Science.gov

Sample records for academic scientific community

  1. Scientific literacy and academic identity: Creating a community of practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reveles, John Michael

    2005-07-01

    This one-year ethnographic study of a third grade classroom examined the construction of elementary school science. The research focused on the co-development of scientific literacy and academic identity. Unlike much research in science education that views literacy as merely supportive of science; this dissertation research considers how students learned both disciplinary knowledge in science as well as about themselves as learners through language use. The study documented and analyzed how students came to engage with scientific knowledge and the impact this engagement had upon their academic identities over time. Ethnographic and discourse analytic methods were employed to investigate three research questions: (a) How were the students in a third grade classroom afforded opportunities to acquire scientific literate practices through the spoken/written discourse and science activities? (b) In what ways did students develop and maintain academic identities taken-up over time as they discursively appropriated scientific literate practices via classroom discourse? and (c) How did students collectively and individually inscribe their academic identities and scientific knowledge into classroom artifacts across the school year? Through multiple forms of analyses, I identified how students' communication and participation in science investigations provided opportunities for them to learn specific scientific literate practices. The findings of this empirical research indicate that students' communication and participation in science influenced the ways they perceived themselves as active participants within the classroom community. More specifically, students were observed to appropriate particular discourse practices introduced by the teacher to frame scientific disciplinary knowledge and investigations. Thus, emerging academic identities and developing literate practices were documented via analysis of discursive (spoken, written, and enacted) classroom interactions. A

  2. Advocating for responsible oil and natural gas extraction policies; FracTracker as a mechanism for overcoming the barriers to scientific advocacy for academics and communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrar, K. J.; Malone, S.; Kelso, M.; Lenker, B.

    2013-12-01

    The inability to translate data to scientific information that can readily be incorporated by citizens into the public arena is an obstacle for science-based advocacy. This issue is particularly poignant for shale oil and natural gas development via hydraulic fracturing, as the issue has become highly politicized. Barriers to engaging in policy debate are different but highly related for community members and scientists. For citizens and interest groups, barriers including accessibility, public awareness and data presentation limit the motivation for community involvement in political interactions. To overcome such barriers, social researchers call for public engagement to move upstream and many call for a broad engagement of scientists in science-based advocacy. Furthermore surveys have shown that citizens, interest groups, and decision-makers share a broad desire for scientists to engage in environmental policy development. Regardless, scientists face a number of perceived barriers, with academics expressing the most resistance to overcoming the tension created by adherence to the scientific method and the need to engage with the broader society, described by Schneider (1990) as the 'double ethical bind'. For the scientific community the appeal of public dissemination of information beyond the scope of academic journals is limited for a number of reasons. Barriers include preservation of credibility, peer attitudes, training, and career trajectory. The result is a lack of translated information available to the public. This systematic analysis of the FracTracker platform provides an evaluation of where the features of the public engagement, GIS platform has been successful at overcoming these barriers to public dissemination, where the platform needs further development or is ill-suited to address these issues, and the development of FracTracker as an outlet for scientific researchers to engage with citizens. The analysis will also provide insight into what

  3. Academic Staff and Scientific Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyvik, Svein

    1993-01-01

    A survey of tenured faculty in four Norwegian universities investigated publication and scientific productivity patterns in a three-year period. Analysis of results suggests underlying reasons for differences between individuals, age groups, and gender groups and implications for administrative policy to support productivity. (MSE)

  4. Community-Academic Partnership Participation.

    PubMed

    Meza, Rosemary; Drahota, Amy; Spurgeon, Emily

    2016-10-01

    Community-academic partnerships (CAPs) improve the research process, outcomes, and yield benefits for the community and researchers. This exploratory study examined factors important in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) community stakeholders, previously contacted to participate in a CAP (n = 18), completed the 15-item Decision to Participate Questionnaire (DPQ). The DPQ assessed reasons for participating or declining participation in the ASD CAP. CAP participants rated networking with other providers, fit of collaboration with agency philosophy, and opportunity for future training/consultations as factors more important in their decision to participate in the ASD CAP than nonparticipants. Nonparticipants reported the number of requests to participate in research as more important in their decision to decline participation than participants. Findings reveal important factors in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs that may provide guidance on increasing community engagement in CAPs and help close the science-to-service gap.

  5. Academic Planning in Response to Community Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, G. Ronald; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The changing role of the academic institution in relation to its environment is reviewed in terms of student constituents, white collar employees, geographic neighborhood, and professionals. An "androgogical" rather than "pedagogical" approach to community knowledge development and transfer, and ways for university planners to make academe more…

  6. Academic Dishonesty: Cheating among Community College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moeck, Pat G.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the problem of cheating among community college students and offers suggestions for detection and prevention of academic dishonesty. Includes an inventory of "paper mills" and a list of cybercheating preventative and investigative software. (Contains 36 references.) (AUTH/NB)

  7. Academic Capitalism and the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Ilene

    2010-01-01

    Profit-generating entrepreneurial initiatives have become increasingly important as community colleges look for alternative revenue to support escalating costs in an environment characterized by funding constraints. Academic capitalism was used as the conceptual framework to determine whether community colleges have become increasingly market…

  8. The Community College General Academic Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Community Colleges, Los Angeles, CA.

    The General Academic Assessment (GAA), an instrument designed to measure students' knowledge of the liberal arts, was developed by the Center for the Study of Community Colleges for use by community colleges to informing decisions about curriculum modifications and estimating institutional outcomes. The instrument, which includes 29 demographic…

  9. The Future Academic Community: Continuity and Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council on Education, Washington, DC.

    This collection of papers was compiled as background information for participants in the 1968 Annual Meeting of the American Council on Education. The 10 papers focus on the academic community of the future, and ways of being responsive to change while preserving valuable continuities. John Caffrey relates the present community to the future…

  10. Academic Community: Discourse or Discord? Higher Education Policy Series 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Ronald, Ed.

    This collection of 12 author-contributed papers examines the notion of "academic community" within and among institutions of higher education. Papers are grouped into four sections which examine the idea of academic community, community through academic inquiry, community through curriculum, and community through organization, respectively. Papers…

  11. Comparing academic and community-based hospitalists.

    PubMed

    Malkenson, David; Siegal, Eric M; Leff, Jared A; Weber, Rachel; Struck, Rhonda

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, hospitalist programs were formally introduced at both an academic and community hospital in the same city providing an opportunity to study the similarities and differences in workflows in these two settings. The data were collected using a time-flow methodology allowing the two workflows to be compared quantitatively. The results showed that the hospitalists in the two settings devoted similar proportions of their workday to the task categories studied. Most of the time was spent providing indirect patient care followed by direct patient care, travel, personal, and other. However, after adjusting for patient volumes, the data revealed that academic hospitalists spent significantly more time per patient providing indirect patient care (Academic: 54.7 +/- 11.1 min/patient, Community: 41.9 +/- 9.8 min/patient, p < 0.001). Additionally, we found that nearly half of the hospitalists' time at both settings was spent multitasking. Although we found subtle workflow differences between the academic and community programs, their similarities were more striking as well as greater than their differences. We attribute these small differences to the higher case mix index at the academic program as well greater complexity and additional communication hand-offs inherent to a tertiary academic medical center. It appears that hospitalists, irrespective of their work environment, spend far more time documenting, communicating and coordinating care than they do at the bedside raising the question, is this is a necessary feature of the hospitalist care model or should hospitalists restructure their workflow to improve outcomes?

  12. Linking Academic and Community Guidelines for Community-Engaged Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLugan, Robin Maria; Roussos, Stergios; Skram, Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Research universities seeking to promote community-engaged scholarship (CES), defined here as research of mutual benefit to community and academic interests, will discover that it requires capacity building and institutional support. At the University of California at Merced, our 7-year experience in building a new public research university that…

  13. Community-academic partnerships: how can communities benefit?

    PubMed

    Carney, Jan K; Maltby, Hendrika J; Mackin, Kathleen A; Maksym, Martha E

    2011-10-01

    In answer to the question of how academic institutions will meet medical education needs and public health challenges of the 21st century, a strong, vibrant, and sustained community partnership has been developed to teach public health, address community public health needs, and develop health policy to sustain these improvements, all with a practical approach. In this paper, the partnership between the University of Vermont College of Medicine and various community agencies is described from the perspective of how the community can benefit from educational efforts in public health. Particular focus is given to the community-academic partnership model in public health, a strong and sustained partnership between the University of Vermont College of Medicine and the United Way of Chittenden County Volunteer Center that began in 2004. Public health projects are designed, through partnerships with community nonprofit agencies, to be effective in addressing community issues while helping prepare students to become problem-solvers in population health. Examples of benefits seen by the community are used to illustrate the success of this approach. Project examples and a brief case study illustrate how community-academic partnerships in medical education can serve as a "catalyst" to improving community health.

  14. Leadership Styles of Community College Academic Deans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sypawka, William; Mallett, William; McFadden, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The future of the community college system will depend on sound leadership, and its success will rely on how well academic deans effectively direct their units. The study investigated the dean's leadership styles using Bolman and Deal's Leadership Orientation Instrument to discover their primary leadership frame with a focus on how data may be…

  15. Academic Crossover Study: Community Colleges, Fall 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.

    In fall 1981, a study was conducted in Hawaii's community colleges to determine the course-taking patterns of different groups of student majors (e.g., the proportion of the liberal arts major's academic load that is taken in the humanities, natural sciences, etc.), and the client-serving patterns of different subject disciplines (e.g., the…

  16. Apprenticeships, Collaboration and Scientific Discovery in Academic Field Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Derek Scott; Grayson, Diane J.; Madden, Erinn H.; Milewski, Antoni V.; Snyder, Cathy Ann

    2012-01-01

    Teachers may use apprenticeships and collaboration as instructional strategies that help students to make authentic scientific discoveries as they work as amateur researchers in academic field studies. This concept was examined with 643 students, ages 14-72, who became proficient at field research through cognitive apprenticeships with the…

  17. Academic and Scientific Misconduct: Issues for Nursing Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Barbara C.; Hansen, Kenneth D.

    1995-01-01

    Academic and scientific misconduct is coming to public attention. Issues to be resolved include definitions of misconduct, provision for anonymity, role of whistleblowers, burden of proof, statute of limitations, due process, nature and application of sanctions, and potential for rehabilitation. (SK)

  18. Teaching Scientific/Academic Writing in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peretz, Arna

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a graduate-level scientific/academic writing course for non-native speakers (NNS) of English at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU), Israel, which is taught in a technology-enhanced or blended learning environment. The use and integration of electronic discourses, such as email and Powerpoint, on-screen marking…

  19. Entrepreneurial Academics: Developing Scientific Careers in Changing University Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duberley, Joanne; Cohen, Laurie; Leeson, Elspeth

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of entrepreneurial initiatives within universities on scientific careers. Based on the career accounts of university-based bioscientists involved in a government-sponsored entrepreneurship training initiative, the paper explores the concept of academic entrepreneurialism. Three groups were identified in the data.…

  20. Deepening Our Understanding of Academic Inbreeding Effects on Research Information Exchange and Scientific Output: New Insights for Academic Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horta, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of academic inbreeding in relation to academic research, and proposes a new conceptual framework for its analysis. We find that mobility (or lack of) at the early research career stage is decisive in influencing academic behaviors and scientific productivity. Less mobile academics have more inward oriented…

  1. Sciologer: Visualizing and Exploring Scientific Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bales, Michael Eliot

    2009-01-01

    Despite the recognized need to increase interdisciplinary collaboration, there are few information resources available to provide researchers with an overview of scientific communities--topics under investigation by various groups, and patterns of collaboration among groups. The tools that are available are designed for expert social network…

  2. Beyond Academics: Challenging Issues Facing Community College Non-Academic Support Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Judith Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This research focused on identifying and exploring the significant current and emerging community college non-academic support service issues. These auxiliary services, not unlike academic or student affairs, support the community college mission and vision as well as students' academic success. Since December 2007, Americans have been…

  3. Perceptions of Campus Climate, Academic Efficacy and Academic Success among Community College Students: An Ethnic Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edman, Jeanne L.; Brazil, Brad

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined whether there are ethnic differences in perceptions of campus climate, social support, and academic efficacy among community college students, and whether student perceptions were associated with academic success. A total of 475 community college students completed a questionnaire that measured students' perceptions of…

  4. Apprenticeships, Collaboration and Scientific Discovery in Academic Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Derek Scott; Grayson, Diane J.; Madden, Erinn H.; Milewski, Antoni V.; Snyder, Cathy Ann

    2012-11-01

    Teachers may use apprenticeships and collaboration as instructional strategies that help students to make authentic scientific discoveries as they work as amateur researchers in academic field studies. This concept was examined with 643 students, ages 14-72, who became proficient at field research through cognitive apprenticeships with the Smithsonian Institute, School for Field Studies and Earthwatch. Control student teams worked from single research goals and sets of methods, while experimental teams varied goals, methods, and collaborative activities in Kenya, Costa Rica, Panama, and Ecuador. Results from studies indicate that students who conducted local pilot studies, collaborative symposia, and ongoing, long-term fieldwork generated significantly more data than did control groups. Research reports of the experimental groups were ranked highest by experts, and contributed the most data to international science journals. Data and anecdotal information in this report indicate that structured collaboration in local long-term studies using apprenticeships may increase the potential for students' academic field studies contribution of new information to science.

  5. Community (in) Colleges: The Relationship Between Online Network Involvement and Academic Outcomes at a Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Eliza D.; McFarland, Daniel A.; Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Deil-Amen, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study explores the relationship between online social network involvement and academic outcomes among community college students. Prior theory hypothesizes that socio-academic moments are especially important for the integration of students into community colleges and that integration is related to academic outcomes. Online social…

  6. Enhancing Academic Success by Creating a Community of Learners

    PubMed Central

    Berlie, Helen; Salinitri, Francine; McCuistion, Micah; Slaughter, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To enhance academic performance and student progression by creating a community of learners. Design. Academic performance and student progression of students participating in the first 3 years of a second-year pharmacy learning community were compared with those of students in the 3 previous classes. Students participating in the learning community completed surveys at the end of each semester and at the end of the academic year. Peer mentors were surveyed at the end of the academic year. Assessment. After implementing the learning community, failures during the second year of the pharmacy program decreased. Students had increasingly positive perceptions of the experience over the 3 years. Peer mentors rated their overall experience highly. Conclusion. Implementation of a learning community resulted in improved progression through the program and was well received by students. PMID:26396279

  7. Academic Achievement and Scientific Aptitude in Science among the Students of Standard-X

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manichander, T.; Brindhamani, M.

    2014-01-01

    The investigator attempted to find out the significant relationship between Academic Achievement and Scientific Aptitude in Science among the Students of Standard X. Scientific Aptitude Inventory was developed and Academic Achievement in Science Test as a tool was used to assess the Variables for this study. The Investigators employed Stratified…

  8. Sustaining Academic Community in the Aftermath of Tragedy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Terry M.

    2008-01-01

    The author's charge in this article is to focus particularly on the question of how an academic community can sustain itself and work productively and positively to achieve normally high aspirations for its students and all members of the community. Writing from the perspective of a longtime member of the Virginia Tech community, he begins with a…

  9. Academic Divisions Connections to the Community: Essential for Effective Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Lea Gabbert

    This commentary focuses on the need to develop collaborative efforts between academic divisions and the community. While the role of the public school in the community has not changed, there is growing concern that the personal interactions between schools and the community have been lost, thereby dismissing students' need to understand their…

  10. Early-Career Academics' Learning in Academic Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmik, Marvi; Karm, Mari; Haamer, Anu; Lepp, Liina

    2011-01-01

    Communities of practice are generally known as places of engagement, learning and development. The current research aims to develop understanding of Estonian early-career university teachers' learning and developing possibilities as teachers in the community of practice (in the university). This paper is based on narrative interviews of 25…

  11. Academic-community partnerships for sustainable preparedness and response systems.

    PubMed

    Isakov, Alexander; O'Neal, Patrick; Prescott, John; Stanley, Joan; Herrmann, Jack; Dunlop, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Academic institutions possess tremendous resources that could be important for community disaster response and preparedness activities. In-depth exploration of the role of academic institutions in community disaster response has elicited information about particular academic resources leveraged for and essential to community preparedness and response; factors that contribute to the decision-making process for partner engagement; and facilitators of and barriers to sustainable collaborations from the perspectives of academic institutions, public health and emergency management agencies, and national association and agency leaders. The Academic-Community Partnership Project of the Emory University Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center in collaboration with the Association of Schools of Public Health convened an invitational summit which included leadership from the National Association of County and City Health Officials, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, Directors of Public Health Preparedness, Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, CDC Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, Association of Schools of Public Health, Association of American Medical Colleges, Association of Academic Health Centers, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, and American Association of Poison Control Centers. From this convention, emerged recommendations for building and sustaining academic-public health-community collaborations for preparedness locally and regionally. PMID:25068939

  12. PUBLISHING SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOLARSHIP IN THE GLOBAL ACADEMIC COMMUNITY.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Elizabeth

    2015-09-20

    South Africa's academic publishing history has been profoundly influenced by its colonial heritage. This is reflected in the publication of Transactions of the South African Philosophical Society (later, the Royal Society of South Africa) from 1878. Although the Society and journal sought to promote original research about South Africa, it was modelled after the Royal Society in London and formed part of an imperial scientific community. As the local higher education institutions grew more independent and research-focused, local scholarly publishing developed as well, with university presses playing an increasingly important role. The University of South Africa (Unisa) Press started publishing departmental journals in the 1950s, with a focus on journals that 'speak to the student', and it is today the only South African university press with an active journals publishing programme. As external funding declined and the country became intellectually isolated in the high apartheid period, the Press managed to attract journals that could no longer be subsidized by learned societies and other universities. More recently, new co-publishing arrangements have brought South African journals back into an international intellectual community. Although some argue that this constitutes a re-colonization of South African knowledge production, it is also an innovative strategy for positioning local research in a global context.

  13. PUBLISHING SOUTH AFRICAN SCHOLARSHIP IN THE GLOBAL ACADEMIC COMMUNITY.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Elizabeth

    2015-09-20

    South Africa's academic publishing history has been profoundly influenced by its colonial heritage. This is reflected in the publication of Transactions of the South African Philosophical Society (later, the Royal Society of South Africa) from 1878. Although the Society and journal sought to promote original research about South Africa, it was modelled after the Royal Society in London and formed part of an imperial scientific community. As the local higher education institutions grew more independent and research-focused, local scholarly publishing developed as well, with university presses playing an increasingly important role. The University of South Africa (Unisa) Press started publishing departmental journals in the 1950s, with a focus on journals that 'speak to the student', and it is today the only South African university press with an active journals publishing programme. As external funding declined and the country became intellectually isolated in the high apartheid period, the Press managed to attract journals that could no longer be subsidized by learned societies and other universities. More recently, new co-publishing arrangements have brought South African journals back into an international intellectual community. Although some argue that this constitutes a re-colonization of South African knowledge production, it is also an innovative strategy for positioning local research in a global context. PMID:26495579

  14. Publishing South African scholarship in the global academic community

    PubMed Central

    le Roux, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    South Africa's academic publishing history has been profoundly influenced by its colonial heritage. This is reflected in the publication of Transactions of the South African Philosophical Society (later, the Royal Society of South Africa) from 1878. Although the Society and journal sought to promote original research about South Africa, it was modelled after the Royal Society in London and formed part of an imperial scientific community. As the local higher education institutions grew more independent and research-focused, local scholarly publishing developed as well, with university presses playing an increasingly important role. The University of South Africa (Unisa) Press started publishing departmental journals in the 1950s, with a focus on journals that ‘speak to the student’, and it is today the only South African university press with an active journals publishing programme. As external funding declined and the country became intellectually isolated in the high apartheid period, the Press managed to attract journals that could no longer be subsidized by learned societies and other universities. More recently, new co-publishing arrangements have brought South African journals back into an international intellectual community. Although some argue that this constitutes a re-colonization of South African knowledge production, it is also an innovative strategy for positioning local research in a global context. PMID:26495579

  15. Enhancing the mission of academic surgery by promoting scientific writing skills.

    PubMed

    Derish, Pamela A; Maa, John; Ascher, Nancy L; Harris, Hobart W

    2007-06-15

    Writing and publishing are key to career development and academic success for surgeons who have less time than ever to devote to these activities. To improve the scientific writing skills of its faculty and trainees and to help them complete their manuscripts and grant proposals more quickly, the Department of Surgery at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) established a service dedicated to scientific writing and editing. Through coursework in scientific writing, individual writing consultations, and editorial review, the service helps academic surgeons with the difficult tasks of writing and publishing their research and seeking extramural funding. The service has rapidly become a successful adjunct to the academic mission of the UCSF Department of Surgery and could offer a model for other academic surgery departments to increase scientific productivity and advance the academic surgical mission.

  16. Irreparable Cleavages in the Academic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Roosevelt

    1972-01-01

    The author concludes that the ideological are inherent and desirable in the academic process. Racial problems have been a social reality in the American society and will therefore continue on the campuses which are in fact microcosms of society. (Author)

  17. [Academic international cultural exchange: an experience of personal and scientific growth].

    PubMed

    Dalmolin, Indiara Sartori; Pereira, Eliane Ramos; Silva, Rose Mary Costa Rosa Andrade; Gouveia, Maria José Baltazar; Sardinheiro, José Júlio

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the student experience to integrate an international academic mobility program during undergraduate nursing. It is reported academic experience in Portugal, Algarve University, made possible by the Federal University of Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The experience of exchange performed within six months, enabled the acquisition of new scientific knowledge and cultural rights, including innovations in healthcare technology, development of research and academic links. As contributions are expected to stimulate and intensify the international mobility especially at undergraduate level, considering its importance to the improvement of academic excellence and the Brazilian higher education through scientific and cultural exchange abroad.

  18. Profiling Chief Academic Officers in Public Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Cynthia B.; Cejda, Brent D.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 369 chief academic officers (CAOs) at public community colleges belonging to the American Association of Community Colleges was conducted in 1998-99. Reports on the personal and professional characteristics of respondents. Indicates that female CAOs differ from male CAOs in four ways. Notes the continued low representation of ethnic…

  19. Academic Standards in the American Community College: Trends and Controversies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Howard B.

    Reasons for slipping academic standards in U.S. community colleges and a specific program combating this problem are discussed. Two reasons are offered for this slippage; the first has to do with the ambiguous state of the community college faculty. These teachers are said to have difficulty defining their roles because they feel a powerlessness…

  20. Measuring Academic Productivity and Changing Definitions of Scientific Impact

    PubMed Central

    Sarli, Cathy C.; Carpenter, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript provides a brief overview of the history of communication of scientific research and reporting of scientific research impact outcomes. Current day practices are outlined along with examples of how organizations and libraries are providing tools to evaluate and document the impact of scientific research to provide a meaningful narrative suitable for a variety of purposes and audiences. PMID:25438359

  1. The Effects of University-Industry Relationships and Academic Research on Scientific Performance: Synergy or Substitution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manjarres-Henriquez, Liney; Gutierrez-Gracia, Antonio; Carrion-Garcia, Andres; Vega-Jurado, Jaider

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates whether university-industry relationships (UIR) and academic research activities have complementary effects on the scientific production of university lecturers. The analysis is based on a case study of two Spanish universities. We find that the effects of R&D contracts with industry, and academic research activity on…

  2. Community-Academic Partnerships: Developing a Service-Learning Framework.

    PubMed

    Voss, Heather C; Mathews, Launa Rae; Fossen, Traci; Scott, Ginger; Schaefer, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Academic partnerships with hospitals and health care agencies for authentic clinical learning have become a major focus of schools of nursing and professional nursing organizations. Formal academic partnerships in community settings are less common despite evolving models of care delivery outside of inpatient settings. Community-Academic partnerships are commonly developed as a means to engage nursing students in service-learning experiences with an emphasis on student outcomes. The benefit of service-learning projects on community partners and populations receiving the service is largely unknown primarily due to the lack of structure for identifying and measuring outcomes specific to service-learning. Nursing students and their faculty engaged in service-learning have a unique opportunity to collaborate with community partners to evaluate benefits of service-learning projects on those receiving the service. This article describes the development of a service-learning framework as a first step toward successful measurement of the benefits of undergraduate nursing students' service-learning projects on community agencies and the people they serve through a collaborative community-academic partnership.

  3. Community-Academic Partnerships: Developing a Service-Learning Framework.

    PubMed

    Voss, Heather C; Mathews, Launa Rae; Fossen, Traci; Scott, Ginger; Schaefer, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Academic partnerships with hospitals and health care agencies for authentic clinical learning have become a major focus of schools of nursing and professional nursing organizations. Formal academic partnerships in community settings are less common despite evolving models of care delivery outside of inpatient settings. Community-Academic partnerships are commonly developed as a means to engage nursing students in service-learning experiences with an emphasis on student outcomes. The benefit of service-learning projects on community partners and populations receiving the service is largely unknown primarily due to the lack of structure for identifying and measuring outcomes specific to service-learning. Nursing students and their faculty engaged in service-learning have a unique opportunity to collaborate with community partners to evaluate benefits of service-learning projects on those receiving the service. This article describes the development of a service-learning framework as a first step toward successful measurement of the benefits of undergraduate nursing students' service-learning projects on community agencies and the people they serve through a collaborative community-academic partnership. PMID:26428344

  4. Creating Health-Focused Academic Community Partnerships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Sherry K.; Kelley, Susan J.; Spencer, Lorine

    1997-01-01

    Partnerships with communities help universities respond to contemporary societal issues, enrich educational experiences, and offer opportunities for research and faculty service. At Georgia State University, three health-related programs link campus and community in projects for grandparents raising grandchildren, migrant farm workers, and…

  5. Integration of community pediatricians into an academic department.

    PubMed

    Broffman, G; Stapleton, F B

    1995-01-01

    A process of enhanced participation by community pediatricians in the programs and administration of an academic department is described. We realize that many departments incorporate volunteer faculty into their academic programs without creating a specific structure, such as our divisional classification. The customary paradigm of providing "ad hoc" opportunities and responsibilities for volunteer faculty is somewhat analogous to the traditional "quality assurance" model of management, which is responsive in nature and places the participants in a dependent relationship to the academic leadership. Creating academic division structure allows the volunteer faculty to initiate projects, create interdivisional work teams, and evaluate the results of their involvement and is more reflective of the new "continuous quality improvement" model. This system elevates the volunteer faculty into a partnership relationship with the academic faculty. The sense of ownership and opportunity for personal growth appear to be important drives for sustained community involvement. Although the benefits of our program appear promising, committed leadership within the academy and community will be required for long-term success. Re-analysis of the intramural dynamics and activities following systemic restructuring of the health care system will be of interest.

  6. The dynamic interest in topics within the biomedical scientific community.

    PubMed

    Michon, Frederic; Tummers, Mark

    2009-08-07

    The increase in the size of the scientific community created an explosion in scientific production. We have analyzed the dynamics of biomedical scientific output during 1957-2007 by applying a bibliometric analysis of the PubMed database using different keywords representing specific biomedical topics. With the assumption that increased scientific interest will result in increased scientific output, we compared the output of specific topics to that of all scientific output. This analysis resulted in three broad categories of topics; those that follow the general trend of all scientific output, those that show highly variable output, and attractive topics which are new and grow explosively. The analysis of the citation impact of the scientific output resulted in a typical longtail distribution: the majority of journals and articles are of very low impact. This distribution has remained unchanged since 1957, although the interests of scientists must have shifted in this period. We therefore analyzed the distribution of articles in top journals and lower impact journals over time for the attractive topics. Novelty is rewarded by publication in top journals. Over time more articles are published in low impact journals progressively creating the longtail distribution, signifying acceptance of the topic by the community. There can be a gap of years between novelty and acceptance. Within topics temporary novelty is created with new subtopics. In conclusion, the longtail distribution is the foundation of the scientific output of the scientific community and can be used to examine different aspects of science practice.

  7. The Dynamic Interest in Topics within the Biomedical Scientific Community

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The increase in the size of the scientific community created an explosion in scientific production. We have analyzed the dynamics of biomedical scientific output during 1957–2007 by applying a bibliometric analysis of the PubMed database using different keywords representing specific biomedical topics. With the assumption that increased scientific interest will result in increased scientific output, we compared the output of specific topics to that of all scientific output. This analysis resulted in three broad categories of topics; those that follow the general trend of all scientific output, those that show highly variable output, and attractive topics which are new and grow explosively. The analysis of the citation impact of the scientific output resulted in a typical longtail distribution: the majority of journals and articles are of very low impact. This distribution has remained unchanged since 1957, although the interests of scientists must have shifted in this period. We therefore analyzed the distribution of articles in top journals and lower impact journals over time for the attractive topics. Novelty is rewarded by publication in top journals. Over time more articles are published in low impact journals progressively creating the longtail distribution, signifying acceptance of the topic by the community. There can be a gap of years between novelty and acceptance. Within topics temporary novelty is created with new subtopics. In conclusion, the longtail distribution is the foundation of the scientific output of the scientific community and can be used to examine different aspects of science practice. PMID:19668345

  8. Academic Entrepreneurship and Exchange of Scientific Resources: Material Transfer in Life and Materials Sciences in Japanese Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shibayama, Sotaro; Walsh, John P.; Baba, Yasunori

    2012-01-01

    This study uses a sample of Japanese university scientists in life and materials sciences to examine how academic entrepreneurship has affected the norms and behaviors of academic scientists regarding sharing scientific resources. Results indicate that high levels of academic entrepreneurship in a scientific field are associated with less reliance…

  9. Senate Rostrum: Academic Senate for California Community Colleges Newsletter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Rostrum is a quarterly publication of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges. The following articles are included in this issue: (1) The Need for full Time faculty (again) by Jane Patton; (2) Reading May Be the Key to Unlocking Basic Skills Success by Janet Fulks; (3) Diversity Institute on the Right Track by Beth Smith; (4)…

  10. UNESCO and the Academic Community: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wronski, Stanley P.

    A case study concerning professional ethics and political activism of university professors is presented. The subject of the study is the Committee for an Effective UNESCO, an organization which is pressuring the academic community to boycott all UNESCO-sponsored activities until UNESCO ceases its alleged discriminatory political activities and…

  11. State Level Coordination of Community Colleges: Academic Affairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wattenbarger, James L.; Christofoli, Luther B.

    This report focuses on the increasing number of problems clustered around state coordination of academic programs in community colleges. State directors and their staffs are becoming concerned with preventing duplication and ineffectiveness and with positive long-range planning. Data are based on questionnaires mailed to state agencies responsible…

  12. Negotiating Participation and Identity in Second Language Academic Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morita, Naoko

    2004-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative multiple case study that explored the academic discourse socialization experiences of L2 learners in a Canadian university. Grounded in the notion of "community of practice" (Lave & Wenger, 1991, p. 89), the study examined how L2 learners negotiated their participation and membership in their new L2 classroom…

  13. Academic Development Plan, Honolulu Community College, 1987-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessinger, Peter R.

    This academic development plan outlines the priorities of Honolulu Community College (HCC) for the years 1987 to 1995. After providing a history and description of the campus, the report explains the planning process, which involved campus-wide participation by representatives of faculty, staff, and advisory committees. The report then discusses…

  14. The Community College General Academic Assessment: Los Angeles District, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Michelle

    Information is provided on the characteristics of Los Angeles Community College District (LACCD) students and their general education and liberal arts knowledge. The first sections of the report provide information on the development and administration of the General Academic Assessment (GAA), an instrument containing representative items in the…

  15. The Managerial Roles of Public Community College Chief Academic Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Philip; Murray, John P.; Olivarez, Arturo, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the managerial roles of the community college Chief Academic Officer (CAO). Findings indicated that (1) CAOs placed the most importance on the roles of leader, liaison, and disseminator; (2) managers with more years of experience tended to emphasize the liaison role most; and (3) CAOs over 40 placed the most importance on…

  16. The Managerial Roles of Community College Chief Academic Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Philip Wayne

    This study utilized Mintzberg's taxonomy of managerial roles to examine the roles performed by community college chief academic officers (CAOs). Mintzberg's taxonomy defines managerial roles as a set of behaviors and identifies 10 distinct roles: (1) figurehead; (2) leader; (3) liaison; (4) monitor; (5) disseminator; (6) spokesperson; (7)…

  17. Digital Documents and the Future of the Academic Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Peter

    This paper examines the dynamics of change in scholarly publishing and the impact of technological innovation upon the academic community for which the system of scholarly communication serves as an infrastructure. For the purposes of this discussion, what is of immediate interest is the way the productivity issue frames the possible dimensions of…

  18. Freshmen and Sophomores Abroad: Community Colleges and Overseas Academic Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Gerhard

    The mechanics of establishing and maintaining overseas academic programs are examined in this monograph with respect to the community college level. Chapter 1 provides a history of internationalism in institutions of higher learning from ancient times in India, China, Persia, Greece, Rome, and Western Europe. Chapter 2 presents a rationale for the…

  19. Academic Optimism and Community Engagement in Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Misty M.; DiPaola, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationships among academic optimism, community engagement, and student achievement in urban elementary schools across one district. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from all 35 urban elementary schools across one district in Virginia, USA. Correlation, multiple regression, and…

  20. Increasing the Academic Momentum of Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attewell, Paul; Douglas, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the credits-attempted perspective--in the context of how many credits a student attempts in their first year of college--and reports on several related projects all intended to evaluate potential interventions to raise academic momentum among first-year community college students. The presentation contrasts non-experimental…

  1. Exploring Students' Perceptions of Academically Based Living-Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawrzynski, Matthew R.; Jessup-Anger, Jody Elizabeth; Stolz, Katherine; Helman, Cynthia; Beaulieu, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study employed focus group interviews to explore students' perceptions of three well established academically based living-learning communities at a large, land-grant university in the Midwest. Three themes merged that illustrated students' perceptions of a culture that promoted seamless learning, a scholarly environment, and an…

  2. Academic Crossover Report, Community Colleges, Fall 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Community Coll. System.

    Patterns of course distribution by subject areas and of courses taken by various majors are described in this report on Hawaii community colleges. Distribution of courses by major indicates: (1) liberal arts majors are the largest consumers of general education--66% of all Student Semester Hours (SSH) generated in general education are taken by…

  3. Evaluating Academic Programs in California's Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Andrew M.; Leigh, Duane E.

    2004-01-01

    Community colleges have traditionally received funding based on student enrollment, which is usually considered an input in the educational process. Recently, however, legislation enacted at the federal and state levels specifies that funding is to hinge, as least in part, on student performance--an output measure. Performance standards improve…

  4. Scientific Temper among Academically High and Low Achieving Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kour, Sunmeet

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to compare the scientific temper of high and low achieving adolescent girl students. Random sampling technique was used to draw the sample from various high schools of District Srinagar. The sample for the present study consisted of 120 school going adolescent girls (60 high and 60 low achievers). Data was…

  5. [Between fetishism and survival: are scientific articles a form of academic merchandise?].

    PubMed

    Castiel, Luis David; Sanz-Valero, Javier

    2007-12-01

    This article discusses the possible meanings of the intense prevailing concern in academic circles over the notion of research productivity, as reflected in an excess number of articles published in various scientific journals. The numerical accounting of articles published by researchers in scientific journals with renowned academic status serves to legitimize academics in their fields of work, in various ways. In this sense, we suggest that scientific articles take on aspects of merchandise-as-fetish, according to Marx's theory of use-value and exchange-value and Benjamin's exposure value. Meanwhile, the biological notions of selection and evolution are used as metaphorical elements in "bibliographic Darwinism". There are references as to the possibility many of the prevailing bibliometric concerns serve as instruments for econometric analysis, especially to orient and enhance cost-effectiveness analysis in research investments of various orders and types, from the point of view of their economic return. PMID:18157347

  6. Scientific writing training for academic physicians of diverse language backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Carrie; Deming, Stephanie P; Notzon, Beth; Cantor, Scott B; Broglio, Kristine R; Pagel, Walter

    2009-04-01

    Research articles are the coin of the realm for anyone working in academia, and success or failure to publish determines a biomedical researcher's career path. At the same time, the dramatic increase in foreign faculty and trainees in U.S. academia, as well as in international scientific collaboration, adds another dimension to this developmental vacuum: limited English-language skills. Paradoxically, few programs exist to develop and support the skills needed to accomplish the vital task of writing English-language research articles, which does not come naturally to most. To better prepare all trainees for research careers, editors in the Department of Scientific Publications at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center created an in-depth training program that would target the writing skills gap effectively. Instruction focused on structure, rhetorical organization, and the conventions of biomedical publishing. More than 300 trainees have participated in 22 workshops. Results of a survey of 46 participants at 6 months to 2.5 years after workshop completion indicated that participants from all language backgrounds believed the course to have improved their writing (97.8% strongly agreed or agreed), made it easier to begin a manuscript (80.4%), and helped them to get published (56.8%), with nonnative speakers of English reporting somewhat greater perceived benefit than native English speakers. On the basis of these results, the authors conclude that researchers of varied linguistic backgrounds appreciate the need for, and benefit from, instruction in the conventions of scientific writing.

  7. The Effect of Scientific Process Skills Education on Students' Scientific Creativity, Science Attitudes and Academic Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aktamis, Hilal; Ergin, Omer

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of teaching scientific process skills education to students to promote their scientific creativity, attitudes towards science, and achievements in science. The research includes a pre-test post-test research model with a control group. The subjects of the research consist of 40 students reading…

  8. Evolving from academic to academic entrepreneur: overcoming barriers to scientific progress and finance.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    The overall goal of my career as an academic chemist has always been the design and creation of advanced therapeutics and diagnostics that address unmet medical need in the management of chronic diseases. Realising this goal has been an immensely difficult process involving multidisciplinary problem-driven research at the chemistry-biology-medicine interfaces. With success in the laboratory, I started seriously to question the value of remaining an academic whose career is spent in the pursuit of knowledge and understanding alone without making any significant effort to translate knowledge and understanding gained into products of genuine utility for public benefit. Therefore, I elected by choice to become an academic entrepreneur, seeking opportunities wherever possible for the translation of the best of my personal and collaborative academic research work into potentially valuable and useful products. This choice has brought with it many unexpected difficulties and challenges. Nevertheless, progress bas been made and sufficient learnt to suggest that this would be an appropriate moment to take stock and provide some personal reflections on what it takes to design and create advanced therapeutics and diagnostics in the laboratory then seek to develop, innovate and translate the best towards market.

  9. Evolving from academic to academic entrepreneur: overcoming barriers to scientific progress and finance.

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    The overall goal of my career as an academic chemist has always been the design and creation of advanced therapeutics and diagnostics that address unmet medical need in the management of chronic diseases. Realising this goal has been an immensely difficult process involving multidisciplinary problem-driven research at the chemistry-biology-medicine interfaces. With success in the laboratory, I started seriously to question the value of remaining an academic whose career is spent in the pursuit of knowledge and understanding alone without making any significant effort to translate knowledge and understanding gained into products of genuine utility for public benefit. Therefore, I elected by choice to become an academic entrepreneur, seeking opportunities wherever possible for the translation of the best of my personal and collaborative academic research work into potentially valuable and useful products. This choice has brought with it many unexpected difficulties and challenges. Nevertheless, progress bas been made and sufficient learnt to suggest that this would be an appropriate moment to take stock and provide some personal reflections on what it takes to design and create advanced therapeutics and diagnostics in the laboratory then seek to develop, innovate and translate the best towards market. PMID:27476702

  10. Shaping the Scientific Community: Why You Should Get Involved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Emmerik, T. H. M.; Aalbers, E.

    2014-12-01

    (Early career) hydrologists work hard to gain a better understanding of the water cycle and bring water sciences to the next level. Sometimes we tend to forget that communicating our science to our peers and the public requires a strong and well-functioning community, steered by scientific organizations. Scientific organizations that are often criticized for its poor mix of gender and age. However, as our organizations rely on volunteers, you can actually do something yourself! Attend our presentation in the Water Sciences Pop-Ups session, where we will try to show that everyone can support our community, take initiative and get involved!

  11. Purges in comparative perspective: Rules for exclusion and inclusion in the scientific community under political pressure.

    PubMed

    Beyler, Richard; Kojevnikov, Alexei; Wang, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    During the intense political upheaval that dominated the middle decades of the twentieth century, modern states intensified their drives to discipline broad sectors of society and ensure their political reliability. Subjected to such pressures, scientific institutions faced the challenge of admitting new, officially mandated criteria into the regulation of scientific life. We examine the effects of these policies on the Kaiser Wilhelm Society in National Socialist Germany, the Max Planck Society in occupied Germany after 1945, the USSR Academy of Sciences throughout the Stalin era, and the National Academy of Sciences in early cold war America. In all these cases, while academic elites largely accepted the required radical changes in the rules for membership in the scientific community, they also sought to manipulate the process to their own institutional advantage.

  12. Measuring the Economic Value of the Electronic Scientific Information Services in Portuguese Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melo, Luiza Baptista; Pires, Cesaltina Pacheco

    2011-01-01

    This article has three main objectives: i) to describe the use patterns of electronic and traditional resources in Portuguese academic libraries; ii) to estimate the value of the Portuguese electronic scientific information consortium b-on by using two alternative valuation methodologies; iii) to relate the use patterns with the valuation of b-on.…

  13. An Overlooked Population in Community College: International Students' (In)Validation Experiences With Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Guided by validation theory, this study aims to better understand the role that academic advising plays in international community college students' adjustment. More specifically, this study investigated how academic advising validates or invalidates their academic and social experiences in a community college context. Method: This…

  14. An International Scientific Community: Asian Scholars in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hyaeweol

    This study examines the attitudes of Asian-born scholars and scientists who have settled in the United States and their role in the international scientific and educational community. It is based on interviews with 46 scientists and scholars born in China, Hong Kong, India, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. Nine chapters focus on: (1) Asian scholars…

  15. Academic Innovation and Autonomy: An Exploration of Entrepreneurship Education within American Community Colleges and the Academic Capitalist Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mars, Matthew M.; Ginter, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    Employing interviews with individuals from 16 community colleges across the country, as well as an independent consultant engaged in activities of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), this study considers the organizational structures and academic practices associated with community college entrepreneurship…

  16. Network-Driven Reputation in Online Scientific Communities

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hao; Xiao, Rui; Cimini, Giulio; Medo, Matúš

    2014-01-01

    The ever-increasing quantity and complexity of scientific production have made it difficult for researchers to keep track of advances in their own fields. This, together with growing popularity of online scientific communities, calls for the development of effective information filtering tools. We propose here an algorithm which simultaneously computes reputation of users and fitness of papers in a bipartite network representing an online scientific community. Evaluation on artificially-generated data and real data from the Econophysics Forum is used to determine the method's best-performing variants. We show that when the input data is extended to a multilayer network including users, papers and authors and the algorithm is correspondingly modified, the resulting performance improves on multiple levels. In particular, top papers have higher citation count and top authors have higher h-index than top papers and top authors chosen by other algorithms. We finally show that our algorithm is robust against persistent authors (spammers) which makes the method readily applicable to the existing online scientific communities. PMID:25463148

  17. Network-driven reputation in online scientific communities.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hao; Xiao, Rui; Cimini, Giulio; Medo, Matúš

    2014-01-01

    The ever-increasing quantity and complexity of scientific production have made it difficult for researchers to keep track of advances in their own fields. This, together with growing popularity of online scientific communities, calls for the development of effective information filtering tools. We propose here an algorithm which simultaneously computes reputation of users and fitness of papers in a bipartite network representing an online scientific community. Evaluation on artificially-generated data and real data from the Econophysics Forum is used to determine the method's best-performing variants. We show that when the input data is extended to a multilayer network including users, papers and authors and the algorithm is correspondingly modified, the resulting performance improves on multiple levels. In particular, top papers have higher citation count and top authors have higher h-index than top papers and top authors chosen by other algorithms. We finally show that our algorithm is robust against persistent authors (spammers) which makes the method readily applicable to the existing online scientific communities.

  18. The Community College General Academic Assessment: Miami-Dade Community College District, 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Michelle

    Information is provided on the characteristics of Miami-Dade Community College (MDCC) students and their general education and liberal arts knowledge. The first sections of the report provide information on the development and administration of the General Academic Assessment (GAA), an instrument containing representative items in the humanities,…

  19. The Community College General Academic Assessment: St. Louis Community College, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Michelle

    Information is provided on the characteristics of St. Louis Community College (SLCC) students and their general education and liberal arts knowledge. The first sections of the report provide information on the development and administration of the General Academic Assessment (GAA), an instrument containing representative items in the humanities,…

  20. Community Building and its impact on Sustainable Scientific Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk, Matthew; yt project, Enzo Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    In this talk, I will explore the aspects of community building most relevant to developing, releasing, sustaining and improving scientific software over its lifetime. This will include topics such as code of conduct, developing systems for communication, bridging barriers between different methods of cooperation and competition, and working to ensure that all participants are both recognized for their contributions and feel valued for their efforts. Finally, I will conclude with a few use cases of how this atmosphere can contribute to overall scientific productivity, rather than detract from the productivity of individual researchers.

  1. Enlarging the Academic Community: Creating Retirement Communities Linked to Academic Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Andrew; Tsao, Tien-Chien

    2006-01-01

    This article explores a major opportunity that universities have to capitalize on their existing property portfolio to both earn additional revenue and enhance the quality of the student and staff experience: the creation of university-linked retirement communities. We examine this opportunity in the context of demographic and educational trends…

  2. Curating Big Data Made Simple: Perspectives from Scientific Communities.

    PubMed

    Sowe, Sulayman K; Zettsu, Koji

    2014-03-01

    The digital universe is exponentially producing an unprecedented volume of data that has brought benefits as well as fundamental challenges for enterprises and scientific communities alike. This trend is inherently exciting for the development and deployment of cloud platforms to support scientific communities curating big data. The excitement stems from the fact that scientists can now access and extract value from the big data corpus, establish relationships between bits and pieces of information from many types of data, and collaborate with a diverse community of researchers from various domains. However, despite these perceived benefits, to date, little attention is focused on the people or communities who are both beneficiaries and, at the same time, producers of big data. The technical challenges posed by big data are as big as understanding the dynamics of communities working with big data, whether scientific or otherwise. Furthermore, the big data era also means that big data platforms for data-intensive research must be designed in such a way that research scientists can easily search and find data for their research, upload and download datasets for onsite/offsite use, perform computations and analysis, share their findings and research experience, and seamlessly collaborate with their colleagues. In this article, we present the architecture and design of a cloud platform that meets some of these requirements, and a big data curation model that describes how a community of earth and environmental scientists is using the platform to curate data. Motivation for developing the platform, lessons learnt in overcoming some challenges associated with supporting scientists to curate big data, and future research directions are also presented.

  3. Engage/Trojan Neighbors: A community service partnership between an academic division and residential community.

    PubMed

    Pyatak, Elizabeth A; Díaz, Jesús; Delgado, Celso

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the case of an after-school program, focused on providing enrichment opportunities for neighborhood youth, jointly administered through an academic division and residential community within a large urban research university. The program, originally conceived as an activity-based after-school program for middle school youth, expanded in scope in response to both community and student needs. The resident faculty fellow in this community served as a liaison between the academic division and office of residential education, helping maintain continuity and facilitating effective student leadership of the program. In this case, we detail the origins and evolution of the program, including strategies used to resolve challenges that arose over several years of program implementation.

  4. Building Scientific Community Support for the Next Generation Science Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, S. M.; Awad, A. A.; Robeck, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards offer an opportunity to teach Earth and space science in ways that are closer to how scientists practice, and more relevant to students and to societal issues. However, the level of scientific community involvement required to capitalize on this opportunity is high. Building on the results of the Summit Meeting on the Implementation of the NGSS at the State Level , this presentation proposes a set of mechanisms and practices by which the NGSS Earth and space science community can support NGSS implementation at the national, state and local levels. Based on work with summit attendees, classroom teachers, informal educators and undergraduate faculty, this presentation proposes ways to build a network of practitioners with shared communication, approaches and resources. A set of mechanisms whereby the community can build relationships and share practices will be described, along with an emerging set of strategies for supporting groups as they take the first steps into implementation.

  5. The Attitudes and Behaviors of Generational Students towards Academic Integrity at the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Jeannine M.

    2011-01-01

    Academic dishonesty is a problem that educators face at all levels of education. Many studies have focused on researching academic dishonesty at four year colleges and universities, ignoring the community college. The purpose of this study was to examine the self-reported attitudes and behaviors of generational students towards academic integrity…

  6. Academic Press and School Sense of Community: Sources of Friction, Prospects for Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shouse, Roger C.

    Schools often face a conflict between placing an emphasis on the pursuit of academic excellence (academic press) and creating a positive school community. This paper examines the separate and joint achievement effects of both academic press and communality across a sample of American public and private high schools. The hypothesis holds that when…

  7. A Qualitative Inquiry into the Training and Development Provided to Community College Academic Advisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikluscak, George Steven, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The qualitative study explored the training and development provided to Community College academic advisors who are members of the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA). The purpose was to investigate the factors academic advisors believe are crucial for the support of their roles as advisors. Professional, faculty, and self-identified…

  8. Where Is the Learning in Smaller Learning Communities? Academic Press, Social Support for Learning, and Academic Engagement in Smaller Learning Community Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Christopher; Bol, Linda; Pribesh, Shana; Nunnery, John

    2013-01-01

    The extent to which smaller learning communities' (SLCs) focus on academic press and strong social relationships affects academic engagement among 9th graders in urban high schools was investigated. Data were collected through classroom observations, student questionnaires, and focus groups with teachers. Data were analyzed using descriptive…

  9. Building a community-academic partnership to improve health outcomes in an underserved community.

    PubMed

    McCann, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    East Garfield Park, IL, is an impoverished community with 59.7% of residents falling below twice the poverty level and 42.6% of its children in poverty. In 2001, the leading causes of hospitalizations were heart disease (10.3%), diabetes (2%), and asthma (3.9%), all of which occur at frequencies 33% greater than the Chicago average. Finally, a review of the health care facilities in the community suggests that there is a need for accessible primary health care services in the area. The purpose of this project was to improve health outcomes in an impoverished, underserved community with documented health care needs and lack of adequate health care services by creating a community-academic partnership to provide on-site, interdisciplinary, health care services within an established and trusted community-based social service agency, Marillac House. The short-term objectives for this project included creating a community-academic partnership between Marillac House and Colleges of Nursing, Medicine, and Health Sciences; providing comprehensive health care services; and developing an innovative clinical education model for interdisciplinary care across specialties. Long-term objectives included providing preventative services; evidenced-based management of acute and chronic illness; evaluating client's health outcomes; and creating a sustainability plan for the long-term success of the health center. PMID:20055966

  10. The Scientific Community as Audience: Toward a Rhetorical Analysis of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overington, Michael A.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the contributions of Polanyi, Ziman and Kuhn toward a conception of a scientific community and offers a rhetorical perspective on the construction of scientific knowledge. Outlines a scheme for analyzing scientific discourse and illustrates its application. (MH)

  11. Academic inequality through the lens of community ecology: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Shenhua; Tatsumi, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Ecological assemblages are generally characterized by a few dominant species and numerous others. Such unequal distributions of dominance also emerge in human society, including in scientific communities. Here, based on formal community ecological analyses, we show the temporal trends in the number of scientific publication in the discipline of “ecology.” Based on this, we infer possible factors causing the imbalance of reputation and dominance among countries. We relied on 454 ecological meta-analysis papers published from 1998 to 2014, which sourced over 29,000 original publications. Formal meta-analyses are essential for synthesizing findings from individual studies and are critical for assessing issues and informing policy. We found that, despite the rapid expansion of outlets for ecology papers (analogous to an increase in carrying capacity, in ecological systems), country diversity as determined from first author affiliations (analogous to species diversity) did not increase. Furthermore, a country identity was more powerful than the popularity of the scientific topic and affected the chance of publication in high-profile journals, independent of the potential novelty of findings and arguments of the papers, suggesting possible academic injustice. Consequently, a rank order and hierarchy has been gradually formed among countries. Notably, this country-dominance rank is not only specific to this scientific domain but also universal across different societal situations including sports and economics, further emphasizing that inequality and hierarchical structure exist even in modern human society. Our study demonstrates a need for having robust frameworks to facilitate equality and diversity in the scientific domain in order to better inform society and policy. PMID:26644987

  12. Transitions to College: Academic Pathways from High School to the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines the emergence of high school-to-college transition models, referred to as academic pathways, that regard community colleges as a primary partner for higher learning. It explores three academic pathways that deliberately partner secondary schools with community colleges. They are dual credit and dual enrollment, tech prep and…

  13. Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, January 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Rostrum is a quarterly publication of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges. The following articles are included in this issue: (1) The Master Plan for Higher Education and the Missions of the California Community Colleges (Jane Patton); (2) Academic Dishonesty and the Faculty's Right to Assign a Grade: A Test of the Academic…

  14. Magnets and Seekers: A Network Perspective on Academic Integration inside Two Residential Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    Residential learning communities aim to foster increased academic and social integration, ideally leading to greater student success. However, the concept of academic integration is often conceptualized and measured at the individual level, rather than the theoretically more consistent community level. Network analysis provides a paradigm and…

  15. Rethinking the "Apprenticeship of Liberty": The Case for Academic Programs in Community Engagement in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan W.

    2012-01-01

    This article articulates a model for the "engaged campus" through academic programs focused on community engagement, broadly construed. Such academic programs--usually coalesced in certificate programs, minors, and majors--provide a complementary vision for the deep institutionalization of civic and community engagement in the academy that can…

  16. The PILI ‘Ohana Project: A Community-Academic Partnership to Achieve Metabolic Health Equity in Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    Kekauoha, Puni; Dillard, Adrienne; Yoshimura, Sheryl; Palakiko, Donna-Marie; Hughes, Claire; Townsend, Claire KM

    2014-01-01

    Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) have higher rates of excess body weight and related medical disorders, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, compared to other ethnic groups in Hawai‘i. To address this metabolic health inequity, the Partnership for Improving Lifestyle Intervention (PILI) ‘Ohana Project, a community-academic partnership, was formed over eight years ago and developed two community-placed health promotion programs: the PILI Lifestyle Program (PLP) to address overweight/obesity and the Partners in Care (PIC) to address diabetes self-care. This article describes and reviews the innovations, scientific discoveries, and community capacity built over the last eight years by the PILI ‘Ohana Project's (POP) partnership in working toward metabolic health equity. It also briefly describes the plans to disseminate and implement the PLP and PIC in other NHPI communities. Highlighted in this article is how scientific discoveries can have a real-world impact on health disparate populations by integrating community wisdom and academic expertise to achieve social and health equity through research. PMID:25535599

  17. Science Gateways, Scientific Workflows and Open Community Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, M. E.; Marru, S.

    2014-12-01

    Science gateways and scientific workflows occupy different ends of the spectrum of user-focused cyberinfrastructure. Gateways, sometimes called science portals, provide a way for enabling large numbers of users to take advantage of advanced computing resources (supercomputers, advanced storage systems, science clouds) by providing Web and desktop interfaces and supporting services. Scientific workflows, at the other end of the spectrum, support advanced usage of cyberinfrastructure that enable "power users" to undertake computational experiments that are not easily done through the usual mechanisms (managing simulations across multiple sites, for example). Despite these different target communities, gateways and workflows share many similarities and can potentially be accommodated by the same software system. For example, pipelines to process InSAR imagery sets or to datamine GPS time series data are workflows. The results and the ability to make downstream products may be made available through a gateway, and power users may want to provide their own custom pipelines. In this abstract, we discuss our efforts to build an open source software system, Apache Airavata, that can accommodate both gateway and workflow use cases. Our approach is general, and we have applied the software to problems in a number of scientific domains. In this talk, we discuss our applications to usage scenarios specific to earth science, focusing on earthquake physics examples drawn from the QuakSim.org and GeoGateway.org efforts. We also examine the role of the Apache Software Foundation's open community model as a way to build up common commmunity codes that do not depend upon a single "owner" to sustain. Pushing beyond open source software, we also see the need to provide gateways and workflow systems as cloud services. These services centralize operations, provide well-defined programming interfaces, scale elastically, and have global-scale fault tolerance. We discuss our work providing

  18. A Community-Academic Partnered Grant Writing Series to Build Infrastructure for Partnered Research.

    PubMed

    King, Keyonna M; Pardo, Yvette-Janine; Norris, Keith C; Diaz-Romero, Maria; Morris, D'Ann; Vassar, Stefanie D; Brown, Arleen F

    2015-10-01

    Grant writing is an essential skill necessary to secure financial support for community programs and research projects. Increasingly, funding opportunities for translational biomedical research require studies to engage community partners, patients, or other stakeholders in the research process to address their concerns. However, there is little evidence on strategies to prepare teams of academic and community partners to collaborate on grants. This paper presents the description and formative evaluation of a two-part community-academic partnered grant writing series designed to help community organizations and academic institutions build infrastructure for collaborative research projects using a partnered approach. The first phase of the series was a half-day workshop on grant readiness, which was open to all interested community partners. The second phase, open only to community-academic teams that met eligibility criteria, was a 12-week session that covered partnered grant writing for foundation grants and National Institutes of Health grants. Participants in both phases reported an increase in knowledge and self-efficacy for writing partnered proposals. At 1-year follow-up, participants in Phase 2 had secured approximately $1.87 million in funding. This community-academic partnered grant writing series helped participants obtain proposal development skills and helped community-academic teams successfully compete for funding.

  19. Crossing the Chasm of Mistrust: Collaborating With Immigrant Populations Through Community Organizations and Academic Partners

    PubMed Central

    Pirie, Alex

    2013-01-01

    As a community partner and an academic researcher, we experienced the direct and extended benefits of a relatively small-scale, community-engaged informed consent process that developed in an immigrant occupational health study, Assessing and Controlling Occupational Health Risks for Immigrant Populations in Somerville, Massachusetts. The practice of human participants research played a positive role in the community, and both community partners and researchers, as well as the larger academic community, reaped unexpected benefits during the five-year project (2005–2010), which continue into the present. Lessons learned from our experience may be helpful for wider application. PMID:24134386

  20. Crossing the chasm of mistrust: collaborating with immigrant populations through community organizations and academic partners.

    PubMed

    Pirie, Alex; Gute, David M

    2013-12-01

    As a community partner and an academic researcher, we experienced the direct and extended benefits of a relatively small-scale, community-engaged informed consent process that developed in an immigrant occupational health study, Assessing and Controlling Occupational Health Risks for Immigrant Populations in Somerville, Massachusetts. The practice of human participants research played a positive role in the community, and both community partners and researchers, as well as the larger academic community, reaped unexpected benefits during the five-year project (2005-2010), which continue into the present. Lessons learned from our experience may be helpful for wider application.

  1. Building Scientific Workflows for the Geosciences with Open Community Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, M. E.; Marru, S.; Weerawarana, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    We describe the design and development of the Apache Airavata scientific workflow software and its application to problems in geosciences. Airavata is based on Service Oriented Architecture principles and is developed as general purpose software for managing large-scale science applications on supercomputing resources such as the NSF's XSEDE. Based on the NSF-funded EarthCube Workflow Working Group activities, we discuss the application of this software relative to specific requirements (such as data stream data processing, event triggering, dealing with large data sets, and advanced distributed execution patterns involved in data mining). We also consider the role of governance in EarthCube software development and present the development of Airavata software through the Apache Software Foundation's community development model. We discuss the potential impacts on software accountability and sustainability using this model.

  2. An Investigation of Students' Satisfaction with Academic Advising and Students' Impressions of Academic Advisors at a Rural Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Dedeaux, Vanessa Massalyn

    2011-01-01

    This study was the first attempt to evaluate the college's career/technical current advising practices. The purpose of this study was to investigate career/technical students' satisfaction with academic advising at a rural community college and to investigate whether there were any relationships between students' satisfaction and various…

  3. Dilemmas of Rural Life and Livelihood: Academics and Community. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeYoung, Alan J.

    This essay considers connections between rural American life, livelihood, academics, and community. Two major areas are addressed: curricular issues in rural high schools and the nature of community and its central influence on the rural school. Historically youth who stayed in their rural community did not require preparation for higher…

  4. Variation in the interpretation of scientific integrity in community-based participatory health research.

    PubMed

    Kraemer Diaz, Anne E; Spears Johnson, Chaya R; Arcury, Thomas A

    2013-11-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) has become essential in health disparities and environmental justice research; however, the scientific integrity of CBPR projects has become a concern. Some concerns, such as appropriate research training, lack of access to resources and finances, have been discussed as possibly limiting the scientific integrity of a project. Prior to understanding what threatens scientific integrity in CBPR, it is vital to understand what scientific integrity means for the professional and community investigators who are involved in CBPR. This analysis explores the interpretation of scientific integrity in CBPR among 74 professional and community research team members from of 25 CBPR projects in nine states in the southeastern United States in 2012. It describes the basic definition for scientific integrity and then explores variations in the interpretation of scientific integrity in CBPR. Variations in the interpretations were associated with team member identity as professional or community investigators. Professional investigators understood scientific integrity in CBPR as either conceptually or logistically flexible, as challenging to balance with community needs, or no different than traditional scientific integrity. Community investigators interpret other factors as important in scientific integrity, such as trust, accountability, and overall benefit to the community. This research demonstrates that the variations in the interpretation of scientific integrity in CBPR call for a new definition of scientific integrity in CBPR that takes into account the understanding and needs of all investigators.

  5. Perceptions that influence the maintenance of scientific integrity in community-based participatory research.

    PubMed

    Kraemer Diaz, Anne E; Spears Johnson, Chaya R; Arcury, Thomas A

    2015-06-01

    Scientific integrity is necessary for strong science; yet many variables can influence scientific integrity. In traditional research, some common threats are the pressure to publish, competition for funds, and career advancement. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) provides a different context for scientific integrity with additional and unique concerns. Understanding the perceptions that promote or discourage scientific integrity in CBPR as identified by professional and community investigators is essential to promoting the value of CBPR. This analysis explores the perceptions that facilitate scientific integrity in CBPR as well as the barriers among a sample of 74 professional and community CBPR investigators from 25 CBPR projects in nine states in the southeastern United States in 2012. There were variations in perceptions associated with team member identity as professional or community investigators. Perceptions identified to promote and discourage scientific integrity in CBPR by professional and community investigators were external pressures, community participation, funding, quality control and supervision, communication, training, and character and trust. Some perceptions such as communication and training promoted scientific integrity whereas other perceptions, such as a lack of funds and lack of trust could discourage scientific integrity. These results demonstrate that one of the most important perceptions in maintaining scientific integrity in CBPR is active community participation, which enables a co-responsibility by scientists and community members to provide oversight for scientific integrity. Credible CBPR science is crucial to empower the vulnerable communities to be heard by those in positions of power and policy making.

  6. Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges: Academic Year Report 2013-2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The "Academic Year Report 2013-14" provides a snapshot of funding, facilities, staffing, and enrollments in Washington's community and technical colleges for the past academic year. The report also describes key measures of student outcomes and addresses the most frequently asked questions related to expenditures, personnel, and…

  7. Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges Academic Year Report, 2012-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This "Academic Year Report 2012-13" provides a snapshot of funding, facilities, staffing, and enrollments in community and technical colleges in Washington state for the past academic year. The report also describes key measures of student outcomes and addresses the most frequently asked questions related to expenditures, personnel and…

  8. Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, May 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Rostrum is a quarterly publication of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges. The following articles are included in this issue: (1) An SLO Terminology Glossary: A Draft in Progress by Lesley Kawaguchi; (2) A Tale of Two Data Elements by Mark Wade Lieu; (3) Sustainability and the Academic Senate by David Beaulieu and Don…

  9. Financial Aid Tipping Points: An Analysis of Aid and Academic Achievement at a California Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coria, Elizabeth; Hoffman, John L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore relationships between financial aid awards and measures of student academic achievement. Financial aid and academic records for 11,956 students attending an urban California community college were examined and analyzed using simultaneous linear regression and two-way factorial ANOVAs. Findings revealed a…

  10. State of Washington. State Board for Community and Technical Colleges. Academic Year Report: 2005-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Academic Year Report 2005-06 provides a snapshot of funding, facilities, staffing, and enrollments in community and technical colleges in the past academic year. The report also describes key measures of student outcomes and addresses the most frequently asked questions related to expenditures, personnel and students. Additional demographic…

  11. New Academics Negotiating Communities of Practice: Learning to Swim with the Big Fish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jawitz, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the use of situated cognition theory to investigate how new academics learn to judge complex student performance in an academic department at a South African university. The analysis revealed the existence of two largely separate communities of practice within the department, one centred on the provision of undergraduate…

  12. Exploring the Effect of a Non-Residential Learning Community on Academic Achievement and Institutional Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaton, Patrick Michael

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine what effect the Freshmen Interest Group (FIG) program, a variation of a non-residential learning community had on academic achievement scores and institutional rates of persistence. Study variables included: gender; race; pre-collegiate academic achievement (GPA scores); educational preferences (major…

  13. Academic In/Civility: Co-Constructing the Foundation for a Civil Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Zopito; Polihronis, Christine; Blackwell, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    While it has important implications for the success of students as well as for institutions, academic in/civility is not an issue that is readily engaged by many professors. However, the creation of a civil learning community should be a high priority for everyone in the academe for it has the potential to benefit both individuals and…

  14. A Discourse Analysis of Collaboration between Academic and Student Affairs in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulley, Needham Yancey

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the nature of collaboration between academic affairs and student affairs units in the community college context from a qualitative perspective. A discourse analysis study was conducted to explore the ways in which collaborative practice was discussed and understood by chief and midlevel academic and…

  15. Community ACTION Boards: An Innovative Model for Effective Community–Academic Research Partnerships

    PubMed Central

    James, Sherline; Arniella, Guedy; Bickell, Nina A.; Walker, Willie; Robinson, Virginia; Taylor, Barbara; Horowitz, Carol R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Community-based participatory research (CBPR) requires equitable partnerships between community stakeholders and academics. Traditionally, researchers relied on community advisory boards, but these boards often play a reactive role on a project-by-project basis. The East and Central Harlem Health Outcomes (ECHHO) Community Action Board (CAB), however, is an effective, proactive group. Objectives The ECHHO board sought to identify key strategies and tools to build and employ a partnership model, and to disseminate lessons learned to other community–academic partnerships. Methods Current and former board members were interviewed and a wide range of related documents was reviewed. Lessons Learned The board became effective when it prioritized action and relationship-building, across seven key domains: Shared priorities, diversity, participation, transparency, mutual respect and recognition, and personal connections. The model is depicted graphically. Conclusion Community advisory boards may benefit from attention to taking action, and to building relationships between academics and community members. PMID:22616207

  16. Assessing the Academic Medical Center as a Supportive Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Sam C.

    2011-01-01

    Academic medical centers are well-known for their emphasis on teaching, research and public service; however, like most large, bureaucratic organizations, they oftentimes suffer from an inability to learn as an organization. The role of the research administrator in the academic medical center has grown over time as the profession itself has…

  17. Ernest Solvay*s scientific networks. From personal research to academic patronage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coupain, Nicolas

    2015-09-01

    Ernest Solvay was a multifaceted man. A successful captain of industry, he got known in the second part of his life as a magnanimous sponsor of academic science. His most notable achievements in this field are the creation of a series of university institutes in Brussels as well as the co-organization of the conferences of physics and chemistry that bear his name and are still held today. A famous picture of 1911 depicts this man deprived of any university degree, surrounded by the brightest scientists of the time. The often conveyed image of a self-made man leads to an underestimation of his networking and delegation capabilities. Recent investigations in his private archives as well as in "his" company archives shed new light on his organizational skills in the scientific arena. This paper focuses especially on this facet, and intends to analyze how Solvay behaved as an organizer of science. Three partially overlapping levels are discussed in sequence: the Solvay Company level, his personal level, and the academic level. The paper identifies the key actors in these areas, and evaluates the intensity of control and delegation exerted by Ernest Solvay in each of these spheres.

  18. Bringing Community and Academic Scholars Together to Facilitate and Conduct Authentic Community Based Participatory Research: Project UNITED

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Dwight; Yerby, Lea; Tucker, Melanie; Foster, Pamela Payne; Hamilton, Kara C.; Fifolt, Matthew M.; Hites, Lisle; Shreves, Mary Katherine; Page, Susan B.; Bissell, Kimberly L.; Lucky, Felecia L.; Higginbotham, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Cultural competency, trust, and research literacy can affect the planning and implementation of sustainable community-based participatory research (CBPR). The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight: (1) the development of a CBPR pilot grant request for application; and (2) a comprehensive program supporting CBPR obesity-related grant proposals facilitated by activities designed to promote scholarly collaborations between academic researchers and the community. After a competitive application process, academic researchers and non-academic community leaders were selected to participate in activities where the final culminating project was the submission of a collaborative obesity-related CBPR grant application. Teams were comprised of a mix of academic researchers and non-academic community leaders, and each team submitted an application addressing obesity-disparities among rural predominantly African American communities in the US Deep South. Among four collaborative teams, three (75%) successfully submitted a grant application to fund an intervention addressing rural and minority obesity disparities. Among the three submitted grant applications, one was successfully funded by an internal CBPR grant, and another was funded by an institutional seed funding grant. Preliminary findings suggest that the collaborative activities were successful in developing productive scholarly relationships between researchers and community leaders. Future research will seek to understand the full-context of our findings. PMID:26703675

  19. Bringing Community and Academic Scholars Together to Facilitate and Conduct Authentic Community Based Participatory Research: Project UNITED.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Dwight; Yerby, Lea; Tucker, Melanie; Foster, Pamela Payne; Hamilton, Kara C; Fifolt, Matthew M; Hites, Lisle; Shreves, Mary Katherine; Page, Susan B; Bissell, Kimberly L; Lucky, Felecia L; Higginbotham, John C

    2016-01-01

    Cultural competency, trust, and research literacy can affect the planning and implementation of sustainable community-based participatory research (CBPR). The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight: (1) the development of a CBPR pilot grant request for application; and (2) a comprehensive program supporting CBPR obesity-related grant proposals facilitated by activities designed to promote scholarly collaborations between academic researchers and the community. After a competitive application process, academic researchers and non-academic community leaders were selected to participate in activities where the final culminating project was the submission of a collaborative obesity-related CBPR grant application. Teams were comprised of a mix of academic researchers and non-academic community leaders, and each team submitted an application addressing obesity-disparities among rural predominantly African American communities in the US Deep South. Among four collaborative teams, three (75%) successfully submitted a grant application to fund an intervention addressing rural and minority obesity disparities. Among the three submitted grant applications, one was successfully funded by an internal CBPR grant, and another was funded by an institutional seed funding grant. Preliminary findings suggest that the collaborative activities were successful in developing productive scholarly relationships between researchers and community leaders. Future research will seek to understand the full-context of our findings. PMID:26703675

  20. The Impact of Curricular Learning Communities on Furthering the Engagement and Persistence of Academically Underprepared Students at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Joshua Grant

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the impact of basic skills curricular learning communities on academically underprepared community college students to determine if participation in such programs significantly contributed to student persistence from year one to year two. The conceptual framework that informed this study was Tinto's (1993) longitudinal…

  1. Building sustainable community partnerships into the structure of new academic public health schools and programs.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Monica; Gillman, Laura B; Boumbulian, Paul; Davis, Marsha; Galen, Robert S

    2011-01-01

    We describe and assess how the College of Public Health at the University of Georgia, established in 2005, has developed formal institutional mechanisms to facilitate community-university partnerships that serve the needs of communities and the university. The College developed these partnerships as part of its founding; therefore, the University of Georgia model may serve as an important model for other new public health programs. One important lesson is the need to develop financial and organizational mechanisms that ensure stability over time. Equally important is attention to how community needs can be addressed by faculty and students in academically appropriate ways. The integration of these 2 lessons ensures that the academic mission is fulfilled at the same time that community needs are addressed. Together, these lessons suggest that multiple formal strategies are warranted in the development of academically appropriate and sustainable university-community partnerships.

  2. How to Identify E-Learning Trends in Academic Teaching: Methodological Approaches and the Analysis of Scientific Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Helge; Heise, Linda; Heinz, Matthias; Moebius, Kathrin; Koehler, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to introduce methodology and findings of a trend study in the field of e-learning. The overall interest of the study was the analysis of scientific e-learning discourses. What comes next in the field of academic e-learning? Which e-learning trends dominate the discourse at universities? Answering such…

  3. Scientific Productivity and Academic Promotion: A Study on French and Italian Physicists. NBER Working Paper No. 16341

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lissoni, Francesco; Mairesse, Jacques; Montobbio, Fabio; Pezzoni, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The paper examines the determinants of scientific productivity (number of articles and journals' impact factor) for a panel of about 3600 French and Italian academic physicists active in 2004-05. Endogeneity problems concerning promotion and productivity are addressed by specifying a generalized Tobit model, in which a selection probit equation…

  4. Students' Perceptions of Their Academics, Relationships, and Sense of Belonging: Comparisons across Residential Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schussler, Deborah L.; Fierros, Edward G.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how participation in one of four learning community models influenced first-year college students' perceptions of their academic environment, relationships with other members of the college community, and sense of belonging at the institution. The research was conducted at a private, mid-sized university and employed a…

  5. The Academic Consequences of Employment for Students Enrolled in Community College. CCRC Working Paper No. 46

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadgar, Mina

    2012-01-01

    College students are increasingly combining studying with paid employment, and community college students tend to work even longer hours compared with students at four-year colleges. Yet, there is little evidence on the academic consequences of community college students' term-time employment. Using a rare administrative dataset from Washington…

  6. Academic Performance of Howard Community College Students in Transfer Institutions: Preliminary Findings. Research Report Number 37.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radcliffe, Susan K.

    A study was conducted at Howard Community College (HCC) to determine the performance of HCC students at transfer institutions. Four factors related to transfer success were examined: earning an associate degree at HCC; enrolling in a community college transfer program; length of time spent at HCC; and academic preparation and achievement at the…

  7. Student Engagement and Student Characteristics as Predictors of Student Academic Achievement at Illinois Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egdorf, Randall Louis

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover which student engagement variables and student characteristics predict student academic achievement. The research utilized the standardized national Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) to examine data from 19,516 students from 13 Illinois community colleges. The outcome of student…

  8. Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, March 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Rostrum is a quarterly publication of the academic senate for California community colleges. The following articles are included in this issue: (1) Establishing a Systemwide California Community College General Education Advanced Placement (CCC GE AP) List by Dave Degroot; (2) Explaining the ASCCC Position on "Transfer Degrees" by Jane Patton;…

  9. The Propensity of Community College Chief Academic Officers To Leave an Institution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, John P.; Murray, Judy I.; Summar, Cliff.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the findings of a national survey measuring the propensity of community college chief academic officers (CAOs) to leave their current position, the levels of satisfaction they feel with their jobs, and their perceptions of role conflict and ambiguity. Finds that although community college CAOs do experience some role conflict, they are…

  10. Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This document consists of four issues (a year's worth: Nov 1995; Jan,Mar,Oct 1996) of a newsletter devoted to issues of importance regarding community college education and provides updates on activities and policies of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges. The November 1995 issue highlights affirmative action and offers a…

  11. Academic Advisers: Perceptions of Training and Professional Development at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study utilizing in-depth interviews examined academic advisers' perceptions of training and professional development resources at a Midwestern U.S. community college. In addition, the study examined the availability and accessibility of training and professional development resources at the community college. The study…

  12. O'Farrell Community School: Center for Advanced Academic Studies. A Charter School Prototype.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Bob

    1996-01-01

    O'Farrell Community School, in San Diego, California, was built on the principles of restructuring, teacher and community empowerment, interagency collaboration, and interdisciplinary teaching. Supported by the Panasonic and Stuart Foundations, the school offers an enriched, untracked three-year academic program for grades six through eight. All…

  13. Perceptions That Influence the Maintenance of Scientific Integrity in Community-Based Participatory Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraemer Diaz, Anne E.; Spears Johnson, Chaya R.; Arcury, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific integrity is necessary for strong science; yet many variables can influence scientific integrity. In traditional research, some common threats are the pressure to publish, competition for funds, and career advancement. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) provides a different context for scientific integrity with additional and…

  14. Institutionalization of Community Partnerships: The Challenge for Academic Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Magwood, Gayenell S.; Andrews, Jeannette O.; Zapka, Jane; Cox, Melissa J.; Newman, Susan; Stuart, Gail W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Current public health priorities emphasize the elimination of health disparities, translational research, and transdisciplinary and community alliances. The Center for Community Health Partnerships is a proactive initiative to address new paradigms and priorities in health care through institutionalization of community-university partnerships. This report highlights innovative strategies and lessons learned. PMID:23698666

  15. Perceptions of community-based participatory research in the delta nutrition intervention research initiative:an academic perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lower Mississippi Delta Nutrition Intervention Research Initiative (Delta NIRI) is an academic-community partnership between seven academic institutions and three communities in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. A range of community-based participatory methods have been employed to develop susta...

  16. Developing a sustainable foot care clinic in a homeless shelter within an academic-community partnership.

    PubMed

    Schoon, Patricia M; Champlin, Barbara E; Hunt, Roberta J

    2012-12-01

    Nursing faculty are confronted with the need to design community learning activities with vulnerable populations to prepare students for nursing practice. The creation of sustainable academic-community partnerships with agencies providing care to underserved populations meets this challenge. This article describes the development and implementation of a foot care clinic in a homeless shelter, created through a model of curricular integration, faculty engagement, and a long-term academic-community partnership. A transformative pedagogical approach based on service-learning was used to facilitate student understanding of social justice through activities that promote citizenship, develop advocacy skills, and increase knowledge and skills related to the role of the public health nurse in the community. The process of designing and developing a community clinical learning activity and the essential components for sustainability are discussed. Student outcomes are addressed. Recommendations for implementing a foot care clinic within an academic–community partnership are outlined. PMID:23362514

  17. Blogging as Community of Practice: Lessons for Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Cally; Carter, Susan; Aitchison, Claire

    2015-01-01

    As practices and expectations around doctoral writing continue to change, so too do the demands on academic developers and learning advisors. Social media is increasingly playing a role in doctoral education, just as it is in higher education more generally. This paper explores a blog initiated in 2012 to inform and support doctoral writing; since…

  18. "Academicus Interculturalis"? Negotiating Interculturality in Academic Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otten, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Structure and agency of cultural diversity in (international) higher education have to be addressed with a critical perspective on international mobility and practices of international academic teaching. In order to overcome naive assumptions about intercultural developments on the individual and the organizational level, sociological analysis…

  19. Second Language Students' Discourse Socialization in Academic Online Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yim, Yoon-kyung Kecia

    2011-01-01

    This article reports an investigation of second language (L2) students' class participation in English-language university courses in two different modes: face-to-face off-line and asynchronous online. The study addressed (1) what characteristics of academic online discourse were created in graduate courses; (2) how students reported their…

  20. Creating community-academic partnerships for cancer disparities research and health promotion.

    PubMed

    Meade, Cathy D; Menard, Janelle M; Luque, John S; Martinez-Tyson, Dinorah; Gwede, Clement K

    2011-05-01

    To effectively attenuate cancer disparities in multiethnic, medically underserved populations, interventions must be developed collaboratively through solid community-academic partnerships and driven by community-based participatory research (CBPR). The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) has been created to identify and implement interventions to address local cancer disparities in partnership with community-based nonprofit organizations, faith-based groups, community health centers, local media, and adult literacy and education organizations. TBCCN activities and research efforts are geared toward addressing critical information and access issues related to cancer control and prevention in diverse communities in the Tampa Bay area. Such efforts include cross-cultural health promotion, screening, and awareness activities in addition to applied research projects that are rooted in communities and guided by CBPR methods. This article describes these activities as examples of partnership building to positively affect cancer disparities, promote community health, and set the stage for community-based research partnerships. PMID:19822724

  1. The Engagement of Academic Institutions in Community Disaster Response: A Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Anne L.; Logue, Kristi M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Using comparative analysis, we examined the factors that influence the engagement of academic institutions in community disaster response. Methods We identified colleges and universities located in counties affected by four Federal Emergency Management Agency-declared disasters (Kentucky ice storms, Hurricanes Ike and Gustav, California wildfires, and the Columbia space shuttle disintegration) and performed key informant interviews with officials from public health, emergency management, and academic institutions in those counties. We used a comparative case study approach to explore particular resources provided by academic institutions, processes for engagement, and reasons for engagement or lack thereof in the community disaster response. Results Academic institutions contribute a broad range of resources to community disaster response. Their involvement and the extent of their engagement is variable and influenced by (1) their resources, (2) preexisting relationships with public health and emergency management organizations, (3) the structure and organizational placement of the school's disaster planning and response office, and (4) perceptions of liability and lines of authority. Facilitators of engagement include (1) the availability of faculty expertise or special training programs, (2) academic staff presence on public health and emergency management planning boards, (3) faculty contracts and student practica, (4) incident command system or emergency operations training of academic staff, and (5) the existence of mutual aid or memoranda of agreements. Conclusion While a range of relationships exist between academic institutions that engage with public health and emergency management agencies in community disaster response, recurrent win-win themes include co-appointed faculty and staff; field experience opportunities for students; and shared planning and training for academic, public health, and emergency management personnel. PMID:25355979

  2. Predicting Community College Transfer Student Success: The Role of Community College Academic Experiences on Post-Transfer Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Kristin LeAnne

    2013-01-01

    Community college students who transfer to four-year universities face a variety of academic, social, and psychological challenges as they adjust to new postsecondary institutions (Laanan, 2001; Townsend, 2008). Student success through the transfer process is positively influenced by accumulated knowledge, skills, and experiences from the…

  3. Developing a transcultural academic-community partnership to arrest obesity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rebecca E; Soltero, Erica G; Mama, Scherezade K; Saavedra, Fiorella; Ledoux, Tracey A; McNeill, Lorna

    2013-01-01

    Innovative and empirically tested strategies are needed to define and understand obesity prevention and reduction in a transcultural society. This manuscript describes the development of Science & Community, a partnership developed over a 3-year period with the end goal of implementing a community-based participatory research (CBPR) trial to reduce and prevent obesity. Outreach strategies focused on promoting the project via existing and new channels and identifying and contacting potential partners using established strategies. Science & Community developed and fostered partnerships by hosting a series of interactive meetings, including three Opportunity Receptions, four Community Open Forum Symposia, and quarterly Community Advisory Board (CAB) meetings. Opportunity Reception (N = 62) and Symposia attendees (N = 103) represented the diversity of the community, and participants reported high satisfaction with content and programming. From these events, the CAB was formed and was comprised of 13 community representatives. From these meetings, a Partnership representing 34 organizations and 614 individuals emerged that has helped to guide the development of future proposals and strategies to reduce obesity in Houston/Harris County.

  4. Developing a transcultural academic-community partnership to arrest obesity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rebecca E; Soltero, Erica G; Mama, Scherezade K; Saavedra, Fiorella; Ledoux, Tracey A; McNeill, Lorna

    2013-01-01

    Innovative and empirically tested strategies are needed to define and understand obesity prevention and reduction in a transcultural society. This manuscript describes the development of Science & Community, a partnership developed over a 3-year period with the end goal of implementing a community-based participatory research (CBPR) trial to reduce and prevent obesity. Outreach strategies focused on promoting the project via existing and new channels and identifying and contacting potential partners using established strategies. Science & Community developed and fostered partnerships by hosting a series of interactive meetings, including three Opportunity Receptions, four Community Open Forum Symposia, and quarterly Community Advisory Board (CAB) meetings. Opportunity Reception (N = 62) and Symposia attendees (N = 103) represented the diversity of the community, and participants reported high satisfaction with content and programming. From these events, the CAB was formed and was comprised of 13 community representatives. From these meetings, a Partnership representing 34 organizations and 614 individuals emerged that has helped to guide the development of future proposals and strategies to reduce obesity in Houston/Harris County. PMID:25030103

  5. No More a Stranger: The Development of Academic Literacy in Adult English Language Learners in Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Diane S.

    2011-01-01

    This purpose of this study was to identify how adult ELL community college students perceive their experience in the development of academic literacy, specifically academic writing, and to explore their perceptions of the factors, attitudes, and experiences that have facilitated their development of that level of academic literacy. To address this…

  6. [G. Baglivi and scientific European community between rationalism and enlightenment].

    PubMed

    Toscano, A

    2000-01-01

    The Baglivi Correspondence, kept in the Waller Collection at the University Library of Uppsala, has been published in Italy for the first time in 1999. This Correspondence kept in Sweden provides new information about the scientific Italian culture between the second half of the seventeenth century and the beginning of the eighteenth. Moreover, it provides important knowledge on the diffusion the Baglivi's work in the scientific European context at that time.

  7. Supplemental Instruction: The Effect of Demographic and Academic Preparation Variables on Community College Student Academic Achievement in STEM-Related Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabitoy, Eric R.; Hoffman, John L.; Person, Dawn R.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated variables associated with academic preparation and student demographics as predictors of academic achievement through participation in supplemental instruction (SI) programs for community college students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) fields. The findings suggest a differential impact of SI outcome for…

  8. Developing professional identity in nursing academics: the role of communities of practice.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Nicola; Ferguson, Dorothy; Wilkie, George; Corcoran, Terry; Simpson, Liz

    2009-08-01

    This paper analyses the current standing of nursing within the wider United Kingdom (UK) higher education (HE) environment and considers the development of academic identity within the sector, introducing a technology mediated approach to professional learning and development. A community of practice (CoP) is a way of learning based on collaboration among peers. Individuals come together virtually or physically, with a common purpose, defined by knowledge rather than task [Wenger, E., 1998. Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning and Identity, sixth ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge]. In 2008, a small team of academics at Glasgow Caledonian University, School of Nursing, Midwifery and Community Health created and implemented iCoP, a project undertaken to pilot an international CoP, where novices and expert academics collaborated to debate and discuss the complex transition from clinician to academic. Although not intended as a conventional research project, the developmental journey and emerging online discussion provide an insight into the collective thoughts and opinions of a multi-national group of novice academics. The article also highlights the key challenges, problems and limitations of working in an international online arena with professionals who traditionally work and thrive in a face to face, real time environment. PMID:19250718

  9. Community Intelligence in Knowledge Curation: An Application to Managing Scientific Nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Dong; Li, Ang; Liu, Guocheng; Chen, Fei; Wu, Jiayan; Xiao, Jingfa; Wang, Xumin; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Harnessing community intelligence in knowledge curation bears significant promise in dealing with communication and education in the flood of scientific knowledge. As knowledge is accumulated at ever-faster rates, scientific nomenclature, a particular kind of knowledge, is concurrently generated in all kinds of fields. Since nomenclature is a system of terms used to name things in a particular discipline, accurate translation of scientific nomenclature in different languages is of critical importance, not only for communications and collaborations with English-speaking people, but also for knowledge dissemination among people in the non-English-speaking world, particularly young students and researchers. However, it lacks of accuracy and standardization when translating scientific nomenclature from English to other languages, especially for those languages that do not belong to the same language family as English. To address this issue, here we propose for the first time the application of community intelligence in scientific nomenclature management, namely, harnessing collective intelligence for translation of scientific nomenclature from English to other languages. As community intelligence applied to knowledge curation is primarily aided by wiki and Chinese is the native language for about one-fifth of the world’s population, we put the proposed application into practice, by developing a wiki-based English-to-Chinese Scientific Nomenclature Dictionary (ESND; http://esnd.big.ac.cn). ESND is a wiki-based, publicly editable and open-content platform, exploiting the whole power of the scientific community in collectively and collaboratively managing scientific nomenclature. Based on community curation, ESND is capable of achieving accurate, standard, and comprehensive scientific nomenclature, demonstrating a valuable application of community intelligence in knowledge curation. PMID:23451119

  10. Community intelligence in knowledge curation: an application to managing scientific nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lin; Xu, Chao; Tian, Ming; Sang, Jian; Zou, Dong; Li, Ang; Liu, Guocheng; Chen, Fei; Wu, Jiayan; Xiao, Jingfa; Wang, Xumin; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Harnessing community intelligence in knowledge curation bears significant promise in dealing with communication and education in the flood of scientific knowledge. As knowledge is accumulated at ever-faster rates, scientific nomenclature, a particular kind of knowledge, is concurrently generated in all kinds of fields. Since nomenclature is a system of terms used to name things in a particular discipline, accurate translation of scientific nomenclature in different languages is of critical importance, not only for communications and collaborations with English-speaking people, but also for knowledge dissemination among people in the non-English-speaking world, particularly young students and researchers. However, it lacks of accuracy and standardization when translating scientific nomenclature from English to other languages, especially for those languages that do not belong to the same language family as English. To address this issue, here we propose for the first time the application of community intelligence in scientific nomenclature management, namely, harnessing collective intelligence for translation of scientific nomenclature from English to other languages. As community intelligence applied to knowledge curation is primarily aided by wiki and Chinese is the native language for about one-fifth of the world's population, we put the proposed application into practice, by developing a wiki-based English-to-Chinese Scientific Nomenclature Dictionary (ESND; http://esnd.big.ac.cn). ESND is a wiki-based, publicly editable and open-content platform, exploiting the whole power of the scientific community in collectively and collaboratively managing scientific nomenclature. Based on community curation, ESND is capable of achieving accurate, standard, and comprehensive scientific nomenclature, demonstrating a valuable application of community intelligence in knowledge curation. PMID:23451119

  11. An academic-community cardiovascular service line affiliation: design, implementation, and performance.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Charles R; Bunker, Steve; Garrison, Larry F; Means, Michael D; Pepine, Carl J; Conti, C Richard; Dewar, Marvin A; Goldfarb, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Both affiliation with an academic medical center and implementation of service line management may be effective management strategies for community health care organizations. The authors describe the design, implementation, and performance of a unique combination of these two distinct strategies for cardiovascular program development in the affiliation of the University of Florida Health Science Center with Health First, a regional community-based integrated delivery system.

  12. Establishing the SouthWestern Academic Health Network (SWAHN): A Survey Exploring the Needs of Academic and Community Networks in SouthWestern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Kathryn; Randhawa, Jasmine; Steele, Margaret

    2015-10-01

    With the evolving fields of health research, health professional education and advanced clinical care comes a need to bring researchers, educators and health care providers together to enhance communication, knowledge-sharing and interdisciplinary collaboration. There is also a need for active collaboration between academic institutions and community organizations to improve health care delivery and health outcomes in the community setting. In Canada, an Academic Health Sciences Network model has been proposed to achieve such activities. The SouthWestern Academic Health Network (SWAHN) has been established among three universities, three community colleges, community hospitals, community-based organizations and health care providers and two Local Health Integrated Networks (LHINs) in Southwestern Ontario. A survey was conducted to understand the characteristics, activities, existing partnerships, short- and long-term goals of the academic and community health networks in SouthWestern Ontario to inform the development of SWAHN moving forward. A total of 114 health networks were identified from the two participating LHINs, 103 community health networks and 11 academic health networks. A mailed survey was sent to all networks and responses were analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative approaches. The short- and long-term goals of these networks were categorized into five main themes: Public Health, Education, Research, System Delivery and Special Populations. Overall, this study helped to elicit important information from the academic and community based networks, which will inform the future work of SWAHN. This research has also demonstrated the significance of collecting information from both academic and community partners during the formation of other interdisciplinary health networks.

  13. Rural Community–Academic Partnership Model for Community Engagement and Partnered Research

    PubMed Central

    Baquet, Claudia R.; Bromwell, Jeanne L.; Hall, Margruetta B.; Frego, Jacob F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: A rural community–academic partnership was developed in 1997 between the Eastern Shore Area Health Education Center (ESAHEC) and the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s (UMSOM) Office of Policy and Planning (OPP). The model supports partnered research, bidirectional interactions, and community and health professional education. Objectives: The primary aim was to develop a sustainable community–academic partnership that addressed health and social issues on the rural Eastern Shore. Lessons Learned: Mutual respect and trust led to sustained, bidirectional interactions and communication. Community and academic partner empowerment were supported by shared grant funds. Continual refinement of the partnership and programs occurred in response to community input and qualitative and quantitative research. Results: The partnership led to community empowerment, increased willingness to participate in clinical trials and biospecimen donation, leveraged grant funds, partnered research, and policies to support health and social interventions. Conclusions: This partnership model has significant benefits and demonstrates its relevance for addressing complex rural health issues. Innovative aspects of the model include shared university grants, community inclusion on research protocols, bidirectional research planning and research ethics training of partners and communities. The model is replicable in other rural areas of the United States. PMID:24056510

  14. Exploring "The World around Us" in a Community of Scientific Enquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlop, Lynda; Compton, Kirsty; Clarke, Linda; McKelvey-Martin, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    The primary Communities of Scientific Enquiry project is one element of the outreach work in Science in Society in Biomedical Sciences in partnership with the School of Education at the University of Ulster. The project aims to develop scientific understanding and skills at key stage 2 and is a response to several contemporary issues in primary…

  15. Toward a Model of Social Influence that Explains Minority Student Integration into the Scientific Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, Mica; Woodcock, Anna; Hernandez, Paul R.; Schultz, P. Wesley

    2011-01-01

    Students from several ethnic minority groups are underrepresented in the sciences, indicating that minority students more frequently drop out of the scientific career path than nonminority students. Viewed from a perspective of social influence, this pattern suggests that minority students do not integrate into the scientific community at the same…

  16. Knowledge Sharing and Educational Technology Acceptance in Online Academic Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nistor, Nicolae; Baltes, Beate; Schustek, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Online programs rely on the use of educational technology for knowledge sharing in academic virtual communities of practice (vCoPs). This poses the question as to which factors influence technology acceptance. Previous research has investigated the inter-relationship between educational technology acceptance (ETA) and the vCoP context…

  17. Psychological Symptoms Linking Exposure to Community Violence and Academic Functioning in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busby, Danielle R.; Lambert, Sharon F.; Ialongo, Nicholas S.

    2013-01-01

    African American adolescents are exposed disproportionately to community violence, increasing their risk for emotional and behavioral symptoms that can detract from learning and undermine academic outcomes. The present study examined whether aggressive behavior and depressive and anxious symptoms mediated the association between exposure to…

  18. Early career academic researchers and community-based participatory research: wrestling match or dancing partners?

    PubMed

    Lowry, Kelly Walker; Ford-Paz, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Early career faculty members at academic medical centers face unique obstacles when engaging in community-based participatory research (CBPR). Challenges and opportunities for solutions pertaining to mentorship, time demands, unfamiliarity of colleagues with CBPR approaches, ethical review regulations, funding, and publication and promotion are discussed. PMID:24330696

  19. Partnership for Health Care: An Academic Nursing Center in a Rural Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMone, Priscilla; McDaniel, Roxanne W.; Sullivan, Toni J.

    1998-01-01

    The University of Missouri-Columbia Sinclair School of Nursing collaborates with Moberly Area Community College in providing holistic health care services to rural college students. This academic nursing center is based on nursing models rather than medical models of health. (JOW)

  20. Washington Community Colleges Factbook. Addendum A: Student Enrollments, Academic Year 1977-78.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Terre; Story, Sherie

    In order to reveal trends in community college enrollments in Washington, student demographic and enrollment data for academic year 1977-78 were compiled and compared with figures for previous years. The report provides annualized averages for full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollments for the system for the years 1967 to 1977, and for FTE students by…

  1. Washington Community College Factbook Addendum A: Student Enrollments, Academic Year 1978-79.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Terre

    In order to reveal trends in community college enrollments in Washington, student demographic and enrollment data for academic year 1978-79 were compiled and compared with figures for previous years. The study report provides annualized averages for full-time equivalent (FTE) enrollments for the years 1968-69 to 1978-79 and quarterly and…

  2. Exposure to Violence in the Community Predicts Friendships with Academically Disengaged Peers During Middle Adolescence.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, David; Kelly, Brynn M; Mali, Luiza V; Duong, Mylien T

    2016-09-01

    Adolescents who have been exposed to violence in the community often experience subsequent difficulties with academic achievement. Because competence in the classroom is a salient developmental task during the adolescent years, outcomes in this critical context can then have broader implications for social and psychological functioning. In the current study, we tested a hypothesized progression in which the association between violence exposure and deficient achievement is presumed to potentiate friendships with academically disengaged peers. We followed 415 urban adolescents (53 % girls; average age of 14.6 years) for a one-year period, with two annual assessment of psychosocial functioning. Exposure to violence in the community and academic engagement were assessed with a self-report inventory; reciprocated friendships were assessed with a peer interview; and achievement was indexed based on a review of school records. Consistent with our hypotheses, neighborhood violence was associated with deficient classroom achievement. Poor achievement, in turn, mediated associations between community violence exposure and low academic engagement among friends. Our findings highlight pathways though which exposure to community violence potentially predicts later dysfunction. PMID:27138174

  3. Faculty Use of Culturally Mediated Instruction in a Community College Academic Enrichment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacey, Charna L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine faculty use of Culturally Mediated Instructional (CMI) practices in a community college-based academic enrichment program. The intent of the study was two-fold: (a) to search for evidence that instructional practices were reflective of Hollins' (1996) theory of CMI, and (b) to explore faculty perceptions of…

  4. Community-Engaged Courses in a Conflict Zone: A Case Study of the Israeli Academic Corpus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golan, Daphna; Shalhoub-Kevorkian, Nadera

    2014-01-01

    This article is based on an action-oriented study of 13 community-engaged courses at 11 institutions of higher education in Israel. These courses were not part of peace education programs but rather accredited academic courses in various disciplines, all of which included practice and theory. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how these…

  5. Effectiveness of Blended Cooperative Learning Environment in Biology Teaching: Classroom Community Sense, Academic Achievement and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yapici, I. Ümit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Blended Cooperative Learning Environment (BCLE) in biology teaching on students' classroom community sense, their academic achievement and on their levels of satisfaction. In the study, quantitative and qualitative research methods were used together. The study was carried out with 30 students in…

  6. Latinas/os in Community College Developmental Education: Increasing Moments of Academic and Interpersonal Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acevedo-Gil, Nancy; Santos, Ryan E.; Alonso, LLuliana; Solorzano, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the experiences of Latinas/os in community college English and math developmental education courses. Critical race theory in education and the theory of validation serve as guiding frameworks. The authors find that institutional agents provide academic validation by emphasizing high expectations, focusing on social…

  7. Communities of Practice in Higher Education: Professional Learning in an Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Linet

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the life history of a university academic, and the ways in which he learned in different communities of practice during his career. This account raises questions about the applicability of situated learning theory to a knowledge-based organisation, and argues that both the external context and the individuals within the…

  8. Academic Computing at the Community College of Baltimore: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Beverly; Kearsley, Greg

    Part of a series of case studies on successful academic computing programs at minority institutions, this monograph focuses on the Community College of Baltimore (CCB). Sections I and II outline the purpose and background of the case study project, focusing on the 11 computing activities the case studies are designed to facilitate, the need for…

  9. Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, September 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Rostrum is a quarterly publication of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges. The following articles are included in this issue: (1) A Modest Proposal: Simplifying Articulation, Respecting Local Autonomy, and Responding to "Common Course Numbering" Mandates by Michelle Pilati; (2) Resolving the TBA Dilemma: A Tale of Three Memos…

  10. Academic Performance of Community College Transfers: Psychological, Sociodemographic, and Educational Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Xueli

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the academic performance of community college transfer students at four-year institutions. It uses a nationally representative sample from the National Education Longitudinal Study of 1988 (NELS: 88/2000) and the Postsecondary Education Transcript Study (PETS). Results from an Ordinary Least Squares regression model suggest…

  11. Women Chief Academic Officers of Public Community Colleges: Significant Predictors for Their Career Paths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Cynthia B.; Cejda, Brent D.

    As women now comprise 39% of the chief academic officer (CAO) positions, the focus of this investigation was the career paths and mobility factors of women CAOs in public comprehensive community colleges. This survey of 142 women resulted in eight distinct, common pathways by which women attain this rank. The typical profile of a female CAO is a…

  12. Women Chief Academic Officers of Public Community Colleges: Career Paths and Mobility Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Cynthia B.

    This study investigates the career paths and mobility factors of female chief academic officers (CAOs) in public community colleges. Analysis revealed the most significant predictors for the career paths to be entry port, number of higher education positions held, and the first prior position held. Gender did not significantly influence mobility…

  13. Improving Teaching and Learning in Community Colleges: Guidelines for Academic Leaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawthorne, Elizabeth M.; Smith, Albert B.

    This report presents findings of a 1991 survey of chief academic officers (CAO's) of community, technical, and junior colleges to measure the level of commitment to instructional effectiveness and illuminate those areas which deserve attention. The study replicated a 1987 survey of CAO's at four-year institutions and utilized the five areas of…

  14. Connecting Higher Education Research in Japan with the International Academic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yonezawa, Akiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the historical, current, and future challenges of higher education research in Japan within a global context. Japanese higher education research has been strongly influenced by the international academic community. At the same time, higher education researchers in Japan have participated in international projects, and Japan has…

  15. Community Awareness Planning in Academic Libraries: The Bowling Green State University Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabol, Laurie; Parrish, Marilyn

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the diversity of academic library users and the need for community awareness planning, and describes a program developed at Bowling Green State University libraries that evolved around a celebration of National Library Week. Topics discussed include free computer searches, displays and exhibits, publicity, read-a-thons, fundraising, and…

  16. Putting a Face on Hunger: A Community-Academic Research Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffey, Nancy; Canales, Mary K.; Moore, Emily; Gullickson, Melissa; Kaczmarski, Brenda

    2014-01-01

    Food insecurity is a growing concern for Eau Claire County residents in Western Wisconsin. A community-academic partnership studied food insecurity through the voices of families struggling to access food and institutions that assist with hunger related problems. Data were collected through focus groups held in urban and rural parts of the county.…

  17. The Impact of Video Game Playing on Academic Performance at a Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutcheon, Lynn E.; Campbell, Janice D.

    1986-01-01

    Studies the relationship between video game playing and academic achievement. Compares matched groups of community college psychology students, differing in the amount of their game playing. There were no differences between frequent and infrequent players on measures of psychology class attendance, locus of control, or grade point average.…

  18. The Northwest Indiana Center for Data and Analysis: A Case Study of Academic Library Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Scott; Morris, Cele; Sutherland, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    This paper details community engagement activity of an academic library coordinated within a broader university strategic plan. The Anderson Library at Indiana University Northwest (IU-Northwest) supports a service called the Northwest Indiana Center for Data and Analysis. Created in 1996 with funding made available from the Indiana University…

  19. Understanding Community College Students' Learning Styles and the Link to Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Learning styles have been an area of interest in educational psychology for many decades. However, community college students have been overlooked in learning styles research. To enhance teacher efficacy and student success, it is important to continue to evaluate the relationship between learning styles and academic achievement. The purpose of…

  20. Evaluating the Effects of Basic Skills Mathematics Placement on Academic Outcomes of Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melguizo, Tatiana; Bo, Hans; Prather, George; Kim, Bo

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the authors' proposed study is to evaluate the effectiveness of math placement policies for entering community college students on these students' academic success in math, and their transfer and graduation rates. The main research question that guides the proposed study is: What are the effects of various basic skills…

  1. The Exploding Community? The University Idea and the Smashing of the Academic Atom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuller, Tom

    1990-01-01

    Identifies a number of centrifugal pressures currently splintering universities which raise questions about academia's sense of community. Uses the analogy of smashing the atom to explore these pressures. Cites increasing numbers of temporary and contract workers which brings about a division of labor that affects the nature of academic discourse…

  2. Directory of Academic Marine Programs in California. Community Colleges, Four-Year Colleges, and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Kelly Elizabeth

    This directory provides descriptions of marine academic programs in California's community colleges, 4-year private colleges and universities, and 4-year public colleges and universities. Each program listing (by institution) includes; (1) program title corresponding to official degree title; (2) degree(s) offered; (3) descriptive information…

  3. Black Males and the Community College: Student Perspectives on Faculty and Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, J. Luke; Turner, Caroline S.

    2011-01-01

    This article highlights findings from a qualitative study of factors affecting the academic success of African American male students in the community college. Data was collected through interviews with 28 Black male students in a midsized institution in the southwestern United States. Findings illuminated four key faculty-initiated elements that…

  4. Balancing Open Access with Academic Standards: Implications for Community College Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabbard, Anita; Mupinga, Davison M.

    2013-01-01

    Community colleges act as the gateway for students to higher education. Many of these colleges realize this mission through open-door policies where students lacking in basic reading, writing, and mathematics skills can enroll. But, this open-access policy often creates challenges when meeting academic standards. Based on data collected from…

  5. Generational Differences among Community College Students in Their Evaluation of Academic Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wotring, Kathleen E.; Bol, Linda

    2011-01-01

    This study examined how community college students (n = 650) vary by generation and other characteristics in their evaluation of academic activities as cheating. A Likert-type instrument was developed based on the literature, pilot tested, and subjected to factor analysis. Results of MANOVA found no difference by generation in the evaluation of…

  6. Learning in Action: Academic Communities and First-Year Interest Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumley, Kristie; Demarest, Kate

    2010-01-01

    Carroll Community College connects students to their peers and to educators who share similar academic, personal, and career interests. Students get involved in hands-on experiences inside and outside of the classroom. The results include higher retention, reduced student anonymity, and an institutional commitment to student success.

  7. Senate Rostrum: The Newsletter of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Julie, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 newsletter of Senate Rostrum contains the February and October issues. The February issue covers the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges' January 2002 hearing on Draft A of the proposed new accreditation standards. Members of the Academic Senate attended the meeting in order to voice their concerns regarding the new…

  8. The relative importance of relational and scientific characteristics of psychotherapy: Perceptions of community members vs. therapists.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Nicholas R; Deacon, Brett J

    2016-03-01

    Although client preferences are an integral component of evidence-based practice in psychology (American Psychological Association, 2006), relatively little research has examined what potential mental health consumers value in the psychotherapy they may receive. The present study was conducted to examine community members' preferences for the scientific and relational aspects of psychotherapy for different types of presenting problems, and how accurately therapists perceive these preferences. Community members (n = 200) were surveyed about the importance of scientific (e.g., demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials) and relational (e.g., therapist empathy) characteristics of psychotherapy both for anxiety disorders (e.g., obsessive-compulsive disorder) and disorder-nonspecific issues (e.g., relationship difficulties). Therapists (n = 199) completed the same survey and responded how they expected the average mental health consumer would. Results showed that although community members valued relational characteristics significantly more than scientific characteristics, the gap between these two was large for disorder-nonspecific issues (d = 1.24) but small for anxiety disorders (d = .27). Community members rated scientific credibility as important across problem types. Therapists significantly underestimated the importance of scientific characteristics to community members, particularly in the treatment of disorder-nonspecific issues (d = .74). Therapists who valued research less in their own practice were more likely to underestimate the importance of scientific credibility to community members. The implications of the present findings for understanding the nature of client preferences in evidence-based psychological practice are discussed.

  9. Disease Surveillance and the Academic, Clinical, and Public Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Rebmann, Catherine A.; Schuchat, Anne; Hughes, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The Emerging Infections Programs (EIPs), a population-based network involving 10 state health departments and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, complement and support local, regional, and national surveillance and research efforts. EIPs depend on collaboration between public health agencies and clinical and academic institutions to perform active, population-based surveillance for infectious diseases; conduct applied epidemiologic and laboratory research; implement and evaluate pilot prevention and intervention projects; and provide capacity for flexible public health response. Recent EIP work has included monitoring the impact of a new conjugate vaccine on the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease, providing the evidence base used to derive new recommendations to prevent neonatal group B streptococcal disease, measuring the impact of foodborne diseases in the United States, and developing a systematic, integrated laboratory and epidemiologic method for syndrome-based surveillance. PMID:12890317

  10. The Productive High School: Creating Personalized Academic Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Joseph; Beck, Lynn G.; Crawford, Marilyn; Hodges, Amy; McGaughy, Charis L.

    This book is designed to inform the educational community about the empirical foundations of productive high schools. Part 1 focuses on the core technology (learning and teaching), the organizational systems in which the core function are nested (the ecology of the institution), and the institutional linkages between the school and its…

  11. Washington Community Colleges Academic Year Report, 1983-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community Coll. Education, Olympia.

    Information on enrollments, personnel, finances, and facilities in Washington community colleges is provided in this report for the four quarters of 1983-84 and these data are compared with figures from previous years. First, general information is presented on the college's role, mission, and history and the organization of the state system.…

  12. Washington Community Colleges Academic Year Report, 1982-83.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community Coll. Education, Olympia.

    Information on enrollments, personnel, finances, and facilities in Washington state community colleges is provided in this report for the four quarters of 1982-83 and for previous years. First, general information is presented on the colleges' role, mission, and history; the organization of the state system; and sources of funding. Section I…

  13. Washington Community Colleges Academic Year Report, l981-82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Sherie; And Others

    Information on enrollments, personnel, finances, and facilities in Washington state community colleges is provided in this report for the four quarters of 1981-82 and for previous years. First, general information is presented on the colleges' role, missions, and history; the organization of the state system; and sources of funding. Section 1…

  14. Service-Learning: Some Academic and Community Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronick, Robert F.; Cunningham, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Civic engagement, service-learning, and university-assisted community schools are strong forces in making universities, as anchor institutions, engaged and responsible within their spheres of influence. By helping solve social problems, universities engage in the highest form of learning, come to understand social issues and problems, and escape…

  15. A Learning Community's Potential Academic Impact: A Qualitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael W.; Warner, Susan C.; Rose, Stephanie Firebaugh; Johnson, Courtney B.; Firmin, Ruth L.

    2012-01-01

    Learning Communities (LC) in higher education can serve as powerful connectors among individuals, particularly when integrating minority and White students. We conducted 24 in-depth interviews, using qualitative research methodology, with the 2004 cohort of LC students from a private, selective, Midwest university. Seniors at the time of…

  16. Exemplary Academic Programs at the Community College. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazer, Gerald, Ed.

    Brief descriptions are provided of 54 community college programs identified as outstanding by the National Council of Instructional Administrators. Organized alphabetically by program title, the descriptions include the name of the college president, the name of a contact person, and the name, address, and telephone number of the college. The…

  17. Washington Community Colleges Factbook, Academic Year 1980-81.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Sherie; And Others

    This four-part report provides data tables and information describing Washington state's 27 community colleges and their students, personnel, financial operations, and facilities and capital planning. The report's introduction begins with highlights of major changes in the system, including an 11% increase in student enrollments, a decline in the…

  18. Building an Online Academic Learning Community among Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Adele

    2015-01-01

    Online learning communities are frequently created for higher education students; however, these are most often designed to cater to a particular unit or subject. In an effort to strengthen the Bachelor of Arts course at the University of New England, the author sought to create an online space that would promote an interdisciplinary and collegial…

  19. "Why Fly That Way?" Linking Community and Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greely, Kathy

    This book tells the story of a year in one middle school teacher's class full of lively young adolescents, highlighting exemplary ways of learning and types of schooling. This alternative model of education shows how a strong, supportive community is essential in helping students reach their highest potential. The book includes: specific projects…

  20. Reconfiguring Academic Priorities: Through the Eyes of Michigan Community College Chief Academic Officers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergh, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Strategic planning decisions and determinations in higher education present significant challenges even during relatively uneventful economic periods. In times of economic turbulence, the only predictable factor is a constantly diminishing funding base. Community colleges in particular are affected most directly and immediately by downturns in the…

  1. Capacity building for long-term community-academic health partnership outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, M Kathryn; Felix, Holly C; Cottoms, Naomi; Olson, Mary; Shelby, Beatrice; Huff, Anna; Colley, Dianne; Sparks, Carla; McKindra, Freeman

    2014-01-01

    Too often, populations experiencing the greatest burden of disease and disparities in health outcomes are left out of or ineffectively involved in academic-led efforts to address issues that impact them the most. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) is an approach increasingly being used to address these issues, but the science of CBPR is still viewed by many as a nascent field. Important to the development of the science of CBPR is documentation of the partnership process, particularly capacity building activities important to establishing the CBPR research infrastructure. This paper uses a CBPR Logic Model as a structure for documenting partnership capacity building activities of a long-term community-academic partnership addressing public health issues in Arkansas, U.S. Illustrative activities, programs, and experiences are described for each of the model’s four constructs: context, group dynamics, interventions, and outcomes. Lessons learned through this process were: capacity building is required by both academic and community partners; shared activities provide a common base of experiences and expectations; and creating a common language facilitates dialogue about difficult issues. Development of community partnerships with one institutional unit promoted community engagement institution-wide, enhanced individual and partnership capacity, and increased opportunity to address priority issues. PMID:25750694

  2. Introduction of Sap ERP System Into a Heterogeneous Academic Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mornar, Vedran; Fertalj, Krešimir; Kalpić, Damir

    2010-06-01

    Introduction of a complex ERP system like SAP into a heterogeneous academic environment like the University of Zagreb is far from being a trivial task. The University comprises more than 30 constituents, called faculties or academies, geographically dispersed, with long and specific traditions. Financing according to the lump sum principle, enforced in Croatia as a side effect of the in Europe obligatory and omnipresent Bologna process, requires a unified view on the educational institutions in order to provide a more just and appropriate financing scheme than the current one. After the experience with own development to support educational tasks and student administration, for standard financial and administration tasks SAP has been chosen as the most appropriate platform. The developer was selected after public bidding and the authors' institution was chosen for the pilot project. The authors were playing principal roles in the process of successful deployment and still expect to offer their expertise for implementation in the rest of the University. However, serious risks stemming from lack of motivation by some constituents are present.

  3. Documentation of chemotherapy infusion preparation costs in academic- and community-based oncology practices.

    PubMed

    Brixner, Diana I; Oderda, Gary M; Nickman, Nancy A; Beveridge, Roy; Jorgenson, James A

    2006-03-01

    Significant changes in Medicare reimbursement for outpatient oncology services were proposed as part of the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003. The purpose of this study was to identify the "true cost" associated with drug-related handling for the preparation and delivery of chemotherapy doses to estimate the impact of changing reimbursement schema by Medicare. Two academic medical outpatient infusion centers and 2 community cancer centers provided data used to estimate all costs (excluding drug cost) associated with the preparation of chemotherapy doses. The data included both fixed costs (drug storage, space, equipment, and information resources) and variable costs (insurance management, inventory, waste management, pharmacy staff payroll, supplies, and shipping). The average cost for the preparation of chemotherapy doses across all sites was dollar 34.27 (range, dollar 32.08-dollar 41.23). A time-and-motion study was also performed to determine what tasks were conducted by pharmacy staff and how much time was spent in the preparation of the top 15 chemotherapeutic drugs and regimens used in the 4 sites. Data from the 4 centers was projected to show that if 3,990,495 million chemotherapy infusions were administered to a national Medicare population in 2003, when multiplied by the average cost of preparation for infusions determined by the current study (dollar 34.27), the estimated total annual cost to Medicare for chemotherapy preparation by pharmacists is dollar 136,754,263.65. The pharmacists spent most of their days (90% or more) performing tasks directly related to the preparation of these agents. These data provide scientific support for the consideration of appropriate reimbursement for chemotherapy services provided by pharmacists to Medicare beneficiaries. PMID:16507268

  4. The production and reception of scientific papers in the academic-industrial complex: the clinical evaluation of a new medicine.

    PubMed

    Abraham, J

    1995-06-01

    The production and reception of scientific papers in the academic-industrial complex have been neglected in sociology. In this article the social processes which influence the nature of the scientific paper in that complex are explored in depth by taking a number of controversial medical papers as case studies. The empirical evidence is collected and discussed in the light of sociological theories of normative ethos, paradigm development, reward-induced conformity and social interests in science. It is concluded that within the medical-industrial complex conformity to industrial interests can be a major criterion in defining the kind of reception given to a scientific paper and the professional autonomy of the authors in the paper's production, rather than an ethos of scientific scepticism or commitment to paradigmatic conventions. This is seen to have implications for the production of scientific knowledge - implications that might be in conflict with the public interest. Consequently, the desirability of current British Government proposals to intensify its policy of making science more responsive to the needs of industry may have significant drawbacks, hitherto unacknowledged in official circles, and in need of more extensive sociological investigation.

  5. The Detroit Community-Academic Urban Research Center: development, implementation, and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Israel, B A; Lichtenstein, R; Lantz, P; McGranaghan, R; Allen, A; Guzman, J R; Softley, D; Maciak, B

    2001-09-01

    There is increasing research evidence that stressors in the social and physical environment (e.g., poverty, inadequate housing, air pollution, and racism) are associated with poor health outcomes. Given the complex set of determinants of health status, the disproportionate burden of disease experienced within marginalized communities, and the limited effectiveness of traditional prevention research, particularly within communities of color, there have been growing calls for more comprehensive and participatory approaches to public health research and practice. The purpose of this article is to describe and analyze the process of establishing, implementing, and evaluating the Detroit Community-Academic Urban Research Center (URC), a community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnership involving community-based organizations, a local health department, academia, and an integrated health care system. Lessons learned and recommendations for creating effective CBPR partnerships are presented.

  6. Extending Climate Change Education from the Scientific Community to Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendel, W. B.; Russell, E.; McDougall, C.

    2010-12-01

    One of the major challenges facing researchers in today’s world is making their research understandable to the general public. In addition, being able to explain to decision and policy makers what the relevancy and value of the research is to society is critical in obtaining funding for the continuation of their research. Therefore, having a vehicle through which their research is accessible, presentable and understandable to audiences of varied backgrounds can be of significant value. Science On a Sphere® (SOS) is such a vehicle. It was developed by NOAA with the goal in mind to be a very versatile educational platform. It is a six foot animated globe that can show real-time weather, tsunamis, sea ice concentrations, sea level rise, climate models, and is only limited by the imagination. Using an external projection system, these datasets are projected onto the sphere creating a seamless global image. SOS provides the global climate science community an innovative way to show their research from a different perspective, one that makes the impacts of climate science more tangible to the general public. Since its debut in 2004, Science On a Sphere® has been installed in more than 50 sites around the world including science museums, aquariums, planetariums and universities. In a recent cross-site evaluation of Science On a Sphere®, 82% of participants said yes, seeing information displayed on a sphere changed their understanding of the information. By presenting their research in this innovative way, scientists are able to reach a broader audience and expose them to climate change science. In this session we will discuss the foundations of the Science On a Sphere® program, how the global climate science community, educators and society can benefit from utilizing such a unique visualization tool, and the opportunities, through the SOS community, that are readily available to them today with Science On a Sphere®.

  7. Using Technology to Create a Scientific Learning Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Ray

    2001-06-01

    Roxbury Community College (RCC) is an urban, multicultural, two-year college in Boston with a large population of African-American and Hispanic students. Most of the entering students fail to meet minimal levels on standardized math and science tests. RCC has been involved in science and math education reform for more than ten years, in part because these standardized test results for incoming students indicate a lack of proficiency in science and math. The reform has taken two major approaches. The first was the introduction of a course in general science; the second was the introduction of undergraduate research.

  8. Academic medical libraries' policies and procedures for notifying library users of retracted scientific publications.

    PubMed

    Hughes, C

    1998-01-01

    Academic medical libraries have a responsibility to inform library users regarding retracted publications. Many have created policies and procedures that identify flawed journal articles. A questionnaire was sent to the 129 academic medical libraries in the United States and Canada to find out how many had policies and procedures for identifying retracted publications. Of the returned questionnaires, 59% had no policy and no practice for calling the attention of the library user to retracted publications. Forty-one percent of the libraries called attention to retractions with or without a formal policy for doing so. Several responding libraries included their policy statement with the survey. The increasing number of academic medical libraries that realize the importance of having policies and practices in place highlights the necessity for this procedure.

  9. Manuscript Editing as a Way of Teaching Academic Writing: Experience from a Small Scientific Journal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misak, A.; Marusic, M.; Marusic, A.

    2005-01-01

    Medical writing and manuscript preparation are rarely taught in the context of undergraduate, graduate, or continuing medical education. As editors of a ''small'' medical scientific journal published in English in a non-native English-speaking (NNES) country, we hold that the knowledge of scientific methodology and specificities of scientific…

  10. Manuscript editing as a way of teaching academic writing: experience from a small scientific journal.

    PubMed

    Misak, Aleksandra; Marusić, Matko; Marusić, Ana

    2006-01-01

    Medical writing and manuscript preparation are rarely taught in the context of undergraduate, graduate, or continuing medical education. As editors of a "small" medical scientific journal published in English in a non-native English-speaking (NNES) country, we hold that the knowledge of scinetific methodology and specificities of scientific reporting is a necessary precondition for a succesful scientific publication. Our experience shows that language professionals and translators whose services NNES authors use should be acquainted with the basic rules of scientific reporting. In this article we describe how each of the four layers of a manuscript -the study quality,the narrative, the scientific reporting style, and finally the language per se-can be improved.

  11. Academic Debate: Publications Which Promote Political Agendas Have no Place in Scientific and Medical Journals, and Academics Should Refrain from Publishing in Such Journals.

    PubMed

    Glick, Shimon; Clarfield, A Mark; Strous, Rael D; Horton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the full debate held on October 1, 2014, which focused on the following resolution: "Publications which promote political agendas have no place in scientific and medical journals, and academics should refrain from publishing in such journals." The debate moderator was Professor Shimon Glick. Taking the pro stance was Professor A. Mark Clarfield; the con stance was held by Professor Rael D. Strous. Following the first part of the debate, Dr Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief of The Lancet, gave his thoughts on the topic. This was followed by the opportunity for rebuttal by Professors Clarfield and Strous. The debate was summarized and closed by Professor Glick. This paper provides a slightly edited text of the debate, for ease of reading.

  12. Academic Debate: Publications Which Promote Political Agendas Have no Place in Scientific and Medical Journals, and Academics Should Refrain from Publishing in Such Journals

    PubMed Central

    Glick, Shimon; Clarfield, A. Mark; Strous, Rael D.; Horton, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the full debate held on October 1, 2014, which focused on the following resolution: “Publications which promote political agendas have no place in scientific and medical journals, and academics should refrain from publishing in such journals.” The debate moderator was Professor Shimon Glick. Taking the pro stance was Professor A. Mark Clarfield; the con stance was held by Professor Rael D. Strous. Following the first part of the debate, Dr Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief of The Lancet, gave his thoughts on the topic. This was followed by the opportunity for rebuttal by Professors Clarfield and Strous. The debate was summarized and closed by Professor Glick. This paper provides a slightly edited text of the debate, for ease of reading. PMID:25717385

  13. Journal Clubs: An Educational Approach to Advance Understanding among Community Partners and Academic Researchers about CBPR and Cancer Health Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Simmons, Vani N.; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Malo, Teri; Klasko, Lynne; Rodriguez, Maria; Waddell, Rhonda; Gwede, Clement K.; Meade, Cathy D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Journal clubs may enhance the knowledge and skills necessary to engage in community-based participatory research (CBPR) that will ultimately impact cancer health disparities. This article: (1) describes an innovative approach to adapting the traditional journal club format to meet community and academic participants’ needs, (2) presents evaluation data, and (3) explores whether responses differed between academic and community members. Methods Five journal clubs occurred between February 2011 and May 2012 as a training activity of a regional cancer health disparities initiative. Each journal club was jointly planned and facilitated by an academic member in collaboration with a community partner. Attendees were recruited from academic programs across the Moffitt Cancer Center/university and community partners. Responses to a 13-item evaluation of each journal club session were compared to assess whether certain topics were evaluated more favorably, and explore differences between academic and community participants’ assessment of the topic relevance. Results Evaluations were positive (mean ratings >4 out of 5) on most items and overall. No statistically significant differences were observed between academic and community members’ ratings. Key overlapping interests by community partners and academic researchers/trainees for future journal club topics included discussing real-world CBPR examples and methods for involving the community in research. Conclusions Although the initial goal was to use journal clubs as an educational tool to increase CBPR knowledge and skills of junior faculty trainees, results suggest mutual academic-community benefit and interest in learning more about CBPR as a way to reduce cancer health disparities. PMID:24078328

  14. Academic Advising Issues in Pennsylvania's Community Colleges. A Summary of the Proceedings of the Conference on Academic Advising in Pennsylvania's Community Colleges (Williamsport, Pennsylvania, March 26-27, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, William J., Ed.

    This conference proceedings provides a summary of presentations on five academic advising issues of concern to Pennsylvania's community colleges. The first topic addressed during the conference was "Models of Academic Advising." The presentation by Richard A. Kratz, Preston Pulliams, John Hariston, Dolores Hill, and Sharon Gavin described four…

  15. Preferences for Teaching Styles Matter in Academic Achievement: Scientific and Practical Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Li-fang

    2008-01-01

    The two primary objectives of this study were: to identify the preferred teaching styles of secondary-school students and to compare these preferences with those of university students from past research; and to examine the contributions of students' preferred teaching styles to their academic achievement. A sample of 298 students from a Catholic…

  16. Using an academic-community partnership model and blended learning to advance community health nursing pedagogy.

    PubMed

    Ezeonwu, Mabel; Berkowitz, Bobbie; Vlasses, Frances R

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a model of teaching community health nursing that evolved from a long-term partnership with a community with limited existing health programs. The partnership supported RN-BSN students' integration in the community and resulted in reciprocal gains for faculty, students and community members. Community clients accessed public health services as a result of the partnership. A blended learning approach that combines face-to-face interactions, service learning and online activities was utilized to enhance students' learning. Following classroom sessions, students actively participated in community-based educational process through comprehensive health needs assessments, planning and implementation of disease prevention and health promotion activities for community clients. Such active involvement in an underserved community deepened students' awareness of the fundamentals of community health practice. Students were challenged to view public health from a broader perspective while analyzing the impacts of social determinants of health on underserved populations. Through asynchronous online interactions, students synthesized classroom and community activities through critical thinking. This paper describes a model for teaching community health nursing that informs students' learning through blended learning, and meets the demands for community health nursing services delivery.

  17. Gender differences on osteoporosis health beliefs and related behaviors in non-academic community Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yin-Ping; Xia, Ru-Yi; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Xin-Shuang; Zhang, Lu-Lu; Li, Hao

    2014-06-01

    Osteoporosis represents the major public health concern worldwide. The purpose of this study was to assess osteoporosis beliefs and actual performance of osteoporosis preventive behaviors in non-academic community Chinese population and to explore whether the differences exist in community females and males. A cross sectional study including 137 females and 122 males was conducted in four non-academic communities of Xi'an city during November 2012, selected by multi-stage sampling method. Self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. The respondents' mean age was 56.06 ± 5.81 years. 35.5% of the participants had a bone mineral density test. The participants exhibit relatively low osteoporosis health beliefs. The total health belief score was 63.30 ± 8.55 and 64.13 ± 6.47 in females and males respectively. There was significant gender differences in the subscales of Perceived seriousness (p = 0.03), Perceived barriers to exercise (p = 0.004) and Perceived motivation (p = 0.01). Participants had low frequencies of preventive practices. Gender differences were revealed in current smoking and alcohol intake, soybean food intake, smoking history (p < 0.001), alcohol intake history (p = 0.001), meat or egg intake (p = 0.019). The findings from the study suggest an increased awareness of this major public health problem in non-academic Chinese and the scope for enhancing osteoporosis intervention considering the gender difference.

  18. Geohazard Data Sharing In The 21st Century: Three Online Venues For The Scientific Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, S. E.; Sloan, V.; Gross, S.; Blume, F.; Riley, J.

    2011-12-01

    Following the many large earthquake disasters of the past two years, members of the geoscience community have quickly mobilized to collect data from each region, sometimes requesting geodetic instrumental support from UNAVCO, an NSF- and NASA-funded geoscience support facility. UNAVCO has also provided online scientific support including: (1) a Supersite page for the immediate sharing of results and data, (2) an interactive forum that facilitates the exchange of logistical and scientific information, and (3) an "Event Page" which presents selected data, contextual information, and weblinks for a broader scientific audience. A Supersite is declared when the GEO task lead and the Supersites lead from ESA determine that the damage caused by the event is severe enough to justify international cooperation in order to share geophysical data and results. A UNAVCO Forum and Event Page are created once a formal request for geodetic instrumental support has been submitted to UNAVCO by a member of the scientific community or if the disaster (e.g. Japan) is deemed significant enough to warrant a response. This paper will discuss the intent, value, and issues related to these tools, community feedback and web traffic, and possible future directions in supporting the community in scientific communication.

  19. Something for everyone? A community and academic partnership to address farmworker pesticide exposure in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Quandt, S A; Arcury, T A; Pell, A I

    2001-06-01

    Partnerships between academic researchers and community organizations are frequently formed to address environmental health concerns in underserved communities. Although such participatory approaches to research combine valuable assets of both partners, they are often difficult to maintain. We describe a partnership formed to investigate migrant and seasonal farmworker exposure to pesticides in North Carolina and to develop effective interventions to reduce exposure. North Carolina ranks fifth in the United States in the number of farmworkers; most are from Mexico, and a significant minority come to the United States on work contracts. Several barriers to establishing effective collaboration were recognized in this partnership, including stereotypes, cultural differences, competing demands for time and attention, and differences in orientation to power structures. To overcome these barriers, members of the partnership took actions in three domains: clarifying the different goals of each partner, operationalizing a model of participation that could involve many different community segments developing cultural sensitivity. By taking these actions, the work of the partnership was accomplished in ways that met the criteria for success of both academic researchers and community members. This approach can be used by others to develop collaborative relationships to investigate environmental health issues within a community-based participatory framework.

  20. Something for everyone? A community and academic partnership to address farmworker pesticide exposure in North Carolina.

    PubMed Central

    Quandt, S A; Arcury, T A; Pell, A I

    2001-01-01

    Partnerships between academic researchers and community organizations are frequently formed to address environmental health concerns in underserved communities. Although such participatory approaches to research combine valuable assets of both partners, they are often difficult to maintain. We describe a partnership formed to investigate migrant and seasonal farmworker exposure to pesticides in North Carolina and to develop effective interventions to reduce exposure. North Carolina ranks fifth in the United States in the number of farmworkers; most are from Mexico, and a significant minority come to the United States on work contracts. Several barriers to establishing effective collaboration were recognized in this partnership, including stereotypes, cultural differences, competing demands for time and attention, and differences in orientation to power structures. To overcome these barriers, members of the partnership took actions in three domains: clarifying the different goals of each partner, operationalizing a model of participation that could involve many different community segments developing cultural sensitivity. By taking these actions, the work of the partnership was accomplished in ways that met the criteria for success of both academic researchers and community members. This approach can be used by others to develop collaborative relationships to investigate environmental health issues within a community-based participatory framework. PMID:11427393

  1. The impact of a virtual community on student engagement and academic performance among baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Giddens, Jean; Hrabe, David; Carlson-Sabelli, Linnea; Fogg, Louis; North, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present findings from a study which evaluated the effectiveness of a virtual community (an emerging pedagogical application) on student engagement and academic performance. Virtual communities mirror real-life through unfolding patient histories and relationship development over time. Students also become more engaged in learning by creating personally meaningful knowledge of a concept (Rogers & Stone, 2007). Virtual communities offer one teaching strategy to assist students in learning complex, health-related content in a contextualized manner. This quasi-experimental study involved first-semester baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a course at two campuses of a nursing program at a large university in the Southwest. Three key strategies assessed the impact of the virtual community on student engagement and learning: third-party observational measurement, end-of-class student/faculty surveys, and use of knowledge items in student exams for the class. Significant differences between the control and experimental group were found regarding learning engagement and communication exchanges; the groups appeared similar in ratings of quality of instruction and academic performance. Use of virtual communities can help nursing educators address the recent Carnegie Foundation study's (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard & Day, 2010) counsel to implement "pedagogies of contextualization" in which theoretical and factual information about diseases and conditions are placed in the context of a patient's experience.

  2. The impact of a virtual community on student engagement and academic performance among baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Giddens, Jean; Hrabe, David; Carlson-Sabelli, Linnea; Fogg, Louis; North, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to present findings from a study which evaluated the effectiveness of a virtual community (an emerging pedagogical application) on student engagement and academic performance. Virtual communities mirror real-life through unfolding patient histories and relationship development over time. Students also become more engaged in learning by creating personally meaningful knowledge of a concept (Rogers & Stone, 2007). Virtual communities offer one teaching strategy to assist students in learning complex, health-related content in a contextualized manner. This quasi-experimental study involved first-semester baccalaureate nursing students enrolled in a course at two campuses of a nursing program at a large university in the Southwest. Three key strategies assessed the impact of the virtual community on student engagement and learning: third-party observational measurement, end-of-class student/faculty surveys, and use of knowledge items in student exams for the class. Significant differences between the control and experimental group were found regarding learning engagement and communication exchanges; the groups appeared similar in ratings of quality of instruction and academic performance. Use of virtual communities can help nursing educators address the recent Carnegie Foundation study's (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard & Day, 2010) counsel to implement "pedagogies of contextualization" in which theoretical and factual information about diseases and conditions are placed in the context of a patient's experience. PMID:23006650

  3. The Relationship between Professional Learning Community Implementation and Academic Achievement and Graduation Rates in Georgia High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardinger, Regina Gail

    2013-01-01

    Many educational administrators in Georgia continue to struggle with low student academic achievement and low high school graduation rates. DuFour's professional learning community (PLC) theory suggests a positive relationship between levels of PLC implementation and academic achievement and between levels of PLC implementation and graduation…

  4. Brief Report: The Impact of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Symptoms on Academic Performance in an Adolescent Community Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birchwood, James; Daley, Dave

    2012-01-01

    Less is understood about the relationship between ADHD symptoms and academic performance in adolescents than the relationship in younger children. As such, the aim of the present study was to investigate the prospective relationship between ADHD symptoms and academic performance in a community adolescent sample. Three hundred and twenty-four…

  5. Iowa Lakes Community College: Partnerships for Academic and Economic Success in a Rapidly Evolving Wind-Energy Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohni, Mary; Rogers, Jolene; Zeitz, Al

    2007-01-01

    Iowa Lakes Community College responded to a national need for wind-energy technicians. The Wind-Energy and Turbine Program aligned industry and academic competencies with experiential learning components to foster exploration of additional renewable energy applications. Completers understand both the physical and academic rigor a career in wind…

  6. Impact of Campus-Based Child Care on the Academic Success of Student-Parents at SUNY Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadale, LaVerna M.; Winter, Gene M.

    The focus of this study was the relationship between campus-based child care services at the State University of New York (SUNY) community colleges and the academic success of student-parents. Academic success was defined as completion of a degree or certificate program, transfer, or continued enrollment. Data were collected through surveys mailed…

  7. The Impact of Employment on the Academic Achievement of Full-Time Community College Students. AIR 1989 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volkwein, J. Fredericks; And Others

    Is college student academic performance harmed by competing employment obligations? At what point do the hours spent on the job begin to interfere with the predicted academic achievement of full-time students? This study addresses these questions by analyzing data collected from students at two non-residential community colleges. Using an outcomes…

  8. Sense of Community in Academic Communities of Practice: Predictors and Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nistor, Nicolae; Daxecker, Irene; Stanciu, Dorin; Diekamp, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Sense of community (SoC) in communities of practice (CoP) seems to play a similar role to that of group cohesion in small groups: Both sustain participants' knowledge sharing, which in turn substantiates the socio-cognitive structures that make up the CoP such as scholar identities, practical repertoires in research and teaching or…

  9. Science Teaching Reform through Professional Development: Teachers' Use of a Scientific Classroom Discourse Community Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Elizabeth B.; Baker, Dale R.; Helding, Brandon A.

    2015-01-01

    This report outlines a 2-year investigation into how secondary science teachers used professional development (PD) to build scientific classroom discourse communities (SCDCs). Observation data, teacher, student, and school demographic information were used to build a hierarchical linear model. The length of time that teachers received PD was the…

  10. Forging successful academic-community partnerships with community health centers: the California statewide Area Health Education Center (AHEC) experience.

    PubMed

    Fowkes, Virginia; Blossom, H John; Mitchell, Brenda; Herrera-Mata, Lydia

    2014-01-01

    Increased access to insurance under the Affordable Care Act will increase demands for clinical services in community health centers (CHCs). CHCs also have an increasingly important educational role to train clinicians who will remain to practice in community clinics. CHCs and Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) are logical partners to prepare the health workforce for the future. Both are sponsored by the Health Resources and Services Administration, and they share a mission to improve quality of care in medically underserved communities. AHECs emphasize the educational side of the mission, and CHCs the service side. Building stronger partnerships between them can facilitate a balance between education and service needs.From 2004 to 2011, the California Statewide AHEC program and its 12 community AHECs (centers) reorganized to align training with CHC workforce priorities. Eight centers merged into CHC consortia; others established close partnerships with CHCs in their respective regions. The authors discuss issues considered and approaches taken to make these changes. Collaborative innovative processes with program leadership, staff, and center directors revised the program mission, developed common training objectives with an evaluation plan, and defined organizational, functional, and impact characteristics for successful AHECs in California. During this planning, centers gained confidence as educational arms for the safety net and began collaborations with statewide programs as well as among themselves. The AHEC reorganization and the processes used to develop, strengthen, and identify standards for centers forged the development of new partnerships and established academic-community trust in planning and implementing programs with CHCs. PMID:24280858

  11. The Effects of Research & Development Funding on Scientific Productivity: Academic Chemistry, 1990-2009

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbloom, Joshua L.; Ginther, Donna K.; Juhl, Ted; Heppert, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between Research & Development (R&D) funding and the production of knowledge by academic chemists. Using articles published, either raw counts or adjusted for quality, we find a strong, positive causal effect of funding on knowledge production. This effect is similar across subsets of universities, suggesting a relatively efficient allocation of R&D funds. Finally, we document a rapid acceleration in the rate at which chemical knowledge was produced in the late 1990s and early 2000s relative to the financial and human resources devoted to its production. PMID:26372555

  12. An academic-community partnership: a model of service and education.

    PubMed

    Lough, M A

    1999-01-01

    To meet the challenge of preparing nurses for delivery of health care that is directed toward health promotion and focused on populations at the community level, it is critical that academicians develop new methods to educate their students. In this article, I describe an innovative clinical practice model in which an academic-community partnership was created between a college of nursing and a neighborhood grade school and parish. The purpose of the partnership is to provide needed health services to clients, at the same time giving students the opportunity to practice population-focused care in the community. The benefits of the partnership are numerous, including improved client health status, increased access to health promotion services, and enhanced student learning.

  13. Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC): Using innovative tools and services to support worldwide space weather scientific communities and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, A. M.; Bakshi, S.; Berrios, D.; Chulaki, A.; Evans, R. M.; Kuznetsova, M. M.; Lee, H.; MacNeice, P. J.; Maddox, M. M.; Mays, M. L.; Mullinix, R. E.; Ngwira, C. M.; Patel, K.; Pulkkinen, A.; Rastaetter, L.; Shim, J.; Taktakishvili, A.; Zheng, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) was established to enhance basic solar terrestrial research and to aid in the development of models for specifying and forecasting conditions in the space environment. In achieving this goal, CCMC has developed and provides a set of innovative tools varying from: Integrated Space Weather Analysis (iSWA) web -based dissemination system for space weather information, Runs-On-Request System providing access to unique collection of state-of-the-art solar and space physics models (unmatched anywhere in the world), Advanced Online Visualization and Analysis tools for more accurate interpretation of model results, Standard Data formats for Simulation Data downloads, and recently Mobile apps (iPhone/Android) to view space weather data anywhere to the scientific community. The number of runs requested and the number of resulting scientific publications and presentations from the research community has not only been an indication of the broad scientific usage of the CCMC and effective participation by space scientists and researchers, but also guarantees active collaboration and coordination amongst the space weather research community. Arising from the course of CCMC activities, CCMC also supports community-wide model validation challenges and research focus group projects for a broad range of programs such as the multi-agency National Space Weather Program, NSF's CEDAR (Coupling, Energetics and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions), GEM (Geospace Environment Modeling) and Shine (Solar Heliospheric and INterplanetary Environment) programs. In addition to performing research and model development, CCMC also supports space science education by hosting summer students through local universities; through the provision of simulations in support of classroom programs such as Heliophysics Summer School (with student research contest) and CCMC Workshops; training next generation of junior scientists in space weather forecasting; and educating

  14. Contributing to the Community: The Economic Significance of Academic Health Centers and Their Role in Neighborhood Development. Report IV. Report of the Task Force on Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commonwealth Fund, New York, NY.

    This report is a selective analysis and assessment of quantitative data and field studies that reflect the economic role of the Academic Health Center (AHC) in the urban economy and in neighborhood revitalization. It describes the effect of a variety of cooperative efforts between local community organizations and AHCs, which usually include a…

  15. Electronic Communities: a Forum for Supporting Women Professionals and Students in Technical and Scientific Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Single, Peg Boyle; Muller, Carol B.; Cunningham, Christine M.; Single, Richard M.

    In this article, we report on electronic discussion lists (e-lists) sponsored by MentorNet, the National Electronic Industrial Mentoring Network for Women in Engineering and Science. Using the Internet, the MentorNet program connects students in engineering and science with mentors working in industry. These e-lists are a feature of MentorNet's larger electronic mentoring program and were sponsored to foster the establishment of community among women engineering and science students and men and women professionals in those fields. This research supports the hypothesis that electronic communications can be used to develop community among engineering and science students and professionals and identifies factors influencing the emergence of electronic communities (e-communities). The e-lists that emerged into self-sustaining e-communities were focused on topic-based themes, such as balancing personal and work life, issues pertaining to women in engineering and science, and job searching. These e-communities were perceived to be safe places, embraced a diversity of opinions and experiences, and sanctioned personal and meaningful postings on the part of the participants. The e-communities maintained three to four simultaneous threaded discussions and were sustained by professionals who served as facilitators by seeding the e-lists with discussion topics. The e-lists were sponsored to provide women students participating in MentorNet with access to groups of technical and scientific professionals. In addition to providing benefits to the students, the e-lists also provided the professionals with opportunities to engage in peer mentoring with other, mostly female, technical and scientific professionals. We discuss the implications of our findings for developing e-communities and for serving the needs of women in technical and scientific fields.

  16. Getting published in an academic-community hospital: the success of writing groups.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Deitrick, Lynn; Mahady, Erica T; Moser, Kathleen; Gertner, Eric J; Sabino, Judith N

    2012-01-01

    Expressed barriers to writing for publication include lack of time, competing demands, anxiety about writing and a lack of knowledge about the submission process. These limitations can be magnified for practitioners in non-university environments in which there are fewer incentives or expectations regarding academic publication productivity. However, as members of professional disciplines, practitioners have both the responsibility and, oftentimes, the insights to make valuable contributions to the professional literature. Collaborative writing groups can be a useful intervention to overcome barriers, provide the necessary skills and encouragement as well as produce publications and conference presentations that make worthy additions to the professional body of knowledge. This article discusses the evolution and outcomes of writing groups at Lehigh Valley Health Network and describes how this strategy can be adopted by other academic community hospitals to promote professional development and publication. PMID:21922155

  17. Getting published in an academic-community hospital: the success of writing groups.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Deitrick, Lynn; Mahady, Erica T; Moser, Kathleen; Gertner, Eric J; Sabino, Judith N

    2012-01-01

    Expressed barriers to writing for publication include lack of time, competing demands, anxiety about writing and a lack of knowledge about the submission process. These limitations can be magnified for practitioners in non-university environments in which there are fewer incentives or expectations regarding academic publication productivity. However, as members of professional disciplines, practitioners have both the responsibility and, oftentimes, the insights to make valuable contributions to the professional literature. Collaborative writing groups can be a useful intervention to overcome barriers, provide the necessary skills and encouragement as well as produce publications and conference presentations that make worthy additions to the professional body of knowledge. This article discusses the evolution and outcomes of writing groups at Lehigh Valley Health Network and describes how this strategy can be adopted by other academic community hospitals to promote professional development and publication.

  18. Latin American Cancer Research Coalition. Community primary care/academic partnership model for cancer control.

    PubMed

    Kreling, Barbara A; Cañar, Janet; Catipon, Ericson; Goodman, Michelle; Pallesen, Nancy; Pomeroy, Jyl; Rodriguez, Yosselyn; Romagoza, Juan; Sheppard, Vanessa B; Mandelblatt, Jeanne; Huerta, Elmer E

    2006-10-15

    The Latin American Cancer Research Coalition (LACRC) was funded by NCI as a Special Populations Network to 1) provide training to clinic staff in cancer control and foster development of Latino faculty training, 2) conduct a needs assessment with the community clinics, 3) enhance the ability of the clinics to promote healthy lifestyles, 4) collaborate on research projects to improve use of early detection, and 5) explore partnerships to increase access to culturally competent cancer care. The LACRC developed a model for cancer control focused on community-based clinics as the focal point for in-reach and community outreach targeted to Latinos to reduce cancer disparities. This framework was designed to link the community to local hospitals and academic centers, build capacity, and promote diffusion of innovations directly into delivery systems. Eight research projects submitted by junior investigator/clinic teams have been funded by NCI. These research projects range from recruiting for clinical trials to prevention to survivorship. The LACRC has trained 6 cancer control coordinators from partner sites and educated 59 undergraduate minority student interns in aspects of cancer control research. Central to LACRC's success to date has been the creation and maintenance of an infrastructure of trusting relationships, especially those developed between clinician/investigators and individuals within the greater Latino community. Community clinics can be effective agents for cancer control among Latinos. Latinos are likely to participate in research conducted by culturally representative teams of researchers using culturally appropriate recruiting strategies. Cancer 2006. (c) 2006 American Cancer Society. PMID:16986105

  19. A growing opportunity: Community gardens affiliated with US hospitals and academic health centers

    PubMed Central

    George, Daniel R.; Rovniak, Liza S.; Kraschnewski, Jennifer L.; Hanson, Ryan; Sciamanna, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Community gardens can reduce public health disparities through promoting physical activity and healthy eating, growing food for underserved populations, and accelerating healing from injury or disease. Despite their potential to contribute to comprehensive patient care, no prior studies have investigated the prevalence of community gardens affiliated with US healthcare institutions, and the demographic characteristics of communities served by these gardens. Methods In 2013, national community garden databases, scientific abstracts, and public search engines (e.g., Google Scholar) were used to identify gardens. Outcomes included the prevalence of hospital-based community gardens by US regions, and demographic characteristics (age, race/ethnicity, education, household income, and obesity rates) of communities served by gardens. Results There were 110 healthcare-based gardens, with 39 in the Midwest, 25 in the South, 24 in the Northeast, and 22 in the West. Compared to US population averages, communities served by healthcare-based gardens had similar demographic characteristics, but significantly lower rates of obesity (27% versus 34%, P < .001). Conclusions Healthcare-based gardens are located in regions that are demographically representative of the US population, and are associated with lower rates of obesity in communities they serve. PMID:25599017

  20. Evaluation of a Community-Based Participatory Research Consortium from the Perspective of Academics and Community Service Providers Focused on Child Health and Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pivik, Jayne R.; Goelman, Hillel

    2011-01-01

    A process evaluation of a consortium of academic researchers and community-based service providers focused on the health and well-being of children and families provides empirical and practice-based evidence of those factors important for community-based participatory research (CBPR). This study draws on quantitative ratings of 33 factors…

  1. Designing New Academic Pathways: Reimaging the Community College Experience with Students' Needs and Best Interests at Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClenney, Kay; Dare, Donna

    2013-01-01

    This is the second article in a three-part series on reimagining the community college student experience, describing a new model for academic pathways, key design principles, examples from colleges leading the way, and implementation challenges. Community colleges are beginning to embrace the task of reimagining students' educational experiences.…

  2. Engagement of National Winners of the 2006 All-USA Community College Academic Team while Attending Senior Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risley, Rod; King, Stephanie B.

    2012-01-01

    All-USA Community College Academic Team national winners attending senior colleges were compared with both a general population of community college transfer students as well as senior college native students based on their responses to the National Survey on Student Engagement (NSSE). Results indicated that the national winners' levels of…

  3. The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) Leadership Competencies as Gauged through the Voices of Female Academic Senators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferri-Milligan, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore faculty perceptions about effective leadership skills, knowledge, and qualities as identified by female community college academic senators and to examine the relationship of those perceptions to the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) leadership competencies. Examining the…

  4. A Predictive Study of Community College Faculty Perceptions of Student Academic Preparation, Work Ethics, and Institutional Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibezim-Uche, Scholar

    2013-01-01

    Examined in this study were faculty perceptions of students who do not continue their college education. Also examined was how urban and rural community colleges faculty perceived academic preparation, work ethics, and institutional support as predictors of student success. In this predictive study of community college faculty, 36 faculty members…

  5. Small Learning Communities versus Small Schools: Describing the Difference in the Academic Achievement of African American High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    In 1999, the United States Department of Education began its Small Learning Community Program in an effort to support the breakup of large schools into smaller learning communities. In an effort to improve the academic success rate of students, President George W. Bush signed into law the "No Child Left Behind Act of 2001" (NCLB). NCLB had as its…

  6. The Potential of Research-Based Learning for the Creation of Truly Inclusive Academic Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Pete; Rust, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The academic community in higher education is becoming increasingly fragmented, with arguably the greatest fault line between research and teaching. This paper argues that, through the reinvention of the undergraduate curriculum to focus on student engagement in research and research-type activities, a truly inclusive community of academic…

  7. Misconduct Policies, Academic Culture and Career Stage, Not Gender or Pressures to Publish, Affect Scientific Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Daniele; Costas, Rodrigo; Larivière, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The honesty and integrity of scientists is widely believed to be threatened by pressures to publish, unsupportive research environments, and other structural, sociological and psychological factors. Belief in the importance of these factors has inspired major policy initiatives, but evidence to support them is either non-existent or derived from self-reports and other sources that have known limitations. We used a retrospective study design to verify whether risk factors for scientific misconduct could predict the occurrence of retractions, which are usually the consequence of research misconduct, or corrections, which are honest rectifications of minor mistakes. Bibliographic and personal information were collected on all co-authors of papers that have been retracted or corrected in 2010-2011 (N=611 and N=2226 papers, respectively) and authors of control papers matched by journal and issue (N=1181 and N=4285 papers, respectively), and were analysed with conditional logistic regression. Results, which avoided several limitations of past studies and are robust to different sampling strategies, support the notion that scientific misconduct is more likely in countries that lack research integrity policies, in countries where individual publication performance is rewarded with cash, in cultures and situations were mutual criticism is hampered, and in the earliest phases of a researcher’s career. The hypothesis that males might be prone to scientific misconduct was not supported, and the widespread belief that pressures to publish are a major driver of misconduct was largely contradicted: high-impact and productive researchers, and those working in countries in which pressures to publish are believed to be higher, are less-likely to produce retracted papers, and more likely to correct them. Efforts to reduce and prevent misconduct, therefore, might be most effective if focused on promoting research integrity policies, improving mentoring and training, and encouraging

  8. Misconduct Policies, Academic Culture and Career Stage, Not Gender or Pressures to Publish, Affect Scientific Integrity.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Daniele; Costas, Rodrigo; Larivière, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The honesty and integrity of scientists is widely believed to be threatened by pressures to publish, unsupportive research environments, and other structural, sociological and psychological factors. Belief in the importance of these factors has inspired major policy initiatives, but evidence to support them is either non-existent or derived from self-reports and other sources that have known limitations. We used a retrospective study design to verify whether risk factors for scientific misconduct could predict the occurrence of retractions, which are usually the consequence of research misconduct, or corrections, which are honest rectifications of minor mistakes. Bibliographic and personal information were collected on all co-authors of papers that have been retracted or corrected in 2010-2011 (N=611 and N=2226 papers, respectively) and authors of control papers matched by journal and issue (N=1181 and N=4285 papers, respectively), and were analysed with conditional logistic regression. Results, which avoided several limitations of past studies and are robust to different sampling strategies, support the notion that scientific misconduct is more likely in countries that lack research integrity policies, in countries where individual publication performance is rewarded with cash, in cultures and situations were mutual criticism is hampered, and in the earliest phases of a researcher's career. The hypothesis that males might be prone to scientific misconduct was not supported, and the widespread belief that pressures to publish are a major driver of misconduct was largely contradicted: high-impact and productive researchers, and those working in countries in which pressures to publish are believed to be higher, are less-likely to produce retracted papers, and more likely to correct them. Efforts to reduce and prevent misconduct, therefore, might be most effective if focused on promoting research integrity policies, improving mentoring and training, and encouraging

  9. Participatory Evaluation of a Community-Academic Partnership to Inform Capacity-building and Sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Vani Nath; Klasko, Lynne B.; Fleming, Khaliah; Koskan, Alexis M.; Jackson, Nia T.; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Luque, John S.; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Britt, Lounell; Waddell, Rhondda; Meade, Cathy D.; Gwede, Clement K.

    2015-01-01

    The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) was formed as a partnership comprised of committed community based organizations (grassroots, service, health care organizations) and a National Cancer Institute designated cancer center working together to reduce cancer health disparities. Adhering to principles of community-based participatory research, TBCCN’s primary aims are to develop and sustain outreach, training, and research programs that aim to reach medically underserved, multicultural and multilingual populations within the Tampa Bay tri-county area. Using a participatory evaluation approach, we recently evaluated the partnerships’ priorities for cancer education and outreach; perspectives on the partnerships’ adherence to CBPR principles; and suggestions for sustaining TBCCN and its efforts. The purpose of this paper is to describe implementation and outcomes of this participatory evaluation of a community/academic partnership, and to illustrate the application of evaluation findings for partnership capacity-building and sustainability. Our evaluation provides evidence for partners’ perceived benefits and realized expectations of the partnership and illustrates the value of ongoing and continued partnership assessment to directly inform program activities and build community capacity and sustainability. PMID:25863014

  10. Participatory evaluation of a community-academic partnership to inform capacity-building and sustainability.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Vani Nath; Klasko, Lynne B; Fleming, Khaliah; Koskan, Alexis M; Jackson, Nia T; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Luque, John S; Vadaparampil, Susan T; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Britt, Lounell; Waddell, Rhondda; Meade, Cathy D; Gwede, Clement K

    2015-10-01

    The Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TBCCN) was formed as a partnership comprised of committed community based organizations (grassroots, service, health care organizations) and a National Cancer Institute designated cancer center working together to reduce cancer health disparities. Adhering to principles of community-based participatory research, TBCCN's primary aims are to develop and sustain outreach, training, and research programs that aim to reach medically underserved, multicultural and multilingual populations within the Tampa Bay tri-county area. Using a participatory evaluation approach, we recently evaluated the partnerships' priorities for cancer education and outreach; perspectives on the partnerships' adherence to CBPR principles; and suggestions for sustaining TBCCN and its efforts. The purpose of this paper is to describe implementation and outcomes of this participatory evaluation of a community/academic partnership, and to illustrate the application of evaluation findings for partnership capacity-building and sustainability. Our evaluation provides evidence for partners' perceived benefits and realized expectations of the partnership and illustrates the value of ongoing and continued partnership assessment to directly inform program activities and build community capacity and sustainability.

  11. Perspective: adopting an asset bundles model to support and advance minority students' careers in academic medicine and the scientific pipeline.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Japera; Bozeman, Barry

    2012-11-01

    The authors contend that increasing diversity in academic medicine, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics requires the adoption of a systematic approach to retain minority high school and college students as they navigate the scientific pipeline. Such an approach should focus on the interrelated and multilayered challenges that these students face. The authors fuse an alternative conceptualization of the scientific and technical human capital theoretical framework and the theory of social identity contingencies to offer a conceptual model for targeting the critical areas in which minority students may need additional support to continue toward careers in science. Their proposed asset bundles model is grounded in the central premise that making greater progress in recruiting and retaining minorities likely requires institutions to respond simultaneously to various social cues that signal devaluation of certain identities (e.g., gender, race, socioeconomic status). The authors define "asset bundles" as the specific sets of abilities and resources individuals develop that help them succeed in educational and professional tasks, including but not limited to science and research. The model consists of five asset bundles, each of which is supported in the research literature as a factor relevant to educational achievement and, the authors contend, may lead to improved and sustained diversity: educational endowments, science socialization, network development, family expectations, and material resources. Using this framework, they suggest possible ways of thinking about the task of achieving diversity as well as guideposts for next steps. Finally, they discuss the feasibility of implementing such an approach. PMID:23018329

  12. Perspective: adopting an asset bundles model to support and advance minority students' careers in academic medicine and the scientific pipeline.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Japera; Bozeman, Barry

    2012-11-01

    The authors contend that increasing diversity in academic medicine, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics requires the adoption of a systematic approach to retain minority high school and college students as they navigate the scientific pipeline. Such an approach should focus on the interrelated and multilayered challenges that these students face. The authors fuse an alternative conceptualization of the scientific and technical human capital theoretical framework and the theory of social identity contingencies to offer a conceptual model for targeting the critical areas in which minority students may need additional support to continue toward careers in science. Their proposed asset bundles model is grounded in the central premise that making greater progress in recruiting and retaining minorities likely requires institutions to respond simultaneously to various social cues that signal devaluation of certain identities (e.g., gender, race, socioeconomic status). The authors define "asset bundles" as the specific sets of abilities and resources individuals develop that help them succeed in educational and professional tasks, including but not limited to science and research. The model consists of five asset bundles, each of which is supported in the research literature as a factor relevant to educational achievement and, the authors contend, may lead to improved and sustained diversity: educational endowments, science socialization, network development, family expectations, and material resources. Using this framework, they suggest possible ways of thinking about the task of achieving diversity as well as guideposts for next steps. Finally, they discuss the feasibility of implementing such an approach.

  13. Perspective: Adopting an Asset Bundle Model to Support and Advance Minority Students’ Careers in Academic Medicine and the Scientific Pipeline

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Japera; Bozeman, Barry

    2012-01-01

    The authors contend that increasing diversity in the scientific pipeline (e.g., academic medicine, science, technology, engineering and mathematics) requires a systematic approach to retain minority high school and college students. Such an approach should focus on the interrelated and multilayered challenges that these students face. The authors fuse an alternative conceptualization of the scientific and technical human capital theoretical framework and the theory of social identity contingencies to offer a conceptual model for targeting the critical areas in which minority students may need additional support in order to continue toward a career in science. Their proposed asset bundles model is grounded in the central premise that making greater progress in recruiting and retaining minorities likely requires institutions to respond simultaneously to various social cues that signal devaluation of certain identities (e.g., gender, race, or socioeconomic status). The authors define “asset bundles” as the specific sets of abilities and resources individuals develop that help them succeed in educational and professional tasks, including but not limited to science and research. The model consists of five asset bundles, each of which is supported in the research literature as a factor relevant to educational achievement and, the authors contend, may lead to improved and sustained diversity: educational endowments, science socialization, network development, family expectations, and material resources. Using this framework, they suggest possible ways of thinking about the task of achieving diversity as well as guideposts for next steps. Finally, they discuss the feasibility of implementing such an approach. PMID:23018329

  14. Exploiting the Use of Social Networking to Facilitate Collaboration in the Scientific Community

    SciTech Connect

    Coppock, Edrick G.

    2014-04-07

    The goal of this project was to exploit social networking to facilitate scientific collaboration. The project objective was to research and identify scientific collaboration styles that are best served by social networking applications and to model the most effective social networking applications to substantiate how social networking can support scientific collaboration. To achieve this goal and objective, the project was to develop an understanding of the types of collaborations conducted by scientific researchers, through classification, data analysis and identification of unique collaboration requirements. Another technical objective in support of this goal was to understand the current state of technology in collaboration tools. In order to test hypotheses about which social networking applications effectively support scientific collaboration the project was to create a prototype scientific collaboration system. The ultimate goal for testing the hypotheses and research of the project was to refine the prototype into a functional application that could effectively facilitate and grow collaboration within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research community.

  15. Building a Community - Academic Partnership to Enhance Hepatitis C Virus Screening

    PubMed Central

    Irvin, R; McAdams-Mahmoud, A; Hickman, D; Wilson, J; Fenwick, W; Chen, I; Irvin, N; Falade-Nwulia, O; Sulkowski, M; Chaisson, R; Thomas, DL; Mehta, SH

    2016-01-01

    Background An estimated 3.5 million Americans are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, the majority are unaware of their HCV diagnosis and few are treated. New models are required to diagnose and link HCV infected patients to HCV care. This paper describes an innovative partnership between Sisters Together and Reaching (STAR), Inc., a community organization, and Johns Hopkins University (JHU), an academic institution, for the identification of HCV cases. Methods STAR and JHU identified a mutual interest in increasing hepatitis C screening efforts and launched an HCV screening program which was designed to enhance STAR's existing HIV efforts. STAR and JHU used the Bergen Model of Collaborative Functioning as theoretical framework for the partnership. We used descriptive statistics to characterize the study population and correlates of HCV antibody positivity were reported in univariable/multivariable logistic regression. Results From July 2014 to June 2015, 325 rapid HCV antibody tests were performed in community settings with 49 (15%) positive HCV antibody tests. 33 of the 49 HCV antibody positive individuals answered questions about their HCV testing history and 42% reported a prior positive result but were not engaged in care and 58% reported that they were unaware of their HCV status. In multivariable analysis, factors that were significantly associated with screening HCV antibody positive were increasing age (AOR: 1.06, 95% CI 1.02-1.10), male sex (AOR: 5.56, 95% CI 1.92-14.29), and history of injection drug use (AOR: 39.3, 95% CI 15.20-101.49). Conclusions The community-academic partnership was successful in identifying individuals with hepatitis C infection through a synergistic collaboration. The program data suggests that community screening may improve the hepatitis C care continuum by identifying individuals unaware of their HCV status or aware of their HCV status but not engaged in care and linking them to care. PMID:27525192

  16. Comparable sustained virologic suppression between community and academic-based HIV care settings

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Carolyn; Heo, Moonseong; Peshansky, Alex; Umanski, Galina; Meissner, Paul; Voss, Cindy; Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States is evolving due to factors including aging and geographical diffusion. Provider shortages are also driving the restructuring of HIV care delivery away from specialized settings, and family medicine providers may play a larger role in the future. We attempted to compare the effectiveness of HIV treatment delivered at community versus hospital care settings. Methods The outcome of interest was sustained virologic suppression defined as two consecutive HIV-1 RNA measurements ≤ 400 copies/mL within one year after antiretroviral initiation. We used data from the multi-state HIV Research Network cohort to compare sustained virologic suppression outcomes among 15,047 HIV-infected adults followed from 2000–2008 at five community- and eight academic hospital-based ambulatory care sites. Community-based sites were mostly staffed by family medicine and general internal medicine physicians with HIV expertise whereas hospital sites were primarily staffed by infectious disease subspecialists. Multivariate mixed-effects logistic regression controlling for potential confounding variables was applied to account for clustering effects of study sites. Results In an unadjusted analysis, the rate of sustained virologic suppression was significantly higher among subjects treated in the community-based care settings: 1,646/2,314 (71.1%) vs. 8,416/12,733 (66.1%) (p < 0.01). In the adjusted multivariate model with potential confounding variables, the rate was higher, although not statistically significant, in the community-based settings (AOR = 1.26, 95% CI 0.73–2.16). Conclusion Antiretroviral therapy can be delivered effectively through community-based treatment settings. This finding is potentially important for new program development to shift HIV care into community-based settings as the landscape of accountable care, health reform, and HIV funding and resources evolves. PMID:25567825

  17. Evaluation of a community-academic partnership: lessons from Latinos in a network for cancer control.

    PubMed

    Corbin, J Hope; Fernandez, Maria E; Mullen, Patricia D

    2015-05-01

    Established in 2002, Latinos in a Network for Cancer Control is a community-academic network supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute. The network includes >130 individuals from 65 community and academic organizations committed to reducing cancer-related health disparities. Using an empirically derived systems model--the Bergen Model of Collaborative Functioning--as the analytic frame, we interviewed 19 partners to identify challenges and successful processes. Findings indicated that sustained partner interaction created "meaningful relationships" that were routinely called on for collaboration. The leadership was regarded positively on vision, charisma, and capacity. Limitations included overreliance on a single leader. Suggestions supported more delegation of decision making, consistent communication, and more equitable resource distribution. The study highlighted new insights into dynamics of collaboration: Greater inclusiveness of inputs (partners, finances, mission) and loosely defined roles and structure produced strong connections but less network-wide productivity (output). Still, this profile enabled the creation of more tightly defined and highly productive subgroups, with clear goals and roles but less inclusive of inputs than the larger network. Important network outputs included practice-based research publications, cancer control intervention materials, and training to enhance the use of evidence-based interventions, as well as continued and diversified funding. PMID:25395057

  18. Academic Institutionalization of Community Health Services: Way Ahead in Medical Education Reforms

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Raman

    2012-01-01

    Policy on medical education has a major bearing on the outcome of health care delivery system. Countries plan and execute development of human resource in health, based on the realistic assessments of health system needs. A closer observation of medical education and its impact on the delivery system in India reveals disturbing trends. Primary care forms backbone of any system for health care delivery. One of the major challenges in India has been chronic deficiency of trained human resource eager to work in primary care setting. Attracting talent and employing skilled workforce seems a distant dream. Talking specifically of the medical education, there are large regional variations, urban - rural divide and issues with financing of the infrastructure. The existing design of medical education is not compatible with the health care delivery system of India. Impact is visible at both qualitative as well as quantitative levels. Medical education and the delivery system are working independent of each other, leading outcomes which are inequitable and unjust. Decades of negligence of medical education regulatory mechanism has allowed cropping of multiple monopolies governed by complex set of conflict of interest. Primary care physicians, supposed to be the community based team leaders stand disfranchised academically and professionally. To undo the distorted trajectory, a paradigm shift is required. In this paper, we propose expansion of ownership in medical education with academic institutionalization of community health services. PMID:24478994

  19. Evaluation of a community-academic partnership: lessons from Latinos in a network for cancer control.

    PubMed

    Corbin, J Hope; Fernandez, Maria E; Mullen, Patricia D

    2015-05-01

    Established in 2002, Latinos in a Network for Cancer Control is a community-academic network supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute. The network includes >130 individuals from 65 community and academic organizations committed to reducing cancer-related health disparities. Using an empirically derived systems model--the Bergen Model of Collaborative Functioning--as the analytic frame, we interviewed 19 partners to identify challenges and successful processes. Findings indicated that sustained partner interaction created "meaningful relationships" that were routinely called on for collaboration. The leadership was regarded positively on vision, charisma, and capacity. Limitations included overreliance on a single leader. Suggestions supported more delegation of decision making, consistent communication, and more equitable resource distribution. The study highlighted new insights into dynamics of collaboration: Greater inclusiveness of inputs (partners, finances, mission) and loosely defined roles and structure produced strong connections but less network-wide productivity (output). Still, this profile enabled the creation of more tightly defined and highly productive subgroups, with clear goals and roles but less inclusive of inputs than the larger network. Important network outputs included practice-based research publications, cancer control intervention materials, and training to enhance the use of evidence-based interventions, as well as continued and diversified funding.

  20. The Effect of Use of Animations on the Academic Achievements of the Students, Retention of the Knowledge Learned, and the Scientific Process Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dasdemir, Ikramettin

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of the use of the animation on the academic achievements of the students, retention of this achievement, and the development of scientific process skills in the unit of force and motion of the science and technology course of the 6th grade basic education and to find out the student's views. The…

  1. Analysis of Scientific Attitude, Computer Anxiety, Educational Internet Use, Problematic Internet Use, and Academic Achievement of Middle School Students According to Demographic Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekmezci, Mehmet; Celik, Ismail; Sahin, Ismail; Kiray, Ahmet; Akturk, Ahmet Oguz

    2015-01-01

    In this research, students' scientific attitude, computer anxiety, educational use of the Internet, academic achievement, and problematic use of the Internet are analyzed based on different variables (gender, parents' educational level and daily access to the Internet). The research group involves 361 students from two middle schools which are…

  2. An exploration of the assessment experiences of new academics as they engage with a community of practice in higher education.

    PubMed

    Garrow, Amanda; Tawse, Stephen

    2009-08-01

    This paper considers a phenomenological research study that attempted to explore how new academics were introduced to the assessment process within a Higher Education context. Two key educational perspectives have shaped the interpretation of the studies findings. These are Nonaka and Takeuchi's [Nonaka, I., Takeuchi, H., 1995. The Knowledge Creating Company: How Japanese Companies Create the Dynamics of Innovation. Oxford University Press, New York] model of knowledge conversion and Lave and Wenger's work on communities of practice (1991, 2002). Three key findings emerged from this work. Firstly, the study highlights a number of issues relating to the types of support and guidance that new academics receive. These were divided into formal and informal types that either promoted conformity or facilitated challenge. Secondly, the study suggests that the ways in which experienced academic staff communicate their assessment knowledge and interact with new academics may require further consideration. Finally, the study raises questions about the type of academic that the organisation would wish to develop.

  3. Major lessons learned from a nationally-based community-academic partnership: addressing sibling adjustment to childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    Long, Kristin A; Goldish, Melanie; Lown, E Anne; Ostrowski, Nancy L; Alderfer, Melissa A; Marsland, Anna L; Ring, Sandra; Skala, Suzanne; Ewing, Linda J

    2015-03-01

    Prolonged, intensive treatment protocols for childhood cancer disrupt family routines and daily functioning, with effects extending to all family members. Despite their unique needs, siblings of children with cancer receive limited attention from community organizations and researchers. Community-academic partnerships may foster research that effectively assesses and addresses siblings' unmet needs. In this article, "community" refers to siblings of children with cancer who participate in SuperSibs!, a national nonprofit organization for siblings of children with cancer. This article (a) describes a replicable model for successful community-academic partnerships: the Sibling Research Advisory Board (SRAB) and (b) articulates "lessons learned" from this partnership, including documenting the ability to recruit a representative sample through a community organization. Lessons emerged from an iterative process of discussion and revision that involved all SRAB members. This case study describes approaches to overcoming practical obstacles in community-partnered research planning and implementation. To meet the common goals of identifying and addressing unmet sibling needs, SRAB partners learned to establish a common language, identify each team member's unique expertise, and acknowledge differences in approach (e.g., methodology, pace of accomplishment) between research and community service. SRAB's ability to recruit a representative sample was achieved through close collaboration with SuperSibs! and implementation of active recruitment strategies to overcome barriers to research participation. Protection of community member privacy was emphasized alongside methodological rigor. Community-academic partnerships enable research with high-need, hard-to-access populations. Proactively identifying and addressing common pitfalls of community-academic partnerships promotes community engagement and acceptability and facilitates high-quality research.

  4. A novel program trains community-academic teams to build research and partnership capacity.

    PubMed

    Winckler, Eva; Brown, Jen; Lebailly, Susan; McGee, Richard; Bayldon, Barbara; Huber, Gail; Kaleba, Erin; Lowry, Kelly Walker; Martens, Joseph; Mason, Maryann; Nuñez, Abel

    2013-06-01

    The Community-Engaged Research Team Support (CERTS) program was developed and tested to build research and partnership capacity for community-engaged research (CEnR) teams. Led by the Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (NUCATS), the goals of CERTS were: (1) to help community-academic teams build capacity for conducting rigorous CEnR and (2) to support teams as they prepare federal grant proposal drafts. The program was guided by an advisory committee of community and clinical partners, and representatives from Chicago's Clinical and Translational Science Institutes. Monthly workshops guided teams to write elements of NIH-style research proposals. Draft reviewing fostered a collaborative learning environment and helped teams develop equal partnerships. The program culminated in a mock-proposal review. All teams clarified their research and acquired new knowledge about the preparation of NIH-style proposals. Trust, partnership collaboration, and a structured writing strategy were assets of the CERTS approach. CERTS also uncovered gaps in resources and preparedness for teams to be competitive for federally funded grants. Areas of need include experience as principal investigators, publications on study results, mentoring, institutional infrastructure, and dedicated time for research.

  5. Public-academic partnerships: a program to improve the quality of antipsychotic prescribing in a community mental health system.

    PubMed

    Brunette, Mary F; de Nesnera, Alexander; Swain, Karin; Riera, Erik G; Lotz, Doris; Bartels, Stephen J

    2011-09-01

    State mental health authorities can use public-academic partnerships to create professional roles in which leaders can track trends, identify problems, and carry out quality improvement projects to address key issues. Leaders with positions in both academic institutions and state mental health authorities ensure access to resources, technical expertise, and key relationships to improve quality. The authors describe a public-academic partnership in New Hampshire and a quality improvement program it carried out. The program encourages providers at community mental health centers to adopt prescribing practices that limit the cardiometabolic side effects of antipsychotic medicines.

  6. The Impact of Freshman Year Learning Community Participation on Students' Self-Reported Sense of Meaning in Life, Academic Self-Efficacy and Commitment to Academic Major at the Beginning of the Second Academic Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruett, Karen Ann

    2011-01-01

    Student retention is one of the most studied areas in higher education. Much of the focus has been on providing services to aid in retention efforts from the first to the second academic year. Freshman seminar classes as well as learning community programs have become common on college campuses to provide students with the resources and support to…

  7. Scientific Research for Integrated Solutions to Community Challenges: The Thriving Earth Exchange (TEX) Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udu-gama, N.; Pandya, R.

    2015-12-01

    There is tremendous unmet and sometimes unrealized need for Earth and space science (ESS) expertise as part of civic decisions and local planning for climate change, natural hazards and natural resources. The Thriving Earth Exchange (TEX) helps AGU contribute that expertise to humanity in respectful, integrated ways. TEX brings ESS scientists together with local communities tackling issues of climate change, natural hazards and natural resources to co-design solutions that equitably integrate both scientific and community knowledge. To achieve this ambitious goal, TEX is partnering with organizations that are respected by and knowledgeable about communities both in the United States and internationally. Such partnerships include Rockefeller's 100 Resilient Cities Initiative, ICLEI USA, MIT's Climate Colab, among others. TEX works with these partners to approach communities who are ready to or already addressing ESS related issues. With partners, we help the communities define their goals, develop specific projects, and connect with relevant and helpful ESS scientists. We will also show how we help scientists and community leaders work productively together, and the tools we bring to support their innovation. It will highlight international examples, such as in the Pamir Mountains of Afghanistan-Tajikistan, Sri Lanka, and Ethiopia, and provide concrete examples of how these initiatives are helping TEX further expand the frontiers of collaborative research.

  8. Exploring group dynamics for integrating scientific and experiential knowledge in Community Advisory Boards for HIV research

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rogério M.; Spector, Anya Y.; Valera, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    To demonstrate how Community Advisory Boards (CABs) can best integrate community perspectives with scientific knowledge and involve community in disseminating HIV knowledge, this paper provides a case study exploring the structure and dynamic process of a “Community Collaborative Board” (CCB). We use the term CCB to emphasize collaboration over advisement. The CCB membership, structure and dynamics are informed by theory and research. The CCB is affiliated with Columbia University School of Social Work and its original membership included 30 members. CCB was built using six systematized steps meant to engage members in procedural and substantive research roles. Steps: (1) Engaging membership, (2) Developing relationships, (3) Exchanging information, (4) Negotiation and decision-making, (5) Retaining membership, and (6) Studying dynamic process. This model requires that all meetings be audio-taped to capture CCB dynamics. Using transcribed meeting data, we have identified group dynamics that help the CCB accomplish its objectives: 1) dialectic process helps exchange of information; 2) mutual support helps members work together despite social and professional differences; and 3) problem solving helps members achieve consensus. These dynamics also help members attain knowledge about HIV treatment and prevention and disseminate HIV-related knowledge. CABs can be purposeful in their use of group dynamics, narrow the knowledge gap between researchers and community partners, prepare members for procedural and substantive research roles, and retain community partners. PMID:21390878

  9. Uses of the Drupal CMS Collaborative Framework in the Woods Hole Scientific Community (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffei, A. R.; Chandler, C. L.; Work, T. T.; Shorthouse, D.; Furfey, J.; Miller, H.

    2010-12-01

    Organizations that comprise the Woods Hole scientific community (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Marine Biological Laboratory, USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center, Woods Hole Research Center, NOAA NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center, SEA Education Association) have a long history of collaborative activity regarding computing, computer network and information technologies that support common, inter-disciplinary science needs. Over the past several years there has been growing interest in the use of the Drupal Content Management System (CMS) playing a variety of roles in support of research projects resident at several of these organizations. Many of these projects are part of science programs that are national and international in scope. Here we survey the current uses of Drupal within the Woods Hole scientific community and examine reasons it has been adopted. The promise of emerging semantic features in the Drupal framework is examined and projections of how pre-existing Drupal-based websites might benefit are made. Closer examination of Drupal software design exposes it as more than simply a content management system. The flexibility of its architecture; the power of its taxonomy module; the care taken in nurturing the open-source developer community that surrounds it (including organized and often well-attended code sprints); the ability to bind emerging software technologies as Drupal modules; the careful selection process used in adopting core functionality; multi-site hosting and cross-site deployment of updates and a recent trend towards development of use-case inspired Drupal distributions casts Drupal as a general-purpose application deployment framework. Recent work in the semantic arena casts Drupal as an emerging RDF framework as well. Examples of roles played by Drupal-based websites within the Woods Hole scientific community that will be discussed include: science data metadata database, organization main website, biological

  10. Globus-based Services for the Hydro-Meteorology Scientific Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntean, Ioan-Lucian; Hofmann, Matthias; Heller, Helmut

    2013-04-01

    Scientific workflows in hydro-meteorology involve multiple applications with varying computational requirements. These are best met by different e-Infrastructures in Europe: sequential codes with modest requirements are well suited to resources offered in EGI (European Grid Infrastructure) while parallelized, computationally demanding codes have to run on PRACE (Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe) resources. Access to major Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCI) in Europe such as PRACE and EGI is provided by means of grid middleware like Globus, which is available in both eInfrastructures and thus can bridge between them. The consortium "Initiative for Globus in Europe" (IGE - http://www.ige-project.eu) and its community body EGCF (http://www.egcf.eu) act as European provider for Globus technology, offering the resource providers and scientific user communities professional services such as Globus software provisioning and certification, training and documentation, and community software adaptation to Globus technology. This presentation will cover the following two parts: an outline of the IGE/EGCF services for the DRIHM community and an introduction to data handling with Globus Online, with emphasis on the achievements to date. The set of Globus-centered services of potential interest to the hydro-meteorology community have been identified to be: Globus support for: data access and handling: GridFTP, Globus Online, Globus Connect, Globus Storage; computing: GRAM for submission of parallel jobs to PRACE or of high-throughput jobs to EGI; accounting: tracking the usage records with GridSAFE. Infrastructure and workflow integration support such as: setup of virtual organizations for DRIHM community; access to EGI and PRACE infrastructures via Globus-based tools; investigation of workflow interoperability technologies (such as SHIWA). Furthermore, IGE successfully provides access to test bed resources where developers of the DRIHM community can port

  11. Brominated flame retardants and organochlorine compounds in duplicate diet samples from a Portuguese academic community.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Sónia D; Sousa, Ana C A; Isobe, Tomohiko; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Nogueira, António J A; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2016-10-01

    Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDDs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), chlordane compounds (CHLs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), were measured in duplicate diet samples from 21 volunteers at a Portuguese academic community (University of Aveiro). Overall, the levels of the target compounds were low, with detection frequencies varying widely depending on the compounds and with brominated flame retardants (BFRs) registering the lowest detection frequencies. Among PCB congeners, nondioxin-like PCBs were predominant and detected in the majority of the samples. Organochlorine pesticides were also detected in the majority of the samples, with 100% detection for DDTs and HCHs. Estimated daily intakes (EDIs) were calculated using lower and upper bound estimations, and in both cases values were far below the currently established tolerable daily intakes for PCBs and OCs and the reference doses for PBDEs and HBCDDs.

  12. Brominated flame retardants and organochlorine compounds in duplicate diet samples from a Portuguese academic community.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Sónia D; Sousa, Ana C A; Isobe, Tomohiko; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Nogueira, António J A; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2016-10-01

    Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDDs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), chlordane compounds (CHLs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), were measured in duplicate diet samples from 21 volunteers at a Portuguese academic community (University of Aveiro). Overall, the levels of the target compounds were low, with detection frequencies varying widely depending on the compounds and with brominated flame retardants (BFRs) registering the lowest detection frequencies. Among PCB congeners, nondioxin-like PCBs were predominant and detected in the majority of the samples. Organochlorine pesticides were also detected in the majority of the samples, with 100% detection for DDTs and HCHs. Estimated daily intakes (EDIs) were calculated using lower and upper bound estimations, and in both cases values were far below the currently established tolerable daily intakes for PCBs and OCs and the reference doses for PBDEs and HBCDDs. PMID:27367176

  13. Asthma in the community: Designing instruction to help students explore scientific dilemmas that impact their lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Erika Dawn

    School science instruction that connects to students' diverse home, cultural, or linguistic experiences can encourage lifelong participation in the scientific dilemmas that impact students' lives. This dissertation seeks effective ways to support high school students as they learn complex science topics and use their knowledge to transform their personal and community environments. Applying the knowledge integration perspective, I collaborated with education, science, and community partners to design a technology enhanced science module, Improving Your Community's Asthma Problem. This exemplar community science curriculum afforded students the opportunity to (a) investigate a local community health issue, (b) interact with relevant evidence related to physiology, clinical management, and environmental risks, and (c) construct an integrated understanding of the asthma problem in their community. To identify effective instructional scaffolds that engage students in the knowledge integration process and prepare them to participate in community science, I conducted 2 years of research that included 5 schools, 10 teachers, and over 500 students. This dissertation reports on four studies that analyzed student responses on pre-, post-, and embedded assessments. Researching across four design stages, the iterative design study investigated how to best embed the visualizations of the physiological processes breathing, asthma attack, and the allergic immune response in an inquiry activity and informed evidence-based revisions to the module. The evaluation study investigated the impact of this revised Asthma module across multiple classrooms and differences in students' prior knowledge. Combining evidence of student learning from the iterative and evaluation studies with classroom observations and teacher interviews, the longitudinal study explored the impact of teacher practices on student learning in years 1 and 2. In the final chapter, I studied how the Asthma module and

  14. Creating a Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship with Mutual Benefits for an Academic Medical Center and a Community Health System

    PubMed Central

    Poncelet, Ann Noelle; Mazotti, Lindsay A; Blumberg, Bruce; Wamsley, Maria A; Grennan, Tim; Shore, William B

    2014-01-01

    The longitudinal integrated clerkship is a model of clinical education driven by tenets of social cognitive theory, situated learning, and workplace learning theories, and built on a foundation of continuity between students, patients, clinicians, and a system of care. Principles and goals of this type of clerkship are aligned with primary care principles, including patient-centered care and systems-based practice. Academic medical centers can partner with community health systems around a longitudinal integrated clerkship to provide mutual benefits for both organizations, creating a sustainable model of clinical training that addresses medical education and community health needs. A successful one-year longitudinal integrated clerkship was created in partnership between an academic medical center and an integrated community health system. Compared with traditional clerkship students, students in this clerkship had better scores on Clinical Performance Examinations, internal medicine examinations, and high perceptions of direct observation of clinical skills. Advantages for the academic medical center include mitigating the resources required to run a longitudinal integrated clerkship while providing primary care training and addressing core competencies such as systems-based practice, practice-based learning, and interprofessional care. Advantages for the community health system include faculty development, academic appointments, professional satisfaction, and recruitment. Success factors include continued support and investment from both organizations’ leadership, high-quality faculty development, incentives for community-based physician educators, and emphasis on the mutually beneficial relationship for both organizations. Development of a longitudinal integrated clerkship in a community health system can serve as a model for developing and expanding these clerkship options for academic medical centers. PMID:24867551

  15. Creating a longitudinal integrated clerkship with mutual benefits for an academic medical center and a community health system.

    PubMed

    Poncelet, Ann Noelle; Mazotti, Lindsay A; Blumberg, Bruce; Wamsley, Maria A; Grennan, Tim; Shore, William B

    2014-01-01

    The longitudinal integrated clerkship is a model of clinical education driven by tenets of social cognitive theory, situated learning, and workplace learning theories, and built on a foundation of continuity between students, patients, clinicians, and a system of care. Principles and goals of this type of clerkship are aligned with primary care principles, including patient-centered care and systems-based practice. Academic medical centers can partner with community health systems around a longitudinal integrated clerkship to provide mutual benefits for both organizations, creating a sustainable model of clinical training that addresses medical education and community health needs. A successful one-year longitudinal integrated clerkship was created in partnership between an academic medical center and an integrated community health system. Compared with traditional clerkship students, students in this clerkship had better scores on Clinical Performance Examinations, internal medicine examinations, and high perceptions of direct observation of clinical skills.Advantages for the academic medical center include mitigating the resources required to run a longitudinal integrated clerkship while providing primary care training and addressing core competencies such as systems-based practice, practice-based learning, and interprofessional care. Advantages for the community health system include faculty development, academic appointments, professional satisfaction, and recruitment.Success factors include continued support and investment from both organizations' leadership, high-quality faculty development, incentives for community-based physician educators, and emphasis on the mutually beneficial relationship for both organizations. Development of a longitudinal integrated clerkship in a community health system can serve as a model for developing and expanding these clerkship options for academic medical centers.

  16. A Comparison of Student Satisfaction and Value of Academic Community between Blended and Online Sections of a University-Level Educational Foundations Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overbaugh, Richard C.; Nickel, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    This pre-test/post-test study explores students' (n = 262) sense of academic community, including their perspectives of the value of academic community, plus course satisfaction and perceived learning in nearly identical blended and online sections of an educational foundations course. Students in both delivery modes were generally satisfied with…

  17. Dimensions of Managing Academic Affairs in the Community College. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 109. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robillard, Douglas, Jr., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This volume of New Directions for Community Colleges contains the following articles: (1) "Toward a Definition of Deaning," by Douglas Robillard, Jr.; (2) "The Dean as Chief Academic Officer," by John Stuart Erwin; (3) "The Dean and the Faculty," by Hans A. Andrews; (4) "The Dean and the President," by Hans J. Kuss; (5) "Aspects of Difficult…

  18. Out-of-School-Time Academic Programs to Improve School Achievement: A Community Guide Health Equity Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Knopf, John A.; Hahn, Robert A.; Proia, Krista K.; Truman, Benedict I.; Johnson, Robert L.; Muntaner, Carles; Fielding, Jonathan E.; Jones, Camara Phyllis; Fullilove, Mindy T.; Hunt, Pete C.; Qu, Shuli; Chattopadhyay, Sajal K.; Milstein, Bobby

    2015-01-01

    Context Low-income and minority status in the United States are associated with poor educational outcomes, which, in turn, reduce the long-term health benefits of education. Objective This systematic review assessed the extent to which out-of-school-time academic (OSTA) programs for at-risk students, most of whom are from low-income and racial/ethnic minority families, can improve academic achievement. Because most OSTA programs serve low-income and ethnic/racial minority students, programs may improve health equity. Design Methods of the Guide to Community Preventive Services were used. An existing systematic review assessing the effects of OSTA programs on academic outcomes (Lauer et al 2006; search period 1985–2003) was supplemented with a Community Guide update (search period 2003–2011). Main Outcome Measure Standardized mean difference. Results Thirty-two studies from the existing review and 25 studies from the update were combined and stratified by program focus (ie, reading-focused, math-focused, general academic programs, and programs with minimal academic focus). Focused programs were more effective than general or minimal academic programs. Reading-focused programs were effective only for students in grades K-3. There was insufficient evidence to determine effectiveness on behavioral outcomes and longer-term academic outcomes. Conclusions OSTA programs, particularly focused programs, are effective in increasing academic achievement for at-risk students. Ongoing school and social environments that support learning and development may be essential to ensure the longer-term benefits of OSTA programs. PMID:26062096

  19. How Do School Resources and Academic Performance Differ across Australia's Rural, Regional and Metropolitan Communities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Kevin; Perry, Laura B.; McConney, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This study uses data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) to gain a better understanding of how academic performance and resources vary across rural-urban school communities in Australia. While it is well known that schools in rural areas have difficulty recruiting and retaining teachers, the degree to which schools in…

  20. High-Quality 21st Century Community Learning Centers: Academic Achievement among Frequent Participants and Non-Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holstead, Jenell; King, Mindy Hightower

    2011-01-01

    This study examined academic differences between students who attended 21st Century Community Learning Center (CCLC) programs frequently (60 or more days) and matched nonattendees during the 2008-2009 school year. Schools included in the study represented only those centers found to be implementing high-quality programming, as measured by a…

  1. The Value of Professional Development Activities in Advancing the Careers of Women Chief Academic Officers in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cejda, Brent D.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has shown that there are not distinct career lines leading to the chief academic officer (CAO) position in community colleges.Rather, it appears that a variety of skills and experiences contribute to advancement to this position. This paper examines the perceptions of women CAOs as to the importance of professional development…

  2. Student Academic Achievement and Dropout Rate in Traditional and Online Courses at a Community College in New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caruso, Janet

    2012-01-01

    The academic achievement, dropout rate, and demographics of students enrolled in traditional face-to-face and online courses at a community college located in the suburbs of New York State were examined. Courses offered during the fall 2010 semester in both instructional delivery models were selected from arts and humanities, behavioral science,…

  3. The Impact of Pell Grants on Academic Outcomes for Low-Income California Community College Students. MPR Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Jennie H.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines whether financial aid, specifically federal Pell grants, is associated with academic success for low-income community college students in California. Previous studies in this series of MPR Research Briefs have examined transfer patterns and the types of financial aid typically received by students in this sector. This report…

  4. The Influence of a Freshman Orientation Course on the Academic Performance and Retention of New Community College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robles, Stacey Y.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of a freshman orientation course on the academic performance and retention of new community college students. The study was designed to obtain both qualitative and quantitative data. A survey was distributed to students who attended Coral College (a pseudonym), California, from the fall of…

  5. The Role of Arts Participation in Students' Academic and Nonacademic Outcomes: A Longitudinal Study of School, Home, and Community Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Andrew J.; Mansour, Marianne; Anderson, Michael; Gibson, Robyn; Liem, Gregory A. D.; Sudmalis, David

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study draws on positive youth development frameworks and ecological models to examine the role of school-, home- and community-based arts participation in students' academic (e.g., motivation, engagement) and nonacademic (e.g., self-esteem, life satisfaction) outcomes. The study is based on 643 elementary and high school students…

  6. Participation of Part-time Faculty on the Executive Committee of the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, Sacramento.

    At the 1996 Spring Plenary Session, the Academic Senate for California Community Colleges (ASCCC) passed resolution S961.5, which authorizes the participation of part-time faculty on the Executive Committee. The assurance of participation of part-time faculty on the Executive Committee of the ASCCC at first appeared a simple proposal, but was soon…

  7. Randomized Trial of Prolonged Exposure for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder with and without Cognitive Restructuring: Outcome at Academic and Community Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foa, Edna B.; Hembree, Elizabeth A.; Cahill, Shawn P.; Rauch, Sheila A. M.; Riggs, David S.; Feeny, Norah C.; Yadin, Elna

    2005-01-01

    Female assault survivors (N = 171) with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were randomly assigned to prolonged exposure (PE) alone, PE plus cognitive restructuring (PE/CR), or wait-list (WL). Treatment, which consisted of 9-12 sessions, was conducted at an academic treatment center or at a community clinic for rape survivors. Evaluations…

  8. The Academic Performance and Persistence Pattern of a Select Group of Developmental Students at Harrisburg Area Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basonic, N. Lorraine Yovanovich

    In 1981, a study was conducted to investigate the academic performance and persistence patterns of developmental students who matriculated at Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC) between 1977 and 1979. Specifically, the study sought to determine the proportion of developmental students who successfully completed developmental and subsequent…

  9. Knowledge Acquisition or Participation in Communities of Practice? Academics' Metaphors of Teaching and Learning at the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wegner, Elisabeth; Nückles, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Learning has been described by two conceptual metaphors: as individual acquisition of knowledge ("acquisition metaphor"), and as an enculturation into a subject community ("participation metaphor"). On the other hand, academics' conceptions of teaching are usually reported to vary between teacher and student orientation. In…

  10. The Relationship of Learning Communities to Engineering Students' Perceptions of the Freshman Year Experience, Academic Performance, and Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolley, Patricia Ann Separ

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the effects of a residential learning community and enrollment in an introductory engineering course to engineering students' perceptions of the freshman year experience, academic performance, and persistence. The sample included students enrolled in a large, urban, public, research university…

  11. Using Community College Prior Academic Performance to Predict Re-Enrollment at a Four-Year Online University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadasen, Denise; List, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Students' re-enrollment in the subsequent semester after their first semester at a four-year institution is a strong predictor of retention and graduation. This is especially true for students who transfer from a community college to a four-year institution because of the many external or non-academic factors influencing a student's decision to…

  12. Association between co-authorship network and scientific productivity and impact indicators in academic medical research centers: A case study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi-Nooraie, Reza; Akbari-Kamrani, Marjan; Hanneman, Robert A; Etemadi, Arash

    2008-01-01

    Background We aimed to examine the co-authorship networks in three successful Iranian academic research centers, in order to find the association between the scientific productivity and impact indicators with network features in a case study. Methods We searched for English articles of the three research centers. We drew co-authorship maps of each center and calculated social network measures. Results The collaboration networks in centers shared many structural features, including a "star-like" pattern of relations. Centers with more successful scientific profile showed denser and more cooperative networks. Key figures in each center were interviewed for their understandings of the reasons for the emergence of these patterns. Conclusion Star shape network structure and dependency on a single big member is a common feature observed in our case study. Scientific output measures correlate with the network structure of research centers. Network analysis seems a useful method to explore the subtle scientific contexts in research organizations. PMID:18796149

  13. Scientific challenges in thermosphere-ionosphere forecasting - conclusions from the October 2014 NASA JPL community workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannucci, Anthony J.; Hagan, Maura E.; Vourlidas, Angelos; Huang, Cheryl Y.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga P.; Deng, Yue

    2016-10-01

    Interest in forecasting space weather in the thermosphere and ionosphere (T-I) led to a community workshop held at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in October, 2014. The workshop focus was "Scientific Challenges in Thermosphere-Ionosphere Forecasting" to emphasize that forecasting presumes a sufficiently advanced state of scientific knowledge, yet one that is still evolving. The purpose of the workshop, and this topical issue that arose from the workshop, was to discuss research frontiers that will lead to improved space weather forecasts. Three areas are discussed in some detail in this paper: (1) the role of lower atmosphere forcing in the response of the T-I to geomagnetic disturbances; (2) the significant deposition of energy at polar latitudes during geomagnetic disturbances; and (3) recent developments in understanding the propagation of coronal mass ejections through the heliosphere and prospects for forecasting the north-south component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) using observations at the Lagrangian L5 point. We describe other research presented at the workshop that appears in the topical issue. The possibility of establishing a "positive feedback loop" where improved scientific knowledge leads to improved forecasts is described (Siscoe 2006, Space Weather, 4, S01003; Mannucci 2012, Space Weather, 10, S07003).

  14. Academic Detailing Interventions Improve Tobacco Use Treatment among Physicians Working in Underserved Communities

    PubMed Central

    Evers-Casey, Sarah; Graden, Sarah; Schnoll, Robert; Mallya, Giridhar

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Tobacco use disproportionately affects the poor, who are, in turn, least likely to receive cessation treatment from providers. Providers caring for low-income populations perform simple components of tobacco use treatment (e.g., assessing tobacco use) with reasonable frequency. However, performance of complex treatment behaviors, such as pharmacologic prescription and follow-up arrangement, remains suboptimal. Objectives: Evaluate the influence of academic detailing (AD), a university-based, noncommercial, educational outreach intervention, on primary care physicians’ complex treatment practice behaviors within an urban care setting. Methods: Trained academic detailers made in-person visits to targeted primary care practices, delivering verbal and written instruction emphasizing three key messages related to tobacco treatment. Physicians’ self-reported frequency of simple and complex treatment behaviors were assessed using a seven-item questionnaire, before and 2 months after AD. Results: Between May 2011 and March 2012, baseline AD visits were made to 217 physicians, 109 (50%) of whom also received follow-up AD. Mean frequency scores for complex behaviors increased significantly, from 2.63 to 2.92, corresponding to a clinically significant 30% increase in the number of respondents who endorsed “almost always” or “always” (P < 0.001). Improvement in mean simple behavior frequency scores was also noted (3.98 vs. 4.13; P = 0.035). Sex and practice type appear to influence reported complex behavior frequency at baseline, whereas only practice type influenced improvement in complex behavior scores at follow up. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility and potential effectiveness of a low-cost and highly disseminable intervention to improve clinician behavior in the context of treating nicotine dependence in underserved communities. PMID:25867533

  15. Standards for Academic and Professional Instruction in Foundations of Education, Educational Studies, and Educational Policy Studies Third Edition, 2012, Draft Presented to the Educational Community by the American Educational Studies Association's Committee on Academic Standards and Accreditation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tutwiler, Sandra Winn; deMarrais, Kathleen; Gabbard, David; Hyde, Andrea; Konkol, Pamela; Li, Huey-li; Medina, Yolanda; Rayle, Joseph; Swain, Amy

    2013-01-01

    This third edition of the "Standards for Academic and Professional Instruction in Foundations of Education, Educational Studies, and Educational Policy Studies" is presented to the educational community by the American Educational Studies Association's Committee on Academic Standards and Accreditation. The Standards were first developed and…

  16. Citizens of the Academic Community? A Societal Perspective on Leadership in UK Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolden, Richard; Gosling, Jonathan; O'Brien, Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a societal perspective on academic leadership by exploring the preoccupations of academics as citizens rather than as employees, managers or individuals. It uses a listening post methodology to ask "what is it like to be a citizen of an academic institution in contemporary Britain?" Three listening posts, comprising…

  17. Engaging a Wider Community: The Academic Library as a Center for Creativity, Discovery, and Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Academic libraries have reported long-term declines in circulation, reference transactions, reserves, and in-house library materials usage. Increasingly, libraries are perceived as being less critical to the academic enterprise. Are these trends irreversible? Perhaps public libraries and some innovative academic libraries can provide us with some…

  18. Intelligence and Scientific-Creative Thinking: Their Convergence in the Explanation of Students' Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Maria Jose; Bermejo, Rosario; Ferrando, Mercedes; Prieto, Maria Dolores; Sainz, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Academic performance is usually generally explained by student's intelligence, although other factors such as personality and motivation also account for it. Factors associated with a more complex thought process in adolescence are also beginning to gain importance in the prediction of academic performance. Among these forms of…

  19. COMESEP: bridging the gap between the SEP, CME, and terrestrial effects scientific communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Norma; Veronig, Astrid; Rodriguez, Luciano; Vrsnak, Bojan; Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Malandraki, Olga; Dalla, Silvia; Srivastava, Nandita

    2016-04-01

    In the past there has been a tendency for the geomagnetic storm and solar energetic particle (SEP) communities to work in parallel rather than to apply a cross-disciplinary work approach specifically in regard to space weather forecasting. To provide more awareness on the existing links between these communities, as well as further bridge this gap, the three-year EU FP7 COMESEP (COronal Mass Ejections and Solar Energetic Particles: forecasting the space weather impact) project emphasized cross-collaboration between the SEP, coronal mass ejection, and terrestrial effects scientific communities. COMESEP went from basic solar-terrestrial physics research to space weather operations by developing, validating and implementing multi-purpose tools into an operational 24/7 alert service. Launched in November 2013, the COMESEP alert system provides space weather stakeholders geomagnetic storm alerts ("Event based" and "Next 24 hours") and SEP (proton) storm alerts (E > 10 MeV and E > 60 MeV) without human intervention based on the COMESEP definition of risk. COMESEP alerts and forecasts are freely available on the COMESEP alert website (http://www.comesep.eu/alert), as well as disseminated by e-mail to registered users. Acknowledgement: This work has received funding from the European Commission FP7 Project COMESEP (263252).

  20. The Circulation of Scientific Articles in the Sphere of Web-Based Media: Citation Practices, Communities of Interests and Local Ties.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Muriel; Renard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    On 5th December 2012, a scientific article reviewing a change in the feeding behaviour of the European catfish, one of the largest freshwater fish, was published in the American scientific journal, PLOS ONE, an open access journal, which also allows the mass publication of pictures and videos. Within a few days following the publication of this article, it was relayed by numerous web sites and generated a media craze. In this paper, we analyse the circulation of this scientific information in the sphere of Web-based media during the two months following its publication, by revealing the citation mechanisms of the original article and the logic of the Internet users participating in its diffusion. In addition, since the circulation of its informational content travelled beyond linguistic and geographical boundaries, we chose to compare the citation modalities and intertextual relationships of documents in the three countries where the article spread the most widely, namely: France, the United States and Great Britain. Even though our study shows that the media circulation of scientific papers operates in a traditional way, the intertextual analysis underlines the grand variety of participants (such as journalists, non-scientists, fishermen, technology enthusiasts and Internet users) involved in the diffusion of this information, each of them mobilizing different intertextual strategies, according to their various targets. They all transformed, reformulated and appropriated the scientific information according to their own, unique interests. This study also emphasizes the importance of journalistic websites as opinion relays. They were the first diffusers involved in spreading the information but this role was rarely acknowledged by the Internet users - through citations, for example. In contrast, we observed that amateurs' communities (communities of practices and communities of interest of fishermen or of buzz fans), which only became involved in a second temporal

  1. The Circulation of Scientific Articles in the Sphere of Web-Based Media: Citation Practices, Communities of Interests and Local Ties.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Muriel; Renard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    On 5th December 2012, a scientific article reviewing a change in the feeding behaviour of the European catfish, one of the largest freshwater fish, was published in the American scientific journal, PLOS ONE, an open access journal, which also allows the mass publication of pictures and videos. Within a few days following the publication of this article, it was relayed by numerous web sites and generated a media craze. In this paper, we analyse the circulation of this scientific information in the sphere of Web-based media during the two months following its publication, by revealing the citation mechanisms of the original article and the logic of the Internet users participating in its diffusion. In addition, since the circulation of its informational content travelled beyond linguistic and geographical boundaries, we chose to compare the citation modalities and intertextual relationships of documents in the three countries where the article spread the most widely, namely: France, the United States and Great Britain. Even though our study shows that the media circulation of scientific papers operates in a traditional way, the intertextual analysis underlines the grand variety of participants (such as journalists, non-scientists, fishermen, technology enthusiasts and Internet users) involved in the diffusion of this information, each of them mobilizing different intertextual strategies, according to their various targets. They all transformed, reformulated and appropriated the scientific information according to their own, unique interests. This study also emphasizes the importance of journalistic websites as opinion relays. They were the first diffusers involved in spreading the information but this role was rarely acknowledged by the Internet users - through citations, for example. In contrast, we observed that amateurs' communities (communities of practices and communities of interest of fishermen or of buzz fans), which only became involved in a second temporal

  2. The Circulation of Scientific Articles in the Sphere of Web-Based Media: Citation Practices, Communities of Interests and Local Ties

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Julie

    2016-01-01

    On 5th December 2012, a scientific article reviewing a change in the feeding behaviour of the European catfish, one of the largest freshwater fish, was published in the American scientific journal, PLOS ONE, an open access journal, which also allows the mass publication of pictures and videos. Within a few days following the publication of this article, it was relayed by numerous web sites and generated a media craze. In this paper, we analyse the circulation of this scientific information in the sphere of Web-based media during the two months following its publication, by revealing the citation mechanisms of the original article and the logic of the Internet users participating in its diffusion. In addition, since the circulation of its informational content travelled beyond linguistic and geographical boundaries, we chose to compare the citation modalities and intertextual relationships of documents in the three countries where the article spread the most widely, namely: France, the United States and Great Britain. Even though our study shows that the media circulation of scientific papers operates in a traditional way, the intertextual analysis underlines the grand variety of participants (such as journalists, non-scientists, fishermen, technology enthusiasts and Internet users) involved in the diffusion of this information, each of them mobilizing different intertextual strategies, according to their various targets. They all transformed, reformulated and appropriated the scientific information according to their own, unique interests. This study also emphasizes the importance of journalistic websites as opinion relays. They were the first diffusers involved in spreading the information but this role was rarely acknowledged by the Internet users - through citations, for example. In contrast, we observed that amateurs’ communities (communities of practices and communities of interest of fishermen or of buzz fans), which only became involved in a second

  3. Preparing new nurse graduates for practice in multiple settings: a community-based academic-practice partnership model.

    PubMed

    West, Nikki; Berman, Audrey; Karshmer, Judith; Prion, Susan; Van, Paulina; Wallace, Jonalyn

    2014-06-01

    Responding to local and national concerns about the nursing workforce, the California Institute for Nursing and Health Care worked with private and public funders and community health care partners to establish community-based transition-to-practice programs for new RN graduates unable to secure nursing positions in the San Francisco Bay Area. The goals were to retain new RN graduates in nursing and further develop their skills and competencies to increase their employability. Leaders from academic and inpatient, ambulatory, and community-based practice settings, as well as additional community partners, collaboratively provided four 12- to 16-week pilot transition programs in 2010-2011. A total of 345 unemployed new nurse graduates enrolled. Eighty-four percent of 188 respondents to a post-program survey were employed in inpatient and community settings 3 months after completion. Participants and clinical preceptors also reported increases in confidence and competence.

  4. Outposts of science; the knowledge trade and the expansion of scientific community in post-Civil War America.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Daniel

    2008-09-01

    By the second half of the nineteenth century, local and regional voluntary societies were among the most widespread, accessible, and familiar public scientific institutions in America. Collectively, they made up an institutional network that converted individuals' private interest in science into a public activity. They played an essential role in the dissemination of scientific information, the growth of a scientifically literate population, and the extension of public support for science in the decades after the Civil War. This essay delineates and maps the spread of these societies throughout the country, as well as the flow of scientific information both among societies and between a society and its regional hinterland. Using the Davenport [Iowa] Academy of Natural Sciences as an example, it demonstrates how local societies were embedded in a national scientific community and mediated between it and local scientific enthusiasts, to the benefit of both.

  5. The Power of Community: How Foster Parents, Teachers, and Community Members Support Academic Achievement for Foster Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Foster children have been identified as one of the most high-risk groups for academic failure in schools today. However, a small number of foster youth are beating the odds by achieving academically. How are they able to overcome tremendous barriers and succeed? This phenomenological study reports the findings of former foster youth and their P-12…

  6. 21st century community learning centers--improving the academic performance of at-risk students: a Bronx tale.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Arleen T; Bowen, Lizette M

    2011-01-01

    The authors of this article report on an intervention designed to improve the academic component of an extended after-school program. The agency involved in this intervention was a non-profit community action group (CAG) agency whose mission is to improve the socio-economic well-being of the residents of Upper Manhattan, the Bronx, and New York City. The agency has a staff of 200 that serve high school students. The intervention program was designed to (1) improve the working relationship between teachers, families, and students in the after-school program, (2) develop new and innovative ways to improve the academic curricula of the after-school program, and (3) provide continuous education to stakeholders to the after-school program. Improvements in student performance relating to attendance, academic work, discipline and social behaviors were reported. The intervention reported in this article has the potential of supporting learning and developmental outcomes over time.

  7. Making FLASH an Open Code for the Academic High-Energy Density Physics Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, D. Q.; Couch, S. M.; Dubey, A.; Gopal, S.; Graziani, C.; Lee, D.; Weide, K.; Xia, G.

    2010-11-01

    High-energy density physics (HEDP) is an active and growing field of research. DOE has recently decided to make FLASH a code for the academic HEDP community. FLASH is a modular and extensible compressible spatially adaptive hydrodynamics code that incorporates capabilities for a broad range of physical processes, performs well on a wide range of existing advanced computer architectures, and has a broad user base. A rigorous software maintenance process allows the code to operate simultaneously in production and development modes. We summarize the work we are doing to add HEDP capabilities to FLASH. We are adding (1) Spitzer conductivity, (2) super time-stepping to handle the disparity between diffusion and advection time scales, and (3) a description of electrons, ions, and radiation (in the diffusion approximation) by 3 temperatures (3T) to both the hydrodynamics and the MHD solvers. We are also adding (4) ray tracing, (5) laser energy deposition, and (6) a multi-species equation of state incorporating ionization to the hydrodynamics solver; and (7) Hall MHD, and (8) the Biermann battery term to the MHD solver.

  8. Community- and School-Sponsored Program Participation and Academic Achievement in a Full-Service Community School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houser, John H. W.

    2016-01-01

    Community schools represent a school reform approach that purports to address the multifaceted and intertwined challenges faced by poor urban communities and schools. The community school approach includes partnering with community organizations, making the school a community hub where services are provided during and outside of the school day,…

  9. EDP Sciences and A&A: partnering to providing services to support the scientific community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Agnes

    2015-08-01

    Scholarly publishing is no longer about simply producing and packaging articles and sending out to subscribers. To be successful, as well as being global and digital, Publishers and their journals need to be fully engaged with their stakeholders (authors, readers, funders, libraries etc), and constantly developing new products and services to support their needs in the ever-changing environment that we work in.Astronomy & Astrophysics (A&A) is a high quality, major international Journal that belongs to the astronomical communities of a consortium of European and South American countries supported by ESO who sponsor the journal. EDP Sciences is a non-profit publisher belonging to several learned societies and is appointed by ESO to publish the journal.Over the last decade, as well as publishing the results of worldwide astronomical and astrophysical research, A&A and EDP Sciences have worked in partnership to develop a wide range of services for the authors and readers of A&A:- A specialist language editing service: to provide a clear and excellent level of English ensuring full understanding of the high-quality science.- A flexible and progressive Open Access Policy including Gold and Green options and strong links with arXiv.- Enriched articles: authors are able to enhance their articles using a wide range of rich media such as 3D models, videos and animations.Multiple publishing formats: allowing readers to browse articles on multiple devices including eReaders and Kindles.- “Scientific Writing for Young Astronomers”: In 2008 EDP Sciences and A&A set up the Scientific Writing for Young Astronomers (SWYA) School with the objective to teach early PhD Students how write correct and efficient scientific papers for different mediums (journals, proceedings, thesis manuscripts, etc.).

  10. Socioemotional Adjustment as a Mediator of the Association between Exposure to Community Violence and Academic Performance in Low-Income Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hardaway, Cecily R.; Larkby, Cynthia A.; Cornelius, Marie D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study examines whether exposure to community violence is indirectly related to academic performance through anxious/depressed symptoms and delinquent behaviors. Methods Three hundred eighteen mothers and adolescents who participated in a longitudinal investigation were interviewed when adolescents were age 10, 14, and 16. Results Community violence exposure at age 14 was significantly related to anxious/depressed symptoms and delinquent behaviors. Delinquent behaviors (but not anxious/depressed symptoms) were significantly associated with academic performance at age 16. Exposure to community violence was indirectly related to academic performance through delinquent behaviors. There was no significant indirect effect of exposure to community violence on academic performance through anxious/depressed symptoms. Covariates included sociodemographics and exposure to child abuse. Age 10 anxious/depressed symptoms, age 10 delinquent behaviors, and age 14 academic performance were also included in the model to control for preexisting differences in socioemotional adjustment and academic performance. Conclusions Results suggest that exposure to community violence may initiate a cascade of problems that spread from behavior problems to declines in academic performance. Our results highlight the need for schools to consider exposure to community violence as one form of trauma and to transform in ways that make them more trauma-sensitive. The use of trauma-sensitive practices that address the effects of violence exposure on youth may help limit the progression of adverse effects from delinquent behavior to other domains of functioning. PMID:25485167

  11. Scientific Benefits of Space Science Models Archiving at Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Berrios, David; Chulaki, Anna; Hesse, Michael; MacNeice, Peter J.; Maddox, Marlo M.; Pulkkinen, Antti; Rastaetter, Lutz; Taktakishvili, Aleksandre

    2009-01-01

    The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) hosts a set of state-of-the-art space science models ranging from the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. CCMC provides a web-based Run-on-Request system, by which the interested scientist can request simulations for a broad range of space science problems. To allow the models to be driven by data relevant to particular events CCMC developed a tool that automatically downloads data from data archives and transform them to required formats. CCMC also provides a tailored web-based visualization interface for the model output, as well as the capability to download the simulation output in portable format. CCMC offers a variety of visualization and output analysis tools to aid scientists in interpretation of simulation results. During eight years since the Run-on-request system became available the CCMC archived the results of almost 3000 runs that are covering significant space weather events and time intervals of interest identified by the community. The simulation results archived at CCMC also include a library of general purpose runs with modeled conditions that are used for education and research. Archiving results of simulations performed in support of several Modeling Challenges helps to evaluate the progress in space weather modeling over time. We will highlight the scientific benefits of CCMC space science model archive and discuss plans for further development of advanced methods to interact with simulation results.

  12. NSF Antarctic and Arctic Data Consortium; Scientific Research Support & Data Services for the Polar Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, P. J.; Pundsack, J. W.; Carbotte, S. M.; Tweedie, C. E.; Grunow, A.; Lazzara, M. A.; Carpenter, P.; Sjunneskog, C. M.; Yarmey, L.; Bauer, R.; Adrian, B. M.; Pettit, J.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium (a2dc) is a collaboration of research centers and support organizations that provide polar scientists with data and tools to complete their research objectives. From searching historical weather observations to submitting geologic samples, polar researchers utilize the a2dc to search andcontribute to the wealth of polar scientific and geospatial data.The goals of the Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium are to increase visibility in the research community of the services provided by resource and support facilities. Closer integration of individual facilities into a "one stop shop" will make it easier for researchers to take advantage of services and products provided by consortium members. The a2dc provides a common web portal where investigators can go to access data and samples needed to build research projects, develop student projects, or to do virtual field reconnaissance without having to utilize expensive logistics to go into the field.Participation by the international community is crucial for the success of a2dc. There are 48 nations that are signatories of the Antarctic Treaty, and 8 sovereign nations in the Arctic. Many of these organizations have unique capabilities and data that would benefit US ­funded polar science and vice versa.We'll present an overview of the Antarctic & Arctic Data Consortium, current participating organizations, challenges & opportunities, and plans to better coordinate data through a geospatial strategy and infrastructure.

  13. Learning in the context of community: The academic experiences of first-year arts and science students in a learning community program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Nancy

    2000-10-01

    This study explored the academic experiences of two groups of first-year students in university, one in the arts and one in the science, who participated in a residential-based learning community program. Using qualitative and critical analysis of in-depth student interviews conducted over a fall and winter semester, I constructed their world as implied from their stories and narratives. From this vantage point, I investigated how students as novice learners negotiated their role as learners; the belief systems they brought with them to minimize academic risk; their coping strategies in a 12 week semestered system; and the tacit theories they acquired within their day-to-day educational experiences. A number of themes emerged from the research: students intentionally minimizing faculty contact until they developed 'worthiness'; learning as 'teacher pleasing'; disciplinary learning differences between the arts and sciences students; and a grade orientation that influenced what and how students learned. Within the broader political, ideological, and cultural framework of the university, I identified student patterns of accommodation, resistance, silence and submission in negotiating their roles as learners. By critiquing the academic side of university life as students experienced it and lived it as a community of learners, I exposed the tensions, contradictions, and paradoxes that emerged. I revealed the points of disjuncture that came from competing discourses within the university for these students: the discourse of community, the discourse of collective harmony, and the discourse of the market place.

  14. The Los Angeles Healthy Community Neighborhood Initiative: A Ten Year Experience in Building and Sustaining a Successful Community-Academic Partnership

    PubMed Central

    King, Keyonna M; Morris, D’Ann; Jones, Loretta; Lucas-Wright, Aziza; Jones, Felica; del Pino, Homero E; Porter, Courtney; Vargas, Roberto; Kahn, Katherine; Brown, Arleen F; Norris, Keith C

    2016-01-01

    Background Developing effective Community-Academic Partnerships (CAPs) is challenging, and the steps to build and sustain them have not been well documented. This paper describes efforts to form and sustain the Healthy Community Neighborhood Initiative (HCNI), a CAP to improve health in a low-income community in South Los Angeles. Methods Moderated, semi-structured discussions with HCNI community and academic partners were used to develop a framework for CAP formation. Results We identified two key features, shared values and respect, as critical to the decision to form the HCNI. Five elements were identified as necessary for building and sustaining the HCNI: trust, transparency, equity and fairness, adequate resources and developing protocols to provide structure. We also identified several challenges and barriers and the strategies used in the HCNI to mitigate these challenges. Conclusion We developed a framework to incorporate and reinforce the key elements identified as crucial in building and sustaining a CAP in a low-income community. PMID:27747314

  15. “We Make the Path by Walking It”: Building an Academic Community Partnership With Boston Chinatown

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Carolyn Leung; Allukian, Nathan; Wang, Xingyue; Ghosh, Sujata; Huang, Chien-Chi; Wang, Jacy; Brugge, Doug; Wong, John B.; Mark, Shirley; Dong, Sherry; Koch-Weser, Susan; Parsons, Susan K.; Leslie, Laurel K.; Freund, Karen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The potential for academic community partnerships are challenged in places where there is a history of conflict and mistrust. Addressing Disparities in Asian Populations through Translational Research (ADAPT) represents an academic community partnership between researchers and clinicians from Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University and community partners from Boston Chinatown. Based in principles of community-based participatory research and partnership research, this partnership is seeking to build a trusting relationship between Tufts and Boston Chinatown. Objectives This case study aims to provides a narrative story of the development and formation of ADAPT as well as discuss challenges to its future viability. Methods Using case study research tools, this study draws upon a variety of data sources including interviews, program evaluation data and documents. Results Several contextual factors laid the foundation for ADAPT. Weaving these factors together helped to create synergy and led to ADAPT’s formation. In its first year, ADAPT has conducted formative research, piloted an educational program for community partners and held stakeholder forums to build a broad base of support. Conclusions ADAPT recognizes that long term sustainability requires bringing multiple stakeholders to the table even before a funding opportunity is released and attempting to build a diversified funding base. PMID:25435562

  16. Community-academic partnerships in HIV-related research: a systematic literature review of theory and practice

    PubMed Central

    Brizay, Ulrike; Golob, Lina; Globerman, Jason; Gogolishvili, David; Bird, Mara; Rios-Ellis, Britt; Rourke, Sean B; Heidari, Shirin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Community involvement in HIV research has increased over recent years, enhancing community-academic partnerships. Several terms have been used to describe community participation in research. Clarification is needed to determine whether these terms are synonymous or actually describe different research processes. In addition, it remains unclear if the role that communities play in the actual research process follows the recommendations given in theoretical frameworks of community-academia research. Objectives The objective of this study is to review the existing terms and definitions regarding community-academic partnerships and assess how studies are implementing these in relation to conceptual definitions. Methods A systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed. Two reviewers independently assessed each article, applying the following inclusion criteria: the article must be published in English before 2013; it must provide an explicit definition and/or defining methodology for a term describing research with a community component; and it has to refer to HIV or AIDS, reproductive health and/or STDs. When disagreements about the relevance of an article emerged, a third reviewer was involved until concordance was reached. Data were extracted by one reviewer and independently verified by a second. Qualitative data were analyzed using MaxQDA for content and thematic analyses while quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Community feedback on data analysis and presentation of results was also incorporated. Results In total, 246 articles were retrieved, 159 of which fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The number of studies that included community participation in the field of HIV research increased between 1991 and 2012, and the terms used to describe these activities have changed, moving away from action research (AR) to participatory action research (PAR), community-based research (CBR) and community-based participatory research

  17. Motivation, Self-Regulated Learning Efficacy, and Academic Achievement among International and Domestic Students at an Urban Community College: A Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Hsiang-Ann; Ferdenzi, Anita Cuttita; Edlin, Margot

    2012-01-01

    This study is designed to examine how intrinsic motivation, extrinsic motivation, and self-regulated learning efficacy influence academic achievement of international and domestic community college students. Results show that for both international and domestic students, motivation did not directly affect academic achievement. Self-regulated…

  18. Aligning the Goals of Community-Engaged Research: Why and How Academic Health Centers Can Successfully Engage with Communities to Improve Health

    PubMed Central

    Michener, Lloyd; Cook, Jennifer; Ahmed, Syed M.; Yonas, Michael A.; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Community engagement (CE) and community-engaged research (CEnR) are increasingly viewed as the keystone to translational medicine and improving the health of the nation. In this article, the authors seek to assist academic health centers (AHCs) in learning how to better engage with their communities and build a CEnR agenda by suggesting five steps: defining community and identify partners; learning the etiquette of community engagement; building a sustainable network of CEnR researchers; recognizing that CEnR will require the development of new methodologies; and improving translation and dissemination plans. Health disparities that lead to uneven access to and quality of care as well as high costs will persist without a CEnR agenda that finds answers to both medical and public health questions. One of the biggest barriers toward a national CEnR agenda, however, are the historical structures and processes of an AHC – including the complexities of how institutional review boards operate, accounting practices and indirect funding policies, and tenure and promotion paths. Changing institutional culture starts with the leadership and commitment of top decision-makers in an institution. By aligning the motivations and goals of their researchers, clinicians, and community members into a vision of a healthier population, AHC leadership will not just improve their own institutions, but improve the health of the nation – starting with improving the health of their local communities, one community at a time. PMID:22373619

  19. Reaching a Multicultural Student Community: A Handbook for Academic Librarians. The Greenwood Library Management Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, Karen E.; And Others

    This handbook is intended for academic librarians who are interested in establishing peer outreach programs for minority students on their campuses or who are trying to decide whether such a program would meet the needs of their students. Chapters include an overview of the unique challenges facing academic institutions and libraries in serving…

  20. Academic Success Strategy Use among Community-Active Urban Hispanic Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Rebecca M.; Packard, Becky Wai-Ling

    2008-01-01

    Although much has been written about the "risky" behaviors in which some Hispanic adolescents participate, the predictors of academic success are less understood. Toward this end, predictors of academic self-regulation were investigated in Hispanic adolescents. Specifically, a predictive model incorporating self-efficacy, instrumentality, salience…

  1. The Effectiveness of the Academic Appeal Program at John A. Logan Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Kathleen A.

    This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of the Academic Appeal Program (AAP) in improving the retention of at-risk students at John A. Logan College (JALC) in Illinois. The AAP allows students whose poor academic performance results in ineligibility for financial aid to continue their schooling under a strict performance contract.…

  2. Student Engagement and Academic Performance of Iraqi Refugee Community College Students in America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollands, Lucinda

    2012-01-01

    Many researchers have documented the challenges of working with culturally different elementary and high school students and have provided evidence of pedagogical practices that increase student engagement and academic success. However, a gap still exists in the understanding of student engagement and academic success of adult refugee students in…

  3. Urban High School Students' Academic Communities and Their Effects on Mathematics Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Erica N.

    2006-01-01

    This article reports findings from a study exploring the roles of peer influences in cultivating urban high school students' academic success in mathematics. While the literature describing family/school influences on the academic achievement of students of color is compelling, much of it suggests that urban students' peer groups do not support…

  4. Use of open source information and commercial satellite imagery for nuclear nonproliferation regime compliance verification by a community of academics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solodov, Alexander

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons is a great threat to world peace and stability. The question of strengthening the nonproliferation regime has been open for a long period of time. In 1997 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (BOG) adopted the Additional Safeguards Protocol. The purpose of the protocol is to enhance the IAEA's ability to detect undeclared production of fissile materials in member states. However, the IAEA does not always have sufficient human and financial resources to accomplish this task. Developed here is a concept for making use of human and technical resources available in academia that could be used to enhance the IAEA's mission. The objective of this research was to study the feasibility of an academic community using commercially or publicly available sources of information and products for the purpose of detecting covert facilities and activities intended for the unlawful acquisition of fissile materials or production of nuclear weapons. In this study, the availability and use of commercial satellite imagery systems, commercial computer codes for satellite imagery analysis, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification International Monitoring System (IMS), publicly available information sources such as watchdog groups and press reports, and Customs Services information were explored. A system for integrating these data sources to form conclusions was also developed. The results proved that publicly and commercially available sources of information and data analysis can be a powerful tool in tracking violations in the international nuclear nonproliferation regime and a framework for implementing these tools in academic community was developed. As a result of this study a formation of an International Nonproliferation Monitoring Academic Community (INMAC) is proposed. This would be an independent organization consisting of academics (faculty, staff and students) from both nuclear weapon states (NWS) and

  5. Scientific and Ethical Reflections on Academic Corruption in Universities: On the Science Research Evaluation System in China's Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiaochun, Wu; Dan, Jia

    2007-01-01

    A study of the science research activities in China's institutions of higher learning in recent years indicates that there is a major connection between the current instances of corruption in scientific research at colleges and universities and the evaluations system for scientific research implemented at many of the colleges and universities.…

  6. Status of the recommendations on the African cyberinfrastructure expressed by the scientific community written in 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petitdidier, M.

    2009-04-01

    In today's Information Age, an effective cyber-infrastructure and Internet access underpins development and human welfare by strengthening education and training, expanding science, technology and innovation capability, opening up collaboration opportunities with the rest of the world, and generating the knowledge base for decision-making. Poor Internet connectivity prevents many countries in Africa, especially Sub-Saharan ones, from taking advantage of these opportunities. There are many initiatives from local, governmental, African, European and international organisations to promote, survey and fund networking. The eGY (electronic Geophysical Year) and Sharing Knowledge Foundation initiatives are based on African scientific communities, and are complementary of other initiatives. Their bottom-up role is twofold: firstly to motivate and support the scientists in each country (1) to ask their government or organisations for a better Internet for research and for education and (2) to organize themselves to welcome new technologies, secondly to promote a better cyber-infrastructure for their universities towards international organisations. In 2007 during the IHY workshop that gathered African scientists from 20 countries eGY provided the results of the questionnaire sent to all the participants to describe the status of internet in the Universities and Research institutes. Then recommendations were written. In 2007 Sharing the knowledge foundation organized a meeting devoted to internet and Grids in Africa. The participants, scientists, industrialists and members of NGO originating from 14 countries wrote also recommendations. In 2009 the presentation in this session of R.L.A Cottrell and U. Kalim will provide an overview of the evolution of the networking. In parallel to the improvement of internet the development of scientific collaboration among African countries and with Europe by using ICT was considered as an essential point. This presentation will be focused

  7. Aligning the goals of community-engaged research: why and how academic health centers can successfully engage with communities to improve health.

    PubMed

    Michener, Lloyd; Cook, Jennifer; Ahmed, Syed M; Yonas, Michael A; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2012-03-01

    Community engagement (CE) and community-engaged research (CEnR) are increasingly viewed as the keystone to translational medicine and improving the health of the nation. In this article, the authors seek to assist academic health centers (AHCs) in learning how to better engage with their communities and build a CEnR agenda by suggesting five steps: defining community and identifying partners, learning the etiquette of CE, building a sustainable network of CEnR researchers, recognizing that CEnR will require the development of new methodologies, and improving translation and dissemination plans. Health disparities that lead to uneven access to and quality of care as well as high costs will persist without a CEnR agenda that finds answers to both medical and public health questions. One of the biggest barriers toward a national CEnR agenda, however, are the historical structures and processes of an AHC-including the complexities of how institutional review boards operate, accounting practices and indirect funding policies, and tenure and promotion paths. Changing institutional culture starts with the leadership and commitment of top decision makers in an institution. By aligning the motivations and goals of their researchers, clinicians, and community members into a vision of a healthier population, AHC leadership will not just improve their own institutions but also improve the health of the nation-starting with improving the health of their local communities, one community at a time.

  8. The responsibility of the scientific community in matters of national security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Louis

    1989-05-01

    Scientists must provide more and better leadership in the debate over how to avoid catastrophe, whether it be through war, or starvation, or plague, or environmental degradation. Scientists should be vigilant about challenging false perceptions and defending the truth. They should alert our citizenry to major dangers—such as those brought about by weapons of great destructive potential—whether they be nuclear, biological, chemical, or even psychological. The scientific community needs to provide accurate and understandable analyses of these issues. It is their duty to develop and disseminate factual information by engaging in research, teaching, public outreach, and even lobbying. The scientific community has an obligation to identify and challenge muddled thinking. It is absolutely essential that the quality of public debate be raised well above where it now resides, in this election year. Some years ago, the American Physical Society created a Panel on Public Affairs. It has sponsored in-depth studies on critical national concerns such as energy and the environment. In this connection, I quote from a letter to the membership from Sid Drell, when he was President of the American Physical Society: As a result of the great impact of technology on our conditions of life and especially the threat of nuclear holocaust, there has never been a greater need for scientists, and physicists in particular, to be involved with public policy. The Society can and should play a constructive and instructive role in informing its members and in supporting and presenting appropriate studies to members of government and to the public. The council and officers of the Society have an important trust in protecting a high standard for such studies. The APS directedenergy weapons study stands out as the most pressing item on the society's agenda this year. I hope that by this coming summer the council will be able to release a report which will contribute significantly to the national

  9. Rating Health and Social Indicators for Use with Indigenous Communities: A Tool for Balancing Cultural and Scientific Utility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Mark; Cargo, Margaret; Marks, Elisabeth; Paquet, Catherine; Simmons, David; Williams, Margaret; Rowley, Kevin; O'Dea, Kerin

    2009-01-01

    This study reports on the development and evaluation of a rating tool to assess the scientific utility and cultural appropriateness of community-level indicators for application with Indigenous populations. Indicator criteria proposed by the U.S. Institute of Medicine were culturally adapted through reviewing the literature and consultations with…

  10. "There Is No Black or White": Scientific Community Views on Ethics in Intellectual and Developmental Disability Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Katherine; Patka, Mazna

    2012-01-01

    From an ethical standpoint, there are questions about the best ways to include adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities in research. Scholarship reflects divergent responses to these enduring questions and values that can be at odds with one another. To deepen our understanding of beliefs in the scientific community about how to…

  11. A review and evaluation of the Langley Research Center's Scientific and Technical Information Program. Results of phase 4: Knowledge and attitudes survey, academic and industrial personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, T. E.; Glassman, M.; Glassman, N. A.

    1981-01-01

    Feedback from engineers and scientists in the academic and industrial community provided an assessment of the usage and perceived quality of NASA Langley generated STI and the familiarity and usage of selected NASA publications and services and identified ways to increase the accessibility of Langley STI. The questionnaire utilized both open and closed ended questions and was pretested for finalization. The questions were organized around the seven objectives for Phase IV. From a contact list of nearly 1,200 active industrial and academic researchers, approximately 600 addresses were verified. The 497 persons who agreed to participate were mailed questionnaires. The 381 completed questionnaires received by the cutoff date were analyzed. Based on the survey findings, recommendations were made for increasing the familiarity with and use of NASA and Langley STI and selected NASA publications and services. In addition, recommendations were made for increasing the accessibility of Langley STI.

  12. Unique microbial community in drilling fluids from Chinese continental scientific drilling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, G.; Dong, H.; Jiang, H.; Xu, Z.; Eberl, D.D.

    2006-01-01

    Circulating drilling fluid is often regarded as a contamination source in investigations of subsurface microbiology. However, it also provides an opportunity to sample geological fluids at depth and to study contained microbial communities. During our study of deep subsurface microbiology of the Chinese Continental Scientific Deep drilling project, we collected 6 drilling fluid samples from a borehole from 2290 to 3350 m below the land surface. Microbial communities in these samples were characterized with cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques. Characterization of 16S rRNA genes indicated that the bacterial clone sequences related to Firmicutes became progressively dominant with increasing depth. Most sequences were related to anaerobic, thermophilic, halophilic or alkaliphilic bacteria. These habitats were consistent with the measured geochemical characteristics of the drilling fluids that have incorporated geological fluids and partly reflected the in-situ conditions. Several clone types were closely related to Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus, Caldicellulosiruptor lactoaceticus, and Anaerobranca gottschalkii, an anaerobic metal-reducer, an extreme thermophile, and an anaerobic chemoorganotroph, respectively, with an optimal growth temperature of 50-68??C. Seven anaerobic, thermophilic Fe(III)-reducing bacterial isolates were obtained and they were capable of reducing iron oxide and clay minerals to produce siderite, vivianite, and illite. The archaeal diversity was low. Most archaeal sequences were not related to any known cultivated species, but rather to environmental clone sequences recovered from subsurface environments. We infer that the detected microbes were derived from geological fluids at depth and their growth habitats reflected the deep subsurface conditions. These findings have important implications for microbial survival and their ecological functions in the deep subsurface.

  13. Scientific Objectives for UV/Visible Astrophysics Investigations: A Summary of Responses by the Community (2012)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scowen, Paul; Perez, Mario R.; Neff, Susan G.; Benford, Dominic J.

    2012-01-01

    Following several recommendations presented by the Astrophysics Decadal Survey 2010 centered around the need to define "a future ultraviolet-optical space capability," on 2012 May 25, NASA issued a Request for Information (RFI) seeking persuasive ultraviolet (UV) and visible wavelength astrophysics science investigations. The goal was to develop a cohesive and compelling set of science objectives that motivate and support the development of the next generation of ultraviolet/visible space astrophysics missions. Responses were due on 10 August 2012 when 34 submissions were received addressing a number of potential science drivers. A UV/visible Mission RFI Workshop was held on 2012 September 20 where each of these submissions was summarized and discussed in the context of each other. We present a scientific analysis of these submissions and presentations and the pursuant measurement capability needs, which could influence ultraviolet/visible technology development plans for the rest of this decade. We also describe the process and requirements leading to the inception of this community RFI, subsequent workshop and the expected evolution of these ideas and concepts for the remainder of this decade.

  14. Scientific Objectives for UV-Visible Astrophysics Investigations: A Summary of Responses by the Community (2012)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scowen, Paul A.; Perez, Mario R.; Neff, Susan G.; Benford, Dominic J.

    2013-01-01

    Following several recommendations presented by the Astrophysics Decadal Survey 2010 centered around the need to define "a future ultraviolet-optical space capability," on 2012 May 25, NASA issued a Request for Information (RFI) seeking persuasive ultraviolet (UV) and visible wavelength astrophysics science investigations. The goal was to develop a cohesive and compelling set of science objectives that motivate and support the development of the next generation of ultraviolet/visible space astrophysics missions. Responses were due on 10 August 2012 when 34 submissions were received addressing a number of potential science drivers. A UV/visible Mission RFI Workshop was held on 2012 September 20 where each of these submissions was summarized and discussed in the context of each other. We present a scientific analysis of these submissions and presentations and the pursuant measurement capability needs, which could influence ultraviolet/visible technology development plans for the rest of this decade. We also describe the process and requirements leading to the inception of this community RFI, subsequent workshop and the expected evolution of these ideas and concepts for the remainder of this decade.

  15. Scientific Objectives for UV-Visible Astrophysics Investigations: A Summary of Responses by the Community (2012)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scowen, Paul A.; Perez, Mario R.; Neff, Susan G.; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    Following several recommendations presented by the Astrophysics Decadal Survey 2010 centered around the need to define "a future ultraviolet-optical space capability," on 2012 May 25, NASA issued a Request for Information (RFI) seeking persuasive ultraviolet (UV) and visible wavelength astrophysics science investigations. The goal was to develop a cohesive and compelling set of science objectives that motivate and support the development of the next generation of ultraviolet/visible space astrophysics missions. Responses were due on 10 August 2012 when 34 submissions were received addressing a number of potential science drivers. A UV/visible Mission RFI Workshop was held on 2012 September 20 where each of these submissions was summarized and discussed in the context of each other. We present a scientific analysis of these submissions and presentations and the pursuant measurement capability needs, which could influence ultraviolet/visible technology development plans for the rest of this decade. We also describe the process and requirements leading to the inception of this community RFI, subsequent workshop and the expected evolution of these ideas and concepts for the remainder of this decade.

  16. Setting up a scientific community by means of a small grants program: the Latin American experience.

    PubMed

    Briceño-León, R

    1994-08-01

    The study of tropical diseases in Latin America has been dominated by the biomedical sciences, and whilst recently social science health research has been developed, there has been little collaboration between the two. The Latin American Small Grants Programme for Social and Economic Aspects of Tropical Diseases, launched by WHO/TDR in 1990, aimed to attract junior researchers into the area of social sciences and tropical diseases, and to create among them a scientific community. The program is unique in that it has involved the transfer of decision-making power from an international organisation (WHO/TDR) to a regional group. This article discusses the organisational structure of the program, the methods by which the program handled proposals, the evaluation process, the types of research proposals received, a profile of applicants, and the results of the applications. There was a balance of biomedical and social science applications. We conclude that the Small Grants Programme has been successful in fulfilling its objectives, due to the design of the grants scheme itself.

  17. The Community College General Academic Assessment: Combined Districts, 1983-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Michelle

    Information is provided on the characteristics and general education and liberal arts knowledge of students attending four community college districts: Los Angeles Community College District, Miami-Dade Community College District, St. Louis Community College, and the City Colleges of Chicago. The first sections of the report provide information on…

  18. Evaluating the Impact of Conflict Resolution on Urban Children's Violence-Related Attitudes and Behaviors in New Haven, Connecticut, through a Community-Academic Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuval, Kerem; Pillsbury, Charles A.; Cavanaugh, Brenda; McGruder, La'rie; McKinney, Christy M.; Massey, Zohar; Groce, Nora E.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous schools are implementing youth violence prevention interventions aimed at enhancing conflict resolution skills without evaluating their effectiveness. Consequently, we formed a community-academic partnership between a New Haven community-based organization and Yale's School of Public Health and Prevention Research Center to examine the…

  19. Academic Affairs Officers: An Application of the American Association of Community Colleges Competencies for Community College Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Misty Renee

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, several studies have confirmed that there is a leadership crisis among the nation's community colleges. In response to this leadership crisis, the American Association of Community Colleges [AACC] commissioned the development of a leadership competency framework consisting of six leadership competency areas deemed…

  20. Bacteria Community in the Terrestrial Deep Subsurface Microbiology Research of the Chinese Continent Scientific Drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Xia, Y.; Dong, H.; Dong, X.; Yang, K.; Dong, Z.; Huang, L.

    2005-12-01

    Microbial communities in the deep drill cores from the Chinese Continent Scientific Drilling were analyzed with culture-independent and dependent techniques. Genomic DNA was extracted from two metamorphic rocks: S1 from 430 and S13 from 1033 meters below the ground surface. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by cloning and sequencing. The total cell number was counted using the 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and biomass of two specific bacteria were quantified using real-time PCR. Enrichment was set up for a rock from 3911 meters below the surface in medium for authotrophic methanogens (i.e., CO2 + H2). The total cell number in S13 was 1.0 × 104 cells per gram of rock. 16S rRNA gene analysis indicated that low G + C Gram positive sequences were dominant (50 percent of all 54 clone sequenced) followed by the alpha-, beta, and gamma-Proteobacteria. Within the low G + C Gram positive bacteria, most clone sequences were similar to species of Bacillus from various natural environments (deserts, rivers etc.). Within the Proteobacteria, our clone sequences were similar to species of Acinetobacter, Acidovorax, and Aeromonas. The RT-RCP results showed that biomass of two particular clone sequences (CCSD1305, similar to Aeromonas caviae and CCSD1307, similar to Acidovorax facilis) was 95 and 1258 cells/g, respectively. A bacterial isolate was obtained from the 3911-m rock in methanogenic medium. It was Gram negative with no flagella, immobile, and facultative anaerobic, and grows optimally at 65oC. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that it was closely related to the genus of Bacillus. Physiological tests further revealed that it was a strain of Bacillus caldotenax.

  1. Scientific and popular health knowledge in the education work of community health agents in Rio de Janeiro shantytowns.

    PubMed

    Zanchetta, M S; Kolawole Salami, B; Perreault, M; Leite, L C

    2012-08-01

    Health education for socially marginalized populations challenges the efficacy of existing strategies and methods, and the pertinence of the educational and philosophical principles that underpin them. The Brazilian Community Health Agents Initiative (CHAI) hires residents of deprived marginalized communities to undertake health promotion and education in their communities. The ultimate goal of the CHAI is to connect populations with the public healthcare system by promoting social re-affiliation, protecting civil rights and enhancing equity of access to health services. In this article, we present the education work of community health agents through interplay between popular and scientific health knowledge in nine Rio de Janeiro shantytowns. A critical ethnographic research design, using thematic analysis, allowed us to explore agents' education work to enhance family health literacy in shantytowns. Local culture and social practices inspire Agents to create original strategies to reconcile forms of health knowledge in their work.

  2. The Cognitive Roots of Scientific and Mathematical Ability and Discussant Reaction: Alternative Representations: A Key to Academic Talent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, D. N.; Simmons, Rebecca

    This paper examines the cognitive structures and processes that mediate mathematical and scientific ability. Ability is divided into achieved abilities and precursor abilities. Identified concepts in the area of achieved ability include expertise, understanding, and problem-solving. Other abilities can be seen as precursors to such achieved…

  3. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 10: Summary report to phase 3 academic library respondents including frequency distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.; White, Terry F.

    1991-01-01

    Phase 3 of a 4 part study was undertaken to study the use of scientific and technical information (STI) in the academic aerospace community. Phase 3 of this project used three questionnaires that were sent to three groups (i.e., faculty, librarians, and students) in the academic aerospace community. Specific attention was paid to the types of STI used and the methods in which academic users acquire STI. The responses of the academic libraries are focussed on herein. Demographic information on academic aerospace libraries is provided. Data regarding NASA interaction with academic aerospace libraries is also included, as is the survey instrument.

  4. The Relationship between Academic Writing Experience and Academic Publishing for Graduate Physics Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Steven Timothy Michael

    2012-01-01

    Writing for scientific publication represents an opportunity to interact with colleagues and make a positive contribution to the academic community. However, there is a growing concern regarding the ability of graduate students' to transfer writing skill sets learned at the graduate and undergraduate levels into professional settings. The main…

  5. The Role of Communities of Practice in the Professional Education of Academic Librarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilodeaua, Edward; Carson, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to better understand the range of learning practices that academic librarians use throughout their careers, and to explore the ways library schools give students the opportunities to engage in learning methods that they are likely to use in their careers as librarians. The study uses semi-structured interviews with…

  6. Student Affairs and Academic Affairs Collaborations in the Community College Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulley, Needham Yancey; Mullendore, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between academic affairs and student affairs units in higher education settings has traditionally and historically been troubled by the divergent understandings of each other's institutional role and the systematic division of labor between the two. However, for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is a desire to…

  7. Creating a Community of Support for Graduate Students and Early Career Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Kenneth E.

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on strategies for enhancing the preparation of geographers moving into academic careers. Based on research and experience gained from the Geography Faculty Development Alliance and Enhancing Departments and Graduate Education in geography projects, several suggestions for improved practice are detailed. These move beyond…

  8. Bioterrorism Threats Must Unite Academe and the U.S. Intelligence Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Elizabeth Rindskopf

    2004-01-01

    The National Research Council recently issued a report that suggested ways in which to improve the management of potentially dangerous biomedical research in both academe and private industry, without unduly restricting scientists in their research activities. Here, the author shares her views on the report as well as the estrangement of the…

  9. The Community College General Academic Assessment: City Colleges of Chicago, 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Michelle

    Information is provided on the characteristics of students attending the City Colleges of Chicago (CCC) and their general education and liberal arts knowledge. The first sections of the report provide information on the development and administration of the General Academic Assessment (GAA), an instrument containing representative items in the…

  10. Alien Environments or Supportive Writing Communities? Pursuing Writing Groups in Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasternak, Donna L.; Longwell-Grice, Hope; Shea, Kelly A.; Hanson, Linda K.

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the impetus for joining and maintaining writing groups in academe. The authors consider the motivations and purposes for organizing and forming such groups. Revealing the complexities of writing both as profession and in pursuit of the profession, they analyze their experiences as collaborative writers. They examine the…

  11. A National Study of Community College Chief Academic Officers' Perceived Commitment to Instructional Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Albert B.; Hawthorne, Elizabeth M.

    In spring 1991, a survey was conducted of chief academic officers (CAO's) at two-year colleges to identify the instructional improvement categories and strategies that received the highest levels of support. The study replicated a 1987 survey of CAO's at four-year institutions and asked respondents to rate their commitment to practices in five…

  12. Academic Outcomes among a Sample of Learning Support Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Amy D.

    2014-01-01

    This research examined the relationship between placement in a learning support college program and subsequent academic outcomes. The sample consisted of 275 entering freshmen students who were enrolled in the Learning Support reading courses in the fall of 2005. Data were collected from the Gordon College Office of Institutional Research. The…

  13. Bringing History to the Library: University-Community Engagement in the Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Allan

    2011-01-01

    Through the power of easily accessible and engaging new digital media technologies, family and oral histories can give voice to the unknown and overlooked stories of immigrants and their families--stories that often never make it beyond the children or the grandchildren. The academic library can be a natural focal point for this interaction and…

  14. Does Mathematics Remediation Work?: A Comparative Analysis of Academic Attainment among Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahr, Peter Riley

    2008-01-01

    Postsecondary remediation is a controversial topic. On one hand, it fills an important and sizeable niche in higher education. On the other hand, critics argue that it wastes tax dollars, diminishes academic standards, and demoralizes faculty. Yet, despite the ongoing debate, few comprehensive, large-scale, multi-institutional evaluations of…

  15. Using mixed methods to measure the perception of community capacity in an academic-community partnership for a walking intervention.

    PubMed

    Anderson-Lewis, Charkarra; Cuy-Castellanos, Diana; Byrd, Arnecca; Zynda, Karen; Sample, Alicia; Blakely Reed, Vickie; Beard, Mary; Minor, Latessa; Yadrick, Kathleen

    2012-11-01

    H.U.B. City Steps is a 5-year community-based participatory research walking intervention designed to help lower blood pressure in a majority African American population in southern Mississippi via community collaboration and capacity building, increased walking, culturally tailored health education sessions, and motivational interviewing. Building community capacity for physical activity is a key component of this intervention. Qualitative and quantitative methods have been used to assess how project stakeholders perceive the community capacity-building efforts of the project. This article illustrates the baseline results of this mixed methods approach from the perspective of three groups of stakeholders: project researchers and staff, community advisory board, and intervention walking coaches. Eight constructs were examined, including leadership, resources, external networking, visibility and recognition, personnel sustainability, ability and commitment to organize, communication with community members, and relationships with influential others. Quantitative results indicated significant differences among stakeholder groups for project leadership and personnel sustainability. Qualitative perspectives provided an opportunity to examine possible reasons for these differences. Overall findings provide direction related to improving intervention outcomes and sustainability. PMID:21965594

  16. Lessons Learned From a Community–Academic Initiative: The Development of a Core Competency–Based Training for Community–Academic Initiative Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Sergio; Kapadia, Smiti; Islam, Nadia; Cusack, Arthur; Kwong, Sylvia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Despite the importance of community health workers (CHWs) in strategies to reduce health disparities and the call to enhance their roles in research, little information exists on how to prepare CHWs involved in community–academic initiatives (CAIs). Therefore, the New York University Prevention Research Center piloted a CAI–CHW training program. Methods. We applied a core competency framework to an existing CHW curriculum and bolstered the curriculum to include research-specific sessions. We employed diverse training methods, guided by adult learning principles and popular education philosophy. Evaluation instruments assessed changes related to confidence, intention to use learned skills, usefulness of sessions, and satisfaction with the training. Results. Results demonstrated that a core competency–based training can successfully affect CHWs’ perceived confidence and intentions to apply learned content, and can provide a larger social justice context of their role and work. Conclusions. This program demonstrates that a core competency–based framework coupled with CAI-research–specific skill sessions (1) provides skills that CAI–CHWs intend to use, (2) builds confidence, and (3) provides participants with a more contextualized view of client needs and CHW roles. PMID:22594730

  17. A Community Translational Research Pilot Grants Program to Facilitate Community–Academic Partnerships: Lessons From Colorado’s Clinical Translational Science Awards

    PubMed Central

    Main, Deborah S.; Felzien, Maret C.; Magid, David J.; Calonge, B. Ned; O’Brien, Ruth A.; Kempe, Allison; Nearing, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Background National growth in translational research has increased the need for practical tools to improve how academic institutions engage communities in research. Methods One used by the Colorado Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (CCTSI) to target investments in community-based translational research on health disparities is a Community Engagement (CE) Pilot Grants program. Innovative in design, the program accepts proposals from either community or academic applicants, requires that at least half of requested grant funds go to the community partner, and offers two funding tracks: One to develop new community–academic partnerships (up to $10,000), the other to strengthen existing partnerships through community translational research projects (up to $30,000). Results and Conclusion We have seen early success in both traditional and capacity building metrics: the initial investment of $272,742 in our first cycle led to over $2.8 million dollars in additional grant funding, with grantees reporting strengthening capacity of their community–academic partnerships and the rigor and relevance of their research. PMID:22982851

  18. An Evaluation of a Community-Academic-Clinical Partnership to Reduce Prostate Cancer Disparities in the South

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Daniela B.; Owens, Otis L.; Jackson, Dawnyea D.; Johnson, Kim M.; Gansauer, Lucy; Dickey, Joe; Miller, Ron; Payne, Johnny; Bearden, James D.; Hebert, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Engaging partners in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of cancer education programs is critical for improving the health of our communities. A two-year pilot education intervention on prostate cancer decision making and participation in medical research was funded by the National Cancer Institute. The partnership involving community members and clinical staff at a cancer center was used to develop recruitment strategies and plan for the implementation of the intervention with African-American (AA) middle-age and older men and female family members. We assessed partners’ perceptions of this community-academic-clinical research collaboration. Methods In year 2, eight project advisory council members were selected among existing partners and year 1 participants to serve as a formal committee. Council members were required to participate in telephone and in-person meetings and actively support recruitment/implementation efforts. At the conclusion of the project, 20 individuals (all clinical and community partners, including the eight advisory council members) were invited to complete a survey to assess their perceived impact of the collaboration on the community and provide suggestions for future collaborations. Results Most partners agreed that their organization benefitted from the collaboration and that various aspects of the advisory council process (e.g., both formal and informal communication) worked well. The most noted accomplishment of the partnership related to leveraging the collaboration to make men more knowledgeable about prostate cancer decision making. Suggested improvements for future collaborations included distributing more frequent updates regarding project successes. Conclusions Evaluating partners’ perceptions of this collaboration provided important recommendations for future planning, implementation, and evaluation of community-based cancer education programs. PMID:24078315

  19. The Power of the Program: How the Academic Program Can Improve Community College Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitecki, Elena M.

    2011-01-01

    The challenge faced by all community colleges is how to increase student success, whether success is defined in terms of graduating with a degree or certificate, transferring, or retaining a job. With approximately 40% of the nation's undergraduates pursuing higher education through the community college (52% when one considers public institutions…

  20. A Portraiture of Six Hispanic Women's Academic Pursuit in a Community College Setting: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artiaga, Maria D.

    2013-01-01

    Community colleges in the United States serve as social, cultural, and intellectual hubs that take the role as gatekeepers by committing to opening up the doors of opportunity to the public (Vaughan, 2006). Community colleges prepare their students for the workforce by providing credit or non-credit courses, certifications, or degrees. Depending…

  1. Including the Majority: Academic and Social Inclusion of Adjunct Faculty at Selected Texas Public Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaniel, Suzann Holland

    2012-01-01

    As the majority of teaching faculty on many community college campuses, adjuncts are accountable for the higher education of an increasing number of college-going students. However, adjunct faculty often are disconnected from the community colleges that depend upon them. The purpose of this nonexperimental quantitative study was to investigate the…

  2. An academic practice's transition to the business of medicine in the community. A case study.

    PubMed

    Griffin, S L; Schryver, D L

    2000-01-01

    This case study highlights the problems confronting a clinical practice corporation affiliated with a major medical school, and the business realizations it made in the acquisition of a community-based clinic. Launching a financially viable enterprise requires careful planning, determination of formal goals and expectations, an appropriate mix of physicians and services, a specific marketing campaign and community support. PMID:11010507

  3. Between Ethnic and English Names: Name Choice for Transnational Chinese Students in a US Academic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diao, Wenhao

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how transnational Chinese students negotiate identity options through name choice while studying in the US. Name choice can discursively index membership in various communities. Drawing on theories of heteroglossia (Bakhtin, 1981) and community of practices (Lave and Wenger, 1991), this study examines how name choice becomes…

  4. An Educational Community to Promote High School Students' Retention and Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubé, France; Bélanger, Jean; Fontan, Jean-Marc; Beaulieu, Geneviève; Lévesque, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to mobilize the educational community of a disadvantaged Montreal high school so as to implement practices more adapted to its environmental reality by developing an approach to support the building of collaborative bridges connecting school, family, and community. During the discussion, the perceptions of high…

  5. Challenges Facing Community Colleges: Perceptions of Chief Academic Officers in Nine States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cejda, Brent D.; Leist, Jay

    2006-01-01

    Recent economic events and constantly-shifting priorities continue to challenge the traditional hallmarks of community colleges: responsiveness, adaptability, and flexibility. Institutional leaders are increasingly questioning whether the comprehensive community college model and, more importantly, open access, are still sustainable in today's…

  6. The Effect of Small Learning Communities on Academic Success: One School's Journey from Comprehensive to Personalized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruggeiro, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Many schools are starting Small Learning Communities yet much is unknown about their outcomes. Students are literally disappearing in comprehensive high schools and violence has escalated. Those who implement Small Learning Communities are looking to combat these problems. While rarely feasible to split large schools into smaller schools, it is…

  7. Wyoming Community College System Annual Enrollment Report. Academic Year 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report provides an annual look at the summer 2009, fall 2009 and spring 2010 terms' enrollment in categories such as enrollment status, location and demographics of the community college student population. The content and format of this report have been developed through a collaborative effort between the Wyoming Community College Commission…

  8. The Impact of a Psychology Learning Community on Academic Success, Retention, and Student Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buch, Kim; Spaulding, Sue

    2011-01-01

    Learning communities have become an integral part of the educational reform movement of the past two decades and have been heralded as a promising strategy for restructuring undergraduate education. This study used a matched control group design to examine the impact of participation in a psychology learning community (PLC) on a range of student…

  9. University of Hawaii at Manoa Graduates with Community College Background. Community Colleges, Academic Year 1979-80.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.

    Data were collected on the number of transfer students from six of Hawaii's community colleges (i.e., Honolulu, Kapiolani, Kauai, Leeward, Maui, and Windward) who earned degrees at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM). The data, obtained from UHM's Admissions and Records Office and student enrollment reports, reveal that the number of graduates…

  10. Framing Scientific Analyses for Risk Management of Environmental Hazards by Communities: Case Studies with Seafood Safety Issues

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Nancy L.; Drew, Christina H.; Acharya, Chetana; Mitchell, Todd A.; Donatuto, Jamie L.; Burns, Gary W.; Burbacher, Thomas M.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2005-01-01

    Risk management provides a context for addressing environmental health hazards. Critical to this approach is the identification of key opportunities for participation. We applied a framework based on the National Research Council’s (NRC) analytic–deliberative risk management dialogue model that illustrates two main iterative processes: informing and framing. The informing process involves conveying information from analyses of risk issues, often scientific, to all parties so they can participate in deliberation. In the framing process, ideas and concerns from stakeholder deliberations help determine what and how scientific analyses will be carried out. There are few activities through which affected parties can convey their ideas from deliberative processes for framing scientific analyses. The absence of participation results in one-way communication. The analytic–deliberative dialogue, as envisioned by the NRC and promoted by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), underscores the importance of two-way communication. In this article we present case studies of three groups—an Asian and Pacific Islander community coalition and two Native American Tribes—active in framing scientific analyses of health risks related to contaminated seafood. Contacts with these organizations were established or enhanced through a regional NIEHS town meeting. The reasons for concern, participation, approaches, and funding sources were different for each group. Benefits from their activities include increased community involvement and ownership, better focusing of analytical processes, and improved accuracy and appropriateness of risk management. These examples present a spectrum of options for increasing community involvement in framing analyses and highlight the need for increased support of such activities. PMID:16263503

  11. Constructing scientific literacy in inquiry-based communities of science practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Kristen Adair

    English Language Learners and socioeconomically disadvantaged students were studied from an ethnographic perspective in this research study. These high school students were engaged in the study of local fresh water ecology with their teacher, the researcher. Transcribed audiotapes of students' discourse, their illustrated guides to macroinvertebrates, their macroinvertebrate indices for two fresh water locations, their power point presentations of findings, and transcribed interviews with three focus students were utilized as data. Findings indicated that, for the most part, students were provided opportunities to enact scientific practices and communications and that they did indeed do so. More specifically, students learned to identify questions and concepts that guide ecology research, formulate and revise scientific explanations using logic and evidence, and communicate scientific arguments. However, students were not provided adequate opportunities to practice defending the scientific arguments they constructed and communicated. They also struggled at times to use scientific language. I close with recommendations for teaching and for conducting qualitative research with English Language Learners in science. Qualitative research holds the potential for revealing what science learning opportunities promote scientific literacy development amongst socioeconomically disadvantaged students.

  12. Exploring the Academic and Social Experiences of Latino Engineering Community College Transfer Students at a 4-Year Institution: A Qualitative Research Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagler, LaTesha R.

    As the number of historically underrepresented populations transfer from community college to university to pursue baccalaureate degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), little research exists about the challenges and successes Latino students experience as they transition from 2-year colleges to 4-year universities. Thus, institutions of higher education have limited insight to inform their policies, practices, and strategic planning in developing effective sources of support, services, and programs for underrepresented students in STEM disciplines. This qualitative research study explored the academic and social experiences of 14 Latino engineering community college transfer students at one university. Specifically, this study examined the lived experiences of minority community college transfer students' transition into and persistence at a 4-year institution. The conceptual framework applied to this study was Schlossberg's Transition Theory, which analyzed the participant's social and academic experiences that led to their successful transition from community college to university. Three themes emerged from the narrative data analysis: (a) Academic Experiences, (b) Social Experiences, and (c) Sources of Support. The findings indicate that engineering community college transfer students experience many challenges in their transition into and persistence at 4-year institutions. Some of the challenges include lack of academic preparedness, environmental challenges, lack of time management skills and faculty serving the role as institutional agents.

  13. An Open-Source Sandbox for Increasing the Accessibility of Functional Programming to the Bioinformatics and Scientific Communities.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Matthew; Sesanker, Colbert; Schiller, Martin R; Ellis, Heidi Jc; Hinman, M Lee; Vyas, Jay; Gryk, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Scientists are continually faced with the need to express complex mathematical notions in code. The renaissance of functional languages such as LISP and Haskell is often credited to their ability to implement complex data operations and mathematical constructs in an expressive and natural idiom. The slow adoption of functional computing in the scientific community does not, however, reflect the congeniality of these fields. Unfortunately, the learning curve for adoption of functional programming techniques is steeper than that for more traditional languages in the scientific community, such as Python and Java, and this is partially due to the relative sparseness of available learning resources. To fill this gap, we demonstrate and provide applied, scientifically substantial examples of functional programming, We present a multi-language source-code repository for software integration and algorithm development, which generally focuses on the fields of machine learning, data processing, bioinformatics. We encourage scientists who are interested in learning the basics of functional programming to adopt, reuse, and learn from these examples. The source code is available at: https://github.com/CONNJUR/CONNJUR-Sandbox (see also http://www.connjur.org).

  14. An Open-Source Sandbox for Increasing the Accessibility of Functional Programming to the Bioinformatics and Scientific Communities.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Matthew; Sesanker, Colbert; Schiller, Martin R; Ellis, Heidi Jc; Hinman, M Lee; Vyas, Jay; Gryk, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Scientists are continually faced with the need to express complex mathematical notions in code. The renaissance of functional languages such as LISP and Haskell is often credited to their ability to implement complex data operations and mathematical constructs in an expressive and natural idiom. The slow adoption of functional computing in the scientific community does not, however, reflect the congeniality of these fields. Unfortunately, the learning curve for adoption of functional programming techniques is steeper than that for more traditional languages in the scientific community, such as Python and Java, and this is partially due to the relative sparseness of available learning resources. To fill this gap, we demonstrate and provide applied, scientifically substantial examples of functional programming, We present a multi-language source-code repository for software integration and algorithm development, which generally focuses on the fields of machine learning, data processing, bioinformatics. We encourage scientists who are interested in learning the basics of functional programming to adopt, reuse, and learn from these examples. The source code is available at: https://github.com/CONNJUR/CONNJUR-Sandbox (see also http://www.connjur.org). PMID:25328913

  15. An Open-Source Sandbox for Increasing the Accessibility of Functional Programming to the Bioinformatics and Scientific Communities

    PubMed Central

    Fenwick, Matthew; Sesanker, Colbert; Schiller, Martin R.; Ellis, Heidi JC; Hinman, M. Lee; Vyas, Jay; Gryk, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Scientists are continually faced with the need to express complex mathematical notions in code. The renaissance of functional languages such as LISP and Haskell is often credited to their ability to implement complex data operations and mathematical constructs in an expressive and natural idiom. The slow adoption of functional computing in the scientific community does not, however, reflect the congeniality of these fields. Unfortunately, the learning curve for adoption of functional programming techniques is steeper than that for more traditional languages in the scientific community, such as Python and Java, and this is partially due to the relative sparseness of available learning resources. To fill this gap, we demonstrate and provide applied, scientifically substantial examples of functional programming, We present a multi-language source-code repository for software integration and algorithm development, which generally focuses on the fields of machine learning, data processing, bioinformatics. We encourage scientists who are interested in learning the basics of functional programming to adopt, reuse, and learn from these examples. The source code is available at: https://github.com/CONNJUR/CONNJUR-Sandbox (see also http://www.connjur.org). PMID:25328913

  16. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women's health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program's acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p < 0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients.

  17. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women's health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program's acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p < 0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients. PMID:27271058

  18. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda, Sheila F.; Giacinto, Rebeca E.; Medeiros, Elizabeth A.; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women’s health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program’s acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p<0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients. PMID:27271058

  19. Soccer science and the Bayes community: exploring the cognitive implications of modern scientific communication.

    PubMed

    Shrager, Jeff; Billman, Dorrit; Convertino, Gregorio; Massar, J P; Pirolli, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Science is a form of distributed analysis involving both individual work that produces new knowledge and collaborative work to exchange information with the larger community. There are many particular ways in which individual and community can interact in science, and it is difficult to assess how efficient these are, and what the best way might be to support them. This paper reports on a series of experiments in this area and a prototype implementation using a research platform called CACHE. CACHE both supports experimentation with different structures of interaction between individual and community cognition and serves as a prototype for computational support for those structures. We particularly focus on CACHE-BC, the Bayes community version of CACHE, within which the community can break up analytical tasks into "mind-sized" units and use provenance tracking to keep track of the relationship between these units.

  20. Using GIS with real-time water quality assessment to guide scientific inquiry and learning in a community college environmental studies program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, M. C.; Beauregard, A.

    2011-12-01

    The overarching goal of this project is to introduce community college students to the use of environmental analytical technology and geographical information systems (GIS) through the development of a new course in Aquatic Environmental Science at Northwest Florida State College (NWFSC), a community college in Niceville, FL. During the new course, NWFSC students are guided by an instructor from NWFSC and one from the local university, the University of West Florida (UWF), as well as a UWF graduate student. Students learn to use field instruments to measure water quality variables (temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and nutrients) during several field trips on a local estuary. While still in the field, students on multiple boats in different parts of the estuary use a wireless broadband interface to upload field data to a web-based GIS system interface developed by commissioned GIS professionals. This GIS system compiles the data and generates maps to show a whole-basin view of variations in water quality parameters that students access from the field. The capstone of each field trip is a "floating classroom" during which students and instructors discuss summary results, test field hypotheses, and compare results with historical data collected during previous field trips. Our continuing assessment of the impact on student learning of this real-time geospatial assessment suggests that student interest in environmental science and technology has been positively affected by the use of these methods. Furthermore, students show considerable improvement in their use of the technology and their understanding of the related scientific concepts (e.g., aquatic biogeochemistry). While the primary goal of this course is the academic benefit provided to NWFSC students, the in-class sampling also provides access to important data that can be used to support ongoing research by both authors. We are currently assessing the precision of the data collected by NWFSC students in

  1. Shared Academic Values: Testing a Model of the Association between Hong Kong Parents' and Adolescents' Perception of the General Value of Science and Scientific Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acosta, Sandra; Hsu, Hsien-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated parent general value of science operationalized in the 2006 questionnaire of the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), as a determinant of adolescents' scientific literacy performance. The transmission of academic values literature is small. To the best of our knowledge, no previous studies to date…

  2. Social Network and Content Analysis of the North American Carbon Program as a Scientific Community of Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Molly E.; Ihli, Monica; Hendrick, Oscar; Delgado-Arias, Sabrina; Escobar, Vanessa M.; Griffith, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The North American Carbon Program (NACP) was formed to further the scientific understanding of sources, sinks, and stocks of carbon in Earth's environment. Carbon cycle science integrates multidisciplinary research, providing decision-support information for managing climate and carbon-related change across multiple sectors of society. This investigation uses the conceptual framework of com-munities of practice (CoP) to explore the role that the NACP has played in connecting researchers into a carbon cycle knowledge network, and in enabling them to conduct physical science that includes ideas from social science. A CoP describes the communities formed when people consistently engage in shared communication and activities toward a common passion or learning goal. We apply the CoP model by using keyword analysis of abstracts from scientific publications to analyze the research outputs of the NACP in terms of its knowledge domain. We also construct a co-authorship network from the publications of core NACP members, describe the structure and social pathways within the community. Results of the content analysis indicate that the NACP community of practice has substantially expanded its research on human and social impacts on the carbon cycle, contributing to a better understanding of how human and physical processes interact with one another. Results of the co-authorship social network analysis demonstrate that the NACP has formed a tightly connected community with many social pathways through which knowledge may flow, and that it has also expanded its network of institutions involved in carbon cycle research over the past seven years.

  3. Using the Delphi and Snow Card Techniques to Build Consensus Among Diverse Community and Academic Stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Rideout, Catlin; Gil, Rosa; Browne, Ruth; Calhoon, Claudia; Rey, Mariano; Gourevitch, Marc; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2013-01-01

    Background: The New York University– New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (NYU-HHC) Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) used a community-based participatory research (CBPR) and consensus-building approach among its community advisory board (CAB) and steering committee (SC) members to formulate research priorities to foster shared research collaborations. Methods: The Delphi technique is a methodology used to generate consensus from diverse perspectives and organizational agendas through a multi-method, iterative approach to collecting data. A series of on-line surveys was conducted with CAB members to identify health and research priorities from the community perspective. Subsequently, CAB and SC members were brought together and the snow card approach was utilized to narrow to two priority areas for shared research collaborations. Results: Cardiovascular disease (CVD)/obesity and mental health were identified as health disparity areas for shared research collaborations within a social determinants framework. In response, two workgroups were formed with leadership provided by three co-chairs representing the three constituents of the NYU-HHC CTSI: NYU faculty, HHC providers, and community leaders Conclusions: The Delphi approach fostered ownership and engagement with community partners because it was an iterative process that required stakeholders’ input into decision making. The snow card technique allowed for organizing of a large number of discrete ideas. Results have helped to inform the overall CTSI research agenda by defining action steps, and setting an organizing framework to tackle two health disparity areas. The process helped ensure that NYUHHC CTSI research and community engagement strategies are congruent with community priorities.

  4. Authorship Issues and Conflict in the U.S. Academic Chemical Community

    PubMed Central

    Seeman, Jeffrey I.; House, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    A survey on credit issues and related “responsible conduct of research” (RCR) behaviors was conducted with academic chemists in Ph.D. granting institutions in the U.S. Six hundred faculty members responded. Fifty percent of the respondents reported not receiving appropriate credit for contributions they had made to projects the results of which had been published, including when they themselves were students. Thirty percent of these individuals discussed this lack of credit with the “offending” individual, and as a consequence of those discussions, a small percentage of individuals were provided either co-authorship or an acknowledgment. The majority who did not enter into a discussion with the “offending” individual reported two primary reasons for not doing so: that they “could not imagine any good coming from such a conversation” and “I was afraid of being in a compromised situation.” A discussion of relationship asymmetry in the academic setting is provided. Confronting one’s colleague regarding credit is compared with whistleblowing, and the possible consequences of blacklisting are discussed. A number of recommendations for minimizing authorship disputes are provided. PMID:26155731

  5. Health Care in the Community: Developing Academic/Practice Partnerships for Care Coordination and Managing Transitions.

    PubMed

    Fortier, Mary E; Perron, Tracy; Fountain, Donna M; Hinic, Katherine; Vargas, Maryelena; Swan, Beth Ann; Heelan-Fancher, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of health care is quickly changing from an acute care to a community-based setting. Faculty development and mastery in the use of new technologies, such as high-definition simulation and virtual communities are crucial for effective student learning outcomes. Students' benefits include opportunities for hands-on experience in various patient care scenarios, realtime faculty feedback regarding their critical reasoning and clinical performance, interdisciplinary collaboration, and access to a nonthreatening learning environment. The results of this study provide some evidence of the benefits of developing faculty and nursing curricula that addresses the shift from an ilness-based, acute hospital model, to a community and population health-based preventive model. PMID:26259341

  6. The deep South network for cancer control: eliminating cancer disparities through community-academic collaboration.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Edward E; Fouad, Mona N; Hinton, Agnes W; Hardy, Claudia M; Liscovicz, Nedra; White-Johnson, Freddie; Higginbotham, John C

    2005-01-01

    African Americans have a substantially increased mortality rate compared to Whites in many cancers, including breast and cervix. The Deep South Network for Cancer Control (the Network) was established to develop sustainable community infrastructure to promote cancer awareness, enhance participation of African Americans and other special populations in clinical trials, recruit and train minority investigators, and develop and test innovative community-based cancer control measures to eliminate cancer mortality disparities in special populations. This article describes the steps necessary to form the network and the process and activities required to establish it as an effective infrastructure for eliminating disparities between Whites and African Americans in the United States.

  7. The a3 problem solving report: a 10-step scientific method to execute performance improvements in an academic research vivarium.

    PubMed

    Bassuk, James A; Washington, Ida M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to illustrate the application of A3 Problem Solving Reports of the Toyota Production System to our research vivarium through the methodology of Continuous Performance Improvement, a lean approach to healthcare management at Seattle Children's (Hospital, Research Institute, Foundation). The Report format is described within the perspective of a 10-step scientific method designed to realize measurable improvements of Issues identified by the Report's Author, Sponsor and Coach. The 10-step method (Issue, Background, Current Condition, Goal, Root Cause, Target Condition, Countermeasures, Implementation Plan, Test, and Follow-up) was shown to align with Shewhart's Plan-Do-Check-Act process improvement cycle in a manner that allowed for quantitative analysis of the Countermeasure's outcomes and of Testing results. During fiscal year 2012, 9 A3 Problem Solving Reports were completed in the vivarium under the teaching and coaching system implemented by the Research Institute. Two of the 9 reports are described herein. Report #1 addressed the issue of the vivarium's veterinarian not being able to provide input into sick animal cases during the work day, while report #7 tackled the lack of a standard in keeping track of weekend/holiday animal health inspections. In each Report, a measurable Goal that established the basis for improvement recognition was present. A Five Whys analysis identified the Root Cause for Report #1 as historical work patterns that existed before the veterinarian was hired on and that modern electronic communication tools had not been implemented. The same analysis identified the Root Cause for Report #7 as the vivarium had never standardized the process for weekend/holiday checks. Successful outcomes for both Reports were obtained and validated by robust audit plans. The collective data indicate that vivarium staff acquired a disciplined way of reporting on, as well as solving, problems in a manner consistent with high

  8. The A3 Problem Solving Report: A 10-Step Scientific Method to Execute Performance Improvements in an Academic Research Vivarium

    PubMed Central

    Bassuk, James A.; Washington, Ida M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to illustrate the application of A3 Problem Solving Reports of the Toyota Production System to our research vivarium through the methodology of Continuous Performance Improvement, a lean approach to healthcare management at Seattle Children's (Hospital, Research Institute, Foundation). The Report format is described within the perspective of a 10-step scientific method designed to realize measurable improvements of Issues identified by the Report's Author, Sponsor and Coach. The 10-step method (Issue, Background, Current Condition, Goal, Root Cause, Target Condition, Countermeasures, Implementation Plan, Test, and Follow-up) was shown to align with Shewhart's Plan-Do-Check-Act process improvement cycle in a manner that allowed for quantitative analysis of the Countermeasure's outcomes and of Testing results. During fiscal year 2012, 9 A3 Problem Solving Reports were completed in the vivarium under the teaching and coaching system implemented by the Research Institute. Two of the 9 reports are described herein. Report #1 addressed the issue of the vivarium's veterinarian not being able to provide input into sick animal cases during the work day, while report #7 tackled the lack of a standard in keeping track of weekend/holiday animal health inspections. In each Report, a measurable Goal that established the basis for improvement recognition was present. A Five Whys analysis identified the Root Cause for Report #1 as historical work patterns that existed before the veterinarian was hired on and that modern electronic communication tools had not been implemented. The same analysis identified the Root Cause for Report #7 as the vivarium had never standardized the process for weekend/holiday checks. Successful outcomes for both Reports were obtained and validated by robust audit plans. The collective data indicate that vivarium staff acquired a disciplined way of reporting on, as well as solving, problems in a manner consistent with high

  9. The a3 problem solving report: a 10-step scientific method to execute performance improvements in an academic research vivarium.

    PubMed

    Bassuk, James A; Washington, Ida M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to illustrate the application of A3 Problem Solving Reports of the Toyota Production System to our research vivarium through the methodology of Continuous Performance Improvement, a lean approach to healthcare management at Seattle Children's (Hospital, Research Institute, Foundation). The Report format is described within the perspective of a 10-step scientific method designed to realize measurable improvements of Issues identified by the Report's Author, Sponsor and Coach. The 10-step method (Issue, Background, Current Condition, Goal, Root Cause, Target Condition, Countermeasures, Implementation Plan, Test, and Follow-up) was shown to align with Shewhart's Plan-Do-Check-Act process improvement cycle in a manner that allowed for quantitative analysis of the Countermeasure's outcomes and of Testing results. During fiscal year 2012, 9 A3 Problem Solving Reports were completed in the vivarium under the teaching and coaching system implemented by the Research Institute. Two of the 9 reports are described herein. Report #1 addressed the issue of the vivarium's veterinarian not being able to provide input into sick animal cases during the work day, while report #7 tackled the lack of a standard in keeping track of weekend/holiday animal health inspections. In each Report, a measurable Goal that established the basis for improvement recognition was present. A Five Whys analysis identified the Root Cause for Report #1 as historical work patterns that existed before the veterinarian was hired on and that modern electronic communication tools had not been implemented. The same analysis identified the Root Cause for Report #7 as the vivarium had never standardized the process for weekend/holiday checks. Successful outcomes for both Reports were obtained and validated by robust audit plans. The collective data indicate that vivarium staff acquired a disciplined way of reporting on, as well as solving, problems in a manner consistent with high

  10. Asthma in the Community: Designing Instruction to Help Students Explore Scientific Dilemmas that Impact Their Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tate, Erika Dawn

    2009-01-01

    School science instruction that connects to students' diverse home, cultural, or linguistic experiences can encourage lifelong participation in the scientific dilemmas that impact students' lives. This dissertation seeks effective ways to support high school students as they learn complex science topics and use their knowledge to transform their…

  11. Learning in a Community of Practice: Factors Impacting English-Learning Students' Engagement in Scientific Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González-Howard, María; McNeill, Katherine L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent education reform efforts have included an increasing push for school science to better mirror authentic scientific endeavor, including a focus on science practices. However, despite expectations that all students engage in these language-rich practices, little prior research has focused on how such opportunities will be created for…

  12. Key Aspects of Scientific Competence for Citizenship: A Delphi Study of the Expert Community in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanco-López, Ángel; España-Ramos, Enrique; González-García, Francisco José; Franco-Mariscal, Antonio Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Recent decades have seen an increasing emphasis on linking the content and aims of science teaching to what the average citizen requires in order to participate effectively in contemporary society, one that is heavily dependent on science and technology. However, despite attempts to define what a scientific education for citizenship should ideally…

  13. An Analysis of Student Success Rates for Academic and Workforce Programs at a Large Texas Community College: Examining Fall 2009 to Spring 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    High, Clennis F.

    2012-01-01

    Student success rates for academic track and workforce track students were examined for thousands of students at a large urban Texas Community College. The study covered fall 2009 through spring 2011, a two year period. Data were collected from the institution's data base regarding students who successfully completed the courses in which they were…

  14. "I Don't Know Where We'd Be without Them": Understanding Community Partners' Motivations to Participate in Academic Outreach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrera, Douglas Stuart

    2012-01-01

    While the literature on institutional civic engagement is quite extensive, the community perspective on such endeavors remains an under-developed area of study. This is particularly true of academic outreach programs meant to support the college preparation of underrepresented students. The purpose of this study was to explore the motivations of…

  15. Impact of School Sense of Community within a Faith-Based University: Administrative and Academic Staff Perceptions on Institutional Mission and Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Cowman, Shaun E.; Milner, Lauren A.; Gutierrez, Robert E.; Drake, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Academic staff (n = 305) and administrative staff (n = 595) at a large urban, Catholic, and religious order teaching university completed on-line school sense of community, social desirability, and mission-identity plus mission-driven activity measures. Partial correlates (controlling for social desirability) indicated that for both faculty and…

  16. Using ePortfolios to Assess Applied and Collaborative Learning and Academic Identity in a Summer Research Program for Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer-Freeman, Karen; Bastone, Linda; Skrivanek, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We evaluate the extent to which ePortfolios can be used to assess applied and collaborative learning and academic identity among community college students from underrepresented minority groups who participated in a summer research program. Thirty-eight students were evaluated by their research sponsor and two or three naïve faculty evaluators.…

  17. Voices from a Community College Developmental Writing Classroom: Seeking the Role of Teacher Knowledge and Its Impact upon Student Perceptions of Authority over Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallings, Thresa E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to describe the role of teacher knowledge in the instructional methods of a community college developmental literacy instructor and determine in what ways that knowledge may have impacted the perceptions of the student participants regarding their authority over their academic progress in the class. Therefore,…

  18. Integrating Language, Literacy, and Academic Development: Alternatives to Traditional English as a Second Language and Remedial English for Language Minority Students in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, George C.; Kibler, Amanda K.

    2015-01-01

    This article argues for the importance of integrating a focus on language, literacy, and academic development for United States-educated language minority (US-LM) students, sometimes called "Generation 1.5." It describes four initiatives at community colleges in California that aim to do so. US-LM students have completed some K-12…

  19. The Relationship of Career Decision Self-Efficacy and Perceived Barriers to Academic Preparedness for Community College Students of African Descent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twomey, Joshua Patrick

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of career decision self-efficacy and perception of barriers to the outcome variables perception of academic reality (i.e., a construct for student perceived college readiness) and college GPA. The sample consisted of students of African descent (n = 85) attending a northeastern community college located in an…

  20. Examining the Academic Performance and Retention of First-Year Students in Living-Learning Communities and First-Year Experience Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdie, John R., II; Rosser, Vicki J.

    2011-01-01

    Institutional data were used to examine the grades and retention of first-year students in 2 types of living learning communities--Academic Theme Floors (ATFs) and Freshman Interest Groups (FIGs)--and a First-Year Experience (FYE) course. Multiple regression revealed students in FIGs earned nominally higher GPAs (standardized [beta] = 0.02, p less…

  1. From Expectations to Experiences: Using a Structural Typology to Understand First-Year Student Outcomes in Academically Based Living-Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawrzynski, Matthew R.; Jessup-Anger, Jody E.

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated to what extent noncognitive variables (e.g., expectations for college) and the college environment (i.e., academically based living-learning communities) influence students' college experience. This research goes beyond grouping all living-learning students into one category, which has dominated much of the…

  2. Introducing the global medical community to the information presented at local scientific conferences through nephrology blogs.

    PubMed

    Desai, Tejas; Fang, Xiangming; Ferris, Maria

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of healthcare providers author medical blogs (bloggers) to educate the public and fellow physicians. Traditionally, many bloggers have assumed that readers are most interested in information presented at prestigious and popular scientific meetings. As a result, the readers and bloggers often ignore blogs of local scientific meetings. We hypothesize that blog readers will utilize blogs about local scientific meetings less than those about national meetings. We examined nephrology-pertinent blogs from 2010-2012. Blogs were categorized as "local/regional" or "national/international" based on the majority of the audience that attended the live scientific meeting. We tracked the number of pageviews, reading time, and location of use per blog for the first 90-days after its first availability on the website. Wilcoxon testing was performed on all data. There were 9 local/regional and 11 national/international scientific meetings for which blogs were available. The mean number of page views was significantly lower in blogs from local/regional than national/international conferences (84.7 versus 160.3, respectively; p < 0.01). However, the mean difference in total reading time between both categories of blogs was not significant (p = 0.25). Data from this investigation do not fully support the hypothesis that readers utilized local/regional blogs less than national/international blogs. Although local/regional blogs attracted fewer readers (lower pageviews), the content in these blogs was compelling enough to keep the reader equally engaged as with national/international blogs.

  3. The Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative: working to reverse the obesity epidemic through academically based community service.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Francis E

    2009-01-01

    The Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative (AUNI) presents a fruitful partnership between faculty and students at a premier research university and members of the surrounding community aimed at addressing the problem of childhood obesity. AUNI uses a problem-solving approach to learning by focusing course activities, including service-learning, on understanding and mitigating the obesity culture.

  4. Journal Clubs and Case Conferences: From Academic Tradition to Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David W.; Felix, Kate G.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: As small group learning sessions, Journal Clubs (JCs) and Case Conferences (CCs), if structured interactively, have potential as educational formats that can change practice. However, the degree to which these formats, as currently typically structured, lead to practice change is unknown. Methods: We used concepts of communities of…

  5. Community College Students' Perceived Effects of the Home Environment on Academic Success: A Theory Unveiled

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hambric, Tuesday S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the researcher unveils a generalized theory that holistically explains the root of the phenomenon which is the increasing dropout rate of community college students. Such information can be added to basic psychological research to help develop solutions that can be tested as applied psychological research. To create a theory that…

  6. Underserved, Underrepresented, Unprepared: Experiences of African American Females in Community College with Barriers to Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobe, LaWanda D.

    2013-01-01

    African American women are enrolling and returning to college in large numbers across many community college campuses, especially those women who would be characterized as nontraditional students. This qualitative study examined and analyzed the experiences, stresses, and coping mechanisms of first generation, nontraditional, single parent,…

  7. Academic Planning in the Physical Education Department of Polk Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Hershel H.

    This study illustrates an attempt to quantitatively express justification for altering the workloads and compensation for members of the physical education department of Polk Community College (Florida). While equitable workloads can be det4rmined in most other fields because credit hours coincide with an instructor's time in class, the physical…

  8. The Impact of a Professional Learning Community on Student Academic Achievement in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Eldridge

    2013-01-01

    The continued failure of a large, suburban, Title I high school to meet adequate yearly performance indicators as defined in the No Child Left Behind Act is a concern for school personnel, district officials, and the school community. The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine whether 9th grade teachers working collaboratively, within…

  9. Creating an Academic and Rural Community Network To Improve Diabetes Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Carol A.; Kennedy, Diane M.; Lahoz, Monina Rasay; Hislop, David A.; Erkel, Elizabeth E.

    The South Carolina Rural Interdisciplinary Program in Training (SCRIPT) provides practical educational experiences for students from multiple health care majors in rural communities in the Low Country (Southern region) of South Carolina. Faculty from the Medical University of South Carolina joined with staff from the Low Country Area Health…

  10. The Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative: Working to Reverse the Obesity Epidemic through Academically Based Community Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Francis E.

    2009-01-01

    The Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative (AUNI) presents a fruitful partnership between faculty and students at a premier research university and members of the surrounding community aimed at addressing the problem of childhood obesity. AUNI uses a problem-solving approach to learning by focusing course activities, including service-learning, on…

  11. Loving All Your Neighbors: Why Community Colleges Need the Academic Study of Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maley, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explains how the study of world religions prepares the community college student to become a better citizen, worker, and neighbor. The effective middle between the pitfalls of religious relativism and religious dominance in a world religions classroom is central to this discussion of teaching critical thinking, empathy, and…

  12. Building Better Bridges: Understanding Academic Text Readiness at One Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Sonya L.; Stahl, Norman A.; Kantner, M. Joanne

    2016-01-01

    The multipronged study described in this manuscript was designed to determine the implicit definition of college-text ready at one community college. The impetus for this study is a need to fully understand what it means to be college-text ready based on the literacy demands, practices, and expectations in introductory-level (or entry-level)…

  13. Academic Development in "Assessment for Learning": The Value of a Concept and Communities of Assessment Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimann, Nicola; Wilson, Angelina

    2012-01-01

    This interview-based study investigates staff perceptions of their involvement in a university centre which focuses on the development of assessment for learning (AfL) approaches. Learning about assessment is examined both as conceptual change and within communities of practice. Involvement in the centre ranged from perceived exclusion to culture…

  14. An International Call for Democratizing the Academic Journal Culture from a Community of Editors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Carol A.; Pryor, Caroline R.; Browne-Ferrigno, Tricia; Harris, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    In our reflective essay from our multiple perspectives as journal editors, peer reviewers, and published authors, we present ideas about editorial support, democracy, and innovation in the publishing process. As four tenured professors who work in universities in the states of Illinois, Virginia, Texas, and Kentucky, we are a community of editors…

  15. Interdisciplinary Connections and Academic Performance in Psychology-English Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grose-Fifer, Jillian; Helmer, Kimberly A.; Zottoli, Tina M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether students in psychology-based learning communities (LCs; i.e., cohorts who took introductory psychology and English together) performed better on psychology tests than those in standard classes. There were two types of LC; in one (connected LC), we created links between English and psychology by using English class readings…

  16. In Their Own Words: Women Chief Academic Officers Discuss the Community College and Their Career Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cejda, Brent D.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown that a variety of skills and experiences contribute to the career advancement of community college leaders. With the increased representation of women in senior-level positions, this paper answers the call to move beyond male-versus-female comparisons. Through in-depth interviews and follow-up conversations, six female…

  17. Outcomes of an Academic Service-Learning Project on Four Urban Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Debra Abston

    2015-01-01

    Service-learning has a rich history in higher education, with a multitude of studies indicating positive learning, community engagement, and moral development outcomes of student participants. The majority of the research findings, however, have represented four-year colleges. And while there are limited outcome studies of service-learning in…

  18. Perceptions of the Persistent: Academic Experiences of First Generation Community College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amos, Anthea E.

    2010-01-01

    While open access is still possible at community colleges and state colleges in Florida through the Florida College System, and the numbers of those enrolling are increasing, retention of first generation students is still an issue. Florida has increased the opportunity to attend college by limiting the barrier that inadequate financial support…

  19. Academic Achievement of First-Generation Mexican American Males in a Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pena, Carlos C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the complexities of successful attainment and achievement of 10 Mexican American males in a rural Southwest community college. This study strives to offer insights concerning the questions: (a) what behavioral patterns of current family, peers, and conditions in school have influenced the educational…

  20. Spaces of the Hilltop: A Case Study of Community/Academic Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knochel, Aaron; Selfe, Dickie

    2012-01-01

    The mapping imagery of the web interface is an attempt to illustrate the surprising element of the Hilltop project. The map is not "accurate." It shows real streets and highways in, around, and in-between the Ohio State University and the Hilltop community, but it is not intended to provide directions.

  1. Tidewater Community College Biennial Transfer Student Report, 1996-97 and 1997-98 Academic Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janicki, Heidi

    This report provides an analysis of Tidewater Community College (TCC) (Virginia) students who transferred to a four-year institution in Virginia beginning in fall 1996 or 1997. The following topics are discussed: overview of the transfer process; acceptance and enrollment rates for each of the four-year institutions; performance of TCC graduates…

  2. A Study of the Academic Performance of Student Athletes in California's Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanter, Martha; Lewis, Merillee

    In the California Community Colleges (CCC), students who participate in athletics must be enrolled in a minimum of 12 credit units during the season of participation and must maintain a grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.0. In 1989, a study was conducted to determine whether there were differences in the educational goal achievement of…

  3. Academic Leaders in Alabama Community Colleges: Roles and Tasks of Department Chairs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, A. Dale; Miller, Michael T.

    This document describes the findings from a survey conducted to compare the middle-level managers, department, and unit chairs and heads in Alabama's two-year colleges with those identified in the National Community College Chair Academy Survey of 1994. In particular, the study was designed to note differences or similarities between the national…

  4. Promoting Academic Engagement among Immigrant Adolescents through School-Family-Community Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez-Orozco, Carola; Onaga, Marie; de Lardemelle, Cecile

    2010-01-01

    Schools are receiving students of immigrant origin in unprecedented numbers. Using an ecological framework, the authors reviewed the community, school, familial, and individual challenges that immigrant adolescent students encounter. They examined cognitive, relational, and behavioral dimensions of student engagement as well as culturally…

  5. Washington Community and Technical Colleges Academic Year Report 2000-01.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, Olympia.

    This report provides 2000-2001 information on funding, staffing, facilities, and enrollment at all Washington State community and technical colleges. It also includes demographics on student characteristics, enrollment, graduation, and transfer rates. Highlights include: (1) the colleges enrolled the equivalent of 158,192 full-time students; (2) a…

  6. Rerouting Success: Several Academic Pathways Programs Are Fueling Reform at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Bob

    2015-01-01

    "Completion" has become the rallying cry at community colleges. As the 21st century unfolds, the earlier emphasis on guaranteeing greater access to a postsecondary education has evolved into a sharp focus on student success. Whether that means earning a workforcerelated certificate or an associate degree transferable to a four-year…

  7. Pueblo Community College. Accountability Progress Report, Academic Year 1990-1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amerman, Monique

    College outcomes assessment data and data collection plans for the future are presented in this report on Pueblo Community College's (PCC's) progress in implementing its 1991 Revised Accountability Plan. Following introductory sections, information is presented on changes made as the result of assessment efforts, activities to disseminate…

  8. Integration of an academic medical center and a community hospital: the Brigham and Women's/Faulkner hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Sussman, Andrew J; Otten, Jeffrey R; Goldszer, Robert C; Hanson, Margaret; Trull, David J; Paulus, Kenneth; Brown, Monte; Dzau, Victor; Brennan, Troyen A

    2005-03-01

    Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), a major academic tertiary medical center, and Faulkner Hospital (Faulkner), a nearby community teaching hospital, both in the Boston, Massachusetts area, have established a close affiliation relationship under a common corporate parent that achieves a variety of synergistic benefits. Formed under the pressures of limited capacity at BWH and excess capacity at Faulkner, and the need for lower-cost clinical space in an era of provider risk-sharing, BWH and Faulkner entered into a comprehensive affiliation agreement. Over the past seven years, the relationship has enhanced overall volume, broadened training programs, lowered the cost of resources for secondary care, and improved financial performance for both institutions. The lessons of this relationship, both in terms of success factors and ongoing challenges for the hospitals, medical staffs, and a large multispecialty referring physician group, are reviewed. The key factors for success of the relationship have been integration of training programs and some clinical services, provision of complementary clinical capabilities, geographic proximity, clear role definition of each institution, commitment and flexibility of leadership and medical staff, active and responsive communication, and the support of a large referring physician group that embraced the affiliation concept. Principal challenges have been maintaining the community hospital's cost structure, addressing cultural differences, avoiding competition among professional staff, anticipating the pace of patient migration, choosing a name for the new affiliation, and adapting to a changing payer environment. PMID:15734807

  9. Academic Incentives for Faculty Participation in Community-based Participatory Research

    PubMed Central

    Nyden, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Recognizing the need to overcome the obstacles of traditional university- and discipline-oriented research approaches, a variety of incentives to promote community-based participatory research (CBPR) are presented. Experiences of existing CBPR researchers are used in outlining how this methodological approach can appeal to faculty: the common ground shared by faculty and community leaders in challenging the status quo; opportunities to have an impact on local, regional, and national policy; and opening doors for new research and funding opportunities. Strategies for promoting CBPR in universities are provided in getting CBPR started, changing institutional practices currently inhibiting CBPR, and institutionalizing CBPR. Among the specific strategies are: development of faculty research networks; team approaches to CBPR; mentoring faculty and students; using existing national CBPR networks; modifying tenure and promotion guidelines; development of appropriate measures of CBPR scholarship; earmarking university resources to support CBPR; using Institutional Review Boards to promote CBPR; making CBPR-oriented faculty appointments; and creating CBPR centers. PMID:12848841

  10. An Academic-Government-Faith Partnership to Build Disaster Mental Health Preparedness and Community Resilience

    PubMed Central

    Semon, Natalie L.; Lating, Jeffrey M.; Everly, George S.; Perry, Charlene J.; Moore, Suzanne Straub; Mosley, Adrian M.; Thompson, Carol B.; Links, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Faculty and affiliates of the Johns Hopkins Preparedness and Emergency Response Research Center partnered with local health departments and faith-based organizations to develop a dual-intervention model of capacity-building for public mental health preparedness and community resilience. Project objectives included (1) determining the feasibility of the tri-partite collaborative concept; (2) designing, delivering, and evaluating psychological first aid (PFA) training and guided preparedness planning (GPP); and (3) documenting preliminary evidence of the sustainability and impact of the model. Methods We evaluated intervention effectiveness by analyzing pre- and post-training changes in participant responses on knowledge-acquisition tests administered to three urban and four rural community cohorts. Changes in percent of correct items and mean total correct items were evaluated. Criteria for model sustainability and impact were, respectively, observations of nonacademic partners engaging in efforts to advance post-project preparedness alliances, and project-attributable changes in preparedness-related practices of local or state governments. Results The majority (11 of 14) test items addressing technical or practical PFA content showed significant improvement; we observed comparable testing results for GPP training. Government and faith partners developed ideas and tools for sustaining preparedness activities, and numerous project-driven changes in local and state government policies were documented. Conclusions Results suggest that the model could be an effective approach to promoting public health preparedness and community resilience. PMID:25355980

  11. Implementation of Scientific Community Laboratories and Their Effect on Student Conceptual Learning, Attitudes, and Understanding of Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lark, Adam

    Scientific Community Laboratories, developed by The University of Maryland, have shown initial promise as laboratories meant to emulate the practice of doing physics. These laboratories have been re-created by incorporating their design elements with the University of Toledo course structure and resources. The laboratories have been titled the Scientific Learning Community (SLC) Laboratories. A comparative study between these SLC laboratories and the University of Toledo physics department's traditional laboratories was executed during the fall 2012 semester on first semester calculus-based physics students. Three tests were executed as pre-test and post-tests to capture the change in students' concept knowledge, attitudes, and understanding of uncertainty. The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) was used to evaluate students' conceptual changes through the semester and average normalized gains were compared between both traditional and SLC laboratories. The Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS) was conducted to elucidate students' change in attitudes through the course of each laboratory. Finally, interviews regarding data analysis and uncertainty were transcribed and coded to track changes in the way students understand uncertainty and data analysis in experimental physics after their participation in both laboratory type. Students in the SLC laboratories showed a notable an increase conceptual knowledge and attitudes when compared to traditional laboratories. SLC students' understanding of uncertainty showed most improvement, diverging completely from students in the traditional laboratories, who declined throughout the semester.

  12. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 6: Aerospace knowledge diffusion in the academic community: A report of phase 3 activities of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Kennedy, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Descriptive and analytical data regarding the flow of aerospace-based scientific and technical information (STI) in the academic community are presented. An overview is provided of the Federal Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project, illustrating a five-year program on aerospace knowledge diffusion. Preliminary results are presented of the project's research concerning the information-seeking habits, practices, and attitudes of U.S. aerospace engineering and science students and faculty. The type and amount of education and training in the use of information sources are examined. The use and importance ascribed to various information products by U.S. aerospace faculty and students including computer and other information technology is assessed. An evaluation of NASA technical reports is presented and it is concluded that NASA technical reports are rated high in terms of quality and comprehensiveness, citing Engineering Index and IAA as the most frequently used materials by faculty and students.

  13. Preparation for Practice: Elementary Preservice Teachers Learning and Using Scientific Classroom Discourse Community Instructional Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Elizabeth; Dema, Oxana; Harshbarger, Dena

    2014-01-01

    Despite historical national efforts to improve elementary science education, science instruction continues to be marginalized, varying by state. This study was designed to address the ongoing challenge of educating elementary preservice teachers (PSTs) to teach science. Elementary PSTs are one of the science education community's major links…

  14. Animal Research Practices and Doctoral Student Identity Development in a Scientific Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Karri

    2009-01-01

    This article examines doctoral student identity development in regard to engagement with research practices. Using animal research as a contextual lens, it considers how students develop an identity congruent to their perception of the community which facilitates their social and cognitive activities. The shared, interpretive understanding among…

  15. An academic, business, and community alliance to promote evidence-based public health policy: the case of primary seat belt legislation.

    PubMed

    Goldzweig, Irwin A; Schlundt, David G; Moore, Wayne E; Smith, Patricia E; Zoorob, Roger J; Levine, Robert S

    2013-08-01

    An academic, business, and community alliance comprising 285 organizations, including 43 national groups represented on a Blue Ribbon Panel organized by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation, targeted Arkansas, Florida, Mississippi, Minnesota, Tennessee, and Wisconsin for high involvement/intervention consisting of community organization and other political action to support passage of primary seat belt laws. State-level alliance activities began in January 2003. All six states enacted a primary seat belt law between 2004 and 2009. From January 2003 to May 2010, passage of primary legislation was 4.5 times as likely (95% CI 1.90, 10.68) in states with high versus low alliance involvement. Positive interaction between high alliance involvement and offers of federal incentives may have occurred as well. This evidence of success suggests that academic-business-community alliances for action to promote evidence-based public health policy may be effective.

  16. Becoming respectable: T. Dale Stewart and the acceptance of forensic anthropology in the academic community.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, K A

    2000-03-01

    Before World War II, forensic anthropology was of peripheral interest to a few anthropologists willing to assist in investigations by law enforcement agencies. A strong bias that "police work" was unbecoming to the scholarly pursuits of academics persisted into the post-war years. Changes took place as a consequence of T. Dale Stewart's case work in the identification of human remains with the FBI from 1943 to 1969, his directorship of the National Museum of Natural History (Smithsonian Institution) beginning in 1962, and his work with the Armed Forces after 1948. This paper discusses the historic period of transition of attitudes and practices in the contexts of Stewart's contributions and the cases and teaching programs of one of his contemporaries. Theodore D. McCown at the University of California at Berkeley, during the period of 1939 to 1969. The establishment of the Physical Anthropology Section within the American Academy of Forensic Sciences in 1972 and the creation of the T. Dale Stewart award for distinguished service in forensic anthropology advanced those laboratory research programs and medical-legal investigations conducted by present-day forensic anthropologists. PMID:10782943

  17. Becoming respectable: T. Dale Stewart and the acceptance of forensic anthropology in the academic community.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, K A

    2000-03-01

    Before World War II, forensic anthropology was of peripheral interest to a few anthropologists willing to assist in investigations by law enforcement agencies. A strong bias that "police work" was unbecoming to the scholarly pursuits of academics persisted into the post-war years. Changes took place as a consequence of T. Dale Stewart's case work in the identification of human remains with the FBI from 1943 to 1969, his directorship of the National Museum of Natural History (Smithsonian Institution) beginning in 1962, and his work with the Armed Forces after 1948. This paper discusses the historic period of transition of attitudes and practices in the contexts of Stewart's contributions and the cases and teaching programs of one of his contemporaries. Theodore D. McCown at the University of California at Berkeley, during the period of 1939 to 1969. The establishment of the Physical Anthropology Section within the American Academy of Forensic Sciences in 1972 and the creation of the T. Dale Stewart award for distinguished service in forensic anthropology advanced those laboratory research programs and medical-legal investigations conducted by present-day forensic anthropologists.

  18. Physician clinical alignment and integration: a community-academic hospital approach.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Weiss, Sandra Jarva; Nester, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    An overwhelming need for change in the U.S. healthcare delivery system, coupled with the need to improve clinical and financial outcomes, has prompted hospitals to direct renewed efforts toward achieving high quality and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, with the dawn of accountable care organizations and increasing focus on patient expectations, hospitals have begun to seek physician partners through clinical alignment. Contrary to the unsuccessful alignment strategies of the 1990s, today's efforts are more mutually beneficial, driven by the need to achieve better care coordination, increased access to infrastructure, improved quality, and lower costs. In this article, we describe a large, academic, tertiary care hospital's approach to developing and implementing alignment and integration models with its collaboration-ready physicians and physician groups. We developed four models--short of physicians' employment with the organization--tailored to meet the needs of both the physician group and the hospital: (1) medical directorship (group physicians are appointed to serve as medical directors of a clinical area), (2) professional services agreement (specific clinical services, such as overnight admissions help, are contracted), (3) co-management services agreement (one specialty group co-manages all services within the specialty service lines), and (4) lease arrangement (closest in scope to employment, in which the hospital pays all expenses and receives all revenue). Successful hospital-physician alignment requires careful planning and the early engagement of legal counsel to ensure compliance with federal statutes. Establishing an integrated system with mutually identified goals better positions hospitals to deliver cost-effective and high-quality care under the new paradigm of healthcare reform. PMID:24988674

  19. Physician clinical alignment and integration: a community-academic hospital approach.

    PubMed

    Salas-Lopez, Debbie; Weiss, Sandra Jarva; Nester, Brian; Whalen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    An overwhelming need for change in the U.S. healthcare delivery system, coupled with the need to improve clinical and financial outcomes, has prompted hospitals to direct renewed efforts toward achieving high quality and cost-effectiveness. Additionally, with the dawn of accountable care organizations and increasing focus on patient expectations, hospitals have begun to seek physician partners through clinical alignment. Contrary to the unsuccessful alignment strategies of the 1990s, today's efforts are more mutually beneficial, driven by the need to achieve better care coordination, increased access to infrastructure, improved quality, and lower costs. In this article, we describe a large, academic, tertiary care hospital's approach to developing and implementing alignment and integration models with its collaboration-ready physicians and physician groups. We developed four models--short of physicians' employment with the organization--tailored to meet the needs of both the physician group and the hospital: (1) medical directorship (group physicians are appointed to serve as medical directors of a clinical area), (2) professional services agreement (specific clinical services, such as overnight admissions help, are contracted), (3) co-management services agreement (one specialty group co-manages all services within the specialty service lines), and (4) lease arrangement (closest in scope to employment, in which the hospital pays all expenses and receives all revenue). Successful hospital-physician alignment requires careful planning and the early engagement of legal counsel to ensure compliance with federal statutes. Establishing an integrated system with mutually identified goals better positions hospitals to deliver cost-effective and high-quality care under the new paradigm of healthcare reform.

  20. The Hartnell Astronomy Short Course: Bolstering the Scientific Research Preparation of Community College Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metevier, A. J.; Joggerst, C. C.; Moth, P.; Lotz, J.; Pollack, L.; Noeske, K.; Lopez, L.; Laver, C.; Rubin, K.; Ammons, M.; Laird, E.; Newton, A.

    2010-12-01

    Community college students who express an interest in science and engineering have excellent learning opportunities in the classroom, but rarely have access to forefront research experiences. To address this need, we developed the Hartnell Astronomy Short Course to provide Hartnell community college students with an authentic research experience on their home campus. Hartnell is a federally designated Hispanic Serving Institution, and thus draws a population of students that are underrepresented in the sciences. The one-week, intensive short course centered on an innovative inquiry activity in which student investigators used telescope images and spectra to study their own questions about fundamental galaxy properties, the differences between "normal" and "active" galaxies, and evidence for dark matter, with guidance from instructor-advisors. We supported the inquiry activity with lectures and laboratory activities on light and spectra, cosmology, and extragalactic topics, as well as community-building and career-oriented activities. Over the four years in which the short course was taught (2004 - 2007), over 60 students were served.

  1. Identifying Teaching Groups as a Basis for Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinrich, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Academic development recognizes the strengths of communities, such as communities of practice or learning communities, in providing academics with supportive environments for the development of teaching. The problem academic development faces is that not enough academics are involved in these communities. Instead of trying to interest academics in…

  2. A community of scientists: cultivating scientific identity among undergraduates within the Berkeley Compass Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceves, Ana V.; Berkeley Compass Project

    2015-01-01

    The Berkeley Compass Project is a self-formed group of graduate and undergraduate students in the physical sciences at UC Berkeley. Our goals are to improve undergraduate physics education, provide opportunities for professional development, and increase retention of students from populations typically underrepresented in the physical sciences. For students who enter as freshmen, the core Compass experience consists of a summer program and several seminar courses. These programs are designed to foster a diverse, collaborative student community in which students engage in authentic research practices and regular self-reflection. Compass encourages undergraduates to develop an identity as a scientist from the beginning of their university experience.

  3. The Einstein Observatory: A New Public/Private Observatory Complex for Community Education and Scientific Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowell, J.

    1999-12-01

    The Development Authority of Cherokee County (Georgia) is leading a public/private partnership of business/industry professionals, educators, and university scientists that seeks to develop a national prototype educational and scientific research facility for grades K-12, as well as college-level research, that will inspire our youth to become literate in science and technology. In particular, the goal is to make this complex a science, math, and engineering magnet learning facility and to raise the average SAT scores of local area students by 100 points. A dark-site mountain, nestled on the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains at the northern-most edge of Atlanta, will become the home for the "Einstein" Observatory. The complex will have four telescopes: one 50-inch, one 24-inch, and two 16-inch telescopes. Each telescope will have digital cameras and an optic-fiber feed to a single, medium-resolution spectroscope. All four telescopes will be electronically accessible from local schools. Professional astronomers will establish suitable observational research projects and will lead K-12 and college students in the acquisition and analysis of data. Astronomers will also assist the local area schoolteachers in methods for nurturing children's scientific inquiry. The observatory mountain will have 100 platform locations for individual viewing by visiting families, school groups, and amateur astronomers. The Atlanta Astronomer Club will provide numerous evening programs and viewing opportunities for the general public. An accompanying Planetarium & Science Center will be located on the nearby campus of Reinhardt College. The Planetarium & Science Center will be integrated with Reinhardt College's theme of learning focused upon studying the past and present as a basis for projecting the future.

  4. Preparing for a Global Scientific Workforce: Lessons Learned by the Chemistry Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranovic, M.; Nameroff, T.

    2005-12-01

    Globalization has significant implications for science, science education, and the workforce. Flows of capital and knowledge are altering patterns of economic and technological development. Technology is allowing science to be conducted in real time on a global scale. International connections and mobility are increasing worldwide. At the same time science is becoming a truly global endeavor, the convergence of disciplines suggests that scientists from different backgrounds can learn from each other's experiences in addressing these challenges and opportunities. This presentation reviews some of the impacts of globalization on the chemically related sciences, students, and profession. As a result of globalization, today's practitioners of chemistry need an ever-expanding skill set to succeed. In addition to a strong command of the basic principles of chemistry, students and practitioners need to know how to work on multicultural teams, have knowledge of other languages, and be able to communicate effectively. The American Chemical Society (ACS) is coming to terms with and responding to changes in the nature of chemistry and its practice. This presentation will explore some of the innovative efforts of ACS to meet the challenges for chemistry in an era of globalization. The Earth and space sciences community may benefit from the chemistry community's "lessons learned."

  5. Using the give-get grid to understand potential expectations of engagement in a community-academic partnership.

    PubMed

    Southerland, Jodi; Behringer, Bruce; Slawson, Deborah L

    2013-11-01

    Research suggests that stakeholder investment is maximized when partnerships understand the assumptions held by partners of the benefits to be derived and contributions to be made to the partnership. In 2011, representatives from seven rural county high schools and five university departments participated in a planning workshop designed to identify elements of an effective community-academic partnership to address adolescent obesity disparity in Southern Appalachia. The purpose of this investigation was to examine key elements of partnership building by way of the Give-Get Grid partnership tool. Content analysis was conducted to identify emerging themes. University representatives consistently identified more proposed program contributions as well as benefits than their high school partners. University personnel responses generally pertained to their level of participation and investment in the partnership, whereas high school personnel tended to identify contributions fundamental to both partnership and program success. Additionally, content analysis uncovered programmatic facilitators and potential barriers that can be instrumental in program planning and forming program messages. Findings suggest that although partners often share common goals, perceptions of the value of investment and benefits may vary. The Give-Get Grid can be used during the program-planning phase to help identify these differences. Implications for practice are discussed.

  6. The Impact of Community Design and Land-Use Choices on Public Health: A Scientific Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Dannenberg, Andrew L.; Jackson, Richard J.; Frumkin, Howard; Schieber, Richard A.; Pratt, Michael; Kochtitzky, Chris; Tilson, Hugh H.

    2003-01-01

    The design of a community’s built environment influences the physical and mental health of its residents. Because few studies have investigated this relationship, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hosted a workshop in May 2002 to help develop a scientific research agenda on these issues. Workshop participants’ areas of expertise included physical activity, injury prevention, air pollution, water quality, urban planning, transportation, architecture, epidemiology, land use, mental health, social capital, housing, and social marketing. This report describes the 37 questions in the resulting research agenda. The next steps are to define priorities and obtain resources. The proposed research will help identify the best practices for designing new communities and revitalizing old ones in ways that promote physical and mental health. PMID:12948970

  7. An academic-community partnership to improve care for the underserved.

    PubMed

    Fancher, Tonya L; Keenan, Craig; Meltvedt, Caitlyn; Stocker, Timothy; Harris, Tracie; Morfín, José; McCarron, Robert; Kulkarni-Date, Mrinalini; Henderson, Mark C

    2011-02-01

    Despite the need for a robust primary care workforce, the number of students and residents choosing general internal medicine careers continues to decline. In this article, the authors describe their efforts at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine to bolster interest in internal medicine careers and improve the quality of care for medically underserved populations through a tailored third-year residency track developed in partnership with the Sacramento County Department of Health and Human Services. The Transforming Education and Community Health (TEACH) Program improves continuity of care between inpatient and outpatient settings, creates a new multidisciplinary teaching clinic in the Sacramento County health system, and prepares residents to provide coordinated care for vulnerable populations. Since its inception in 2005, 25 residents have graduated from the TEACH Program. Compared with national rates, TEACH graduates are more likely to practice general internal medicine and to practice in medically underserved settings. TEACH residents report high job satisfaction and provide equal or higher-quality diabetes care than that indicated by national benchmarks. The authors provide an overview of the TEACH Program, including curriculum details, preliminary outcomes, barriers to continued and expanded implementation, and thoughts about the future of the program. PMID:21169777

  8. Developing a scientific procedure for community based hazard mapping and risk mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrier, M.

    2011-12-01

    As an international exchange student from the Geological Sciences Department at San Diego State University (SDSU), I joined the KKN-PPM program at Universitas Gadjah Mada (UGM), Yogyakarta, Indonesia, in July 2011 for 12 days (July 4th to July 16th) of its two month duration (July 4th to August 25th). The KKN-PPM group I was attached was designated 154 and was focused in Plosorejo Village, Karanganyar, Kerjo, Central Java, Indonesia. The mission of KKN-PPM 154 was to survey Plosorejo village for existing landslides, to generate a simple hazard susceptibility map that can be understood by local villagers, and then to begin dissemination of that map into the community. To generate our susceptibility map we first conducted a geological survey of the existing landslides in the field study area, with a focus on determining landslide triggers and gauging areas for susceptibility for future landslides. The methods for gauging susceptibility included lithological observation, the presence of linear cracking, visible loss of structural integrity in structures such as villager homes, as well as collaboration with local residents and with the local rescue and response team. There were three color distinctions used in representing susceptibility which were green, where there is no immediate danger of landslide damage; orange, where transportation routes are at risk of being disrupted by landslides; and red, where imminent landslide potential puts a home in direct danger. The landslide inventory and susceptibility data was compiled into digital mediums such as CorelDraw, ArcGIS and Google Earth. Once a technical map was generated, we presented it to the village leadership for confirmation and modification based on their experience. Finally, we began to use the technical susceptibility map to draft evacuation routes and meeting points in the event of landslides, as well as simple susceptibility maps that can be understood and utilized by local villagers. Landslide mitigation

  9. Does a research group increase impact on the scientific community or general public discussion? Alternative metric-based evaluation

    PubMed Central

    De Gregori, Manuela; Scotti, Valeria; De Silvestri, Annalisa; Curti, Moreno; Fanelli, Guido; Allegri, Massimo; Schatman, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of scientific publications of the Italian SIMPAR (Study In Multidisciplinary PAin Research) group by using altmetrics, defined as nontraditional metrics constituting an alternative to more traditional citation-impact metrics, such as impact factor and H-index. By correlating traditional and alternative metrics, we attempted to verify whether publications by the SIMPAR group collectively had more impact than those performed by its individual members, either in solo publications or in publications coauthored by non-SIMPAR group investigators (which for the purpose of this study we will refer to as “individual publications”). For all the 12 members of the group analyzed (pain therapists, biologists, and pharmacologists), we created Open Researcher and Contributor ID and Impact Story accounts, and synchronized these data. Manually, we calculated the level metrics for each article by dividing the data obtained from the research community by those obtained from the public community. We analyzed 759 articles, 18 of which were published by the SIMPAR group. Altmetrics demonstrated that SIMPAR group publications were more likely to be saved (77.8% vs 45.9%), discussed (61.1% vs 1.1%, P<0.0001), and publicly viewed (11.1% vs 1.3%, P=0.05) than individual publications. These results support the importance of multidisciplinary research groups in the impact of scientific literature; the interaction and synergy among the research participants allowed the obtainment of high impact-literature in the field of personalized pain medicine. Finally, our findings demonstrate the potential of altmetrics in estimating the value of the research products of a group. PMID:27358575

  10. Scientific Visualization to Study Flux Transfer Events at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rastatter, Lutz; Kuznetsova, Maria M.; Sibeck, David G.; Berrios, David H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present results of modeling of reconnection at the dayside magnetopause with subsequent development of flux transfer event signatures. The tools used include new methods that have been added to the suite of visualization methods that are used at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC). Flux transfer events result from localized reconnection that connect magnetosheath magnetic field and plasma with magnetospheric fields and plasma and results in flux rope structures that span the dayside magnetopause. The onset of flux rope formation and the three-dimensional structure of flux ropes are studied as they have been modeled by high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the dayside magnetosphere of the Earth. We show that flux transfer events are complex three-dimensional structures that require modern visualization and analysis techniques. Two suites of visualization methods are presented and we demonstrate the usefulness of those methods through the CCMC web site to the general science user.

  11. How the Scientific Community Reacts to Newly Submitted Preprints: Article Downloads, Twitter Mentions, and Citations

    PubMed Central

    Shuai, Xin; Pepe, Alberto; Bollen, Johan

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the online response to the preprint publication of a cohort of 4,606 scientific articles submitted to the preprint database arXiv.org between October 2010 and May 2011. We study three forms of responses to these preprints: downloads on the arXiv.org site, mentions on the social media site Twitter, and early citations in the scholarly record. We perform two analyses. First, we analyze the delay and time span of article downloads and Twitter mentions following submission, to understand the temporal configuration of these reactions and whether one precedes or follows the other. Second, we run regression and correlation tests to investigate the relationship between Twitter mentions, arXiv downloads, and article citations. We find that Twitter mentions and arXiv downloads of scholarly articles follow two distinct temporal patterns of activity, with Twitter mentions having shorter delays and narrower time spans than arXiv downloads. We also find that the volume of Twitter mentions is statistically correlated with arXiv downloads and early citations just months after the publication of a preprint, with a possible bias that favors highly mentioned articles. PMID:23133597

  12. Communication on urban resilience to extreme weather: challenges and achievements in the dialogue between the international scientific community and local stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicari, Rosa; Gires, Auguste; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Schertzer, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    uncertainty and its open issues as a virtuous process, aligning diverging objectives and approaches in a common vision, making an innovative technology visible to the public and managing rumours on security issues, bridging the gap between scientific discourses from an international academic community and operational discourses from local communities.

  13. A systematic strategic planning process focused on improved community engagement by an academic health center: the University of Kansas Medical Center's story.

    PubMed

    Cook, David C; Nelson, Eve-Lynn; Ast, Cori; Lillis, Teresa

    2013-05-01

    A growing number of academic health centers (AHCs) are considering approaches to expand collaboration with their communities in order to address complex and multisystem health concerns. In 2010, internal leaders at the University of Kansas Medical Center undertook a strategic planning process to enhance both community engagement activities and the scholarship resulting from these engagement activities. The authors describe the strategic planning process, recommendations, and actions associated with elevating community engagement within the AHC's mission and priorities. The strategic planning process included conducting an inventory of community engagement activities within the AHC; analyzing strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats for community engagement work; and identifying goals and strategies to improve future community engagement activities and scholarship. The resulting road map for enhancing community engagement at their institution through 2015 consists of four main strategies: emphasize scholarship in community engagement, revise organizational structures to better facilitate community engagement, prioritize current engagement activities to ensure appropriate use of resources, and enhance communication of engagement initiatives to further develop stakeholder relationships.The authors also discuss implementation of the plan to date and highlight lessons learned that may inform other AHCs as they enhance and expand similar endeavors.

  14. Marine Phytoplankton Temperature versus Growth Responses from Polar to Tropical Waters – Outcome of a Scientific Community-Wide Study

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Philip W.; Rynearson, Tatiana A.; Armstrong, Evelyn A.; Fu, Feixue; Hayashi, Kendra; Hu, Zhangxi; Hutchins, David A.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Litchman, Elena; Mulholland, Margaret R.; Passow, Uta; Strzepek, Robert F.; Whittaker, Kerry A.; Yu, Elizabeth; Thomas, Mridul K.

    2013-01-01

    “It takes a village to finish (marine) science these days” Paraphrased from Curtis Huttenhower (the Human Microbiome project) The rapidity and complexity of climate change and its potential effects on ocean biota are challenging how ocean scientists conduct research. One way in which we can begin to better tackle these challenges is to conduct community-wide scientific studies. This study provides physiological datasets fundamental to understanding functional responses of phytoplankton growth rates to temperature. While physiological experiments are not new, our experiments were conducted in many laboratories using agreed upon protocols and 25 strains of eukaryotic and prokaryotic phytoplankton isolated across a wide range of marine environments from polar to tropical, and from nearshore waters to the open ocean. This community-wide approach provides both comprehensive and internally consistent datasets produced over considerably shorter time scales than conventional individual and often uncoordinated lab efforts. Such datasets can be used to parameterise global ocean model projections of environmental change and to provide initial insights into the magnitude of regional biogeographic change in ocean biota in the coming decades. Here, we compare our datasets with a compilation of literature data on phytoplankton growth responses to temperature. A comparison with prior published data suggests that the optimal temperatures of individual species and, to a lesser degree, thermal niches were similar across studies. However, a comparison of the maximum growth rate across studies revealed significant departures between this and previously collected datasets, which may be due to differences in the cultured isolates, temporal changes in the clonal isolates in cultures, and/or differences in culture conditions. Such methodological differences mean that using particular trait measurements from the prior literature might introduce unknown errors and bias into modelling

  15. Marine phytoplankton temperature versus growth responses from polar to tropical waters--outcome of a scientific community-wide study.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Philip W; Rynearson, Tatiana A; Armstrong, Evelyn A; Fu, Feixue; Hayashi, Kendra; Hu, Zhangxi; Hutchins, David A; Kudela, Raphael M; Litchman, Elena; Mulholland, Margaret R; Passow, Uta; Strzepek, Robert F; Whittaker, Kerry A; Yu, Elizabeth; Thomas, Mridul K

    2013-01-01

    "It takes a village to finish (marine) science these days" Paraphrased from Curtis Huttenhower (the Human Microbiome project) The rapidity and complexity of climate change and its potential effects on ocean biota are challenging how ocean scientists conduct research. One way in which we can begin to better tackle these challenges is to conduct community-wide scientific studies. This study provides physiological datasets fundamental to understanding functional responses of phytoplankton growth rates to temperature. While physiological experiments are not new, our experiments were conducted in many laboratories using agreed upon protocols and 25 strains of eukaryotic and prokaryotic phytoplankton isolated across a wide range of marine environments from polar to tropical, and from nearshore waters to the open ocean. This community-wide approach provides both comprehensive and internally consistent datasets produced over considerably shorter time scales than conventional individual and often uncoordinated lab efforts. Such datasets can be used to parameterise global ocean model projections of environmental change and to provide initial insights into the magnitude of regional biogeographic change in ocean biota in the coming decades. Here, we compare our datasets with a compilation of literature data on phytoplankton growth responses to temperature. A comparison with prior published data suggests that the optimal temperatures of individual species and, to a lesser degree, thermal niches were similar across studies. However, a comparison of the maximum growth rate across studies revealed significant departures between this and previously collected datasets, which may be due to differences in the cultured isolates, temporal changes in the clonal isolates in cultures, and/or differences in culture conditions. Such methodological differences mean that using particular trait measurements from the prior literature might introduce unknown errors and bias into modelling

  16. Recruitment Campaigns as a Tool for Social and Cultural Reproduction of Scientific Communities: A case study on how scientists invite young people to science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrée, Maria; Hansson, Lena

    2014-08-01

    Young people's interest in pursuing science and science-intense educations has been expressed as a concern in relation to societal, economic and democratic development by various stakeholders (governments, industry and university). From the perspective of the scientific communities, the issues at stake do not necessarily correspond to the overall societal aims. Rather, initiatives to recruit young people to science are also ways for the scientific community to engage in the social and cultural reproduction of itself. For a community to survive and produce a future, it needs to secure regeneration of itself in succeeding generations. The aim of this study is to, from a perspective of social and cultural production/reproduction, shed light on an initiative from the scientific community to recruit young people to science education. This is a case study of one recruitment campaign called the Chemistry Advent calendar. The calendar consists of 25 webcasted films, produced and published by the science/technology faculty at a university. The analysed data consist of the films and additional published material relating to the campaign such as working reports and articles published about the campaign. The analysis focussed on what messages are communicated to potential newcomers. The messages were categorised by means of a framework of subjective values. The results are discussed both from a perspective of how the messages mirror traditions and habits of the scientific community, and in relation to research on students' educational choices.

  17. Climate perceptions of local communities validated through scientific signals in Sikkim Himalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Shrestha, D G

    2016-10-01

    Sikkim, a tiny Himalayan state situated in the north-eastern region of India, records limited research on the climate change. Understanding the changes in climate based on the perceptions of local communities can provide important insights for the preparedness against the unprecedented consequences of climate change. A total of 228 households in 12 different villages of Sikkim, India, were interviewed using eight climate change indicators. The results from the public opinions showed a significant increase in temperature compared to a decade earlier, winters are getting warmer, water springs are drying up, change in concept of spring-water recharge (locally known as Mul Phutnu), changes in spring season, low crop yields, incidences of mosquitoes during winter, and decrease in rainfall in last 10 years. In addition, study also showed significant positive correlations of increase in temperature with other climate change indicators viz. spring-water recharge concept (R (2) = 0.893), warmer winter (R (2) = 0.839), drying up of water springs (R (2) = 0.76), changes in spring season (R (2) = 0.68), low crop yields (R (2) = 0.68), decrease in rainfall (R (2) = 0.63), and incidences of mosquitoes in winter (R (2) = 0.50). The air temperature for two meteorological stations of Sikkim indicated statistically significant increasing trend in mean minimum temperature and mean minimum winter temperature (DJF). The observed climate change is consistent with the people perceptions. This information can help in planning specific adaptation strategies to cope with the impacts of climate change by framing village-level action plan.

  18. Climate perceptions of local communities validated through scientific signals in Sikkim Himalaya, India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Shrestha, D G

    2016-10-01

    Sikkim, a tiny Himalayan state situated in the north-eastern region of India, records limited research on the climate change. Understanding the changes in climate based on the perceptions of local communities can provide important insights for the preparedness against the unprecedented consequences of climate change. A total of 228 households in 12 different villages of Sikkim, India, were interviewed using eight climate change indicators. The results from the public opinions showed a significant increase in temperature compared to a decade earlier, winters are getting warmer, water springs are drying up, change in concept of spring-water recharge (locally known as Mul Phutnu), changes in spring season, low crop yields, incidences of mosquitoes during winter, and decrease in rainfall in last 10 years. In addition, study also showed significant positive correlations of increase in temperature with other climate change indicators viz. spring-water recharge concept (R (2) = 0.893), warmer winter (R (2) = 0.839), drying up of water springs (R (2) = 0.76), changes in spring season (R (2) = 0.68), low crop yields (R (2) = 0.68), decrease in rainfall (R (2) = 0.63), and incidences of mosquitoes in winter (R (2) = 0.50). The air temperature for two meteorological stations of Sikkim indicated statistically significant increasing trend in mean minimum temperature and mean minimum winter temperature (DJF). The observed climate change is consistent with the people perceptions. This information can help in planning specific adaptation strategies to cope with the impacts of climate change by framing village-level action plan. PMID:27650439

  19. Maintaining Scientific Community Vocabularies in Drupal through Consumption of Linked Open Data and Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, A.; Arko, R. A.; Maffei, A. R.; Chandler, C. L.

    2012-12-01

    In the Summer of 2011, a one-year pilot project was funded by the National Science Foundation to build a pre-cruise planning application using the Drupal content management system (CMS). This application will be used to assist the individual operators of research vessels in the UNOLS fleet. A large portion of the operator's pre-cruise process revolves around a questionnaire presented to the principal investigator(PI) that is used to gather information about the nature of their upcoming cruise. The Drupal-based application will be delivered as a distribution for use by any operator of a UNOLS vessel to construct customized questionnaires and provide an interface for the PI to complete this questionnaire at their leisure. A major goal of the project is to develop an application that will require as little programming maintenance as possible after the initial development effort. One of the strategies employed is the reuse of existing controlled vocabularies and linked open data wherever possible for fields of the questionnaire - most notably to populate the concepts of Country, Organization, Port, and Ship. The Rolling Deck to Repository (R2R) program manages controlled vocabularies for these concepts and currently exposes these concepts as linked open data. Furthermore, R2R has identified the authoritative source for pertinent oceanographic community vocabularies as ICES for Ship, UNOLS for Port, IANA for Organization, ISO for Country, ISO for Language, SeaDataNet for Device, FIPS for State, and IHO for Sea Area as described at http://www.rvdata.us/voc. The scope of the terms provided by these sources matches the scope of the operator's needs for these concepts, and so the application is being designed to automatically consume served information about these vocabulary terms to populate and update Drupal taxonomies for use in the questionnaire. Where newer terms are required for a PI to complete a questionnaire (before they appear in the vocabularies), the Drupal

  20. Nanotoxicology and nanotechnology: new findings from the NIEHS and Superfund Research Program scientific community.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Danielle J

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are characterized by their small size (i.e., nanometer scale) and can be engineered from nearly any chemical substance, creating materials that differ in composition, particle size, shape, and surface coatings. These materials are often seen as a "double-edged sword" by having properties that make them potentially beneficial in product development, drug delivery, and remediation of hazardous substances, but these same properties may result in interaction with biological systems and potential effects in the environment. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is interested in both the potential risks associated with exposure to these materials, while harnessing the power of engineered nanomaterials to improve public health. This presentation will consist of discussion of nanoparticle studies by NIEHS researchers and the extramural community and its efforts to develop cross-agency initiatives to solve the many vexing issues associated with nanomaterials. For example, researchers from the NIEHS National Toxicology Program (NTP) are evaluating a number of nanomaterial classes in comprehensive toxicology studies. NIEHS also has an extensive extramural research grant portfolio consisting of the Nano Grand Opportunities (Nano GO) Program and NIEHS Centers for Nanotechnology Health Implications Research (NCNHIR) Consortium consisting of U19 and U01 Cooperative Centers. Furthermore, the NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP), which supports a network of university (P42, R01), small business (SBIR/STTR), and training grants (R25), provides funding to grantees evaluating the toxicology of nanomaterials, developing new or improved nanotechnologies to monitor and remediate hazardous substances, and training professionals in the use of these of materials. The NIEHS's Worker Education Branch also offers educational materials for training workers on risks of nanotechnology in laboratories, manufacturing facilities, at hazardous waste cleanup

  1. Educating Youth About Health and Science Using a Partnership Between an Academic Medical Center and Community-based Science Museum

    PubMed Central

    Griest, Susan; Howarth, Linda C.; Beemsterboer, Phyllis; Cameron, William; Carney, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Declining student interest and scholastic abilities in the sciences are concerns for the health professions. Additionally, the National Institutes of Health is committed to promoting more research on health behaviors among US youth, where one of the most striking contemporary issues is obesity. This paper reports findings on the impact of a partnership between Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry linked to a 17-week exhibition of BodyWorlds3 and designed to inform rural underserved youth about science and health research. Self-administered survey measures included health knowledge, attitudes, intended health behaviors, and interest in the health professions. Four hundred four surveys (88% of participants) were included in analyses. Ninety percent or more found both the Body-Worlds (n = 404) and OHSU (n = 239) exhibits interesting. Dental care habits showed the highest level of intended behavior change (Dental = 45%, Exercise = 34%, Eating = 30%). Overall, females and middle school students were more likely than male and high school students, respectively, to state an intention to change exercise, eating and dental care habits. Females and high school students were more likely to have considered a career in health or science prior to their exhibit visit and, following the exhibit, were more likely to report that this intention had been reinforced. About 6% of those who had not previously considered a career in health or science (n = 225) reported being more likely to do so after viewing the exhibits. In conclusion, high quality experiential learning best created by community-academic partnerships appears to have the ability to stimulate interest and influence intentions to change health behaviors among middle and high school students. PMID:19350372

  2. Educating youth about health and science using a partnership between an academic medical center and community-based science museum.

    PubMed

    Bunce, Arwen E; Griest, Susan; Howarth, Linda C; Beemsterboer, Phyllis; Cameron, William; Carney, Patricia A

    2009-08-01

    Declining student interest and scholastic abilities in the sciences are concerns for the health professions. Additionally, the National Institutes of Health is committed to promoting more research on health behaviors among US youth, where one of the most striking contemporary issues is obesity. This paper reports findings on the impact of a partnership between Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry linked to a 17-week exhibition of BodyWorlds3 and designed to inform rural underserved youth about science and health research. Self-administered survey measures included health knowledge, attitudes, intended health behaviors, and interest in the health professions. Four hundred four surveys (88% of participants) were included in analyses. Ninety percent or more found both the BodyWorlds (n = 404) and OHSU (n = 239) exhibits interesting. Dental care habits showed the highest level of intended behavior change (Dental = 45%, Exercise = 34%, Eating = 30%). Overall, females and middle school students were more likely than male and high school students, respectively, to state an intention to change exercise, eating and dental care habits. Females and high school students were more likely to have considered a career in health or science prior to their exhibit visit and, following the exhibit, were more likely to report that this intention had been reinforced. About 6% of those who had not previously considered a career in health or science (n = 225) reported being more likely to do so after viewing the exhibits. In conclusion, high quality experiential learning best created by community-academic partnerships appears to have the ability to stimulate interest and influence intentions to change health behaviors among middle and high school students. PMID:19350372

  3. Educating youth about health and science using a partnership between an academic medical center and community-based science museum.

    PubMed

    Bunce, Arwen E; Griest, Susan; Howarth, Linda C; Beemsterboer, Phyllis; Cameron, William; Carney, Patricia A

    2009-08-01

    Declining student interest and scholastic abilities in the sciences are concerns for the health professions. Additionally, the National Institutes of Health is committed to promoting more research on health behaviors among US youth, where one of the most striking contemporary issues is obesity. This paper reports findings on the impact of a partnership between Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry linked to a 17-week exhibition of BodyWorlds3 and designed to inform rural underserved youth about science and health research. Self-administered survey measures included health knowledge, attitudes, intended health behaviors, and interest in the health professions. Four hundred four surveys (88% of participants) were included in analyses. Ninety percent or more found both the BodyWorlds (n = 404) and OHSU (n = 239) exhibits interesting. Dental care habits showed the highest level of intended behavior change (Dental = 45%, Exercise = 34%, Eating = 30%). Overall, females and middle school students were more likely than male and high school students, respectively, to state an intention to change exercise, eating and dental care habits. Females and high school students were more likely to have considered a career in health or science prior to their exhibit visit and, following the exhibit, were more likely to report that this intention had been reinforced. About 6% of those who had not previously considered a career in health or science (n = 225) reported being more likely to do so after viewing the exhibits. In conclusion, high quality experiential learning best created by community-academic partnerships appears to have the ability to stimulate interest and influence intentions to change health behaviors among middle and high school students.

  4. Academic Achievement of African American Boys: A City-Wide, Community-Based Investigation of Risk and Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fantuzzo, John; LeBoeuf, Whitney; Rouse, Heather; Chen, Chin-Chih

    2012-01-01

    In light of persistent Black-White achievement gaps for boys, this study examined publicly monitored risks believed to be associated with being behind academically for an entire subpopulation of African American boys in a large urban public school district. Also examined were indicators of academic engagement hypothesized to mediate the relations…

  5. Investigating Connections between Text and Discourse Communities: A Cross-Disciplinary Study of Evaluative Discourse Practices in Academic Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motta-Roth, Desiree

    A study of the discourse of book reviews in several academic disciplines examines how interaction of text and context varies across disciplines. Sixty academic book reviews in linguistics, chemistry, and economics were analyzed for rhetorical structure and for the communicative goal of the genre, that of evaluating knowledge production. The book…

  6. Effects of Remediation on Academic Success of First-Time-in-College Female African Americans in a Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jean-Francois, Francisse

    2013-01-01

    For decades, remedial education has been extensively used in higher education and studied as an effective tool to help overcome the challenge of student unpreparedness. While previous studies on remedial education addressed the academic failure of students, this study focuses on academic success of African American females. This causal-comparative…

  7. Mozambique Hit by a Flood Disaster, Again: What Role for the Scientific Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matonse, A. H.; Zucula, P.

    2007-05-01

    natural disasters as a basic dimension of poverty. However, in spite of these advances the situation with the current flood disaster shows the need for a revision of this program to reduce future flood damage in the country. These revisions should include: 1) readjustments in the actual disaster relieve strategies; 2) disaster risk management to minimize the impact of flooding on individuals and communities; and 3) floodplain management in terms of (i) reviewing regulations intending to modify susceptibility to flood damage and disruption and (ii) the studying of alternative solutions for flood control in the affected areas. Interestingly, while the central provinces of Mozambique are facing floods, the southern part of the country is being hit by drought. To deal with this scenario it is important that the resulting floodplain management strategy accounts for regional and transboundary character of targeted water systems and thus be integrated with regional water resources, river development, and management programs. As part of this process collaborative research in the areas of hydroclimatology, impacts, and management of extraordinary floods is needed and should be encouraged within the region and internationally.

  8. High Arctic Coasts At Risk - The Impact of Coastal Hazards on Scientific and Community Infrastructure in Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strzelecki, M. C.; Pawlowski, L.; Jaskolski, M.; Lim, M.; Zagorski, P.; Long, A. J.; Jensen, M.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid climate warming being observed in the Svalbard is leading to an increase in human activities in the coastal zone, leading to an increased need for coastal hazard assessment. Present-day Svalbard coastal landscapes are modified by increased degradation of permafrost accelerated sediment supply from deglaciated catchments, and prolonged periods of open-water conditions and wave activity. Since the second half of 20thcentury there is also an observed increase in the number and intensity of storms entering the Arctic particularly in summer months when coastlines are free of protective ice cover. Despite the potential significance of these coastal hazards on the security of scientific (research bases and devices) and community (ports, airports, roads, buildings) infrastructure on Svalbard, relatively little is known on the present-day rate of Svalbard coastal zone changes and how they might impact the nearshore infrastructure in the future. Here we report the results of a project that focused on rates of coastal zone changes in Svalbard and examined the impact of extreme coastal processes on scientific and community infrastructure. The project applied combination of remote sensing and field-based mapping techniques to characterise coastal changes observed in the surroundings of main research stations in Svalbard in Hornsund (PPS), Petuniabukta (AMUPS) and Bellsund (Calypsobyen) as well as a major towns: Longyearbyen, Piramiden, Barentsburg and Svea. Our results document dramatic changes of Svalbard coastal zone under intervals characterised by a warming climate, retreating local ice masses, a shortened winter sea-ice season and melting permafrost. The study confirmed the growing importance of extreme processes in shaping coasts of Svalbard and the impact of these changes on human infrastructure. Our study proposes a risk assessment for a development and protection of infrastructure along the coasts of Svalbard under scenarios of climate change, sea level rise

  9. Capitalizing on a Natural Experiment Opportunity in Two Low-income Urban Food Desert Communities: Combining Scientific Rigor with Community Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Dubowitz, Tamara; Ncube, Collette; Leuschner, Kristin; Tharp-Gilliam, Shannah

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has highlighted an association between a lack of access to nutritious, affordable food (e.g., through full-service grocery stores [FSG]), poor diet, and increased risk for obesity. In response, there has been growing interest among policymakers in encouraging the siting of supermarkets in “food deserts,” i.e., low-income geographic areas with low access to healthy food options. However, there is limited research to evaluate the impact of such efforts, and most studies to date have been cross-sectional. The Pittsburgh Hill/Homewood Research on Eating, Shopping and Health (PHRESH) is a longitudinal quasi-experimental study of a dramatic change (i.e., a new FSG) in the food landscape of a low-income, predominantly African-American neighborhood. The study is following a stratified random sample of households (n=1372), and all food venues (n=60) in both intervention and control neighborhoods, and the most frequently reported food shopping venues outside both neighborhoods. This paper describes the study design and community-based methodology, which focused simultaneously on the conduct of scientifically rigorous research and the development and maintenance of trust and buy-in from the involved neighborhoods. Early results have begun to define markers for success in creating a natural experiment, including strong community engagement. Baseline data show that the vast majority of residents already shop at a FSG and do not shop at the nearest one. Follow-up data collection will help determine whether and how a new FSG may change behaviors, and may point to the need for additional interventions beyond new full service grocery stores alone. PMID:25829122

  10. The Communication in Science Inquiry Project (CISIP): A Project to Enhance Scientific Literacy through the Creation of Science Classroom Discourse Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Dale R.; Lewis, Elizabeth B.; Purzer, Senay; Watts, Nievita Bueno; Perkins, Gita; Uysal, Sibel; Wong, Sissy; Beard, Rachelle; Lang, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This study reports on the context and impact of the Communication in Science Inquiry Project (CISIP) professional development to promote teachers' and students' scientific literacy through the creation of science classroom discourse communities. The theoretical underpinnings of the professional development model are presented and key professional…

  11. Recruitment Campaigns as a Tool for Social and Cultural Reproduction of Scientific Communities: A Case Study on How Scientists Invite Young People to Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrée, Maria; Hansson, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Young people's interest in pursuing science and science-intense educations has been expressed as a concern in relation to societal, economic and democratic development by various stakeholders (governments, industry and university). From the perspective of the scientific communities, the issues at stake do not necessarily correspond to the…

  12. From Apprentice to Agenda-Setter: Comparative Analysis of the Influence of Contract Conditions on Roles in the Scientific Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Höhle, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Academic career paths in Europe are heterogeneous, and the chances for early career researchers to become a permanent member of the academic profession differ from country to country. In some countries, the employment prospects are very insecure. It is asked whether contract conditions at universities influence the chance of taking over a mature…

  13. The configuration of the Brazilian scientific field.

    PubMed

    Barata, Rita B; Aragão, Erika; de Sousa, Luis E P Fernandes; Santana, Taris M; Barreto, Mauricio L

    2014-03-01

    This article describes the configuration of the scientific field in Brazil, characterizing the scientific communities in every major area of knowledge in terms of installed capacity, ability to train new researchers, and capacity for academic production. Empirical data from several sources of information are used to characterize the different communities. Articulating the theoretical contributions of Pierre Bourdieu, Ludwik Fleck, and Thomas Kuhn, the following types of capital are analyzed for each community: social capital (scientific prestige), symbolic capital (dominant paradigm), political capital (leadership in S & T policy), and economic capital (resources). Scientific prestige is analyzed by taking into account the volume of production, activity index, citations, and other indicators. To characterize symbolic capital, the dominant paradigms that distinguish the natural sciences, the humanities, applied sciences, and technology development are analyzed theoretically. Political capital is measured by presidency in one of the main agencies in the S & T national system, and research resources and fellowships define the economic capital. The article discusses the composition of these different types of capital and their correspondence to structural capacities in various communities with the aim of describing the configuration of the Brazilian scientific field. PMID:24676181

  14. The configuration of the Brazilian scientific field.

    PubMed

    Barata, Rita B; Aragão, Erika; de Sousa, Luis E P Fernandes; Santana, Taris M; Barreto, Mauricio L

    2014-03-01

    This article describes the configuration of the scientific field in Brazil, characterizing the scientific communities in every major area of knowledge in terms of installed capacity, ability to train new researchers, and capacity for academic production. Empirical data from several sources of information are used to characterize the different communities. Articulating the theoretical contributions of Pierre Bourdieu, Ludwik Fleck, and Thomas Kuhn, the following types of capital are analyzed for each community: social capital (scientific prestige), symbolic capital (dominant paradigm), political capital (leadership in S & T policy), and economic capital (resources). Scientific prestige is analyzed by taking into account the volume of production, activity index, citations, and other indicators. To characterize symbolic capital, the dominant paradigms that distinguish the natural sciences, the humanities, applied sciences, and technology development are analyzed theoretically. Political capital is measured by presidency in one of the main agencies in the S & T national system, and research resources and fellowships define the economic capital. The article discusses the composition of these different types of capital and their correspondence to structural capacities in various communities with the aim of describing the configuration of the Brazilian scientific field.

  15. What Drives Academic Data Sharing?

    PubMed Central

    Fecher, Benedikt; Friesike, Sascha; Hebing, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Despite widespread support from policy makers, funding agencies, and scientific journals, academic researchers rarely make their research data available to others. At the same time, data sharing in research is attributed a vast potential for scientific progress. It allows the reproducibility of study results and the reuse of old data for new research questions. Based on a systematic review of 98 scholarly papers and an empirical survey among 603 secondary data users, we develop a conceptual framework that explains the process of data sharing from the primary researcher’s point of view. We show that this process can be divided into six descriptive categories: Data donor, research organization, research community, norms, data infrastructure, and data recipients. Drawing from our findings, we discuss theoretical implications regarding knowledge creation and dissemination as well as research policy measures to foster academic collaboration. We conclude that research data cannot be regarded as knowledge commons, but research policies that better incentivise data sharing are needed to improve the quality of research results and foster scientific progress. PMID:25714752

  16. Outcome-Based Community-Schools Partnerships: The Impact of the After-School Programs on Non-Academic and Academic Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Marco A.

    Afterschool programs enable inner city public schools to plan, implement, or expand projects that benefit the educational, health, social services, cultural, and recreational needs of the community. This study investigated the impact of afterschool programs on various non-cognitive and cognitive measures (e.g., attendance, suspensions, and grade…

  17. Reaching for Health Equity and Social Justice in Baltimore: The Evolution of an Academic-Community Partnership and Conceptual Framework to Address Hypertension Disparities.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Lisa A; Purnell, Tanjala S; Ibe, Chidinma A; Halbert, Jennifer P; Bone, Lee R; Carson, Kathryn A; Hickman, Debra; Simmons, Michelle; Vachon, Ann; Robb, Inez; Martin-Daniels, Michelle; Dietz, Katherine B; Golden, Sherita Hill; Crews, Deidra C; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Marsteller, Jill A; Boulware, L Ebony; Miller, Edgar R Iii; Levine, David M

    2016-07-21

    Cardiovascular health disparities persist despite decades of recognition and the availability of evidence-based clinical and public health interventions. Racial and ethnic minorities and adults in urban and low-income communities are high-risk groups for uncontrolled hypertension (HTN), a major contributor to cardiovascular health disparities, in part due to inequitable social structures and economic systems that negatively impact daily environments and risk behaviors. This commentary presents the Johns Hopkins Center to Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities as a case study for highlighting the evolution of an academic-community partnership to overcome HTN disparities. Key elements of the iterative development process of a Community Advisory Board (CAB) are summarized, and major CAB activities and engagement with the Baltimore community are highlighted. Using a conceptual framework adapted from O'Mara-Eves and colleagues, the authors discuss how different population groups and needs, motivations, types and intensity of community participation, contextual factors, and actions have shaped the Center's approach to stakeholder engagement in research and community outreach efforts to achieve health equity.

  18. Reaching for Health Equity and Social Justice in Baltimore: The Evolution of an Academic-Community Partnership and Conceptual Framework to Address Hypertension Disparities.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Lisa A; Purnell, Tanjala S; Ibe, Chidinma A; Halbert, Jennifer P; Bone, Lee R; Carson, Kathryn A; Hickman, Debra; Simmons, Michelle; Vachon, Ann; Robb, Inez; Martin-Daniels, Michelle; Dietz, Katherine B; Golden, Sherita Hill; Crews, Deidra C; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Marsteller, Jill A; Boulware, L Ebony; Miller, Edgar R Iii; Levine, David M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular health disparities persist despite decades of recognition and the availability of evidence-based clinical and public health interventions. Racial and ethnic minorities and adults in urban and low-income communities are high-risk groups for uncontrolled hypertension (HTN), a major contributor to cardiovascular health disparities, in part due to inequitable social structures and economic systems that negatively impact daily environments and risk behaviors. This commentary presents the Johns Hopkins Center to Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities as a case study for highlighting the evolution of an academic-community partnership to overcome HTN disparities. Key elements of the iterative development process of a Community Advisory Board (CAB) are summarized, and major CAB activities and engagement with the Baltimore community are highlighted. Using a conceptual framework adapted from O'Mara-Eves and colleagues, the authors discuss how different population groups and needs, motivations, types and intensity of community participation, contextual factors, and actions have shaped the Center's approach to stakeholder engagement in research and community outreach efforts to achieve health equity. PMID:27440977

  19. External Community Review Committee:

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Maureen A.; Kaufman, Nancy J.; Dearlove, Andrea J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Major gaps exist between what we know and what we do in clinical practice and community health programs and narrowing this gap will require substantive partnerships between academic researchers and the communities they serve. Objectives: We describe a research pilot award program that makes a unique commitment to community engagement through the addition of an External Community Review Committee to the typical research review process that gives external stakeholders decision-making power over research funding. Methods: Whereas engaging community reviewers in discussion and rating of research proposals is not novel, the ICTR ECRC review process is distinct in that it is subsequent to peer review and uses different criteria and methodology. This method of engagement allows for the community review panel to re-rank scientifically meritorious proposals—such that proposals funded do not necessarily follow the rank order from scientific peer review. The approach taken by UW ICTR differs from those discussed in the literature that present a model of community-academic co-review. Results: This article provides guidance for others interested in this model of community engagement and reviews insights gained during the evolution of this strategy; including how we addressed conflict, how the committee was able to change the pilot award program over time, and individual roles that were crucial to the success of this approach. Conclusions: The advantages of this approach include success through traditional academic metrics while achieving an innovative shared-power mechanism for community engagement which we believe is critical for narrowing the gap between knowledge and practice.

  20. Physics education in the Greek community schools of Istanbul (19th century). Scientific instruments and experiments in electrostatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazos, Panagiotis; Vlahakis, George N.

    2016-03-01

    The Greek schools operating in Istanbul date back to the 19th century. These schools have noteworthy collections of old scientific instruments that were used in teaching experimental physics. Amongst them, more outstanding are the scientific instruments used in demonstrating electrostatics. This paper briefly presents the equipment, focuses on exceptional scientific instruments and attempts to illuminate certain aspects in teaching the natural sciences.

  1. Climate Feedback: Bringing the Scientific Community to Provide Direct Feedback on the Credibility of Climate Media Coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, E. M.; Matlock, T.; Westerling, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    While most scientists recognize climate change as a major societal and environmental issue, social and political will to tackle the problem is still lacking. One of the biggest obstacles is inaccurate reporting or even outright misinformation in climate change coverage that result in the confusion of the general public on the issue.In today's era of instant access to information, what we read online usually falls outside our field of expertise and it is a real challenge to evaluate what is credible. The emerging technology of web annotation could be a game changer as it allows knowledgeable individuals to attach notes to any piece of text of a webpage and to share them with readers who will be able to see the annotations in-context -like comments on a pdf.Here we present the Climate Feedback initiative that is bringing together a community of climate scientists who collectively evaluate the scientific accuracy of influential climate change media coverage. Scientists annotate articles sentence by sentence and assess whether they are consistent with scientific knowledge allowing readers to see where and why the coverage is -or is not- based on science. Scientists also summarize the essence of their critical commentary in the form of a simple article-level overall credibility rating that quickly informs readers about the credibility of the entire piece.Web-annotation allows readers to 'hear' directly from the experts and to sense the consensus in a personal way as one can literaly see how many scientists agree with a given statement. It also allows a broad population of scientists to interact with the media, notably early career scientists.In this talk, we will present results on the impacts annotations have on readers -regarding their evaluation of the trustworthiness of the information they read- and on journalists -regarding their reception of scientists comments.Several dozen scientists have contributed to this effort to date and the system offers potential to

  2. Formative research on the primo vascular system and acceptance by the korean scientific community: the gap between creative basic science and practical convergence technology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon Gi

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to trace the formative process of primo vascular system (PVS) research over the past decade and to describe the characteristics of the Korean scientific community. By publishing approximately 30 papers in journals ranking in the Science Citation Index (Expanded), the PVS research team actively convinced domestic and international scientists of the anatomical existence of the PVS and its possible application to Korean and Western medicine. In addition, by sharing the PVS observation technique, the team promoted the dissemination and further pursuit of the research. In 2012, however, PVS researchers performed smaller scale research without advancing to a higher level as compared to the early days. The main reasons were found to be the Korean Research and Development policy of supporting creative, small-scale basic research and applied research of Western scientific fields that promised potentially greater success on an extensive scale; the indifference concerning, and the disbelief in, the existence of a new circulatory system were shown by the Western medical community. In addition, the Oriental medical community was apathetic about working with the PVS team. Professors Kwang-Sup Soh and Byung-Cheon Lee were the prime movers of PVS research under difficult conditions. Spurred by their belief in the existence and significance of the PVS, they continued with their research despite insufficient experimental data. The Korean scientific community is not ready to promote the Korea-oriented creative field of the PVS team.

  3. Formative research on the primo vascular system and acceptance by the korean scientific community: the gap between creative basic science and practical convergence technology.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoon Gi

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to trace the formative process of primo vascular system (PVS) research over the past decade and to describe the characteristics of the Korean scientific community. By publishing approximately 30 papers in journals ranking in the Science Citation Index (Expanded), the PVS research team actively convinced domestic and international scientists of the anatomical existence of the PVS and its possible application to Korean and Western medicine. In addition, by sharing the PVS observation technique, the team promoted the dissemination and further pursuit of the research. In 2012, however, PVS researchers performed smaller scale research without advancing to a higher level as compared to the early days. The main reasons were found to be the Korean Research and Development policy of supporting creative, small-scale basic research and applied research of Western scientific fields that promised potentially greater success on an extensive scale; the indifference concerning, and the disbelief in, the existence of a new circulatory system were shown by the Western medical community. In addition, the Oriental medical community was apathetic about working with the PVS team. Professors Kwang-Sup Soh and Byung-Cheon Lee were the prime movers of PVS research under difficult conditions. Spurred by their belief in the existence and significance of the PVS, they continued with their research despite insufficient experimental data. The Korean scientific community is not ready to promote the Korea-oriented creative field of the PVS team. PMID:24290796

  4. Assessment of Current Knowledge about the Effectiveness of School Desegregation Strategies. Volume V. A Review of the Empirical Research on Desegregation: Community Response, Race Relations, Academic Achievement and Resegregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossell, Christine; And Others

    This literature review considers the impact of desegregation on community response, racial relations, academic achievement and resegregation. Chapter one examines the effectiveness of desegregation plans in reducing racial isolation and white flight, and in promoting a positive community response. Desegregation school practices and effects on…

  5. Facility Focus: Academic Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Humanities Building at Rice University, the Health Sciences Center at Lake Sumter Community College, and the Norman S. and Lida M. Smith Academic Technology Center at Bentley College as examples of the importance of academic buildings in helping define campus image. Includes photographs. (EV)

  6. Methods for open innovation on a genome-design platform associating scientific, commercial, and educational communities in synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Tetsuro

    2011-01-01

    Synthetic biology requires both engineering efficiency and compliance with safety guidelines and ethics. Focusing on the rational construction of biological systems based on engineering principles, synthetic biology depends on a genome-design platform to explore the combinations of multiple biological components or BIO bricks for quickly producing innovative devices. This chapter explains the differences among various platform models and details a methodology for promoting open innovation within the scope of the statutory exemption of patent laws. The detailed platform adopts a centralized evaluation model (CEM), computer-aided design (CAD) bricks, and a freemium model. It is also important for the platform to support the legal aspects of copyrights as well as patent and safety guidelines because intellectual work including DNA sequences designed rationally by human intelligence is basically copyrightable. An informational platform with high traceability, transparency, auditability, and security is required for copyright proof, safety compliance, and incentive management for open innovation in synthetic biology. GenoCon, which we have organized and explained here, is a competition-styled, open-innovation method involving worldwide participants from scientific, commercial, and educational communities that aims to improve the designs of genomic sequences that confer a desired function on an organism. Using only a Web browser, a participating contributor proposes a design expressed with CAD bricks that generate a relevant DNA sequence, which is then experimentally and intensively evaluated by the GenoCon organizers. The CAD bricks that comprise programs and databases as a Semantic Web are developed, executed, shared, reused, and well stocked on the secure Semantic Web platform called the Scientists' Networking System or SciNetS/SciNeS, based on which a CEM research center for synthetic biology and open innovation should be established.

  7. Academic Medical Centers Forming Accountable Care Organizations and Partnering With Community Providers: The Experience of the Johns Hopkins Medicine Alliance for Patients.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Ishii, Lisa; Schulz, John; Poffenroth, Matt

    2016-03-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs)--which include teaching hospital(s) and additional care delivery entities--that form accountable care organizations (ACOs) must decide whether to partner with other provider entities, such as community practices. Indeed, 67% (33/49) of AMC ACOs through the Medicare Shared Savings Program through 2014 are believed to include an outside community practice. There are opportunities for both the AMC and the community partners in pursuing such relationships, including possible alignment around shared goals and adding ACO beneficiaries. To create the Johns Hopkins Medicine Alliance for Patients (JMAP), in January 2014, Johns Hopkins Medicine chose to partner with two community primary care groups and one cardiology practice to support clinical integration while adding approximately 60 providers and 5,000 Medicare beneficiaries. The principal initial interventions within JMAP included care coordination for high-risk beneficiaries and later, in 2014, generating dashboards of ACO quality measures to facilitate quality improvement and early efforts at incorporating clinical pathways and Choosing Wisely recommendations. Additional interventions began in 2015.The principal initial challenges JMAP faced were data integration, generation of quality measure reports among disparate electronic medical records, receiving and then analyzing claims data, and seeking to achieve provider engagement; all these affected timely deployment of the early interventions. JMAP also created three regional advisory councils as a forum promoting engagement of local leadership. Network strategies among AMCs, including adding community practices in a nonemployment model, will continue to require thoughtful strategic planning and a keen understanding of local context. PMID:26535867

  8. Academic Medical Centers Forming Accountable Care Organizations and Partnering With Community Providers: The Experience of the Johns Hopkins Medicine Alliance for Patients.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Ishii, Lisa; Schulz, John; Poffenroth, Matt

    2016-03-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs)--which include teaching hospital(s) and additional care delivery entities--that form accountable care organizations (ACOs) must decide whether to partner with other provider entities, such as community practices. Indeed, 67% (33/49) of AMC ACOs through the Medicare Shared Savings Program through 2014 are believed to include an outside community practice. There are opportunities for both the AMC and the community partners in pursuing such relationships, including possible alignment around shared goals and adding ACO beneficiaries. To create the Johns Hopkins Medicine Alliance for Patients (JMAP), in January 2014, Johns Hopkins Medicine chose to partner with two community primary care groups and one cardiology practice to support clinical integration while adding approximately 60 providers and 5,000 Medicare beneficiaries. The principal initial interventions within JMAP included care coordination for high-risk beneficiaries and later, in 2014, generating dashboards of ACO quality measures to facilitate quality improvement and early efforts at incorporating clinical pathways and Choosing Wisely recommendations. Additional interventions began in 2015.The principal initial challenges JMAP faced were data integration, generation of quality measure reports among disparate electronic medical records, receiving and then analyzing claims data, and seeking to achieve provider engagement; all these affected timely deployment of the early interventions. JMAP also created three regional advisory councils as a forum promoting engagement of local leadership. Network strategies among AMCs, including adding community practices in a nonemployment model, will continue to require thoughtful strategic planning and a keen understanding of local context.

  9. Public health, academic medicine, and the alcohol industry's corporate social responsibility activities.

    PubMed

    Babor, Thomas F; Robaina, Katherine

    2013-02-01

    We explored the emerging relationships among the alcohol industry, academic medicine, and the public health community in the context of public health theory dealing with corporate social responsibility. We reviewed sponsorship of scientific research, efforts to influence public perceptions of research, dissemination of scientific information, and industry-funded policy initiatives. To the extent that the scientific evidence supports the reduction of alcohol consumption through regulatory and legal measures, the academic community has come into increasing conflict with the views of the alcohol industry. We concluded that the alcohol industry has intensified its scientific and policy-related activities under the general framework of corporate social responsibility initiatives, most of which can be described as instrumental to the industry's economic interests.

  10. Public Health, Academic Medicine, and the Alcohol Industry’s Corporate Social Responsibility Activities

    PubMed Central

    Robaina, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    We explored the emerging relationships among the alcohol industry, academic medicine, and the public health community in the context of public health theory dealing with corporate social responsibility. We reviewed sponsorship of scientific research, efforts to influence public perceptions of research, dissemination of scientific information, and industry-funded policy initiatives. To the extent that the scientific evidence supports the reduction of alcohol consumption through regulatory and legal measures, the academic community has come into increasing conflict with the views of the alcohol industry. We concluded that the alcohol industry has intensified its scientific and policy-related activities under the general framework of corporate social responsibility initiatives, most of which can be described as instrumental to the industry’s economic interests. PMID:23237151

  11. The Cultivation of Esteem and Retrieval of Scientific Knowledge in Physician Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menchik, Daniel A.; Meltzer, David O.

    2010-01-01

    This article evaluates how physicians draw upon scientific and other forms of knowledge in different professional communities. We argue that because physicians will draw upon clinical research findings to improve their reputation with colleagues, and because the terms for accruing esteem in an academic hospital may differ depending on the dominant…

  12. Between a Ball and a Harsh Place: A Study of Black Male Community College Student-Athletes and Academic Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, David, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study examined to what extent differences exist in pre-college characteristics and academic performance between Black male student-athletes and their student-athlete peers. Method: Data provided by the Florida Department of Education's PK-20 Education Data Warehouse (EDW) were analyzed as a function of group membership (gender and…

  13. Closing the Academic Achievement Gap on the California High School Exit Exam (CAHSEE) through Professional Learning Communities (PLC) Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buenrostro, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of importance that DuFour's nine characteristics of highly effective schools have on closing the academic achievement gap on the California High School Exit Exam, as perceived by high school principals. The study also examined the strategies believed to be most important in…

  14. The Nelson-Denny Reading Test as a Predictor of Academic Success in Selected Classes in a Specific Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gudan, Sirkka

    A review of the literature indicates that the Nelson-Denny Reading Test (NDRT) may be a viable instrument for screening students and predicting their academic success in particular circumstances. In 1981, a study was conducted at Schoolcraft College to determine the extent of the relationship between the reading abilities of entering students and…

  15. Reading and Writing with a Public Purpose: Fostering Middle School Students' Academic and Critical Community Literacies through Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirra, Nicole; Honoroff, Benjamin; Elgendy, Suzanne; Pietrzak, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Middle school is a crucial transition period for adolescents; in addition to beginning to grapple with the academic literacy demands of college and career readiness, they are working to find their place in public life and developing opinions about civic issues. This article presents debate as a literacy practice that is uniquely suited to helping…

  16. Household Density and Academic Standing among Community College Students: The Effects of Time Orientation and Spatial Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campagna, Grace

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to develop a multifactorial model tracing paths from housing affordances to academic outcomes in higher education. The study sought to connect two areas of psychological research: on one side, the adverse effects of environmental stressors and inadequate self-regulation upon life course prospects and, on the other, the…

  17. Frameworks for Understanding the Nature of Interactions, Networking, and Community in a Social Networking Site for Academic Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conole, Grainne; Galley, Rebecca; Culver, Juliette

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a new social networking site, Cloudworks, which has been developed to enable discussion and sharing of learning and teaching ideas/designs and to promote reflective academic practice. The site aims to foster new forms of social and participatory practices (peer critiquing, sharing, user-generated content, aggregation, and…

  18. The Effect of Remedial Education Programs on Academic Achievement and Persistence at the Two-Year Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batzer, Lyn Ann

    This study was designed to measure the performance of academically underprepared students who complete remediation, compared with underprepared students who do not complete remediation. The study was conducted on 766 full-time students at Ivy Tech State College, a two-year technical institution in Indiana. All of the students included were…

  19. Lessons in Citizenship: Using Collaboration in the Classroom to Build Community, Foster Academic Integrity, and Model Civic Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    The rise in academic integrity violations and the connection between dishonest behavior in college and civic behavior after graduation signal a call to educators that more should be done to prepare students to be ethical, responsible citizens. Through collaboration, particularly on written projects for their peers, students can feel more a part of…

  20. Widening the Academic Conversation to Include Support Staff: Wabash College Extends a Common Classroom Experience to Its Entire Campus Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eubanks, Philip W.; Lynch, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    College support staff members often have an important, if sometimes unrecognized, impact on students' lives. Regardless of their job responsibilities, these individuals generally care deeply about the academic environment and the institution in general. When these individuals demonstrate to others how much they care, they are helping to build a…