, and pricing strategies. Setting up a modern cosmetic services program at an academic center has some unique challenges, including funding, academic politics, and turf. The authors opened a free-standing academic multidisciplinary center at their medical school 3 years ago. The center is an off-site, 13,000-sq ft facility that includes faculty from plastic surgery, ear, nose, and throat, dermatology, and vascular surgery. In this article, the authors discuss the process of developing and executing a plan for starting an aesthetic services center in an academic setting. The financing of the center and factors in pricing services are discussed. The authors show the impact of the center on their cosmetic surgery patient volumes, resident education, and finances. They expect that their experience will be helpful to other plastic surgery programs at academic medical centers.

  13. One vision of academic nursing centers.

    PubMed

    Esperat, M Christina; Green, Alexia; Acton, Cindy

    2004-01-01

    Reconciling vision, mission, and financial realities into a successful socially responsive endeavor is a challenge for academic nursing centers. A financially viable faculty practice enterprise is a response to this challenge. Entrepreneurial management and strategy assist in establishing financial sustainability.

  14. A Financial Ratio Analysis of For-Profit and Non-Profit Rural Referral Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCue, Michael J.; Nayar, Preethy

    2009-01-01

    Context: National financial data show that rural referral center (RRC) hospitals have performed well financially. RRC hospitals' median cash flow margin ratio was 10.04% in 2002 and grew to 11.04% in 2004. Purpose: The aim of this study is to compare the ratio analysis of key operational and financial performance measures of for-profit RRCs to…

  15. A Simple and Effective Program to Increase Faculty Knowledge of and Referrals to Counseling Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Susan A.; Pace, Kristi A.; Iannelli, Richard J.; Palma, Thomas V.; Pakalns, Gail P.

    2006-01-01

    The authors describe a simple, cost-effective, and empirically supported program to increase faculty referrals of students to counseling centers (CCs). Incoming faculty members at 3 universities received a mailing and personal telephone call from a CC staff member. Faculty assigned to the outreach program had greater knowledge of and rates of…

  16. Outcomes of Cataract Surgery at a Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Seyed-Farzad; Hashemi, Hassan; Mazouri, Arash; Rahman-A, Nazanin; Ashrafi, Elham; Mehrjardi, Hadi Z.; Roohipour, Ramak; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of cataract surgery at a large referral eye hospital and to identify factors associated with less than excellent visual outcomes. Methods: Hospital records of patients, who had undergone age-related cataract extraction (1,285 procedures) within a two-year period were sampled randomly for 353 patients (405 eyes) and baseline characteristics were recorded. Up to three causes of visual loss (contributory reasons) were considered and the principal cause of “less than excellent outcome,” i.e., best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA) <20/25 was defined as the primary reason. Results: Mean age of the participants was 68.6 years, and 50.7% of enrolled subjects were female. Phacoemulsification had been performed in 92.1% of cases. Out of 405 eyes, 54%, 78%, and 97% achieved BSCVA of ≥20/25, ≥20/40, and ≥20/200, respectively. Poor visual outcomes were significantly associated with older age (OR: 4.55 for age >70 years), female gender (OR: 4.64), ocular comorbidities (OR: 7.68), surgically challenging eyes (OR: 7.33), long and short eyes (versus eyes with normal axial length, OR: 3.24), and being operated on by a novice surgeon (OR: 2.41). The leading contributory reasons for unfavorable outcome, in descending order were maculopathy (17%), posterior capsule opacification (PCO, 11.8%), corneal opacity (5.7%), and degenerative myopia (5.4%). Conclusion: Maculopathy, PCO, corneal opacity, degenerative myopia and ARMD may contribute to unfavorable outcomes in cataract surgery. PMID:26730309

  17. Interschool Relationships in Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1981-01-01

    Within academic health centers there exists a well-established "pecking order" influencing daily life and reflecting fundamental relationships between medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, and allied health. Relationships between individual professionals and between schools within a center are examined for clues to possible change. (MSE)

  18. Increasing Referrals to a YMCA-Based Diabetes Prevention Program: Effects of Electronic Referral System Modification and Provider Education in Federally Qualified Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Blank, Arthur E.; Ouziel, Judy; Hollingsworth, Nicole; Riley, Rachael W.; Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Diabetes Prevention Program has been translated to community settings with varying success. Although primary care referrals are used for identifying and enrolling eligible patients in the Diabetes Prevention Program, little is known about the effects of strategies to facilitate and sustain eligible patient referrals using electronic health record systems. Methods To facilitate and sustain patient referrals, a modification to the electronic health record system was made and combined with provider education in 6 federally qualified health centers in the Bronx, New York. Referral data from April 2012 through November 2014 were analyzed using segmented regression analysis. Results Patient referrals increased significantly after the modification of the electronic health record system and implementation of the provider education intervention. Before the electronic system modification, 0 to 2 patients were referred per month. During the following year (September 2013 through August 2014), which included the provider education intervention, referrals increased to 1 to 9 per month and continued to increase to 5 to 11 per month from September through November 2014. Conclusions Modification of an electronic health record system coupled with a provider education intervention shows promise as a strategy to identify and refer eligible patients to community-based Diabetes Prevention Programs. Further refinement of the electronic system for facilitating referrals and follow-up of eligible patients should be explored. PMID:26542141

  19. Academic Cancer Center Phase I Program Development.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Arthur E; Flaherty, Keith T; Weiner, George J; Chen, Robert; Azad, Nilofer S; Pishvaian, Michael J; Thompson, John A; Taylor, Matthew H; Mahadevan, Daruka; Lockhart, A Craig; Vaishampayan, Ulka N; Berlin, Jordan D; Smith, David C; Sarantopoulos, John; Riese, Matthew; Saleh, Mansoor N; Ahn, Chul; Frenkel, Eugene P

    2017-04-01

    Multiple factors critical to the effectiveness of academic phase I cancer programs were assessed among 16 academic centers in the U.S. Successful cancer centers were defined as having broad phase I and I/II clinical trial portfolios, multiple investigator-initiated studies, and correlative science. The most significant elements were institutional philanthropic support, experienced clinical research managers, robust institutional basic research, institutional administrative efforts to reduce bureaucratic regulatory delays, phase I navigators to inform patients and physicians of new studies, and a large cancer center patient base. New programs may benefit from a separate stand-alone operation, but mature phase I programs work well when many of the activities are transferred to disease-oriented teams. The metrics may be useful as a rubric for new and established academic phase I programs. The Oncologist 2017;22:369-374.

  20. An analysis of paramilitary referrals to psychiatric services at a tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rohit; Mina, Shaily; Deshpande, Smita N.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is a dearth of specialized mental health services for Indian paramilitary service personnel. Those requiring psychiatric evaluation are referred to government psychiatric services often with minimal information. Hence, major diagnostic and decision making relies on the psychiatrist's clinical evaluation and judgment. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate the paramilitary referrals to psychiatric services at a tertiary care referral center. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart analysis of all consecutive referrals by various Indian paramilitary services to a tertiary care hospital (2008-2010) was carried out. Results: Among the sample of 18 referrals, all were males (mean age: 37 years ± standard deviation (SD) =7.79). Various reasons for referral included: Evaluation of fitness for duty (83.3%), fitness to handle firearms (16.7%), and for disability certification (5.6%). There were no informants at all in 22.2%, and family members were available in only 11.1%. Hence, most referrals were admitted to the psychiatry ward for observation for various lengths of time. The mean duration of assessment (outpatient and inpatient) was 17.89 days (SD = 20.74) and final reported diagnoses were schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder in 16.7, 11.1, and 11.1%, respectively. There was concurrent history of alcohol and nicotine dependence (40%). A large group (40%) was diagnosed not to suffer from a major mental illness, while a firm and final diagnosis could not be arrived at in 16.7% subjects. Only one subject was given the fitness to handle firearms, fitness for duty was refused in three (16.7%) subjects, and one subject was referred to neurology after being diagnosed as a case of seizure disorder. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for intensive training both to paramilitary physicians as well as to general hospital psychiatrists regarding proper assessment of paramilitary personnel, as there are frequent chances of the

  1. Developing physician leaders in academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, D J

    1997-01-01

    While physicians have historically held positions of leadership in academic medical centers, there is an increasing trend that physicians will not only guide the clinical, curriculum and scientific direction of the institution, but its business direction as well. Physicians are assuming a greater role in business decision making and are found at the negotiating table with leaders from business, insurance and other integrated health care delivery systems. Physicians who lead "strategic business units" within the academic medical center are expected to acquire and demonstrate enhanced business acumen. There is an increasing demand for formal and informal training programs for physicians in academic medical centers in order to better prepare them for their evolving roles and responsibilities. These may include the pursuit of a second degree in business or health care management; intramurally conducted courses in leadership skill development, management, business and finance; or involvement in extramurally prepared and delivered training programs specifically geared toward physicians as conducted at major universities, often in their schools of business or public health. While part one of this series, which appeared in Volume 43, No. 6 of Medical Group Management Journal addressed, "The changing role of physician leaders at academic medical centers," part 2 will examine as a case study the faculty leadership development program at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. These two articles were prepared by the author from his research into, and the presentation of a thesis entitled. "The importance of leadership training and development for physicians in academic medical centers in an increasingly complex health care environment," prepared for the Credentials Committee of the American College of Healthcare Executives in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Fellowship in this College.*

  2. Jones Center Vocational/Academic Program (JCVA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rydalch, Jeff

    This document provides information on the Jones Center Vocational/Academic Program of the Granite School District (Utah), the purpose of which is to maintain or reintegrate students who are potential high school dropouts or dropouts into appropriate educational alternatives. Its mission statement is followed by a list of program components,…

  3. Discrepancy in Diagnosis of Primary Myelofibrosis between Referral and Tertiary Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Cecilia Arana; Jeyakumar, Ghayathri; Medina, Pedro; Cortes, Jorge; Pierce, Sherry; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos; Kantarjian, Hagop; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2015-01-01

    Primary myelofibrosis (PMF) is myeloproliferative neoplasm whose diagnosis is based on a combination of clinical and pathology criteria. We evaluated 560 consecutive patients who were diagnosed with PMF upon a referral to our center and evaluated the frequency of and reasons for diagnostic discordance. Discordance in the diagnosis was found in 70 (12.5%) patients. Discordant cases had a significantly lower grade of bone marrow fibrosis (grade 0–1), more likely to be JAK2V617F-mutation negative, and have no peripheral blood blasts, possibly explaining the difficulty in making a proper diagnosis and underscoring the need for a complete evaluation at a tertiary center. PMID:24284333

  4. Iatrogenic Biliary Injuries: Multidisciplinary Management in a Major Tertiary Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Ibrahim Abdelkader; Shoreem, Hany Abdelmeged; Saleh, Sherif Mohamed; Hegazy, Osama; Housseni, Mohamed; Abbasy, Mohamed; Badra, Gamal; Ibrahim, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    Background. Iatrogenic biliary injuries are considered as the most serious complications during cholecystectomy. Better outcomes of such injuries have been shown in cases managed in a specialized center. Objective. To evaluate biliary injuries management in major referral hepatobiliary center. Patients & Methods. Four hundred seventy-two consecutive patients with postcholecystectomy biliary injuries were managed with multidisciplinary team (hepatobiliary surgeon, gastroenterologist, and radiologist) at major Hepatobiliary Center in Egypt over 10-year period using endoscopy in 232 patients, percutaneous techniques in 42 patients, and surgery in 198 patients. Results. Endoscopy was very successful initial treatment of 232 patients (49%) with mild/moderate biliary leakage (68%) and biliary stricture (47%) with increased success by addition of percutaneous (Rendezvous technique) in 18 patients (3.8%). However, surgery was needed in 198 patients (42%) for major duct transection, ligation, major leakage, and massive stricture. Surgery was urgent in 62 patients and elective in 136 patients. Hepaticojejunostomy was done in most of cases with transanastomotic stents. There was one mortality after surgery due to biliary sepsis and postoperative stricture in 3 cases (1.5%) treated with percutaneous dilation and stenting. Conclusion. Management of biliary injuries was much better with multidisciplinary care team with initial minimal invasive technique to major surgery in major complex injury encouraging early referral to highly specialized hepatobiliary center. PMID:25435672

  5. Imaging investigations before referral to a sarcoma center delay the final diagnosis of musculoskeletal sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Dyrop, Heidi Buvarp; Vedsted, Peter; Rædkjær, Mathias; Safwat, Akmal; Keller, Johnny

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose The use of point-of-care or local investigations before referral to specialist sarcoma centers as part of a fast-track diagnostic pathway varies, and may affect the time to diagnosis. We wanted to investigate differences in time intervals and proportion of malignancy in patients who were referred after initial diagnostic investigations were performed locally and in patients who were referred without these investigations. Patients and methods We included 545 consecutive patients who were referred to Aarhus Sarcoma Center for suspected musculoskeletal sarcoma. Data on time intervals and investigations performed were collected from questionnaires and patient records. Patients who were referred from outside Aarhus uptake area after initial MRI/CT or histology performed locally were compared with patients who were referred from Aarhus uptake area without these investigations. Results The median total interval from first symptom to diagnosis was 166 days for outside patients referred with MRI/CT or histology, which was 91 (95% CI: 76–106) days longer than for local patients who were referred without MRI/CT or histology. Comparing the same groups, the median diagnostic interval was 41 (95% CI: 30–51) days longer for outside patients including both primary care and hospital intervals. Both the proportion of malignancies (38% vs. 14%) and the proportion of sarcomas (24% vs. 7%) were higher in the outside group referred with MRI/CT or histology than in the local group without MRI/CT or histology. Interpretation Pre-referral investigations at a local hospital increased the diagnostic interval by at least 1 month for 50% of the patients, and the proportion of malignancy was more than doubled—to almost 40%. If investigations are to be performed before referral to a sarcoma center, they should be part of the fast-track pathway in order to ensure timely diagnosis. PMID:28077058

  6. Emergent mechanical support in the community: improvement with early transplant center referral.

    PubMed

    Morris, Rohinton J; Pochettino, Alberto; O'Hara, Marylou; Gardner, Timothy J; Acker, Michael A

    2005-06-01

    Emergent mechanical support for the failing ventricle, with eventual transfer for definitive care, is often required at non-transplant centers. Transfer for definitive care, in terms of bridge to transplant, may require ventricular assist device (VAD) placement at the primary institution or at the transplant center. Review of consecutive single transplant center referrals was conducted to decipher optimal management. From January 1997 to December 2000, 104 patients were transferred to the University of Pennsylvania Heart Failure/Transplant Service. Most were transferred from active cardiac surgical programs, with 56 patients having post-cardiotomy failure at the primary site. A VAD was placed in procedures done at the outside hospital (OSH) in 28 patients, most commonly (60%) an Abiomed device. Of the 76 patients that received a VAD at the transplant center (TxpC), 86% received a TCI or Thoratec device. Biventricular support was required in 34 patients. Overall survival was 57%, with 54 patients bridged to transplantation and 5 patients undergoing recovery. Patients having a VAD placed at the OSH had a 32% (9 of 28) survival, whereas at the TxpC survival was 65% (45 of 76) (p < 0.05). Mid-term follow-up showed that all 5 patients weaned are presently alive, and 52 patients are alive at >1-year post-transplant. The most common cause of death was multi-system organ failure (19 of 45), followed by major neurologic event (15 of 45). Infection was the cause of death in only 6 patients. Left ventricular failure can be treated by emergent VAD placement. Overall survival is substantial if these patients are referred to a transplant center with multiple options. In contrast to previous reports, survival rates may be improved by earlier referral, before VAD placement at non-transplant centers and use of a VAD with longer-term capability.

  7. Whither academic health centers? A commentary.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D E

    1996-01-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) currently face the greatest challenge of their entire existence. Managed care, increased competition for research funding, and inefficiency all contribute to the present vulnerability of AHCs in the cost competitiveness of today's health care marketplace. The increased reliance of medical schools on clinical income to subsidize undergraduate and graduate education and biomedical research now jeopardizes the success of their missions, since clinical income is declining. While AHCs must make significant changes to adapt to the new environment, left on their own in the marketplace, many will not survive. Additionally, the biomedical research advances and high technology medical care that we have come to expect in this country will also likely suffer. A national approach designed to preserve responsive AHCs is needed.

  8. Marketing physician services in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Eudes, J A; Divis, K L; Vaughan, D G; Fottler, M D

    1987-01-01

    As a result of recent environmental changes in the health care industry, marketing has become a vital necessity for the survival of most hospitals. Kotler's conceptual framework is used to study and evaluate an innovative program for marketing physician services in a large urban medical center. This program was quite successful in increasing admissions and referrals and won a national award in 1984.

  9. Health Care Reform and the Academic Health Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmey, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A discussion of the implications of health care reform for academic health centers (a complex of institutions which educate health professionals) looks at problems in the current system, the role of academic health centers in the current system, financial pressures, revenue sources other than patient care, impact on health research, and human…

  10. Assessing the Academic Medical Center as a Supportive Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Sam C.

    2011-01-01

    Academic medical centers are well-known for their emphasis on teaching, research and public service; however, like most large, bureaucratic organizations, they oftentimes suffer from an inability to learn as an organization. The role of the research administrator in the academic medical center has grown over time as the profession itself has…

  11. Academic Dispensations and the Role of the Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meilman, Philip W.

    2011-01-01

    Many institutions of higher education have provisions for allowing academic latitude when serious mental health problems get in the way of learning. This article reviews a hierarchy of academic remedies that may be utilized and the role of the college counseling center with respect to their use. The discussion centers around counseling center…

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound characteristics of pancreatic lymphoepithelial cysts: A case series from a large referral center

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Kunal S.; DeWitt, John M.; Sherman, Stuart; Cramer, Harvey M.; Tirkes, Temel; Al-Haddad, Mohammad A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) of the pancreas are benign lesions that can mimic cystic neoplasms on imaging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) features have not been well described. We aimed to describe the clinical and EUS characteristics of LECs and the present outcomes of management at a high-volume referral center. Materials and Methods: We identified patients who underwent EUS and were found to have LECs based on fine-needle aspiration (FNA) cytology or surgical pathology from existing databases. EUS features, imaging characteristics, and pathology results were described. Results: Sixteen patients were found to have 17 LECs. The mean size was 33 mm ± 15 mm. Locations within the pancreas included 10 lesions in the tail, 3 in the body, 1 in the uncinate process; the remaining 3 were exophytic. Six lesions were anechoic, 6 were hypoechoic, and 5 had mixed echogenicity. Nine lesions had mixed solid/cystic components, 7 were purely cystic, and 1 was solid. Cyst fluid was thick or viscous in six cases and thin in three. Eleven patients had diagnostic cytopathology. Six patients ultimately underwent surgery due to symptoms, nondiagnostic FNA, or other clinical concerns for malignancy. Conclusions: Pancreatic LECs have variable morphology and echogenicity on EUS, but the appearance of a cyst with variable solid and cystic components combined with the appearance of thick, turbid, and viscous aspirate should raise suspicion for an LEC. The majority of patients with LECs at our center avoided surgery for LECs on the basis of diagnostic EUS-FNA. PMID:27503157

  13. Deaths in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Lagman, Ruth L; Walsh, Declan; Kunkle, Chad; LeGrand, Susan B; Davis, Mellar P

    2006-12-01

    The number of inpatient deaths in a calendar year in an academic medical center was reviewed from a computerized database. The total number was 1222. The median length of hospital stay for those who died was 7 days (range, 1-190); 404 (33%) were 75 years or older. There were 678 (55%) males and 544 (45%) females. The pulmonary medicine service had the most deaths with 290 (24%) followed by hematology/oncology 230 (18%). The most common primary diagnoses in the decedents were subendocardial infarction 58 (5%), congestive heart failure 57 (5%), and pneumonia 45 (4%). The most common diagnostic-related groups (DRGs) were respiratory system disorders (475), 98 (8%); tracheostomy (483), 75 (6%); and heart surgery (110), 65 (5%). Frequent procedures done prior to death were mechanical ventilation (<96 hours) 101 (8%), and mechanical ventilation (>96 hours) 55 (5%), and tracheostomy 54 (4%). Invasive procedures were common. Forty-five percent of the predeath patient days were spent in intensive care units. Palliative medicine was involved in the care of 20% of all the decedents.

  14. Neighborhood Communications Centers: Planning Information and Referral Services in The Urban Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yin, Robert K.; And Others

    The potential development of information and referral (I&R) services in branch libraries was explored by examining five cases where such services have been initiated. The extent to which the public library system is appropriate for information and referral services was carefully examined in the light of its ability to carry on seven functions: (1)…

  15. Occult hepatitis B virus infection in liver transplant patients in a Brazilian referral center

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, T.C.A.; Xavier, M.A.P.; Vidigal, P.V.T.; Amaral, N.S.; Diniz, P.A.; Resende, A.P.; Miranda, D.M.; Faria, A.C.; Lima, A.S.; Faria, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection prevalence varies among different studies depending on the prevalence of HBV infection in the study population and on the sensitivity of the assay used to detect HBV DNA. We investigated the prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplantation in a Brazilian referral center. Frozen liver samples from 68 adults were analyzed using a nested polymerase chain reaction assay for HBV DNA. The specificity of the amplified HBV sequences was confirmed by direct sequencing of the amplicons. The patient population comprised 49 (72.1%) males and 19 (27.9%) females with a median age of 53 years (range=18-67 years). Occult HBV infection was diagnosed in three (4.4%) patients. The etiologies of the underlying chronic liver disease in these cases were alcohol abuse, HBV infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Two of the patients with cryptic HBV infection also presented hepatocellular carcinoma. Markers of previous HBV infection were available in two patients with occult HBV infection and were negative in both. In conclusion, using a sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction assay to detect HBV DNA in frozen liver tissue, we found a low prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplant, probably due to the low prevalence of HBV infection in our population. PMID:25296362

  16. Quality of life of individuals with sickle cell disease followed at referral centers in Alagoas, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Rosana Quintella Brandão; Cavalcante, Jairo Calado; Cavalcante, Bruno Fernandes; Araújo, Diego Lisboa; Lôbo, Matheus de Melo; Nunes, Fernando Antônio Tenório

    2012-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease is a genetic, hereditary and chronic disease that affects the health of its carriers and might impair their health-related quality of life. Objective The aim of the current study was to assess the health-related quality of life of individuals with sickle cell disease followed at referral centers in Alagoas, Brazil. Methods A total of 40 individuals with sickle cell disease aged 12 to 43 years old were evaluated by means of sociodemographic and clinical questionnaires, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey and the Beck Depression Inventory. The latter was applied only to adults. Results Most participants were adults (62.5%) with a predominance of the SS genotype (85%) with pain being the commonest complication (95%). Mood disorder was found in 40% of the adults. The patients exhibited overall impairment of quality of life, which was more pronounced among the adults and under 15-year-old adolescents. Married adults exhibited less impairment of most quality of life domains compared to unmarried adults, and the adults with mood disorder exhibited greater impairment of all quality of life domains. Conclusions These results suggest that interventions that aim to improve vitality, pain, and mental health might contribute to maintaining high levels of quality of life in patients with sickle cell disease, especially among adults and under 15-year-old adolescents. PMID:23323069

  17. Characteristics of a large population of patients with refractory epilepsy attending tertiary referral centers in Italy.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Veriano; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Fattore, Cinzia; Franco, Valentina; Gambardella, Antonio; Guerrini, Renzo; La Briola, Francesca; Ladogana, Marianna; Rosati, Eleonora; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Striano, Salvatore; Perucca, Emilio

    2010-05-01

    The characteristics of 1,124 consecutive adults and children with refractory epilepsy attending 11 tertiary referral centers in Italy were investigated at enrollment into a prospective observational study. Among 933 adults (age 16-86 years), the most common syndromes were symptomatic (43.7%) and cryptogenic (39.0%) focal epilepsies, followed by idiopathic (8.1%) and cryptogenic/symptomatic generalized (6.2%) epilepsies. The most common syndrome among 191 children was symptomatic focal epilepsy (35.1%), followed by cryptogenic focal (18.8%), cryptogenic/symptomatic generalized (18.3%), undetermined whether focal or generalized (16.8%), and idiopathic generalized (7.3%). Primarily and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizures were reported in 27.8% of adults and 16.8% of children. The most commonly reported etiologies were mesial temporal sclerosis (8.0%) and disorders of cortical development (6.2%) in adults, and disorders of cortical development (14.7%) and nonprogressive encephalopathies (6.8%) in children. More than three-fourths of subjects in both age groups were on antiepileptic drug (AED) polytherapy.

  18. Oral Lesions in Elderly Patients in Referral Centers for Oral Lesions of Bahia

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Sarah; Alves, Técia; Santos, Jean; Oliveira, Márcio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aging population phenomenon is occurring on a global scale; aging affects all of the structures of organisms, including the oral cavity. Objective To estimate the frequency of oral lesions, according to the clinical and histopathologic diagnoses, and to describe the sociodemographic profile of the elderly treated at the referral centers of oral lesions of public universities in Bahia, Brazil. Methods A descriptive epidemiologic study with transverse characteristics was conducted with elderly patients between August 2010 and January 2012. A form was used to collect data. The descriptive analysis consisted of calculating the simple and relative frequencies of sociodemographic variables and oral lesions. Results The population was predominantly black women, and the minority of elderly people were retired. Fibroid (13%) and squamous cell carcinoma (145%) were more prevalent clinical diagnoses, with squamous cell carcinoma (30.7%) and fibrous hyperplasia more prevalent histopathologic diagnoses. Conclusion A prevention policy needs to be implemented to reduce new cases of oral lesions in Bahia, Brazil and to aid in early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of oral lesions. PMID:26491471

  19. Academic Skills Center Program: Peer Tutoring, Study Skills Classes, Academic Assistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Betty Marie; And Others

    The Academic Skills Center at Black Hills State University provides a peer assistance program comprising both individual tutoring in classes offered in each academic division and credit classes in study skills. The goal of the Center is to respond effectively and quickly to individual educational needs of students and faculty through a…

  20. [Public health and mental health: methodological tools to evaluate the Brazilian Network of Referral Centers for Psycho-Social Care (CAPS) in the Brazilian Unified Health System].

    PubMed

    Onocko-Campos, Rosana Teresa; Furtado, Juarez Pereira

    2006-05-01

    This article presents a preliminary discussion of potential methodological tools for qualitative research on the Network of Referral Centers for Psycho-Social Care (CAPS) in the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS). The relevance of mental health within the field of public health is examined. The study focuses on the high prevalence of mental disorders and the disproportionate lack of studies on the interface between mental health and public health. The establishment of an interdisciplinary field between public health and mental health is proposed to meet common needs by achieving similar perspectives in knowledge and practice. A particular group of tools is proposed, emphasizing the importance of reclaiming and guaranteeing the roles of various social actors to shape the assessment process, the need for collecting and standardizing academic studies on the topic, and the importance of promoting a new research field focusing on public health policies to support policymakers, managers, and health teams in reshaping their practices.

  1. Translating research into action: An evaluation of the World Trade Center Health Registry's Treatment Referral Program

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Alice E; Debchoudhury, Indira; Jordan, Hannah T; Petrsoric, Lysa J; Farfel, Mark R; Cone, James E

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript describes the design, implementation and evaluation of the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry's Treatment Referral Program (TRP), created to respond to enrollees’ self-reported 9/11-related physical and mental health needs and promote the use of WTC-specific health care. In 2009–2011, the TRP conducted personalized outreach, including an individualized educational mailing and telephone follow-up to 7,518 selected enrollees who resided in New York City, did not participate in rescue/recovery work, and reported symptoms of 9/11-related physical conditions or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on their most recently completed Registry survey. TRP staff spoke with enrollees to address barriers to care and schedule appointments at the WTC Environmental Health Center for those eligible. We assessed three nested outcomes: TRP participation (e.g., contact with TRP staff), scheduling appointments, and keeping scheduled appointments. A total of 1,232 (16.4%) eligible enrollees participated in the TRP; 32% of them scheduled a first-time appointment. We reached 84% of participants who scheduled appointments; 79.4% reported having kept the appointment. Scheduling an appointment, but not keeping it, was associated with self-reported unmet health care need, PTSD, and poor functioning (≥14 days of poor physical or mental health in the past 30 days) (P < 0.05). Neither scheduling nor keeping an appointment was associated with demographic characteristics. Successful outreach to disaster-exposed populations may require a sustained effort that employs a variety of methods in order to encourage and facilitate use of post-disaster services. Findings from this evaluation can inform outreach to the population exposed to 9/11 being conducted by other organizations. PMID:28229004

  2. Translating research into action: An evaluation of the World Trade Center Health Registry's Treatment Referral Program.

    PubMed

    Welch, Alice E; Debchoudhury, Indira; Jordan, Hannah T; Petrsoric, Lysa J; Farfel, Mark R; Cone, James E

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript describes the design, implementation and evaluation of the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry's Treatment Referral Program (TRP), created to respond to enrollees' self-reported 9/11-related physical and mental health needs and promote the use of WTC-specific health care. In 2009-2011, the TRP conducted personalized outreach, including an individualized educational mailing and telephone follow-up to 7,518 selected enrollees who resided in New York City, did not participate in rescue/recovery work, and reported symptoms of 9/11-related physical conditions or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on their most recently completed Registry survey. TRP staff spoke with enrollees to address barriers to care and schedule appointments at the WTC Environmental Health Center for those eligible. We assessed three nested outcomes: TRP participation (e.g., contact with TRP staff), scheduling appointments, and keeping scheduled appointments. A total of 1,232 (16.4%) eligible enrollees participated in the TRP; 32% of them scheduled a first-time appointment. We reached 84% of participants who scheduled appointments; 79.4% reported having kept the appointment. Scheduling an appointment, but not keeping it, was associated with self-reported unmet health care need, PTSD, and poor functioning (≥14 days of poor physical or mental health in the past 30 days) (P < 0.05). Neither scheduling nor keeping an appointment was associated with demographic characteristics. Successful outreach to disaster-exposed populations may require a sustained effort that employs a variety of methods in order to encourage and facilitate use of post-disaster services. Findings from this evaluation can inform outreach to the population exposed to 9/11 being conducted by other organizations.

  3. What do clinicians want? Interest in integrative health services at a North Carolina academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Kemper, Kathi J; Dirkse, Deborah; Eadie, Dee; Pennington, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Background Use of complementary medicine is common, consumer driven and usually outpatient focused. We wished to determine interest among the medical staff at a North Carolina academic medical center in integrating diverse therapies and services into comprehensive care. Methods We conducted a cross sectional on-line survey of physicians, nurse practitioners and physician assistants at a tertiary care medical center in 2006. The survey contained questions on referrals and recommendations in the past year and interest in therapies or services if they were to be provided at the medical center in the future. Results Responses were received from 173 clinicians in 26 different departments, programs and centers. There was strong interest in offering several specific therapies: therapeutic exercise (77%), expert consultation about herbs and dietary supplements (69%), and massage (66%); there was even stronger interest in offering comprehensive treatment programs such as multidisciplinary pain management (84%), comprehensive nutritional assessment and advice (84%), obesity/healthy lifestyle promotion (80%), fit for life (exercise and lifestyle program, 76%), diabetes healthy lifestyle promotion (73%); and comprehensive psychological services for stress management, including hypnosis and biofeedback (73%). Conclusion There is strong interest among medical staff at an academic health center in comprehensive, integrated services for pain, obesity, and diabetes and in specific services in fitness, nutrition and stress management. Future studies will need to assess the cost-effectiveness of such services, as well as their financial sustainability and impact on patient satisfaction, health and quality of life. PMID:17291340

  4. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia: experience from a single referral center in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Anguiano-Alvarez Victor; Amir, Carmona Gonzalez Carlos; Sergio, Rodriguez-Rodriguez; Allan, Pomerantz; Xavier, Lopez-Karpovitch; Juventina, Tuna-Aguilar Elena

    2017-01-01

    Background Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is characterized by an autoimmune-mediated destruction of red blood cells. Warm AIHA (wAIHA) represents 60% of AIHA cases and is associated with the positive detection of IgG and C3d in the direct antiglobulin test (DAT). This study aimed to assess the clinical and laboratorial differences between primary and secondary wAIHA patients from a referral center in Mexico City. Methods All patients diagnosed with wAIHA in our institution from January 1992 to December 2015 were included and received corticosteroids as the first-line treatment. We analyzed the response to the first-line treatment, relapse-free survival, and time to splenectomy. Results Eighty-nine patients were included. Secondary wAIHA represented 55.1% of the cases. At diagnosis, secondary wAIHA patients showed a DAT mixed pattern more frequently than primary wAIHA patients (36.7 vs. 17.5%, P<0.001). In the survival analysis, patients with secondary wAIHA had a lower time to response (18 vs. 37 days, P=0.05), median disease-free survival (28.51 vs. 50.95 weeks, P=0.018), and time to splenectomy (43.5 vs. 61 wks, P=0.029) than those with primary wAIHA. Due to economic constraints, rituximab was considered as the third-line treatment in only two patients. Conclusion Secondary wAIHA may benefit from a longer low-dose steroid maintenance period mainly due to its shorter time to relapse and time to splenectomy than primary wAIHA.

  5. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator mutations at a referral center for cystic fibrosis*

    PubMed Central

    Coutinho, Cyntia Arivabeni de Araújo Correia; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Ribeiro, Antônio Fernando; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of six mutations (F508del, G542X, G551D, R553X, R1162X, and N1303K) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosed, at a referral center, on the basis of abnormal results in two determinations of sweat sodium and chloride concentrations. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 70 patients with CF. The mean age of the patients was 12.38 ± 9.00 years, 51.43% were female, and 94.29% were White. Mutation screening was performed with polymerase chain reaction (for F508del), followed by enzymatic digestion (for other mutations). Clinical analysis was performed on the basis of gender, age, ethnicity, pulmonary/gastrointestinal symptoms, and Shwachman-Kulczycki (SK) score. RESULTS: All of the patients showed pulmonary symptoms, and 8 had no gastrointestinal symptoms. On the basis of the SK scores, CF was determined to be mild, moderate, and severe in 22 (42.3%), 17 (32.7%), and 13 (25.0%) of the patients, respectively. There was no association between F508del mutation and disease severity by SK score. Of the 140 alleles analyzed, F508del mutation was identified in 70 (50%). Other mutations (G542X, G551D, R553X, R1162X, and N1303K) were identified in 12 (7.93%) of the alleles studied. In F508del homozygous patients with severe disease, the OR was 0.124 (95% CI: 0.005-0.826). CONCLUSIONS: In 50% of the alleles studied, the molecular diagnosis of CF was confirmed by identifying a single mutation (F508del). If we consider the analysis of the six most common mutations in the Brazilian population (including F508del), the molecular diagnosis was confirmed in 58.57% of the alleles studied. PMID:24310628

  6. Corneal Transplantation at an Ophthalmological Referral Center in Colombia: Indications and Techniques (2004-2011)

    PubMed Central

    Galvis, Virgilio; Tello, Alejandro; Gomez, Augusto José; Rangel, Carlos Mario; Prada, Angélica María; Camacho, Paul Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To analize changing trends in indications and surgical techniques of corneal transplantation at an ophthalmological tertiary referral center in Colombia over a 7 year period. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of medical records from patients who underwent corneal transplantation surgeries at Fundación Oftalmológica de Santander (FOSCAL) in Bucaramanga, Colombia, between August 2004 and August 2011. Results: During this period from a total of 450 corneal transplants performed, we had access to 402 medical records (89.4%). The patients’ mean age was 55. Leading indications were: pseudophakic/aphakic bullous kerathopathy (PBK/ABK) (34.6%), corneal scar (15.7%), active infectious keratitis (14.4%) and keratoconus (12.7%). During the first period (2004-2007) PBK/ABK was the leading indication, followed by stromal opacities and keratoconus. During the second period (2008-2011) PBK/ABK remained the leading indication. Infectious keratitis, however, became the second most common indication. Stromal opacities and keratoconus, moved to third and fourth, respectively. All transplants performed in the first period (2004-2007) were penetrating keratoplasties. In the second period (2008-2011) 18.7% of the procedures were performed using the Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty technique (DSAEK). Conclusions: Similar to other international results, PBK/ABK was the leading indication for corneal transplantation at our institution. Keratoconus is becoming a less common indication for keratoplasty in our institution. Infectious keratitis remains a frequent indication for corneal transplantation in this geographical area. In our institution we started performing DSAEK in 2009, and it is emerging as the procedure of choice in corneal diseases that involve only the endothelial layers. PMID:23898357

  7. Demographic and Clinical Features of Pediatric Uveitis at a Tertiary Referral Center in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Mansour; Oustad, Marjan; Ashrafi, Afsaneh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical features and distribution of uveitis in the pediatric age group at a referral eye care center in Shiraz, South Iran. Materials and Methods: All new cases of uveitis in patients 18-year-old or younger referred from January 2007 to December 2013 were enrolled in this study. The patient underwent a complete history of systemic and ocular diseases, comprehensive ophthalmic examination. Patients were classified according to the International Uveitis Study Group definitions. The definitive diagnosis was based on clinical manifestations and laboratory investigations. Results: Seventy-seven eyes (54 patients) comprised the study sample. The mean age at the onset of uveitis was 12.5 years. The female-to-male ratio was 1.25. Anterior uveitis was the most frequent anatomical location (40.7%), followed by intermediate uveitis (33.3%), posterior uveitis (18.5%), and panuveitis (7.5%). Seventy-four percent of patients presented with chronic uveitis. Noninfectious uveitis (81.5%) was the most frequent etiology. Thirty-seven percent of patients had a specific diagnosis for uveitis, and 63% were classified as idiopathic cases. Toxocariasis was the most common infectious cause. Associated systemic diseases were present in 14.8% of patients. The most frequent systemic disease was juvenile idiopathic arthritis in 9.2% of patients. Complications occurred in 66 (85.5%) of affected eyes. The most common complications were posterior synechia (20.7%), cataract (18.8%), and cystoid macular edema (12.9%). Conclusions: Uveitis in the majority of children had an insidious onset and was chronic. Over half the patients had a specific diagnosis. Idiopathic cases were more common in the intermediate uveitis group. PMID:27555706

  8. Utilization of a free fitness center-based exercise referral program among women with chronic disease risk factors.

    PubMed

    Waterman, Megan R; Wiecha, John M; Manne, Jennifer; Tringale, Stephen M; Costa, Elizabeth; Wiecha, Jean L

    2014-12-01

    Physical activity (PA) reduces the risk for a number of chronic diseases including heart disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes mellitus type 2. However, most Americans do not meet expert recommendations for exercise, and minorities and low-income persons are the most inactive. Community-based approaches to promoting PA include primary care exercise referral programs. This study examines patient characteristics associated with utilization of a community health center-based exercise referral program. Adult female patients of a community health center with an affiliated fitness center, in Boston, MA, were included in the study if they received a referral to the fitness center from their primary care provider. Demographic and medical information was abstracted from the medical chart, and fitness records were abstracted to measure activation of a fitness center membership (creation of an account denoting at least an initial visit) and utilization over time. Overall, 503 (40%) of the 1,254 referred women in the study sample activated their membership. Black women were almost 60% more likely to activate their membership (adjusted OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.2), and women with higher co-morbidity counts were almost 45% more likely to activate (adjusted OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-2.0). Once activated, a minority of women participated at levels likely to improve cardiometabolic fitness. Of the 503 activations, 96 (19%) had no participation, 359 (71%) had low participation, and only 48 (10%) had high participation. No independent predictors of participation were identified. These findings suggest that program design may benefit from developing activation, initial participation, and retention strategies that address population-specific barriers.

  9. Increasing Therapist Productivity: Using Lean Principles in the Rehabilitation Department of an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Diana; Snedeker, Kristie; Swoboda, Michael; Zalieckas, Cheryl; Dorsey, Rachel; Nohe, Cassandra; Smith, Paige; Roche, Renuka

    2015-12-15

    The Department of Rehabilitation Services, within the University of Maryland Medical Center's 650-bed academic medical center, was experiencing difficulty in meeting productivity standards. Therapists in the outpatient division believed they were not spending enough time performing billable patient care activities. Therapists in the inpatient division had difficulty keeping pace with the volume of incoming referrals. Collectively, these issues caused dissatisfaction among referral sources and frustration among the staff within the rehabilitation department. The department undertook a phased approach to address these issues that included examining the evidence, using Lean process improvement principles, and employing transformational leadership strategies to drive improvements in productivity and efficiency. The lessons learned support the importance of having meaningful metrics appropriate for the patient population served, the use of Lean as an effective tool for improving productivity in rehabilitation departments, the impact of engaging staff at the grassroots level, and the importance of having commitment from leaders. The study findings have implications for not only rehabilitation and hospital leadership, but CEOs and managers of any business who need to eliminate waste or increase staff productivity.

  10. Training Future Leaders of Academic Medicine: Internal Programs at Three Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morahan, Page S.; Kasperbauer, Dwight; McDade, Sharon A.; Aschenbrener, Carol A.; Triolo, Pamela K.; Monteleone, Patricia L.; Counte, Michael; Meyer, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews need for internal leadership training programs at academic health centers and describes three programs. Elements common to the programs include small classes, participants from many areas of academic medicine and health care, building on prior experience and training, training conducted away from the institution, short sessions, faculty…

  11. FaculTea: Professional Development for Learning Centered Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voller, Julie Givans

    2013-01-01

    The theory of learning centered academic advising states that the purpose of advising is to teach undergraduate students about the logic and purpose of their education. Previous scholarship on learning centered advising has focused on the theoretical or on implementation by faculty at small colleges and universities. Methods for supporting…

  12. Lessons learned: mobile device encryption in the academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Kusche, Kristopher P

    2009-01-01

    The academic medical center is faced with the unique challenge of meeting the multi-faceted needs of both a modern healthcare organization and an academic institution, The need for security to protect patient information must be balanced by the academic freedoms expected in the college setting. The Albany Medical Center, consisting of the Albany Medical College and the Albany Medical Center Hospital, was challenged with implementing a solution that would preserve the availability, integrity and confidentiality of business, patient and research data stored on mobile devices. To solve this problem, Albany Medical Center implemented a mobile encryption suite across the enterprise. Such an implementation comes with complexities, from performance across multiple generations of computers and operating systems, to diversity of application use mode and end user adoption, all of which requires thoughtful policy and standards creation, understanding of regulations, and a willingness and ability to work through such diverse needs.

  13. Lost Dollars Threaten Research in Public Academic Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Henry R; Vermillion, Eric B

    2017-03-01

    The decrease of federal and state support threatens long-term sustainability of research in publicly supported academic health centers. In weathering these financial threats, research at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), has undergone 3 substantial changes: institutional salary support goes preferentially to senior faculty, whereas the young increasingly depend on grants; private and government support for research grows apace in clinical departments but declines in basic science departments; and research is judged more on its quantity (numbers of investigators and federal and private dollars) than on its goals, achievements, or scientific quality. We propose specific measures to alleviate these problems. Other large public academic health centers probably confront similar issues, but-except for UCSF-such centers have not been subjected to detailed public analysis.-Bourne, H. R., Vermillion, E. B. Lost dollars threaten research in public academic health centers.

  14. Increasing referral for renal transplant evaluation in recipients of nonrenal solid-organ transplants: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Chandrakantan, Arun; de Mattos, Angelo M; Naftel, David; Crosswy, Apryl; Kirklin, James; Curtis, John J

    2006-07-01

    The use of cyclosporine and tacrolimus therapy in nonrenal (heart, heart/lung, lung, and liver) transplantation has resulted in improved patient and graft survival. Nephrotoxicity is one of the major side effects of tacrolimus and cyclosporine therapy and may lead to ESRD. The trend of referral of nonrenal solid-organ transplant recipients for kidney transplant evaluation at a large multiorgan transplant center was examined. Records of all patients who were referred for renal transplantation at the University of Alabama between January 1, 1993, and June 30, 2004, were reviewed. Eighty (0.96%) of 8318 individuals had previously undergone a nonrenal solid-organ transplant and were included in the study. The majority (72%) of patients had their nonrenal transplants performed at the University of Alabama. Twenty-two patients had their nonrenal transplant performed elsewhere and had fewer data available for analysis. From the period 1993-1996 to 2001-2004, an 11-fold increase in the absolute number of referrals of patients with nonrenal transplants was noted. Of patients who were referred for transplant evaluation, 25 became recipients of kidney transplants with a predominance of living-donor transplants. Referral for kidney transplant evaluation among nonrenal solid-organ transplant recipients is increasing and will exacerbate the existing shortage of deceased-donor kidneys that are available for transplantation. There was a trend for liver transplant recipients compared with other solid-organ recipients to develop ESRD at a greater rate.

  15. Evaluation of the Dutch BRCA1/2 clinical genetic center referral criteria in an unselected early breast cancer population.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Alexandra J; de Ruiter, Karen; van 't Veer, Laura J; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Verhoef, Senno; Schmidt, Marjanka K

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we evaluated the diagnostic value of the Dutch Clinical Genetic Center (CGC) referral guidelines for BRCA1/2 mutation testing in 903 early breast cancer patients, unselected for family history, diagnosed in a cancer hospital before the age of 50 years in 1974-2002; most prevalent Dutch pathogenic BRCA1/2 mutations had been analyzed on coded DNA in a research setting. Forty-nine (5.4%) of the patients were proven to be BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We found that 78% and 69% of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers identified met the criteria for referral to the CGC based on age, family history and synchronous multiple tumors; reflected by a combined sensitivity of 75.5% and specificity of 63.2%. More than half of the BRCA1 mutation carriers, that is, 58% had a triple-negative tumor. The highest AUC was obtained by shifting the age at diagnosis threshold criterion from 40 to 35 years and by adding a 'triple-negative breast cancer' criterion with an age threshold of 45 years; the specificity increased to 71.2%, whereas the sensitivity remained the same; that is, a referral of fewer patients will lead to the identification of at least the same number of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. Two-thirds of the BRCA1/2 mutation carriers identified in this research setting had been referred for counseling and testing. Our results indicate that, awaiting a possibly more extended mutation screening of all breast cancer patients, the triple-negative status of a breast cancer should be added to the CGC referral criteria.

  16. "Call 911" STEMI protocol to reduce delays in transfer of patients from non primary percutaneous coronary intervention referral Centers.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Terrence; Rock, Alisa; Koenig, William J; Rokos, Ivan; French, William J

    2010-09-01

    Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) is the preferred method of reperfusion for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), if it can be performed in a timely manner by an experienced interventional cardiologist at a high volume STEMI Receiving Center. However, an estimated 50% of STEMI patients present to STEMI Referral Centers without PPCI capability. Transfer of STEMI patients for PPCI has been shown to improve outcomes as compared with fibrinolysis given at the presenting hospital. Nonetheless, transfer of STEMI patients for PPCI has not been used extensively in the United States and is associated with markedly prolonged transfer times. This study demonstrates that rapid transfer of STEMI patients from community hospitals without PPCI capability to a STEMI Receiving Center is both safe and feasible using a standardized protocol with an integrated transfer system.

  17. Using Needs Assessment to Develop Curricula for Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) in Academic and Community Health Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satre, Derek D.; McCance-Katz, Elinore F.; Moreno-John, Gina; Julian, Katherine A.; O'Sullivan, Patricia S.; Satterfield, Jason M.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the use of a brief needs assessment survey in the development of alcohol and drug screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) curricula in 2 health care settings in the San Francisco Bay Area. The samples included university medical center faculty (n = 27) and nonphysician community health and social…

  18. Central nervous system tumours profile at a referral center in the Brazilian Amazon region, 1997–2014

    PubMed Central

    Semblano, Aluízio Augusto Pereira; Moreira, Matheus Acácio; de Lemos, Manuela Nascimento; de Mello, Vanessa Jóia; Hamoy, Moisés; Nazareth Junior, Mario Hermes; Paschoal Junior, Fernando Mendes; Adami, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Tumours of the Central Nervous System (CNS) are an important cause of mortality from cancer. Epidemiological data on neoplams affecting the CNS are scarce in Brazil, especially in the Amazon region. The study aims at describing the histopathological profile of CNS tumours cases at a high-complexity referral cancer center. This study has described a 17-year-series profile of CNS tumours, registered at a high-complexity referral cancer center in Pará state, from January 1997 until July 2014 in the Brazilian Amazon Region. Data was gathered from histopathology reports kept in the hospital’s cancer registry and 949 cases of CNS tumours were analyzed. The most common histopathology were neuroepithelial tumours (approx. 40%) and meningioma was the most frequent especific tumor histologic subtype (22.2%). Neuroepithelial tumours were more frequent in patients with ages ranging from less than a year to 19 years, whereas metastatic tumours were prevalent in patients over 40 years of age. It was not found temporal trends during the studied period. The knowledge of these tumours profile is valuable for the understanding of cancer epidemiology in the region, since its prevalence is currently underreported and more awareness on the disease is needed. PMID:28369089

  19. Toward a User-Centered Academic Library Home Page

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McHale, Nina

    2008-01-01

    In the past decade, academic libraries have struggled with the design of an effective library home page. Since librarians' mental models of information architecture differ from those of their patrons, usability assessments are necessary in designing a user-centered home page. This study details a usability sequence of card sort and paper and…

  20. Utilizing College Advising Centers to Facilitate and Revitalize Academic Advising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Robert W.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Brigham Young University's College Advising Center, staffed by faculty and nonfaculty advisors, provides traditional academic advising, maintenance of students' advising files, evaluation of transfer credit for major requirements, new-student orientation, maintaining and publishing degree requirement profiles, faculty assistance, registration…

  1. Recreation Center Participation and Its Relationship to Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knepp, Douglas S.

    2011-01-01

    Many colleges and universities are engaged in developing enrollment strategies in higher education that focus on student retention. Using concepts based on Astin's (1993) theory of involvement and Tinto's (1975) theory of social interaction, this study focused on how participation in recreation center activities is related to the academic success…

  2. Nurturant Ethics and Academic Ideals: Convergence in the Writing Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trachsel, Mary

    1995-01-01

    Examines how and why the American academy has employed the social construct of gender in defining the writing center as a site where caring education is promoted according to a cultural ideal of "women's work." Draws on the author's encounters with feminist philosophy, academic professionalism, psycho-sociolinguistics, and child development…

  3. The Evolving Academic Health Center: Challenges and Opportunities for Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirin, Steven; Summergrad, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Regardless of the outcome of current efforts at healthcare reform, the resources that academic health centers need--to provide care for increasingly complex patient populations, support clinical innovation, grow the clinical enterprise, and carry out their research and teaching missions--are in jeopardy. This article examines the value…

  4. Packet Preparation. Summer Program Academic Resources Coordination Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Cortland. Coll. at Cortland.

    This teaching guide was developed by the Summer Program Academic Resources Coordination Center (SPARCC) in Loudonville, New York. SPARCC was a migrant education grant that developed and helped implement model summer migrant education programs in New York, Virginia, and Florida. This guide provides directions for preparing learning packets to…

  5. The changing academic health center. The death of the traditional academic physician.

    PubMed

    Fargason, C A; Fargason, R E

    1996-08-01

    Organizational change is required if academic health centers (AHCs) are to survive the decreased societal commitment to them. The changes will generate significant emotional responses in the physicians employed by such institutions. This article presents an analogy between the reactions of academic physicians to the changes they are experiencing, and the stages of grief that Dr. Kübler Ross described in terminally ill patients. By placing physician responses in this context, emotional responses to organizational changes can be more easily understood and managed, allowing academic physicians to devote more energy to facing the threats to AHCs in an innovative and constructive manner.

  6. The Center for Healthy Weight: an academic medical center response to childhood obesity

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, T N; Kemby, K M

    2012-01-01

    Childhood obesity represents a worldwide medical and public health challenge. Academic medical centers cannot avoid the effects of the obesity epidemic, and must adopt strategies for their academic, clinical and public policy responses to childhood obesity. The Center for Healthy Weight at Stanford University and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford provides an example and model of one such strategy. The design provides both breadth and depth through six cores: Research, Patient Care, Community Programs, Advocating for Public Policy Change, Training and Professional Education, and the Healthy Hospital Initiative. The Center and its cores are designed to facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration across the university, medical school, children's hospital and surrounding community. The foci of these cores are likely to be relevant to almost any academic medical center's mission and functions. PMID:25089192

  7. United States Directory of Sources, United States International Environmental Referral Center. National Focal Point of the United Nations Environment Program/International Referral System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) was created in 1972. UNEP is an independent agency of the United Nations and has its headquarters in Nairobi, Kenya. In order to carry out its goals, several programs were created, one of which is the International Referral System (UNEP/IRS). The UNEP/IRS is composed of over 60 national and…

  8. Summary of hunting injuries in central Wisconsin: a 4-year experience at a rural referral center.

    PubMed

    Stueland, D; Carpenter, W S; Cleveland, D

    1995-05-01

    Surveillance of hunting-associated injuries was performed over a 4-year period at a rural Emergency Department in central Wisconsin. Over that period of time, 125 individuals sought treatment for hunting-related injuries. The majority of injuries were related to autumn deer hunting and included both gun and bow and arrow hunting. Over half of the persons injured while hunting with a bow and arrow fell from a height. The admission rate for persons in the immediate area was 35.1%, but for those from outside the area, it was 64.8%. The effects of the referral bias result in severe injuries being seen in rural Emergency Departments during hunting seasons, necessitating such departments to be prepared for a wide range of injuries.

  9. Residency Surgical Training at an Independent Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremiah; Sidwell, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Independent academic medical centers have been training surgeons for more than a century; this environment is distinct from university or military programs. There are several advantages to training at a community program, including a supportive learning environment with camaraderie between residents and faculty, early and broad operative experience, and improved graduate confidence. Community programs also face challenges, such as resident recruitment and faculty engagement. With the workforce needs for general surgeons, independent training programs will continue to play an integral role.

  10. Risk Factors and Consequent Outcomes of Placenta Previa: Report From a Referral Center.

    PubMed

    Saleh Gargari, Soraya; Seify, Zahra; Haghighi, Ladan; Khoshnood Shariati, Maryam; Mirzamoradi, Masoumeh

    2016-11-01

     Because of an unknown factor, the frequency of complicated pregnancy with placenta previa has been raised during past decade. This study was designed to deepen our understanding of risk factors and outcomes of placenta previa in our country. This study investigated 694 cases of placenta previa comparing with 600 healthy pregnant women with not overlie placenta in two referral and tertiary Obstetrics and Gynecological Hospital in Iran on the basis of the clinical and para-clinical analysis, in order to find the probable risk factors for occurrence of placenta previa and its effect on maternal and neonatal complications. The most important risk factor for the occurrence of placenta previa was advanced maternal age (P<0.001) and history of stillbirth (OR=117.2, CI=58.3-236.0). In the other hand, the most substantial outcome of this disorder was a reduction of gestational age (P<0.001) and low birth weight neonatally (P<0.001). The conservative follow-up should be programmed for women with placenta previa based on the type of risk factors which can provide the best possible management to decrease the morbidity and mortality of their related complications.

  11. Decline of clinical research in academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Meador, Kimford J

    2015-09-29

    Marked changes in US medical school funding began in the 1960s with progressively increasing revenues from clinical services. The growth of clinical revenues slowed in the mid-1990s, creating a funding crisis for US academic health care centers, who responded by having their faculty increase their clinical duties at the expense of research activities. Surveys document the resultant stresses on the academic clinician researcher. The NIH provides greater funding for basic and translational research than for clinical research, and the new Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute is inadequately funded to address the scope of needed clinical research. An increasing portion of clinical research is funded by industry, which leaves many important clinical issues unaddressed. There is an inadequate supply of skilled clinical researchers and a lack of external support for clinical research. The impact on the academic environment in university medical centers is especially severe on young faculty, who have a shrinking potential to achieve successful academic careers. National health care research funding policies should encourage the right balance of life-science investigations. Medical universities need to improve and highlight education on clinical research for students, residents, fellows, and young faculty. Medical universities also need to provide appropriate incentives for clinical research. Without training to ensure an adequate supply of skilled clinical researchers and a method to adequately fund clinical research, discoveries from basic and translational research cannot be clinically tested and affect patient care. Thus, many clinical problems will continue to be evaluated and treated with inadequate or even absent evidence-based knowledge.

  12. Ten-year experience of retrievable inferior vena cava filters in a tertiary referral center

    PubMed Central

    Tse, George; Cleveland, Trevor; Goode, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE A significant proportion of patients undergoing surgery have an increased incidence of acute pulmonary embolus (PE). We analyzed all patients who had a retrievable inferior vena cava (IVC) filter placed preoperatively for PE prophylaxis and investigated the long-term outcomes of the patients who did not have their filter removed. METHODS Patients who underwent retrievable IVC filter insertion and attempted removal were identified from the radiology information systems database in a large tertiary referral university teaching hospital. Results of all clinical investigations (including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography, and plain radiography) while the IVC filters were in situ were reviewed. RESULTS In total, 393 retrievable IVC filters were inserted, 254 with the indication of preoperative thromboembolic prophylaxis. Recurrent PE was reported in five patients (1.9%) despite the IVC filter. Of the 254 retrievable filters inserted prior to surgery, an attempt at retrieval was made in 168 filters (66.1%). Successful retrieval at the first attempt occurred in 143 cases (85.1%), while 25 cases failed or were aborted (14.9%). No attempt at retrieval was made in 86 (33.9%) patients and a significant proportion of these patients had undergone cancer surgery (P < 0.0107). In those patients where there was no attempt at retrieval, there was an association between cancer surgery and a shorter absolute survival time (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION The majority of attempted filter retrievals were successful, and a proportion of nonretrieved IVC filters are accounted for in patients who underwent cancer surgery and ultimately died with the filter in situ. A departmental protocol is recommended to ensure the filter is removed where appropriate and possible. PMID:28093377

  13. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    PubMed

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed.

  14. Responding to disasters: academic medical centers' responsibilities and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Sklar, David P; Richards, Michael; Shah, Mark; Roth, Paul

    2007-08-01

    Disaster preparedness and disaster response should be a capability of all academic health centers. The authors explore the potential role and impact of academic medical centers (AMC)s in disaster response. The National Disaster Medical System and the evolution of disaster medical assistance teams (DMAT) are described, and the experience at one AMC with DMAT is reviewed. The recent deployment of a DMAT sponsored by an AMC to the Hurricane Katrina disaster is described, and the experience is used to illustrate the opportunities and challenges of future disaster medical training, research, and practice at AMCs. AMCs are encouraged to identify an appropriate academic unit to house and nurture disaster-preparedness activities, participate in education programs for health professionals and the public, and perform research on disaster epidemiology and response. Networks of AMCs offer the potential of acting as a critical resource for those AMCs stricken by a disaster and for communities needing the infusion of highly trained and motivated health care providers. The Association of American Medical Colleges can play a critical role in assisting and coordinating AMC networks through its relationship with all AMCs and the federal government and by increasing the awareness of medical educators and researchers about this important, emerging area of medical knowledge.

  15. Viewpoint: professionalism and humanism beyond the academic health center.

    PubMed

    Swick, Herbert M

    2007-11-01

    Medical professionalism and humanism have long been integral to the practice of medicine, and they will continue to shape practice in the 21st century. In recent years, many advances have been made in understanding the nature of medical professionalism and in efforts to teach and assess professional values and behaviors. As more and more teaching of both medical students and residents occurs in settings outside of academic medical centers, it is critically important that community physicians demonstrate behaviors that resonate professionalism and humanism. As teachers, they must be committed to being role models for what physicians should be. Activities that are designed to promote and advance professionalism, then, must take place not only in academic settings but also in clinical practice sites that are beyond the academic health center. The author argues that professionalism and humanism share common values and that each can enrich the other. Because the cauldron of practice threatens to erode traditional values of professionalism, not only for individual physicians but also for the medical profession, practicing physicians must incorporate into practice settings activities that are explicitly designed to exemplify those values, not only with students and patients, but also within their communities. The author cites a number of examples of ways in which professionalism and humanism can be fostered by individual physicians as well as professional organizations.

  16. Delays in Breast Cancer Presentation and Diagnosis at Two Rural Cancer Referral Centers in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Mpunga, Tharcisse; Hategekimana, Vedaste; Dusengimana, Jean-Marie Vianney; Habineza, Hamissy; Bigirimana, Jean Bosco; Mutumbira, Cadet; Mpanumusingo, Egide; Ngiruwera, Jean Paul; Tapela, Neo; Amoroso, Cheryl; Shulman, Lawrence N.; Keating, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Breast cancer incidence is increasing in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Mortality/incidence ratios in LMICs are higher than in high-income countries, likely at least in part because of delayed diagnoses leading to advanced-stage presentations. In the present study, we investigated the magnitude, impact of, and risk factors for, patient and system delays in breast cancer diagnosis in Rwanda. Materials and Methods. We interviewed patients with breast complaints at two rural Rwandan hospitals providing cancer care and reviewed their medical records to determine the diagnosis, diagnosis date, and breast cancer stage. Results. A total of 144 patients were included in our analysis. Median total delay was 15 months, and median patient and system delays were both 5 months. In multivariate analyses, patient and system delays of ≥6 months were significantly associated with more advanced-stage disease. Adjusting for other social, demographic, and clinical characteristics, a low level of education and seeing a traditional healer first were significantly associated with a longer patient delay. Having made ≥5 health facility visits before the diagnosis was significantly associated with a longer system delay. However, being from the same district as one of the two hospitals was associated with a decreased likelihood of system delay. Conclusion. Patients with breast cancer in Rwanda experience long patient and system delays before diagnosis; these delays increase the likelihood of more advanced-stage presentations. Educating communities and healthcare providers about breast cancer and facilitating expedited referrals could potentially reduce delays and hence mortality from breast cancer in Rwanda and similar settings. Implications for Practice: Breast cancer rates are increasing in low- and middle-income countries, and case fatality rates are high, in part because of delayed diagnosis and treatment. This study examined the delays experienced by patients

  17. Building diversity in a complex academic health center.

    PubMed

    South-Paul, Jeannette E; Roth, Loren; Davis, Paula K; Chen, Terence; Roman, Anna; Murrell, Audrey; Pettigrew, Chenits; Castleberry-Singleton, Candi; Schuman, Joel

    2013-09-01

    For 30 years, the many diversity-related health sciences programs targeting the University of Pittsburgh undergraduate campus, school of medicine, schools of the health sciences, clinical practice plan, and medical center were run independently and remained separate within the academic health center (AHC). This lack of coordination hampered their overall effectiveness in promoting diversity and inclusion. In 2007, a group of faculty and administrators from the university and the medical center recognized the need to improve institutional diversity and to better address local health disparities. In this article, the authors describe the process of linking the efforts of these institutions in a way that would be successful locally and applicable to other academic environments. First, they engaged an independent consultant to conduct a study of the AHC's diversity climate, interviewing current and former faculty and trainees to define the problem and identify areas for improvement. Next, they created the Physician Inclusion Council to address the findings of this study and to coordinate future efforts with institutional leaders. Finally, they formed four working committees to address (1) communications and outreach, (2) cultural competency, (3) recruitment, and (4) mentoring and retention. These committees oversaw the strategic development and implementation of all diversity and inclusion efforts. Together these steps led to structural changes within the AHC and the improved allocation of resources that have positioned the University of Pittsburgh to achieve not only diversity but also inclusion and to continue to address the health disparities in the Pittsburgh community.

  18. Case study: a data warehouse for an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Einbinder, J S; Scully, K W; Pates, R D; Schubart, J R; Reynolds, R E

    2001-01-01

    The clinical data repository (CDR) is a frequently updated relational data warehouse that provides users with direct access to detailed, flexible, and rapid retrospective views of clinical, administrative, and financial patient data for the University of Virginia Health System. This article presents a case study of the CDR, detailing its five-year history and focusing on the unique role of data warehousing in an academic medical center. Specifically, the CDR must support multiple missions, including research and education, in addition to administration and management. Users include not only analysts and administrators but clinicians, researchers, and students.

  19. The number of patients with severe encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis is decreasing in a large referral center in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Kitterer, Daniel; Braun, Niko; Alscher, M Dominik; Segerer, Stephan; Latus, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Background Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is the most severe complication associated with long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD). Previous studies noticed a sharp decline in new patients with severe EPS. We investigated the number of severe EPS patients in our large referral center over almost 20 years. Methods All late-stage EPS patients who underwent major surgery due to extensive symptoms caused by bowel obstruction (vomiting, abdominal pain, and weight loss) between March 1997 and end of December 2015 in our hospital were included in the present study. An index was calculated between the number of patients with severe EPS and the implanted PD catheters in our center. Results Between 1979 and 2015, a total of 745 PD catheters were implanted in our center, with a steady increase in the numbers between 2003 and 2015. First patient with severe EPS was treated in 1998, then a rise in the number of patients with EPS was present in 2005. The number of patients with EPS peaked in the period of 2010–2012 (15 patients within 3 years). Afterward, both the absolute numbers and the index between the number of patients with severe EPS and the implanted catheters demonstrated a prominent reduction in the next 3-year period from 2013 to 2015. Conclusion Our data support the hypothesis that there seems to be a decrease of late-stage EPS incidence over the last years, but data about milder or asymptomatic patients are lacking. This should be kept in mind while giving the patients information about different renal replacement therapies at start of dialysis. PMID:27540308

  20. Early experiences with big data at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Halamka, John D

    2014-07-01

    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), an academic health care institution affiliated with Harvard University, has been an early adopter of electronic applications since the 1970s. Various departments of the medical center and the physician practice groups affiliated with it have implemented electronic health records, filmless imaging, and networked medical devices to such an extent that data storage at BIDMC now amounts to three petabytes and continues to grow at a rate of 25 percent a year. Initially, the greatest technical challenge was the cost and complexity of data storage. However, today the major focus is on transforming raw data into information, knowledge, and wisdom. This article discusses the data growth, increasing importance of analytics, and changing user requirements that have shaped the management of big data at BIDMC.

  1. Pharmaceutical speakers' bureaus, academic freedom, and the management of promotional speaking at academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Boumil, Marcia M; Cutrell, Emily S; Lowney, Kathleen E; Berman, Harris A

    2012-01-01

    Pharmaceutical companies routinely engage physicians, particularly those with prestigious academic credentials, to deliver "educational" talks to groups of physicians in the community to help market the company's brand-name drugs. Although presented as educational, and even though they provide educational content, these events are intended to influence decisions about drug selection in ways that are not based on the suitability and effectiveness of the product, but on the prestige and persuasiveness of the speaker. A number of state legislatures and most academic medical centers have attempted to restrict physician participation in pharmaceutical marketing activities, though most restrictions are not absolute and have proven difficult to enforce. This article reviews the literature on why Speakers' Bureaus have become a lightning rod for academic/industry conflicts of interest and examines the arguments of those who defend physician participation. It considers whether the restrictions on Speakers' Bureaus are consistent with principles of academic freedom and concludes with the legal and institutional efforts to manage industry speaking.

  2. DISCOVERING STRATEGY: A KEY CHALLENGE FOR ACADEMIC HEALTH CENTERS

    PubMed Central

    LEE, THOMAS H.

    2016-01-01

    The health care marketplace is increasingly being driven by competition on value for patients — that is, meeting their needs as efficiently as possible. Academic medical centers must adapt to this shift through the development of true strategies aimed at creating value, as opposed to trying to deflect the pressures of competition through tactics such as merging with competitors. True strategies require clarity on what the organization is trying to do for whom, and how the organization is going to be different from its competitors. Six key questions are described and discussed: 1) What is our goal? 2) What businesses are we in? 3) What set of conditions shall we compete in? 4) How will we be different? 5) What synergies can be created across our sites? and 6) What is our appropriate density and scope? Academic medical centers have been the crown jewel of health care for the United States and, indeed, the rest of the world. Their research, teaching, and patient care missions all command respect, and their halls are filled with representatives of industry interested in scientific advances; trainees seeking expertise; and patients hoping for relief of their suffering — or at least peace of mind that all opportunities for improvement of health have been exhausted. PMID:28066066

  3. Changing indications and techniques for corneal transplantations at a tertiary referral center in Turkey, from 1995 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Altay, Yesim; Burcu, Ayse; Aksoy, Gozde; Ozdemir, Evin Singar; Ornek, Firdevs

    2016-01-01

    Background Indications for corneal transplantation in developed and developing nations differ according to the different spectrum of corneal disease in each country. Objective The purpose of this study is to analyze the changing indications and surgical techniques for corneal transplantation over the past 20 years at a tertiary referral center in Turkey. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients who underwent keratoplasty from January 1995 to December 2014 (between 1995 and 2004, period 1, and between 2005 and 2014, period 2). Patients’ demographic data, indications for corneal transplantation, and the type of surgery were recorded. Results The number of keratoplasties performed ranged from 548 in period 1 to 782 in period 2. Between 1995 and 2004, the leading indications were keratoconus (34.1%), bullous keratopathy (17%), and non-herpetic corneal scar (13.3%), and between 2005 and 2014, they were keratoconus (33.8%), corneal stromal dystrophy (14.2%), and bullous keratopathy (12.7%). All the keratoplasties performed in the 1995–2004 period were penetrating keratoplasty (PKP). During the period 2005–2014, PKP accounted for 93%, automated lamellar keratoplasty 5.8%, and deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty 1.2% of all corneal transplantations. Conclusion Keratoconus was the leading indication for keratoplasty in both periods. In the 2005–2014 period, corneal stromal dystrophy increased significantly. All the keratoplasties performed in period 1 and 93% of all keratoplasties performed in period 2 were PKP. PMID:27330270

  4. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Outcomes in Acute Respiratory Distress Treatment: Case Study in a Chinese Referral Center.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Li, Tong; Xu, Lei; Hu, Xiao-Min; Duan, Da-Wei; Li, Zhi-Bo; Gao, Xin-Jing; Li, Jun; Wu, Peng; Liu, Ying-Wu

    2017-02-10

    BACKGROUND No definitive conclusions have been drawn from the available data about the utilization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The aim of this study was to review our center's experience with ECMO and determine predictors of outcome from our Chinese center. MATERIAL AND METHODS We retrospectively analyzed a total of 23 consecutive candidates who fulfilled the study entry criteria between January 2009 and December 2015. Detailed clinical data, ECMO flow, and respiratory parameters before and after the introduction of ECMO were compared among in-hospital survivors and nonsurvivors; factors associated with mortality were investigated. RESULTS Hemodynamics and oxygenation parameters were significantly improved after ECMO initiation. Thirteen patients survived to hospital discharge. Univariate correlation analysis demonstrated that APACHE II score (r=-0.463, p=0.03), acute kidney injury (r=-0.574, p=0.005), membrane oxygenator replacement (r=-0.516, p=0.014) and total length of hospital stay (r=0.526, p=0.012) were significantly correlated with survival to hospital discharge, and that the evolution of the levels of urea nitrogen, platelet, and fibrinogen may help to determine patient prognosis. Sixteen patients referred for ECMO from an outside hospital were successfully transported to our institution by ambulance, including seven transported under ECMO support. The survival rate of the ECMO-transport group was comparable to the conventional transport or the non-transport group (both p=1.000). CONCLUSIONS ECMO is an effective alternative option for severe ARDS. APACHE II score on admission, onset of acute kidney injury, and membrane oxygenator replacement, and the evolution of levels of urea nitrogen, platelet, and fibrinogen during hospitalization may help to determine the in-hospital patient prognosis. By establishing a well-trained mobile ECMO team, a long-distance, inter-hospital transport

  5. Introduction of cryobiopsies in the diagnostics of interstitial lung diseases – experiences in a referral center

    PubMed Central

    Kronborg-White, Sissel; Folkersen, Birgitte; Rasmussen, Torben Riis; Voldby, Nina; Madsen, Line Bille; Rasmussen, Finn; Poletti, Venerino; Bendstrup, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Transbronchial cryobiopsies (cTBB) has emerged as a new method for obtaining lung tissue biopsies in the diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases (ILDs). Until now, it has been used in a few highly specialized interventional centers and has shown promising results in obtaining a definite diagnosis of ILDs. Method: All patients undergoing a cTBB between November 2015 and June 2016 were included in this case series study. Data on patient demographics, high-resolution computed tomography patterns, size and number of biopsies, histology patterns, the contribution to a confident diagnosis and complications were registered. Results: Thirty-eight patients underwent cTBB in the period. cTBB contributed to the diagnosis in 28 (74%) of the 38 patients. Only few complications were observed; pneumothorax was the most frequent complication (10 patients, 26%). In six patients, local bleeding occurred during the procedure and was easily controlled by a Fogarty catheter balloon and in some cases tranexamic acid. Conclusion: Performing cTBB in the diagnostics of ILDs is a safe and feasible procedure. cTBB resulted in a confident diagnosis in 74% of cases. PMID:28326178

  6. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: Early detection and referral

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Justin M.; Noth, Imre

    2016-01-01

    Summary Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a devastating progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) with no known cause or cure, is the most common and deadly of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. With a median survival of 3–5 years following diagnosis, IPF is characterized by a progressive decline in lung function and quality of life in most patients. Vigilance among clinicians in recognizing IPF early in the disease course remains critical to properly caring for these patients, as this provides the widest range of management options. When IPF is suspected, a multidisciplinary evaluation (MDE) by a clinician, radiologist and pathologist with ILD expertise should occur, as this improves diagnostic agreement in both community and academic settings. When community MDE is not possible, or diagnostic doubt exists, referral to an ILD center should be considered. ILD center referral may also provide access specialized care, including clinical trials and lung transplantation, and should be considered for any patient with an established diagnosis of IPF. PMID:24746629

  7. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Outcomes in Acute Respiratory Distress Treatment: Case Study in a Chinese Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Li, Tong; Xu, Lei; Hu, Xiao-min; Duan, Da-wei; Li, Zhi-bo; Gao, Xin-jing; Li, Jun; Wu, Peng; Liu, Ying-Wu

    2017-01-01

    Background No definitive conclusions have been drawn from the available data about the utilization of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) to treat severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The aim of this study was to review our center’s experience with ECMO and determine predictors of outcome from our Chinese center. Material/Methods We retrospectively analyzed a total of 23 consecutive candidates who fulfilled the study entry criteria between January 2009 and December 2015. Detailed clinical data, ECMO flow, and respiratory parameters before and after the introduction of ECMO were compared among in-hospital survivors and nonsurvivors; factors associated with mortality were investigated. Results Hemodynamics and oxygenation parameters were significantly improved after ECMO initiation. Thirteen patients survived to hospital discharge. Univariate correlation analysis demonstrated that APACHE II score (r=−0.463, p=0.03), acute kidney injury (r=−0.574, p=0.005), membrane oxygenator replacement (r=−0.516, p=0.014) and total length of hospital stay (r=0.526, p=0.012) were significantly correlated with survival to hospital discharge, and that the evolution of the levels of urea nitrogen, platelet, and fibrinogen may help to determine patient prognosis. Sixteen patients referred for ECMO from an outside hospital were successfully transported to our institution by ambulance, including seven transported under ECMO support. The survival rate of the ECMO-transport group was comparable to the conventional transport or the non-transport group (both p=1.000). Conclusions ECMO is an effective alternative option for severe ARDS. APACHE II score on admission, onset of acute kidney injury, and membrane oxygenator replacement, and the evolution of levels of urea nitrogen, platelet, and fibrinogen during hospitalization may help to determine the in-hospital patient prognosis. By establishing a well-trained mobile ECMO team, a long-distance, inter

  8. An Emerging Typology of Academic Interdisciplinary Gerontology Centers in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertz, Judith E.; Douglass, Carolinda; Johnson, Angela; Richmond, Shirley S.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the organization, characteristics or services offered by academic interdisciplinary gerontology centers located in higher education institutions. This article presents a description and an emerging typology of academic interdisciplinary gerontology centers based on information collected from the Websites of 47 centers. The…

  9. Succession planning in an academic medical center nursing service.

    PubMed

    Barginere, Cynthia; Franco, Samantha; Wallace, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    Succession planning is of strategic importance in any industry. It ensures the smooth transition from leader to leader and the ability of the organization to maintain the forward momentum as well as meet its operational and financial goals. Health care and nursing are no exception. In the complex and challenging world of health care today, leadership is critical to an organization's success and leadership succession is a key strategy used to ensure continuity of leadership and development of talent from within the organization. At Rush University Medical Center, a 667-bed academic medical center providing tertiary care to adults and children, the need for a focus on succession planning for the nursing leadership team is apparent as key leaders come to the end of their careers and consider retirement. It has become apparent that to secure the legacy and continue the extraordinary history of nursing excellence, care must be taken to grow talent from within and take the opportunity to leverage the mentoring opportunities before the retirement of many key leaders. To ensure a smooth leadership transition, nursing leadership and human resources partner at Rush University Medical Center to implement a systematic approach to leadership succession planning.

  10. Leadership in Academic Health Centers: Transactional and Transformational Leadership.

    PubMed

    Smith, Patrick O

    2015-12-01

    Leadership is a crucial component to the success of academic health science centers (AHCs) within the shifting U.S. healthcare environment. Leadership talent acquisition and development within AHCs is immature and approaches to leadership and its evolution will be inevitable to refine operations to accomplish the critical missions of clinical service delivery, the medical education continuum, and innovations toward discovery. To reach higher organizational outcomes in AHCs requires a reflection on what leadership approaches are in place and how they can better support these missions. Transactional leadership approaches are traditionally used in AHCs and this commentary suggests that movement toward a transformational approach is a performance improvement opportunity for AHC leaders. This commentary describes the transactional and transformational approaches, how they complement each other, and how to access the transformational approach. Drawing on behavioral sciences, suggestions are made on how a transactional leader can change her cognitions to align with the four dimensions of the transformational leadership approach.

  11. [Academic procrastination in clients of a psychotherapeutic student counselling center].

    PubMed

    Jamrozinski, Katja; Kuda, Manfred; Mangholz, Astrid

    2009-01-01

    The start of university education is the beginning of a new phase of life for young adults, which requires significant psychosocial adjustments. Sociobiographical data, clinical symptoms, characteristics of education, work attitude, and career perspectives were gathered from 152 clients by a psychotherapeutic student counselling center to evaluate characteristics of students with and without academic procrastination. The procrastination group comprised heightened numbers of students who had changed universities, and people with suboptimal career prospects and career targets. These subjects were more often male and showed increased incidences of drug- and alcohol problems, as well as a lack of planning of the future. Furthermore, they had larger amounts of their study self-financed. On the basis of these results, concrete recommendations for preventive measures to improve on-time completion of study, and to prevent student drop-out are presented.

  12. System Integration and Network Planning in the Academic Health Center

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Marcia A.; Spackman, Thomas J.

    1985-01-01

    The transfer of information within the academic health center is complicated by the complex nature of the institution's multi-dimensional role. The diverse functions of patient care, administration, education and research result in a complex web of information exchange which requires an integrated approach to system management. System integration involves a thorough assessment of “end user” needs in terms of hardware and software as well as specification of the communications network architecture. The network will consist of a series of end user nodes which capture, process, archive and display information. This paper will consider some requirements of these nodes, also called intelligent workstations, relating to their management and integration into a total health care network.

  13. An academic medical center's response to widespread computer failure.

    PubMed

    Genes, Nicholas; Chary, Michael; Chason, Kevin W

    2013-01-01

    As hospitals incorporate information technology (IT), their operations become increasingly vulnerable to technological breakdowns and attacks. Proper emergency management and business continuity planning require an approach to identify, mitigate, and work through IT downtime. Hospitals can prepare for these disasters by reviewing case studies. This case study details the disruption of computer operations at Mount Sinai Medical Center (MSMC), an urban academic teaching hospital. The events, and MSMC's response, are narrated and the impact on hospital operations is analyzed. MSMC's disaster management strategy prevented computer failure from compromising patient care, although walkouts and time-to-disposition in the emergency department (ED) notably increased. This incident highlights the importance of disaster preparedness and mitigation. It also demonstrates the value of using operational data to evaluate hospital responses to disasters. Quantifying normal hospital functions, just as with a patient's vital signs, may help quantitatively evaluate and improve disaster management and business continuity planning.

  14. Patterns of "severe acute renal failure" in a referral center in Sudan: excluding intensive care and major surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Kaballo, Babikir G; Khogali, Mohamed S; Khalifa, Eman H; Khaiii, Eltahir A G; Ei-Hassan, Ahmed M; Abu-Aisha, Hasan

    2007-06-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common health problem worldwide. There is limited data on the pattern of ARF in Sudan. Moreover, glomerular diseases, which are a well-known cause of ARF, have not been accurately and adequately diagnosed previously. A retrospective study on the patterns of ARF was carried out in a general nephrology referral center in Sudan during the period from February 2003-February 2004. Patients from intensive care units with ARF and those who developed ARF after massive surgery were excluded from the study. Renal biopsy was performed when indicated and studied with light and immunofluorescent microscopy. Eighty-nine patients (57 (64%) cases were males and mean age was 39+/-19.4 years) fulfilled the criteria for the diagnosis of advanced renal failure requiring renal function replacement therapy. Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) was diagnosed in 50 (56%) patients; 33 (66%) ATN patients had renal failure as a complication of volume depletion, fulminant infections (particularly malaria and typhoid fever) or snakebites and 12 (13.4%) patients ingested paraphenylene-diamine (PPD) (hair/Henna dye) in suicidal attempts. Eight (9%) patients of the total study group had glomerular diseases and 11 (12.3%) had obstructive uropathy associated with ARF; the cause of ARF could not be determined in 17 (19%) patients. Fifty-three (60%) patients recovered their renal function, six (6.7%) patients progressed to chronic kidney disease (CKD), 16 (18%) died and 14 (16%) were lost to follow-up. In conclusion, patients with ARF associated with ATN had a favorable prognosis except when ATN was associated with PPD poisoning.

  15. Aids-related progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: a retrospective study in a referral center in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vidal, José E; Penalva de Oliveira, Augusto C; Fink, Maria Cristina D S; Pannuti, Cláudio S; Trujillo, J Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Few data are available about progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) from Brazil. The objectives of this study were to describe the main features of patients with PML and estimate its frequency among AIDS patients with central nervous system (CNS) opportunistic diseases admitted to the Instituto de Infectologia Emílio Ribas, São Paulo, Brazil, from April 2003 to April 2004. A retrospective and descriptive study was performed. Twelve (6%) cases of PML were identified among 219 patients with neurological diseases. The median age of patients with PML was 36 years and nine (75%) were men. Nine (75%) patients were not on antiretroviral therapy at admission. The most common clinical manifestations were: focal weakness (75%), speech disturbances (58%), visual disturbances (42%), cognitive dysfunction (42%), and impaired coordination (42%). The median CD4+ T-cell count was 45 cells/microL. Eight (67%) of 12 patients were laboratory-confirmed with PML and four (33%) were possible cases. Eleven (92%) presented classic PML and only one case had immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS)-related PML. In four (33%) patients, PML was the first AIDS-defining illness. During hospitalization, three patients (25%) died as a result of nosocomial pneumonia and nine (75%) were discharged to home. Cases of PML were only exceeded by cases of cerebral toxoplasmosis, cryptococcal meningoencephalitis, and CNS tuberculosis, the three more frequent neurologic opportunistic infections in Brazil. The results of this study suggest that PML is not an uncommon HIV-related neurologic disorder in a referral center in Brazil.

  16. Team Teaching Verbal, Mathematics, and Learning Skills. Howard University. The Center for Academic Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Joan; Byrd, Roland

    Team teaching was used in three undergraduate courses to explore its potential for enhancing students' academic development. The courses were part of a program offered to freshmen with unrealized academic potential through the Howard University (District of Columbia) Center for Academic Reinforcement (CAR). A three-hour block of time was set aside…

  17. Outcomes of referrals to Child Protective Services for medical neglect in patients with phenylketonuria: Experiences at a single treatment center.

    PubMed

    Bannick, Allison A; Laufman, Jason D; Edwards, Heidi L; Ventimiglia, June; Feldman, Gerald L

    2015-08-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) results in an accumulation of phenylalanine (phe) in the blood which can lead to multiple health consequences in affected individuals. Treatment for PKU is available; however adherence to medical management recommendations can be difficult. When recommendations are not followed and the health of a child is at risk, one intervention that may be necessary is a referral for medical neglect to the local child protective services (CPS) agency. This study summarizes the cases that were referred from our metabolic clinic at the Children's Hospital of Michigan to CPS, and the outcomes of that intervention. CPS referrals helped to improve adherence to medical management recommendations in the majority of cases, including a lower blood phe level for the child; however, at times that improvement did not occur until after a second referral and/or the child's temporary removal from the home.

  18. A new conceptual framework for academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Borden, William B; Mushlin, Alvin I; Gordon, Jonathan E; Leiman, Joan M; Pardes, Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Led by the Affordable Care Act, the U.S. health care system is undergoing a transformative shift toward greater accountability for quality and efficiency. Academic health centers (AHCs), whose triple mission of clinical care, research, and education serves a critical role in the country's health care system, must adapt to this evolving environment. Doing so successfully, however, requires a broader understanding of the wide-ranging roles of the AHC. This article proposes a conceptual framework through which the triple mission is expanded along four new dimensions: health, innovation, community, and policy. Examples within the conceptual framework categories, such as the AHCs' safety net function, their contributions to local economies, and their role in right-sizing the health care workforce, illustrate how each of these dimensions provides a more robust picture of the modern AHC and demonstrates the value added by AHCs. This conceptual framework also offers a basis for developing new performance metrics by which AHCs, both individually and as a group, can be held accountable, and that can inform policy decisions affecting them. This closer examination of the myriad activities of modern AHCs clarifies their essential role in our health care system and will enable these institutions to evolve, improve, be held accountable for, and more fully serve the health of the nation.

  19. Strategies for developing biostatistics resources in an academic health center.

    PubMed

    Welty, Leah J; Carter, Rickey E; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Harrell, Frank E; Lindsell, Christopher J; Macaluso, Maurizio; Mazumdar, Madhu; Nietert, Paul J; Oster, Robert A; Pollock, Brad H; Roberson, Paula K; Ware, James H

    2013-04-01

    Biostatistics--the application of statistics to understanding health and biology-provides powerful tools for developing research questions, designing studies, refining measurements, analyzing data, and interpreting findings. Biostatistics plays an important role in health-related research, yet biostatistics resources are often fragmented, ad hoc, or oversubscribed within academic health centers (AHCs). Given the increasing complexity and quantity of health-related data, the emphasis on accelerating clinical and translational science, and the importance of conducting reproducible research, the need for the thoughtful development of biostatistics resources within AHCs is growing.In this article, the authors identify strategies for developing biostatistics resources in three areas: (1) recruiting and retaining biostatisticians, (2) efficiently using biostatistics resources, and (3) improving biostatistical contributions to science. AHCs should consider these three domains in building strong biostatistics resources, which they can leverage to support a broad spectrum of research. For each of the three domains, the authors describe the advantages and disadvantages of AHCs creating centralized biostatistics units rather than dispersing such resources across clinical departments or other research units. They also address the challenges that biostatisticians face in contributing to research without sacrificing their individual professional growth or the trajectory of their research teams. The authors ultimately recommend that AHCs create centralized biostatistics units because this approach offers distinct advantages both to investigators who collaborate with biostatisticians as well as to the biostatisticians themselves, and it is better suited to accomplish the research and education missions of AHCs.

  20. Organism profile in periprosthetic joint infection: pathogens differ at two arthroplasty infection referral centers in Europe and in the United States.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Vinay K; Bakhshi, Hooman; Ecker, Niklas Unter; Parvizi, Javad; Gehrke, Thorsten; Kendoff, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Infecting microorganism is a strong predictor of treatment success for periprosthetic joint infection (PJI). The purpose of this study was to compare the infecting pathogens causing PJI at two large infection referral centers in the United States and in Europe. In this study, 898 consecutive cases of PJI were identified at the HELIOS ENDO-Klinik Hamburg in Europe and 772 cases were identified at the Rothman Institute in the United States. The incidence of organisms at the HELIOS ENDO-Klinik Hamburg versus the Rothman Institute was: coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (39.3 vs. 20.2%), S. aureus (13.0 vs. 31.0%), Streptococcus (6.5 vs. 5.8%), Enterococcus (7.0 vs. 3.9%), anaerobic (9.0 vs. 0.9%), fungal (0.3 vs. 2.3%), mycobacterial (0 vs. 0.6%), polymicrobial (3.4 vs. 7.4%), culture negative (16.1 vs. 15.8%), and other organisms (0.9 vs. 5.4%). The percentage of methicillin-resistant S. aureus was significantly higher at the American center than at the European center (48.1 vs. 12.8%; p < 0.0001). Our findings show higher virulence and resistance organisms are more prevalent at a referral center in the United States compared with one in Europe.

  1. Improving the integration of palliative care in a comprehensive oncology center: increasing primary care referrals to palliative care.

    PubMed

    Hydeman, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Confronted with the complexities inherent in delivering palliative care, effective collaboration with referring staff becomes vital. Based on the evaluation of the physical and psychosocial concerns of patients, the goal of palliative care is to craft interventions that maintain quality of life in the face of increasing symptoms and deteriorating functional status. The project's goal was to increase the appropriateness of referrals to palliative care by the primary services in the hospital. The aim was to achieve this by developing a process to assess patient functioning in critical psychosocial and functional areas, and providing this data to referring medical staff to educate them on the contribution of palliative care to symptom control and patient quality of life. The findings show that referrals to palliative care have increased over 100% from a broader range of services since initiating this project. Assessment data has been collected on 165 patients and outcomes are discussed.

  2. Accountable care organization readiness and academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Pahira, Jennifer J

    2014-09-01

    As academic medical centers (AMCs) consider becoming accountable care organizations (ACOs) under Medicare, they must assess their readiness for this transition. Of the 253 Medicare ACOs prior to 2014, 51 (20%) are AMCs. Three critical components of ACO readiness are institutional and ACO structure, leadership, and governance; robust information technology and analytic systems; and care coordination and management to improve care delivery and health at the population level. All of these must be viewed through the lens of unique AMC mission-driven goals.There is clear benefit to developing and maintaining a centralized internal leadership when it comes to driving change within an ACO, yet there is also the need for broad stakeholder involvement. Other important structural features are an extensive primary care foundation; concomitant operation of a managed care plan or risk-bearing entity; or maintaining a close relationship with post-acute-care or skilled nursing facilities, which provide valuable expertise in coordinating care across the continuum. ACOs also require comprehensive and integrated data and analytic systems that provide meaningful population data to inform care teams in real time, promote quality improvement, and monitor spending trends. AMCs will require proven care coordination and management strategies within a population health framework and deployment of an innovative workforce.AMC core functions of providing high-quality subspecialty and primary care, generating new knowledge, and training future health care leaders can be well aligned with a transition to an ACO model. Further study of results from Medicare-related ACO programs and commercial ACOs will help define best practices.

  3. BIRD’S-EYE VIEW OF GnRH ANALOG USE IN A PEDIATRIC ENDOCRINOLOGY REFERRAL CENTER

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Sara E.; Greene, Ariana; Lewis, Katherine; Eugster, Erica A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs (GnRHa) are standard of care for the treatment of central precocious puberty (CPP). GnRHa have also been prescribed in other clinical settings with the hope of increasing adult stature, although evidence to support this practice is lacking. The degree to which GnRHa are being prescribed for indications other than CPP in routine clinical care has not been described. We sought to systematically examine GnRHa prescribing practices among the pediatric endocrinologists at our academic medical center. Methods We reviewed medical records of children treated with GnRHa during a 6-year interval. Variables analyzed included gender, age at start of treatment, indication for therapy, and use of growth hormone as adjunctive treatment. Nonparametric analyses were utilized to compare treatment characteristics of those with CPP versus those without. Results A total of 260 patients (82% female) aged 8.06 ± 2.68 years were identified. Of these, 191 (73.5%) were treated for CPP, whereas 69 (26.5%) were treated for normally timed puberty in the context of idiopathic short stature/poor predicted height (n = 37), growth hormone deficiency (n = 17), congenital adrenal hyperplasia (n = 10), primary hypothyroidism (n = 4), and developmental delay (n = 1). Of the 161 girls with CPP, GnRHa therapy was initiated at ≥8 years of age in 62 (39%). Conclusion Whereas most patients were treated for CPP, ~27% were treated for other indications. Of girls with CPP, 39% were treated at an age when benefit in terms of height is unlikely. This highlights the need for rigorous studies of GnRHa use for indications beyond CPP. PMID:25667370

  4. A Person-Centered Investigation of Academic Motivation and Its Correlates in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wormington, Stephanie V.; Corpus, Jennifer Henderlong; Anderson, Kristen G.

    2012-01-01

    This study used a person-centered approach to identify naturally occurring combinations of intrinsic motivation and controlled forms of extrinsic motivation (i.e., introjected and external regulation) and their correlates in an academic context. 1061 high school students completed measures of academic motivation, performance, and school-related…

  5. Patient and primary care provider attitudes and adherence towards lung cancer screening at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Duong, Duy K; Shariff-Marco, Salma; Cheng, Iona; Naemi, Harris; Moy, Lisa M; Haile, Robert; Singh, Baldeep; Leung, Ann; Hsing, Ann; Nair, Viswam S

    2017-06-01

    Low dose CT (LDCT) for lung cancer screening is an evidence-based, guideline recommended, and Medicare approved test but uptake requires further study. We therefore conducted patient and provider surveys to elucidate factors associated with utilization. Patients referred for LDCT at an academic medical center were questioned about their attitudes, knowledge, and beliefs on lung cancer screening. Adherent patients were defined as those who met screening eligibility criteria and completed a LDCT. Referring primary care providers within this same medical system were surveyed in parallel about their practice patterns, attitudes, knowledge and beliefs about screening. Eighty patients responded (36%), 48 of whom were adherent. Among responders, non-Hispanic patients (p = 0.04) were more adherent. Adherent respondents believed that CT technology is accurate and early detection is useful, and they trusted their providers. A majority of non-adherent patients (79%) self-reported an intention to obtain a LDCT in the future. Of 36 of 87 (41%) responding providers, only 31% knew the correct lung cancer screening eligibility criteria, which led to a 37% inappropriate referral rate from 2013 to 2015. Yet, 75% had initiated lung cancer screening discussions, 64% thought screening was at least moderately effective, and 82% were interested in learning more of the 33 providers responding to these questions. Overall, patients were motivated and providers engaged to screen for lung cancer by LDCT. Non-adherent patient "procrastinators" were motivated to undergo screening in the future. Additional follow through on non-adherence may enhance screening uptake, and raising awareness for screening eligibility through provider education may reduce inappropriate referrals.

  6. Academic Career Selection and Retention in Radiation Oncology: The Joint Center for Radiation Therapy Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Balboni, Tracy A. . E-mail: tbalboni@partners.org; Chen, M.-H.; Harris, Jay R.; Recht, Abram; Stevenson, Mary Ann; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: The United States healthcare system has witnessed declining reimbursement and increasing documentation requirements for longer than 10 years. These have decreased the time available to academic faculty for teaching and mentorship. The impact of these changes on the career choices of residents is unknown. The purpose of this report was to determine whether changes have occurred during the past decade in the proportion of radiation oncology trainees from a single institution entering and staying in academic medicine. Methods and Materials: We performed a review of the resident employment experience of Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy residents graduating during 13 recent consecutive years (n = 48 residents). The outcomes analyzed were the initial selection of an academic vs. nonacademic career and career changes during the first 3 years after graduation. Results: Of the 48 residents, 65% pursued an academic career immediately after graduation, and 44% remained in academics at the last follow-up, after a median of 6 years. A later graduation year was associated with a decrease in the proportion of graduates immediately entering academic medicine (odds ratio, 0.78; 95% confidence interval, 0.65-0.94). However, the retention rate at 3 years of those who did immediately enter academics increased with a later graduation year (p = 0.03). Conclusion: During a period marked by notable changes in the academic healthcare environment, the proportion of graduating Harvard Joint Center for Radiation Therapy residents pursuing academic careers has been declining; however, despite this decline, the retention rates in academia have increased.

  7. School-Based Health Centers and Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Poor academic outcomes and high dropout rates are major concerns of educators, policy makers, and parents alike--and poor health severely limits a child's motivation and ability to learn. Recent research confirms that "health disparities affect educational achievement". Improving students' health is integral to education reform.…

  8. Supporting academic health centers with knowledge management: learning from the Web.

    PubMed

    Littleton, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    In a 2003 publication, the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) made explicit the many ways in which a library might contribute to an academic health center's success through knowledge management (KM). Building on Success: Charting the Future of Knowledge Management within the Academic Health Center elucidated the ways in which a library can serve as the center of an organization's KM initiatives. The study and application of knowledge management tools is formidable; unlike information management (IM), the field of knowledge management has roots in a seemingly infinite and wide-ranging number of professional and academic disciplines. The planning of institutional KM initiatives is not commonly discussed, and history shows knowledge management projects often fail to thrive. This column introduces the topic of knowledge management and includes suggested Web-based resources for further understanding and project planning.

  9. Which Emotional Profiles Exhibit the Best Learning Outcomes? A Person-Centered Analysis of Students' Academic Emotions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganotice, Fraide A., Jr.; Datu, Jesus Alfonso D.; King, Ronnel B.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on academic emotions have mostly used variable-centered approaches. Although these studies have elucidated the relationships between academic emotions and key academic outcomes, they cannot identify naturally-occurring groups of students defined by distinct academic emotion profiles. In this study, we adopted a person-centered…

  10. Finding Your Voice: Talent Development Centers and the Academic Talent Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushneck, Amy S.

    2012-01-01

    Talent Development Centers are just one of many tools every family, teacher, and gifted advocate should have in their tool box. To understand the importance of Talent Development Centers, it is essential to also understand the Academic Talent Search Program. Talent Search participants who obtain scores comparable to college-bound high school…

  11. Italian guidelines for intestinal transplantation: potential candidates among the adult patients managed by a medical referral center for chronic intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Pironi, L; Spinucci, G; Paganelli, F; Merli, C; Masetti, M; Miglioli, M; Pinna, A D

    2004-04-01

    In 2002, the Italian guidelines for eligibility of patients for intestinal transplantation (ITx) were defined as: life-threatening complications of home parenteral nutrition (HPN), lack of venous access for HPN, locally invasive tumors of the abdomen, Chronic intestinal failure (CIF) with a high risk of mortality, primary disease-related poor quality of life (QoL) despite optimal HPN. Our aim was to identify potential candidates for ITx according to these national guidelines among patients managed by a medical referral center for CIF. Records of patients who received HPN were reviewed. CIF was considered reversible or irreversible (energy by HPN <50% or >50% basal energy expenditure). Patients with irreversible CIF were considered eligible for ITx in the absence of a contraindication, as are used for solid organs Tx. From 1986 to 2003 among 64 patients who met the entry criteria 23 showed reversible and 41 irreversible, CIF. Twenty-one patients with irreversible CIF had an indication for ITx, but eight had also contraindications; thus 13 were eligible, including intestinal pseudo-obstruction (n = 6), mesenteric ischemia (n = 3), Crohn's (n = 2), radiation enteritis (n = 1), and desmoid (n = 1). Indications for ITx included HPN liver failure (n = 2), lack of venous access (n = 2), CIF with high risk of mortality (n = 3), very poor QoL (n = 6 including 5 with pseudo-obstruction). According to the Italian guidelines for ITx, 31% of patients with irreversible CIF managed by a medical referral center were eligible for ITx. Primary disease-related poor QoL was the indication in half of them. Studies on the QoL after ITx are required to allow patients to make an educated decision.

  12. A rural cancer outreach program lowers patient care costs and benefits both the rural hospitals and sponsoring academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Desch, C E; Grasso, M A; McCue, M J; Buonaiuto, D; Grasso, K; Johantgen, M K; Shaw, J E; Smith, T J

    1999-01-01

    The Rural Cancer Outreach Program (RCOP) between two rural hospitals and the Medical College of Virginia's Massey Cancer Center (MCC) was developed to bring state-of-the-art cancer care to medically underserved rural patients. The financial impact of the RCOP on both the rural hospitals and the MCC was analyzed. Pre- and post-RCOP financial data were collected on 1,745 cancer patients treated at the participating centers, two rural community hospitals and the MCC. The main outcome measures were costs (estimated reimbursement from all sources), revenues, contribution margins and profit (or loss) of the program. The RCOP may have enhanced access to cancer care for rural patients at less cost to society. The net annual cost per patient fell from $10,233 to $3,862 associated with more use of outpatient services, more efficient use of resources, and the shift to a less expensive locus of care. The cost for each rural patient admitted to the Medical College of Virginia fell by more than 40 percent compared with only an 8 percent decrease for all other cancer patients. The rural hospitals experienced rapid growth of their programs to more than 200 new patients yearly, and the RCOP generated significant profits for them. MCC benefited from increased referrals from RCOP service areas by 330 percent for cancer patients and by 9 percent for non-cancer patients during the same time period. While it did not generate a major profit for the MCC, the RCOP generated enough revenue to cover costs of the program. The RCOP had a positive financial impact on the rural and academic medical center hospitals, provided state-of-the-art care near home for rural patients and was associated with lower overall cancer treatment costs.

  13. Strength and influence of geriatrics departments in academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Marie A; Blanchette, Patricia L; Brummel-Smith, Kenneth

    2009-05-01

    The United States is establishing new medical schools and increasing class size by 30% in response to the predicted increased needs of the baby boom generation, which will retire soon and live longer than prior generations. Society in general and the medical profession in particular are ill equipped to care for the special needs of the elderly. Since the early 1980s, departments of geriatric medicine have been developed in the United States. However, the prevailing U.S. system for the training of physicians in geriatrics is through sections, divisions, or institutes. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of departments of geriatrics, using case examples from three (University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Florida State University College of Medicine, and University of Hawaii at Mãnoa John A. Burns School of Medicine) of the extant 11 medical schools in the United States with departments of geriatrics. Commonalities among the three departments include a seat at the planning table in academic life, equal treatment and collaboration with other departments in academic and research program development, and direct access to key decision makers and opportunities for negotiation for funds. Each department has outreach to all undergraduate medical students through its training program. All three departments were launched through the investment of significant resources obtained both internally and externally. The challenge for the future will be to definitively demonstrate the efficacy of the department model versus the more prevalent section, division, and institute approach to training physicians to care for the elderly.

  14. A retrospective epidemiological study of skin diseases among pediatric population attending a tertiary dermatology referral center in Northern Greece

    PubMed Central

    Vakirlis, Efstratios; Theodosiou, Grigorios; Apalla, Zoe; Arabatzis, Michael; Lazaridou, Elizabeth; Sotiriou, Elena; Lallas, Aimilios; Ioannides, Demetrios

    2017-01-01

    Background The incidence of skin diseases in children is influenced by hereditary, social, and environmental factors. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of pediatric dermatoses at a University Hospital in Northern Greece. Patients and methods We reviewed epidemiologic data of 940 patients, aged 0–18 years, who were referred to the outpatient clinic of a University Hospital between January 2013 and December 2015. Demographic data and the frequency of the various diagnoses in various age groups were studied. Results Nine hundred and forty children and adolescents with 1020 diagnoses were included in the study (52.8% females and 47.2% males). The 10 most frequent diagnoses were: dermatitis/eczema (31.5%), viral infections (12.5%), pigmentary disorders (7.4%), melanocytic nevi (5.8%), alopecia areata (5.8%), acne (5.6%), nail disorders (3.3%), vascular malformations and hemangiomas (2.9%), psoriasis (2.6%), and bacterial infections (2.6%). Atopic dermatitis was the most prevalent dermatosis in all age groups accounting for a total of 20.9% of the study population. A remarkably high incidence of various forms of mastocytosis (2.2%) was seen in our data. Conclusion Atopic dermatitis is the most frequent pediatric dermatosis in all age groups. Viral infections, pigmentary disorders, and nevi account for a significant proportion of the referrals. The high incidence of mastocytosis in our study may be attributed to overdiagnosis, overestimation due to the relatively small study population, or it may represent the real incidence of mastocytosis in our region. The low incidence of acne in our study may be attributed to the fact that only severe cases are referred to our hospital.

  15. Rice University: Building an Academic Center for Nonprofit Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaworth, Angela

    2012-01-01

    According to the author, the setting for their nonprofit education center was close to ideal: Support from a dean who cares deeply about nonprofit organizations; encouragement from the university and its renewed focus on reaching beyond its walls on the eve of its centennial; and a generous gift from alumni who have been affiliated with the…

  16. Meeting Academic Standards through Peer Dialogue at Literacy Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Literacy centers are widely used by teachers seen as being effective in promoting literacy (Pressley, Rankin, & Yokoi, 2000); yet little research has been completed on how or why they are effective. Based on the social cultural constructivist theory posited by Vygotsky (1978), and research theories of Dyson (1993), the peer dialogue at the…

  17. Predictors of early faculty attrition at one Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Faculty turnover threatens the research, teaching and clinical missions of medical schools. We measured early attrition among newly-hired medical school faculty and identified personal and institutional factors associated with early attrition. Methods This retrospective cohort study identified faculty hired during the 2005–2006 academic year at one school. Three-year attrition rates were measured. A 40-question electronic survey measured demographics, career satisfaction, faculty responsibilities, institutional/departmental support, and reasons for resignation. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95 percent confidence intervals (95% CI) identified variables associated with early attrition. Results Of 139 faculty, 34% (95% CI = 26-42%) resigned within three years of hire. Attrition was associated with: perceived failure of the Department Chair to foster a climate of teaching, research, and service (OR = 6.03; 95% CI: 1.84, 19.69), inclusiveness, respect, and open communication (OR = 3.21; 95% CI: 1.04, 9.98). Lack of professional development of the faculty member (OR = 3.84; 95% CI: 1.25, 11.81); institutional recognition and support for excellence in teaching (OR = 2.96; 95% CI: 0.78, 11.19) and clinical care (OR = 3.87; 95% CI: 1.04, 14.41); and >50% of professional time devoted to patient care (OR = 3.93; 95% CI: 1.29, 11.93) predicted attrition. Gender, race, ethnicity, academic degree, department type and tenure status did not predict early attrition. Of still-active faculty, an additional 27 (48.2%, 95% CI: 35.8, 61.0) reported considering resignation within the 5 years. Conclusions In this pilot study, one-third of new faculty resigned within 3 years of hire. Greater awareness of predictors of early attrition may help schools identify threats to faculty career satisfaction and retention. PMID:24512629

  18. Development of a quarterly referral productivity report.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cai; Sandoval, Alex; Hicks, Katrina N; Edwards, Tim J; Green, Lyle D

    2007-10-11

    The Office of Physician Relations at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) has developed a dynamic referral productivity reporting tool for its Multidisciplinary Care Centers (MCC). The tool leverages information within the institution's Enterprise Information Warehouse (EIW) using business intelligent software Hyperion Intelligent Explorer Suite 8.3. the referral productivity reports are intended to provide each MCC with detailed referral and registration data outlining how, and from where, patients arrive here for treatment. The reports supports operational and strategic initiatives aimed at improving referral processes and market related program development.

  19. A path to integration in an academic health science center.

    PubMed

    Panko, W B; Wilson, W

    1992-01-01

    This article describes a networking and integration strategy in use at the University of Michigan Medical Center. This strategy builds upon the existing technology base and is designed to provide a roadmap that will direct short-term development along a productive, long-term path. It offers a way to permit the short-term development of incremental solutions to current problems while at the same time maximizing the likelihood that these incremental efforts can be recycled into a more comprehensive approach.

  20. Cyclotron Production of Radionuclides for Nuclear Medicine at Academic Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapi, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    The increase in use of radioisotopes for medical imaging has led to the development of new accelerator targetry and separation techniques for isotope production. For example, the development of longer-lived position emitting radionuclides has been explored to allow for nuclear imaging agents based on peptides, antibodies and nanoparticles. These isotopes (64Cu, 89Zr, 86Y) are typically produced via irradiation of solid targets on smaller cyclotrons (10-25 MeV) at academic or hospital based facilities. Recent research has further expanded the toolbox of PET tracers to include additional isotopes such as 52Mn, 55Co, 76Br and others. The smaller scale of these types of facilities can enable the straightforward involvement of students, thus adding to the next generation of nuclear science leaders. Research pertaining to development of robust and larger scale production technologies including solid target systems and remote systems for transport and purification of these isotopes has enabled both preclinical and clinical imaging research for many diseases. In particular, our group has focused on the use of radiolabeled antibodies for imaging of receptor expression in preclinical models and in a clinical trial of metastatic breast cancer patients.

  1. Evaluation of the indications for performing magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis at a referral center for cancer, according to the American College of Radiology criteria

    PubMed Central

    Boaventura, Camila Silva; Rodrigues, Daniel Padilha; Silva, Olimpio Antonio Cornehl; Beltrani, Fabrício Henrique; de Melo, Rayssa Araruna Bezerra; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Mendes, Gustavo Gomes; Chojniak, Rubens

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the indications for performing magnetic resonance imaging of the female pelvis at a referral center for cancer. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective, single-center study, conducted by reviewing medical records and imaging reports. We included 1060 female patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis at a cancer center between January 2013 and June 2014. The indications for performing the examination were classified according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) criteria. Results The mean age of the patients was 52.6 ± 14.8 years, and 49.8% were perimenopausal or postmenopausal. The majority (63.9%) had a history of cancer, which was gynecologic in 29.5% and nongynecologic in 34.4%. Of the patients evaluated, 44.0% had clinical complaints, the most common being pelvic pain (in 11.5%) and bleeding (in 9.8%), and 34.7% of patients had previously had abnormal findings on ultrasound. Most (76.7%) of the patients met the criteria for undergoing magnetic resonance imaging, according to the ACR guidelines. The main indications were evaluation of tumor recurrence after surgical resection (in 25.9%); detection and staging of gynecologic neoplasms (in 23.3%); and evaluation of pelvic pain or of a mass (in 17.1%). Conclusion In the majority of the cases evaluated, magnetic resonance imaging was clearly indicated according to the ACR criteria. The main indication was local recurrence after surgical treatment of pelvic malignancies, which is consistent with the routine protocols at cancer centers. PMID:28298725

  2. A path to integration in an academic health science center.

    PubMed Central

    Panko, W. B.; Wilson, W.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes a networking and integration strategy in use at the University of Michigan Medical Center. This strategy builds upon the existing technology base and is designed to provide a roadmap that will direct short-term development along a productive, long-term path. It offers a way to permit the short-term development of incremental solutions to current problems while at the same time maximizing the likelihood that these incremental efforts can be recycled into a more comprehensive approach. PMID:1336413

  3. The Influence of Insurance Status on Access to and Utilization of a Tertiary Hand Surgery Referral Center

    PubMed Central

    Calfee, Ryan P.; Shah, Chirag M.; Canham, Colin D.; Wong, Ambrose H.W.; Gelberman, Richard H.; Goldfarb, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to systematically examine the impact of insurance status on access to and utilization of elective specialty hand surgical care. We hypothesized that patients with Medicaid insurance or those without insurance would have greater difficulty accessing care both in obtaining local surgical care and in reaching a tertiary center for appointments. Methods: This retrospective cohort study included all new patients with orthopaedic hand problems (n = 3988) at a tertiary center in a twelve-month period. Patient insurance status was categorized and clinical complexity was quantified on an ordinal scale. The relationships of insurance status, clinical complexity, and distance traveled to appointments were quantified by means of statistical analysis. An assessment of barriers to accessing care stratified with regard to insurance status was completed through a survey of primary care physicians and an analysis of both patient arrival rates and operative rates at our tertiary center. Results: Increasing clinical complexity significantly correlated (p < 0.001) with increasing driving distance to the appointment. Patients with Medicaid insurance were significantly less likely (p < 0.001) to present with problems of simple clinical complexity than patients with Medicare and those with private insurance. Primary care physicians reported that 62% of local surgeons accepted patients with Medicaid insurance and 100% of local surgeons accepted patients with private insurance. Forty-four percent of these primary care physicians reported that, if patients who were underinsured (i.e., patients with Medicaid insurance or no insurance) had been refused by community surgeons, they were unable to drive to our tertiary center because of limited personal resources. Patients with Medicaid insurance (26%) were significantly more likely (p < 0.001) to fail to arrive for appointments than patients with private insurance (11%), with no-show rates increasing

  4. Generation X: implications for faculty recruitment and development in academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Janet; Brown, Ann J

    2005-03-01

    Differences and tensions between the Baby Boom generation (born 1945-1962) and Generation X (born 1963-1981) have profound implications for the future of academic medicine. By and large, department heads and senior faculty are Boomers; today's residents and junior faculty are Generation X'ers. Looking at these issues in terms of the generations involved offers insights into a number of faculty development challenges, including inadequate and inexpert mentoring, work-life conflicts, and low faculty morale. These insights suggest strategies for strengthening academic medicine's recruitment and retention of Generation X into faculty and leadership roles. These strategies include (1) improving career and academic advising by specific attention to mentoring "across differences"--for instance, broaching the subject of formative differences in background during the initial interaction; adopting a style that incorporates information-sharing with engagement in problem solving; offering frequent, frank feedback; and refraining from comparing today to the glories of yesterday; to support such improvements, medical schools should recognize and evaluate mentoring as a core academic responsibility; (2) retaining both valued women and men in academic careers by having departments add temporal flexibility and create and legitimize less-than-full-time appointments; and (3) providing trainees and junior faculty with ready access to educational sessions designed to turn their "intellectual capital" into "academic career capital."Given the trends discussed in this article, such supports and adaptations are indicated to assure that academic health centers maintain traditions of excellence.

  5. Luxury primary care, academic medical centers, and the erosion of science and professional ethics.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Medical schools and teaching hospitals have been hit particularly hard by the financial crisis affecting health care in the United States. To compete financially, many academic medical centers have recruited wealthy foreign patients and established luxury primary care clinics. At these clinics, patients are offered tests supported by little evidence of their clinical and/or cost effectiveness, which erodes the scientific underpinnings of medical practice. Given widespread disparities in health, wealth, and access to care, as well as growing cynicism and dissatisfaction with medicine among trainees, the promotion by these institutions of an overt, two-tiered system of care, which exacerbates inequities and injustice, erodes professional ethics. Academic medical centers should divert their intellectual and financial resources away from luxury primary care and toward more equitable and just programs designed to promote individual, community, and global health. The public and its legislators should, in turn, provide adequate funds to enable this. Ways for academic medicine to facilitate this largesse are discussed.

  6. Medical economics of PM&R. V. Surviving the complexities of academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Melvin, J L; Pate, C M

    1993-02-01

    The mission statements of academic medical centers call on them to accomplish many goals. This often leads to conflicting choices when selecting activities and establishing policies. When individual faculty members are expected to divide work time to meet research, teaching and clinical needs, careful planning and disciplined decisions of action are necessary to avoid a sense of ambiguity and frustration.

  7. The Northwest Indiana Center for Data and Analysis: A Case Study of Academic Library Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Scott; Morris, Cele; Sutherland, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    This paper details community engagement activity of an academic library coordinated within a broader university strategic plan. The Anderson Library at Indiana University Northwest (IU-Northwest) supports a service called the Northwest Indiana Center for Data and Analysis. Created in 1996 with funding made available from the Indiana University…

  8. Crossing the Great Divide: Adoption of New Technologies, Therapeutics and Diagnostics at Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMonaco, Harold J.; Koski, Greg

    2007-01-01

    The role of new technology in healthcare continues to expand from both the clinical and financial perspectives. Despite the importance of innovation, most academic medical centers do not have a clearly defined process for technology assessment. Recognizing the importance of new drugs, diagnostics and procedures in the care of patients and in the…

  9. Merging Libraries and Computer Centers: Manifest Destiny or Manifestly Deranged? An Academic Services Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Raymond K.

    1985-01-01

    Details trends in information access, services, packaging, dissemination, and networking, service fees, archival storage devices, and electronic information packaging that could lead to complete mergers of academic libraries and computing centers with shared responsibilities. University of California at Berkeley's comprehensive strategy for…

  10. Transformation of an academic medical center: lessons learned from restructuring and downsizing.

    PubMed

    Woodard, B; Fottler, M D; Kilpatrick, A O

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews management literature on health care transformation and describes the processes, including restructuring, job redesign, and downsizing, involved in one academic medical center's experience. The article concludes with lessons learned at each of the stages of the transformation process: planning, implementation, and process continuation. Managerial implications for similar transformation efforts in other health care organizations are suggested.

  11. Books, Bytes, and Bridges: Libraries and Computer Centers in Academic Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Larry, Ed.

    This book about the relationship between computer centers and libraries at academic institutions contains the following chapters: (1) "A History of the Rhetoric and Reality of Library and Computing Relationships" (Peggy Seiden and Michael D. Kathman); (2) "An Issue in Search of a Metaphor: Readings on the Marriageability of…

  12. The History of SHSAAMc: Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeser, Peggy Ingram; Hembree, Wylie; Bonner, Julia

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an historical review of the organization known as Student Health Services at Academic Medical Centers (SHSAAMc). The authors discuss characteristics of health service directors as well as the history of meetings, discussion, and leadership. The focus of the group is the healthcare needs of health professions students at…

  13. Developing a Sustainable Research Culture in an Independent Academic Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Jeffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Independent academic medical centers (IAMC) are challenged to develop and support a research enterprise and maintain primary goals of healthcare delivery and financial solvency. Strategies for promoting translational research have been shown to be effective at institutions in the top level of federal funding, but not for smaller IAMCs. The…

  14. Veterans Affairs and Academic Medical Center Affiliations: The North Texas Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohl, Paul Cecil; Hendrickse, William; Orsak, Catherine; Vermette, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors review the more than 30-year history of the academic affiliation between the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas and the Mental Health Service at the Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System. Methods: The authors interviewed individuals involved at various stages…

  15. Pearce Academic Center for Excellence (PACE): 1984-85 Final Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Belinda Olivarez; Schuyler, Nancy

    Pearce Academic Center for Excellence, Project PACE, involved one English/language arts teacher providing individualized instruction in the mechanics of basic English (e.g., parts of speech, rules on capitalization and punctuation, spelling, sentence writing, and library and dictionary skills) to grade seven and eight retainees in language arts…

  16. Developing physician leaders in academic medical centers. Part 1: Their changing role.

    PubMed

    Bachrach, D J

    1996-01-01

    While physicians have historically held positions of leadership in academic medical centers, there is an increasing trend that physicians will not only guide the clinical, curriculum and scientific direction of the institution, but its business direction as well. Physicians are assuming a greater role in business decision making and are found at the negotiating table with leaders from business, insurance and other integrated health care delivery systems. Physicians who lead "strategic business units" within the academic medical center are expected to acquire and demonstrate enhanced business acumen. There is an increasing demand for formal and informal training programs for physicians in academic medical centers in order to better prepare them for their evolving roles and responsibilities. These may include the pursuit of a second degree in business or health care management, intramurally conducted courses in leadership skill development; management, business and finance; or involvement in extramurally prepared and delivered training programs specifically geared toward physicians as conducted at major universities, often in their schools of business or public health. This article article was prepared by the author from research into and presentation of a thesis entitled. "The Importance of Leadership Training And Development For Physicians In Academic Medical Centers In An Increasingly Complex Healthcare Environment, " prepared for the Credentials Committee of the American College of Healthcare Executives in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Fellowship in the College (ACHE). Part 2 will appear in the next issue of the Journal.

  17. Eleven Years of Primary Health Care Delivery in an Academic Nursing Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildebrandt, Eugenie; Baisch, Mary Jo; Lundeen, Sally P.; Bell-Calvin, Jean; Kelber, Sheryl

    2003-01-01

    Client visits to an academic community nursing center (n=25,495) were coded and analyzed. Results show expansion of nursing practice and services, strong case management, and management of illness care. The usefulness of computerized clinical documentation system and of the Lundeen conceptional model of community nursing care was demonstrated.…

  18. Academic Faculty in University Research Centers: Neither Capitalism's Slaves nor Teaching Fugitives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozeman, Barry; Boardman, Craig

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses university-industry interactions for both educational and industrial outcomes. The results suggest that while academic faculty who are affiliated with centers are more involved with industry than non-affiliated faculty, affiliates are also more involved with and supportive of students at the undergraduate, graduate, and…

  19. Leadership Practices of Clinical Trials Office Leaders in Academic Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naser, Diana D.

    2012-01-01

    In the ever-changing clinical research environment, academic health centers seek leaders who are visionary and innovative. Clinical trials offices across the country are led by individuals who are charged with promoting growth and change in order to maximize performance, develop unique research initiatives, and help institutions achieve a…

  20. Northeast Academic Science Information Center (NASIC), Phase I Report (March 1973-February 1974). Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New England Board of Higher Education, Wellesley, MA. Northeast Academic Science Information Center.

    In this fourth volume of a four-volume report on the activities of the Northeast Academic Science Information Center (NASIC), two studies are reported. The first was a study of the feasibility of marketing bibliographic and census data base products and services via NASIC. It represented an attempt to build a profile of the potential market for…

  1. Managing Academic Health Centers: Meeting the Challenges of the New Health Care World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commonwealth Fund, New York, NY.

    This report focuses on strategies documented by the Commonwealth Fund Task Force on Academic Health Centers (AHCs) concerning AHCs' management of patient care and research missions. Whatever challenges AHCs face in the future, their ability to respond effectively will be determined by the quality of their governance and management. To improve…

  2. The ARAMCO Industrial Traiing Centers: Academic Training and College Preparatory Programs: A Descriptive Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ARAMCO Services Co., Houston, TX.

    The report describes the components of the educational program provided by the Industrial Training Centers of the Training and Career Development Organization of ARAMCO (Arabian American Oil Company) in Saudi Arabia. ARAMCO provides in-house academic or job skills training to over 15,000 employees. Characteristics of the company's training program…

  3. Characteristics of Severe Retinopathy of Prematurity in Infants with Birth Weight above 1500 Grams at a Referral Center in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Gunay, Murat; Celik, Gokhan; Tuten, Abdulhamit; Karatekin, Guner; Bardak, Handan; Ovali, Fahri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in preterm infants with birth weight (BW) above 1500 g in Turkey. Methods A retrospective review of 5920 ROP records was performed in Zeynep Kamil Maternity and Children’s Diseases Training and Research Hospital. The records were obtained from ROP treatment center of the same institute between 2011 and 2016. The data comprised the demographic and clinical characteristics including, gestational age, BW, systemic risk factors, zone and stage of ROP, ROP type, treatment modality, treatment outcomes and inborn/outborn status of the babies. Results A total of 36 infants (71 eyes) with severe ROP and BW> 1500 g were retrieved. There were 30 infants (83.3%) with type 1 ROP and 6 infants (16.7%) with aggressive posterior ROP (APROP). 3 infants (8.3%) were born at our hospital whereas 33 (91.7%) were referred from outer private neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) centers. Zone I APROP was detected during the initial screening. 21 infants (58.3%) underwent laser treatment while 15 (41.7%) received intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) injections. No unfavorable structural outcome was observed following either treatment modality. Conclusion Severe ROP may occur in heavier preterm infants. Laser treatment and IVB injections were useful in selected cases. Presence of APROP at first examination suggests an earlier screening in heavier babies. Standardization of private NICU centers as well as establishing a national ROP protocol is necessary in Turkey. PMID:27548628

  4. The association between fecal incontinence and sexual activity and function in women attending a tertiary referral center

    PubMed Central

    Cichowski, Sara B.; Komesu, Yuko M.; Dunivan, Gena C.; Rogers, Rebecca G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis To determine whether fecal incontinence (FI) is associated with sexual activity and to compare sexual function in women with and without FI. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of all new patients seen in an academic urogynecology clinic. Women who reported fecal incontinence, as defined by loss of fecal material on the Wexner scale, were compared with those without fecal incontinence. We compared sexual activity and Pelvic Organ Prolapse Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12) scores between groups. Results In our population of women with pelvic floor disorder, 588 women reported FI compared with 527 who did not. On multivariate analysis, FI was not associated with sexual activity status, but was associated with worsened PISQ-12 scores (p<0.001). PISQ-12 item analysis found that women with FI reported more dyspareunia, fear, and avoidance of sexual activity with greater partner problems (all p <0.05) than women without FI. Conclusions Women with FI were as likely to engage in sexual relations as women without FI; however, sexually active women with FI had poorer sexual function than those without FI. PMID:23389640

  5. Characteristics of Travel-Related Severe Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Individuals Hospitalized at a Tertiary Referral Center in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Llanos-Chea, Fiorella; Martínez, Dalila; Rosas, Angel; Samalvides, Frine; Vinetz, Joseph M; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro

    2015-12-01

    Severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria is uncommon in South America. Lima, Peru, while not endemic for malaria, is home to specialized centers for infectious diseases that admit and manage patients with severe malaria (SM), all of whom contracted infection during travel. This retrospective study describes severe travel-related malaria in individuals admitted to one tertiary care referral hospital in Lima, Peru; severity was classified based on criteria published by the World Health Organization in 2000. Data were abstracted from medical records of patients with SM admitted to Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia from 2006 to 2011. Of 33 SM cases with complete clinical data, the mean age was 39 years and the male/female ratio was 2.8. Most cases were contracted in known endemic regions within Peru: Amazonia (47%), the central jungle (18%), and the northern coast (12%); cases were also found in five (15%) travelers returning from Africa. Plasmodium vivax was most commonly identified (71%) among the severe infections, followed by P. falciparum (18%); mixed infections composed 11% of the group. Among the criteria of severity, jaundice was most common (58%), followed by severe thrombocytopenia (47%), hyperpyrexia (32%), and shock (15%). Plasmodium vivax mono-infection predominated as the etiology of SM in cases acquired in Peru.

  6. Characteristics of Travel-Related Severe Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Individuals Hospitalized at a Tertiary Referral Center in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Llanos-Chea, Fiorella; Martínez, Dalila; Rosas, Angel; Samalvides, Frine; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria is uncommon in South America. Lima, Peru, while not endemic for malaria, is home to specialized centers for infectious diseases that admit and manage patients with severe malaria (SM), all of whom contracted infection during travel. This retrospective study describes severe travel-related malaria in individuals admitted to one tertiary care referral hospital in Lima, Peru; severity was classified based on criteria published by the World Health Organization in 2000. Data were abstracted from medical records of patients with SM admitted to Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia from 2006 to 2011. Of 33 SM cases with complete clinical data, the mean age was 39 years and the male/female ratio was 2.8. Most cases were contracted in known endemic regions within Peru: Amazonia (47%), the central jungle (18%), and the northern coast (12%); cases were also found in five (15%) travelers returning from Africa. Plasmodium vivax was most commonly identified (71%) among the severe infections, followed by P. falciparum (18%); mixed infections composed 11% of the group. Among the criteria of severity, jaundice was most common (58%), followed by severe thrombocytopenia (47%), hyperpyrexia (32%), and shock (15%). Plasmodium vivax mono-infection predominated as the etiology of SM in cases acquired in Peru. PMID:26483126

  7. Magnetic Resonance Enterography in 300 Known Cases of Crohn’s Disease: An Initial Report from a Referral Center in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Radmard, Amir Reza; Haghighi, Sepehr; Hashemi Taheri, Amir Pejman; Mohammadinejad, Payam; Eftekhar Vaghefi, Rana; Naybandi Atashi, Sara; Pak, Neda; Aghaghazvini, Leila; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has become the modality of choice in assessment of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD). We aimed to present our experience on 300 patients with CD who underwent MRE during the first 30 months after setting up MRE for the first time in a referral center in Iran. METHODS Patients with a definite diagnosis of CD based on either ileocolonoscopy or histopathological studies were included in the final report and categorized into four phenotypes of inactive, active, stricturing, and penetrating disease. RESULTS This was a case series study on 300 patients with known CD out of 594 referred subjects. The most prevalent phenotype was inactive observed in 162 (54.0%) patients followed by stricturing in 44 (14.7%), active in 40 (13.3%), penetrating in 27(9%), and active on chronic in 27 (9%) cases. The number of referred patients increased from 51 cases in the first 6 months to 165 in the last 6 months. CONCLUSION This study presents the first report on the application of MRE in Iran as superb modality for management of CD. The growing number of referred patients indicates that MRE has been successful in addressing the most critical concerns of clinicians on determining the dominant disease phenotype. PMID:27957290

  8. [Sexual violence: a descriptive study of rape victims and care in a university referral center in São Paulo State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Facuri, Cláudia de Oliveira; Fernandes, Arlete Maria Dos Santos; Oliveira, Karina Diniz; Andrade, Tiago Dos Santos; Azevedo, Renata Cruz Soares de

    2013-05-01

    Rape is a global public health problem, and steps have been taken to encourage studies on the issue and propose interventions for its prevention and appropriate care. This study aimed to characterize the population of female rape victims and describe the characteristics of the sexual assault and the care provided at a university referral center. This was a quantitative retrospective study of care provided to female rape victims from June 2006 to December 2010. The majority of the women (n = 687) were white, single, had no children, with a mean age of 23.7 years and primary to secondary schooling, employed, and practiced a religion. One-fourth of the victims reported no sexual intercourse prior to the sexual assault. Rape occurred mainly at night, on the street, perpetrated by a single stranger, with vaginal penetration, and with threatened or actual force. Most of the victims had reported the rape to someone and felt supported. Early care occurred for almost 90% of women, allowing preventive measures. From 2006 to 2010 there was an increase in the proportion of women that sought help. Better knowledge of the characteristics of this group and the event itself can help improve the structure and functioning of models to assist rape victims.

  9. The epidemiology and type of injuries seen at the accident and emergency unit of a Nigerian referral center

    PubMed Central

    Adoga, Adeyi A.; Ozoilo, Kenneth N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A plethora of injuries present at any accident and emergency unit, but the pattern of the injuries varies from region to region especially in ours with the increased ethno-religious clashes and terrorist attacks. This study aims to determine the epidemiology and type of injuries presenting to our center with the possibility of developing injury surveillance initiatives in our center and Nigeria as a whole. Materials and Methods: Injured patients consecutively presenting to the accident and emergency department of the Jos University Teaching Hospital within the period February 2011 to January 2012 were prospectively recorded. Results: A total of 720 injured patients admitted with an age range of 8 months to 75 years (mean = 37.9; SD = ±52.4), which consists of 544 males and 176 females giving a male to female ratio of 3.1:1. Patients aged 20-29 years were in the majority (n = 220, 30.6%) with peak incidences in the period of communal clashes. Injuries sustained from motorcycles were the highest (n = 248, 34.4%). Others were 160 (22.2%) in other vehicular and pedestrian injuries, machete (n = 128), gunshots (n = 92), burns (n = 36), bomb blast injuries (n = 16), fall from heights (n = 32) and miscellaneous (n = 8). Injuries sustained in communal clashes and terrorist attacks accounted for 236 (32.8%) presentations. The most common site of injury was the head (n = 30 4, 42.2%). Relatives, passersby and law enforcement agencies brought patients to the hospital with times between injury and presentation ranging from 1 h to 3 weeks. 40 (5.6%) patients were brought in dead. Conclusion: A collective effort - on the part of the government and the citizenry is required to ensure better outcomes and a safer society for all. PMID:24812451

  10. Accelerating change: Fostering innovation in healthcare delivery at academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Andrey; Barnett, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) have the potential to be leaders in the era of healthcare delivery reform, but most have yet to display a commitment to delivery innovation on par with their commitment to basic research. Several institutional factors impede delivery innovation including the paucity of adequate training in design and implementation of new delivery models and the lack of established pathways for academic career advancement outside of research. This paper proposes two initiatives to jumpstart disruptive innovation at AMCs: an institutional "innovation incubator" program and a clinician-innovator career track coupled with innovation training programs.

  11. Genetic heterogeneity of hemoglobin AEBart's disease: a large cohort data from a single referral center in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chaibunruang, Attawut; Karnpean, Rossarin; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Fucharoen, Supan

    2014-04-01

    AEBart's disease is a thalassemia intermedia usually characterized by the interaction of α(0)-thalassemia with either deletional or non-deletional α(+)-thalassemia in Hb E heterozygote. Genotypic and phenotypic features are heterogeneous. We studied the hematologic and molecular characteristics of this disease in a cohort of 173 Thai patients encountered at our center in northeast Thailand. Hemoglobin and DNA analyses identified patients with deletional AEBart's disease (n=84), Hb Constant Spring AEBart's disease (n=81), Hb Paksé-AEBart's disease (n=5), AEBart's disease with codon 30 mutation (n=1) and two hitherto un-described forms of AEBart's disease due to interaction of Hb E heterozygote and α(0)-thalassemia with the -α(16.6)kb deletional α(+)-thalassemia (n=1) and Hb Q-Thailand (n=1). Different phenotypic expression of these AEBart's diseases with low Hb, Hct and MCV and increased RDW values with marked reduction in Hb E levels were observed. It was found that all these forms of AEBart's disease showed similar thalassemia intermedia phenotypes but those with non-deletional forms were relatively more anemic. Our data confirm that in such area with high prevalence of hemoglobinopathies such as Southeast Asia, identification of rare thalassemia alleles in a thalassemia intermedia patient should not be ignored. Careful consideration of different phenotypic expression may help in providing presumptive diagnosis of this disease where access to molecular testing is limited. However, molecular diagnostic is useful for predicting the clinical outcome and improving genetic counseling of these complex hemoglobinopathies.

  12. The changing face of academic health centers: a path forward for the University of Colorado Denver.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M Roy; Krugman, Richard D

    2008-09-01

    This article describes a decade of major changes at an academic health center (AHC) and university. The authors describe two major changes undertaken at the University of Colorado and its AHC during the past 10 years and the effects of these changes on the organization as a whole. First, the AHC's four health professional schools and two partner hospitals were completely relocated from a space-limited urban campus to a closed Army base. The impact of that change and the management of its potential disruption of academic programs are discussed in detail. In the middle of this total relocation, the AHC campus was consolidated with a general academic campus within the University of Colorado system, compounding the challenge. The authors describe the strategies employed to implement this major consolidation, including changing the organizational structure and selecting the new name of the university--the University of Colorado Denver.

  13. Factors Related to Non-Referral of Patients with Presumptive Pulmonary TB to Designated Microscopy Centers (DMCs) by Registered Private Practitioners in Urban Areas of Punjab, India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Whig, Jagdeep; Satija, Mahesh; Chaudhary, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    Background Early diagnosis and proper treatment under RNTCP guidelines, forms the mainstay of management of a TB patient. A large proportion of patients with presumptive tuberculosis (TB) visit a Private Practitioner (PP) in the first place. Studies have shown that PPs rely more on X-rays and other diagnostic tools rather than referring the patient to the nearest Designated Microscopy Centre (DMC) for sputum microscopy. Aim The present study was planned to look in to factors responsible for non-referral of patients with presumptive pulmonary TB to the DMCs for diagnosis by PPs. Materials and Methods Present study was a case-control study conducted over a period of one year among registered PPs in urban areas of Punjab. The study was carried out in five major cities which have approximately half of the urban population of Punjab. Forty three Private Practitioners per city for referral group and 43 matched PPs for non-referral group were selected. Results Knowledge regarding RNTCP was low in both the referral (38.1%) as well as non-referral (25.6%) group of PPs. Allopathic doctors had significantly higher knowledge regarding TB as compared to ayurvedic and homeopathy doctors, and Registered Medical Practitioners (RMP). Both the knowledge of PPs regarding nearest DMC as well as perception about accessibility of the nearest DMC for the patients were found to be significantly higher in the referral group. Only 15.3% of practitioners in the non-referral group said that they had been contacted by RNTCP staff. Conclusion The main factors responsible for non-referral of pulmonary TB suspects to DMCs for diagnosis in the present study included low knowledge regarding RNTCP, lack of awareness regarding place and accessibility of nearest DMC, and inadequate sensitization of PPs by the RNTCP staff. PMID:26674553

  14. The Impact of Angelina Jolie (AJ)'s Story on Genetic Referral and Testing at an Academic Cancer Centre in Canada.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Jacques; Verma, Sunil; Hewitt, Paul; Eisen, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    In May 2013, Angelina Jolie revealed to the media that she had undergone preventive double mastectomy after testing positive for a BRCA1 gene mutation. Media coverage has been extensive, but it is not clear how such a personal story affected the public and cancer genetics clinics. We conducted a retrospective review using data from the clinical database of the Familial Cancer Program at our centre. The impact of Ms. Jolie's story on genetic counseling referrals and the appropriateness of such referrals were assessed and reported. The number of women referred for genetic counseling increased by 90 % after 6 months and remained high one year after AJ's story with an increase of 88 % from baseline. The number of women who qualified for genetic testing increased by 105 % after 6 months; this increase persisted but was somewhat lower after one year with an increase of 68 % from baseline. Furthermore the number of BRCA1/2 carriers identified increased by 110 % after 6 months and by 42 % after one year.The effect of Mrs. Jolie's story persisted one year after its release; however in the latter half of the year, the hereditary cancer risk of referred women was significantly lower than initially observed. The next challenge for our health care system will not only be to meet the increased demand for cancer genetic services in our region, but also to ensure that referrals and hence use of genetic counseling resources are appropriate.

  15. Strategic Planning as a Tool for Achieving Alignment in Academic Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Higginbotham, Eve J.; Church, Kathryn C.

    2012-01-01

    After the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in March 2010, there is an urgent need for medical schools, teaching hospitals, and practice plans to work together seamlessly across a common mission. Although there is agreement that there should be greater coordination of initiatives and resources, there is little guidance in the literature to address the method to achieve the necessary transformation. Traditional approaches to strategic planning often engage a few leaders and produce a set of immeasurable initiatives. A nontraditional approach, consisting of a Whole-Scale (Dannemiller Tyson Associates, Ann Arbor, MI) engagement, appreciative inquiry, and a balanced scorecard can, more rapidly transform an academic health center. Using this nontraditional approach to strategic planning, increased organizational awareness was achieved in a single academic health center. Strategic planning can be an effective tool to achieve alignment, enhance accountability, and a first step in meeting the demands of the new landscape of healthcare. PMID:23303997

  16. Strategic planning as a tool for achieving alignment in academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Eve J; Church, Kathryn C

    2012-01-01

    After the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in March 2010, there is an urgent need for medical schools, teaching hospitals, and practice plans to work together seamlessly across a common mission. Although there is agreement that there should be greater coordination of initiatives and resources, there is little guidance in the literature to address the method to achieve the necessary transformation. Traditional approaches to strategic planning often engage a few leaders and produce a set of immeasurable initiatives. A nontraditional approach, consisting of a Whole-Scale (Dannemiller Tyson Associates, Ann Arbor, MI) engagement, appreciative inquiry, and a balanced scorecard can, more rapidly transform an academic health center. Using this nontraditional approach to strategic planning, increased organizational awareness was achieved in a single academic health center. Strategic planning can be an effective tool to achieve alignment, enhance accountability, and a first step in meeting the demands of the new landscape of healthcare.

  17. Is there a role for academic medical centers in emerging markets?

    PubMed

    Wiener, Charles M; Thompson, Steven J; Wu, Sandford; Chellappa, Mohan; Hasham, Salim

    2012-01-01

    Governments in emerging markets face mounting challenges in managing health spending, building capability and capacity, modernizing ageing infrastructure, and investing in skills and resources. One path to overcoming these challenges is to establish new public-private models of health care development and delivery based on United States academic medical centers, whose missions are to advance medical education and clinical delivery. Johns Hopkins Medicine is a participant in the collaboration developing between the Perdana University Hospital and the Perdana University Graduate School of Medicine in Malaysia. These two organizations comprise an academic health science center based on the United States model. The Perdana project provides constructive insights into the opportunities and challenges that governments, universities, and the private sector face when introducing new models of patient care that are integrated with medical education, clinical training, and biomedical research.

  18. "Innovation" institutes in academic health centers: enhancing value through leadership, education, engagement, and scholarship.

    PubMed

    Pines, Jesse M; Farmer, Steven A; Akman, Jeffrey S

    2014-09-01

    In the next decade, the biggest change in medicine in the United States will be the organizational transformation of the delivery system. Organizations-including academic health centers-able to achieve better outcomes for less will be the financial winners as new payment models become more prevalent. For medical educators, the question is how to prepare the next generation of physicians for these changes. One solution is the development of new "innovation" or "value" institutes. Around the nation, many of these new institutes are focused on surmounting barriers to value-based care in academic health centers, educating faculty, house staff, and medical students in discussions of cost-conscious care. Innovation institutes can also lead discussions about how value-based care may impact education in environments where there may be less autonomy and more standardization. Quality metrics will play a larger role at academic health centers as metrics focus more on outcomes than processes. Optimizing outcomes will require that medical educators both learn and teach the principles of patient safety and quality improvement. Innovation institutes can also facilitate cross-institutional discussions to compare data on utilization and outcomes, and share best practices that maximize value. Another barrier to cost-conscious care is defensive medicine, which is highly engrained in U.S. medicine and culture. Innovation institutes may not be able to overcome all the barriers to making medical care more cost-conscious, but they can be critical in enabling academic health centers to optimize their teaching and research missions while remaining financially competitive.

  19. Information Technology Support for Clinical Genetic Testing within an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, Samuel; Mahanta, Lisa; Ros, Lei Lei; Clark, Eugene; Babb, Lawrence; Oates, Michael; Rehm, Heidi; Lebo, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Academic medical centers require many interconnected systems to fully support genetic testing processes. We provide an overview of the end-to-end support that has been established surrounding a genetic testing laboratory within our environment, including both laboratory and clinician facing infrastructure. We explain key functions that we have found useful in the supporting systems. We also consider ways that this infrastructure could be enhanced to enable deeper assessment of genetic test results in both the laboratory and clinic. PMID:26805890

  20. Using FTE and RVU performance measures to assess financial viability of academic nurse-managed centers.

    PubMed

    Vonderheid, Susan; Pohl, Joanne; Schafer, Patricia; Forrest, Kathy; Poole, Michele; Barkauskas, Violet; Mackey, Thomas A

    2004-01-01

    Financial performance measures are essential to improve the fiscal management of academic nurse-managed centers (ANMCs). Measures are compared among six ANMCs in a consortium and against an external, self-sustainable, profitable ANMC and national data for family practice physicians. Performance measures help identify a center's strengths and weaknesses facilitating the development of strategies aimed at a variety of targets (business practices related to revenue and costs) to improve financial viability. Using a variety of financial performance measures to inform decision making will aid ANMCs in keeping their doors open for business.

  1. Results of an Institutional LGBT Climate Survey at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Chester, Sean D; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Eckstrand, Kristen L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the climate and culture experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) employees and students at one large academic medical center. An anonymous, online institutional climate survey was used to assess the attitudes and experiences of LGBT employees and students. There were 42 LGBT and 14 non-LGBT survey participants. Results revealed that a surprisingly large percentage of LGBT individuals experienced pressure to remain "closeted" and were harassed despite medical center policies of non-discrimination. Continuing training, inclusive policies and practices, and the development of mechanisms to address LGBT-specific harassment are necessary for improving institutional climate.

  2. The evolving organizational structure of academic health centers: the case of the University of Florida.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Douglas J

    2008-09-01

    The organizational structures of academic health centers (AHCs) vary widely, but they all exist along a continuum of integration--that is, the degree to which the academic and clinical missions operate under a single administrative and governance structure. This author provides a brief overview of the topic of AHC integration, including the pros and cons of more integrated or less integrated models. He then traces the evolution of the University of Florida (UF) Health Science Center, which was created in the 1950s as a fully integrated AHC and which now operates under a more distributed management and governance model. Starting as a completely integrated AHC, UF's Health Science Center reached a time of maximal nonintegration (or dys-integration) in the late 1990s and at the beginning of this decade. Circumstances are now pushing the expanding clinical and academic enterprises to be more together as they face the challenges of market competition, federal research budget constraints, and reengineering clinical operations to reduce costs, enhance access, and improve quality and patient safety. Although formal organizational integration may not be possible or appropriate for any number of legal or political reasons, the author suggests that AHCs should strive for "functional integration" to be successful in the current turbulent environment.

  3. Outcome of Referrals for Non-Responsive Celiac Disease in a Tertiary Center: Low Incidence of Refractory Celiac Disease in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van Wanrooij, R L J; Bouma, G; Bontkes, H J; Neefjes-Borst, A; van Grieken, N C; von Blomberg, B M E; Mulder, C J J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Refractory celiac disease (RCD) is a severe cause of non-responsive celiac disease (CD) due to its association with the enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (EATL). Conflicting data exist on the prevalence and the clinical manifestations of RCD type I (RCD I) and type II (RCD II). The aim of the current study was to provide insight in the incidence of RCD and in the distinction with other causes of non-responsive CD. Methods: A total of 106 CD patients were referred to our tertiary referral center between January 2006 and December 2011 for evaluation of non-responsive CD. In addition, a questionnaire was sent to all 82 gastroenterology departments in the Netherlands to reveal whether a patient with RCD was currently being evaluated or had been treated between 2006 and 2012. Results: During a 6 year period, a total of 31 patients were diagnosed with RCD (19 RCD I and 12 RCD II). The nationwide survey revealed 5 additional patients with RCD I and one patient with RCD II. This leads to an annual incidence of RCD of 0.83/10.000 CD patients. The remaining patients were diagnosed with involuntary gluten ingestion (21.7%), delayed mucosal recovery (11.3%), enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma (7.5%) and autoimmune enteropathy (1.8%). Conclusions: This nationwide study reveals a low incidence of RCD in the Netherlands. Nevertheless, RCD is a clinically relevant disease entity in CD patients non-responsive to the gluten-free diet. PMID:28125074

  4. Academic affiliated training centers in humanitarian health, Part I: program characteristics and professionalization preferences of centers in North America.

    PubMed

    Burkle, Frederick M; Walls, Alexa E; Heck, Joan P; Sorensen, Brian S; Cranmer, Hilarie H; Johnson, Kirsten; Levine, Adam C; Kayden, Stephanie; Cahill, Brendan; VanRooyen, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    The collaborative London based non-governmental organization network ELRHA (Enhancing Learning and Research for Humanitarian Assistance) supports partnerships between higher education institutions and humanitarian organizations worldwide with the objective to enhance the professionalization of the humanitarian sector. While coordination and control of the humanitarian sector has plagued the response to every major crisis, concerns highlighted by the 2010 Haitian earthquake response further catalyzed and accelerated the need to ensure competency-based professionalization of the humanitarian health care work force. The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative sponsored an independent survey of established academically affiliated training centers in North America that train humanitarian health care workers to determine their individual training center characteristics and preferences in the potential professionalization process. The survey revealed that a common thread of profession-specific skills and core humanitarian competencies were being offered in both residential and online programs with additional programs offering opportunities for field simulation experiences and more advanced degree programs. This study supports the potential for the development of like-minded academic affiliated and competency-based humanitarian health programs to organize themselves under ELRHA's regional "consultation hubs" worldwide that can assist and advocate for improved education and training opportunities in less served developing countries.

  5. Mentor training within academic health centers with Clinical and Translational Science Awards.

    PubMed

    Abedin, Zainab; Rebello, Tahilia J; Richards, Boyd F; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-10-01

    Multiple studies highlight the benefits of effective mentoring in academic medicine. Thus, we sought to quantify and characterize the mentoring practices at academic health centers (AHCs) with Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA). Here we report findings pertaining specifically to mentor training at the level of the KL2 mentored award program, and at the broader institutional level. We found only four AHCs did not provide any form of training. One-time orientation was most prevalent at the KL2 level, whereas formal face-to-face training was most prevalent at the institutional level. Despite differences in format usage, there was general consensus at both the KL2 and institutional level about the topics of focus of face-to-face training sessions. Lower-resource training formats utilized at the KL2 level may reveal a preference for preselection of qualified mentors, while institutional selection of resource-heavy formats may be an attempt to raise the mentoring qualifications of the academic community as a whole. The present work fits into the expanding landscape of academic mentoring literature and sets the framework for future longitudinal, outcome studies focused on identifying the most efficient strategies to develop effective mentors.

  6. Good Neighbors: Shared Challenges and Solutions Toward Increasing Value at Academic Medical Centers and Universities.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Gerard P

    2015-12-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) and universities are experiencing increasing pressure to enhance the value they offer at the same time that they are facing challenges related to outcomes, controlling costs, new competition, and government mandates. Yet, rarely do the leaders of these academic neighbors work cooperatively to enhance value. In this Perspective the author, a former university regional campus president with duties in an AMC as an academic physician, shares his insights into the shared challenges these academic neighbors face in improving the value of their services in complex environments. He describes the successes some AMCs have had in generating revenues from new clinical programs that reduce the overall cost of care for larger populations. He also describes how several universities have taken a comprehensive approach to reduce overhead and administrative costs. The author identifies six themes related to successful value improvement efforts and provides examples of successful strategies used by AMCs and their university neighbors to improve the overall value of their programs. He concludes by encouraging leaders of AMCs and universities to share information about their successes in value improvements with each other, to seek additional joint value enhancement efforts, and to market their value improvements to the public.

  7. Luxury Primary Care, Academic Medical Centers, and the Erosion of Science and Professional Ethics

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Medical schools and teaching hospitals have been hit particularly hard by the financial crisis affecting health care in the United States. To compete financially, many academic medical centers have recruited wealthy foreign patients and established luxury primary care clinics. At these clinics, patients are offered tests supported by little evidence of their clinical and/or cost effectiveness, which erodes the scientific underpinnings of medical practice. Given widespread disparities in health, wealth, and access to care, as well as growing cynicism and dissatisfaction with medicine among trainees, the promotion by these institutions of an overt, two-tiered system of care, which exacerbates inequities and injustice, erodes professional ethics. Academic medical centers should divert their intellectual and financial resources away from luxury primary care and toward more equitable and just programs designed to promote individual, community, and global health. The public and its legislators should, in turn, provide adequate funds to enable this. Ways for academic medicine to facilitate this largesse are discussed. PMID:14748866

  8. Perspective: Malpractice in an academic medical center: a frequently overlooked aspect of professionalism education.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Mark S; Seib, Carolyn D; Berman, Russell S; Kalet, Adina L; Zabar, Sondra R; Pachter, H Leon

    2011-03-01

    Understanding how medical malpractice occurs and is resolved is important to improving patient safety and preserving the viability of a physician's career in academic medicine. Every physician is likely to be sued by a patient, and how the physician responds can change his or her professional life. However, the principles of medical malpractice are rarely taught or addressed during residency training. In fact, many faculty at academic medical centers know little about malpractice.In this article, the authors propose that information about the inciting causes of malpractice claims and their resolution should be incorporated into residency professionalism curricula both to improve patient safety and to decrease physician anxiety about a crucial aspect of medicine that is not well understood. The authors provide information on national trends in malpractice litigation and residents' understanding of malpractice, then share the results of their in-depth review of surgical malpractice claims filed during 2001-2008 against their academic medical center. The authors incorporated those data into an evidence-driven curriculum for residents, which they propose as a model for helping residents better understand the events that lead to malpractice litigation, as well as its process and prevention.

  9. Academic medicine: a key partner in strengthening the primary care infrastructure via teaching health centers.

    PubMed

    Rieselbach, Richard E; Crouse, Byron J; Neuhausen, Katherine; Nasca, Thomas J; Frohna, John G

    2013-12-01

    In the United States, a worsening shortage of primary care physicians, along with structural deficiencies in their training, threaten the primary care system that is essential to ensuring access to high-quality, cost-effective health care. Community health centers (CHCs) are an underused resource that could facilitate rapid expansion of the primary care workforce and simultaneously prepare trainees for 21st-century practice. The Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (THCGME) program, currently funded by the Affordable Care Act, uses CHCs as training sites for primary-care-focused graduate medical education (GME).The authors propose that the goals of the THCGME program could be amplified by fostering partnerships between CHCs and teaching hospitals (academic medical centers [AMCs]). AMCs would encourage their primary care residency programs to expand by establishing teaching health center (THC) tracks. Modifications to the current THCGME model, facilitated by formal CHC and academic medicine partnerships (CHAMPs), would address the primary care physician shortage, produce physicians prepared for 21st-century practice, expose trainees to interprofessional education in a multidisciplinary environment, and facilitate the rapid expansion of CHC capacity.To succeed, CHAMP THCs require a comprehensive consortium agreement designed to ensure equity between the community and academic partners; conforming with this agreement will provide the high-quality GME necessary to ensure residency accreditation. CHAMP THCs also require a federal mechanism to ensure stable, long-term funding. CHAMP THCs would develop in select CHCs that desire a partnership with AMCs and have capacity for providing a community-based setting for both GME and health services research.

  10. New organizational and funds flow models for an academic cancer center.

    PubMed

    Spahlinger, David A; Pai, Chih-Wen; Waldinger, Marcy B; Billi, John E; Wicha, Max S

    2004-07-01

    The clinical impetus to develop cancer centers has been the recognition that many cancer patients require a comprehensive treatment plan coordinated across multiple specialties. Developing an effective organizational and financial structure among the multiple entities that comprise an academic cancer center has, however, been a challenge. The authors describe an effort to realize a sustainable clinical operation at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMCCC) by developing an appropriate management structure and financial model. The modified organizational structure established a clear line of administrative authority and held faculty members accountable for their effort in the UMCCC. A unified budget aligned financial incentive among all stakeholders to increase efficiency, revenue, and margin. The authors report preliminary financial evidence of the success of the new managerial structure.

  11. Climate Science Centers: Growing Federal and Academic Expertise in the Nation's Interests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryker, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior's (Interior) natural and cultural resource managers face increasingly complex challenges exacerbated by climate change. In 2009, under Secretarial Order 3289, Interior created eight regional Climate Science Centers managed by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center and in partnership with universities. Secretarial Order 3289 provides a framework to coordinate climate change science and adaptation efforts across Interior and to integrate science and resource management expertise from Federal, State, Tribal, private, non-profit, and academic partners. In addition to broad research expertise, these Federal/university partnerships provide opportunities to develop a next generation of climate science professionals. These include opportunities to increase the climate science knowledge base of students and practicing professionals; build students' skills in working across the boundary between research and implementation; facilitate networking among researchers, students, and professionals for the application of research to on-the-ground issues; and support the science pipeline in climate-related fields through structured, intensive professional development. In 2013, Climate Science Centers supported approximately 10 undergraduates, 60 graduate students, and 26 postdoctoral researchers. Additional students trained by Climate Science Center-affiliated faculty also contribute valuable time and expertise, and are effectively part of the Climate Science Center network. The Climate Science Centers' education and training efforts have also reached a number of high school students interested in STEM careers, and professionals in natural and cultural resource management. The Climate Science Centers are coordinating to build on each other's successful education and training efforts. Early successes include several intensive education experiences, such as the Alaska Climate Science Center's Girls on

  12. Characteristics of schools of nursing operating academic nurse-managed centers.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Joanne M; Sebastian, Juliann G; Barkauskas, Violet H; Breer, M Lynn; Williams, Carolyn A; Stanhope, Marcia; Nagelkerk, Jean; Rayens, Mary Kay

    2007-01-01

    Academic nurse-managed centers (ANMCs) can be important sites for addressing the tripartite mission of the academy. Yet, limited information about numbers of ANMCs and the schools sponsoring them is available. This paper presents an update on schools of nursing (SONs) operating ANMCs. A survey was sent to 683 deans and directors of baccalaureate and higher-degree SONs, with 565 responding (response rate: 83%). Ninety-two SONs indicated they had one or more ANMCs. The largest percentage of the SONs with ANMCs were classified as doctoral/research-intensive or extensive universities, a proportion much higher than the national percent of SONs in this category. Schools of Nursing were financially supporting centers at a lower percentage of actual costs than was reported in earlier studies, although grants continue to be a major source of funding. Academic nurse-managed centers are likely to be supported by SONs with substantial research, practice, faculty, and student resources. Overall, the national number of ANMCs seems stationary over the past two decades.

  13. Establishing an Integrative Medicine Program Within an Academic Health Center: Essential Considerations.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, David M; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Post, Diana E; Hrbek, Andrea L; O'Connor, Bonnie B; Osypiuk, Kamila; Wayne, Peter M; Buring, Julie E; Levy, Donald B

    2016-09-01

    Integrative medicine (IM) refers to the combination of conventional and "complementary" medical services (e.g., chiropractic, acupuncture, massage, mindfulness training). More than half of all medical schools in the United States and Canada have programs in IM, and more than 30 academic health centers currently deliver multidisciplinary IM care. What remains unclear, however, is the ideal delivery model (or models) whereby individuals can responsibly access IM care safely, effectively, and reproducibly in a coordinated and cost-effective way.Current models of IM across existing clinical centers vary tremendously in their organizational settings, principal clinical focus, and services provided; practitioner team composition and training; incorporation of research activities and educational programs; and administrative organization (e.g., reporting structure, use of medical records, scope of clinical practice) and financial strategies (i.e., specific business plans and models for sustainability).In this article, the authors address these important strategic issues by sharing lessons learned from the design and implementation of an IM facility within an academic teaching hospital, the Brigham and Women's Hospital at Harvard Medical School; and review alternative options based on information about IM centers across the United States.The authors conclude that there is currently no consensus as to how integrative care models should be optimally organized, implemented, replicated, assessed, and funded. The time may be right for prospective research in "best practices" across emerging models of IM care nationally in an effort to standardize, refine, and replicate them in preparation for rigorous cost-effectiveness evaluations.

  14. Comparing Lay Community and Academic Survey Center Interviewers in Conducting Household Interviews in Latino Communities

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Golston, Alec M.; Friedlander, Scott; Glik, Deborah C.; Prelip, Michael L.; Belin, Thomas R.; Brookmeyer, Ron; Santos, Robert; Chen, Jie; Ortega, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Background The employment of professional interviewers from academic survey centers to conduct surveys has been standard practice. Because one goal of community-engaged research is to provide professional skills to community residents, this paper considers whether employing locally trained lay interviewers from within the community may be as effective as employing interviewers from an academic survey center with regard to unit and item nonresponse rates and cost. Methods To study a nutrition-focused intervention, 1035 in-person household interviews were conducted in East Los Angeles and Boyle Heights, 503 of which were completed by lay community interviewers. A chi-square test was used to assess differences in unit nonresponse rates between professional and community interviewers and Welch’s t tests were used to assess differences in item nonresponse rates. A cost comparison analysis between the two interviewer groups was also conducted. Results Interviewers from the academic survey center had lower unit nonresponse rates than the lay community interviewers (16.2% vs. 23.3%; p < 0.01). However, the item nonresponse rates were lower for the community interviewers than the professional interviewers (1.4% vs. 3.3%; p < 0.01). Community interviewers cost approximately $415.38 per survey whereas professional interviewers cost approximately $537.29 per survey. Conclusions With a lower cost per completed survey and lower item nonresponse rates, lay community interviewers are a viable alternative to professional interviewers for fieldwork in community-based research. Additional research is needed to assess other important aspects of data quality interviewer such as interviewer effects and response error. PMID:28230551

  15. The house of gastrointestinal medicine: how academic medical centers can build a sustainable economic clinical model.

    PubMed

    Rustgi, Anil K; Allen, John I

    2013-11-01

    Academic Medical Centers (AMCs) have been given unique responsibilities to care for patients, educate future clinicians, and bring innovative research to the bedside. Over the last few decades, this tripartite mission has served the United States well, and payers (Federal, State, and commercial) have been willing to underwrite these missions with overt and covert financial subsidies. As cost containment efforts have escalated, the traditional business model of AMCs has been challenged. In this issue, Dr Anil Rustgi and I offer some insights into how AMCs must alter their business model to be sustainable in our new world of accountable care, cost containment, and clinical integration.

  16. Now is the Time for Psychology to Support the Transformation of Academic Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Linton, John C

    2017-04-11

    Psychologists have made important contributions in academic health centers (AHC), but the reputation of psychology as a discipline has been mixed, by turns viewed as a superfluous soft science, or seen as an important contributor to the AHC mission. AHCs currently face exceptional challenges to the viability of AHCs, including: planned alterations from fee-for-service to value-based funding that requires high quality at lower cost; and rising demands to demonstrate competence in trainees. Now more than ever, psychologists can and must help AHCs to meet these challenges.

  17. Advancing LGBT Health at an Academic Medical Center: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Baligh R; Calder, Daniel; Flesch, Judd D; Hirsh, Rebecca L; Higginbotham, Eve; Tkacs, Nancy; Crawford, Beverley; Fishman, Neil

    2015-12-01

    Academic health centers are strategically positioned to impact the health of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) populations by advancing science, educating future generations of providers, and delivering integrated care that addresses the unique health needs of the LGBT community. This report describes the early experiences of the Penn Medicine Program for LGBT Health, highlighting the favorable environment that led to its creation, the mission and structure of the Program, strategic planning process used to set priorities and establish collaborations, and the reception and early successes of the Program.

  18. Trends in academic health sciences libraries and their emergence as the “knowledge nexus” for their academic health centers*

    PubMed Central

    Kronenfeld, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify trends in academic health sciences libraries (AHSLs) as they adapt to the shift from a print knowledgebase to an increasingly digital knowledgebase. This research was funded by the 2003 David A. Kronick Traveling Fellowship. Methods: The author spent a day and a half interviewing professional staff at each library. The questionnaire used was sent to the directors of each library in advance of the visit, and the directors picked the staff to be interviewed and set up the schedule. Results: Seven significant trends were identified. These trends are part of the shift of AHSLs from being facility and print oriented with a primary focus on their role as repositories of a print-based knowledgebase to a new focus on their role as the center or “nexus” for the organization, access, and use of an increasingly digital-based knowledgebase. Conclusion: This paper calls for a national effort to develop a new model or structure for health sciences libraries to more effectively respond to the challenges of access and use of a digital knowledgebase, much the same way the National Library of Medicine did in the 1960s and 1970s in developing and implementing the National Network of Libraries of Medicine. The paper then concludes with some examples or ideas for research to assist in this process. PMID:15685271

  19. Improving state Medicaid policies with comparative effectiveness research: a key role for academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Zerzan, Judy T; Gibson, Mark; Libby, Anne M

    2011-06-01

    After the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is fully implemented, Medicaid will be the largest single health care payer in the United States. Each U.S. state controls the size and scope of the medicine benefit beyond the federally mandated minimum; however, regulations that require balanced budgets and prohibit deficit spending limit each state's control. In a recessionary environment with reduced revenue, state Medicaid programs operate under a fixed or shrinking budget. Thus, the state Medicaid experience of providing high-quality care under explicit financial limits can inform Medicare and private payers of measures that control per-capita costs without adversely affecting health outcomes. The academic medicine community must play an expanded role in filling evidence gaps in order to continuously improve health policy making among U.S. states. The Drug Effectiveness Review Project and the Medicaid Evidence-based Decisions Project are two multistate Medicaid collaborations that leverage academic health center researchers' comparative effectiveness research (CER) projects to answer policy-relevant research questions. The authors of this article highlight how academic medicine can support states' health policies through CER and how CER-driven benefit-design choices can help states meet their cost and quality needs.

  20. Qualitative and Political Issues Impacting Academic Medical Center Strategic Planning--A Methodological Approach. AIR Forum 1982 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutina, Kenneth L.; And Others

    A simulation model of an academic medical center that was developed to aid in strategic planning and policy analysis is described. The model, designated MCM for Medical Center Model, was implemented at the School of Medicine, University Hospitals of Cleveland, and the private practices of the faculty in the clinical departments at University…

  1. Population health and the academic medical center: the time is right.

    PubMed

    Gourevitch, Marc N

    2014-04-01

    Optimizing the health of populations, whether defined as persons receiving care from a health care delivery system or more broadly as persons in a region, is emerging as a core focus in the era of health care reform. To achieve this goal requires an approach in which preventive care is valued and "nonmedical" determinants of patients' health are engaged. For large, multimission systems such as academic medical centers, navigating the evolution to a population-oriented paradigm across the domains of patient care, education, and research poses real challenges but also offers tremendous opportunities, as important objectives across each mission begin to align with external trends and incentives. In clinical care, opportunities exist to improve capacity for assuming risk, optimize community benefit, and make innovative use of advances in health information technology. Education must equip the next generation of leaders to understand and address population-level goals in addition to patient-level needs. And the prospects for research to define strategies for measuring and optimizing the health of populations have never been stronger. A remarkable convergence of trends has created compelling opportunities for academic medical centers to advance their core goals by endorsing and committing to advancing the health of populations.

  2. Collaborating to improve the global competitiveness of US academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Allen, Molly; Garman, Andrew; Johnson, Tricia; Hohmann, Samuel; Meurer, Steve

    2012-01-01

    President Obama announced the National Export Initiative in his 2010 State of the Union address and set the ambitious goal of doubling US exports by the end of 2014 to support millions of domestic jobs. Understanding the competitive position of US health care in the global market for international patients, University Health System Consortium (UHC), an alliance of 116 academic medical centers and 272 of their affiliated hospitals, representing 90 percent of the nation's non-profit academic medical centers partnered with Rush University, a private University in Chicago, IL and the International Trade Administration of the US Department of Commerce International Trade Administration (ITA) to participate in the Market Development Cooperator Program. The goal of this private-public partnership is to increase the global competitiveness of the US health care industry, which represents over 16 percent of the GDP, amongst foreign health care providers. This article provides an overview of the US health care market and outlines the aims of the US Cooperative for International Patient Programs, the end result of the partnership between UHC, ITA and Rush University.

  3. United States academic medical centers: priorities and challenges amid market transformation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Irene M; Anason, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    United States academic medical centers (AMCs) have upheld their long-standing reputation for excellence by teaching and training the next generation of physicians, supporting medical research, providing world-class medical care, and offering breakthrough treatments for highly complex medical cases. In recent years, the pace and direction of change reshaping the American health care industry has created a set of new and profound challenges that AMC leaders must address in order to sustain their institutions. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of 116 leading nonprofit academic medical centers and 276 of their affiliated hospitals, all of which are focused on delivering world-class patient care. Formed in 1984, UHC fosters collaboration with and among its members through its renowned programs and services in the areas of comparative data and analytics, performance improvement, supply chain management, strategic research, and public policy. Each year, UHC surveys the executives of its member institutions to understand the issues they view as most critical to sustaining the viability and success of their organizations. The results of UHC's most recent 2011 member survey, coupled with a 2012 Strategic Health Perspectives Harris Interactive presentation, based in parton surveys of major health care industry stakeholders reveal the most important and relevant issues and opportunities that hospital leaders face today, as the United States health care delivery system undergoes a period of unprecedented transformation.

  4. An academic health center sees both challenges and enabling forces as it creates an accountable care organization.

    PubMed

    Tallia, Alfred F; Howard, Jenna

    2012-11-01

    Health care reform presents academic health centers with an opportunity to test new systems of care, such as accountable care organizations (ACOs), that are intended to improve patients' health and well-being, mitigate the anticipated shortage in primary care providers, and bend the cost curve. In its ongoing efforts to develop an ACO, the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, an academic health center, has found helpful a rapidly evolving competitive environment and insurers willing to experiment with new models of care. But the center has also encountered six types of barriers: conceptual, financial, cultural, regulatory, organizational, and historical. How this academic health center has faced these barriers offers valuable lessons to other health systems engaged in creating ACOs.

  5. Medicare program; prospective payment system for federally qualified health centers; changes to contracting policies for rural health clinics; and changes to Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988 enforcement actions for proficiency testing referral. Final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2014-05-02

    This final rule with comment period implements methodology and payment rates for a prospective payment system (PPS) for federally qualified health center (FQHC) services under Medicare Part B beginning on October 1, 2014, in compliance with the statutory requirement of the Affordable Care Act. In addition, it establishes a policy which allows rural health clinics (RHCs) to contract with nonphysician practitioners when statutory requirements for employment of nurse practitioners and physician assistants are met, and makes other technical and conforming changes to the RHC and FQHC regulations. Finally, this final rule with comment period implements changes to the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) regulations regarding enforcement actions for proficiency testing (PT) referrals.

  6. The Relationship between Reading Fluency Intervention and the Need for Special Education Referrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polcyn, Dawn M.

    2012-01-01

    Students are often referred for special education evaluations following teacher generated referrals. These referrals indicate observable poor academic progress, although often there is no indication of the cause of the poor performance as well as no indication of remediation attempts prior to a special education referral. Students who demonstrate…

  7. An academic medical center under prolonged rocket attack--organizational, medical, and financial considerations.

    PubMed

    Bar-El, Yaron; Michaelson, Moshe; Hyames, Gila; Skorecki, Karl; Reisner, Shimon A; Beyar, Rafael

    2009-09-01

    The Rambam Medical Center, the major academic health center in northern Israel, serving a population of two million and providing specialized tertiary care, was exposed to an unprecedented experience during the Second Lebanon War in the summer of 2006. For more than one month, it was subjected to continuous rocket attacks, but it continued to provide emergency and routine medical services to the civilian population and also served the military personnel who were evacuated from the battlefront. To accomplish the goals of serving the population while itself being under fire, the Rambam Medical Center had to undertake major organizational decisions, which included maximizing safety within the hospital by shifting patients and departments, ensuring that the hospital was properly fortified, managing the health professional teams' work schedules, and providing needed services for the families of employees. The Rambam Medical Center's Level I trauma center expertise included multidisciplinary teams and extensive collaborations; modern imaging modalities usually reserved for peacetime medical practice were frequently used. The function of the hospital teams during the war was efficient and smooth, based on the long-term actions taken to prepare for disasters and wartime conditions. Routine hospital services continued, although at 60% of normal occupancy. Financial losses incurred were primarily due to the decrease in revenue-generating activity. The two most important components of managing the hospital under these conditions are (1) the ability to arrive at prompt and meaningful decisions with respect to the organizational and medical hospital operations and (2) the leadership and management of the professional staff and teams.

  8. The contributions of library and information services to hospitals and academic health sciences centers: a preliminary taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Abels, Eileen G.; Cogdill, Keith W.; Zach, Lisl

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: This article presents a taxonomy of the contributions of library and information services (LIS) in hospitals and academic health sciences centers. The taxonomy emerges from a study with three objectives: to articulate the value of LIS for hospitals and academic health sciences centers in terms of contributions to organizational missions and goals, to identify measures and measurable surrogates associated with each LIS contribution, and to document best practices for communicating the value of LIS to institutional administrators. Methods: The preliminary taxonomy of LIS contributions in hospitals and academic health sciences centers is based on a review of the literature, twelve semi-structured interviews with LIS directors and institutional administrators, and a focus group of administrators from five academic, teaching, and nonteaching hospitals. Results: Derived from the balanced scorecard approach, the taxonomy of LIS contributions is organized on the basis of five mission-level concepts and fifteen organizational goals. LIS contributions are included only if they have measurable surrogates. Conclusions: The taxonomy of LIS contributions offers a framework for the collection of both quantitative and qualitative data in support of communicating the value of LIS in hospitals and academic health sciences centers. PMID:12113510

  9. Fostering innovation in medicine and health care: what must academic health centers do?

    PubMed

    Dzau, Victor J; Yoediono, Ziggy; Ellaissi, William F; Cho, Alex H

    2013-10-01

    There is a real need for innovation in health care delivery, as well as in medicine, to address related challenges of access, quality, and affordability through new and creative approaches. Health care environments must foster innovation, not just allowing it but actively encouraging it to happen anywhere and at every level in health care and medicine-from the laboratory, to the operating room, bedside, and clinics. This paper reviews the essential elements and environmental factors important for health-related innovation to flourish in academic health systems.The authors maintain that innovation must be actively cultivated by teaching it, creating "space" for and supporting it, and providing opportunities for its implementation. The authors seek to show the importance of these three fundamental principles and how they can be implemented, highlighting examples from across the country and their own institution.Health innovation cannot be relegated to a second-class status by the urgency of day-to-day operations, patient care, and the requirements of traditional research. Innovation needs to be elevated to a committed endeavor and become a part of an organization's culture, particularly in academic health centers.

  10. Top 10 Lessons Learned from Electronic Medical Record Implementation in a Large Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Rizer, Milisa K; Kaufman, Beth; Sieck, Cynthia J; Hefner, Jennifer L; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2015-01-01

    Electronic medical record (EMR) implementation efforts face many challenges, including individual and organizational barriers and concerns about loss of productivity during the process. These issues may be particularly complex in large and diverse settings with multiple specialties providing inpatient and outpatient care. This case report provides an example of a successful EMR implementation that emphasizes the importance of flexibility and adaptability on the part of the implementation team. It also presents the top 10 lessons learned from this EMR implementation in a large midwestern academic medical center. Included are five overarching lessons related to leadership, initial approach, training, support, and optimization as well as five lessons related to the EMR system itself that are particularly important elements of a successful implementation.

  11. Policies pertaining to complementary and alternative medical therapies in a random sample of 39 academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael H; Sandler, Lynne; Hrbek, Andrea; Davis, Roger B; Eisenberg, David M

    2005-01-01

    This research documents policies in 39 randomly selected academic medical centers integrating complementary and alternative medical (CAM) services into conventional care. Twenty-three offered CAM services-most commonly, acupuncture, massage, dietary supplements, mind-body therapies, and music therapy. None had written policies concerning credentialing practices or malpractice liability. Only 10 reported a written policy governing use of dietary supplements, although three sold supplements in inpatient formularies, one in the psychiatry department, and five in outpatient pharmacies. Thus, few academic medical centers have sufficiently integrated CAM services into conventional care by developing consensus-written policies governing credentialing, malpractice liability, and dietary supplement use.

  12. Implementation of Epic Beaker Clinical Pathology at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.; Wilford, Joseph D.; Howard, Wanita; Dane, Susan K.; Davis, Scott R.; Karandikar, Nitin J.; Blau, John L.; Ford, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epic Beaker Clinical Pathology (CP) is a relatively new laboratory information system (LIS) operating within the Epic suite of software applications. To date, there have not been any publications describing implementation of Beaker CP. In this report, we describe our experience in implementing Beaker CP version 2012 at a state academic medical center with a go-live of August 2014 and a subsequent upgrade to Beaker version 2014 in May 2015. The implementation of Beaker CP was concurrent with implementations of Epic modules for revenue cycle, patient scheduling, and patient registration. Methods: Our analysis covers approximately 3 years of time (2 years preimplementation of Beaker CP and roughly 1 year after) using data summarized from pre- and post-implementation meetings, debriefings, and the closure document for the project. Results: We summarize positive aspects of, and key factors leading to, a successful implementation of Beaker CP. The early inclusion of subject matter experts in the design and validation of Beaker workflows was very helpful. Since Beaker CP does not directly interface with laboratory instrumentation, the clinical laboratories spent extensive preimplementation effort establishing middleware interfaces. Immediate challenges postimplementation included bar code scanning and nursing adaptation to Beaker CP specimen collection. The most substantial changes in laboratory workflow occurred with microbiology orders. This posed a considerable challenge with microbiology orders from the operating rooms and required intensive interventions in the weeks following go-live. In postimplementation surveys, pathology staff, informatics staff, and end-users expressed satisfaction with the new LIS. Conclusions: Beaker CP can serve as an effective LIS for an academic medical center. Careful planning and preparation aid the transition to this LIS. PMID:26955505

  13. Implementing a new model of integrated women's health in academic health centers: lessons learned from the National Centers of Excellence in Women's Health.

    PubMed

    Gwinner, V M; Strauss, J F; Milliken, N; Donoghue, G D

    2000-11-01

    The National Centers of Excellence in Women's Health Program (CoE) represents a new model for women's health in academic health centers that unites women's health research, teaching, clinical care, public education and outreach, and career advancement for women in the health sciences. Lessons learned from the first 3 years of implementation indicate that this type of model requires a transformation from the traditionally fragmented set of activities in academic health centers to an integrated system united around the goal of advancing women's health. The transformation requires institutional commitment, dedicated players, and an ability to build on existing resources and bring added value to the institution. Challenges and strategies to link women's health activities and increase collaboration are also discussed.

  14. Mobilizing communities and building capacity for youth violence prevention: the National Academic Centers of Excellence for Youth Violence Prevention.

    PubMed

    Vivolo, Alana M; Matjasko, Jennifer L; Massetti, Greta M

    2011-09-01

    Violence, including its occurrence among youth, results in considerable physical, emotional, social, and economic consequences in the US. Youth violence prevention work at the Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) emphasizes preventing youth violence-related behaviors, injuries, and deaths by collaborating with academic and community partners and stakeholders. In 2000 and 2005, DVP funded the National Academic Centers of Excellence (ACE) for Youth Violence Prevention. Most ACE Centers focus on building community capacity and competence so that evidence-based programs for youth violence prevention can be successfully implemented through effective and supportive research-community partnerships. This commentary provides historical information about the ACE Program, including the development, goals, accomplishments of the Centers, and the utilization of a community-based participatory research approach to prevent youth violence.

  15. Employee health benefit redesign at the academic health center: a case study.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Julie; Weaver, Deirdre C; Splaine, Kevin; Hefner, David S; Kirch, Darrell G; Paz, Harold L

    2013-03-01

    The rapidly escalating cost of health care, including the cost of providing health care benefits, is a significant concern for many employers. In this article, the authors examine a case study of an academic health center that undertook a complete redesign of its health benefit structure to control rising costs, encourage use of its own provider network, and support employee wellness. With the implementation in 2006 of a high-deductible health plan combined with health reimbursement arrangements and wellness incentives, the Penn State Hershey Medical Center (PSHMC) was able to realize significant cost savings and increase use of its own network while maintaining a high level of employee satisfaction. By contracting with a single third-party administrator for its self-insured plan, PSHMC reduced its administrative costs and simplified benefit choices for employees. In addition, indexing employee costs to salary ensured that this change was equitable for all employees, and the shift to a consumer-driven health plan led to greater employee awareness of health care costs. The new health benefit plan's strong focus on employee wellness and preventive health has led to significant increases in the use of preventive health services, including health risk assessments, cancer screenings, and flu shots. PSHMC's experience demonstrates the importance of clear and ongoing communication with employees throughout--before, during, and even after--the process of health benefit redesign.

  16. Building research administration applications for the academic health center: a case study.

    PubMed

    Guard, J Roger; Brueggemann, Ralph F; Highsmith, Robert F; Marine, Stephen A; Riep, Josette R; Schick, Leslie C

    2005-11-01

    The academic health center information environment is saturated with information of varying quality and overwhelming quantity. The most significant challenge is transforming data and information into knowledge. The University of Cincinnati Medical Center's (UCMC) focus is to develop an information architecture comprising data structures, Web services, and user interfaces that enable individuals to manage the information overload so that they can create new knowledge. UCMC has accomplished much of what is reported in this article with the help of a four-year Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems (IAIMS) operation grant awarded by the National Library of Medicine in 2003. In the UCMC vision for knowledge management, individuals have reliable, secure access to information that is filtered, organized, and highly relevant for specific tasks and personal needs. Current applications and tool sets will evolve to become the next generation knowledge management applications or smart digital services. When smart digital services are implemented, silo applications will disappear. A major focus of UCMC's IAIMS grant is research administration. Testing and building out existing and new research administration applications and digital services is underway. The authors review UCMC's progress and results in developing a software architecture, tools, and services for research administration. Included are sections on the evolution to full integration, the impact of the work at UCMC to date, lessons learned during this research and development process, and future plans and needs.

  17. Preparing an Academic Medical Center to Manage Patients Infected With Ebola: Experiences of a University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Carl H; Koenig, Kristi L; Alassaf, Wajdan

    2015-10-01

    As Ebola has spread beyond West Africa, the challenges confronting health care systems with no experience in managing such patients are enormous. Not only is Ebola a significant threat to a population's health, it can infect the medical personnel trying to treat it. As such, it represents a major challenge to those in public health, emergency medical services (EMS), and acute care hospitals. Our academic medical center volunteered to become an Ebola Treatment Center as part of the US effort to manage the threat. We developed detailed policies and procedures for Ebola patient management at our university hospital. Both the EMS system and county public health made significant contributions during the development process. This article shares information about this process and the outcomes to inform other institutions facing similar challenges of preparing for an emerging threat with limited resources. The discussion includes information about management of (1) patients who arrive by ambulance with prior notification, (2) spontaneous walk-in patients, and (3) patients with confirmed Ebola who are interfacility transfers. Hospital management includes information about Ebola screening procedures, personal protective equipment selection and personnel training, erection of a tent outside the main facility, establishing an Ebola treatment unit inside the facility, and infectious waste and equipment management. Finally, several health policy considerations are presented.

  18. USAR Nurse Referral and Retention Program.

    PubMed

    Foley, J E; Foley, B J

    1992-09-01

    In 1987, the 804th Hospital Center made alleviating the shortfall of registered nurses in the Command a priority. The Command had only 79% of its registered nurse positions filled at the time. Using the recruitment strategies of an employee referral program and a mailing list, the Command reached 100% fill in 2 years and maintained those gains for an additional year. Retention strategies were also implemented which lowered the attrition rate. This paper describes the Army Nurse Referral and Retention Program developed and implemented at the 804th Hospital Center that relieved the shortfall of registered nurses in the United States Army Reserve in New England.

  19. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application.

  20. The Future of Course Redesign and the National Center for Academic Transformation: An Interview with Carol A. Twigg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, William H.; Twigg, Carol A.

    2006-01-01

    "Innovate" editorial board member William H. Graves talks with Carol A. Twigg, president and CEO of the National Center for Academic Transformation (NCAT), a nonprofit organization dedicated to encouraging course redesign at both the state and system levels, about NCAT's groundbreaking Program in Course Redesign (PCR). PCR demonstrated that…

  1. Integrating research, clinical care, and education in academic health science centers.

    PubMed

    King, Gillian; Thomson, Nicole; Rothstein, Mitchell; Kingsnorth, Shauna; Parker, Kathryn

    2016-10-10

    Purpose One of the major issues faced by academic health science centers (AHSCs) is the need for mechanisms to foster the integration of research, clinical, and educational activities to achieve the vision of evidence-informed decision making (EIDM) and optimal client care. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach This paper synthesizes literature on organizational learning and collaboration, evidence-informed organizational decision making, and learning-based organizations to derive insights concerning the nature of effective workplace learning in AHSCs. Findings An evidence-informed model of collaborative workplace learning is proposed to aid the alignment of research, clinical, and educational functions in AHSCs. The model articulates relationships among AHSC academic functions and sub-functions, cross-functional activities, and collaborative learning processes, emphasizing the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing collaborative learning processes and optimizing EIDM and client care. Cross-functional activities involving clinicians, researchers, and educators are hypothesized to be a primary vehicle for integration, supported by a learning-oriented workplace culture. These activities are distinct from interprofessional teams, which are clinical in nature. Four collaborative learning processes are specified that are enhanced in cross-functional activities or teamwork: co-constructing meaning, co-learning, co-producing knowledge, and co-using knowledge. Practical implications The model provides an aspirational vision and insight into the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing workplace learning. The paper discusses the conceptual and empirical basis to the model, its contributions and limitations, and implications for AHSCs. Originality/value The model's potential utility for health care is discussed, with implications for organizational culture and the promotion of cross-functional activities.

  2. Health Systems Innovation at Academic Health Centers: Leading in a New Era of Health Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ellner, Andrew L; Stout, Somava; Sullivan, Erin E; Griffiths, Elizabeth P; Mountjoy, Ashlin; Phillips, Russell S

    2015-07-01

    Challenged by demands to reduce costs and improve service delivery, the U.S. health care system requires transformational change. Health systems innovation is defined broadly as novel ideas, products, services, and processes-including new ways to promote healthy behaviors and better integrate health services with public health and other social services-which achieve better health outcomes and/or patient experience at equal or lower cost. Academic health centers (AHCs) have an opportunity to focus their considerable influence and expertise on health systems innovation to create new approaches to service delivery and to nurture leaders of transformation. AHCs have traditionally used their promotions criteria to signal their values; creating a health systems innovator promotion track could be a critical step towards creating opportunities for innovators in academic medicine. In this Perspective, the authors review publicly available promotions materials at top-ranked medical schools and find that while criteria for advancement increasingly recognize systems innovation, there is a lack of specificity on metrics beyond the traditional yardstick of peer-reviewed publications. In addition to new promotions pathways and alternative evidence for the impact of scholarship, other approaches to fostering health systems innovation at AHCs include more robust funding for career development in health systems innovation, new curricula to enable trainees to develop skills in health systems innovation, and new ways for innovators to disseminate their work. AHCs that foster health systems innovation could meet a critical need to contribute both to the sustainability of our health care system and to AHCs' continued leadership role within it.

  3. Engaging a Wider Community: The Academic Library as a Center for Creativity, Discovery, and Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Academic libraries have reported long-term declines in circulation, reference transactions, reserves, and in-house library materials usage. Increasingly, libraries are perceived as being less critical to the academic enterprise. Are these trends irreversible? Perhaps public libraries and some innovative academic libraries can provide us with some…

  4. Biomedical Research and Technology. A Prognosis for International Economic Leadership. Commission on Academic Medical Centers and the Economy of New England [Report].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New England Board of Higher Education, Boston, MA.

    The focus of the work of the Commission on Academic Medical Centers and the Economy of New England is the financing competitors strength and future development of academic centers and biomedical companies in New England. Among the findings and recommendations of the Commission are the following: (1) the New England region will require several…

  5. A qualitative evaluation of the 2005-2011 National Academic Centers of Excellence in Youth Violence Prevention Program.

    PubMed

    Holland, Kristin M; Vivolo-Kantor, Alana M; Dela Cruz, Jason; Massetti, Greta M; Mahendra, Reshma

    2015-12-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Division of Violence Prevention (DVP) funded eight National Academic Centers of Excellence (ACEs) in Youth Violence Prevention from 2005 to 2010 and two Urban Partnership Academic Centers of Excellence (UPACEs) in Youth Violence Prevention from 2006 to 2011. The ACEs and UPACEs constitute DVP's 2005-2011 ACE Program. ACE Program goals include partnering with communities to promote youth violence (YV) prevention and fostering connections between research and community practice. This article describes a qualitative evaluation of the 2005-2011 ACE Program using an innovative approach for collecting and analyzing data from multiple large research centers via a web-based Information System (ACE-IS). The ACE-IS was established as an efficient mechanism to collect and document ACE research and programmatic activities. Performance indicators for the ACE Program were established in an ACE Program logic model. Data on performance indicators were collected through the ACE-IS biannually. Data assessed Centers' ability to develop, implement, and evaluate YV prevention activities. Performance indicator data demonstrate substantial progress on Centers' research in YV risk and protective factors, community partnerships, and other accomplishments. Findings provide important lessons learned, illustrate progress made by the Centers, and point to new directions for YV prevention research and programmatic efforts.

  6. Time-motion analysis of emergency radiologists and emergency physicians at an urban academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Perry, Warren M; Lee, Christoph I; Steers, W Neil; Post, Lori A; Forman, Howard P

    2013-10-01

    Our objective was to characterize the tasks of emergency radiologists and emergency physicians and quantify the proportion of time spent on these tasks to assess their roles in patient evaluation. Our study involved emergency radiologists and emergency physicians at an urban academic level I trauma medical center. Participants were observed for continuous 2-h periods during which all of their activities were timed and categorized into the following tasks: patient history, patient physical findings, assessment/plan, procedures, technical/administration, paperwork, and personal time. We performed multivariate analyses to compare the proportion of time spent on task categories between specialties. Twenty physicians (10 emergency medicine and 10 radiology) were observed for a total of 146,802 s (2,446.7 min). Radiologists spent a significantly larger combined proportion of time on determining physical findings and paperwork than emergency physicians (61.9 vs. 28.3 %, p<0.0001). Emergency physicians spent a significantly larger proportion of time than radiologists on determining patient history (17.5 vs. 2.5 %, p=0.0008) and assessment/plan (42.3 vs. 19.3 %, p<0.0001). Both specialties devoted minimal time toward personal tasks. Radiologists play a major role in the diagnostic evaluation of a subset of acute patients, spending significantly more of their time determining physical findings than their emergency physician counterparts.

  7. Three-Year Experience of an Academic Medical Center Ombuds Office.

    PubMed

    Raymond, John R; Layde, Peter M

    2016-03-01

    An ombuds is an individual who informally helps people or groups (visitors) resolve disputes and/or interpersonal conflicts as an alternative to formal dispute resolution mechanisms within an organization. Ombuds are nearly ubiquitous in many governmental, business, and educational settings but only recently have gained visibility at medical schools. Medical schools in the United States are increasingly establishing ombuds offices as part of comprehensive conflict management systems to address concerns of faculty, staff, students, and others. As of 2015, more than 35 medical schools in the United States have active ombuds Web pages. Despite the growing number of medical schools with ombuds offices, the literature on medical school ombuds offices is scant. In this article, the authors review the first three years of experience of the ombuds office at the Medical College of Wisconsin, a freestanding medical and graduate school with a large physician practice. The article is written from the perspective of the inaugural ombuds and the president who initiated the office. The authors discuss the rationale for, costs of, potential advantages of, and initial reactions of faculty, staff, and administration to having an ombuds office in an academic medical center. Important questions relevant to medical schools that are considering an ombuds office are discussed. The authors conclude that an ombuds office can be a useful complement to traditional approaches for conflict management, regulatory compliance, and identification of systemic issues.

  8. The ebb and flow model: a philosophy of organizational learning in the academic health center.

    PubMed

    Dimario, Francis J

    2012-02-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) have traditionally been a vibrant locale for cutting-edge medical research, androgogic education and innovative clinical care for the most vexing diseases. While these pursuits have coexisted and flourished, the realities of the health-care business environment have demanded reformatting and emulation of a corporate organizational model. This evolution has impacted the core identities of the AHC and challenged individual medical-educators, clinician-scientists and basic science investigators to persist and succeed in this milieu. The AHC has a unique capacity to muster the innate learning drive of these individuals into an organizational mission as it balances the pressures exerted from both the internal and external environments. The AHC as an organization can be viewed as an experimental condition with modifiable variables to which its professionals can react, adapt to, and transform. Organizational learning and change implementation is in essence an experiment in human behavior modification. While all individuals are subject to change, merely assembling them in a single locale determines neither a predictable homogeneous outcome nor the success of their endeavor. This article highlights some of these propositions and offers a philosophical approach to advance the AHC as an organization through the creativity and innovation of its professional ranks.

  9. The academic health center in complex humanitarian emergencies: lessons learned from the 2010 Haiti earthquake.

    PubMed

    Babcock, Christine; Theodosis, Christian; Bills, Corey; Kim, Jimin; Kinet, Melodie; Turner, Madeleine; Millis, Michael; Olopade, Olufunmilayo; Olopade, Christopher

    2012-11-01

    On January 12, 2010, a 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck Haiti. The event disrupted infrastructure and was marked by extreme morbidity and mortality. The global response to the disaster was rapid and immense, comprising multiple actors-including academic health centers (AHCs)-that provided assistance in the field and from home. The authors retrospectively examine the multidisciplinary approach that the University of Chicago Medicine (UCM) applied to postearthquake Haiti, which included the application of institutional structure and strategy, systematic deployment of teams tailored to evolving needs, and the actual response and recovery. The university mobilized significant human and material resources for deployment within 48 hours and sustained the effort for over four months. In partnership with international and local nongovernmental organizations as well as other AHCs, the UCM operated one of the largest and more efficient acute field hospitals in the country. The UCM's efforts in postearthquake Haiti provide insight into the role AHCs can play, including their strengths and limitations, in complex disasters. AHCs can provide necessary intellectual and material resources as well as technical expertise, but the cost and speed required for responding to an emergency, and ongoing domestic responsibilities, may limit the response of a large university and hospital system. The authors describe the strong institutional backing, the detailed predeployment planning and logistical support UCM provided, the engagement of faculty and staff who had previous experience in complex humanitarian emergencies, and the help of volunteers fluent in the local language which, together, made UCM's mission in postearthquake Haiti successful.

  10. Political strategy, business strategy, and the academic medical center: linking theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Souba, W W; Weitekamp, M R; Mahon, J F

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to link external political strategy theory to a specific health care setting-that of the academic medical center (AMC). Political strategy encompasses those activities undertaken by AMCs to acquire, develop, and use power (clout, influence, and credibility) to gain an advantage in situations of conflict. It should be differentiated from internal politics, a topic that will not be dealt with in this review. Political strategy should also be distinguished from but not divorced from competitive strategy. As political and social action can change the competitive landscape and the rules of competition, AMCs must become adept in issues management and stakeholder management. The focus on political strategy is a reflection of the enormous changes in the external environment that have impacted AMCs in recent years. These changes have often emerged out of political and social action and they impact significantly on the organization's more traditional business strategies. We suggest that a tighter alignment between political and business strategies in the future will help ensure organizational survival and success. This article reviews the literature and theory in corporate political strategy and illustrates the application of political strategy with examples of issues and problems faced by AMCs. Models of political strategy are well crafted, and this article concludes with succinct observations on the use of political strategies to enhance the business-based strategies of AMCs. Although the focus is on AMCs, the use of political strategies is applicable to any health care institution.

  11. Improving Initiation and Tracking of Research Projects at an Academic Health Center: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susanne; Goros, Martin; Parsons, Helen M; Saygin, Can; Wan, Hung-Da; Shireman, Paula K; Gelfond, Jonathan A L

    2016-09-20

    Research service cores at academic health centers are important in driving translational advancements. Specifically, biostatistics and research design units provide services and training in data analytics, biostatistics, and study design. However, the increasing demand and complexity of assigning appropriate personnel to time-sensitive projects strains existing resources, potentially decreasing productivity and increasing costs. Improving processes for project initiation, assigning appropriate personnel, and tracking time-sensitive projects can eliminate bottlenecks and utilize resources more efficiently. In this case study, we describe our application of lean six sigma principles to our biostatistics unit to establish a systematic continual process improvement cycle for intake, allocation, and tracking of research design and data analysis projects. The define, measure, analyze, improve, and control methodology was used to guide the process improvement. Our goal was to assess and improve the efficiency and effectiveness of operations by objectively measuring outcomes, automating processes, and reducing bottlenecks. As a result, we developed a web-based dashboard application to capture, track, categorize, streamline, and automate project flow. Our workflow system resulted in improved transparency, efficiency, and workload allocation. Using the dashboard application, we reduced the average study intake time from 18 to 6 days, a 66.7% reduction over 12 months (January to December 2015).

  12. Accuracy of patient's turnover time prediction using RFID technology in an academic ambulatory surgery center.

    PubMed

    Marchand-Maillet, Florence; Debes, Claire; Garnier, Fanny; Dufeu, Nicolas; Sciard, Didier; Beaussier, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Patients flow in outpatient surgical unit is a major issue with regards to resource utilization, overall case load and patient satisfaction. An electronic Radio Frequency Identification Device (RFID) was used to document the overall time spent by the patients between their admission and discharge from the unit. The objective of this study was to evaluate how a RFID-based data collection system could provide an accurate prediction of the actual time for the patient to be discharged from the ambulatory surgical unit after surgery. This is an observational prospective evaluation carried out in an academic ambulatory surgery center (ASC). Data on length of stay at each step of the patient care, from admission to discharge, were recorded by a RFID device and analyzed according to the type of surgical procedure, the surgeon and the anesthetic technique. Based on these initial data (n = 1520), patients were scheduled in a sequential manner according to the expected duration of the previous case. The primary endpoint was the difference between actual and predicted time of discharge from the unit. A total of 414 consecutive patients were prospectively evaluated. One hundred seventy four patients (42%) were discharged at the predicted time ± 30 min. Only 24% were discharged behind predicted schedule. Using an automatic record of patient's length of stay would allow an accurate prediction of the discharge time according to the type of surgery, the surgeon and the anesthetic procedure.

  13. Issues for academic health centers to consider before implementing a balanced-scorecard effort.

    PubMed

    Zelman, W N; Blazer, D; Gower, J M; Bumgarner, P O; Cancilla, L M

    1999-12-01

    Because of changes in the health care environment, it is likely that strategic planning and management will become much more important to academic health centers (AHCs) than in the past. One approach to strategic planning and management that is gaining the considerable interest of health care organizations is the balanced scorecard. Based on a year's experience in examining this management tool, and on early implementation efforts, the authors critically evaluate the applicability of the balanced-scorecard approach at AHCs in relation to two fundamental questions: Does the decentralized nature of most AHCs mitigate the potential usefulness of the balanced-scorecard approach? Are the balanced scorecard's four perspectives (learning and growth, internal; customer; and financial) appropriate for AHCs, which are neither for-profit nor manufacturing organizations? The authors conclude that (1) the unique characteristics of AHCs may mitigate the full benefit of the balanced-scorecard approach, and (2) in cases where it is used, some key modifications must be made in the balanced-scorecard approach to account for those unique characteristics. For example, in a corporation, the key question from the financial perspective is "To succeed financially, how should we appear to our stockholders?" But in an AHC, this question must be revised to "What financial condition must we achieve to allow us to accomplish our mission?"

  14. Evaluation of blood pressure measurement and agreement in an academic health sciences center.

    PubMed

    Minor, Deborah S; Butler, Kenneth R; Artman, Katherine L; Adair, Cathy; Wang, Wanmei; McNair, Valerie; Wofford, Marion R; Griswold, Michael

    2012-04-01

    The authors assessed the process of blood pressure (BP) measurement and level of adherence to recommended procedures at representative sites throughout a large academic health sciences center. A casual observer assessed the setting and observed the process, noting the equipment, technique, and BP recorded by site personnel. A trained observer then repeated the patient's BP measurement following American Heart Association recommendations. Significant biases were observed between measurements by site personnel and the trained observer. Site personnel reported on average an increased systolic BP (SBP) of 5.66 mm Hg (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.09-8.23; P<.001) and a decreased diastolic BP (DBP) of -2.96 mm Hg (95% CI, -5.05 to -0.87; P=.005). Overall, 41% of patients had a ≥10-mm Hg difference in SBP between measurements. Similarly, 54% had differences of ≥5 mm Hg in DBP between measurements. Inaccurate BP measurement and poor technique may lead to misclassification, misdiagnosis, and inappropriate medical decisions. Concordance of measured SBP between our site personnel and trained observer was less than optimal. Several areas for improvement were identified. Routine calibration and use of system-wide standardized equipment, establishment of BP measurement protocols, and periodic technique and equipment recertification can be addressed in future quality initiatives.

  15. A roadmap for academic health centers to establish good laboratory practice-compliant infrastructure.

    PubMed

    Adamo, Joan E; Bauer, Gerhard; Berro, Marlene; Burnett, Bruce K; Hartman, Karen A; Masiello, Lisa M; Moorman-White, Diane; Rubinstein, Eric P; Schuff, Kathryn G

    2012-03-01

    Prior to human clinical trials, nonclinical safety and toxicology studies are required to demonstrate that a new product appears safe for human testing; these nonclinical studies are governed by good laboratory practice (GLP) regulations. As academic health centers (AHCs) embrace the charge to increase the translation of basic science research into clinical discoveries, researchers at these institutions increasingly will be conducting GLP-regulated nonclinical studies. Because the consequences for noncompliance are severe and many AHC researchers are unfamiliar with Food and Drug Administration regulations, the authors describe the regulatory requirements for conducting GLP research, including the strict documentation requirements, the necessary personnel training, the importance of study monitoring, and the critical role that compliance oversight plays in the process. They then explain the process that AHCs interested in conducting GLP studies should take before the start of their research program, including conducting a needs assessment and a gap analysis and selecting a model for GLP compliance. Finally, the authors identify and analyze several critical barriers to developing and implementing a GLP-compliant infrastructure at an AHC. Despite these challenges, the capacity to perform such research will help AHCs to build and maintain competitive research programs and to facilitate the successful translation of faculty-initiated research from nonclinical studies to first-in-human clinical trials.

  16. Three-Year Experience of an Academic Medical Center Ombuds Office

    PubMed Central

    Layde, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    An ombuds is an individual who informally helps people or groups (visitors) resolve disputes and/or interpersonal conflicts as an alternative to formal dispute resolution mechanisms within an organization. Ombuds are nearly ubiquitous in many governmental, business, and educational settings but only recently have gained visibility at medical schools. Medical schools in the United States are increasingly establishing ombuds offices as part of comprehensive conflict management systems to address concerns of faculty, staff, students, and others. As of 2015, more than 35 medical schools in the United States have active ombuds Web pages. Despite the growing number of medical schools with ombuds offices, the literature on medical school ombuds offices is scant. In this article, the authors review the first three years of experience of the ombuds office at the Medical College of Wisconsin, a freestanding medical and graduate school with a large physician practice. The article is written from the perspective of the inaugural ombuds and the president who initiated the office. The authors discuss the rationale for, costs of, potential advantages of, and initial reactions of faculty, staff, and administration to having an ombuds office in an academic medical center. Important questions relevant to medical schools that are considering an ombuds office are discussed. The authors conclude that an ombuds office can be a useful complement to traditional approaches for conflict management, regulatory compliance, and identification of systemic issues. PMID:26675192

  17. Reducing intraoperative red blood cell unit wastage in a large academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Gina M.; Woods, Marcella C.; France, Daniel J.; Austin, Thomas M.; Deegan, Robert J.; Paroskie, Allison; Booth, Garrett S.; Young, Pampee P.; Dmochowski, Roger R.; Sandberg, Warren S.; Pilla, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The wastage of red blood cell (RBC) units within the operative setting results in significant direct costs to health care organizations. Previous education-based efforts to reduce wastage were unsuccessful at our institution. We hypothesized that a quality and process improvement approach would result in sustained reductions in intraoperative RBC wastage in a large academic medical center. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Utilizing a failure mode and effects analysis supplemented with time and temperature data, key drivers of perioperative RBC wastage were identified and targeted for process improvement. RESULTS Multiple contributing factors, including improper storage and transport and lack of accurate, locally relevant RBC wastage event data were identified as significant contributors to ongoing intraoperative RBC unit wastage. Testing and implementation of improvements to the process of transport and storage of RBC units occurred in liver transplant and adult cardiac surgical areas due to their history of disproportionately high RBC wastage rates. Process interventions targeting local drivers of RBC wastage resulted in a significant reduction in RBC wastage (p <0.0001; adjusted odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.15–0.39), despite an increase in operative case volume over the period of the study. Studied process interventions were then introduced incrementally in the remainder of the perioperative areas. CONCLUSIONS These results show that a multidisciplinary team focused on the process of blood product ordering, transport, and storage was able to significantly reduce operative RBC wastage and its associated costs using quality and process improvement methods. PMID:26202213

  18. Building a transcontinental affiliation: a new model for academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Sostman, H Dirk; Forese, Laura L; Boom, Marc L; Schroth, Lynn; Klein, Arthur A; Mushlin, Alvin I; Hagale, John E; Pardes, Herbert; Girotto, Ronald G; Gotto, Antonio M

    2005-11-01

    The recent affiliation of The Methodist Hospital (TMH) with Weill Medical College (WMC) of Cornell University and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital is the first transcontinental primary affiliation between major, not-for-profit academic health centers (AHCs) in the United States. The authors describe the process followed, the issues involved, the initial accomplishments, and the opportunities envisioned. The key enablers of this affiliation were a rapid process, mutual trust based on existing professional relationships, and commitment to the project by Board leadership. Because of their geographic separation, the parties were not competitors in providing clinical care to their regional populations. The affiliation is nonexclusive, but is reciprocally primary in New York and Texas. Members of the TMH medical staff are eligible for faculty appointments at WMC. The principal areas of collaboration will be education, research, quality improvement, information technology, and international program development. The principal challenge has been the physical distance between the parties. Although extensive use of videoconferencing has been successful, personal contact is essential in establishing relationships. External processes impose a slower sequence and tempo of events than some might wish. This new model for AHCs creates exciting possibilities for the tripartite mission of research, education, and patient care. Realizing the potential of these opportunities will require unconstrained ideas and substantial investment of time and other critical resources. Since many consider that AHCs are in economic and cultural crisis, successful development of such possibilities could have importance beyond the collective interests of these three institutions.

  19. Building academic health centers' capacity to shape and respond to comparative effectiveness research policy.

    PubMed

    VanLare, Jordan M; Conway, Patrick H; Rowe, John W

    2011-06-01

    In recent years, the focus on comparative effectiveness research (CER), the funding available to support it, and the range of possible effects of CER policy on academic health centers (AHCs) have increased substantially. CER has implications for the research, education, and clinical care components of AHCs' missions. The current funding and policy environment have created specific opportunities for AHCs to shape and respond to CER policies across the four dimensions of the CER enterprise: research, human and scientific capital, data infrastructure, and translation and dissemination. Characteristics such as the degree of physician-hospital integration, the status of a health information technology infrastructure, and the presence of a well-developed cross-functional health services research capacity linked to the care delivery enterprise could help AHCs respond to these opportunities and influence future policies. AHCs are also essential to the development of methodologies and the training of the next cadre of researchers. Further, a focus on understanding what works in health care and increasing adoption of evidence-based practice must become embedded in the fabric of AHCs. Those AHCs most successful in responding to the CER challenge may leverage it as a point of differentiation in the marketplace for health care and lead transformational improvements in health.

  20. Current state of information technologies for the clinical research enterprise across academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Shawn N; Dubey, Anil; Embi, Peter J; Harris, Paul A; Richter, Brent G; Turisco, Fran; Weber, Griffin M; Tcheng, James E; Keogh, Diane

    2012-06-01

    Information technology (IT) to support clinical research has steadily grown over the past 10 years. Many new applications at the enterprise level are available to assist with the numerous tasks necessary in performing clinical research. However, it is not clear how rapidly this technology is being adopted or whether it is making an impact upon how clinical research is being performed. The Clinical Research Forum's IT Roundtable performed a survey of 17 representative academic medical centers (AMCs) to understand the adoption rate and implementation strategies within this field. The results were compared with similar surveys from 4 and 6 years ago. We found the adoption rate for four prominent areas of IT-supported clinical research had increased remarkably, specifically regulatory compliance, electronic data capture for clinical trials, data repositories for secondary use of clinical data, and infrastructure for supporting collaboration. Adoption of other areas of clinical research IT was more irregular with wider differences between AMCs. These differences appeared to be partially due to a set of openly available applications that have emerged to occupy an important place in the landscape of clinical research enterprise-level support at AMC's.

  1. Behind bars: the compelling case for academic health centers partnering with correctional facilities.

    PubMed

    Trestman, Robert L; Ferguson, Warren; Dickert, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs), particularly those that are publicly funded institutions, have as their mission the treatment of disadvantaged populations, the training of the next generation of clinicians, and the development and dissemination of new knowledge to reduce the burden of disease and improve the health of individuals and populations. Incarcerated populations have the most prevalent and acute disease burden and health disparities in the United States, even in comparison with inner-city populations. Yet, only a small proportion of AHCs have reached out to incarcerated populations to fulfill their mission. Those AHCs that have partnered with correctional facilities have overcome concerns about the value and popularity of "training behind bars"; the cost, liability, and pragmatics of caring for a medically complicated population; and the viability of correctional health research and extramural research funding. They have done so to great benefit to patients, students, and faculty. Partnering with correctional facilities to provide health care offers opportunities for AHCs to fulfill their core missions of clinical service, education, and research, while also enhancing their financial stability, to the benefit of all. In this Commentary, the authors discuss, based on their experiences, these concerns, how existing partnerships have overcome them, and the benefits of such relationships to both AHCs and correctional facilities.

  2. The Changing Landscape of Molecular Diagnostic Testing: Implications for Academic Medical Centers

    PubMed Central

    Rehm, Heidi L.; Hynes, Elizabeth; Funke, Birgit H.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, the field of molecular diagnostics has undergone tremendous transformation, catalyzed by the clinical implementation of next generation sequencing (NGS). As technical capabilities are enhanced and current limitations are addressed, NGS is increasingly capable of detecting most variant types and will therefore continue to consolidate and simplify diagnostic testing. It is likely that genome sequencing will eventually serve as a universal first line test for disorders with a suspected genetic origin. Academic Medical Centers (AMCs), which have been at the forefront of this paradigm shift are now presented with challenges to keep up with increasing technical, bioinformatic and interpretive complexity of NGS-based tests in a highly competitive market. Additional complexity may arise from altered regulatory oversight, also triggered by the unprecedented scope of NGS-based testing, which requires new approaches. However, these challenges are balanced by unique opportunities, particularly at the interface between clinical and research operations, where AMCs can capitalize on access to cutting edge research environments and establish collaborations to facilitate rapid diagnostic innovation. This article reviews present and future challenges and opportunities for AMC associated molecular diagnostic laboratories from the perspective of the Partners HealthCare Laboratory for Molecular Medicine (LMM). PMID:26828522

  3. Referral to pediatric surgical specialists.

    PubMed

    Klein, Michael D

    2014-02-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics, with the collaboration of the Surgical Sections of the American Academy of Pediatrics, has created referral recommendations intended to serve as voluntary practice parameters to assist general pediatricians in determining when and to whom to refer their patients for pediatric surgical specialty care. It is recognized that these recommendations may be difficult to implement, because communities vary in terms of access to major pediatric medical centers. Limited access does not negate the value of the recommendations, however, because the child who needs specialized surgical and anesthetic care is best served by the skills of the appropriate pediatric surgical team. Major congenital anomalies, malignancies, major trauma, and chronic illnesses (including those associated with preterm birth) in infants and children should be managed by pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical specialists at pediatric referral centers that can provide expertise in many areas, including the pediatric medical subspecialties and surgical specialties of pediatric radiology, pediatric anesthesiology, pediatric pathology, and pediatric intensive care. The optimal management of the child with complex problems, chronic illness, or disabilities requires coordination, communication, and cooperation of the pediatric surgical specialist with the child's primary care pediatrician or physician.

  4. Benchmarks for ethically credible partnerships between industry and academic health centers: beyond disclosure of financial conflicts of interest.

    PubMed

    Meslin, Eric M; Rager, Joshua B; Schwartz, Peter H; Quaid, Kimberly A; Gaffney, Margaret M; Duke, Jon; Tierney, William H

    2015-12-01

    Relationships between industry and university-based researchers have been commonplace for decades and have received notable attention concerning the conflicts of interest these relationships may harbor. While new efforts are being made to update conflict of interest policies and make industry relationships with academia more transparent, the development of broader institutional partnerships between industry and academic health centers challenges the efficacy of current policy to effectively manage these innovative partnerships. In this paper, we argue that existing strategies to reduce conflicts of interest are not sufficient to address the emerging models of industry-academic partnerships because they focus too narrowly on financial matters and are not comprehensive enough to mitigate all ethical risk. Moreover, conflict-of-interest strategies are not designed to promote best practices nor the scientific and social benefits of academic-industry collaboration. We propose a framework of principles and benchmarks for "ethically credible partnerships" between industry and academic health centers and describe how this framework may provide a practical and comprehensive approach for designing and evaluating such partnerships.

  5. Performance evaluation of Al-Zahra academic medical center based on Iran balanced scorecard model

    PubMed Central

    Raeisi, Ahmad Reza; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Bakhsh, Roghayeh Mohammadi; Gangi, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Background: Growth and development in any country's national health system, without an efficient evaluation system, lacks the basic concepts and tools necessary for fulfilling the system's goals. The balanced scorecard (BSC) is a technique widely used to measure the performance of an organization. The basic core of the BSC is guided by the organization's vision and strategies, which are the bases for the formation of four perspectives of BSC. The goal of this research is the performance evaluation of Al-Zahra Academic Medical Center in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, based on Iran BSC model. Materials and Methods: This is a combination (quantitative–qualitative) research which was done at Al-Zahra Academic Medical Center in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2011. The research populations were hospital managers at different levels. Sampling method was purposive sampling in which the key informed personnel participated in determining the performance indicators of hospital as the BSC team members in focused discussion groups. After determining the conceptual elements in focused discussion groups, the performance objectives (targets) and indicators of hospital were determined and sorted in perspectives by the group discussion participants. Following that, the performance indicators were calculated by the experts according to the predetermined objectives; then, the score of each indicator and the mean score of each perspective were calculated. Results: Research findings included development of the organizational mission, vision, values, objectives, and strategies. The strategies agreed upon by the participants in the focus discussion group included five strategies, which were customer satisfaction, continuous quality improvement, development of human resources, supporting innovation, expansion of services and improving the productivity. Research participants also agreed upon four perspectives for the Al-Zahra hospital BSC. In the patients and community

  6. Implementation of a Research Participant Satisfaction Survey at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Smailes, Paula; Reider, Carson; Hallarn, Rose Kegler; Hafer, Lisa; Wallace, Lorraine; Miser, William F.

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive case study covers the development of a survey to assess research subject satisfaction among those participating in clinical research studies at an academic medical center (AMC). The purpose was twofold: to gauge the effectiveness of the survey, as well as to determine the level of satisfaction of the research participants. The authors developed and implemented an electronic research participant satisfaction survey. It was created to provide research teams at the authors’ AMC with a common instrument to capture research participant experiences in order to improve upon the quality of research operations. The instrument captured participant responses in a standardized format. Ultimately, the results are to serve as a means to improve the research experience of participants for single studies, studies conducted within a division or department of the AMC, or across the entire research enterprise at the institution. For ease of use, the survey was created within an electronic data capture system known as REDCap, which is used by a consortium of more than 1,800 institutional partners as a tool from the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Participants in the survey described in this article were more than 18 years of age and participating in an institutional review board (IRB)-approved study. Results showed that the vast majority of participants surveyed had a positive experience engaging in research at the authors’ AMC. Further, the tool was found to be effective in making that determination. The authors hope to expand the use of the survey as a means to increase research satisfaction and quality at their university. PMID:27390769

  7. A new survey to evaluate conflict of interest policies at academic medical centers

    PubMed Central

    Hams, Marcia; Zentner, Lynn; Schmidt, Cory; Dweik, Raed A.; Karafa, Matthew; Rose, Susannah L.

    2017-01-01

    Background A majority of academic medical centers (AMCs) have now adopted conflict of interest policies (COI) to address relationships with pharmaceutical and device industries that can increase the risk of bias in patient care, education and research. However, AMCs may have little information on the impact of their policies. This paper provides a new method, which is a free, publicly-available survey, to fill this information gap and improve COI programs at AMCs. Methods & findings The survey, piloted in three AMCs and designed in collaboration with national conflicts of interest policy experts, covers a range of universal compliance-related concerns, which allows institutions to tailor questions to align with their own policies and culture. The survey was low-burden, and provided important data for these AMCs to evaluate their policies. A descriptive analysis of the pooled pilot site data (n = 1578) was performed, which found that a majority of respondents did not have financial ties with industry and a majority was satisfied with specific COI policies at their institutions. The analysis also showed that the survey is sensitive to differences that AMCs will find meaningful. For instance, individuals with industry ties were significantly more likely than individuals without ties to think that COI policies unnecessarily hindered interactions with industry (p = .004), were ineffective at reducing harm to patients (p < .001), and were ineffective in reducing bias in medical education (p>.001). Conclusion The survey is now free and publicly available for use by any institution. AMCs can use the results to update and refine policies, and to provide ongoing education regarding existing policies. PMID:28296898

  8. Integrating Field-Centered, Project Based Activities with Academic Year Coursework: A Curriculum Wide Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, P. R.; Brown, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Based upon constructivist principles and the recognition that many students are motivated by hands-on activities and field experiences, we designed a new undergraduate curriculum at Lake Superior State University. One of our major goals was to develop stand-alone field projects in most of the academic year courses. Examples of courses impacted include structural geology, geophysics, and geotectonics, Students learn geophysical concepts in the context of near surface field-based geophysical studies while students in structural geology learn about structural processes through outcrop study of fractures, folds and faults. In geotectonics students learn about collisional and rifting processes through on-site field studies of specific geologic provinces. Another goal was to integrate data and samples collected by students in our sophomore level introductory field course along with stand-alone field projects in our clastic systems and sequence stratigraphy courses. Our emphasis on active learning helps students develop a meaningful geoscience knowledge base and complex reasoning skills in authentic contexts. We simulate the activities of practicing geoscientists by engaging students in all aspects of a project, for example: field-oriented project planning and design; acquiring, analyzing, and interpreting data; incorporating supplemental material and background data; and preparing oral and written project reports. We find through anecdotal evidence including student comments and personal observation that the projects stimulate interest, provide motivation for learning new concepts, integrate skill and concept acquisition vertically through the curriculum, apply concepts from multiple geoscience subdisiplines, and develop soft skills such as team work, problem solving, critical thinking and communication skills. Through this projected-centered Lake Superior State University geology curriculum students practice our motto of "learn geology by doing geology."

  9. What can we learn from patient dissatisfaction? Analysis of dissatisfying events at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alicia V.; Moriarty, John P.; Borgstrom, Christopher; Horwitz, Leora I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is typically measured by quantitative surveys using predetermined domains. However, dissatisfaction may be a distinct entity from satisfaction, may have different determinants, and may better reflect problems in healthcare delivery. Objective To describe domains of dissatisfaction experienced by patients during hospitalization. Setting United States urban, academic medical center Patients Adults discharged between July 1, 2007 and June 30, 2008 Intervention Post-discharge telephone interview: “If there was one thing we could have done to improve your experience in the hospital what would it have been?” Measurements Standard qualitative analysis of suggestions for improvement. Results We randomly selected 976 of 9764 interviews. A total of 439/976 (45.0%) included at least one suggestion for improvement. We identified six major domains of dissatisfaction: ineptitude (7.68%), disrespect (6.05%), waits (15.78%), ineffective communication (7.38%), lack of environmental control (15.57%) and substandard amenities (6.87%). These domains corresponded to six implicit expectations for quality hospital care: safety, treatment with respect and dignity, minimized wait times, effective communication, control over physical surroundings and high quality amenities. Some of these expectations, such as for safe care, effective communication between providers, and lack of disrespect, may not be adequately captured in existing patient satisfaction assessments. Conclusions The results represent patient-generated priorities for quality improvement in health care. These priorities are not all consistently represented in standard patient satisfaction surveys and quality improvement initiatives. Patient input is critical to assessing the quality of hospital care and to identifying areas for improvement. PMID:21162153

  10. Academic-Centered Peer Interactions and Retention in Undergraduate Mathematics Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Kadian M.

    2009-01-01

    Peer interactions are a critical component of students' academic success and retention in undergraduate programs. Scholars argue that peer interactions influence students' cognitive development, identity development, self-confidence and self-efficacy, and social and academic integration into the university environment (Pascarella & Terenzini,…

  11. A Survey of Intravenous Remifentanil Use for Labor Analgesia at Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Aaronson, Jaime; Abramovitz, Sharon; Smiley, Richard; Tangel, Virginia; Landau, Ruth

    2017-04-01

    Remifentanil is most commonly offered when neuraxial labor analgesia is contraindicated. There is no consensus regarding the optimal administration, dosing strategy, or requirements for maternal monitoring, which may pose a patient safety issue. This exploratory survey evaluated the current practices regarding remifentanil use for labor analgesia at academic centers in the United States. Of 126 obstetric anesthesia directors surveyed, 84 (67%) responded. In 2014 to 2015, an estimated 36% (95% confidence interval: 25.7-46.3) of centers used remifentanil, most of which did so less than 5 times. Some serious maternal and neonatal respiratory complications occurred, emphasizing that clinical protocols and adequate monitoring are key to ensure maternal and neonatal safety.

  12. [Recruiting and Personal Development in Surgical Departments of Large Referral Centers - Current Practice and Options for Improvement from Industry and Service Business].

    PubMed

    Homayounfar, K; König, S; Rabe, C; Beck-Broichsitter, B; Lützen, U; Ghadimi, M B; Schmidt, C

    2016-06-23

    Background: Cut-throat competition, cost pressure, generation Y, shortage of qualified staff and feminisation influence human resources management in visceral surgery. The assessment of the current situation by chief surgeons (CS) as well as proof of transferability of strategies from industry and service business (ISB) have not yet been investigated. Material and Methods: The CS of university hospitals and large referral centres (> 800 beds) were interviewed (n = 100) on the basis of a standardised questionnaire including 43 items. Closed questions were designed with a 5-point Likert scale and their analysis was presented as means (MW) and standard deviations (±). Ten human resources manager (HMR) of ISB were invited to participate in 45-minute telephone interviews. Results: Thirty-seven CS participated in the survey, 15 of whom were full professors. Unsolicited applications (100 %), job advertisements (78 %) and direct approaches to final year students (78 %) were the most common ways of recruitment. Only 17 % of CS used a standardised form for preparation. Professional expertise (MW 2.2 ± 0.9), social skills (MW 1.9 ± 0.6) and excellent German language skills (MW 1.8 ± 0.8) were named as important qualifications for employment, while references and certificates were regarded as being less important (MW 3.2 ± 0.9). Personal development was regarded as important (MW 1.1 ± 0.2), but a defined period for residency was not guaranteed (MW 3.0 ± 1.5). Transparent selection criteria for career opportunities (MW 2.5 ± 1.1) and different career models (MW 2.7 ± 1.2) were only rarely available. Six HRM participated in the interviews. Active head-hunting (75 %), Internet platforms (75 %), presentations at conferences (75 %), as well as hiring trainees (50 %), job advertisements (50 %) and social media (50 %) were established options to find qualified employees. Professional and management careers were often

  13. Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Katrina Inspired Disaster Screenings (KIDS): Psychometric Testing of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network Hurricane Assessment and Referral Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansel, Tonya Cross; Osofsky, Joy D.; Osofsky, Howard J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Post disaster psychosocial surveillance procedures are important for guiding effective and efficient recovery. The Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center Katrina Inspired Disaster Screenings (KIDS) is a model designed with the goal of assisting recovering communities in understanding the needs of and targeting services…

  14. Two Reports of the AAMC Committee on AIDS and the Academic Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Medicine, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Association of American Medical Colleges' reports concerning Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome include "Policy Guidelines for Addressing HIV [human immunodeficiency virus] Infection in the Academic Medical Community" and "The HIV Epidemic and Medical Education." (MSE)

  15. Comparison of academic and nonacademic sites in multi-center clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dording, Christina M; Dalton, Elizabeth D; Pencina, Michael J; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David

    2012-02-01

    The selection of appropriate subjects is a critical element of successful clinical trials. Failure to properly identify, select, and retain subjects in clinical trials of antidepressant medications may affect the ability to show separation from placebo. Little is known about which type of site, academic or nonacademic, is superior in selecting and retaining appropriate subjects. In the present investigation, the authors conducted a retrospective analysis comparing the performance of academic and nonacademic sites in selecting and retaining appropriate subjects in a recently completed multi-site clinical study of aripiprazole augmentation. The authors used a set of operationalized criteria called the SAFER to identify appropriate study subjects. No significant differences were found in rates of SAFER interview passing, study completion, and clinical outcomes between academic and nonacademic sites. Our findings suggest that academic and nonacademic sites are equally effective in their ability to identify and retain appropriate study participants.

  16. Evaluation of Counseling Outcomes at a University Counseling Center: The Impact of Clinically Significant Change on Problem Resolution and Academic Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Keum-Hyeong; Buskey, Wendy; Johnson, Bonita

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate how receiving personal counseling at a university counseling center helps students deal with their personal problems and facilitates academic functioning. To that end, this study used both clinical and academic outcome measures that are relevant to the practice of counseling provided at a…

  17. Spectrum of tablet computer use by medical students and residents at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The value of tablet computer use in medical education is an area of considerable interest, with preliminary investigations showing that the majority of medical trainees feel that tablet computers added value to the curriculum. This study investigated potential differences in tablet computer use between medical students and resident physicians. Materials & Methods. Data collection for this survey was accomplished with an anonymous online questionnaire shared with the medical students and residents at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM) in July and August of 2012. Results. There were 76 medical student responses (26% response rate) and 66 resident/fellow responses to this survey (21% response rate). Residents/fellows were more likely to use tablet computers several times daily than medical students (32% vs. 20%, p = 0.035). The most common reported uses were for accessing medical reference applications (46%), e-Books (45%), and board study (32%). Residents were more likely than students to use a tablet computer to access an electronic medical record (41% vs. 21%, p = 0.010), review radiology images (27% vs. 12%, p = 0.019), and enter patient care orders (26% vs. 3%, p < 0.001). Discussion. This study shows a high prevalence and frequency of tablet computer use among physicians in training at this academic medical center. Most residents and students use tablet computers to access medical references, e-Books, and to study for board exams. Residents were more likely to use tablet computers to complete clinical tasks. Conclusions. Tablet computer use among medical students and resident physicians was common in this survey. All learners used tablet computers for point of care references and board study. Resident physicians were more likely to use tablet computers to access the EMR, enter patient care orders, and review radiology studies. This difference is likely due to the differing educational and professional demands placed on

  18. Spectrum of tablet computer use by medical students and residents at an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The value of tablet computer use in medical education is an area of considerable interest, with preliminary investigations showing that the majority of medical trainees feel that tablet computers added value to the curriculum. This study investigated potential differences in tablet computer use between medical students and resident physicians. Materials & Methods. Data collection for this survey was accomplished with an anonymous online questionnaire shared with the medical students and residents at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM) in July and August of 2012. Results. There were 76 medical student responses (26% response rate) and 66 resident/fellow responses to this survey (21% response rate). Residents/fellows were more likely to use tablet computers several times daily than medical students (32% vs. 20%, p = 0.035). The most common reported uses were for accessing medical reference applications (46%), e-Books (45%), and board study (32%). Residents were more likely than students to use a tablet computer to access an electronic medical record (41% vs. 21%, p = 0.010), review radiology images (27% vs. 12%, p = 0.019), and enter patient care orders (26% vs. 3%, p < 0.001). Discussion. This study shows a high prevalence and frequency of tablet computer use among physicians in training at this academic medical center. Most residents and students use tablet computers to access medical references, e-Books, and to study for board exams. Residents were more likely to use tablet computers to complete clinical tasks. Conclusions. Tablet computer use among medical students and resident physicians was common in this survey. All learners used tablet computers for point of care references and board study. Resident physicians were more likely to use tablet computers to access the EMR, enter patient care orders, and review radiology studies. This difference is likely due to the differing educational and professional demands placed on

  19. There is no "i" in teamwork in the patient-centered medical home: defining teamwork competencies for academic practice.

    PubMed

    Leasure, Emily L; Jones, Ronald R; Meade, Lauren B; Sanger, Marla I; Thomas, Kris G; Tilden, Virginia P; Bowen, Judith L; Warm, Eric J

    2013-05-01

    Evidence suggests that teamwork is essential for safe, reliable practice. Creating health care teams able to function effectively in patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), practices that organize care around the patient and demonstrate achievement of defined quality care standards, remains challenging. Preparing trainees for practice in interprofessional teams is particularly challenging in academic health centers where health professions curricula are largely siloed. Here, the authors review a well-delineated set of teamwork competencies that are important for high-functioning teams and suggest how these competencies might be useful for interprofessional team training and achievement of PCMH standards. The five competencies are (1) team leadership, the ability to coordinate team members' activities, ensure appropriate task distribution, evaluate effectiveness, and inspire high-level performance, (2) mutual performance monitoring, the ability to develop a shared understanding among team members regarding intentions, roles, and responsibilities so as to accurately monitor one another's performance for collective success, (3) backup behavior, the ability to anticipate the needs of other team members and shift responsibilities during times of variable workload, (4) adaptability, the capability of team members to adjust their strategy for completing tasks on the basis of feedback from the work environment, and (5) team orientation, the tendency to prioritize team goals over individual goals, encourage alternative perspectives, and show respect and regard for each team member. Relating each competency to a vignette from an academic primary care clinic, the authors describe potential strategies for improving teamwork learning and applying the teamwork competences to academic PCMH practices.

  20. Marital and job satisfaction among non-resident physicians at a Hispanic academic medical center, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Colón-de Martí, Luz N; Acevedo, Luis F; Céspedes-Gómez, Wayca R

    2009-01-01

    Marital satisfaction has been previously associated with job satisfaction although few studies have addressed this issue among Hispanic physicians. Marital and job satisfaction were assessed in a sample of 92 legally married non-residents physicians working at a Hispanic Academic Medical Center during the 2006-2007 academic year. Marital satisfaction was assessed using the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) and job satisfaction was measured using a 18-item scale. Response rate was 34.8%. Most (70.7%) of the subjects were males. Forty- five percent (45.0%) belonged to the surgical specialties group. The mean scale value for marital satisfaction was found to be in the average range. Almost all (88.7%) the participants reported being "satisfied "to "very satisfied" with their job. Ninety percent (90.0%) of the surgical specialists and 86.9% of the non-surgical specialists reported being satisfied with their job. The percentage of participants that reported to be "very satisfied" with their job, was higher among the group of surgical specialists (23.3%) than among the non-surgical specialists (13.0%) There was no significant relationship between marital satisfaction and job satisfaction. Also, no statistically significant difference was observed in the level of marital satisfaction and job satisfaction when surgical and non-surgical physicians were compared. The findings on marital satisfaction obtained in this sample were similar to those observed in a previous study of resident physicians at the same academic medical center.

  1. CHOA concussion consensus: establishing a uniform policy for academic accommodations.

    PubMed

    Popoli, David Michael; Burns, Thomas G; Meehan, William P; Reisner, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Concussion research generally centers on physical challenges, though aspects such as social functioning and returning to school also warrant attention in pediatric populations. Restoring academic performance postconcussion remains a challenge. Here we provide recommendations addressing a uniform policy for pediatric concussion patients in academic institutions. Tools that may minimize difficulty with academic re-entry include independent educational evaluations, individualized educational programs (IEPs), student support teams (SSTs), letters of academic accommodation, time off, and 504 Plans. Recognition and treatment is crucial for symptom relief and prevention of functional disruption, as is specialist referral during the acute window. We recommend early intervention with a letter of academic accommodation and SST and suggest that 504 Plans and IEPs be reserved for protracted or medically complicated cases. Students with concussion should be observed for anxiety and depression because these symptoms can lead to prolonged recovery, decreased quality of life, and other social challenges.

  2. Changing resident test ordering behavior: a multilevel intervention to decrease laboratory utilization at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Vidyarthi, Arpana R; Hamill, Timothy; Green, Adrienne L; Rosenbluth, Glenn; Baron, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Hospital laboratory test volume is increasing, and overutilization contributes to errors and costs. Efforts to reduce laboratory utilization have targeted aspects of ordering behavior, but few have utilized a multilevel collaborative approach. The study team partnered with residents to reduce unnecessary laboratory tests and associated costs through multilevel interventions across the academic medical center. The study team selected laboratory tests for intervention based on cost, volume, and ordering frequency (complete blood count [CBC] and CBC with differential, common electrolytes, blood enzymes, and liver function tests). Interventions were designed collaboratively with residents and targeted components of ordering behavior, including system changes, teaching, social marketing, academic detailing, financial incentives, and audit/feedback. Laboratory ordering was reduced by 8% cumulatively over 3 years, saving $2 019 000. By involving residents at every stage of the intervention and targeting multiple levels simultaneously, laboratory utilization was reduced and cost savings were sustained over 3 years.

  3. Academic potential among African American adolescents in juvenile detention centers: Implications for reentry to school

    PubMed Central

    Toldson, Ivory A.; Woodson, Kamilah M.; Braithwaite, Ronald; Holliday, Rhonda C.

    2010-01-01

    The study explores Black adolescent detainees academic potential and motivation to return to school to inform best practices and policies for juvenile reentry to educational settings. Adolescent detainees (N = 1,576) who were recruited from one male and one female youth detention facility, responded to surveys that assessed post-detention educational plans, as well as social and emotional characteristics, and criminal history. Multivariate analysis techniques were used to compare factors across race and gender, and plot linear relationships between key indicators of academic potential with associate factors. Findings revealed that youth were more likely to evince academic potential when they had a healthy level of self-esteem, adequate future goal orientation, positive mood, family and community involvement, fewer traumatic events, and less delinquent activity. PMID:21654936

  4. What are the pathology education requirements for all nonpathology ACGME-accredited programs in an academic center?

    PubMed

    Bean, Sarah M; Nagler, Alisa; Buckley, Patrick J

    2012-09-01

    This study aimed to determine institution-wide graduate medical education (GME) requirements in pathology (exclusive of pathology residency and fellowships) at an academic center. All documents related to residency review committee (RRC) program requirements were searched for the key words "pathology," "laboratory," "autopsy," and "morbidity." For each occurrence, it was determined whether a pathology education requirement had been identified. Requirements were categorized and tabulated. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) lists 135 nonpathology programs; 66 programs exist at Duke University Medical Center, of which 54 (82%) had pathology education requirement(s). Twelve education categories were identified. Teaching/conferences were the most common (52%). Thirty-nine percent required consultation/support. Sixteen programs were required to perform gross/microscopic examination. Trainees in medical genetics are required to have a pathology rotation. Elective rotations should be available for trainees in 6 programs. Pathology departments at academic centers face significant institution-wide pathology education requirements for clinical ACGME programs. Didactic teaching/conferences and consultation/support are common requirements. Opportunities exist for innovative teaching strategies.

  5. Implementation of a "learner-driven" curriculum: an screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) interdisciplinary primary care model.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Marina R; Atherton, W Leigh; Toriello, Paul J; Hodgson, Jennifer L

    2012-01-01

    Although screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) has been a popular model to address potential substance abuse issues in primary care, there is a need for innovative approaches for training providers and staff on SBIRT protocols. An interdisciplinary approach to SBIRT training, named ICARE, was implemented at 3 different medical settings. The ICARE team trained 85 employees at an academic family medicine residency center and 37 employees across 2 rural community health care clinics. Using an innovative "learner-driven" approach, the authors implemented a combination of didactic and interactive training strategies that included on-site coaching, patient simulation exercises, as well as large- and small-group learning.

  6. Free text databases in an Integrated Academic Information System (IAIMS) at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Clark, A S; Shea, S

    1991-01-01

    The use of Folio Views, a PC DOS based product for free text databases, is explored in three applications in an Integrated Academic Information System (IAIMS): (1) a telephone directory, (2) a grants and contracts newsletter, and (3) nursing care plans.

  7. People Come First: User-Centered Academic Library Service. ACRL Publications in Librarianship No. 53.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montanelli, Dale S., Ed.; Stenstrom, Patricia F., Ed.

    This book, emphasizing service to users, includes 10 chapters by different librarians who have had experience as practitioners. Chapters are: (1) "Avoiding the Seven Deadly Sins, or Technology and the Future of Library Service in Academic Libraries" (Michael Gorman); (2) "The Gateway Library: Rethinking Undergraduate Services" (Lizabeth A.…

  8. Bronx Community College's Developmental Academic Advising Center: An Evolving Model for the Millennium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa Rita, Emilio, D., Jr.

    This paper proposes a model for developmental academic advising (DAA) at New York's Bronx Community College (BCC) and reviews the purposes of DAA and barriers to its implementation. The first section presents a conceptual model of DAA and its priorities, indicating that it functions as an active attempt to stimulate personal and intellectual…

  9. Re-Engineering Academic Library Services: The Case of the Technical Knowledge Center & Library of Denmark.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjoernshauge, Lars

    The traditional mode of operation of academic libraries is in crisis due to a combination of zero growth funding, rapidly escalating pricing on information resources (especially scientific journals), necessary investments in technology and human resource development, and increasing customer expectations. These issues are addressed as they relate…

  10. Academic Potential among African American Adolescents in Juvenile Detention Centers: Implications for Reentry to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toldson, Ivory A.; Woodson, Kamilah M.; Braithwaite, Ronald; Holliday, Rhonda C.; De La Rosa, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The study explores Black adolescent detainees' academic potential and motivation to return to school, to inform best practices and policies for juvenile reentry to educational settings. Adolescent detainees (N = 1,576) who were recruited from 1 male and 1 female youth detention facility, responded to surveys that assessed postdetention educational…

  11. Molecular and hematological studies in a large cohort of α(0)-thalassemia in northeast Thailand: data from a single referral center.

    PubMed

    Chaibunruang, Attawut; Prommetta, Simaporn; Yamsri, Supawadee; Fucharoen, Goonnapa; Sae-Ung, Nattaya; Sanchaisuriya, Kanokwan; Fucharoen, Supan

    2013-08-01

    α(0)-thalassemia is the most severe form of α-thalassemia alleles found among Southeast Asian and Chinese populations and can cause a fatal condition known as hemoglobin Bart's hydrops fetalis and hemoglobin H disease. In order to provide the molecular epidemiological characteristic of α(0)-thalassemia in northeast Thailand, a total of 12,525 blood specimens referred to our center at Khon Kaen University in northeast Thailand during October 2008 to January 2012 were studied. Hematological parameters were recorded and DNA deletions causing α(0)-thalassemia were examined by PCR related techniques. Among 12,525 samples examined, α(0)-thalassemia alleles were identified in 1,873 (15.0%) samples, including 1855 (14.8%) cases with Southeast Asian (--(SEA)) deletion and 18 cases (0.2%) with THAI deletion (--(THAI)). As many as twenty genotypes were encountered. Hb profiles and hematological parameters were comparatively presented. Data on prevalence, molecular features and phenotypic expression of α(0)-thalassemia should prove useful in a carrier screening and a prevention and control program of this common genetic disorder in the region.

  12. How our practice of histopathology, especially tumour pathology has changed in the last two decades: reflections from a major referral center in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zubair; Idrees, Romana; Fatima, Saira; Arshad, Huma; Din, Nasir-ud; Memon, Aisha; Minhas, Khurram; Ahmed, Arsalan; Fatima, Syeda Samia; Arif, Muhammad; Ahmed, Rashida; Haroon, Saroona; Pervez, Shahid; Hassan, Sheema; Kayani, Naila

    2014-01-01

    Continued advances in the field of histo-pathology (and cyto-pathology) over the past two decades have resulted in dramatic changes in the manner in which these disciplines are now practiced. This is especially true in the setting of a large university hospital where the role of pathologists as clinicians (diagnosticians), undergraduate and postgraduate educators, and researchers has evolved considerably. The world around us has changed significantly during this period bringing about a considerable change in our lifestyles and the way we live. This is the world of the internet and the world-wide web, the world of Google and Wikipedia, of Youtube and Facebook where anyone can obtain any information one desires at the push of a button. The practice of histo (and cyto) pathology has also evolved in line with these changes. For those practicing this discipline in a poor, developing country these changes have been breathtaking. This is an attempt to document these changes as experienced by histo (and cyto) pathologists practicing in the biggest center for Histopathology in Pakistan, a developing country in South Asia with a large (180 million) and ever growing population. The Section of Histopathology, Department of Pathology and Microbiology at the Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH) in Karachi, Pakistan's largest city has since its inception in the mid-1980s transformed the way histopathology is practiced in Pakistan by incorporating modern methods and rescuing histopathology in Pakistan from the primitive and outdated groove in which it was stuck for decades. It set histopathology in Pakistan firmly on the path of modernity and change which are essential for better patient management and care through accurate and complete diagnosis and more recently prognostic and predictive information as well.

  13. Genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of CADASIL in Japan: the experience at a referral center in Kumamoto University from 1997 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Akihiko; Ueda, Mitsuharu; Nagatoshi, Akihito; Hirano, Teruyuki; Ito, Takaaki; Arai, Nobutaka; Uyama, Eiichiro; Mori, Kota; Nakamura, Masaaki; Shinriki, Satoru; Ikeda, Katsuyoshi; Ando, Yukio

    2015-08-01

    This study elucidates the genotypic and phenotypic spectrum and histopathological findings related to cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) in Japan. For this single-center retrospective observational study, we enrolled 215 patients who were clinically suspected of having CADASIL and were examined at Kumamoto University from 1997 to 2014, and we diagnosed CADASIL in 70 patients. We found 19 different NOTCH3 mutations in the patients, with the NOTCH3 Arg133Cys mutation being found most frequently. We also found the Arg75Pro mutation, a cysteine-sparing NOTCH3 mutation. CADASIL patients with this Arg75Pro mutation were frequently found throughout Japan, and fewer patients with the Arg75Pro mutation showed MRI hyperintensity in the anterior temporal pole compared with patients with other NOTCH3 mutations. Significantly more CADASIL patients with the NOTCH3 Arg133Cys mutation had hyperintensity in the external capsule compared with CADASIL patients with the other mutations not including the NOTCH3 Arg75Pro mutation. We also showed postmortem pathological findings of the first Japanese CADASIL case with the NOTCH3 Arg133Cys mutation, and histopathological findings of fresh frozen skin biopsy specimens of CADASIL patients. In conclusions, the spectrum of NOTCH3 mutations in Japanese CADASIL patients may be partially explained by founder effects. Genotype-phenotype correlations may exist in CADASIL, which should be considered so as to make an accurate diagnosis of CADASIL in each population. Fresh frozen skin biopsy specimens may aid detection of Notch3 deposits on vascular walls for an improved diagnosis of CADASIL.

  14. Developing an interdisciplinary collaboration center in an academic Health Sciences Library.

    PubMed

    Moore, Margaret E; Vaughan, K T L; Hayes, Barrie E; McLendon, Wallace

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of the Health Sciences Library's plans for an interdisciplinary, technology-enhanced collaboration center, from a technology-driven space to one with a vision of support for peer-to-peer learning and research. The center offers an exciting opportunity to be an essential partner in collaborative and interdisciplinary programs such as the new Carolina Center for Exploratory Genetic Analysis. The Library is a centrally located and neutral place, which helps minimize geographical and territorial obstacles to effective collaboration. The collaboration center raises the Library's visibility and allows staff to demonstrate the value of knowledge resources, services, technology expertise, infrastructure, and facilities for group study and collaboration.

  15. Impact of Writing Proficiency and Writing Center Participation on Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bielinska-Kwapisz, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Given that there exists in the literature relatively little research into the effectiveness of writing centers at universities, the purpose of this paper is to show the impact of university writing centers on first-year business seminar student writing. Design/methodology/approach: This quantitative study involved 315 first-year…

  16. Current Condition of Michigan Curriculum Materials Centers and Collections in Academic Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohrman, Rita

    2015-01-01

    A 2005 sabbatical study revealed 24 unique curriculum materials centers or collections (CMCs) in Michigan colleges or universities. The focus of the study was to investigate the number, characteristics, and quality of these centers and collections supporting education faculty and students. A follow up 2014 study asked how or if the Michigan…

  17. Modeling the Interplay of Multilevel Risk Factors for Future Academic and Behavior Problems: A Person-Centered Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Stephanie T.; Rhoades, Brittany L.; Nix, Robert L.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    This study identified profiles of 13 risk factors across child, family, school, and neighborhood domains in a diverse sample of children in kindergarten from 4 US locations (n = 750; 45% minority). It then examined the relation of those early risk profiles to externalizing problems, school failure, and low academic achievement in Grade 5. A person-centered approach, latent class analysis, revealed four unique risk profiles, which varied considerably across urban African American, urban white, and rural white children. Profiles characterized by several risks that cut across multiple domains conferred the highest risk for negative outcomes. Compared to a variable-centered approach, such as a cumulative risk index, these findings provide a more nuanced understanding of the early precursors to negative outcomes. For example, results suggested that urban children in single-parent homes that have few other risk factors (i.e., show at least average parenting warmth and consistency and report relatively low stress and high social support) are at quite low risk for externalizing problems, but at relatively high risk for poor grades and low academic achievement. These findings provide important information for refining and targeting preventive interventions to groups of children who share particular constellations of risk factors. PMID:20423544

  18. Identifying and communicating the contributions of library and information services in hospitals and academic health sciences centers

    PubMed Central

    Abels, Eileen G.; Cogdill, Keith W.; Zach, Lisl

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This article introduces a systematic approach to identifying and communicating the value of library and information services (LIS) from the perspective of their contributions to achieving organizational goals. Methods: The contributions of library and information services (CLIS) approach for identifying and communicating the value of LIS draws on findings from a multimethod study of hospitals and academic health sciences centers. Results: The CLIS approach is based on the concept that an individual unit's value to an organization can be demonstrated by identifying and measuring its contributions to organizational goals. The CLIS approach involves seven steps: (1) selecting appropriate organizational goals that are meaningful in a specific setting; (2) linking LIS contributions to organizational goals; (3) obtaining data from users on the correspondence between LIS contributions and LIS services; (4) selecting measures for LIS services; (5) collecting and analyzing data for the selected measures; (6) planning and sustaining communication with administrators about LIS contributions; and (7) evaluating findings and revising selected goals, contributions, and services as necessary. Conclusions: The taxonomy of LIS contributions and the CLIS approach emerged from research conducted in hospitals and academic health sciences centers and reflect the mission and goals common in these organizations. However, both the taxonomy and the CLIS approach may be adapted for communicating the value of LIS in other settings. PMID:14762462

  19. The Great Lakes Center's health hazard evaluation program: promoting community environmental health through partnerships between academic and public health departments.

    PubMed

    Cali, Salvatore; Scheff, Peter; Mucha, Amy; Nickels, Leslie; Oliynyk, Irene; Hryhorczuk, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    The Great Lakes Center of Excellence in Environmental Health (GLCEEH), an innovative capacity-building component of the University of Illinois, performs health hazard evaluations in collaboration with the Illinois Department of Public Health and local health departments. GLCEEH has provided state and local health departments with faculty, industrial-hygiene expertise, and research expertise to help them investigate a variety of environmental health issues. This article describes health hazard evaluations performed with support from the National Center for Environmental Health, lessons learned, and recommendations for successful collaboration between academic and public health departments. From the academic perspective, health hazard evaluations are beneficial because they provide faculty and students with the opportunity to engage in public health practice and encounter new issues that advance the science of environmental health through research. From the perspective of a public health department, health hazard evaluations are beneficial because they address priority environmental health concerns and build the capacity of department personnel to conduct health hazard evaluations with internal resources. A collaborative health hazard evaluation program increases public health capacity by developing new approaches to environmental health problems and by sharing limited resources.

  20. Modeling the interplay of multilevel risk factors for future academic and behavior problems: a person-centered approach.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Stephanie T; Rhoades, Brittany L; Nix, Robert L; Greenberg, Mark T

    2010-05-01

    This study identified profiles of 13 risk factors across child, family, school, and neighborhood domains in a diverse sample of children in kindergarten from four US locations (n = 750; 45% minority). It then examined the relation of those early risk profiles to externalizing problems, school failure, and low academic achievement in Grade 5. A person-centered approach, latent class analysis, revealed four unique risk profiles, which varied considerably across urban African American, urban White, and rural White children. Profiles characterized by several risks that cut across multiple domains conferred the highest risk for negative outcomes. Compared to a variable-centered approach, such as a cumulative risk index, these findings provide a more nuanced understanding of the early precursors to negative outcomes. For example, results suggested that urban children in single-parent homes that have few other risk factors (i.e., show at least average parenting warmth and consistency and report relatively low stress and high social support) are at quite low risk for externalizing problems, but at relatively high risk for poor grades and low academic achievement. These findings provide important information for refining and targeting preventive interventions to groups of children who share particular constellations of risk factors.

  1. Improving Quality of Care for Hospitalized Smokers with HIV: Tobacco Dependence Treatment Referral and Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Sharon A.; Richter, Kimber P.; Mussulman, Laura; Howser, Eric; Nahvi, Shadi; Goggin, Kathy; Cooperman, Nina A.; Faseru, Babalola

    2016-01-01

    Article-at-a-Glance Background Most persons living with HIV smoke cigarettes and tend to be highly dependent, heavy smokers. Few such persons receive tobacco treatment, and many die from tobacco-related illness. Although advancements in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have increased the quality and quantity of life, the health harms from tobacco use diminish these gains. Without cessation assistance, thousands will benefit from costly ART, only to suffer the consequences of tobacco-related disease and death. A study was conducted to examine in detail inpatient tobacco treatment for smokers with HIV. Methods Data collected at hospital admission and data collected by tobacco treatment specialists were examined retrospectively for all inpatients with HIV who were admitted to an academic medical center for a five-year period. Specifically, the prevalence of cigarette smoking, factors predictive of referral to tobacco treatment, referral for tobacco treatment, treatment participation, and abstinence at six months post-treatment were measured. Differences in referral and treatment participation between all smokers and smokers with HIV were also assessed. Results Among the 422 admitted persons with HIV, 54.5% smoked and 21.7% were referred to inpatient tobacco treatment services. Substance abuse and tobacco-related diagnoses were predictive of referral to inpatient tobacco treatment specialists. Among the 14 treatment participants reached for follow-up, 11 (78.6%) made quit attempts and 3 (21.4%) reported abstinence. Smokers with HIV were less likely to be referred to and treated by tobacco treatment services than all smokers admitted during the same time frame. Conclusions Although tobacco is a major cause of mortality, few smokers with HIV are offered treatment during hospitalization. Those who are treated attempt to quit. Hospitalization offers a prime opportunity for initiating smoking cessation among those with HIV. PMID:27066925

  2. Restructuring within an academic health center to support quality and safety: the development of the Center for Quality and Safety at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Bohmer, Richard M J; Bloom, Jonathan D; Mort, Elizabeth A; Demehin, Akinluwa A; Meyer, Gregg S

    2009-12-01

    Recent focus on the need to improve the quality and safety of health care has created new challenges for academic health centers (AHCs). Whereas previously quality was largely assumed, today it is increasingly quantifiable and requires organized systems for improvement. Traditional structures and cultures within AHCs, although well suited to the tripartite missions of teaching, research, and clinical care, are not easily adaptable to the tasks of measuring, reporting, and improving quality. Here, the authors use a case study of Massachusetts General Hospital's efforts to restructure quality and safety to illustrate the value of beginning with a focus on organizational culture, using a systematic process of engaging clinical leadership, developing an organizational framework dependent on proven business principles, leveraging focus events, and maintaining executive dedication to execution of the initiative. The case provides a generalizable example for AHCs of how applying explicit management design can foster robust organizational change with relatively modest incremental financial resources.

  3. Surgical Residency Training at a University-Based Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Rebecca L; Morris, Jon B; Kelz, Rachel R

    2016-02-01

    The past two decades have been witness to some of the most dynamic changes that have occurred in surgical education in all of its history. Political policies, social revolution, and the competing priorities of a new generation of surgical trainees are defining the needs of modern training paradigms. Although the university-based academic program's tripartite mission of clinical service, research, and education has remained steadfast, the mechanisms for achieving success in this mission necessitate adaptation and innovation. The resource-rich learning environment and the unique challenges that face university-based programs contribute to its ability to generate the future leaders of the surgical workforce.

  4. Establishment of a university academic spine center: from concept to reality.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Paul M; Burton, Douglas C; Khan, Talal W; Dixon, Kimberly A; Asher, Marc A; Varghese, George

    2013-01-01

    In fewer than five years, the University of Kansas Hospital Spine Center became the largest and most comprehensive spine care facility in the greater metropolitan Kansas City area. The 22,000-square-foot facility has 27 exam rooms, four specialized diagnostic rooms, 11 pre-/post-interventional procedure rooms, and a 4000-square-foot outpatient rehabilitation gym. Patients can meet with their physicians, undergo diagnostic tests and treatment, and attend therapy sessions in one location. The multidisciplinary Spine Center brings together orthopedic surgeons, neurosurgeons, neurologists, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, psychiatrists, psychologists, pain-management anesthesiologists, radiologists, and physical and occupational therapists. The Spine Center became successful because a group of physicians bought into the philosophy of a comprehensive interdisciplinary program, were willing to sacrifice some territorial claims, and were willing to put patient care and the good of the institution above individual egos.

  5. Academic health centers and community health centers partnering to build a system of care for vulnerable patients: lessons from Carolina Health Net.

    PubMed

    Denham, Amy C; Hay, Sherry S; Steiner, Beat D; Newton, Warren P

    2013-05-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) are challenged to meet their core missions in a time of strain on the health care system from rising costs, an aging population, increased rates of chronic disease, and growing numbers of uninsured patients. AHCs should be leaders in developing creative solutions to these challenges and training future leaders in new models of care. The authors present a case study describing the development, implementation, and early results of Carolina Health Net, a partnership between an AHC and a community health center to manage the most vulnerable uninsured by providing access to primary care medical homes and care management systems. This partnership was formed in 2008 to help transform the delivery of health care for the uninsured. As a result, 4,400 uninsured patients have been connected to primary care services. Emergency department use by enrolled patients has decreased. Patients have begun accessing subspecialty care within the medical home. More than 2,200 uninsured patients have been assisted to enroll in Medicaid. The experience of Carolina Health Net demonstrates that developing a system of care with primary care and wrap-around services such as pharmacy and case management can improve the cost-effectiveness and quality of care, thereby helping AHCs meet their broader missions. This project can serve as a model for other AHCs looking to partner with community-based providers to improve care and control costs for underserved populations.

  6. Harvard Catalyst | The Clinical Translational Science Center IND/IDE Consult Service: providing an IND/IDE consult service in a decentralized network of academic healthcare centers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min J; Winkler, Sabune J; Bierer, Barbara E; Wolf, Delia

    2014-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations require sponsors of clinical investigations involving an investigational drug or device to submit an Investigational New Drug (IND) or Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) application. Strict adherence to applicable regulations is vital to the success of clinical research. Unlike most major pharmaceutical sponsors, investigator sponsors often do not fully appreciate their regulatory obligations nor have resources to ensure compliance. As a result they can place themselves and their institutions at risk. Nevertheless, investigator-initiated clinical trials are vital to the further development of innovative drugs, biologics, and medical devices. The IND/IDE Subcommittee under the Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program at Harvard Catalyst, The Harvard Clinical and Translational Science Center worked in collaboration with Harvard and Harvard affiliated institutions to create and launch an IND/IDE Consult Service in a decentralized network of collaborating Academic Healthcare Centers (AHC). The IND/IDE Consult Service offers expertise, resources, and shared experiences to assist sponsor-investigators and IRBs in meeting regulatory requirements for conducting and reviewing investigator-initiated IND/IDE studies. The scope of the services provided by the Harvard Catalyst IND/IDE Consult Service are described, including the specifics of the service, lessons learned, and challenges faced, in a scalable model that builds inter-institutional capacity.

  7. A systematic strategic planning process focused on improved community engagement by an academic health center: the University of Kansas Medical Center's story.

    PubMed

    Cook, David C; Nelson, Eve-Lynn; Ast, Cori; Lillis, Teresa

    2013-05-01

    A growing number of academic health centers (AHCs) are considering approaches to expand collaboration with their communities in order to address complex and multisystem health concerns. In 2010, internal leaders at the University of Kansas Medical Center undertook a strategic planning process to enhance both community engagement activities and the scholarship resulting from these engagement activities. The authors describe the strategic planning process, recommendations, and actions associated with elevating community engagement within the AHC's mission and priorities. The strategic planning process included conducting an inventory of community engagement activities within the AHC; analyzing strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for community engagement work; and identifying goals and strategies to improve future community engagement activities and scholarship. The resulting road map for enhancing community engagement at their institution through 2015 consists of four main strategies: emphasize scholarship in community engagement, revise organizational structures to better facilitate community engagement, prioritize current engagement activities to ensure appropriate use of resources, and enhance communication of engagement initiatives to further develop stakeholder relationships.The authors also discuss implementation of the plan to date and highlight lessons learned that may inform other AHCs as they enhance and expand similar endeavors.

  8. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda, Sheila F.; Giacinto, Rebeca E.; Medeiros, Elizabeth A.; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women’s health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program’s acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p<0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients. PMID:27271058

  9. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women's health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program's acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p < 0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients.

  10. Instructional Centers for Pima Culture. Final Report: Academic Year 1968-69.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullerton, Bill J., Comp.; Bell, John E., Comp.

    The document contains the final report of the establishment of instructional centers for schools of Arizona's Gila River Indian Community. The project was made possible through Title III funds of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and was intended (1) to provide programs, services, and materials for making learning experiences more…

  11. The Impact of VA's Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Centers on Academic Affiliates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Elizabeth J.; Meganathan, Karthikeyan; Shay, Kenneth; Gilman, Stuart C.; Zeiss, Robert A.; Hettler, Debbie L.

    2011-01-01

    The education mission of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is to train health professionals to benefit VA and the United States. One approach for achieving that mission, along with VA's research and clinical missions, was the establishment of Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Centers (GRECCs) in 1975. These were developed at VA…

  12. Mentoring Programs for Underrepresented Minority Faculty in Academic Medical Centers: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Beech, Bettina M.; Calles-Escandon, Jorge; Hairston, Kristen G.; Langdon, Sarah E.; Latham-Sadler, Brenda A.; Bell, Ronny A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Mentoring is critical for career advancement in academic medicine. However, underrepresented minority (URM) faculty often receive less mentoring than their nonminority peers. The authors conducted a comprehensive review of published mentoring programs designed for URM faculty to identify “promising practices.” Method Databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC, PsychLit, Google Scholar, Dissertations Abstracts International, CINHAL, Sociological Abstracts) were searched for articles describing URM faculty mentoring programs. The RE-AIM framework (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance) formed the model for analyzing programs. Results The search identified 73 citations. Abstract reviews led to retrieval of 38 full-text articles for assessment; 18 articles describing 13 programs were selected for review. The reach of these programs ranged from 7 to 128 participants. Most evaluated programs on the basis of the number of grant applications and manuscripts produced or satisfaction with program content. Programs offered a variety of training experiences, and adoption was relatively high, with minor changes made for implementing the intended content. Barriers included time-restricted funding, inadequate evaluation due to few participants, significant time commitments required from mentors, and difficulty in addressing institutional challenges faced by URM faculty. Program sustainability was a concern because programs were supported through external funds, with minimal institutional support. Conclusions Mentoring is an important part of academic medicine, particularly for URM faculty who often experience unique career challenges. Despite this need, relatively few publications exist to document mentoring programs for this population. Institutionally supported mentoring programs for URM faculty are needed, along with detailed plans for program sustainability. PMID:23425989

  13. Department of Petroleum Engineering and Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering annual report, 1990--1991 academic year

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Petroleum Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin is one of more than 20 such departments in the United States and more than 40 worldwide. The department has more than 20 faculty members and, as of the fall of 1990, 146 undergraduate and 156 graduate students. During the 1990--91 academic year, undergraduate enrollment is up slightly from the several downturns that began in 1986; graduate enrollment continues to increase, significantly in the number of Ph.D. candidates enrolled. The 1990--91 academic year was one of consolidation of gains. A remote teaching program in the Midland-Odessa area was initiated. During 1991, the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (CPGE) continued its large, diversified research activities related to oil, gas and geopressured/geothermal energy production, energy and mineral resources analysis, and added new research projects in other areas such as groundwater remediation. Many of these research projects included interdisciplinary efforts involving faculty, research scientists and graduate students in chemistry, mathematics, geology, geophysics, engineering mechanics, chemical engineering, microbiology and other disciplines. Several projects were undertaken in cooperation with either the Bureau of Economic Geology or the Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin. Collaborative research projects with scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rice University, and Sandia National Laboratory were also initiated. About 43 companies from seven countries around the world continued to provide the largest portion of research funding to CPGE.

  14. Department of Petroleum Engineering and Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering annual report, 1990--1991 academic year

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    The Department of Petroleum Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin is one of more than 20 such departments in the United States and more than 40 worldwide. The department has more than 20 faculty members and, as of the fall of 1990, 146 undergraduate and 156 graduate students. During the 1990--91 academic year, undergraduate enrollment is up slightly from the several downturns that began in 1986; graduate enrollment continues to increase, significantly in the number of Ph.D. candidates enrolled. The 1990--91 academic year was one of consolidation of gains. A remote teaching program in the Midland-Odessa area was initiated. During 1991, the Center for Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (CPGE) continued its large, diversified research activities related to oil, gas and geopressured/geothermal energy production, energy and mineral resources analysis, and added new research projects in other areas such as groundwater remediation. Many of these research projects included interdisciplinary efforts involving faculty, research scientists and graduate students in chemistry, mathematics, geology, geophysics, engineering mechanics, chemical engineering, microbiology and other disciplines. Several projects were undertaken in cooperation with either the Bureau of Economic Geology or the Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin. Collaborative research projects with scientists at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rice University, and Sandia National Laboratory were also initiated. About 43 companies from seven countries around the world continued to provide the largest portion of research funding to CPGE.

  15. Cancer Imaging at the Crossroads of Precision Medicine: Perspective From an Academic Imaging Department in a Comprehensive Cancer Center.

    PubMed

    Van den Abbeele, Annick D; Krajewski, Katherine M; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Fennessy, Fiona M; DiPiro, Pamela J; Nguyen, Quang-Dé; Harris, Gordon J; Jacene, Heather A; Lefever, Greg; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2016-04-01

    The authors propose one possible vision for the transformative role that cancer imaging in an academic setting can play in the current era of personalized and precision medicine by sharing a conceptual model that is based on experience and lessons learned designing a multidisciplinary, integrated clinical and research practice at their institution. The authors' practice and focus are disease-centric rather than imaging-centric. A "wall-less" infrastructure has been developed, with bidirectional integration of preclinical and clinical cancer imaging research platforms, enabling rapid translation of novel cancer drugs from discovery to clinical trial evaluation. The talents and expertise of medical professionals, scientists, and staff members have been coordinated in a horizontal and vertical fashion through the creation of Cancer Imaging Consultation Services and the "Adopt-a-Radiologist" campaign. Subspecialized imaging consultation services at the hub of an outpatient cancer center facilitate patient decision support and management at the point of care. The Adopt-a-Radiologist campaign has led to the creation of a novel generation of imaging clinician-scientists, fostered new collaborations, increased clinical and academic productivity, and improved employee satisfaction. Translational cancer research is supported, with a focus on early in vivo testing of novel cancer drugs, co-clinical trials, and longitudinal tumor imaging metrics through the imaging research core laboratory. Finally, a dedicated cancer imaging fellowship has been developed, promoting the future generation of cancer imaging specialists as multidisciplinary, multitalented professionals who are trained to effectively communicate with clinical colleagues and positively influence patient care.

  16. Fully aligned academic health centers: a model for 21st-century job creation and sustainable economic growth.

    PubMed

    Reece, E Albert; Chrencik, Robert A; Miller, Edward D

    2012-07-01

    Alignment is the degree to which component parts of academic health centers (AHCs) work cohesively. Full alignment allows AHCs to act quickly and cohesively toward common goals and to take advantage of opportunities that present themselves, particularly where collaboration is essential. Maryland's two major AHCs-University of Maryland Medicine (UMM) and Johns Hopkins Medicine (JHM)-have experienced periods of significant misalignment during each of their histories. Their most recent periods of misalignment caused significant negative economic and academic impacts. However, the process of realigning their clinical and research missions has not only given them a renewed economic vigor but has also paid significant dividends for the state of Maryland, helping it weather the current recession much better than other regions of the country. The two AHCs' continued economic success during the recession has led Maryland lawmakers to increasingly seek out their expertise in attempts to stimulate economic development. Indeed, UMM, JHM, and other fully aligned AHCs have shown that they can be powerful economic engines and offer a model of job growth and economic development in the 21st century.

  17. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection: a successful prevention effort employing a multipronged initiative at an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Purvis, Suzanne; Gion, Therese; Kennedy, Gregory; Rees, Susan; Safdar, Nasia; VanDenBergh, Shelly; Weber, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    An interdisciplinary clinical improvement workgroup was formed at this academic medical center with the goal of reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs). In 2011, the CAUTI rate was noted to be 4.7 CAUTIs per 1000 catheter days. Rounding by 2 lead clinical nurse specialists revealed deficiencies in current practice, which were addressed with multifaceted strategies, including evidence-based indwelling urinary catheter and bladder management protocols, education of staff, reporting of data, and utilization of an icon in the electronic health record (EHR). After the implementation of these strategies, the CAUTI rate decreased and was noted to be 2.4 in February 2013. In addition to this, there was a downward trend line for catheter days.

  18. The Emory Chemical Biology Discovery Center: leveraging academic innovation to advance novel targets through HTS and beyond.

    PubMed

    Johns, Margaret A; Meyerkord-Belton, Cheryl L; Du, Yuhong; Fu, Haian

    2014-03-01

    The Emory Chemical Biology Discovery Center (ECBDC) aims to accelerate high throughput biology and translation of biomedical research discoveries into therapeutic targets and future medicines by providing high throughput research platforms to scientific collaborators worldwide. ECBDC research is focused at the interface of chemistry and biology, seeking to fundamentally advance understanding of disease-related biology with its HTS/HCS platforms and chemical tools, ultimately supporting drug discovery. Established HTS/HCS capabilities, university setting, and expertise in diverse assay formats, including protein-protein interaction interrogation, have enabled the ECBDC to contribute to national chemical biology efforts, empower translational research, and serve as a training ground for young scientists. With these resources, the ECBDC is poised to leverage academic innovation to advance biology and therapeutic discovery.

  19. Informational influences on physician referrals.

    PubMed

    Beltramini, R F; Sirsi, A K

    1992-01-01

    Today's health care marketers are devoting significant resources to increase physician referrals, an area vital to their continued survival. The goal of this investigation was to integrate the findings of previous research on physician referrals, and to provide an up-to-date assessment of those influences underlying physician referral behavior. A questionnaire was mailed to 1,800 physicians differing in specialty and years in practice. Three informational influences were found to affect physician referrals: Program Information, Patient Input, and Location. The results suggest a need for specialists and other organizations interested in managing physician referrals to (a) establish and maintain a network of relationships among those physicians referring patients and specialists being referred to through personal communication, (b) maintain a pool of knowledgeable professionals willing to supply relevant and current information to physicians, and (c) provide complete and prompt feedback information to the referring physician. Managerial implications and directions for future research are also discussed.

  20. The Academic Medical Center Linear Disability Score (ALDS) item bank: item response theory analysis in a mixed patient population

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Rebecca; Weisscher, Nadine; Glas, Cees AW; Dijkgraaf, Marcel GW; Vermeulen, Marinus; de Haan, Rob J; Lindeboom, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a lot of interest in the flexible framework offered by item banks for measuring patient relevant outcomes. However, there are few item banks, which have been developed to quantify functional status, as expressed by the ability to perform activities of daily life. This paper examines the measurement properties of the Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank in a mixed population. Methods This paper uses item response theory to analyse data on 115 of 170 items from a total of 1002 respondents. These were: 551 (55%) residents of supported housing, residential care or nursing homes; 235 (23%) patients with chronic pain; 127 (13%) inpatients on a neurology ward following a stroke; and 89 (9%) patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. Results Of the 170 items, 115 were judged to be clinically relevant. Of these 115 items, 77 were retained in the item bank following the item response theory analysis. Of the 38 items that were excluded from the item bank, 24 had either been presented to fewer than 200 respondents or had fewer than 10% or more than 90% of responses in the category 'can carry out'. A further 11 items had different measurement properties for younger and older or for male and female respondents. Finally, 3 items were excluded because the item response theory model did not fit the data. Conclusion The Academic Medical Center linear disability score item bank has promising measurement characteristics for the mixed patient population described in this paper. Further studies will be needed to examine the measurement properties of the item bank in other populations. PMID:16381611

  1. Pediatric Hematology Providers on Referral for Transplant Evaluation for Sickle Cell Disease: A Regional Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mikles, Bethany; Bhatia, Monica; Oyeku, Suzette O.; Jin, Zhezhen; Green, Nancy S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematology referral for evaluation is a key step for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for sickle cell disease (SCD). Pediatric SCD providers in the US Northeast (New York-Mid-Atlantic and New England regions) were surveyed anony-mously for perspectives and practices regarding transplant referral and compared by whether they practiced at SCD transplant centers. Data were analyzed using the Fisher exact test, χ2 test, and logistic regression. Half of the respondents practiced primarily at transplant sites. Most (79%) were enthusiastic about transplant for SCD and 78% had recently referred ≥1 child for evaluation. Overall, 77% limited referral to certain sickle hemoglobinopathies and 44% preferred referral for β-thalassemia to SCD. Indications selected for referral resembled current transplant criteria, plus family request or poor response to therapy. Referral for children on chronic transfusions predicted enthusiasm and prior referral. Many (66%) referred children with multiple SCD complications, even without matched sibling donors, 37% with sibling donors despite limited disease. Practitioners at transplant centers more commonly accepted event-free survival rates of ≤90% (P = 0.002). North-eastern providers expressed varying enthusiasm for referral for evaluation based on eligibility, donor availability, and acceptable risk, with modestly more interest from practitioners at transplant centers. Differing provider perspectives may affect patient referral for transplant consideration. PMID:24633300

  2. Evaluation of a data warehouse in an academic health sciences center.

    PubMed Central

    Schubart, J. R.; Einbinder, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    A data warehouse can provide significant benefits to a health care organization if successfully designed and implemented. The Clinical Data Repository (CDR) at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center improves access to needed data for clinical research and effective decision making at many levels of the organization. We conducted an evaluation of the CDR using a survey questionnaire and interviews of key executive leaders. Our results suggest factors that influence the initial decision to use an information resource, examine the impact of communication channels, and highlight key issues that determine the continued use and ultimate success of a healthcare data warehouse. PMID:10566432

  3. Law & psychiatry: Telecourt: the use of videoconferencing for involuntary commitment hearings in academic health centers.

    PubMed

    Price, Janis; Sapci, Hasan

    2007-01-01

    The use of videoconferencing for psychiatric involuntary commitment hearings is not a recent development. The courts ruled on the constitutionality of these proceedings as long ago as 1993. In 2004 University of Michigan Hospital began videoconferencing involuntary commitment hearings with Washtenaw County Probate Court. The experience of the University of Michigan Health System and the Washtenaw Probate Court with telecourt hearings for involuntary commitment has proven to benefit the safety and dignity of patients as well as the financial health of the medical center.

  4. Retinoblastoma Referral Pattern in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Nyamori, Joseph M.; Kimani, Kahaki; Njuguna, Margaret W.; Dimaras, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Kenya is a large country with a widely dispersed population. As retinoblastoma requires specialized treatment, we determined the referral pattern for patients with retinoblastoma in Kenya to facilitate the formulation of a national policy. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was performed for retinoblastoma patients who presented from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2007. Data were collected on the referral process from presenting health facility to the hospital where patient was treated. Data were also collected on the time interval when the first symptoms were noticed to the time of presentation at a health facility (lag time). For cases that could be traced to a referral hospital, the time delay due to referral (referral lag time) was recorded. Results: There were 206 patients diagnosed with retinoblastoma in 51 Kenyan and 2 foreign healthcare facilities, and they received final treatment at a Kenyan hospital. Mean lag time was 6.8 months (±6.45). Of all patients, 18% (38/206) were treated at the hospital where they first presented and 82% (168/206) were referred elsewhere. Of those referred, 35% (58/168) were lost to follow-up. The mean referral lag time was 1.7 months (±2.5). Conclusions: A significant proportion of cases presented late, and either delayed seeking further treatment or were lost after initial referral. We recommend the implementation of a national strategy that emphasizes early detection, documentation and follow up of retinoblastoma patients. PMID:25371638

  5. Academic Health Centers and Care of Undocumented Immigrants in the United States: Servant Leaders or Uncourageous Followers?

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Public dialogue and debate about the health care overhaul in the United States is centered on one contentious question: Is there a moral obligation to ensure that all people (including undocumented immigrants) within its borders have access to affordable health care? For academic health centers (AHCs), which often provide safety-net care to the uninsured, this question has moral and social implications. An estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States (80% of whom are Latino) are uninsured and currently prohibited from purchasing exchange coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, even at full cost. The authors attempt to dispel the many misconceptions and distorted assumptions surrounding the use of health services by this vulnerable population. The authors also suggest that AHCs need to recalibrate their mission to focus on social accountability as well as the ethical and humanistic practice of medicine for all people, recognizing the significance of inclusion over exclusion in making progress on population health and health care. AHCs play a crucial role, both in educational policy and as a safety-net provider, in reducing health disparities that negatively impact vulnerable populations. Better health for all is possible through better alignment, collaboration, and partnering with other AHCs and safety-net providers. Through servant leadership, AHCs can be the leaders that this change imperative demands. PMID:24556781

  6. Essential telemedicine elements (tele-ments) for connecting the academic health center and remote community providers to enhance patient care.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Brett C; Clarke, Christopher A; Troke, Tana M; Friedman, Lawrence S

    2012-08-01

    The authors draw on their experience with the University of California, San Diego Medical Center's successful enterprise-level clinical telemedicine program to present a paradigm for other academic health centers (AHCs) that wish to develop such a program. They detail key telemedicine program elements, or "tele-ments," that they consider essential to the development of a centralized, structured telemedicine program and relevant to the development of smaller programs. These tele-ments include an overall organizational vision, a centralized telemedicine infrastructure, telemedicine-specific policies and procedures, medical record documentation, relationships between the AHC clinical hub and its remote (spoke) partners, identification of and training for specialty providers, a business plan based on service agreements and/or insurance billing, and licensure/privileging. They discuss the importance of delaying equipment purchases until a plan is in place for sustaining the telemedicine enterprise and of establishing measures to define success at the outset of program development. In addition, they detail the benefits and concerns associated with telemedicine, provide a comprehensive listing of the roles and responsibilities of providers and staff involved in all aspects of telemedicine, and share samples of their program's informed consent forms and workflow checklists. Their goal is to offer support and guidance to other AHCs entering the telemedicine arena, enabling them to replicate key elements of a successful, enterprise-wide telemedicine infrastructure.

  7. Association between co-authorship network and scientific productivity and impact indicators in academic medical research centers: A case study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi-Nooraie, Reza; Akbari-Kamrani, Marjan; Hanneman, Robert A; Etemadi, Arash

    2008-01-01

    Background We aimed to examine the co-authorship networks in three successful Iranian academic research centers, in order to find the association between the scientific productivity and impact indicators with network features in a case study. Methods We searched for English articles of the three research centers. We drew co-authorship maps of each center and calculated social network measures. Results The collaboration networks in centers shared many structural features, including a "star-like" pattern of relations. Centers with more successful scientific profile showed denser and more cooperative networks. Key figures in each center were interviewed for their understandings of the reasons for the emergence of these patterns. Conclusion Star shape network structure and dependency on a single big member is a common feature observed in our case study. Scientific output measures correlate with the network structure of research centers. Network analysis seems a useful method to explore the subtle scientific contexts in research organizations. PMID:18796149

  8. Hospitalized but not Admitted: Characteristics of Patients with “Observation Status” at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Ann M.; Graf, Ben; Gangireddy, Sreedevi; Hoffman, Robert; Ehlenbach, Mary; Heidke, Cynthia; Fields, Sheilah; Liegel, Barbara; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)defines observation status for hospitalized patients as a “well-defined set of specific, clinically appropriate services,” usually lasting <24 hours, and that in “only rare and exceptional cases” should last > 48 hours. Although an increasing proportion of observation care occurs on hospital wards, studies of patients with observation status have focused on the efficiency of dedicated units. Objective To describe inpatient and observation care. Design and Setting Descriptive study of all inpatient and observation stays between July 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, a 566 bed tertiary academic medical center. Participants All patients with observation or inpatient stays during the study period. Main Outcome and Measures Patient demographics, length of stay, difference between cost and reimbursement per stay, and percent of patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities. Results Of 43,853 stays, 4,578 (10.4%) were observation, with 1,141 distinct diagnosis codes. Average observation length of stay was 33.3 hours, with 44.4% of stays <24 hours, and 16.5% >48 hours. Observation care had a negative margin per stay (-$331); the inpatient margin per stay was positive (+$2,163). Adult General Medicine patients accounted for 2,404 (52.5%) of all observation stays; 25.4% of the 9,453 Adult General Medicine stays were observation. The mean length of stay for general medicine observation patients was 41.1 hours, with 32.6% of stays < 24 hours, and 26.4% >48 hours. As compared to observation patients on other clinical services, Adult General Medicine had the highest percent >65 years (40.9%), highest percent female (57.9%), highest percent discharged to skilled nursing facilities (11.6%) and the most negative margin per stay (-$1,378). Conclusions and Relevance In an academic medical center, observation status for hospitalized patients differed markedly

  9. NASA as a Convener: Government, Academic and Industry Collaborations Through the NASA Human Health and Performance Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.

    2011-01-01

    On October 18, 2010, the NASA Human Health and Performance center (NHHPC) was opened to enable collaboration among government, academic and industry members. Membership rapidly grew to 60 members (http://nhhpc.nasa.gov ) and members began identifying collaborative projects as detailed below. In addition, a first workshop in open collaboration and innovation was conducted on January 19, 2011 by the NHHPC resulting in additional challenges and projects for further development. This first workshop was a result of the SLSD successes in running open innovation challenges over the past two years. In 2008, the NASA Johnson Space Center, Space Life Sciences Directorate (SLSD) began pilot projects in open innovation (crowd sourcing) to determine if these new internet-based platforms could indeed find solutions to difficult technical problems. From 2008 to 2010, the SLSD issued 34 challenges, 14 externally and 20 internally. The 14 external challenges were conducted through three different vendors: InnoCentive, Yet2.com and TopCoder. The 20 internal challenges were conducted using the InnoCentive platform, customized to NASA use, and promoted as NASA@Work. The results from the 34 challenges involved not only technical solutions that were reported previously at the 61st IAC, but also the formation of new collaborative relationships. For example, the TopCoder pilot was expanded by the NASA Space Operations Mission Directorate to the NASA Tournament Lab in collaboration with Harvard Business School and TopCoder. Building on these initial successes, the NHHPC workshop in January of 2011, and ongoing NHHPC member discussions, several important collaborations are in development: Space Act Agreement between NASA and GE for collaborative projects, NASA and academia for a Visual Impairment / Intracranial Hypertension summit (February 2011), NASA and the DoD through the Defense Venture Catalyst Initiative (DeVenCI) for a technical needs workshop (June 2011), NASA and the San Diego Zoo

  10. A comprehensive model to build improvement capability in a pediatric academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Gerry M; Schoettker, Pamela J; Alessandrini, Evaline A; Luzader, Carolyn; Kotagal, Uma

    2014-01-01

    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center developed a comprehensive model to build quality improvement (QI) capability to support its goal to transform its delivery system through a series of training courses. Two online modules orient staff to basic concepts and terminology and prepare them to participate more effectively in QI teams. The basic program (Rapid Cycle Improvement Collaborative, RCIC) is focused on developing the capability to use basic QI tools and complete a narrow-scoped project in approximately 120 days. The Intermediate Improvement Science Series (I(2)S(2)) program is a leadership course focusing on improvement skills and developing a broader and deeper understanding of QI in the context of the organization and external environment. The Advanced Improvement Methods (AIM) course and Quality Scholars Program stimulate the use of more sophisticated methods and prepare Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) and external faculty to undertake QI research. The Advanced Improvement Leadership Systems (AILS) sessions enable interprofessional care delivery system leadership teams to effectively lead a system of care, manage a portfolio of projects, and to deliver on CCHMC's strategic plan. Implementing these programs has shown us that 1) a multilevel curricular approach to building improvement capability is pragmatic and effective, 2) an interprofessional learning environment is critical to shifting mental models, 3) repetition of project experience with coaching and feedback solidifies critical skills, knowledge and behaviors, and 4) focusing first on developing capable interprofessional improvement leaders, versus engaging in broad general QI training across the whole organization, is effective.

  11. Improving the Safety of Oral Chemotherapy at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Erica; Capozzi, Donna; McGettigan, Suzanne; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Schuchter, Lynn; Myers, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Over the last decade, the use of oral chemotherapy (OC) for the treatment of cancer has dramatically increased. Despite their route of administration, OCs pose many of the same risks as intravenous agents. In this quality improvement project, we sought to examine our current process for the prescription of OC at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania and to improve on its safety. Methods: A multidisciplinary team that included oncologists, advanced-practice providers, and pharmacists was formed to analyze the current state of our OC practice. Using Lean Six Sigma quality improvement tools, we identified a lack of pharmacist review of the OC prescription as an area for improvement. To address these deficiencies, we used our electronic medical system to route OC orders placed by treating providers to an oncology-specific outpatient pharmacist at the Abramson Cancer Center for review. Results: Over 7 months, 63 orders for OC were placed for 45 individual patients. Of the 63 orders, all were reviewed by pharmacists, and, as a result, 22 interventions were made (35%). Types of interventions included dosage adjustment (one of 22), identification of an interacting drug (nine of 22), and recommendations for additional drug monitoring (12 of 22). Conclusion: OC poses many of the same risks as intravenous chemotherapy and should be prescribed and reviewed with the same oversight. At our institution, involvement of an oncology-trained pharmacist in the review of OC led to meaningful interventions in one third of the orders. PMID:26733627

  12. An Evaluation of a Voluntary Academic Medical Center Website Designed to Improve Access to Health Education among Consumers: Implications for E-Health and M-Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris-Hollingsworth, Nicole Rosella

    2012-01-01

    Academic Medical Centers across the United States provide health libraries on their web portals to disseminate health promotion and disease prevention information, in order to assist patients in the management of their own care. However, there is a need to obtain consumer input, consumer satisfaction, and to conduct formal evaluations. The purpose…

  13. The Impact of School-Based Child Centered Play Therapy on Academic Achievement, Self-Concept, and Teacher-Child Relationship Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanco, Pedro J.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of child centered play therapy (CCPT) with academically at-risk 1st graders. In this quasi-experimental design, twenty-one 1st grade students were assigned to the experimental group and 20 students were assigned to the no treatment control group. The children in the experimental group received two 30 minute…

  14. Achievement, Engagement, and Behavior Outcomes of At-Risk Youth Following Participation in a Required Ninth-Grade Academic Support Study Center Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Jeffrey P.

    2012-01-01

    Overall, pretest-posttest results for achievement, behavior, and engagement for at-risk boys not eligible (n = 13) and eligible (n = 9) for participation in the free or reduced price lunch program who completed a school-year long academic support study center program were not statistically different over time and end of school year for cumulative…

  15. Assessing the Impact of School-Based Health Centers on Academic Achievement and College Preparation Efforts: Using Propensity Score Matching to Assess School-Level Data in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bersamin, Melina; Garbers, Samantha; Gaarde, Jenna; Santelli, John

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the association between school-based health center (SBHC) presence and school-wide measures of academic achievement and college preparation efforts. Publicly available educational and demographic data from 810 California public high schools were linked to a list of schools with an SBHC. Propensity score matching, a method to…

  16. The Phenomenon of Collaboration: A Phenomenologic Study of Collaboration between Family Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology Departments at an Academic Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David R.; Brewster, Cheryl D.; Karides, Marina; Lukas, Lou A.

    2011-01-01

    Collaboration is essential to manage complex real world problems. We used phenomenologic methods to elaborate a description of collaboration between two departments at an academic medical center who considered their relationship to represent a model of effective collaboration. Key collaborative structures included a shared vision and commitment by…

  17. Creating a Supportive Teaching Culture in the Research University Context: Strategic Partnering and Interdisciplinary Collaboration between a Teaching Center and Academic Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Marie Kendall; Ralston, Patricia A. S.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Schreck, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes 2 "strategic partnering" and "interdisciplinary collaboration" case studies between a Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) and an academic unit at a mid-sized metropolitan research university in the American Midwest. These faculty development partnerships were developed to meet the unique needs of faculty…

  18. The Association between Teachers' Child-Centered Beliefs and Children's Academic Achievement: The Indirect Effect of Children's Behavioral Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hur, Eunhye; Buettner, Cynthia K.; Jeon, Lieny

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have suggested that teachers' psychological attributes can be an indicator of teacher quality (Rimm-Kaufman and Hamre in "Dev Psychol" 45(4):958-972. doi: 10.1037/a0015861 , 2010), and teachers' child-centered beliefs have been associated with children's academic achievement (Burchinal and Cryer in "Early…

  19. Presentation and treatment of venomous snakebites at a northern academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Cowles, Robert A; Colletti, Lisa M

    2003-05-01

    Poisonous snakebites are relatively rare in the United States. The incidence of venomous snakebites is comparatively high in the southern states compared with the northern states and reports of these accidents from northern states is particularly uncommon. We report the experience with treatment of venomous snakebites at the University of Michigan over a 25-year period from 1976 to 2001. Six cases were identified and are described in detail. All patients were male and all were bitten in the upper extremity by pit vipers. One patient suffered a moderate envenomation and was treated with antivenin. Four other cases of mild envenomation occurred and two of these cases required antivenin therapy. One case was considered to represent a "dry" bite and required only 24-hour observation. There were no severe envenomations and no mortalities. On short-term follow-up all patients recovered without sequelae. This report demonstrates that venomous snakebites can be treated effectively at low-volume centers.

  20. Professional writing in nursing education: creating an academic-community writing center.

    PubMed

    Latham, Christine L; Ahern, Nancy

    2013-11-01

    Contemporary professional nursing requires competency in both oral and written communication. Outside of writing for publication, instructional methods to teach professional writing in baccalaureate nursing programs are not well documented in the literature. The need for professional writing, coupled with the need to diversify the workforce with students from varying ethnic and educational backgrounds, creates some additional challenges to meet programmatic requirements for scholarly, evidence-based writing outcomes. As two new prelicensure programs were initiated, a comprehensive assessment was conducted that included student focus groups and writing assessment tools to assess writing quality and student support needs. As a result of these data, faculty implemented curricular and instructional revisions and created a writing center that was staffed by older adult volunteers who had careers in writing. The processes, tools, and preliminary outcomes of these faculty-initiated changes to improve student support for writing are presented.

  1. Policy for therapeutic acupuncture in an academic health center: a model for standard policy development.

    PubMed

    Myklebust, Monica; Colson, James; Kaufman, Jacqueline; Winsauer, Jeffery; Zhang, Yu Quin; Harris, Richard E

    2006-12-01

    Acupuncture as a therapeutic modality offers multiple applications. Its effectiveness coupled with its general acceptance by conventional health care professionals makes it one of the first complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities to be incorporated in an integrative approach to care. However, few centers that offer acupuncture have written standard policies to regulate its use. This lack of standard policies may impede provision of quality care, serve as a barrier to cross-institutional data collection and clinical application of that data, and may put health care professionals and institutions at risk when credentialing or malpractice liability has not been clearly addressed. Here we present a policy for acupuncture, created by a diverse group of health care professionals at the University of Michigan Health System. It may function as a generalizable template for standard policy development by institutions incorporating acupuncture.

  2. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  3. Achieving high quality in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction care: one urban academic medical center experience.

    PubMed

    Purim-Shem-Tov, Yanina A; Melgoza, Normal; Haw, Janet; Schaer, Gary L; Calvin, James E; Rumoro, Dino P

    2012-03-01

    Management of acute myocardial infarction with ST elevation (STEMI) remains a challenge for academic institutions. There are numerous factors at play from the time electrocardiogram is obtained to the time the patient arrives to a catheterization laboratory and the balloon is inflated. Academic hospitals that are located in large urban centers have to deal with staff living long distances from the facility, and therefore, assembling the catheterization team after-hours and on the weekends becomes a difficult task to achieve. There are other factors that contribute to time delays, such as, administering electrocardiograms in timely fashion, having emergency physicians activate the catheterization team, instead of contacting the cardiologist to discuss the case, and other time-sensitive factors. All of the aforementioned issues contribute to the delay. Yet, primary percutaneous coronary intervention is clearly demonstrated as the modality of choice in treatment of STEMI, which improves patient's morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it is imperative that institutions do all they can to improve their protocols and meet the core measures in the treatment of STEMI patients, including the door-to-balloon time of less than 90 minutes. Our institution started a quality improvement program for STEMI care in 1993 and has showed progressive improvement in use of aspirin, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and other medication, culminating in 95% to 100% use of these medications in 2003-2004, when we operated in accordance with the Get With The Guidelines program. Door-to-balloon time in less than 90 minutes became a new phase in our quality improvement process, and we achieved 100% compliance in the last 2 years.

  4. The Disproportionality Dilemma: Patterns of Teacher Referrals to School Counselors for Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Julia; Day-Vines, Norma L.; Griffin, Dana; Moore-Thomas, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    Disproportionality plagues schools nationwide in special education placement, dropout, discipline referral, suspension, and expulsion rates. This study examined predictors of teacher referrals to school counselors for disruptive behavior in a sample of students selected from the Educational Longitudinal Study 2002 (National Center for Education…

  5. A Collaborative Process Model for Promoting Successful Referrals in College Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iarussi, Melanie M.; Shaw, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    The need to refer students to off-campus mental health providers is common in college counseling. Such referrals can be challenging for college counselors who strive to meet students' counseling needs while adhering to ethical and center policy guidelines. In this article, the authors explore the nature and challenges of referral in college…

  6. 42 CFR 411.353 - Prohibition on certain referrals by physicians and limitations on billing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... limitations on billing. 411.353 Section 411.353 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... § 411.353 Prohibition on certain referrals by physicians and limitations on billing. (a) Prohibition on...) Limitations on billing. An entity that furnishes DHS pursuant to a referral that is prohibited by paragraph...

  7. 42 CFR 411.353 - Prohibition on certain referrals by physicians and limitations on billing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... limitations on billing. 411.353 Section 411.353 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... § 411.353 Prohibition on certain referrals by physicians and limitations on billing. (a) Prohibition on...) Limitations on billing. An entity that furnishes DHS pursuant to a referral that is prohibited by paragraph...

  8. Laparoscopic vs open donor nephrectomy: Lessons learnt from single academic center experience

    PubMed Central

    Tsoulfas, Georgios; Agorastou, Polyxeni; Ko, Dicken S C; Hertl, Martin; Elias, Nahel; Cosimi, AB; Kawai, Tatsuo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare laparoscopic and open living donor nephrectomy, based on the results from a single center during a decade. METHODS This is a retrospective review of all living donor nephrectomies performed at the Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, between 1/1998 - 12/2009. Overall there were 490 living donors, with 279 undergoing laparoscopic living donor nephrectomy (LLDN) and 211 undergoing open donor nephrectomy (OLDN). Demographic data, operating room time, the effect of the learning curve, the number of conversions from laparoscopic to open surgery, donor preoperative glomerular filtration rate and creatinine (Cr), donor and recipient postoperative Cr, delayed graft function and donor complications were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS Overall there was no statistically significant difference between the LLDN and the OLDN groups regarding operating time, donor preoperative renal function, donor and recipient postoperative kidney function, delayed graft function or the incidence of major complications. When the last 100 laparoscopic cases were analyzed, there was a statistically significant difference regarding operating time in favor of the LLDN, pointing out the importance of the learning curve. Furthermore, another significant difference between the two groups was the decreased length of stay for the LLDN (2.87 d for LLDN vs 3.6 d for OLDN). CONCLUSION Recognizing the importance of the learning curve, this paper provides evidence that LLDN has a safety profile comparable to OLDN and decreased length of stay for the donor. PMID:28101451

  9. Early Clinical Experiences for Second-Year Student Pharmacists at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Amerine, Lindsey B.; Chen, Sheh-Li; Luter, David N.; Arnall, Justin; Smith, Shayna; Roth, Mary T.; Rodgers, Philip T.; Williams, Dennis M.; Pinelli, Nicole R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine student outcomes associated with the Student Medication and Reconciliation Team (SMART) program, which was designed to provide second-year student pharmacists at the University of North Carolina (UNC) Eshelman School of Pharmacy direct patient care experience at UNC Medical Center. Design. Twenty-two second-year student pharmacists were randomly selected from volunteers, given program training, and scheduled for three 5-hour evening shifts in 2013-2014. Pre/post surveys and reflection statements were collected from 19 students. Data were analyzed with a mixed methods approach. Assessment. Survey results revealed an increase in student self-efficacy (p<0.05) and positive perceptions of SMART. Qualitative findings suggest the program provided opportunities for students to develop strategies for practice, promoted an appreciation for the various roles pharmacists play in health care, and fostered an appreciation for the complexity of real-world practice. Conclusion. Early clinical experiences can enhance student learning and development while fostering an appreciation for pharmacy practice. PMID:26839428

  10. E-referral Solutions: Successful Experiences, Key Features and Challenges- a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Naseriasl, Mansour; Adham, Davoud; Janati, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: around the world health systems constantly face increasing pressures which arise from many factors, such as an ageing population, patients and providers demands for equipment’s and services. In order to respond these challenges and reduction of health system’s transactional costs, referral solutions are considered as a key factor. This study was carried out to identify referral solutions that have had successes. Methods: relevant studies identified using keywords of referrals, consultation, referral system, referral model, referral project, electronic referral, electronic booking, health system, healthcare, health service and medical care. These searches were conducted using PubMed, ProQuest, Google Scholar, Scopus, Emerald, Web of Knowledge, Springer, Science direct, Mosby’s index, SID, Medlib and Iran Doc data bases. 4306 initial articles were obtained and refined step by step. Finally, 27 articles met the inclusion criteria. Results: we identified seventeen e-referral systems developed in UK, Norway, Finland, Netherlands, Denmark, Scotland, New Zealand, Canada, Australia, and U.S. Implemented solutions had variant degrees of successes such as improved access to specialist care, reduced wait times, timeliness and quality of referral communication, accurate health information transfer and integration of health centers and services. Conclusion: each one of referral solutions has both positive and changeable aspects that should be addressed according to sociotechnical conditions. These solutions are mainly formed in a small and localized manner. PMID:26236167

  11. Use of a data warehouse at an academic medical center for clinical pathology quality improvement, education, and research

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.; Schriever, Andy; Mathur, Gagan; Blau, John L.; Stauffer, Stephanie L.; Ford, Bradley A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pathology data contained within the electronic health record (EHR), and laboratory information system (LIS) of hospitals represents a potentially powerful resource to improve clinical care. However, existing reporting tools within commercial EHR and LIS software may not be able to efficiently and rapidly mine data for quality improvement and research applications. Materials and Methods: We present experience using a data warehouse produced collaboratively between an academic medical center and a private company. The data warehouse contains data from the EHR, LIS, admission/discharge/transfer system, and billing records and can be accessed using a self-service data access tool known as Starmaker. The Starmaker software allows users to use complex Boolean logic, include and exclude rules, unit conversion and reference scaling, and value aggregation using a straightforward visual interface. More complex queries can be achieved by users with experience with Structured Query Language. Queries can use biomedical ontologies such as Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes and Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine. Result: We present examples of successful searches using Starmaker, falling mostly in the realm of microbiology and clinical chemistry/toxicology. The searches were ones that were either very difficult or basically infeasible using reporting tools within the EHR and LIS used in the medical center. One of the main strengths of Starmaker searches is rapid results, with typical searches covering 5 years taking only 1–2 min. A “Run Count” feature quickly outputs the number of cases meeting criteria, allowing for refinement of searches before downloading patient-identifiable data. The Starmaker tool is available to pathology residents and fellows, with some using this tool for quality improvement and scholarly projects. Conclusion: A data warehouse has significant potential for improving utilization of clinical pathology testing. Software

  12. Implementation of a Prolonged Infusion Guideline for Time-Dependent Antimicrobial Agents at a Tertiary Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hohlfelder, Benjamin; Kubiak, David W; Degrado, Jeremy R; Reardon, David P; Szumita, Paul M

    Administration of time-dependent beta-lactam antibiotic as a prolonged infusion may maximize the pharmacodynamic target of time above the minimum inhibitory concentration. We describe the implementation of a prolonged infusion at a tertiary academic medical center, and a 1-year compliance analysis with the guideline. After performing a thorough literature search, a guideline was developed by members of the Department of Infectious Diseases and Department of Pharmacy. Approval and endorsement of the guideline was obtained by the Antimicrobial Subcommittee and Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. Physical champions were instrumental in the implementation of the guideline institution-wide. We then performed a 1-year retrospective analysis of guideline compliance from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011. Noncompliant administrations were obtained from smart infusion pumps. The total number of doses administered was taken from pharmacy information resources. In total, nearly 85,000 time-dependent doses were administered. Compliance with the prolonged infusion guideline was 89%. Rates of compliance did not significantly differ between medications (P = 0.555). Obtaining support from key stakeholders in collateral services and institutional leadership was vital for the success of this guideline. Compliance with the guideline 1 year after implementation was high. Implementation of a prolonged infusion guideline is feasible with institutional support and motivation.

  13. The response of academic medical centers to the 2010 Haiti earthquake: the Mount Sinai School of Medicine experience.

    PubMed

    Ripp, Jonathan A; Bork, Jacqueline; Koncicki, Holly; Asgary, Ramin

    2012-01-01

    On January 12, 2010, Haiti was struck by a 7.0 earthquake which left the country in a state of devastation. In the aftermath, there was an enormous relief effort in which academic medical centers (AMC) played an important role. We offer a retrospective on the AMC response through the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (MSSM) experience. Over the course of the year that followed the Earthquake, MSSM conducted five service trips in conjunction with two well-established groups which have provided service to the Haitian people for over 15 years. MSSM volunteer personnel included nurses, resident and attending physicians, and specialty fellows who provided expertise in critical care, emergency medicine, wound care, infectious diseases and chronic disease management of adults and children. Challenges faced included stressful and potentially hazardous working conditions, provision of care with limited resources and cultural and language barriers. The success of the MSSM response was due largely to the strength of its human resources and the relationship forged with effective relief organizations. These service missions fulfilled the institution's commitment to social responsibility and provided a valuable training opportunity in advocacy. For other AMCs seeking to respond in future emergencies, we suggest early identification of a partner with field experience, recruitment of administrative and faculty support across the institution, significant pre-departure orientation and utilization of volunteers to fundraise and advocate. Through this process, AMCs can play an important role in disaster response.

  14. Developing a consensus framework and risk profile for agents of opportunity in academic medical centers: implications for public health preparedness.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Brenna M; Nelson, Lewis S; Graham, Margaret E; Bendzans, Carly; McCrillis, Aileen M; Portelli, Ian; Zhang, Meng; Goldberg, Judith; Rosenberg, Sheldon D; Goldfrank, Lewis R; Tunik, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Agents of opportunity (AO) in academic medical centers (AMC) are defined as unregulated or lightly regulated substances used for medical research or patient care that can be used as "dual purpose" substances by terrorists to inflict damage upon populations. Most of these agents are used routinely throughout AMC either during research or for general clinical practice. To date, the lack of careful regulations for AOs creates uncertain security conditions and increased malicious potential. Using a consensus-based approach, we collected information and opinions from staff working in an AMC and 4 AMC-affiliated hospitals concerning identification of AO, AO attributes, and AMC risk and preparedness, focusing on AO security and dissemination mechanisms and likely hospital response. The goal was to develop a risk profile and framework for AO in the institution. Agents of opportunity in 4 classes were identified and an AO profile was developed, comprising 16 attributes denoting information critical to preparedness for AO misuse. Agents of opportunity found in AMC present a unique and vital gap in public health preparedness. Findings of this project may provide a foundation for a discussion and consensus efforts to determine a nationally accepted risk profile framework for AO. This foundation may further lead to the implementation of appropriate regulatory policies to improve public health preparedness. Agents of opportunity modeling of dissemination properties should be developed to better predict AO risk.

  15. Utilization of a Pharmacy Clinical Surveillance System for Pharmacist Alerting and Communication at a Tertiary Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hohlfelder, Benjamin; Stashek, Chad; Anger, Kevin E; Szumita, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this analysis is to describe the utilization metrics of a pharmacy clinical surveillance system (PCSS) at a tertiary, academic medical center.We performed a retrospective database analysis assessing rule-based alerts (RBA), interventions and pharmacist communication notes documented in the PCSS from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014. Reports were generated on 92 unique RBAs sent to clinicians for evaluation. Metrics assessed included the number of RBAs that were triggered, clinically evaluated, intervened on by pharmacists, and therapeutic category of interventions. Pharmacy communication notes were also evaluated.A total of 399,979 RBAs were triggered through the PCSS. During that time, pharmacists documented a total of 17,733 interventions. The most common RBAs were related to lab abnormalities (132,487; 33 %) and anticoagulation/antiplatelet therapy (126,425; 32.1 %). Interventions were most frequently related to RBAs regarding anticoagulation/antiplatelet therapy (6412; 36 %) and antimicrobial therapy (3320; 19 %). Pharmacist communication was most commonly related to clarification of medication and lab orders, and therapeutic drug monitoring.Based on utilization metrics presented, the implementation of a PCSS has successfully generated RBAs to aid pharmacists in clinical practice and improved departmental documentation and communication. Further analysis is warranted to assess the impact of the RBAs, interventions, and communication notes on outcomes such as hospital cost and adverse drug events.

  16. Referral pattern for epilepsy surgery after evidence-based recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Haneef, Zulfi; Stern, John; Dewar, Sandra; Engel, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    Background: Class I evidence for surgical effectiveness in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in 2001 led to an American Academy of Neurology practice parameter in 2003 recommending “referral to a surgical epilepsy center on failing appropriate trials of first-line antiepileptic drugs.” We examined whether this led to a change in referral patterns to our epilepsy center. Methods: We compared referral data for patients with TLE at our center for 1995 to 1998 (group 1, n = 83) and 2005 to 2008 (group 2, n = 102) to determine whether these recommendations resulted in a change in referral patterns for surgical evaluation. Patients with brain tumors, previous epilepsy surgery evaluations, or brain surgery (including epilepsy surgery) were excluded. Results: We did not find a difference between the groups in the duration from the diagnosis of habitual seizures to referral (17.1 ± 10.0 vs 18.6 ± 12.6 years, p = 0.39) or the age at the time of evaluation (34.1 ± 10.3 vs 37.0 ± 11.8 years, p = 0.08). However, there was a difference in the distributions of age at evaluation (p = 0.03) and the duration of pharmacotherapy (p = 0.03) between the groups, with a greater proportion of patients in group 2 with drug-resistant epilepsy both earlier and later in their treatment course. Nonepileptic seizures were referred significantly earlier than TLE in either group or when combined. Conclusions: Our analysis does not identify a significantly earlier referral for epilepsy surgery evaluation as recommended in the practice parameter, but suggests a hopeful trend in this direction. GLOSSARY AAN = American Academy of Neurology; AED = antiepileptic drug; ERSET = Early Randomized Surgical Epilepsy Trial; NES = nonepileptic seizures; RCT = randomized controlled trial; TLE = temporal lobe epilepsy; VNS = vagus nerve stimulator. PMID:20733145

  17. The Theory and Application of Information and Referral Systems in the University of Maryland Residence Halls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoman, Cherie; Moore, Jerry E.

    1977-01-01

    This resource system consists of eight information and referral centers each housing a resource instrument (binders and flip chart), an operator, outreach staff, one mobile instrument, a systematic updating system and an evaluation system. (Author/DOW)

  18. Interdepartmental Dermatology: Characteristics and Impact of Dermatology Inpatient Referrals at a Teaching Hospital in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Satyendra Nath; Podder, Indrasish; Saha, Abanti; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata

    2017-01-01

    Background: Dermatology is primarily considered to be an outpatient-centered specialty. However, several inpatient admissions to other specialties require dermatologic consultation for optimum management. Aims: To analyze the causes of inpatient dermatology referrals, departments sending referrals, and impact of dermatology consultation on patient management. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study by analyzing the records of 486 patient referrals over a 4-year period. The demographic details, specialties requesting consultation, cause of referral, and dermatological advice have been recorded and analyzed. Results: Dermatology consultation changed the dermatologic diagnosis and treatment of almost two-thirds of patients. General medicine requested the maximum number of referrals, “skin rash” being the most common cause for referral. Accurate diagnosis on referrals was provided by only 30.2% of nondermatologists. Common dermatological disorders were often misdiagnosed by these physicians, and dermatology referrals had significant impact on the diagnosis and subsequent management of these patients. Conclusion: While dermatologic referral leads to improved patient care, there is a need for better training of nondermatologists enabling them to recognize and treat common dermatoses. PMID:28216722

  19. Improving the Collection of Race, Ethnicity, and Language Data to Reduce Healthcare Disparities: A Case Study from an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Chen; Veeranki, Sreenivas P; Serag, Hani; Eschbach, Karl; Smith, Kenneth D

    2016-01-01

    Well-designed electronic health records (EHRs) must integrate a variety of accurate information to support efforts to improve quality of care, particularly equity-in-care initiatives. This case study provides insight into the challenges those initiatives may face in collecting accurate race, ethnicity, and language (REAL) information in the EHR. We present the experience of an academic medical center strengthening its EHR for better collection of REAL data with funding from the EHR Incentive Programs for meaningful use of health information technology and the Texas Medicaid 1115 Waiver program. We also present a plan to address some of the challenges that arose during the course of the project. Our experience at an academic medical center can provide guidance about the likely challenges similar institutions may expect when they implement new initiatives to collect REAL data, particularly challenges regarding scope, personnel, and other resource needs.

  20. Improving the Collection of Race, Ethnicity, and Language Data to Reduce Healthcare Disparities: A Case Study from an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Chen; Veeranki, Sreenivas P.; Serag, Hani; Eschbach, Karl; Smith, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    Well-designed electronic health records (EHRs) must integrate a variety of accurate information to support efforts to improve quality of care, particularly equity-in-care initiatives. This case study provides insight into the challenges those initiatives may face in collecting accurate race, ethnicity, and language (REAL) information in the EHR. We present the experience of an academic medical center strengthening its EHR for better collection of REAL data with funding from the EHR Incentive Programs for meaningful use of health information technology and the Texas Medicaid 1115 Waiver program. We also present a plan to address some of the challenges that arose during the course of the project. Our experience at an academic medical center can provide guidance about the likely challenges similar institutions may expect when they implement new initiatives to collect REAL data, particularly challenges regarding scope, personnel, and other resource needs. PMID:27843424

  1. Spinal Epidural Abscess in Adults: A 10-Year Clinical Experience at a Tertiary Care Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Artenstein, Andrew W; Friderici, Jennifer; Holers, Adam; Lewis, Deirdre; Fitzgerald, Jan; Visintainer, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Background.  Delayed recognition of spinal epidural abscess (SEA) contributes to poor outcomes from this highly morbid and potentially lethal infection. We performed a case-control study in a regional, high-volume, tertiary care, academic medical center over the years 2005-2015 to assess the potential changing epidemiology, clinical and laboratory manifestations, and course of this disorder and to identify factors that might lead to early identification of SEA. Methods.  Diagnostic billing codes consistent with SEA were used to identify inpatient admissions for abstraction. Subjects were categorized as cases or controls based on the results of spinal imaging studies. Characteristics were compared using Fisher's exact or Kruskal-Wallis tests. All P values were 2-sided with a critical threshold of <.05. Results.  We identified 162 cases and 88 controls during the study period. The incidence of SEA increased from 2.5 to 8.0 per 10 000 admissions, a 3.3-fold change from 2005 to 2015 (P < .001 for the linear trend). Compared with controls, cases were significantly more likely to have experienced at least 1 previous healthcare visit or received antimicrobials within 30 days of admission; to have comorbidities of injection drug use, alcohol abuse, or obesity; and to manifest fever or rigors. Cases were also more likely to harbor coinfection at a noncontiguous site. When available, inflammatory markers were noted to be markedly elevated in cases. Focal neurologic deficits were seen with similar frequencies in both groups. Conclusions.  Based on our analysis, it appears that selected factors noted at the time of clinical presentation may facilitate early recognition of SEA.

  2. Spinal Epidural Abscess in Adults: A 10-Year Clinical Experience at a Tertiary Care Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Artenstein, Andrew W.; Friderici, Jennifer; Holers, Adam; Lewis, Deirdre; Fitzgerald, Jan; Visintainer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background. Delayed recognition of spinal epidural abscess (SEA) contributes to poor outcomes from this highly morbid and potentially lethal infection. We performed a case-control study in a regional, high-volume, tertiary care, academic medical center over the years 2005–2015 to assess the potential changing epidemiology, clinical and laboratory manifestations, and course of this disorder and to identify factors that might lead to early identification of SEA. Methods. Diagnostic billing codes consistent with SEA were used to identify inpatient admissions for abstraction. Subjects were categorized as cases or controls based on the results of spinal imaging studies. Characteristics were compared using Fisher's exact or Kruskal-Wallis tests. All P values were 2-sided with a critical threshold of <.05. Results. We identified 162 cases and 88 controls during the study period. The incidence of SEA increased from 2.5 to 8.0 per 10 000 admissions, a 3.3-fold change from 2005 to 2015 (P < .001 for the linear trend). Compared with controls, cases were significantly more likely to have experienced at least 1 previous healthcare visit or received antimicrobials within 30 days of admission; to have comorbidities of injection drug use, alcohol abuse, or obesity; and to manifest fever or rigors. Cases were also more likely to harbor coinfection at a noncontiguous site. When available, inflammatory markers were noted to be markedly elevated in cases. Focal neurologic deficits were seen with similar frequencies in both groups. Conclusions. Based on our analysis, it appears that selected factors noted at the time of clinical presentation may facilitate early recognition of SEA. PMID:28018923

  3. Impact of Changes in Urine Culture Ordering Practice on Antimicrobial Utilization in Intensive Care Units at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Sarg, Mohamed; Waldrop, Greer E; Beier, Mona A; Heil, Emily L; Thom, Kerri A; Preas, Michael Anne; Johnson, J Kristie; Harris, Anthony D; Leekha, Surbhi

    2016-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess antimicrobial utilization before and after a change in urine culture ordering practice in adult intensive care units (ICUs) whereby urine cultures were only performed when pyuria was detected. DESIGN Quasi-experimental study SETTING A 700-bed academic medical center PATIENTS Patients admitted to any adult ICU METHODS Aggregate data for all adult ICUs were obtained for population-level antimicrobial use (days of therapy [DOT]), urine cultures performed, and bacteriuria, all measured per 1,000 patient days before the intervention (January-December 2012) and after the intervention (January-December 2013). These data were compared using interrupted time series negative binomial regression. Randomly selected patient charts from the population of adult ICU patients with orders for urine culture in the presence of indwelling or recently removed urinary catheters were reviewed for demographic, clinical, and antimicrobial use characteristics, and pre- and post-intervention data were compared. RESULTS Statistically significant reductions were observed in aggregate monthly rates of urine cultures performed and bacteriuria detected but not in DOT. At the patient level, compared with the pre-intervention group (n=250), in the post-intervention group (n=250), fewer patients started a new antimicrobial therapy based on urine culture results (23% vs 41%, P=.002), but no difference in the mean total DOT was observed. CONCLUSION A change in urine-culture ordering practice was associated with a decrease in the percentage of patients starting a new antimicrobial therapy based on the index urine-culture order but not in total duration of antimicrobial use in adult ICUs. Other drivers of antimicrobial use in ICU patients need to be evaluated by antimicrobial stewardship teams. Infect.

  4. Prevalence and factors predictive of intraocular fungal infection in patients with fungemia at an academic urban tertiary care center

    PubMed Central

    Geraymovych, Elena; Conduff, Joseph H; Braich, Puneet S; Leffler, Christopher T; Brar, Vikram S

    2015-01-01

    Objective To report the prevalence and to identify factors predictive of intraocular infection in patients with fungemia receiving prophylactic antifungal therapy. Methods A retrospective review of patients who received prophylactic antifungal therapy and a dilated fundus examination at an academic urban tertiary care center from 2000 to 2007. Basic demographic information, fungal species grown, antifungal agent(s) used, number of positive blood culture specimens, visual acuity, visual symptoms, and known risks of disseminated candidiasis were noted. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors significantly associated with intraocular fungal infection. Results A total of 132 patients with positive fungemia culture were requested to have ophthalmology consults. The prevalence of ocular infection was 6.9% (N=9). All nine patients were infected with Candida species. Undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) surgery within the prior 6 months was significantly related to developing intraocular infection, with an odds ratio of 18.5 (95% confidence interval, 15.1–24.3; P=0.002). Having ≥3 positive fungal blood cultures was also a significant risk factor, with an odds ratio of 2.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.8–3.7; P=0.03). Among 40 patients having GI surgery, eight (20.0%) had intraocular fungal disease, compared with one of 92 patients (1.1%) not having GI surgery. Among 125 patients with a negative baseline examination result, two of 32 patients (6.3%), who had recent GI surgery, subsequently developed fungal ocular disease, compared with 0 of 93 patients (0%), who did not have recent GI surgery. Conclusion Recent GI surgery and higher numbers of positive fungal blood culture specimens may be predictive of candida ocular infections. Normal baseline fundoscopy examination results in patients with such risks may require repeat evaluations to detect delayed manifestations. PMID:26491246

  5. Referrals between Public Sector Health Institutions for Women with Obstetric High Risk, Complications, or Emergencies in India - A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Samiksha; Doyle, Pat; Campbell, Oona M; Mathew, Manu; Murthy, G V S

    2016-01-01

    Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within primary health care systems requires a linked referral system to be effective in reducing maternal death. This systematic review aimed to summarize evidence on the proportion of referrals between institutions during pregnancy and delivery, and the factors affecting referrals, in India. We searched 6 electronic databases, reviewed four regional databases and repositories, and relevant program reports from India published between 1994 and 2013. All types of study or reports (except editorials, comments and letters) which reported on institution-referrals (out-referral or in-referral) for obstetric care were included. Results were synthesized on the proportion and the reasons for referral, and factors affecting referrals. Of the 11,346 articles identified by the search, we included 232 articles in the full text review and extracted data from 16 studies that met our inclusion criteria Of the 16, one was RCT, seven intervention cohort (without controls), six cross-sectional, and three qualitative studies. Bias and quality of studies were reported. Between 25% and 52% of all pregnancies were referred from Sub-centres for antenatal high-risk, 14% to 36% from nurse run delivery or basic EmOC centres for complications or emergencies, and 2 to 7% were referred from doctor run basic EmOC centres for specialist care at comprehensive EmOC centres. Problems identified with referrals from peripheral health centres included low skills and confidence of staff, reluctance to induce labour, confusion over the clinical criteria for referral, non-uniform standards of care at referral institutions, a tendency to by-pass middle level institutions, a lack of referral communication and supervision, and poor compliance. The high proportion of referrals from peripheral health centers reflects the lack of appropriate clinical guidelines, processes, and skills for obstetric care and referral in India. This, combined with inadequate referral communication

  6. Referral Practices of School Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Martin H.; Partin, Ronald L.

    1994-01-01

    Surveyed school counselors (n=149) concerning their referral practices. Found that average number of students that counselors reported referring to other professionals during typical year was 30 (average of 6.5% of students they served). Emotional concerns, family concerns, alcoholism or drug abuse, and suspected child abuse were concerns most…

  7. Evidence Equals Excellence: The application of an evidence-based practice model in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Balakas, Karen; Potter, Patricia; Pratt, Elizabeth; Rea, Gail; Williams, Jennifer

    2009-03-01

    An evidence-based practice (EBP) program that is designed to develop mentors in both clinical and academic settings has the potential for transforming a health care organization. This article describes an innovative program, Evidence Equals Excellence, which consists of two components: a clinical practice component for health care clinicians and an academic program for baccalaureate and graduate nursing students. The development of EBP mentors creates a core group of clinicians who can assist fellow staff members apply evidence at the bedside. An academic program prepares new graduates to partner easily with clinical mentors to support and initiate successful practice changes.

  8. 12 CFR 612.2301 - Referrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM STANDARDS OF CONDUCT AND REFERRAL OF KNOWN OR SUSPECTED CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS Referral of Known or Suspected Criminal Violations § 612.2301 Referrals. (a..., appropriate investigation, and reporting of criminal activity. Within 30 calendar days of determining...

  9. Predictors of responses to psychotherapy referral of WTC utility disaster workers.

    PubMed

    Jayasinghe, Nimali; Giosan, Cezar; Difede, Joann; Spielman, Lisa; Robin, Lisa

    2006-04-01

    This study examined male utility disaster workers' responses to referral for trauma-specific psychotherapy. Among 328 workers offered referral for symptoms related to the World Trade Center (WTC) attacks during psychological screening, approximately 48% chose to accept, 28% chose to consider only, and 24% chose to decline. Analyses examined predisposing factors, i.e., age, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, previous mental health treatment, and previous disorder; as well as illness level; i.e., posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and general psychiatric distress; current treatment; and time of referral as predictors of referral response. PTSD (specifically reexperiencing and hyperarousal symptoms), depressive symptoms, and previous mental health treatment were positively associated with workers' accepting referral. Implications and limitations of these findings are discussed.

  10. Predictors of Academic Performance and School Engagement--Integrating Persistence, Motivation and Study Skills Perspectives Using Person-Centered and Variable-Centered Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Paulo A. S.; Dias, Paulo; Vaz, Filipa Machado; Vaz, Joao Machado

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing need for the integration of various theoretical perspectives on academic performance, especially the theories on educational persistence, and motivational theories. Recent models of students' engagement with school incorporate different dimensions of students, family and school. However, some authors are arguing that academic…

  11. Adult Education Information and Referral Hot-Line. Adult Education Special Project. Final Report, July 1980-June 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Jim

    A toll-free adult education information and referral hotline provided information and referral services to approximately 1500 adults in Region IX in Texas from September 1980 to June 1981. Adult education co-ops and testing centers forwarded pertinent program information (class schedules, General Educational Development testing information) to the…

  12. Directory of Marine and Marine Related Information Resources at the University of Wisconsin. Part I, Reference and Referral Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luedtke, John R.

    This volume, part one of a two-volume directory, contains listings and descriptions of reference and referral resources for marine and marine-related information. These resources include the reference and referral services of the University of Wisconsin, other regional libraries and information centers, selected national oceanographic data…

  13. Automatic referral to cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jane P

    2008-01-01

    The pervasive negative impact of cardiovascular disease in the United States is well documented. Although advances have been made, the campaign to reduce the occurrence, progression, and mortality continues. Determining evidence-based data is only half the battle. Implementing new and updated clinical guidelines into daily practice is a challenging task. Cardiac rehabilitation is an example of a proven intervention whose benefit is hindered through erratic implementation. The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR), the American College of Cardiology (ACC), and the American Heart Association (AHA) have responded to this problem by publishing the AACVPR/ACC/AHA 2007 Performance Measures on Cardiac Rehabilitation for Referral to and Delivery of Cardiac Rehabilitation/Secondary Prevention Services. This new national guideline recommends automatic referral to cardiac rehabilitation for every eligible patient (performance measure A-1). This article offers guidance for the initiation of an automatic referral system, including individualizing your protocol with regard to electronic or paper-based order entry structures.

  14. Design and Implementation of a Physician Coaching Pilot to Promote Value-Based Referrals to Specialty Care

    PubMed Central

    Tuzzio, Leah; Ludman, Evette J; Chang, Eva; Palazzo, Lorella; Abbott, Travis; Wagner, Edward H; Reid, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Referral rates to specialty care from primary care physicians vary widely. To address this variability, we developed and pilot tested a peer-to-peer coaching program for primary care physicians. Objectives To assess the feasibility and acceptability of the coaching program, which gave physicians access to their individual-level referral data, strategies, and a forum to discuss referral decisions. Methods The team designed the program using physician input and a synthesis of the literature on the determinants of referral. We conducted a single-arm observational pilot with eight physicians which made up four dyads, and conducted a qualitative evaluation. Results Primary reasons for making referrals were clinical uncertainty and patient request. Physicians perceived doctor-to-doctor dialogue enabled mutual learning and a pathway to return joy to the practice of primary care medicine. The program helped physicians become aware of their own referral data, reasons for making referrals, and new strategies to use in their practice. Time constraints caused by large workloads were cited as a barrier both to participating in the pilot and to practicing in ways that optimize referrals. Physicians reported that the program could be sustained and spread if time for mentoring conversations was provided and/or nonfinancial incentives or compensation was offered. Conclusion This physician mentoring program aimed at reducing specialty referral rates is feasible and acceptable in primary care settings. Increasing the appropriateness of referrals has the potential to provide patient-centered care, reduce costs for the system, and improve physician satisfaction. PMID:28368789

  15. Effects of Child Gender and Symptom Type on Referrals for ADHD by Elementary School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sciutto, Mark J.; Nolfi, Cara J.; Bluhm, Carla

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the effects of child gender and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptom type on elementary school teachers' referral decisions. Participants (N =199) read a profile of a fictional child's academic record and rated the likelihood of referring the child for an evaluation. The profiles varied by…

  16. Personalized Learning for the At-Risk through Intervention and Referral Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePass Pipkin, Tamika S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-methodology study was to examine whether Personalized Student Learning Plans (PSLPs) could reduce at-risk students' academic and social dysfunction. At-risk students were referred to Intervention & Referral Services (I&RS) and PSLPs were used to develop a personal plan for progress. Data sources included…

  17. Adherence patterns to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines for referral to cancer genetic professionals

    PubMed Central

    Febbraro, Terri; Robison, Katina; Wilbur, Jennifer Scalia; Laprise, Jessica; Bregar, Amy; Lopes, Vrishali; Legare, Robert; Stuckey, Ashley

    2016-01-01

    Objective Genetic predisposition is responsible for 5–10% of breast cancer, 10% of ovarian cancer and 2–5% of uterine cancer. The study objective was to compare genetic counseling and testing referral rates among women with breast cancer that met NCCN referral guidelines to the referral rates among women with gynecologic cancers and determine predictors of referral. Methods Utilizing an institutional tumor registry database, patients from an academic women's oncology program were identified who met a subset of NCCN guidelines for genetic referral between 2004 and 2010. Patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer, breast cancer ≤50 years of age, or uterine cancer <50 years of age were included. A retrospective electronic chart review was conducted to evaluate for a genetic referral and uptake of genetic testing. Results 820 women were included (216 uterine, 314 breast, and 290 ovarian cancer). The overall genetic referral rate was 21.7%. 34% of eligible breast cancer patients were referred compared to 13.4% of uterine cancer and 14.5% ofovarian cancer patients (p < 0.0001). Younger age, breast cancer diagnosis, family history and earlier stage were all significant referral predictors. The odds of being referred increased with the number of affected family members. 70.8% of referred patients, consulted with genetics. Among those who consulted with genetics, 95.2% underwent testing. Conclusions Although increasing, genetic counseling remains underutilized across cancer diagnosis. Women with breast cancer are more likely to be referred than women with gynecologic cancers. Younger age, earlier stage and positive family history appear to be predictive of referral for genetic evaluation. PMID:25933682

  18. Academic and non-academic career options for marine scientists. - Support measures for early career scientists offered at MARUM - Center for Marine Environmental Sciences, University of Bremen, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbeln, Dierk; Klose, Christina

    2015-04-01

    Early career scientists at MARUM cover a wide range of research topics and disciplines including geosciences, biology, chemistry, social sciences and law. Just as colourful as the disciplinary background of the people, are their ideas for their personal careers. With our services and programmes, we aim to address some important career planning needs of PhD students and early career Postdocs, both, for careers in science and for careers outside academia. For PhD students aiming to stay in science, MARUM provides funding opportunities for a research stay abroad for a duration of up to 6 months. A range of courses is offered to prepare for the first Postdoc position. These include trainings in applying for research funding, proposal writing and interview skills. Following MARUM lectures which are held once a month, early career scientists are offered the opportunity to talk to senior scientists from all over the world in an informal Meet&Greet. Mentoring and coaching programmes for women in science are offered in cooperation with the office for equal opportunities at the University of Bremen. These programmes offer an additional opportunity to train interpersonal skills and to develop personal career strategies including a focus on special challenges that especially women might (have to) face in the scientific community. Early career scientists aiming for a non-academic career find support on different levels. MARUM provides funding opportunities for placements in industry, administration, consulting or similar. We offer trainings in e.g. job hunting strategies or interview skills. For a deeper insight into jobs outside the academic world, we regularly invite professionals for informal fireside chats and career days. These events are organised in cooperation with other graduate programmes in the region to broaden the focus of both, the lecturers and the participants. A fundamental component of our career programmes is the active involvement of alumni of MARUM and our

  19. Innovative Research into Practice in Support Centers for College Athletes: Implications for the Academic Progress Rate Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comeaux, Eddie

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about the educational experiences of Division I athletes are pervasive. Finding meaningful ways to strike a healthy balance between athletics and academics has been an ongoing struggle for colleges and universities, and this article emphasizes the need for and value of innovation in current practices. The article introduces the Career…

  20. Challenges of becoming a regional referral system: the University of Kentucky as a case study.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Robert L; Lofgren, Richard P; Birdwhistell, Mark D; Zembrodt, James W; Karpf, Michael

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. health care system must change because of unsustainable costs and limited access to care. Health care legislation and the recognition that health care costs must be curbed have accelerated the change process. How should academic medical centers (AMCs) respond? Teaching hospitals are a heterogeneous group, and the leaders of each must understand their institution's goals and the necessary resources to achieve them. Clinical leaders and staff at one AMC, the University of Kentucky (UK), committed to transforming the AMC into a regional referral center. To achieve this goal, UK leaders integrated the clinical enterprise, focused recruitment on advanced subspecialists, and initiated productive relationships with other providers. Attracting adequate numbers of destination patients with complex illnesses required UK to have a "market space" of five to seven million people. The resources required to effect such progress have been daunting. Relationships with providers and payers have been necessary to forge a network. These relationships have been challenging to establish and manage and have evolved over time. Most AMCs are not-for-profit public good entities that nevertheless exist in an industry driven by competition in quality and cost, and therefore scale and access to capital are paramount. AMC leaders must understand their institutions as both part of an industry and as a public good in order to adapt to the changing health care system. Although the experience of any particular AMC is inherently unique, UK's journey provides a useful case study in establishing institutional goals, outlining a strategy, and identifying required resources.

  1. Development and Implementation of a Collaborative Team Care Model for Effective Insulin Use in an Academic Medical Center Primary Care Network.

    PubMed

    Eisenstat, Stephanie A; Chang, Yuchiao; Porneala, Bianca C; Geagan, Elizabeth; Wilkins, Gianna; Chase, Barbara; O'Keefe, Sandra M; Delahanty, Linda M; Atlas, Steven J; Zai, Adrian H; Finn, David; Weil, Eric; Wexler, Deborah J

    2016-05-27

    Improving glycemic control across a primary care diabetes population is challenging. This article describes the development, implementation, and outcomes of the Diabetes Care Collaborative Model (DCCM), a collaborative team care process focused on promoting effective insulin use targeting patients with hyperglycemia in a patient-centered medical home model. After a pilot, the DCCM was implemented in 18 primary care practices affiliated with an academic medical center. Its implementation was associated with improvements in glycemic control and increase in insulin prescription longitudinally and across the entire population, with a >1% reduction in the proportion of glycated hemoglobin >9% at 2 years after the implementation compared with the 2 years prior (P < .001). Facilitating factors included diverse stakeholder engagement, institutional alignment of priorities, awarding various types of credits for participation and implementation to providers, and a strong theoretical foundation using the principles of the collaborative care model.

  2. Strategies and tactics for successful implementation of bundled payments: bundled payment for care improvement at a large, urban, academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Richard

    2015-03-01

    As health care reform continues to evolve, there will need to be an emphasis on generating value, quality improvement, and cost control. In 2011, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) initiated a new Bundled Payment for Care Improvement initiative. Early results from this CMS bundled payment initiative at an urban, tertiary, academic medical center demonstrate decreased length of stay and increased discharge to home, with decreasing readmission rates, which can result in cost-savings without compromise of the quality of care. Changes in care coordination, clinical care pathways, and evidence-based protocols are the key to improving the quality metrics and cost effectiveness within the implementation of the bundled payment for care initiative, thus bringing increased value to our total joint arthroplasty patients.

  3. Annual Faculty Research Report of the Department of Systems Engineering and the Operations Research Center for the Academic Year 2006

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    brain lid” and drive modification of theory applied in other fields, such as site percolation theory, information entropy, and artificial...Point, NY 10996 1 Director, Center for Teaching Excellence MADN- CTE USMA, Bldg 601, Room 119 West Point, NY 10996 1 Director, Center for

  4. Understanding the Process of Medical Referral

    PubMed Central

    Muzzin, Linda J.

    1991-01-01

    In a critique of the existing literature, the author found that most studies simply calculate referral rates and count letters between referring physicians and specialists. Longitudinal studies that consider all participants' views and place referral in a broader context could reveal more about this complex process. This article is the first of a six-part series reporting on a longitudinal study of 50 referrals in Ontario and Manitoba. PMID:21229088

  5. Penn Center for Community Health Workers: Step-by-Step Approach to Sustain an Evidence-Based Community Health Worker Intervention at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Anna U; Grande, David T; Carter, Tamala; Long, Judith A; Kangovi, Shreya

    2016-11-01

    Community-engaged researchers who work with low-income communities can be reliant on grant funding. We use the illustrative case of the Penn Center for Community Health Workers (PCCHW) to describe a step-by-step framework for achieving financial sustainability for community-engaged research interventions. PCCHW began as a small grant-funded research project but followed an 8-step framework to engage both low-income patients and funders, determine outcomes, and calculate return on investment. PCCHW is now fully funded by Penn Medicine and delivers the Individualized Management for Patient-Centered Targets (IMPaCT) community health worker intervention to 2000 patients annually.

  6. Feasibility of Telerehabilitation Implementation as a Novel Experience in Rehabilitation Academic Centers and Affiliated Clinics in Tehran: Assessment of Rehabilitation Professionals' Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Movahedazarhouligh, Sara; Vameghi, Roshanak; Hatamizadeh, Nikta; Bakhshi, Enayatollah; Moosavy Khatat, Seyed Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to assess rehabilitation professionals' attitude toward implementation and application of telerehabilitation technology as a novel study in rehabilitation academic centers and affiliated clinics in Tehran. Methods. It was a descriptive cross-sectional study. To collect data, a researcher-designed questionnaire was developed. 141 rehabilitation experts participated in the study. Results. A majority of faculty members (78%) and clinicians (89.7%) either were in “definite agreement” or “somewhat agreed” with implementation and application of this technology, which demonstrates an overall positive attitude. Discussion. Based on the positive attitudes of the majority of participants toward implementation and application of this technology and their preferences in offering different telerehabilitation services, it seems that there is an appropriate and desirable acceptance and administrative culture to implement this technology among rehabilitation experts in Tehran. It is thus expected that implementation and application of this technology will be a promising experience in rehabilitation academic centers and affiliate clinics in Tehran. PMID:26640483

  7. SU-E-P-01: An Informative Review On the Role of Diagnostic Medical Physicist in the Academic and Private Medical Centers

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The role of physicist in the academic and private hospital environment continues to evolve and expand. This becomes more obvious with the newly revised requirements of the Joint Commission (JC) on imaging modalities and the continued updated requirements of ACR accreditation for medical physics (i.e., starting in June 2014, a physicists test will be needed before US accreditation). We provide an informative review on the role of diagnostic medical physicist and hope that our experience will expedite junior physicists in understanding their role in medical centers, and be ready to more opportunities. Methods: Based on our experience, diagnostic medical physicists in both academic and private medical centers perform several clinical functions. These include providing clinical service and physics support, ensuring that all ionizing radiation devices are tested and operated in compliance with the State and Federal laws, regulations and guidelines. We also discuss the training and education required to ensure that the radiation exposure to patients and staff is as low as reasonably achievable. We review the overlapping roles of medical and health physicist in some institutions. Results: A detailed scheme on the new requirements (effective 7/1/2014) of the JC is provided. In 2015, new standards for fluoroscopy, cone beam CT and the qualifications of staff will be phased in. A summary of new ACR requirements for different modalities is presented. Medical physicist have other duties such as sitting on CT and fluoroscopy committees for protocols design, training of non-radiologists to meet the new fluoroscopy rules, as well as helping with special therapies such as Yittrium 90 cases. Conclusion: Medical physicists in both academic and private hospitals are positioned to be more involved and prominent. Diagnostic physicists need to be more proactive to involve themselves in the day to day activities of the radiology department.

  8. GPs' payment contracts and their referral practice.

    PubMed

    Mariñoso, Begoña Garcia; Jelovac, Izabela

    2003-07-01

    This paper compares the role of general practitioners in determining access to specialists in two types of health care systems: gate-keeping systems, where a general practitioner (GP) referral is compulsory to visit a specialist, and non-gate-keeping systems, where this referral is optional. We model the dependence between the GP's diagnosis effort and her referral behaviour, and identify the optimal contracts that induce the best behaviour from a public insurer's point of view, where there is asymmetry of information between the insurer and the GP regarding diagnosis effort and referral decisions. We show that gate keeping is superior wherever GP's incentives matter.

  9. Referrals between Public Sector Health Institutions for Women with Obstetric High Risk, Complications, or Emergencies in India – A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Samiksha; Doyle, Pat; Campbell, Oona M.; Mathew, Manu; Murthy, G. V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within primary health care systems requires a linked referral system to be effective in reducing maternal death. This systematic review aimed to summarize evidence on the proportion of referrals between institutions during pregnancy and delivery, and the factors affecting referrals, in India. We searched 6 electronic databases, reviewed four regional databases and repositories, and relevant program reports from India published between 1994 and 2013. All types of study or reports (except editorials, comments and letters) which reported on institution-referrals (out-referral or in-referral) for obstetric care were included. Results were synthesized on the proportion and the reasons for referral, and factors affecting referrals. Of the 11,346 articles identified by the search, we included 232 articles in the full text review and extracted data from 16 studies that met our inclusion criteria Of the 16, one was RCT, seven intervention cohort (without controls), six cross-sectional, and three qualitative studies. Bias and quality of studies were reported. Between 25% and 52% of all pregnancies were referred from Sub-centres for antenatal high-risk, 14% to 36% from nurse run delivery or basic EmOC centres for complications or emergencies, and 2 to 7% were referred from doctor run basic EmOC centres for specialist care at comprehensive EmOC centres. Problems identified with referrals from peripheral health centres included low skills and confidence of staff, reluctance to induce labour, confusion over the clinical criteria for referral, non-uniform standards of care at referral institutions, a tendency to by-pass middle level institutions, a lack of referral communication and supervision, and poor compliance. The high proportion of referrals from peripheral health centers reflects the lack of appropriate clinical guidelines, processes, and skills for obstetric care and referral in India. This, combined with inadequate referral communication

  10. 2 CFR 175.20 - Referral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Referral. 175.20 Section 175.20 Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS Reserved AWARD TERM FOR TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS § 175.20 Referral. An agency official should inform the...

  11. 2 CFR 175.20 - Referral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Referral. 175.20 Section 175.20 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS AWARD TERM FOR TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS § 175.20 Referral....

  12. 13 CFR 120.926 - Referral fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Loan Program (504) Third Party Loans § 120.926 Referral fee. The CDC can receive a reasonable referral fee from the Third Party Lender if the CDC secured the Third Party Lender for the Borrower under a written contract between the CDC and the Third Party Lender. Both the CDC and the Third Party Lender...

  13. 13 CFR 120.926 - Referral fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Loan Program (504) Third Party Loans § 120.926 Referral fee. The CDC can receive a reasonable referral fee from the Third Party Lender if the CDC secured the Third Party Lender for the Borrower under a written contract between the CDC and the Third Party Lender. Both the CDC and the Third Party Lender...

  14. 13 CFR 120.926 - Referral fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Loan Program (504) Third Party Loans § 120.926 Referral fee. The CDC can receive a reasonable referral fee from the Third Party Lender if the CDC secured the Third Party Lender for the Borrower under a written contract between the CDC and the Third Party Lender. Both the CDC and the Third Party Lender...

  15. 13 CFR 120.926 - Referral fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Loan Program (504) Third Party Loans § 120.926 Referral fee. The CDC can receive a reasonable referral fee from the Third Party Lender if the CDC secured the Third Party Lender for the Borrower under a written contract between the CDC and the Third Party Lender. Both the CDC and the Third Party Lender...

  16. 13 CFR 120.926 - Referral fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Loan Program (504) Third Party Loans § 120.926 Referral fee. The CDC can receive a reasonable referral fee from the Third Party Lender if the CDC secured the Third Party Lender for the Borrower under a written contract between the CDC and the Third Party Lender. Both the CDC and the Third Party Lender...

  17. 28 CFR 35.174 - Referral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Referral. 35.174 Section 35.174 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES Compliance Procedures § 35.174 Referral. If the public entity declines to enter into...

  18. 28 CFR 35.174 - Referral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Referral. 35.174 Section 35.174 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES Compliance Procedures § 35.174 Referral. If the public entity declines to enter into...

  19. 28 CFR 35.174 - Referral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Referral. 35.174 Section 35.174 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF DISABILITY IN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES Compliance Procedures § 35.174 Referral. If the public entity declines to enter into...

  20. The second market failure phenomenon in safety-net health systems: the case of a municipal academic medical center from 1980 to 2000.

    PubMed

    Tataw, David

    2011-01-01

    The specific aim of this analysis is to demonstrate how the trade-off between efficiency and equity policy approaches affects the ability of at-risk children to access quality health care services at the King/Drew Medical Center of Los Angeles County from 1980 to 2000. The concept of a second market phenomenon is used as a framework to illustrate how efficiency-seeking behaviors of federal, state, and local government actors affected government intervention efforts initiated to remedy health care access hardships created by market failure in low-income communities. A second market failure occurs when government failure results from the reintroduction of market protocols in an environment where the market had originally failed to facilitate the distribution of basic goods and services. The review suggest that financial austerity at the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services in the context of federal, state, and local government policies that emphasized allocative efficiencies, compromised equity values by undermining access to quality pediatric services at the King/Drew Medical Center which was a municipal academic medical center.

  1. A Metric-Based System for Evaluating the Productivity of Preclinical Faculty at an Academic Medical Center in the Era of Clinical and Translational Science.

    PubMed

    Wiegers, Susan E; Houser, Steven R; Pearson, Helen E; Untalan, Ann; Cheung, Joseph Y; Fisher, Susan G; Kaiser, Larry R; Feldman, Arthur M

    2015-08-01

    Academic medical centers are faced with increasing budgetary constraints due to a flat National Institutes of Health budget, lower reimbursements for clinical services, higher costs of technology including informatics and a changing competitive landscape. As such, institutional stakeholders are increasingly asking whether resources are allocated appropriately and whether there are objective methods for measuring faculty contributions and engagement. The complexities of translational research can be particularly challenging when trying to assess faculty contributions because of team science. For over a decade, we have used an objective scoring system called the Matrix to assess faculty productivity and engagement in four areas: research, education, scholarship, and administration or services. The Matrix was developed to be dynamic, quantitative, and able to insure that a fully engaged educator would have a Matrix score that was comparable to a fully engaged investigator. In this report, we present the Matrix in its current form in order to provide a well-tested objective system of performance evaluation for nonclinical faculty to help academic leaders in decision making.

  2. A decade of building massage therapy services at an academic medical center as part of a healing enhancement program.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Nancy J; Cutshall, Susanne M; Dion, Liza J; Dreyer, Nikol E; Hauschulz, Jennifer L; Ristau, Crystal R; Thomley, Barb S; Bauer, Brent A

    2015-02-01

    The use of complementary and integrative medicine therapies is steadily becoming an integral part of health care. Massage therapy is increasingly offered to hospitalized patients for various conditions to assist with the management of common symptoms such as pain, anxiety, and tension. This article summarizes a decade of building the massage therapy service at a large tertiary care medical center, from the early pilot studies and research to the current program offerings, and the hopes and dreams for the future.

  3. Research Plan of the Department of Systems Engineering and the Operations Research Center for Academic Year 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    on the team. The methodologies and results should further uncover new dimensions for exploration into the “ brain lid” and drive modification of... brain lid” and drive modification of theory applied in other fields, such as site percolation theory, information entropy, and artificial...Learning MADN-CTEL USMA, Bldg 745, Room W5100 West Point, NY 10996 1 Director, Center for Teaching Excellence MADN- CTE USMA, Bldg 601, Room 119

  4. Data Day to Day: building a community of expertise to address data skills gaps in an academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Surkis, Alisa; LaPolla, Fred Willie Zametkin; Contaxis, Nicole; Read, Kevin B.

    2017-01-01

    Background The New York University Health Sciences Library data services team had developed educational material for research data management and data visualization and had been offering classes at the request of departments, research groups, and training programs, but many members of the medical center were unaware of these library data services. There were also indications of data skills gaps in these subject areas and other data-related topics. Case Presentation The data services team enlisted instructors from across the medical center with data expertise to teach in a series of classes hosted by the library. We hosted eight classes branded as a series called “Data Day to Day.” Seven instructors from four units in the medical center, including the library, taught the classes. A multipronged outreach approach resulted in high turnout. Evaluations indicated that attendees were very satisfied with the instruction, would use the skills learned, and were interested in future classes. Conclusions Data Day to Day met previously unaddressed data skills gaps. Collaborating with outside instructors allowed the library to serve as a hub for a broad range of data instruction and to raise awareness of library services. We plan to offer the series three times in the coming year with an expanding roster of classes. PMID:28377684

  5. An exploration of key issues and potential solutions that impact physician wellbeing and professional fulfillment at an academic center

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Keri J.S.; Trockel, Mickey

    2016-01-01

    Background. Physician wellness is a vital element of a well-functioning health care system. Not only is physician wellness empirically associated with quality and patient outcomes, but its ramifications span individual, interpersonal, organizational, and societal levels. The purpose of this study was to explore academic physicians’ perceptions about their work-related wellness, including the following questions: (a) What are the workplace barriers and facilitators to their wellness? (b) What workplace solutions do theythinkwouldimprove their wellness? (c)What motivates their work? and (d) What existing wellness programs are they aware of? Methods. A multi-method design was applied to conduct a total of 19 focus group sessions in 17 clinical departments. All academic faculty ranks and career lines were represented in the 64 participating physicians, who began the sessions with five open-ended survey questions pertaining to physician wellness in their work environment. Participants entered their answers into a web-based survey program that enabled anonymous data collection. The initial survey component was followed by semi-structured focus group discussion. Data analysis of this qualitative study was informed by the general inductive approach as well as a review of extant literature through September 2015 on physician wellness, professional fulfillment, satisfaction, dissatisfaction, burnout and work-life. Results. Factors intrinsic to the work of physicians dominated the expressed reasons for work motivation. These factors all related to the theme of overall contribution, with categories of meaningful work, patient care, teaching, scientific discovery, self-motivation and matching of career interests. Extrinsic factors such as perceptions of suboptimal goal alignment, inadequate support, restricted autonomy, lack of appreciation, and suboptimal compensation and benefits dominated the risk of professional dissatisfaction. Discussion. Our findings indicate that the

  6. Theme: Teaching Academically Disadvantaged Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Maynard J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Will We Serve the Academically Disadvantaged?" (Iverson); "Using Centers of Learning to Reach Academically Disadvantaged Students" (Gentry); "Georgia's Special Lamb Project Adoption Program" (Farmer); "Teacher Expectations" (Powers); "Providing Instruction for Special Populations" (Jewell); and "The Educational Reform Movement and…

  7. Creating and Maintaining a Successful Service Line in an Academic Medical Center at the Dawn of Value-Based Care: Lessons Learned From the Heart and Vascular Service Line at UMass Memorial Health Care.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Robert A; Cyr, Jay; Keaney, John F; Messina, Louis M; Meyer, Theo E; Tam, Stanley K C; Korenda, Kathleen; Darrigo, Melinda; Kumar, Pooja; Challapalli, Sailu

    2015-10-01

    The service line (SL) model has been proven to help shift health care toward value-based services, which is characterized by coordinated, multidisciplinary, high-quality, and cost-effective care. However, academic medical centers struggle with how to effectively set up SL structures that overcome the organizational and cultural challenges associated with simultaneously delivering the highest-value care for the patient and advancing the academic mission. In this article, the authors examine the evolution of UMass Memorial Health Care's heart and vascular service line (HVSL) from 2006 to 2011 and describe the impact on its success of multiple strategic decisions. These include key academic physician leadership recruitments and engagement via a matrixed governance and management model; development of multidisciplinary teams; empowerment of SL leadership through direct accountability and authority over programs and budgets; joint educational and training programs; incentives for academic achievement; and co-localization of faculty, personnel, and facilities. The authors also explore the barriers to success, including the need to overcome historical departmental-based silos, cultural and training differences among disciplines, confusion engendered by a matrixed reporting structure, and faculty's unfamiliarity with the financial and organizational skills required to operate a successful SL. Also described here is the impact that successful implementation of the SL has on creating high-quality services, increased profitability, and contribution to the financial stability and academic achievement of the academic medical center.

  8. A Prolonged Outbreak of KPC-3-Producing Enterobacter cloacae and Klebsiella pneumoniae Driven by Multiple Mechanisms of Resistance Transmission at a Large Academic Burn Center.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Hajime; Parobek, Christian M; Juliano, Jonathan J; van Duin, David; Cairns, Bruce A; Weber, David J; Rutala, William A

    2017-02-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Enterobacter cloacae has been recently recognized in the United States. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has become a useful tool for analysis of outbreaks and for determining transmission networks of multidrug-resistant organisms in health care settings, including carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE). We experienced a prolonged outbreak of CRE E. cloacae and K. pneumoniae over a 3-year period at a large academic burn center despite rigorous infection control measures. To understand the molecular mechanisms that sustained this outbreak, we investigated the CRE outbreak isolates by using WGS. Twenty-two clinical isolates of CRE, including E. cloacae (n = 15) and K. pneumoniae (n = 7), were sequenced and analyzed genetically. WGS revealed that this outbreak, which seemed epidemiologically unlinked, was in fact genetically linked over a prolonged period. Multiple mechanisms were found to account for the ongoing outbreak of KPC-3-producing E. cloacae and K. pneumoniae This outbreak was primarily maintained by a clonal expansion of E. cloacae sequence type 114 (ST114) with distribution of multiple resistance determinants. Plasmid and transposon analyses suggested that the majority of blaKPC-3 was transmitted via an identical Tn4401b element on part of a common plasmid. WGS analysis demonstrated complex transmission dynamics within the burn center at levels of the strain and/or plasmid in association with a transposon, highlighting the versatility of KPC-producing Enterobacteriaceae in their ability to utilize multiple modes to resistance gene propagation.

  9. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Osteoporosis in Women Referring to the Bone Densitometry Academic Center in Urmia, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Marzieh Saei Ghare; Ozgoli, Giti; Aghdashi, Mir Amir; Salmani, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is one of the fastest growing health problems around the world. Several factors can affect this silent disease. The current study aimed to determine the prevalence and risk factors of osteoporosis in women in Urmia, a city in northwestern Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 360 non-pregnant women over the age of 15 who referred for bone density testing to the Urmia Imam Khomeini Academic Hospital. Data were collected by questionnaire, and bone mineral density of the femoral neck and lumbar spines L1- L4 was evaluated by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Results: The total prevalence of osteoporosis in this study was 42.2%; prevalence of osteoporosis among women 45 years old or less was 14.3% and over the age of 45 years was 50.7%. The factors such as level of education, history of bone fracture, disease history (rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, high blood pressure), gravidity and parity values, duration of lactation (p<0.001), nutrition dimension of lifestyle (p=0.03), and green tea consumption (p=002) showed a statistically significant association with the bone mineral density. According to the regression model, age (OR=1.081), history of bone fracture (OR=2.75), and gravidity (OR=1.14) were identified as significant risk factors for osteoporosis, while the body mass index (OR=0.94) was identified as a protector against osteoporosis. Conclusion: The prevalence of osteoporosis in this study was high, and findings showed that the advancement of age, lifestyle, and reproductive factors (especially gravidity and duration of lactation) were determining factors for osteoporosis. Appropriate educational programs and interventions could help to increase the women’s peak bone mass therefore reducing their risk of developing osteoporosis. PMID:26925890

  10. Evaluation of Electronic Health Record Implementation in Ophthalmology at an Academic Medical Center (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Michael F.; Read-Brown, Sarah; Tu, Daniel C.; Choi, Dongseok; Sanders, David S.; Hwang, Thomas S.; Bailey, Steven; Karr, Daniel J.; Cottle, Elizabeth; Morrison, John C.; Wilson, David J.; Yackel, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate three measures related to electronic health record (EHR) implementation: clinical volume, time requirements, and nature of clinical documentation. Comparison is made to baseline paper documentation. Methods: An academic ophthalmology department implemented an EHR in 2006. A study population was defined of faculty providers who worked the 5 months before and after implementation. Clinical volumes, as well as time length for each patient encounter, were collected from the EHR reporting system. To directly compare time requirements, two faculty providers who utilized both paper and EHR systems completed time-motion logs to record the number of patients, clinic time, and nonclinic time to complete documentation. Faculty providers and databases were queried to identify patient records containing both paper and EHR notes, from which three cases were identified to illustrate representative documentation differences. Results: Twenty-three faculty providers completed 120,490 clinical encounters during a 3-year study period. Compared to baseline clinical volume from 3 months pre-implementation, the post-implementation volume was 88% in quarter 1, 93% in year 1, 97% in year 2, and 97% in year 3. Among all encounters, 75% were completed within 1.7 days after beginning documentation. The mean total time per patient was 6.8 minutes longer with EHR than paper (P<.01). EHR documentation involved greater reliance on textual interpretation of clinical findings, whereas paper notes used more graphical representations, and EHR notes were longer and included automatically generated text. Conclusion: This EHR implementation was associated with increased documentation time, little or no increase in clinical volume, and changes in the nature of ophthalmic documentation. PMID:24167326

  11. Educating youth about health and science using a partnership between an academic medical center and community-based science museum.

    PubMed

    Bunce, Arwen E; Griest, Susan; Howarth, Linda C; Beemsterboer, Phyllis; Cameron, William; Carney, Patricia A

    2009-08-01

    Declining student interest and scholastic abilities in the sciences are concerns for the health professions. Additionally, the National Institutes of Health is committed to promoting more research on health behaviors among US youth, where one of the most striking contemporary issues is obesity. This paper reports findings on the impact of a partnership between Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry linked to a 17-week exhibition of BodyWorlds3 and designed to inform rural underserved youth about science and health research. Self-administered survey measures included health knowledge, attitudes, intended health behaviors, and interest in the health professions. Four hundred four surveys (88% of participants) were included in analyses. Ninety percent or more found both the BodyWorlds (n = 404) and OHSU (n = 239) exhibits interesting. Dental care habits showed the highest level of intended behavior change (Dental = 45%, Exercise = 34%, Eating = 30%). Overall, females and middle school students were more likely than male and high school students, respectively, to state an intention to change exercise, eating and dental care habits. Females and high school students were more likely to have considered a career in health or science prior to their exhibit visit and, following the exhibit, were more likely to report that this intention had been reinforced. About 6% of those who had not previously considered a career in health or science (n = 225) reported being more likely to do so after viewing the exhibits. In conclusion, high quality experiential learning best created by community-academic partnerships appears to have the ability to stimulate interest and influence intentions to change health behaviors among middle and high school students.

  12. Qualitative study on maternal referrals in rural Tanzania: decision making and acceptance of referral advice.

    PubMed

    Pembe, Andrea B; Urassa, David P; Darj, Elisabeth; Carlsted, Anders; Olsson, Pia

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to describe perceptions of maternal referrals in a rural district in Tanzania. Focus group discussions (FGDs) with health workers and community members, stratified by age and gender, were conducted. The FGDs revealed that husbands and relatives are the decision makers in maternal referrals, whereas the women had limited influence, especially on emergency referrals. The process in deciding to seek referral care is envisaged within community perception of seriousness of the condition, difficulty to access and cost involved in transport, living expenses at the hospital, and perceived quality of care at facility level. The hospitals were seen as providing acceptable quality of care, whereas, the health centres had lower quality than expected. To improve maternal referral compliance and reduce perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality, community views of existing referral guidelines, poverty reduction, women's empowerment and male involvement in maternal care are necessary.

  13. [Characteristics of women victims of sexual violence and their compliance with outpatient follow-up: time trends at a referral center in Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Oshikata, Carlos Tadayuki; Bedone, Aloíso José; Papa, Mariana de Sá Fonseca; Santos, Gabriela Bezerra dos; Pinheiro, Caroline Damasceno; Kalies, Ana Helena

    2011-04-01

    Sexual violence is a crime against individual integrity and sexual freedom. It affects women of all socioeconomic levels, and the perpetrator does not choose the victim's color or age. It is a source of high financial cost and a serious public health problem in Brazil. The current study aimed to assess compliance with outpatient follow-up by women victims of sexual violence treated at the Center for Women's Comprehensive Healthcare at the State University in Campinas, São Paulo State, from January 2000 to December 2006. We observed a significant increase in the return for scheduled appointments. In 2000, 41% of the women completed the six-month follow-up, and by 2006 the proportion had increased to 70%. Some 70% of the women appeared for treatment within 24 hours after being raped. Sexual assault by perpetrators known to the victims tripled during this same period. There were changes in the forms of intimidation and a significant decreased in prescription of emergency contraception.

  14. 32 CFR 2001.34 - Referrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... classified information from inadvertent disclosure. (b) Automatic declassification. The referral process for records subject to automatic declassification entails identification of records containing classified... be completed prior to the date of automatic declassification established by section 3.3(a) of...

  15. 32 CFR 2001.34 - Referrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... classified information from inadvertent disclosure. (b) Automatic declassification. The referral process for records subject to automatic declassification entails identification of records containing classified... be completed prior to the date of automatic declassification established by section 3.3(a) of...

  16. 28 CFR 549.62 - Initial referral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.62 Initial referral. (a) Staff shall refer an inmate who is observed to be on a hunger strike to medical or mental health staff for evaluation and, when appropriate,...

  17. 28 CFR 549.62 - Initial referral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Hunger Strikes, Inmate § 549.62 Initial referral. (a) Staff shall refer an inmate who is observed to be on a hunger strike to medical or mental health staff for evaluation and, when appropriate,...

  18. Variations in PET/CT Methodology for Oncologic Imaging at U.S. Academic Medical Centers: An Imaging Response Assessment Team Survey

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Michael M.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Wahl, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    In 2005, 8 Imaging Response Assessment Teams (IRATs) were funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as supplemental grants to existing NCI Cancer Centers. After discussion among the IRATs regarding the need for increased standardization of clinical and research PET/CT methodology, it became apparent that data acquisition and processing approaches differ considerably among centers. To determine the variability in detail, a survey of IRAT sites and IRAT affiliates was performed. Methods A 34-question instrument evaluating patient preparation, scanner type, performance approach, display, and analysis was developed. Fifteen institutions, including the 8 original IRATs and 7 institutions that had developed affiliate IRATs, were surveyed. Results The major areas of variation were18F-FDG dose (259–740 MBq [7–20 mCi]) uptake time (45–90 min), sedation (never to frequently), handling of diabetic patients, imaging time (2–7 min/bed position), performance of diagnostic CT scans as a part of PET/CT, type of acquisition (2-dimensional vs. 3-dimensional), CT technique, duration of fasting (4 or 6 h), and (varying widely) acquisition, processing, display, and PACS software—with 4 sites stating that poor-quality images appear on PACS. Conclusion There is considerable variability in the way PET/CT scans are performed at academic institutions that are part of the IRAT network. This variability likely makes it difficult to quantitatively compare studies performed at different centers. These data suggest that additional standardization in methodology will be required so that PET/CT studies, especially those performed quantitatively, are more comparable across sites. PMID:21233185

  19. Strategic Planning: An Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) at Georgetown University Medical Center. Volume 1, Implementation Plan. Volume 2, Planning Accomplishments. Volume 3, Environmental Forecast. Volume 4, Institutional Self Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broering, Naomi C.; And Others

    Strategic planning for an Integrated Academic Information Management System (IAIMS) for Georgetown University Medical Center is considered. The goal is to organize and transmit accessible and timely biomedical information where it is needed. Activities are proposed for education, research, patient care, management, sharing information on…

  20. Clinical use of ruxolitinib in an academic medical center in unselected patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms not on clinical study.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Kiran; Daver, Naval; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Bose, Prithviraj; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2017-04-01

    Ruxolitinib is the only approved therapy for myelofibrosis (MF). However, its use in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) not participating in clinical studies has been poorly described. We reviewed the medical records of 45 patients (35 MF, 10 others) treated with ruxolitinib at our center, off clinical study, during the year after its approval. Patients had advanced features and were refractory to multiple therapies. Ruxolitinib was effective in reducing splenomegaly (51% response rate) and constitutional symptoms (42% response rate). It controlled blood counts in patients with polycythemia and thrombocythemia but was not effective in patients with non-classic MPNs. Ruxolitinib was an active therapy in patients previously treated with a JAK inhibitor and was safely combined with hypomethylating agents in patients with elevated blasts. Median overall survival was 24 months; 10 patients transformed to acute leukemia. Its use in combination with other active agents should be further explored in clinical studies.

  1. Developing partnerships to advance youth violence prevention in Puerto Rico: the role of an academic center of excellence.

    PubMed

    Mirabal, Brenda; López-Sánchez, Gerardo; Franco-Ortiz, Mariluz; Méndez, Milagros

    2008-03-01

    This article presents and discusses strategies implemented by the University of Puerto Rico Center for Hispanic Youth Violence Prevention (CHYVP) to facilitate community mobilization to reduce youth violence in a high-risk Latino community. Participatory communication strategies were used to enhance mobilization and to develop community partnerships. Short-term outcomes included overcoming resistance and distrust, active community dialogue and consensus building, the development of a school-community task force, the identification of priorities, the negotiation of conflicts, the implementation of a common action plan, and the commitment of government officials to adopt community recommendations. Challenges included gaining trust, inadequate coordination among partners, diversity within the community, dealing with prejudice, enhancing male participation, working at the community's pace, party politics, and the effect of the loss of funding and its impact on the community. A participatory communication process can help to mobilize Latino communities to prevent and reduce youth violence.

  2. Academic freedom and academic-industry relationships in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Streiffer, Robert

    2006-06-01

    Commercial academic-industry relationships (AIRs) are widespread in biotechnology and have resulted in a wide array of restrictions on academic research. Objections to such restrictions have centered on the charge that they violate academic freedom. I argue that these objections are almost invariably unsuccessful. On a consequentialist understanding of the value of academic freedom, they rely on unfounded empirical claims about the overall effects that AIRs have on academic research. And on a rights-based understanding of the value of academic freedom, they rely on excessively lavish assumptions about the kinds of activities that academic freedom protects.

  3. The Nature of All "Inappropriate Referrals" Made to a Countywide Physical Activity Referral Scheme: Implications for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Lynne Halley; Warwick, Jane; De Ste Croix, Mark; Crone, Diane; Sldford, Adrienne

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a centralised referral mechanism (CRM) upon the number and type of "inappropriate referrals" made to a countywide physical activity referral scheme. Design: Case study. Method: Phase 1: Hierarchical Content Analysis of 458 "inappropriate referrals" made to a countywide scheme over a…

  4. Access of primary and secondary literature by health personnel in an academic health center: implications for open access*

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Ryan M.; Moorhead, Laura; O'Brien, Bridget; Willinsky, John

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The research sought to ascertain the types and quantity of research evidence accessed by health personnel through PubMed and UpToDate in a university medical center over the course of a year in order to better estimate the impact that increasing levels of open access to biomedical research can be expected to have on clinical practice in the years ahead. Methods: Web log data were gathered from the 5,042 health personnel working in the Stanford University Hospitals (SUH) during 2011. Data were analyzed for access to the primary literature (abstracts and full-text) through PubMed and UpToDate and to the secondary literature, represented by UpToDate (research summaries), to establish the frequency and nature of literature consulted. Results: In 2011, SUH health personnel accessed 81,851 primary literature articles and visited UpToDate 110,336 times. Almost a third of the articles (24,529) accessed were reviews. Twenty percent (16,187) of the articles viewed were published in 2011. Conclusion: When it is available, health personnel in a clinical care setting frequently access the primary literature. While further studies are needed, this preliminary finding speaks to the value of the National Institutes of Health public access policy and the need for medical librarians and educators to prepare health personnel for increasing public access to medical research. PMID:23930091

  5. Multi-institutional Study of Voice Disorders and Voice Therapy Referral: Report from the CHEER Network

    PubMed Central

    Misono, Stephanie; Marmor, Schelomo; Roy, Nelson; Mau, Ted; Cohen, Seth M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess perspectives of patients with voice problems and identify factors associated with the likelihood of referral to voice therapy via the CHEER (Creating Healthcare Excellence through Education and Research) practice-based research network infrastructure. Study Design Prospectively enrolled cross-sectional study of CHEER patients seen for a voice problem (dysphonia). Setting The CHEER network of community and academic sites. Methods Patient-reported demographic information, nature and severity of voice problems, clinical diagnoses, and proposed treatment plans were collected. The relationship between patient factors and voice therapy referral was investigated. Results Patients (N = 249) were identified over 12 months from 10 sites comprising 30 otolaryngology physicians. The majority were women (68%) and white (82%). Most patients reported a recurrent voice problem (72%) and symptom duration >4 weeks (89%). The most commonly reported voice-related diagnoses were vocal strain, reflux, and benign vocal fold lesions. Sixty-seven percent of enrolled patients reported receiving a recommendation for voice therapy. After adjusting for sociodemographic and other factors, diagnoses including vocal strain/excessive tension and vocal fold paralysis and academic practice type were associated with increased likelihood of reporting a referral for voice therapy. Conclusions The CHEER network successfully enrolled a representative sample of patients with dysphonia. Common diagnoses were vocal strain, reflux, and benign vocal fold lesions; commonly reported treatment recommendations included speech/voice therapy and antireflux medication. Recommendation for speech/voice therapy was associated with academic practice type. PMID:27371624

  6. Guide for Referral and Case Coordination for Young Children in Hospital Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Cordelia C.; And Others

    The Early Referral and Follow-up Project of the University of Nebraska Medical Center was designed to facilitate developmental assessment and intervention with long-term or repeatedly hospitalized children from birth to 3 years of age. Developmentally delayed children, handicapped children, and children at risk for delays were eligible for…

  7. 42 CFR 455.13 - Methods for identification, investigation, and referral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Methods for identification, investigation, and referral. 455.13 Section 455.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PROGRAM INTEGRITY: MEDICAID...

  8. 42 CFR 455.13 - Methods for identification, investigation, and referral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methods for identification, investigation, and referral. 455.13 Section 455.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PROGRAM INTEGRITY: MEDICAID...

  9. 42 CFR 422.105 - Special rules for self-referral and point of service option.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special rules for self-referral and point of service option. 422.105 Section 422.105 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Benefits...

  10. The relationship between participation in student-centered discussions and the academic achievement of fifth-grade science students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathues, Patricia Kelly

    Although the social constructivist theory proposed by Vygotsky states the value of discourse as a contribution to the ability of the learner to create meaning, student-led discussions have often been relegated to the language arts classroom. The standards created by the National Council of Teachers of English and the International Reading Association have long recognized that learners create meaning in a social context. The National Science Education Standards have also challenged science teachers to facilitate discourse. However, the science standards document provides no specific structure through which such discourse should be taught. This study investigated the effectiveness of a discussion strategy provided by Shoop and Wright for teaching and conducting student-centered discussions (SCD). Fifth graders in one school were randomly selected and randomly assigned to one of two science classes; 22 students in one class learned and applied the SCD strategies while a second class with 19 students learned the same science concepts from a teacher using traditional methods as described by Cazden. This study used a pretest-posttest design to test the hypothesis that participation in SCD's would effect a difference in fifth-graders' abilities to comprehend science concepts. Results of independent-samples t-tests showed that while there was no significant difference between the mean ability scores of the two groups of subjects as measured by a standardized mental abilities test, the mean pretest score of the traditional group was significantly higher than the SCD group's mean pretest score. ANCOVA procedures demonstrated that the SCD group's mean posttest score was significantly higher than the mean posttest score of the traditional group. Data analysis supported the rejection of the null hypothesis. The investigator concluded that the SCD methodology contributed to students' understanding of the science concepts. Results of this study challenge content area teachers to

  11. Improving Immunization Rates Using Lean Six Sigma Processes: Alliance of Independent Academic Medical Centers National Initiative III Project

    PubMed Central

    Hina-Syeda, Hussaini; Kimbrough, Christina; Murdoch, William; Markova, Tsveti

    2013-01-01

    Background Quality improvement education and work in interdisciplinary teams is a healthcare priority. Healthcare systems are trying to meet core measures and provide excellent patient care, thus improving their Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers & Systems scores. Crittenton Hospital Medical Center in Rochester Hills, MI, aligned educational and clinical objectives, focusing on improving immunization rates against pneumonia and influenza prior to the rates being implemented as core measures. Improving immunization rates prevents infections, minimizes hospitalizations, and results in overall improved patient care. Teaching hospitals offer an effective way to work on clinical projects by bringing together the skill sets of residents, faculty, and hospital staff to achieve superior results. Methods We designed and implemented a structured curriculum in which interdisciplinary teams acquired knowledge on quality improvement and teamwork, while focusing on a specific clinical project: improving global immunization rates. We used the Lean Six Sigma process tools to quantify the initial process capability to immunize against pneumococcus and influenza. Results The hospital's process to vaccinate against pneumonia overall was operating at a Z score of 3.13, and the influenza vaccination Z score was 2.53. However, the process to vaccinate high-risk patients against pneumonia operated at a Z score of 1.96. Improvement in immunization rates of high-risk patients became the focus of the project. After the implementation of solutions, the process to vaccinate high-risk patients against pneumonia operated at a Z score of 3.9 with a defects/million opportunities rate of 9,346 and a yield of 93.5%. Revisions to the adult assessment form fixed 80% of the problems identified. Conclusions This process improvement project was not only beneficial in terms of improved quality of patient care but was also a positive learning experience for the interdisciplinary team

  12. Reconceptualizing Academic Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vantine, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, more and more independent schools have established academic support programs and learning centers to address their students' individual learning needs. Perhaps not surprisingly, as the number of students being evaluated has increased, even more families have requested academic accommodations and services for their children.…

  13. Influence of Access, Anticoagulant, and Bleeding Definition on Outcomes of Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Early Experience of an US Academic Center.

    PubMed

    Bheemarasetti, M K; Shawar, S; Chithri, S; Khalife, W I; Rangasetty, U M; Fujise, K; Gilani, S A

    2015-03-01

    Background We aimed to carry out comparison of different bleeding avoidance strategies in doing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI) using either radial or femoral as access of choice and either bivalirudin or unfractionated heparin as anticoagulant of choice. In this analysis, we analyzed the influence of major bleeding definition on bleeding outcomes as well. Methods We did a retrospective analysis of 139 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) who had PPCI in our academic center from January 2010 till October 2013. The primary outcome at 30 days was a composite of death from any cause or stent thrombosis or non-coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) related major bleeding (CathPCI Registry definition) and secondary outcomes were individual components of primary outcome and the hospital length of stay. Results There was no significant difference among different access/anticoagulant combinations with regards to primary outcome (22% in radial/bivalirudin vs. 5% in radial/heparin vs. 17% in femoral/bivalirudin vs. 28% in femoral/heparin group; p = 0.2) as well as its individual components except the hospital length of stay (2.56 vs. 3 vs. 3.97 vs. 4.4 days each; p < 0.0001). The overall rate of major bleeding was 11.5%. When we use HORIZON-AMI bleeding definition, it went up to 25 % due to one particular component (p < 0.004). Conclusions This single center observational study doing PPCI did not show any superiority of one bleeding avoidance strategy over others with regard to primary outcome and its individual components except the hospital length of stay. It also shows the importance of bleeding definition on bleeding outcomes.

  14. Aligning the goals of community-engaged research: why and how academic health centers can successfully engage with communities to improve health.

    PubMed

    Michener, Lloyd; Cook, Jennifer; Ahmed, Syed M; Yonas, Michael A; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2012-03-01

    Community engagement (CE) and community-engaged research (CEnR) are increasingly viewed as the keystone to translational medicine and improving the health of the nation. In this article, the authors seek to assist academic health centers (AHCs) in learning how to better engage with their communities and build a CEnR agenda by suggesting five steps: defining community and identifying partners, learning the etiquette of CE, building a sustainable network of CEnR researchers, recognizing that CEnR will require the development of new methodologies, and improving translation and dissemination plans. Health disparities that lead to uneven access to and quality of care as well as high costs will persist without a CEnR agenda that finds answers to both medical and public health questions. One of the biggest barriers toward a national CEnR agenda, however, are the historical structures and processes of an AHC-including the complexities of how institutional review boards operate, accounting practices and indirect funding policies, and tenure and promotion paths. Changing institutional culture starts with the leadership and commitment of top decision makers in an institution. By aligning the motivations and goals of their researchers, clinicians, and community members into a vision of a healthier population, AHC leadership will not just improve their own institutions but also improve the health of the nation-starting with improving the health of their local communities, one community at a time.

  15. Using an evidence-based approach for system selection at a large academic medical center: lessons learned in selecting an ambulatory EMR at Mount Sinai Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kannry, Joseph; Mukani, Sonia; Myers, Kristin

    2006-01-01

    The experience of Mount Sinai Hospital is representative of the challenges and problems facing large academic medical centers in selecting an ambulatory EMR. The facility successfully revived a stalled process in a challenging financial climate, using a framework of science and rigorous investigation. The process incorporated several innovations: 1) There was a thorough review of medical informatics literature to develop a mission statement, determine practical objectives and guide the demonstration process; 2) The process involved rigorous investigation of vendor statements, industry statements and other institution's views of vendors; 3) The initiative focused on user-centric selection, and the survey instrument was scientifically and specifically designed to assess user feedback; 4) There was scientific analysis of validated findings and survey results at all steering meetings; 5) The process included an assessment of vendors' ability to support research by identifying funded and published research; 6) Selection involved meticulous total cost of ownership analysis to assess and compare real costs of implementing a vendor solution; and finally, 7) There were iterative meetings with stakeholders, executives and users to understand needs, address concerns and communicate the vision.

  16. Prospective Evaluation of Infection Episodes in Cancer Patients in a Tertiary Care Academic Center: Microbiological Features and Risk Factors for Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Çalık Başaran, Nursel; Karaağaoğlu, Ergun; Hasçelik, Gülşen; Durusu Tanrıöver, Mine; Akova, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to determine the frequency, type, and etiology of infections and the risk factors for infections and mortality in hospitalized cancer patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively enrolled adult cancer patients hospitalized in the internal medicine wards of a tertiary care academic center between January and August 2004. Patients were followed during their hospitalization periods for neutropenia, infections, culture results, and mortality. Results: We followed 473 cancer patients with 818 hospitalization episodes and 384 infection episodes in total. Seventy-nine percent of the infections were nosocomial, and febrile neutropenia (FN) was observed in 196 (51%) of the infection episodes. Bacteremia was found in 29% of FN episodes and in 8% of nonneutropenic patients. Gram-positive bacteria were the leading cause of bacteremia in both neutropenic and nonneutropenic cases (70% and 58%, respectively). Presence of an indwelling central catheter increased bacteremia risk by 3-fold. The overall mortality rate was 17%, whereas 34% of the patients with bloodstream infections died. Presence of bacteremia and advanced disease stage increased overall mortality by 6.1-fold and 3.7-fold, respectively. Conclusion: Nearly half of the cancer patients developed an infection during their hospital stays, with gram-positive bacteria being the predominant etiologic microorganisms. This demonstrates the changing trends in infections considering that, until 2004, gram-negative bacteria were the most predominant microorganisms among cancer patients in our institute. PMID:27095391

  17. Hearing complaints and the audiological profile of the users of an academic health center in the western region of São Paulo

    PubMed Central

    Samelli, Alessandra Giannella; de Andrade, Camila Quintiliano; Pereira, Marília Barbieri; Matas, Carla Gentile

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Few population-based studies have quantified hearing levels in Brazil; additional studies on this subject are needed. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to characterize hearing complaints and the audiological profile of the population served by the Clinical Audiology Service of an Academic Health Center in the western region of São Paulo, Brazil, between 2003 and 2008. An additional aim was to check whether there is a positive association between the signs/symptoms and type of hearing loss. Methods: This was a retrospective study of the records of 2,145 patients. The health history, tonal and vocal audiometry, and imitanciometry findings were analyzed. Results: The mean age of the patients was 20.6 years. The majority of the subjects had normal hearing thresholds, and the prevalence of hearing loss was approximately 35%. As the patient's age increased, the frequency of conductive hearing loss decreased and that of sensorineural hearing loss increased. There was a tendency toward hearing loss worsening with age. Conclusion: Hearing complaints can predict the type of hearing loss; therefore, they should always be valued because they can be used as a form of screening and thus help to determine the diagnostic hypothesis. This could help to reduce the gap between the patient's perception of the complaints and the audiological assessment and thus improve the prognosis. PMID:25992004

  18. New challenges facing interinstitutional social science and educational program evaluation research at academic health centers: a case study from the ELAM program.

    PubMed

    Morahan, Page S; Yamagata, Hisashi; McDade, Sharon A; Richman, Rosalyn; Francis, Ray; Odhner, Victoria C

    2006-06-01

    Since the mid-1990s, the protection of human subjects through institutional review boards (IRBs) has progressively broadened in scope. In this case study, the authors describe their challenges in effectively handling IRB processes to conduct educational and social sciences research within academic health centers, particularly (1) complications in conducting longitudinal interinstitutional research that involves multiple IRBs, each with different procedures that changed over ten years; and (2) factors affecting consent form and survey response rates when applying the biomedical IRB process to obtain the consent of human subjects for participation in social and educational research. The authors had a unique opportunity to follow the effect of changes in consent forms (from no form to a one-page form to a three-page form requiring signature of a witness), ways of administration (in person or by mail), and time of administration (at the time of the program or years later) on consent form and survey response rates among medical and dental school faculty members. The authors explore the extended timelines required for data collection and increased costs in dealing with these issues, as well as the effects on response rates of consent form language and administration procedures. The authors recommend strategies to lessen adverse effects of dealing with multiple IRBs at different institutions for social science and educational research, and discuss policy implications for funders, institutions and investigators.

  19. Referral Finder: Saving Time and Improving The Quality of In-hospital Referrals.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Jennifer; Cowan, Neil; Tully, Vicki

    2016-01-01

    Making referrals to other hospital specialties is one of the key duties of the foundation doctor, which can be difficult and time consuming. In Ninewells hospital, Scotland, in our experience the effectiveness of referrals is limited by contact details not being readily accessible and foundation doctors not knowing what information is relevant to each specialty. We surveyed foundation doctors on their experience of the existing referral process to identify where we needed to focus to improve the process. The doctors reported significant delays in obtaining contact details from the operator, and found they did not know the specific information needed in each referral. To increase the information available to foundation doctors, we set up a page on the staff intranet called 'Referral Finder'. This page includes contact details, guidelines for referral, and links to relevant protocols for each specialty. By making this information readily accessible our objective was to increase the speed and quality of referrals. When surveyed two months after the web page was established, foundation doctors reported a reduction in calls to operator from baseline and reported achieving more effective referrals. When asked to comment, many doctors asked if the page could include details for other hospitals in our health board and provide more specialty specific information. This feedback prompted us to extend the scope of the page to include the district general hospital in our region, and update many of the existing details. Doctors were then surveyed after the updates, 100% agreed that the website saved time and there was a 49.3% reduction in doctors who reported not knowing the specific information needed for a referral. Having adequate information improved referrals and resulted in time saved. This would allow more time for patient care. The quality improvement project was praised among doctors as a useful, innovative and replicable project.

  20. Promoting a smokers' quitline in Ontario, Canada: an evaluation of an academic detailing approach.

    PubMed

    Kirst, Maritt; Schwartz, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This study assesses the impact of an academic detailing quitline promotional outreach program on integration of patient referrals to the quitline by fax in healthcare settings and quitline utilization in Ontario, Canada. The study employed a mixed methods approach for evaluation, with trend analysis of quitline administrative data from the year before program inception (2005) to 2011 and qualitative interviews with quitline stakeholders. Participants in the qualitative interviews included academic detailing program staff, regional tobacco control stakeholders and quitline promotion experts. Quantitative outcomes included the number of fax referral partners and fax referrals received, and quitline reach. Trends in proximal and distal outreach program outcomes were assessed. The qualitative data were analysed through a process of data coding involving the constant comparative technique derived from grounded theory methods. The study identified that the outreach program has had some success in integrating the fax referral program in healthcare settings through evidence of increased fax referrals since program inception. However, organizational barriers to program partner engagement have been encountered. While referral from health professionals through the fax referral programs has increased since the inception of the outreach program, the overall reach of the quitline has not increased. The study findings highlight that an academic detailing approach to quitline promotion can have some success in achieving increased fax referral program integration in healthcare settings. However, findings suggest that investment in a comprehensive promotional strategy, incorporating academic detailing, media and the provision of free cessation medications may be a more effective approach to quitline promotion.

  1. An academic hospitalist model to improve healthcare worker communication and learner education: Results from a quasi-experimental study at a veterans affairs medical center

    PubMed Central

    Saint, Sanjay; Fowler, Karen E; Krein, Sarah L; Flanders, Scott A; Bodnar, Timothy W; Young, Eric; Moseley, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although hospitalists may improve efficiency and quality of inpatient care, their effect on healthcare-worker communication and education has been less well-studied. OBJECTIVE To test various approaches to improving healthcare-worker communication and learner education within the context of a newly designed academic hospital medicine program. DESIGN Before-and-after design with concurrent control group. SETTING A Midwestern Veterans Affairs medical center. INTERVENTION Multimodal systems redesign of 1 of 4 medical teams (Gold team) that included clinical modifications (change in rounding structure, with inclusion of nurses, a Clinical Care Coordinator, and a pharmacist) and educational interventions (providing explicit expectations of learners and providing a reading list for both learners and attending physicians). MEASUREMENTS Number of admissions, length of stay, readmissions, house officer and medical student ratings of attendings' teaching, medical student internal medicine National Board of Medical Examiners Subject Examination (“shelf” exam) scores, and clinical staff surveys. RESULTS Length of stay was reduced by about 0.3 days on all teams after the initiative began (P = 0.004), with no significant differences between Gold and non-Gold teams. The majority of physicians (83%) and nurses (68%) felt that including nurses during rounds improved healthcare-worker communication; significantly more nurses were satisfied with communication with the Gold team than with the other teams (71% vs 53%; P = 0.02). Gold attendings generally received higher teaching scores compared with non-Gold attendings, and third-year medical students on the Gold team scored significantly higher on the shelf exam compared with non–Gold team students (84 vs 82; P = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS Academic hospitalists working within a systems redesign intervention were able to improve healthcare-worker communication and enhance learner education without increasing

  2. 42 CFR 412.96 - Special treatment: Referral centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... meets the applicable criteria of paragraph (b) or (c) of this section. (b) Criteria for cost reporting... previously closed for renovation. (C) Transfer to the prospective payment system of acute care beds... 25 miles from the hospital. (c) Alternative criteria. For cost reporting periods beginning on...

  3. 42 CFR 412.96 - Special treatment: Referral centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... from the prospective payment system under subpart B of this part) during the most recent Federal fiscal... Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education or the American Osteopathic Association. (4) Source of... section, CMS uses the most recent hospital admissions or discharge data available. (3) Annual notice....

  4. 42 CFR 412.96 - Special treatment: Referral centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... from the prospective payment system under subpart B of this part) during the most recent Federal fiscal... Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education or the American Osteopathic Association. (4) Source of... section, CMS uses the most recent hospital admissions or discharge data available. (3) Annual notice....

  5. 42 CFR 412.96 - Special treatment: Referral centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... from the prospective payment system under subpart B of this part) during the most recent Federal fiscal... Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education or the American Osteopathic Association. (4) Source of... section, CMS uses the most recent hospital admissions or discharge data available. (3) Annual notice....

  6. Differences in Physician Referral Drive Disparities in Surgical Intervention for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chidi, Alexis P.; Bryce, Cindy L.; Myaskovsky, Larissa; Fine, Michael J.; Geller, David A.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Tsung, Allan

    2014-01-01

    STRUCTURED ABSTRACT Objective To determine whether sociodemographic and geographic factors are associated with referral for surgery and receipt of a recommended surgical intervention. Summary Surgical interventions confer significant survival advantages compared to palliative therapies for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but there are disparities exist in use of surgical intervention. Few have investigated referral for surgery as a potential barrier to surgical intervention and little is known about the effects of patient geographic factors, including proximity to a surgical centers. Methods Data were abstracted from the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry for all patients diagnosed with HCC from 2006–2011. Using hospital procedure volume data from the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council, we calculated proximity to a surgical center. We performed used multivariable logistic regression analyses to determine whether geographic, racial, socioeconomic, and clinical factors were associated with referral for surgery and receipt of a recommended surgical intervention. Results Of 3,576 patients with HCC, Approximately 41.0% of the 3,576 patients with HCC were referred for surgery. Patients who lived closer to a surgical center were less likely to be referred for surgery (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR]: 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.68–0.92). Surgical referral was less likely among older, male patients with Medicaid insurance and advanced tumor stage at diagnosis. Of those referred, 1,276 (87.0%) underwent a surgical intervention. Proximity to a surgical center was not associated with receipt of surgical intervention (p=0.27). Patients with distant tumor stage at diagnosis were less likely to receive recommended surgical intervention (AOR: 0.27, CI: 0.15–0.50). Conclusions Geographic and socioeconomic disparities in referral for surgery may be major barriers to surgical intervention for patients with HCC. PMID:25563883

  7. Discoid Lupus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Retrospective Chart Review to Determine the Prevalence and Progression of Co-occurrence of these Conditions at a Single Academic Center

    PubMed Central

    Two, Aimee; So, Jessica Kim; Paravar, Taraneh

    2017-01-01

    Context: Discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are both disorders of the immune system. The pathophysiology of these diseases varies greatly as DLE is characterized by an overactive immune system that attacks normal host cells, whereas HIV is characterized by an exogenous attack on the immune system that depletes it of key cell types. Although the reason is unknown, co-occurrence of DLE and HIV is rare. Aims: The goal of this study is to determine the prevalence of co-occurrence of DLE and HIV and to determine whether patients with both DLE and HIV share any clinical feature. Subjects and Methods: The medical records of all patients seen within a single academic health center over a 20-year period were reviewed to determine the prevalence of cutaneous lupus, HIV, and co-occurrence of these conditions. The charts of patients diagnosed with both conditions were further reviewed to determine similarities between them. Results: Of the 10,719 patients diagnosed with HIV and 182 patients diagnosed with cutaneous lupus, only 2 patients were diagnosed with both conditions. Both of these patients were diagnosed with DLE several years after being diagnosed with HIV. They had an undetectable HIV viral load, normal CD4 T-cell counts, and were on antiretroviral therapy when diagnosed with DLE. Conclusion: These results confirm that co-occurrence of DLE and HIV is rare. Although our study population was small, findings from these patients suggest that in HIV-positive patients, DLE manifestations occur when their HIV disease activity is minimal.

  8. Total parathyroidectomy in a large cohort of cases with hyperparathyroidism associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: experience from a single academic center

    PubMed Central

    de Menezes Montenegro, Fabio Luiz; Lourenço, Delmar Muniz; Tavares, Marcos Roberto; Arap, Sergio Samir; Nascimento, Climerio Pereira; Neto, Ledo Mazzei Massoni; D'Alessandro, André; Toledo, Rodrigo Almeida; Coutinho, Flávia Lima; Brandão, Lenine Garcia; de Britto e Silva Filho, Gilberto; Cordeiro, Anói Castro; Toledo, Sergio Pereira Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Most cases of sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism present disturbances in a single parathyroid gland and the surgery of choice is adenomectomy. Conversely, hyperparathyroidism associated with multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (hyperparathyroidism/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1) is an asynchronic, asymmetrical multiglandular disease and it is surgically approached by either subtotal parathyroidectomy or total parathyroidectomy followed by parathyroid auto-implant to the forearm. In skilful hands, the efficacy of both approaches is similar and both should be complemented by prophylactic thymectomy. In a single academic center, 83 cases of hyperparathyroidism/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 were operated on from 1987 to 2010 and our first surgical choice was total parathyroidectomy followed by parathyroid auto-implant to the non-dominant forearm and, since 1997, associated transcervical thymectomy to prevent thymic carcinoid. Overall, 40% of patients were given calcium replacement (mean intake 1.6 g/day) during the first months after surgery, and this fell to 28% in patients with longer follow-up. These findings indicate that several months may be needed in order to achieve a proper secretion by the parathyroid auto-implant. Hyperparathyroidism recurrence was observed in up to 15% of cases several years after the initial surgery. Thus, long-term follow-up is recommended for such cases. We conclude that, despite a tendency to subtotal parathyroidectomy worldwide, total parathyroidectomy followed by parathyroid auto-implant is a valid surgical option to treat hyperparathyroidism/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. Larger comparative systematic studies are needed to define the best surgical approach to hyperparathyroidism/multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1. PMID:22584718

  9. The role of academic health centers and their partners in reconfiguring and retooling the existing workforce to practice in a transformed health system.

    PubMed

    Fraher, Erin P; Ricketts, Thomas C; Lefebvre, Ann; Newton, Warren P

    2013-12-01

    Inspired by the Affordable Care Act and health care payment models that reward value over volume, health care delivery systems are redefining the work of the health professionals they employ. Existing workers are taking on new roles, new types of health professionals are emerging, and the health workforce is shifting from practicing in higher-cost acute settings to lower-cost community settings, including patients' homes. The authors believe that although the pace of health system transformation has accelerated, a shortage of workers trained to function in the new models of care is hampering progress. In this Perspective, they argue that urgent attention must be paid to retraining the 18 million workers already employed in the system who will actually implement system change.Their view is shaped by work they have conducted in helping practices transform care, by extensive consultations with stakeholders attempting to understand the workforce implications of health system redesign, and by a thorough review of the peer-reviewed and gray literature. Through this work, the authors have become increasingly convinced that academic health centers (AHCs)-organizations at the forefront of innovations in health care delivery and health workforce training-are uniquely situated to proactively lead efforts to retrain the existing workforce. They recommend a set of specific actions (i.e., discovering and disseminating best practices; developing new partnerships; focusing on systems engineering approaches; planning for sustainability; and revising credentialing, accreditation, and continuing education) that AHC leaders can undertake to develop a more coherent workforce development strategy that supports practice transformation.

  10. Feasibility of Using the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System in Academic Health Centers: Case Series Design on Pain Reduction After Chiropractic Care

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jeanmarie R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to test the utility of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) as a resource for collecting data on patient-reported outcomes (PRO) within academic health centers at a chiropractic college; and, to describe changes in PRO following pragmatic chiropractic care incorporating instrument-assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) on pain symptoms. Methods This was a pre-post intervention design without a control group (case series) involving 25 patients (14 females and 11 males; 40.5 ± 16.39 years, range 20-70 years) who completed their chiropractic care and their baseline and post-treatment pain assessments. The pragmatic chiropractic care intervention included both spinal manipulation and IASTM to treat pain symptoms. PRO’s were collected using PROMIS to measure pain behavior, pain interference and pain intensity. Results The average pre-post assessment interval was 33 ± 22.5 days (95% CI, 23-42 days). The durations of treatments ranged from one week to 10 weeks. The median number of IASTM treatments was six. Pre-post decreases in T-scores for pain behavior and pain interference were 55.5 to 48.4 and 57.7 to 48.4, respectively (P < .05). Only 12 patients had a baseline T-score for pain intensity greater than 50. The pre-post decrease in pain intensity T-scores for these 12 patients was from 53.4 to 40.9. Conclusion Within the limitations of a case series design, these data provide initial evidence on the utility of PROMIS instruments for clinical and research outcomes in chiropractic patients. PMID:25225465

  11. 49 CFR 655.62 - Referral, evaluation, and treatment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Referral, evaluation, and treatment. 655.62... OPERATIONS Consequences § 655.62 Referral, evaluation, and treatment. If a covered employee has a verified... and treatment programs....

  12. 2 CFR 175.20 - Referral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Referral. 175.20 Section 175.20 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS Reserved AWARD TERM FOR TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS §...

  13. 2 CFR 175.20 - Referral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Referral. 175.20 Section 175.20 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS NATIONAL POLICY REQUIREMENTS AWARD TERM FOR TRAFFICKING...

  14. 2 CFR 175.20 - Referral.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Referral. 175.20 Section 175.20 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET GOVERNMENTWIDE GUIDANCE FOR GRANTS AND AGREEMENTS NATIONAL POLICY REQUIREMENTS AWARD TERM FOR TRAFFICKING...

  15. Understanding the Process of Medical Referral

    PubMed Central

    Muzzin, Linda

    1991-01-01

    Fifty referrals from family physicians in Ontario were examined by interviewing the patients, referring physicians, consultants, and others involved at various points in the process. This, the second in a series of six articles, introduces the participants and describes how grounded theory methodology was used to analyze the approximately 3000 pages of field notes. PMID:21229052

  16. 32 CFR 2001.34 - Referrals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... an NDC database system. (3) Notification of referral of records accessioned into NARA or in the... unmarked Restricted Data or Formerly Restricted Data shall be referred to the Department of Energy through the NDC. If the Department of Energy confirms that the document contains Restricted Data or...

  17. Information and Referral Service, District Office Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health and Welfare Council of Central Maryland, Inc., Baltimore.

    Within a standard format the details of instruction and training in various areas (units) of information and referral (I and R) services are given for Social Security Administration workers. Each unit is specified by the following categories: objective, special consideration, background, presentation, participation, review, and examples. There are…

  18. 34 CFR 303.303 - Referral procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Child Find, Evaluations and Assessments, and Individualized Family Service Plans Referral... the subject of a substantiated case of child abuse or neglect; or (2) Is identified as directly affected by illegal substance abuse or withdrawal symptoms resulting from prenatal drug exposure....

  19. 34 CFR 303.303 - Referral procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Child Find, Evaluations and Assessments, and Individualized Family Service Plans Referral... the subject of a substantiated case of child abuse or neglect; or (2) Is identified as directly affected by illegal substance abuse or withdrawal symptoms resulting from prenatal drug exposure....

  20. 34 CFR 303.303 - Referral procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... DISABILITIES Child Find, Evaluations and Assessments, and Individualized Family Service Plans Referral... the subject of a substantiated case of child abuse or neglect; or (2) Is identified as directly affected by illegal substance abuse or withdrawal symptoms resulting from prenatal drug exposure....

  1. Alternative Education's Impact on Office Disciplinary Referrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gut, Eva; McLaughlin, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Disruptive behaviors negatively impact learning by taking time away from classroom instruction (Gottlieb and Polirstok 2005) and may also produce unsafe school environments. This study examined changes in the number of office disciplinary referrals (ODRs) received in public schools prior to and following the schools partnering with one particular…

  2. Sources of referral information: a marketing analysis of physician behavior.

    PubMed

    Powers, T L; Swan, J E; Taylor, J A; Bendall, D

    1998-01-01

    The referral process is an important means of obtaining patients and it is necessary to determine ways of influencing the referral process to increase the patient base. This article reports research based on a survey of the referral habits of 806 primary care physicians. The results are examined in the context of physician receptivity to marketer-controlled versus health services sources of referral information.

  3. 10 CFR 1014.7 - Referral to Department of Justice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Referral to Department of Justice. 1014.7 Section 1014.7... § 1014.7 Referral to Department of Justice. (a) When Department of Justice approval or consultation is required under § 1014.6, the referral or request shall be transmitted to the Department of Justice by...

  4. 24 CFR 17.9 - Referral to Department of Justice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Referral to Department of Justice... Procedures § 17.9 Referral to Department of Justice. When Department of Justice approval or consultation is required under § 17.8, the referral or request shall be transmitted to the Department of Justice by...

  5. 34 CFR 303.206 - Referral policies for specific children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Referral policies for specific children. 303.206... Referral policies for specific children. Each application must include the State's policies and procedures that require the referral for early intervention services under this part of specific children...

  6. Utility of an Abbreviated Dizziness Questionnaire to Differentiate between Causes of Vertigo and Guide Appropriate Referral: A Multicenter Prospective Blinded Study

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Lauren T.; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Sinks, Belinda C.; Rauch, Steven D.; Shepard, Neil T.; White, Judith A.; Goebel, Joel A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Test performance of a focused dizziness questionnaire’s ability to discriminate between peripheral and non-peripheral causes of vertigo. Study Design Prospective multi-center Setting Four academic centers with experienced balance specialists Patients New dizzy patients Interventions A 32-question survey was given to participants. Balance specialists were blinded and a diagnosis was established for all participating patients within 6 months. Main outcomes Multinomial logistic regression was used to evaluate questionnaire performance in predicting final diagnosis and differentiating between peripheral and non-peripheral vertigo. Univariate and multivariable stepwise logistic regression were used to identify questions as significant predictors of the ultimate diagnosis. C-index was used to evaluate performance and discriminative power of the multivariable models. Results 437 patients participated in the study. Eight participants without confirmed diagnoses were excluded and 429 were included in the analysis. Multinomial regression revealed that the model had good overall predictive accuracy of 78.5% for the final diagnosis and 75.5% for differentiating between peripheral and non-peripheral vertigo. Univariate logistic regression identified significant predictors of three main categories of vertigo: peripheral, central and other. Predictors were entered into forward stepwise multivariable logistic regression. The discriminative power of the final models for peripheral, central and other causes were considered good as measured by c-indices of 0.75, 0.7 and 0.78, respectively. Conclusions This multicenter study demonstrates a focused dizziness questionnaire can accurately predict diagnosis for patients with chronic/relapsing dizziness referred to outpatient clinics. Additionally, this survey has significant capability to differentiate peripheral from non-peripheral causes of vertigo and may, in the future, serve as a screening tool for specialty referral

  7. [Current situation and countermeasures of two-way referral between wound healing department and community health system].

    PubMed

    Mao, Yi-hao; Luo, Xuan; Chen, Xi-lu; Xie, Ting; Zhang, Zhi-ruo

    2012-12-01

    This study analyzed the current situation and problems of two-way referral between wound healing department of general hospitals and community health service centers through stipulated interview with physicians in general hospitals and community health service centers, and patients visiting these organizations from March 2011 to April. It was found that the current two-way referral process for wound repair were facing a series of problems, including hospitals-transfer difficulty, incomplete two-way referral policy and undefined practice protocol, information-sharing obstacle between general hospitals and community health service centers. The critical countermeasures for overcoming these obstacles in two-way referral of wound ailments shall include construction of further linkage mechanism among all levels of hospitals, establishment of the drug-obtaining mechanism, establishment of an explicit two-way referral process of wound repair, and establishment of a database of diagnosis and treatment information of patients that can be accessed by doctors of different levels of hospitals, etc.

  8. Characteristics of Successful and Unsuccessful Mental Health Referrals of Refugees.

    PubMed

    Shannon, Patricia J; Vinson, Gregory A; Cook, Tonya L; Lennon, Evelyn

    2016-07-01

    In this community based participatory research study, we explored key characteristics of mental health referrals of refugees using stories of providers collected through an on-line survey. Ten coders sorted 60 stories of successful referrals and 34 stories of unsuccessful referrals into domains using the critical incident technique. Principal components analysis yielded categories of successful referrals that included: active care coordination, establishing trust, proactive resolution of barriers, and culturally responsive care. Unsuccessful referrals were characterized by cultural barriers, lack of care coordination, refusal to see refugees, and system and language barriers. Recommendations for training and policy are discussed.

  9. [Appropriateness of referrals for magnetic resonance imaging in Latium, Italy].

    PubMed

    Prota, Federica; Rosano, Aldo; San Martini, Elena; Cau, Norberto; Guasticchi, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    Long wait times for access to Nuclear Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations are a concern and for this reason the project "Appropriateness of referrals for MRI examinations" has been launched in Latium (Italy). The aim of this preliminary study was to describe the main characteristics of MRI referrals in the region. Findings highlight a large variation in referral rates across the region, with 80% of MRI referrals being ordered by general practitioners and family pediatricians. The latter points to the possibility of inappropriate referrals for MRI imaging in Latium.

  10. Safe medication management and use of narcotics in a Joint Commission International-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xu; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Xia, Ping; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Safe medication management and use of high-alert narcotics should arouse concern. Risk management experiences in this respect in a large-scale Joint Commission International (JCI)-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People's Republic of China during 2011-2015, focusing on organizational, educational, motivational, and information technological measures in storage, prescribing, preparing, dispensing, administration, and monitoring of medication are summarized. The intensity of use of meperidine in hospitalized patients in 2015 was one-fourth that in 2011. A 100% implementation rate of standard storage of narcotics has been achieved in the hospital since December 2012. A "Plan, Do, Check, Act" cycle was efficient because the ratio of number of inappropriate narcotics prescriptions to total number of narcotics prescriptions for inpatients decreased from August 2014 to December 2014 (28.22% versus 2.96%, P=0.0000), and it was controlled below 6% from then on. During the journey to good pain management ward accreditation by the Ministry of Health, People's Republic of China, (April 2012-October 2012), the medical oncology ward successfully demonstrated an increase in the pain screening rate at admission from 43.5% to 100%, cancer pain control rate from 85% to 96%, and degree of satisfaction toward pain nursing from 95.4% to 100% (all P-values <0.05). Oral morphine equivalent dosage in the good pain management ward increased from 2.3 mg/patient before June 2012 to 54.74 mg/patient in 2014. From 2011 to 2015, the oral morphine equivalent dose per discharged patient increased from 8.52 mg/person to 20.36 mg/person. A 100% implementation rate of independent double-check prior to narcotics dosing has been achieved since January 2013. From 2014 to 2015, the ratio of number of narcotics-related medication errors to number of discharged patients significantly decreased (6.95% versus 0.99%, P=0.0000). Taken together, continuous quality improvements have been

  11. Safe medication management and use of narcotics in a Joint Commission International-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xu; Zhu, Ling-ling; Pan, Sheng-dong; Xia, Ping; Chen, Meng; Zhou, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Safe medication management and use of high-alert narcotics should arouse concern. Risk management experiences in this respect in a large-scale Joint Commission International (JCI)-accredited academic medical center hospital in the People’s Republic of China during 2011–2015, focusing on organizational, educational, motivational, and information technological measures in storage, prescribing, preparing, dispensing, administration, and monitoring of medication are summarized. The intensity of use of meperidine in hospitalized patients in 2015 was one-fourth that in 2011. A 100% implementation rate of standard storage of narcotics has been achieved in the hospital since December 2012. A “Plan, Do, Check, Act” cycle was efficient because the ratio of number of inappropriate narcotics prescriptions to total number of narcotics prescriptions for inpatients decreased from August 2014 to December 2014 (28.22% versus 2.96%, P=0.0000), and it was controlled below 6% from then on. During the journey to good pain management ward accreditation by the Ministry of Health, People’s Republic of China, (April 2012–October 2012), the medical oncology ward successfully demonstrated an increase in the pain screening rate at admission from 43.5% to 100%, cancer pain control rate from 85% to 96%, and degree of satisfaction toward pain nursing from 95.4% to 100% (all P-values <0.05). Oral morphine equivalent dosage in the good pain management ward increased from 2.3 mg/patient before June 2012 to 54.74 mg/patient in 2014. From 2011 to 2015, the oral morphine equivalent dose per discharged patient increased from 8.52 mg/person to 20.36 mg/person. A 100% implementation rate of independent double-check prior to narcotics dosing has been achieved since January 2013. From 2014 to 2015, the ratio of number of narcotics-related medication errors to number of discharged patients significantly decreased (6.95% versus 0.99%, P=0.0000). Taken together, continuous quality improvements

  12. Analysis of vitamin D status at two academic medical centers and a national reference laboratory: result patterns vary by age, gender, season, and patient location

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Testing for 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] has increased dramatically in recent years. The present report compares overall utilization and results for 25(OH)D orders at two academic medical centers - one in New York and one in Iowa – in order to characterize the vitamin D status of our inpatient and outpatient populations. Results are also compared to those from a national reference laboratory to determine whether patterns at these two institutions reflect those observed nationally. Methods Retrospective data queries of 25(OH)D orders and results were conducted using the laboratory information systems at Weill Cornell Medical College / New York Presbyterian Hospital (WCMC), University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC), and ARUP Laboratories (ARUP). Chart review was conducted for cases with very high or low serum 25(OH)D levels in the WCMC and UIHC datasets. Results The majority of tests were ordered on females and outpatients. Average serum 25(OH)D levels were higher in female versus male patients across most ages in the WCMC, UIHC, and ARUP datasets. As expected, average serum 25(OH)D levels were higher in outpatients than inpatients. Serum 25(OH)D levels showed seasonal periodicity, with average levels higher in summer than winter and correlating to regional UV index. Area plots demonstrated a peak of increased 25(OH)D insufficiency / deficiency in adolescent females, although overall worse 25(OH)D status was found in male versus female patients in the WCMC, UIHC, and ARUP datasets. Surprisingly, improved 25(OH)D status was observed in patients starting near age 50. Finally, chart review of WCMC and UIHC datasets revealed over-supplementation (especially of ≥ 50,000 IU weekly doses) in the rare cases of very high 25(OH)D levels. General nutritional deficiency and/or severe illness was found in most cases of severe 25(OH)D deficiency. Conclusions 25(OH)D status of patients seen by healthcare providers varies according to age, gender, season

  13. Depression in older adults: screening and referral.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Brown, Ellen; Raue, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Depression is related to disability and affects rehabilitation participation, outcomes, and compliance with treatment. Improving older adult depression detection and referral requires knowledge, skills, supportive organizational policies, and access to mental health experts. This review provides a selected overview of evidence-based approaches for screening of suspected cases of depression in older adults by physical therapists and other non-mental health professionals and discusses procedures to refer suspected cases to primary care providers and/or mental health specialists for evaluation, including resources and a tool to assist in communicating depression-related information to the primary care provider or mental health specialist. We hope that this review will promote the incorporation of evidence-based screening and referral of suspected cases of depression in older adults into routine practice.

  14. How Evident Are Student Efficacy Measures across Academic Tracks? A Student-Centered Analysis of Academic Tracking and Labeling as They Relate to Literacy Instruction, Conduct Development, and Mentorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Pandwe Aletha

    2010-01-01

    This empirical study quantified the effects of academic tracking and labeling on student efficacy in the three extended learning time (ELT) schools in Boston, Massachusetts. Prominent research on student efficacy implicates literacy instruction, conduct development, and student mentorship as key factors driving student achievement. These three…

  15. Academic Blogging: Academic Practice and Academic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkup, Gill

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale study which investigates the role of blogging in professional academic practice in higher education. It draws on interviews with a sample of academics (scholars, researchers and teachers) who have blogs and on the author's own reflections on blogging to investigate the function of blogging in academic practice…

  16. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  17. The Impact of Multiple Intelligence Theory on Teacher Perception of Giftedness and the Referral of African American Students to Gifted and Talented Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Tanya A.

    2013-01-01

    Programs for gifted students have been criticized for narrowly defining giftedness as merely cognitive or academic performance. Teacher referrals are usually an important component of identifying gifted students. Teacher perceptions, low expectations, and lack of cultural competence are perceived as barriers to the access of Gifted and Talented…

  18. A Study to Determine a Methodology for Establishing a Center of Excellence Program at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-10

    cardiovascular disease is one method that Fitzsimons Army Medical Center can pursue...center of excellence program in cardiovascular disease . The development of specific criteria required for implementation of a cardiovascular center of...treatment capabilities at the Army medical centers.... Center of excellence, Specialized treatment facilities, Cardiovascular disease program criteria, Patient referral process, Aeromedical evacuation system, Graduate medical

  19. Psychotic symptoms in young people warrant urgent referral.

    PubMed

    Deakin, Julia; Lennox, Belinda

    2013-03-01

    There is a worse prognosis for psychosis and schizophrenia when onset is in childhood or adolescence. However, outcomes are improved with early detection and treatment. Psychotic symptoms can be associated with a variety of disorders including schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, drug-induced psychosis, personality disorder, epilepsy and autistic spectrum disorder. Positive symptoms include hallucinations and delusions. Negative symptoms include apathy, lack of drive, poverty of speech, social withdrawal and self-neglect. The DSM IV criteria for schizophrenia include two or more of the following: hallucinations, delusions, disorganised speech, grossly disorganised or catatonic behaviour and negative symptoms. Adults may raise concerns about social withdrawal, bizarre ideas, a change in behaviour or a decline in achievement. Most children and young people with psychotic symptoms will not go on to develop psychosis or schizophrenia. Direct enquiry may be needed to elicit suspected unusual beliefs or hallucinations. To distinguish unusual ideas from delusions the ideas should be tested for fixity. For example by asking: 'Are you sure? Could there be another explanation?' Mood and anxiety symptoms should be explored. The assessment should include a developmental history with particular attention to premorbid functioning. Failure to make expected progress whether personal, social or academic is significant. Better outcomes in terms of symptoms and social function are associated with a shorter duration of untreated psychosis. The detection of psychotic symptoms in primary care therefore warrants an urgent referral to secondary care mental health services for assessment and treatment.

  20. So You Think You've Got Troubles? College Students' Referrals for Friends with Various Personal Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Bryna A.; Ault, Ruth L.

    Students with personal-social problems report seeking help from friends and relatives first, as compared to faculty, clergy, and counseling centers. To investigate the subsequent referrals friends might provide, 28 college freshmen, 14 male and 14 female, rated 16 problem descriptions on a 0-9 point scale according to the likelihood that they…

  1. Student Centered Homogeneous Ability Grouping: Using Bronfenbrenner's Theory of Human Development to Investigate the Ecological Factors Contributing to the Academic Achievement of High School Students in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Karla Denise

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the interconnectedness of the environment, human development, and the factors that influence students' academic performance in a homogeneous ability grouped mathematics classroom. The study consisted of four African American urban high school juniors, 2 male and 2 female. During the 12 week…

  2. Neurotology symptoms at referral to vestibular evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness-vertigo is common in adults, but clinical providers may rarely diagnose vestibular impairment and referral could be delayed. To assess neurotology symptoms (including triggers) reported by patients with peripheral vestibular disease, during the year just before their referral to vestibular evaluation. Methods 282 patients with peripheral vestibular disease and 282 control subjects accepted to participate. They had no middle ear, retinal, neurological, psychiatric, autoimmune or autonomic disorders. They reported their symptoms by a standardized questionnaire along with their anxiety/depression symptoms. Results Patients were referred after months or years from the onset of their symptoms, 24% of them reported frequent falls with a long clinical evolution; 10% of them reported no vertigo but instability related to specific triggers; 86% patients and 12% control subjects reported instability when moving the head rapidly and 79% patients and 6% control subjects reported instability when changing posture. Seven out of the 9 symptoms explored by the questionnaire allowed the correct classification of circa 95% of the participants (Discriminant function analysis, p < 0.001). High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms showed a mild correlation with the total score of symptoms (multiple R2 =0.18, p < 0.001). Conclusions Late referral to vestibular evaluation may underlie a history of frequent falls; some patients may not report vertigo, but instability related to specific triggers, which could be useful to prompt vestibular evaluation. High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms may have a mild influence on the report of symptoms of vestibular disease in both, patients and control subjects. PMID:24279682

  3. Variation in periodontal referral by general dental practitioners.

    PubMed

    Linden, G J

    1998-08-01

    This study investigated the extent of and reasons for variation in the periodontal referral patterns of general dental practitioners in Northern Ireland. A questionnaire was circulated to all general dental practitioners in Northern Ireland. This questionnaire investigated the management of periodontal disease in the general dental service and referral for specialist periodontal advice and treatment. A usable return was made by 355 (68%) of those surveyed. The mean number of periodontal referrals by each respondent in the past year was 6.5 (SD 7.7), range 0 to 80. Backward stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated that independent predictors of high referral rate were practice location close to the referral centre (p<0.0001); dissatisfaction with ability to treat periodontal disease under the National Health Service (p=0.001); that previous refusals of referral had not dissuaded a dentist from continuing to offer referral (p=0.002); not offering root planing as a treatment (p=0.005); and perceived inadequate postgraduate education in periodontology (p=0.03). It is concluded that considerable variation exists between general dental practitioners working in Northern Ireland in relation to the referral of patients for specialist periodontal advice and treatment. It is further concluded that in many cases non-disease factors, such as the accessibility of the specialist service, have powerful effects on the decisions made by dentists and patients in relation to periodontal referral.

  4. Developmental Screening Referrals: Child and Family Factors that Predict Referral Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Danielle J.; Hanline, Mary Frances

    2013-01-01

    This study researched the predictive impact of developmental screening results and the effects of child and family characteristics on completion of referrals given for evaluation. Logistical and hierarchical logistic regression analyses were used to determine the significance of 10 independent variables on the predictor variable. The number of…

  5. Do GP referral guidelines really work? Audit of an electronic urgent referral system for suspected head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann-Maree; Aziz, Abdul; Khalid, Sameena; Hurman, David

    2012-05-01

    We adapted the 2002 Scottish Referral Guidelines for suspected squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) as a set of "alarm symptoms." These were then incorporated into a new Suspected Cancer Urgent Referral Electronically (SeCURE) system enabling immediate electronic referral from primary care to the appropriate hospital-based multi-disciplinary cancer team. All referrals made via the SeCURE system during the first year of its implementation were reviewed retrospectively. One hundred and ninety patients were urgently referred, of whom 15 (8%) were ultimately diagnosed with SCCHN. This audit demonstrated overall poor compliance with the referral guidelines. Although the electronic referral system helped for speedy clinic appointments, there was a low pick up rate of positive head and neck cancer cases. Continuing education for GPs is important and following discussion with colleagues in primary care, steps have been taken to reinforce awareness and more appropriate use of the SeCURE system.

  6. A review and evaluation of the Langley Research Center's Scientific and Technical Information Program. Results of phase 4: Knowledge and attitudes survey, academic and industrial personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, T. E.; Glassman, M.; Glassman, N. A.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback from engineers and scientists in the academic and industrial community provided an assessment of the usage and perceived quality of NASA Langley generated STI and the familiarity and usage of selected NASA publications and services and identified ways to increase the accessibility of Langley STI. The questionnaire utilized both open and closed ended questions and was pretested for finalization. The questions were organized around the seven objectives for Phase IV. From a contact list of nearly 1,200 active industrial and academic researchers, approximately 600 addresses were verified. The 497 persons who agreed to participate were mailed questionnaires. The 381 completed questionnaires received by the cutoff date were analyzed. Based on the survey findings, recommendations were made for increasing the familiarity with and use of NASA and Langley STI and selected NASA publications and services. In addition, recommendations were made for increasing the accessibility of Langley STI.

  7. Incidental Findings on Cone Beam Computed Tomography and Reasons for Referral by Dental Practitioners in Indore City (M.P)

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajappa, Sandesh; Dasar, Prahlad L; Warhekar, Ashish M; Parihar, Ajay; Phulambrikar, Tushar; Airen, Bhuvnesh; Jain, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cone beam computed tomography is a new diagnostic innovation to dental imaging. Despite the use of CBCT in oral and maxillofacial imaging, reports on its use either by individual practitioners or referral patterns to CBCT centers is lacking. Hence, a study was conducted to determine incidental findings on CBCT and reasons for referral by dental practitioners in Indore city. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of 795 records that were referred for CBCT imaging at Institutional and Oracal CBCT Centre, Indore was undertaken. Referrals from both within and outside institution, as well as from private practitioners were considered. The reason for CBCT referral, provision diagnosis, final diagnosis and any incidental diagnosis were recorded. Results: This retrospective chart audit revealed that 56.7 % were male and 43.3% were females. Greatest source of patients was referred by oral surgeons (21.9%) followed by oral and maxillofacial radiologist (14.2%) and prosthodontist (9.3%). The most common reason for referral was for implant analysis (24.2%) and the most common incidental finding diagnosed by CBCT was oral malignancies. Conclusion: In Institutional set-up, CBCT referrals were mostly for the reason of planning implant placement followed by trauma whereas private practitioners used CBCT mostly for implant placement followed by impaction. CBCT was being utilized more by Oral surgeons in private sector whereas it in an Institutional setup majority of referrals from Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology. Findings that were most commonly diagnosed incidentally on CBCT were Orofacial malignancies followed maxillary sinus pathologies. PMID:25859519

  8. Verification in referral-based crowdsourcing.

    PubMed

    Naroditskiy, Victor; Rahwan, Iyad; Cebrian, Manuel; Jennings, Nicholas R

    2012-01-01

    Online social networks offer unprecedented potential for rallying a large number of people to accomplish a given task. Here we focus on information gathering tasks where rare information is sought through "referral-based crowdsourcing": the information request is propagated recursively through invitations among members of a social network. Whereas previous work analyzed incentives for the referral process in a setting with only correct reports, misreporting is known to be both pervasive in crowdsourcing applications, and difficult/costly to filter out. A motivating example for our work is the DARPA Red Balloon Challenge where the level of misreporting was very high. In order to undertake a formal study of verification, we introduce a model where agents can exert costly effort to perform verification and false reports can be penalized. This is the first model of verification and it provides many directions for future research, which we point out. Our main theoretical result is the compensation scheme that minimizes the cost of retrieving the correct answer. Notably, this optimal compensation scheme coincides with the winning strategy of the Red Balloon Challenge.

  9. Verification in Referral-Based Crowdsourcing

    PubMed Central

    Naroditskiy, Victor; Rahwan, Iyad; Cebrian, Manuel; Jennings, Nicholas R.

    2012-01-01

    Online social networks offer unprecedented potential for rallying a large number of people to accomplish a given task. Here we focus on information gathering tasks where rare information is sought through “referral-based crowdsourcing”: the information request is propagated recursively through invitations among members of a social network. Whereas previous work analyzed incentives for the referral process in a setting with only correct reports, misreporting is known to be both pervasive in crowdsourcing applications, and difficult/costly to filter out. A motivating example for our work is the DARPA Red Balloon Challenge where the level of misreporting was very high. In order to undertake a formal study of verification, we introduce a model where agents can exert costly effort to perform verification and false reports can be penalized. This is the first model of verification and it provides many directions for future research, which we point out. Our main theoretical result is the compensation scheme that minimizes the cost of retrieving the correct answer. Notably, this optimal compensation scheme coincides with the winning strategy of the Red Balloon Challenge. PMID:23071530

  10. Academic writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  11. Effect of primary care physicians' use of estimated glomerular filtration rate on the timing of their subspecialty referral decisions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Primary care providers' suboptimal recognition of the severity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) may contribute to untimely referrals of patients with CKD to subspecialty care. It is unknown whether U.S. primary care physicians' use of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) rather than serum creatinine to estimate CKD severity could improve the timeliness of their subspecialty referral decisions. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 154 United States primary care physicians to assess the effect of use of eGFR (versus creatinine) on the timing of their subspecialty referrals. Primary care physicians completed a questionnaire featuring questions regarding a hypothetical White or African American patient with progressing CKD. We asked primary care physicians to identify the serum creatinine and eGFR levels at which they would recommend patients like the hypothetical patient be referred for subspecialty evaluation. We assessed significant improvement in the timing [from eGFR < 30 to ≥ 30 mL/min/1.73m2) of their recommended referrals based on their use of creatinine versus eGFR. Results Primary care physicians recommended subspecialty referrals later (CKD more advanced) when using creatinine versus eGFR to assess kidney function [median eGFR 32 versus 55 mL/min/1.73m2, p < 0.001]. Forty percent of primary care physicians significantly improved the timing of their referrals when basing their recommendations on eGFR. Improved timing occurred more frequently among primary care physicians practicing in academic (versus non-academic) practices or presented with White (versus African American) hypothetical patients [adjusted percentage(95% CI): 70% (45-87) versus 37% (reference) and 57% (39-73) versus 25% (reference), respectively, both p ≤ 0.01). Conclusions Primary care physicians recommended subspecialty referrals earlier when using eGFR (versus creatinine) to assess kidney function. Enhanced use of eGFR by primary care physicians' could lead

  12. Pre-referral rectal artesunate in severe malaria: flawed trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Immediate injectable treatment is essential for severe malaria. Otherwise, the afflicted risk lifelong impairment or death. In rural areas of Africa and Asia, appropriate care is often miles away. In 2009, Melba Gomes and her colleagues published the findings of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of rectal artesunate for suspected severe malaria in such remote areas. Enrolling nearly 18,000 cases, the aim was to evaluate whether, as patients were in transit to a health facility, a pre-referral artesunate suppository blocked disease progression sufficiently to reduce these risks. The affirmative findings of this, the only trial on the issue thus far, have led the WHO to endorse rectal artesunate as a pre-referral treatment for severe malaria. In the light of its public health importance and because its scientific quality has not been assessed for a systematic review, our paper provides a detailed evaluation of the design, conduct, analysis, reporting, and practical features of this trial. Results We performed a checklist-based and an in-depth evaluation of the trial. The evaluation criteria were based on the CONSORT statement for reporting clinical trials, the clinical trial methodology literature, and practice in malaria research. Our main findings are: The inclusion and exclusion criteria and the sample size justification are not stated. Many clearly ineligible subjects were enrolled. The training of the recruiters does not appear to have been satisfactory. There was excessive between center heterogeneity in design and conduct. Outcome evaluation schedule was not defined, and in practice, became too wide. Large gaps in the collection of key data were evident. Primary endpoints were inconsistently utilized and reported; an overall analysis of the outcomes was not done; analyses of time to event data had major flaws; the stated intent-to-treat analysis excluded a third of the randomized subjects; the design-indicated stratified or multi

  13. 42 CFR 411.355 - General exceptions to the referral prohibition related to both ownership/investment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... medical center on a full-time or substantial part-time basis. (A “component” of an academic medical center... his or her professional time or 8 hours per week providing academic services or clinical teaching... spend at least 20 percent of his or her professional time or 8 hours per week providing...

  14. 42 CFR 411.355 - General exceptions to the referral prohibition related to both ownership/investment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... academic medical center must meet all of the following conditions: (A) All transfers of money between..., indigent care, research, or community service. (B) The relationship of the components of the academic... medical center are reflected in the routine financial reports covering the components. (C) All money...

  15. 42 CFR 411.355 - General exceptions to the referral prohibition related to both ownership/investment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... academic medical center must meet all of the following conditions: (A) All transfers of money between..., indigent care, research, or community service. (B) The relationship of the components of the academic... medical center are reflected in the routine financial reports covering the components. (C) All money...

  16. 42 CFR 411.355 - General exceptions to the referral prohibition related to both ownership/investment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... academic medical center must meet all of the following conditions: (A) All transfers of money between..., indigent care, research, or community service. (B) The relationship of the components of the academic... medical center are reflected in the routine financial reports covering the components. (C) All money...

  17. 42 CFR 411.355 - General exceptions to the referral prohibition related to both ownership/investment and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... academic medical center must meet all of the following conditions: (A) All transfers of money between..., indigent care, research, or community service. (B) The relationship of the components of the academic... medical center are reflected in the routine financial reports covering the components. (C) All money...

  18. How Academic Is Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    University provision for academic development is well established in the USA, UK and many other countries. However, arrangements for its provision and staffing vary. In Australia, there has been a trend towards professional rather than academic staff appointments. Is this appropriate? In this paper, the domains of academic development work are…

  19. 32 CFR 727.9 - Referrals to civilian lawyers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Referrals to civilian lawyers. 727.9 Section 727... ASSISTANCE § 727.9 Referrals to civilian lawyers. (a) General. If it is determined that the legal assistance... the assistance requested, the client should be referred to a civilian lawyer. When the client does...

  20. 32 CFR 727.9 - Referrals to civilian lawyers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Referrals to civilian lawyers. 727.9 Section 727... ASSISTANCE § 727.9 Referrals to civilian lawyers. (a) General. If it is determined that the legal assistance... the assistance requested, the client should be referred to a civilian lawyer. When the client does...

  1. 40 CFR 1620.8 - Referral to Department of Justice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Referral to Department of Justice. 1620.8 Section 1620.8 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS ARISING UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1620.8 Referral to Department of Justice....

  2. User Satisfaction with Referrals at a Collaborative Virtual Reference Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Nahyun

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: This study investigated unmonitored referrals in a nationwide, collaborative chat reference service. Specifically, it examined the extent to which questions are referred, the types of questions that are more likely to be referred than others, and the level of user satisfaction with the referrals in the collaborative chat reference…

  3. 28 CFR 902.3 - Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee. 902.3 Section 902.3 Judicial Administration NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION AND PRIVACY COMPACT COUNCIL DISPUTE ADJUDICATION PROCEDURES § 902.3 Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee. (a) The five...

  4. 28 CFR 902.3 - Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee. 902.3 Section 902.3 Judicial Administration NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION AND PRIVACY COMPACT COUNCIL DISPUTE ADJUDICATION PROCEDURES § 902.3 Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee. (a) The five...

  5. 28 CFR 902.3 - Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee. 902.3 Section 902.3 Judicial Administration NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION AND PRIVACY COMPACT COUNCIL DISPUTE ADJUDICATION PROCEDURES § 902.3 Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee. (a) The five...

  6. 28 CFR 902.3 - Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee. 902.3 Section 902.3 Judicial Administration NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION AND PRIVACY COMPACT COUNCIL DISPUTE ADJUDICATION PROCEDURES § 902.3 Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee. (a) The five...

  7. 28 CFR 902.3 - Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee. 902.3 Section 902.3 Judicial Administration NATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION AND PRIVACY COMPACT COUNCIL DISPUTE ADJUDICATION PROCEDURES § 902.3 Referral to Dispute Resolution Committee. (a) The five...

  8. 5 CFR 831.1309 - Referral for litigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Referral for litigation. 831.1309 Section 831.1309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT Collection of Debts § 831.1309 Referral for litigation. From time to time and in...

  9. 7 CFR 3.21 - Referrals of Debts to Justice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Referrals of Debts to Justice. 3.21 Section 3.21... and Compromise of Claims § 3.21 Referrals of Debts to Justice. An agency shall promptly refer to Justice for litigation debts on which aggressive collection activity has been taken in accordance...

  10. 44 CFR 11.17 - Referral to Department of Justice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Justice. 11.17 Section 11.17 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... Referral to Department of Justice. When Department of Justice approval or consultation is required under § 11.16, the referral or request shall be transmitted to the Department of Justice by the Chief...

  11. 5 CFR 177.108 - Referral to Department of Justice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Referral to Department of Justice. 177... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 177.108 Referral to Department of Justice. When Department of Justice approval or consultation is required, or the advice of the Department of Justice...

  12. 29 CFR 502.37 - Referral to Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Referral to Administrative Law Judge. 502.37 Section 502.37... § 502.37 Referral to Administrative Law Judge. (a) Upon receipt of a timely request for a hearing filed... Judge, for a determination in an administrative proceeding as provided herein. The notice...

  13. 29 CFR 801.63 - Referral to Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Referral to Administrative Law Judge. 801.63 Section 801.63... § 801.63 Referral to Administrative Law Judge. (a) Upon receipt of a timely request for a hearing filed... Judge, for a determination in an administrative proceeding as provided herein. The notice...

  14. 29 CFR 500.224 - Referral to Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Referral to Administrative Law Judge. 500.224 Section 500... Hearing § 500.224 Referral to Administrative Law Judge. (a) Upon receipt of a timely request for a hearing... Administrative Law Judge, for a determination in an administrative proceeding as provided herein. The notice...

  15. 29 CFR 580.10 - Referral to Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Referral to Administrative Law Judge. 580.10 Section 580.10... Referral to Administrative Law Judge. (a) Upon receipt of a timely exception to a determination of... Administrative Law Judge, for a determination in an administrative proceeding as provided herein. A copy of...

  16. 10 CFR 733.7 - Referral to the contracting officer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Referral to the contracting officer. 733.7 Section 733.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ALLEGATIONS OF RESEARCH MISCONDUCT § 733.7 Referral to the contracting... misconduct, the DOE Element should forward the allegation to the contracting officer responsible...

  17. 10 CFR 430.54 - Referral to the Attorney General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Referral to the Attorney General. 430.54 Section 430.54 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Small Business Exemptions § 430.54 Referral to the Attorney General. Notice of the application for...

  18. 10 CFR 430.54 - Referral to the Attorney General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Referral to the Attorney General. 430.54 Section 430.54 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Small Business Exemptions § 430.54 Referral to the Attorney General. Notice of the application for...

  19. 10 CFR 430.54 - Referral to the Attorney General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Referral to the Attorney General. 430.54 Section 430.54 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Small Business Exemptions § 430.54 Referral to the Attorney General. Notice of the application for...

  20. 10 CFR 430.54 - Referral to the Attorney General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Referral to the Attorney General. 430.54 Section 430.54 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Small Business Exemptions § 430.54 Referral to the Attorney General. Notice of the application for...

  1. 10 CFR 430.54 - Referral to the Attorney General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Referral to the Attorney General. 430.54 Section 430.54 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Small Business Exemptions § 430.54 Referral to the Attorney General. Notice of the application for...

  2. 45 CFR 1619.3 - Referral to the Corporation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Referral to the Corporation. 1619.3 Section 1619.3 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION DISCLOSURE OF INFORMATION § 1619.3 Referral to the Corporation. If a person requests information, not...

  3. NETWORK. A History of the Scottish Telephone Referral Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Vernon

    Since its beginnings in 1974 as an outgrowth of the BBC Adult Literacy project, NETWORK SCOTLAND LTD (formerly the Scottish Telephone Referral Service) has grown to play a key role in the provision of broadcast support and educational information services in the United Kingdom. The referral service was originally established to provide a mechanism…

  4. Referral Patterns of Community Health Workers Diagnosing and Treating Malaria: Cluster-Randomized Trials in Two Areas of High- and Low-Malaria Transmission in Southwestern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Sham; Ndyomugenyi, Richard; Magnussen, Pascal; Hansen, Kristian S.; Alexander, Neal D.; Paintain, Lucy; Chandramohan, Daniel; Clarke, Siân E.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria-endemic countries have implemented community health worker (CHW) programs to provide malaria diagnosis and treatment to populations living beyond the reach of health systems. However, there is limited evidence describing the referral practices of CHWs. We examined the impact of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs) on CHW referral in two cluster-randomized trials, one conducted in a moderate-to-high malaria transmission setting and one in a low-transmission setting in Uganda, between January 2010 and July 2012. All CHWs were trained to prescribe artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) for malaria and recognize signs and symptoms for referral to health centers. CHWs in the control arm used a presumptive diagnosis for malaria based on clinical symptoms, whereas intervention arm CHWs used mRDTs. CHWs recorded ACT prescriptions, mRDT results, and referral in patient registers. An intention-to-treat analysis was undertaken using multivariable logistic regression. Referral was more frequent in the intervention arm versus the control arm (moderate-to-high transmission, P < 0.001; low transmission, P < 0.001). Despite this increase, referral advice was not always given when ACTs or prereferral rectal artesunate were prescribed: 14% prescribed rectal artesunate in the moderate-to-high setting were not referred. In addition, CHWs considered factors alongside mRDTs when referring. Child visits during the weekends or the rainy season were less likely to be referred, whereas visits to CHWs more distant from health centers were more likely to be referred (low transmission only). CHWs using mRDTs and ACTs increased referral compared with CHWs using a presumptive diagnosis. To address these concerns, referral training should be emphasized in CHW programs as they are scaled-up. PMID:27799650

  5. Academic etiquette for the nephrologist.

    PubMed

    Watnick, Suzanne

    2008-11-01

    Academic etiquette is an underexplored and underemphasized topic. Yet, a collegial atmosphere is essential to accomplish the missions of an academic medical center. Appropriate social, personal, and cultural behaviors are not only desirable, but they are also necessary to practice and emulate. As faculty in an academic center, one may want to share these thoughts with peers, students, and other healthcare providers. As a trainee, one may want dedicated lectures on this topic and to observe the behaviors modeled by mentors. This article attempts to outline principles of appropriate etiquette in the academic workplace. These include issues of loyalty, collegiality, and collaboration in daily activities from research to clinical care. Approaching personal interactions with grace and integrity can be an essential tool in the pursuit of academic excellence and success.

  6. Referral and Timing of Referral to Hospice Care in Nursing Homes: The Significant Role of Staff Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Lisa C.; Miller, Susan C.; Martin, Edward W.; Nanda, Aman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Given concerns about end-of-life care for many nursing home (NH) residents, this study sought to understand factors influencing hospice referral or nonreferral as well as timing of referral. Design and Methods: We conducted semistructured interviews with personnel from seven participating NHs and two hospices. We interviewed NH directors…

  7. Examining the variation in GPs’ referral practice: a cross-sectional study of GPs’ reasons for referral

    PubMed Central

    Ringberg, Unni; Fleten, Nils; Førde, Olav Helge

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a large variation in referral rates to secondary care among GPs, which is partly unexplained. Aim To explore associations between reasons for referral to secondary care and patient, GP, and healthcare characteristics. Design and setting A cross-sectional study in Northern Norway. Method Data were derived from 44 (42%) of 104 randomly selected GPs between 2008 and 2010. GPs scored the relevance of nine predefined reasons for 595 referrals from 4350 consecutive consultations on a four-level categorical scale. Associations were examined by multivariable ordered and multivariable multilevel logistic regression analyses. Results Medical necessity was assessed as a relevant reason in 93% of the referrals, 43.7% by patient preference, 27.5% to avoid overlooking anything, and 14.6% to reassure the patient. The higher the referral rates, the more frequently the GPs referred to avoid overlooking anything. Female GPs referred to reassure the patient and due to perceived deficient medical knowledge significantly more often than male GPs. However, perceived easy accessibility of specialists was significantly less frequently given as a reason for referral by female GPs compared with male GPs. When the GPs scored the referrals to be of lesser medical necessity, male GPs referred significantly more frequently than female GPs to reassure the patient due to patient preference and perceived deficient medical knowledge. Conclusion There are striking differences in reasons for referral between Norwegian male and female GPs and between GPs with high and low referral rates, which reflects difficulties in handling professional uncertainty. Referring to reassure the patients, especially when referrals are less medically necessary, may reflect consideration and acquiescence towards the patients. PMID:24982495

  8. Academic Incivility among Health Sciences Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Melissa; Hill, Lilian H.

    2015-01-01

    Academic health centers are under pressure to graduate more health professionals and, therefore, must retain talented faculty members who can educate students in respective disciplines. Faculty-to-faculty incivility is especially relevant to academic medical centers because faculty in the health professions must not only meet university tenure and…

  9. Nurture personal referrals--your best source of new patients.

    PubMed

    Jameson, C

    1996-01-01

    In your morning meetings, identify those patients who would be a great person to ask for a referral--patients who have expressed pleasure in receiving treatment from you. Then, determine who is going to ask for that referral. You wouldn't want to have EVERY-ONE ask them for a referral, so give someone that responsibility. Be sure that you have done some role playing and have practiced the verbal skills of "asking" for a referral. Get comfortable asking. Know that you will never know what you will get unless you ASK!!! All good businesses ask for referrals from their best customers. Learn from the masters. Pattern your own behavior after those who have acquired admirable results. When you identify patients who have accepted and have been pleased with your treatment, have come to their appointments on time, have gladly paid their bills, and have been a joy to treat, ASK these folks for a referral. More than likely they will refer others to you who are of like character. You can build a practice "on good patients just like you" and expect that to happen!!! Together, as a team, develop ways of acknowledging and nurturing your referral sources. If these wonderful people provide 70+ percent of your new patients, it benefits you to invest time and money in maximizing this source of practice growth.

  10. Brazilian Specialists’ Perspectives on the Patient Referral Process

    PubMed Central

    Juliani, Carmen; MacPhee, Maura; Spiri, Wilza

    2017-01-01

    Since 1988, healthcare has been considered a citizen’s right in Brazil. The Sistema Único de Saúde (SUS), has undergone development and expansion to ensure universal health coverage for the Brazilian public, the world’s fifth largest population. The coordination of effective communications between primary care physicians, specialists and patients is a significant challenge, particularly the referral process. Our study objective was to understand the facilitators and barriers associated with referral process communications between primary care physicians and regional university hospital specialists in the State of Sao Paulo. This paper reports specialists’ perspectives of the referral process. This was a phenomenological study that employed a qualitative research method with three components (description, reduction and comprehension). We conducted focus groups with 54 hospital residents from different specialties (surgery, medicine, obstetrics/gynecology, pediatrics) from July to October 2014. The main results showed lack of an adequate referral-return referral process resulting in treatment delays and inappropriate use of emergency services. Communications were impeded by lack of integrated, computerized booking and standardized referral-return referral processes; underlying lack of trust in primary care physicians; and patients’ inappropriate use of healthcare services. Although computerized systems will facilitate communications between primary and specialty care, other strategies are needed to promote collaboration between services, and ensure appropriate utilization of them. PMID:28146046

  11. X-PAT: a multiplatform patient referral data management system for small healthcare institution requirements.

    PubMed

    Masseroli, Marco; Marchente, Mario

    2008-07-01

    We present X-PAT, a platform-independent software prototype that is able to manage patient referral multimedia data in an intranet network scenario according to the specific control procedures of a healthcare institution. It is a self-developed storage framework based on a file system, implemented in eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and PHP Hypertext Preprocessor Language, and addressed to the requirements of limited-dimension healthcare entities (small hospitals, private medical centers, outpatient clinics, and laboratories). In X-PAT, healthcare data descriptions, stored in a novel Referral Base Management System (RBMS) according to Health Level 7 Clinical Document Architecture Release 2 (CDA R2) standard, can be easily applied to the specific data and organizational procedures of a particular healthcare working environment thanks also to the use of standard clinical terminology. Managed data, centralized on a server, are structured in the RBMS schema using a flexible patient record and CDA healthcare referral document structures based on XML technology. A novel search engine allows defining and performing queries on stored data, whose rapid execution is ensured by expandable RBMS indexing structures. Healthcare personnel can interface the X-PAT system, according to applied state-of-the-art privacy and security measures, through friendly and intuitive Web pages that facilitate user acceptance.

  12. Determining factors for implant referral rates.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger P

    2002-01-01

    The research findings indicate that the field of implant dentistry will only grow at a moderately low level unless certain changes are made. Findings indicated that the effort by the implant companies has been nothing short of dramatic, and yet almost 60% of restorative doctors do not participate annually in any implant case. There was no clear indication that younger restorative doctors will significantly increase the number of implant referrals, as their overall implant education has not dramatically differed from those dentists who graduated in earlier years. Once the research was completed, it became obvious to Levin Group that the driving force behind implant referral growth will be implant surgeons, because of their one-to-one relationship with restorative doctors. The Levin Group Implant Management and Marketing Consulting Program is based on approaching restorative doctors in several different levels, starting with awareness all the way through to case facilitation and long-term tracking and communication. Finally, a continuing marketing/education effort needs to be consistently in place with effective materials, not only to create a high level of awareness, but also to motivate restorative doctors to refer cases and then work through the case with the implant surgeon to a satisfactory completion for the restorative doctor, implant surgeon, and patient. While the surgical insertion of implants may seem to carry a high-profit margin relative to the restoration of implants, the truth is that the restoration of implants usually provides a 40% higher profit margin for the restorative doctor than traditional dental services. One of the key issues is that referring doctors have not necessarily learned how to set fees and present cases with regard to implant dentistry. The key factor here is to ensure that the patient understands that implant services involve higher fees than traditional services, because of the necessarily higher levels of experience, education

  13. Academic Bullies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    Many professors have been traumatized by academic bullies. Unlike bullies at school, the academic bully plays a more subtle game. Bullies may spread rumors to undermine a colleague's credibility or shut their target out of social conversations. The more aggressive of the species cuss out co-workers, even threatening to get physical. There is…

  14. [Urine incontinence referral criteria for primary care].

    PubMed

    Brenes Bermúdez, F J; Cozar Olmo, J M; Esteban Fuertes, M; Fernández-Pro Ledesma, A; Molero García, J M

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of urinary incontinence (UI), health professional awareness of this disease is low, which in itself is not serious but significantly limits the lives of the patients. The Primary Care associations, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN], Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG], Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [semFYC]) along with the Asociación Española de Urología (EAU) have developed this consensus with the proposal of making GPs aware, and to help them in the diagnosis, treatment and referral to Urologists. The first goal in primary care must be the detection of UI, thus an opportunistic screening at least once in the lifetime of asymptomatic women > 40 years old and asymptomatic men > 55 years old. The diagnosis, based on medical history and physical examination, must determine the type and severity of the UI in order to refer severe cases to the Urologist. Except for overactive bladder (OAB), non-pharmacological conservative treatment is the first approach to uncomplicated UI in females and males. Antimuscarinics are the only drugs that have demonstrated efficacy and safety in urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and OAB. In men with mixed symptoms, excluding severe obstruction cases, a combination therapy of alpha-blockers and antimuscarinics should be chosen.

  15. [Urine incontinence referral criteria for primary care].

    PubMed

    Brenes Bermúdez, F J; Cozar Olmo, J M; Esteban Fuertes, M; Fernández-Pro Ledesma, A; Molero García, J M

    2013-05-01

    Despite the high incidence of urinary incontinence (UI), health professional awareness of this disease is low, which in itself is not serious but significantly limits the lives of the patients. The Primary Care associations, Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN], Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG], Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [semFYC]) along with the Asociación Española de Urología (EAU) have developed this consensus with the proposal of making GPs aware, and to help them in the diagnosis, treatment and referral to Urologists. The first goal in primary care must be the detection of UI, thus an opportunistic screening at least once in the lifetime of asymptomatic women > 40 years old and asymptomatic men > 55 years old. The diagnosis, based on medical history and physical examination, must determine the type and severity of the UI in order to refer severe cases to the Urologist. Except for overactive bladder (OAB), non-pharmacological conservative treatment is the first approach to uncomplicated UI in females and males. Antimuscarinics are the only drugs that have demonstrated efficacy and safety in urge urinary incontinence (UUI) and OAB. In men with mixed symptoms, excluding severe obstruction cases, a combination therapy of alpha-blockers and antimuscarinics should be chosen.

  16. Role of the emergency medical services system in regionwide health monitoring and referral.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, A K; Hedges, J R

    1993-11-01

    The emergency medical services (EMS) system of the future has the opportunity to serve as a regional community health monitoring and referral system. Such a system would shift attention from care of the individual to cost-effective community health efforts using community resource integration, while emphasizing individual responsibility for health. This health care system model requires the establishment of a centralized monitoring agency, the "regional center." The regional center would coordinate the monitoring of regional EMS use and linkage of patients with essential health promotion and behavior change organizations. Many of these supporting organizations are in place but are functioning without the benefit of communitywide health monitoring or effective referral and follow-up links with other resources. Coordination through the EMS system and a regional center would permit these resources to be used in an efficient and accountable fashion. We propose a model in which the EMS system could contribute to coordinated regional health monitoring and maintenance, timely and appropriate health care legislation and regulation, and high-impact health care education and intervention in the setting of self-destructive individual behavior.

  17. 12 CFR 313.123 - Certification and referral of debt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PROCEDURES FOR CORPORATE DEBT COLLECTION Tax Refund Offset § 313.123 Certification and referral of debt. When... judgment debt or as otherwise allowed by law, the debt is referred for offset within ten years after...

  18. Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De George, Richard T.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that Martin Michaelson's proposal in "Should Untenured as Well as Tenured Faculty Be Guaranteed Academic Freedom? A Few Observations," despite its good intentions, is seriously flawed and if adopted in preference to existing standards will weaken rather than strengthen academic freedom. (EV)

  19. 40 CFR 13.33 - Referrals to the Department of Justice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Referrals to the Department of Justice... COLLECTION STANDARDS Referrals § 13.33 Referrals to the Department of Justice. (a) Prompt referral. The... Justice, Washington, DC 20530. (2) Unless otherwise provided by DOJ regulations or procedures, EPA...

  20. Online referrals one way capitated groups gain efficiencies, reduce errors.

    PubMed

    2002-08-01

    An online referral system is just the latest money and time-saving tool in the e-commerce arsenal at Hill Physicians Medical Group. Using a modified version of Healinx Corp.'s secure e-mail messaging platform, Hill is testing a custom-made online referral system at two primary care practices that appear to be helping the practice boost its bottom line under capitation.