Science.gov

Sample records for academic staff members

  1. An Examination of the Factors That Shape the Engagement of Faculty Members and Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, Crystal G.; Omae, Hilda Nyougo

    2011-01-01

    In this article we discuss some of the factors that influence how faculty members and academic staff at Michigan State University connect their scholarly activities to external audiences. Logistic regression was used to analyze data collected using an institutional-wide survey. Findings reveal that appointment type, discipline, and demographic…

  2. Techniques of Learning: Self-Modification of Academic Behavior--Manual for Staff Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handfield, Victoria; And Others

    The "Manual for Staff Members" describes the Techniques of Learning Program, a part of the Peer Environmental Analysts, Counselors, Educators (PEACE) Program at American University. PEACE is a large, student-operated peer counseling program that consists of six services and related academic courses. Techniques of Learning is a program that teaches…

  3. College Advisor, Student, and Senior Staff Member Perceptions of Academic Advising Modalities and Types: A Community College Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marvin, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Institutions of higher learning, their senior staff members, and advisors are always striving to create advising modalities and utilize matching advising types that work best for the individual student. This qualitative single-case study was conducted to examine perceptions of the students, advisors, and senior staff members of the advising…

  4. College Advisor, Student, and Senior Staff Member Perceptions of Academic Advising Modalities and Types: A Community College Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marvin, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Institutions of higher learning, their senior staff members, and advisors are always striving to create advising modalities and utilize matching advising types that work best for the individual student. This qualitative single-case study was conducted to examine perceptions of the students, advisors, and senior staff members of the advising…

  5. Towards mobile staff members management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encheva, Sylvia

    2017-07-01

    Todays project management requires a number of abilities which involve finding quick solutions to shortage of staff members with possession of specific qualities. When persons with team responsibilities are under pressure or due to various circumstances are unable to perform exhaustive search in databases, an interactive visualization tool can come in quite handy in finding good solutions unforeseen occurrences. In particular we propose application of selected graphs for facilitating mobile human resource management.

  6. Academic Staff Work Loads in a University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Neville H.

    1981-01-01

    The workloads of 1,032 members of the full-time teaching staff at the University of Queensland (Australia) are analyzed and compared by rank and by academic field. The study suggests that the workloads, although different in nature, are comparable in magnitude. (Author/MLF)

  7. Are Students Customers? Perceptions of Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomas, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the notion of the student as a customer in a university, focusing on the perceptions of academic staff. Changes in the higher education sector in recent years have significantly reduced the differences between universities and other types of organisations and it has been argued that students have become "consumers" of…

  8. The Impact of Adopting a Mainstreamed Model of Service Provision: The Experiences of University Staff Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harryba, Sophia A.; Knight, Shirlee-ann

    2013-01-01

    A qualitative case study examined the challenges of service provision and utilization regarding international students at an Australian university. Using a Social Constructivist Grounded Theory methodology, 73 participants were interviewed, including 38 staff members (16 academic, 22 non-academic), 25 international students, and 10 domestic…

  9. Difficulty and Ability: Staff Member Perceptions of Seasonal Staff Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Gwynn M.; Bixler, Robert D. Switzer, Deborah M.; Hurtes, Karen P.

    New and returning camp staff were surveyed about the difficulty of camp-specific skills and knowledge and their own abilities. A summer-camp training inventory of 24 camp-specific skills and knowledge statements was administered to a total of 702 new and returning staff at eight camps on the first and last day of pre-season training sessions and…

  10. Academic Staff Disposition to Promotion Criteria in Nigerian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archibong, Ijeoma A.; Effiom, David O.; Omoike, Don; Edet, Aniefiok O.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at determining academic staff satisfaction with promotion criteria and what, in their view, should be included in the promotion criteria. A researcher-designed questionnaire was utilized for data collection from a sample size of 349 academic staff. Findings show that the majority of the academic staff were dissatisfied with the…

  11. Academic Staff Disposition to Promotion Criteria in Nigerian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archibong, Ijeoma A.; Effiom, David O.; Omoike, Don; Edet, Aniefiok O.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at determining academic staff satisfaction with promotion criteria and what, in their view, should be included in the promotion criteria. A researcher-designed questionnaire was utilized for data collection from a sample size of 349 academic staff. Findings show that the majority of the academic staff were dissatisfied with the…

  12. Pulled in Many Directions: Tensions and Complexity for Academic Staff Responding to International Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skyrme, Gillian; McGee, Alyson

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an interview-based study of the academic practices of staff members in a New Zealand university in response to international students in their classes and under their supervision. International students enter academic cultures which are inevitably different from those which have provided their academic preparation.…

  13. Increasing Day Care Staff Members' Interactions during Caregiving Routines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venn, Martha L.; Wolery, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Four paraprofessional staff members in a mainstreamed day care program were trained to engage in positive interactive behaviors during diaper changing. Results indicated that staff increased frequency of game playing and other interactive behaviors during diapering, but increases were not generalized to feeding routines. (Author/JDD)

  14. Engaging and Empowering Academic Staff to Promote Service-Learning Curriculum in Research-Intensive Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Yahui

    2016-01-01

    Much of the literature on service-learning discusses issues related to faculty, students, and community partners. However, there is little research on issues related to academic staff. In this project, through a series of meetings and workshops, change lab methodology was used to analyze the barriers to staff members' involvement in…

  15. Female Staff Members in the Fabrication Shop

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1944-06-21

    The loss of male NACA employees to the war effort and the military’s increased demand for expedited aeronautical research results resulted in a sharp demand for increased staffing in the early 1940s. The Aircraft Engine Research Laboratory (AERL) undertook an extensive recruiting effort to remedy the situation. Current employees were asked to bring in friends and family members, including women. The number of women employed at the AERL nearly doubled to 412 between 1943 and 1944. In May 1944 Director Raymond Sharp initiated a program to train women as machine operators, electricians, instrumentation engineers, and other technical positions. The move coincided with the lab’s implementation of a third shift to meet the military’s demands for improved aircraft performance. There was also a modest, but important, number of female engineers and chemists, as well as large group employed in more traditional positions such as data analysts, editors, and clerks. The integration of women in the research process was critical. Researchers developed a test and submitted plans to the Drafting Section to be converted into blueprints. In some instances the Instrumentation Shop was asked to create instruments for the test. During the test, computers gathered and analyzed the data. The researcher then wrote the report which was reviewed by the Editorial Department and printed in the Duplication Unit. All of these tasks were generally performed by female employees.

  16. Understanding Resistance: An Analysis of Discourses in Academic Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Using social realist theory and critical discourse analysis, this article examines a number of discourses which construct academic staff attitudes to teaching and learning in their disciplines. It seeks to explain academics' resistance to engaging in activities aimed at professionalising academic practice. The research described in the article…

  17. Early Career Academic Staff Support: Evaluating Mentoring Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, J. Denard; Lunsford, Laura Gail; Rodrigues, Helena A.

    2015-01-01

    Which academics benefit from participation in formal mentoring programmes? This study examined the needs and mentoring networks of new academics with evaluative data from a pilot mentoring programme. Themes from these data point towards re-envisioning initiatives for academic staff development. First, an examination of the expansion of mentoring…

  18. Understanding Resistance: An Analysis of Discourses in Academic Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Using social realist theory and critical discourse analysis, this article examines a number of discourses which construct academic staff attitudes to teaching and learning in their disciplines. It seeks to explain academics' resistance to engaging in activities aimed at professionalising academic practice. The research described in the article…

  19. Early Career Academic Staff Support: Evaluating Mentoring Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, J. Denard; Lunsford, Laura Gail; Rodrigues, Helena A.

    2015-01-01

    Which academics benefit from participation in formal mentoring programmes? This study examined the needs and mentoring networks of new academics with evaluative data from a pilot mentoring programme. Themes from these data point towards re-envisioning initiatives for academic staff development. First, an examination of the expansion of mentoring…

  20. Ancillary Staff Members' Mainstreaming Recommendations for Students with Mild Exceptionalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Richard L.; Myles, Brenda Smith

    1991-01-01

    Examined mainstreaming modifications judged to be important by ancillary professionals in recommending mainstreaming of students with mild exceptionalities. Data revealed that no significant differences were noted in number of selected modifications as function of diagnostic category. Ancillary staff members indicated, however, that substantial…

  1. Improving staff member satisfaction and productivity through technology.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Noreen

    2004-09-01

    In 2000, the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, installed a patient flow management system. Staff members embraced the technology, finding that it improved communication and quality of patient care, and hospital administrators noticed increased productivity and revenue after implementing the system. This article offers an overview of the system's benefits as well as recommendations for successful technology implementation.

  2. Role of Department Heads in Academic Development: A Leader-Member Exchange and Organizational Resource Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Andre Leonard; du Plessis, Yvonne; Nkomo, Stella

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the role of leadership in the development of academic talent in higher education from a social exchange and organizational support perspective. Drawing from a sample of academic staff at a large South African university, the study investigates the extent to which a quality leader-member exchange relationship versus a formal…

  3. Role of Department Heads in Academic Development: A Leader-Member Exchange and Organizational Resource Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horne, Andre Leonard; du Plessis, Yvonne; Nkomo, Stella

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the role of leadership in the development of academic talent in higher education from a social exchange and organizational support perspective. Drawing from a sample of academic staff at a large South African university, the study investigates the extent to which a quality leader-member exchange relationship versus a formal…

  4. Role of Academic Managers in Workload and Performance Management of Academic Staff: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    This small-scale case study focused on academic managers to explore the ways in which they control the workload of academic staff and the extent to which they use the workload model in performance management of academic staff. The links that exist between the workload and performance management were explored to confirm or refute the conceptual…

  5. Role of Academic Managers in Workload and Performance Management of Academic Staff: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    This small-scale case study focused on academic managers to explore the ways in which they control the workload of academic staff and the extent to which they use the workload model in performance management of academic staff. The links that exist between the workload and performance management were explored to confirm or refute the conceptual…

  6. Upgrading a ColdFusion-Based Academic Medical Library Staff Intranet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Hart, Robert; Ingrassia, Barbara; Mayotte, Kerry; Palmer, Lisa A.; Powell, Julia

    2010-01-01

    This article details the process of upgrading and expanding an existing academic medical library intranet to include a wiki, blog, discussion forum, and photo collection manager. The first version of the library's intranet from early 2002 was powered by ColdFusion software and existed primarily to allow staff members to author and store minutes of…

  7. Upgrading a ColdFusion-Based Academic Medical Library Staff Intranet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Hart, Robert; Ingrassia, Barbara; Mayotte, Kerry; Palmer, Lisa A.; Powell, Julia

    2010-01-01

    This article details the process of upgrading and expanding an existing academic medical library intranet to include a wiki, blog, discussion forum, and photo collection manager. The first version of the library's intranet from early 2002 was powered by ColdFusion software and existed primarily to allow staff members to author and store minutes of…

  8. Day Jobs/Nightwork: Academic Staff Studying towards Higher Degrees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winberg, C.; Adams, A.; Esbach, J.; Groenewald, W.; Lakay, D.; Muzondo, I.; Randall, K.; Seane, G.; Siyepu, S.; Veeran, P.

    2010-01-01

    Universities of Technology (UTs) offer career-focused education in a wide variety of disciplines and fields. Traditionally, UTs recruited academic staff with relevant workplace experience, rather than academic qualifications. The result of this strategy was, while many lecturers possessed professional qualifications in their field, they did not…

  9. Developing the Digital Literacies of Academic Staff: An Institutional Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newland, Barbara; Handley, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Institutional engagement with digital literacies at the University of Brighton has been promoted through the creation of a Digital Literacies Framework (DLF) aimed at academic staff. The DLF consists of 38 literacies divided into four categories that align to the following key areas of academic work: (1) Learning and teaching; (2) Research; (3)…

  10. The Transition from Clinical Staff Member to Manager.

    PubMed

    Leicher, Brian; Collins, Sandra K

    2016-01-01

    Internally promoting clinical staff members into management positions is often a wise organizational strategy. Although there are advantages in doing such, there are also a number of challenges. Newly appointed managers may need introductory management level training given technical expertise does not always equate to management expertise. Devoting time to teaching even the most basic management skills will assure a more seamless role transition for the promoted employee. Upper administration also needs to be aware that possessing clinical expertise does not always serve as a precursor to promotion. Not every clinical employee, regardless of how proficient they are in their technical roles, seeks to be a manager.

  11. Staff vs. Books in Academic Library Budgets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacob, Emerson; Salinger, Florence

    1978-01-01

    Trends between the personnel-materials budget ratios were analyzed for a group of academic libraries with 400,000 volumes or more in 1967 and 1975. There has been a continuous increase in the percentage that libraries allocate for personnel, and automation has not reduced the outlay for salaries and wages. (Author/JPF)

  12. Impact of Management Style on Performance Indicators of Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irtwange, S. V.; Orsaah, S.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the impact of management style on academic staff performance with University of Agriculture, Makurdi as a case study. The management style of the vice chancellor of the University of Agriculture, Makurdi between the periods, September 3, 1996 to September 3, 2001 was determined using the Ohio State…

  13. Excellence in University Academic Staff Evaluation: A Problematic Reality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Pat; O'Hagan, Clare

    2016-01-01

    This article is concerned with the macro-cultural ideal or institutional myth of excellence as defined and used in the evaluation of academic staff as part of an institutional logic. Such logics "prescribe what constitutes legitimate behaviour and provide taken-for-granted conceptions of what goals are appropriate and what means are…

  14. Talent Wars: The International Market for Academic Staff. Policy Briefing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Universities UK, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This policy briefing aims to raise awareness and understanding among policy-makers and UK higher institutions of the international dimensions of academic staff recruitment and the factors that may influence it. This briefing summarises recent research and considers its implications for institutions and for national policies. Annex A contains:…

  15. Impact of Management Style on Performance Indicators of Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irtwange, S. V.; Orsaah, S.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the impact of management style on academic staff performance with University of Agriculture, Makurdi as a case study. The management style of the vice chancellor of the University of Agriculture, Makurdi between the periods, September 3, 1996 to September 3, 2001 was determined using the Ohio State…

  16. Job Satisfaction among Support Staff in Twelve Ohio Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmer, Coleen; East, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Discusses previous job satisfaction research and reports a study of job satisfaction among Ohio academic library support staff using Paul E. Spector's Job Satisfaction Survey. The 434 responses indicate general satisfaction, with greater satisfaction among females, among those who work in public services, have less experience, or who work…

  17. Burnout of Academic Staff in South African Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothmann, S.; Barkhuizen, N.

    2008-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to assess the psychometric properties of an adapted version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-GS) for academic staff in South African higher education institutions and to investigate differences between the burnout levels of different demographic groups. A survey design was used, with stratified…

  18. Supervisory Rotation: Impact on an Academic Library Reference Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perdue, Bob; Piotrowski, Chris

    1986-01-01

    Presents results of managerial rotation program (librarians take turns on two-year cycle serving as department head) in medium-sized academic library reference department. An assessment of both the advantages and disadvantages of such a plan examines impact of this innovative and collegial management technique on staff, library, and patrons. (7…

  19. Job Satisfaction among Support Staff in Twelve Ohio Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmer, Coleen; East, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Discusses previous job satisfaction research and reports a study of job satisfaction among Ohio academic library support staff using Paul E. Spector's Job Satisfaction Survey. The 434 responses indicate general satisfaction, with greater satisfaction among females, among those who work in public services, have less experience, or who work…

  20. Attitude of Academic Staff in Nigerian Tertiary Educational Institutions to Student Evaluation of Instruction (SEI): A Case Study of Cross River State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaka, Idaka I.; Joshua, Monday T.

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the attitude of academic staff in Nigerian tertiary educational institutions to student evaluation of instruction (SEI) and to find out the variable factors that influenced the expressed attitude of members of the academic staff, using Cross River State University as a case study. The study was a survey and so a…

  1. Attitude of Academic Staff in Nigerian Tertiary Educational Institutions to Student Evaluation of Instruction (SEI): A Case Study of Cross River State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaka, Idaka I.; Joshua, Monday T.

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to assess the attitude of academic staff in Nigerian tertiary educational institutions to student evaluation of instruction (SEI) and to find out the variable factors that influenced the expressed attitude of members of the academic staff, using Cross River State University as a case study. The study was a survey and so a…

  2. Faculty Member Perceptions of Academic Leadership Styles at Private Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gidman, Lori Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    The leadership style of academic leaders was studied through the eyes of faculty members. This empirical study looked at faculty perceptions of academic leadership with the use of a numerical survey as the basis for observation. Faculty members at six private liberal arts institutions completed the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) in…

  3. Faculty Member Perceptions of Academic Leadership Styles at Private Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gidman, Lori Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    The leadership style of academic leaders was studied through the eyes of faculty members. This empirical study looked at faculty perceptions of academic leadership with the use of a numerical survey as the basis for observation. Faculty members at six private liberal arts institutions completed the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) in…

  4. The Life Satisfaction of Academic and Non-Academic Staff in a Malaysian Higher Education Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jusoff, Kamaruzaman; Hussein, Zaliha Hj.; SoonYew, Ju; Din, Mohd Salleh Hj.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted in Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM) Penang, Malaysia in April 2005. The objectives of the study were to examine the life satisfaction of the academic and non-academic staff. Findings revealed that some demographic variables had significant difference in life satisfaction. This study could provide meaningful information to…

  5. Faculty Members' Views on Academic Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odabasi, Hatice Ferhan; Kurt, Adile Askim; Kabakçi Yurdakul, Isil; Firat, Mehmet; Izmirli, Serkan; Çankaya, Serkan; Misirli, Zeynel Abidin

    2012-01-01

    Problem Statement: Providing an integrated viewpoint to academic activities related to instruction, research, community service, and administration and determining academicians' views on these academic activities will contribute to the development and improvement of the profession of academicians. Purpose of Study: The purpose of this study is to…

  6. An Analysis of a District-Led Leadership Seminar on the Dispositions of Certified Staff Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupprecht, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not a district-led, grow-your-own leadership seminar had a significant impact on the dispositions of its members compared to staff members who did not participate in the program. The participants involved (N = 20) included a naturally formed group of certified staff members (n = 10) who…

  7. An Analysis of a District-Led Leadership Seminar on the Dispositions of Certified Staff Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupprecht, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not a district-led, grow-your-own leadership seminar had a significant impact on the dispositions of its members compared to staff members who did not participate in the program. The participants involved (N = 20) included a naturally formed group of certified staff members (n = 10) who…

  8. Staff-family relationships in residential aged care facilities: the views of residents' family members and care staff.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Michael; Fetherstonhaugh, Deirdre; Tarzia, Laura; Chenco, Carol

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to examine staff and family members' perceptions of each other's roles and responsibilities in the Australian residential aged care setting. Data was collected by interview and focus group from 27 staff and 14 family members at five residential aged care facilities in the state of Victoria, Australia. Findings highlight "communication" as the core category supporting the formation of constructive staff-family relationships, as described by three main themes; "building trust," "involvement," and "keeping the family happy." Staff attitudes, mutual cooperation, meaningful engagement, and shared expectations lay the foundation for relationships. Findings suggest that further efforts to establish and sustain good relationships with families are required by facilities. Characteristics, roles, and expectations of staff and family that can both promote and hinder the formation of constructive staff-family relationships are discussed.

  9. Workforce Development and Renewal in Australian Universities and the Management of Casual Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Robyn; Strachan, Glenda; Peetz, David

    2013-01-01

    Most undergraduate teaching in Australia's universities is now performed by hourly paid staff, and these casual academics form the majority of the academic teaching workforce in our universities. This recent development has significant implications for the careers and working lives of those staff, for other academic staff, and for students,…

  10. Perceptions of Academics and Students as Customers: A Survey of Administrative Staff in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitman, Tim

    2000-01-01

    Interviewed administrative staff at Australia's Curtin University about the extent to which they perceive academics and staff as customers. Found that they have ambivalent feelings toward academics as customers and perceived a lack of interpersonal skills among some academics. In dealing with students, administrative staff move beyond the…

  11. Challenges Facing Chinese Academic Staff in a UK University in Terms of Language, Relationships and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Hui-hua

    2012-01-01

    The recruitment of international academic staff is viewed as one of the strategies to internationalise the universities. International academic staff, however, usually encounter many challenges when in a foreign context. This study aims to investigate the challenges of Chinese academic staff teaching in the UK in terms of language, relationships…

  12. Cultural Awareness Among Nursing Staff at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Jennifer; Smith-Miller, Cheryl A; Madigan, Catherine K; Li, Yin

    2016-03-01

    The goal is to identify areas for targeted improvement in regard to cultural awareness and competence among nursing staff and in the work environment. Many facilities have initiated programs to facilitate cultural competence development among nursing staff; however, there has been little examination of the effect of these initiatives, assessment of experienced nurses' cultural awareness, or investigation of nurse leader's role in promoting cultural competence in the literature. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, a cultural awareness survey was modified and electronically distributed to all registered nurses and assistive personnel at an academic medical center. The modified survey instrument showed good reliability and validity among the study population. Most nursing staff exhibited a moderate to high level of cultural awareness and held positive opinions about nursing leadership and the work environment with regard to cultural issues. In increasingly diverse work environments, assessing the cultural awareness of nursing staff enables nurse leaders to evaluate efforts in promoting cultural competence and to identify specific areas in which to target staff development efforts and leadership training.

  13. School Climate for Gay and Lesbian Students and Staff Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, John D.

    1994-01-01

    In high schools, a conspiracy of silence shrouds the sexual orientation issue. Although the social atmosphere is vaguely supportive, fear and the realities of life cause most gays and lesbians to keep their sexual identities hidden. Homophobia can be addressed through staff development, support staff and services, inclusion of homosexual issues in…

  14. The Effect of Multitasking to Faculty Members' Academic Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Bahar

    2013-01-01

    Faculty members in higher education institutions which technology produced in and used actively try to overcome simultaneous one more works because of their intensive works and responsibilities. This study associated simultaneously doing one more academic works to multitasking. Multitasking may have a detrimental effect on academic works since it…

  15. Widening the Academic Conversation to Include Support Staff: Wabash College Extends a Common Classroom Experience to Its Entire Campus Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eubanks, Philip W.; Lynch, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    College support staff members often have an important, if sometimes unrecognized, impact on students' lives. Regardless of their job responsibilities, these individuals generally care deeply about the academic environment and the institution in general. When these individuals demonstrate to others how much they care, they are helping to build a…

  16. A Case Study: The Operation of Nonpublic Schools from the Perspective of Nonpublic School Staff Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Ka'Nessia S.

    2012-01-01

    The descriptive qualitative case study examined the resources nonpublic school staff members used to manage severe maladaptive behaviors and to facilitate the reintegration of students with severe maladaptive behaviors into public schools. The case study involved the participation of 17 nonpublic school staff members in semi-structured…

  17. A Case Study: The Operation of Nonpublic Schools from the Perspective of Nonpublic School Staff Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Ka'Nessia S.

    2012-01-01

    The descriptive qualitative case study examined the resources nonpublic school staff members used to manage severe maladaptive behaviors and to facilitate the reintegration of students with severe maladaptive behaviors into public schools. The case study involved the participation of 17 nonpublic school staff members in semi-structured…

  18. Opportunities and Challenges of Academic Staff in Higher Education in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mushemeza, Elijah Dickens

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the opportunities and challenges of academic staff in higher education in Africa. The paper argues that recruitment, appointment and promotion of academic staff should depend highly on their productivity (positive production per individual human resource). The staff profile and qualifications should be posted on the University…

  19. Academic Staff Quality in Higher Education: An Empirical Analysis of Portuguese Public Administration Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarrico, Cláudia S.; Alves, André A.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education accreditation frameworks typically consider academic staff quality a key element. This article embarks on an empirical study of what academic staff quality means, how it is measured, and how different aspects of staff quality relate to each other. It draws on the relatively nascent Portuguese experience with study programme…

  20. Academic Staff Quality in Higher Education: An Empirical Analysis of Portuguese Public Administration Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarrico, Cláudia S.; Alves, André A.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education accreditation frameworks typically consider academic staff quality a key element. This article embarks on an empirical study of what academic staff quality means, how it is measured, and how different aspects of staff quality relate to each other. It draws on the relatively nascent Portuguese experience with study programme…

  1. Ongoing consultation as a method of improving performance of staff members in a group home.

    PubMed Central

    Harchik, A E; Sherman, J A; Sheldon, J B; Strouse, M C

    1992-01-01

    A model of ongoing consultation was implemented in a community group home for 8 adults with severe and profound mental retardation. Two consultants, highly experienced in working with people with mental retardation and in the procedures used in group homes, taught staff members to use a token reinforcement system, to engage the adults in a variety of activities, and to improve the content and style of the staff members' interactions with the adults. The consultants taught skills to 9 staff members through brief mini-workshops, direct observation of the staff members' use of the skills during regular activities in the group home, and individual verbal feedback regarding a staff member's performance of the skills. Evaluation of the ongoing consultation process by the 2 consultants showed it to be effective in improving the performance of the staff members and in changing the behaviors of the adults who lived in the home. Continued implementation of the process, however, appeared to be necessary for the behavior changes of staff members to be maintained at high levels. PMID:1429314

  2. Prevalence of Common Postural Disorders Among Academic Dental Staff

    PubMed Central

    Vakili, Leila; Halabchi, Farzin; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Khami, Mohammad Reza; Irandoost, Shahla; Alizadeh, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Musculoskeletal disorders are common problems among dentists. These conditions may lead to inappropriate postures and impairment in physical and psychological function. On the other hand, poor postures and inappropriate ergonomic may result in a wide variety of musculoskeletal disorders. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of common postural disorders of the spine and shoulder girdle among the dentists and possible correlations between demographic, anthropometric and occupational characteristics with these abnormal postures. Patients and Methods In a cross-sectional study, 96 dental staff including academic staff, residents and senior students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences was enrolled. Data were collected using a questionnaire and posture assessment tools such as plumb-line, checkerboard and flexible ruler. Data analysis was done with SPSS version 17. Results The prevalence of the forward head posture (FHP), rounded shoulder posture (RSP), scoliosis and hyperlordosis were reported in 85.5%, 68.8%, 18.8% and 17.3% of the participants, respectively. A significant correlation was found between gender and FHP (P = 0.04) and also scoliosis (P = 0.009). On the other hand, a significant correlation was seen between weight and hyperlordosis (P = 0.007). Conclusions Our study revealed a high prevalence of postural disorders especially FHP, RSP and scoliosis among Iranian dental staff. The female dentists were less susceptible to FHP and scoliosis. PMID:27625751

  3. Analysis of Application of 1:3 Ratio in Employments of Academic and Non-Academic Staff in Nigerian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghaji Ifedili, Chika Josephine

    2006-01-01

    The study examined the application of 1:3 in employments of academic and non-academic staff in Nigerian Universities, as recommended by the National Universities Commission (N.U.C.), following the general feeling that Nigerian Universities were highly bureaucratised; non-teaching staff was over employed while some universities lacked…

  4. Does race influence conflict between nursing home staff and family members of residents?

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Pillemer, Karl; Sechrist, Jori; Suitor, Jill

    2011-11-01

    This study examines the influence of race on perceived similarity and conflict between nursing home staff and family members of residents. Despite evidence that the caregiving experience varies by race for both family and professional caregivers, little is known about how race plays a role in staff conflict with residents' family members. We used a representative sample of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) to test relationships between race, treatment from family members, similarity to family members in expectations for care by CNAs, and conflicts with family members concerning aspects of resident care. Results of structural equation modeling indicated that race was not a predictor of staff perception of conflict with family members or of poor treatment from residents' families. However, Black nursing assistants were more likely to perceive that their own expectations of nursing care are dissimilar from those of residents' family members. Dissimilarity predicted reports of poor treatment from family members, and poor treatment was a positive predictor of perception of conflict. The personal long-term nature of nursing home care necessitates a high level of connectedness between family caregivers and nursing home staff. Results highlight the importance of establishing organizational pathways for communication of expectations between nursing staff and residents' families.

  5. Staff Members' Understandings about Communication with Individuals Who Have Multiple Learning Disabilities: A Case of Finnish OIVA Communication Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koski, Katja; Martikainen, Kaisa; Burakoff, Katja; Launonen, Kaisa

    2010-01-01

    Background: Often communication training has been directed at the communication practices of staff members working with people with multiple learning disabilities. To date, the thinking habits of staff members, which also influence interactions, have not been addressed. We identified the issues staff members perceived as important for their…

  6. Analysis of databases appropriation in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences according to the social appropriation approach

    PubMed Central

    Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Sohrabi, Mozaffar Cheshmeh; Zare, Firoozeh; Hassnazadeh, Akbar; Malekahmadi, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Numerous researches conducted on about the quality of perception of media messages shows that the people are not passive receivers but they have the ability of understanding, interpreting and accepting or rejecting messages. In order to make clear the relationship of information and communication technologies with social changes and to gain a broader vision from this scope, sociological theories about information and communication technologies’ usage, especially appropriation approach can be very useful. So, keeping in mind the important role of Databases in the qualitative expansion of education, research, diagnosis, remedy and medical services presentation, this research was carried out with the aim of status determination of databases appropriation in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences according to the social appropriation approach in 2012. Materials and Methods: This is an applicative research of an analytical-descriptive type, which was carried out by measurement approach. The statistical society of this research was composed of the academic staffs of the Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences in 2012 and finally 390 academic staffs were selected according to the Cochran's formula were selected. The research tool are searcher's made questionnaire, which was composed of nine separate parts. Its validity was accepted by the specialists and its reliability was calculated and found to be 0.961 by Cronbakh's alpha. Results: Database appropriation score in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences with 65.020% was in a good status and data bases dis appropriation score with 71.484 was in a high status. Conclusion: According to the findings of this research, Librarians and politicians in this scope-with determination of the academic staff's positive and negative points in usage and appropriation would be capable of accurately diagnozing and analyzing the chances and challenges of the academic staffs

  7. Academic Staff Research Productivity: A Study of Universities in South-South Zone of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usang, Bassey; Basil, Akuegwu; Lucy, Udida; Udey, Franca U.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined academic staff research productivity in Universities in South-South zone of Nigeria. Ex post facto design was adopted for this study. Three hypotheses were formulated to guide this study. The sample size comprised of 480 academic staff drawn from a population of 3120. Data collection was carried out using a…

  8. Greening the Campus Intentions: A Study of the University of the Aegean Non-Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellou, Chrysanthi; Petreniti, Vassiliki; Skanavis, Constantina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to focus on the University of Aegean's non-academic staff's environmental sustainability attitudes and behavior both at work and at home, their perceptions for sustainability enforcement and their active participation skills. Design/methodology/approach: The research participants were the 101 non-academic staff working at…

  9. State, Adoption and Use of ICTs by Students and Academic Staff at Mzuzu University, Malawi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaputula, Aubrey Harvey

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to look at the state, adoption and use of ICTs by students and academic staff at Mzuzu University. Design/methodology/approach: The research used a survey method whose study population included students, academic and library staff. Data for the study were collected using an interview guide and…

  10. Academic Staff Utilization of Information and Communication Technology and Knowledge Creation in Cross River State Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekpoh, Uduak Imo; Etor, Comfort Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study examined academic staff utilization of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in knowledge creation in universities in Cross River State. The study was guided by two research questions and one hypothesis. A questionnaire was developed, validated and used for data collection from a sample of 300 academic staff. Descriptive…

  11. Dimensions of Kenyan University Academic Staff's Job Satisfaction in View of Various Managerial Leadership Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiplangat, Henry Kiptiony; Momanyi, Marcella; Kangethe, Ngigi Simon

    2017-01-01

    Attaining high levels of academic staff job satisfaction has proved to be challenging for university management. This paper is an excerpt of a study that investigated the magnitude of Kenyan University academic staff's job satisfaction based on various managerial leadership practices. The study focused on the Rift Valley Region (RVR) of Kenya. The…

  12. Performance Appraisal System Impact on University Academic Staff Job Satisfaction and Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ndambakuwa, Yustina; Mufunda, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    The University of Zimbabwe (UZ) introduced a performance appraisal system (PAS) designed to improve performance indicators across the board in Public Service including academic/faculty staff at the University of Zimbabwe as part of a nation wide strategy. The Public service is a body responsible for all civil workers including academic staff,…

  13. Level of Discipline among University Academic Staff as a Correlate of University Development in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhoman, Anyi Mary

    2017-01-01

    This study entitled "Level of Discipline Among University Academic Staff as a Correlate of University Development in Nigeria" adopted the correlation design with a population of 2,301 academic staff purposively selected from four Universities in the North-Central Geo-Political zone of Nigeria. The Stratified Random Sampling Method was…

  14. State, Adoption and Use of ICTs by Students and Academic Staff at Mzuzu University, Malawi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaputula, Aubrey Harvey

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to look at the state, adoption and use of ICTs by students and academic staff at Mzuzu University. Design/methodology/approach: The research used a survey method whose study population included students, academic and library staff. Data for the study were collected using an interview guide and…

  15. Culture Clash or Ties That Bind? What Australian Academics Think of Professional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses a framework analysis to explore the opinions a cohort of Australian academic staff hold towards professional staff. Five indicative themes were identified from the extant literature on university professional staff: the professional other; managerialism; an expensive bureaucracy; complementary agendas; and the third space and…

  16. A Model for the Allocation and Utilisation of Academic Staff Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griew, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    A model is presented that provides a basis for judgments concerning the efficiency of academic staff utilization, the equitable deployment of staff in matrix organizations, the utilization of staff in complex settings such as the professional school, and the assessment of spare, reallocable teaching capacity. (Author/MLW)

  17. House staff member awareness of older inpatients' risks for hazards of hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Helen M; Callahan, Kathryn E; Likourezos, Antonios; Leipzig, Rosanne M

    2008-02-25

    Many hospitalized older adults develop iatrogenic complications unrelated to their presenting diagnoses that can result in longer hospitalizations, functional impairment, or unanticipated medical or surgical interventions. These complications are often referred to as "hazards of hospitalization" and include delirium, malnutrition, urinary incontinence, pressure ulcers, depression, falls, restraint use, infection, functional decline, adverse drug effects, and death. The aims of this study were to assess house staff member awareness of older patients' risk factors for developing hazards of hospitalization and to determine areas in which interventions may help improve recognition. A cross-sectional study was performed, from December 1, 1999, through August 31, 2002, of internal medicine and medicine or pediatric house staff members and their patients from 4 medical units at Mount Sinai Medical Center. Each house staff member completed a 23-item survey on 3 of their recently admitted patients. These patients and, if appropriate, their surrogates were interviewed by the study investigator within 2 hours of the completion of the house staff survey. House staff member responses are compared with those obtained by the study investigator. The completed house staff surveys were compared with the reference standard, and areas of agreement and disagreement were noted. Eighty-six house staff teams, consisting of 1 intern and 1 resident (in either the second or third postgraduate year), and 105 patients were enrolled in the study. The house staff members were in frank disagreement or poor agreement with the reference standard in knowing the following: how well their patients were oriented to place or how long they had been hospitalized; patients' quality of sleep, presence of pain, history of falls, mood, quantity of food intake, and use of hearing aids, glasses, or an ambulation assistive device when at home; and the name of their patients' primary care physicians. This study

  18. Risk profile of coronary heart disease among the staff members of Qassim University, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Nohair, Sultan A. L.; Mohaimeed, Abdulrahman A. L.; Sharaf, Fawzy; Naeem, Zahid; Midhet, Farid; Homaidan, Homaidan A. L.; Winter, Sandra J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the risk profile of coronary heart disease (CHD) among the staff members of Qassim University and assess their knowledge in a screening campaign in Qassim region, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among male and female staff at Qassim University campus. All employees of Qassim University were invited to participate in the study. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire. The study sample size was 233 staff and employees. The data were entered and analyzed using SPSS version 18. The data analysis focused on providing point estimates for the risk factors. Results: The study found that 30% of participants have one or more risk factors for CHD, namely obesity 20.6%, diabetes 10.3%, hypertension 12.4%, dyslipidemia 10.7%, and smokers (11.6%). About 54% of the participants have a family history of at least one chronic disease as a risk factor for CHD. Conclusion: The most common risk factor of CHD among the staff members is obesity by 20.6%. Risk factors for CHD are quite common among Qassim University staff. These findings need to increase the health education and disease promotion program as an important intervention to reduce the occurrence and severity of CHD risk factors and to improve the quality of the life of the staff members of Qassim University. PMID:28293152

  19. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media. (a) A member of the naval service on active duty or Navy civilian may act as correspondent for a news...

  20. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media. (a) A member of the naval service on active duty or Navy civilian may act as correspondent for a news...

  1. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media. (a) A member of the naval service on active duty or Navy civilian may act as correspondent for a news...

  2. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media. (a) A member of the naval service on active duty or Navy civilian may act as correspondent for a news...

  3. 10 CFR 7.18 - Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory committee members, staffs, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory committee members, staffs, and consultants. 7.18 Section 7.18 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.18 Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory...

  4. 10 CFR 7.18 - Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory committee members, staffs, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory committee members, staffs, and consultants. 7.18 Section 7.18 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.18 Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory...

  5. 10 CFR 7.18 - Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory committee members, staffs, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory committee members, staffs, and consultants. 7.18 Section 7.18 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.18 Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory...

  6. 10 CFR 7.18 - Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory committee members, staffs, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory committee members, staffs, and consultants. 7.18 Section 7.18 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.18 Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory...

  7. 10 CFR 7.18 - Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory committee members, staffs, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory committee members, staffs, and consultants. 7.18 Section 7.18 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ADVISORY COMMITTEES § 7.18 Appointment, compensation, and expense reimbursement of advisory...

  8. The Health and Wellbeing of Staff Members at a Tertiary Institution in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dreyer, Sonja; Dreyer, Lukas I.; Rankin, Dean M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the physical, psychological and biochemical health status of staff members at a higher educational institution (Institute of Technology). Relative large numbers of subjects were identified with hypertension (18.5%), stress symptoms (32.1%), job stress (36%) and emotional exhaustion (11.4%). Thirty percent…

  9. Organizational Communication: Perceptions of Staff Members' Level of Communication Satisfaction and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Priti; Lampley, James; Good, Donald

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to explore the topic of organizational communication in higher education and examine staff members' perceptions about their level of communication and job satisfaction in their workplaces. This study was also designed to test the relationship between communication satisfaction and job satisfaction by…

  10. Use of Nonphysician Staff to Evaluate Humanistic Behavior of Internal Medicine Residents and Faculty Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Lawrence S.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The use of nurses or other health workers to assess residents' humanistic behavior is discussed. Since nurses and other paramedical staff members observe residents interacting with their patients, these professionals may be a valuable but underused resource in the evaluation of physicians' humanistic qualities. (MLW)

  11. Staff Members Acting as Grandparents in a High School for Recent Immigrants: Los Abuelitos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jo

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study considered how a high school in the south central United States serving predominantly immigrant students from Mexico and Central America made use of older Hispanic or Latino staff members as surrogate or stand-in grandparents (fondly called "abuelitos" by the students). The caring, intergenerational relationships…

  12. Staff Members Acting as Grandparents in a High School for Recent Immigrants: Los Abuelitos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Jo

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study considered how a high school in the south central United States serving predominantly immigrant students from Mexico and Central America made use of older Hispanic or Latino staff members as surrogate or stand-in grandparents (fondly called "abuelitos" by the students). The caring, intergenerational relationships…

  13. 78 FR 60653 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Members of Congress and Congressional Staff

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Abortion Services OPM received over 59,000 comments regarding coverage of abortion services for Members of... Congress and congressional staff include abortion services. Current law prohibits the use of Federal funds to pay for abortions, except in the case of rape, incest, or when the life of the woman is...

  14. Teaching the Lecturers: Academic Staff Learning about Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northcote, Maria; Reynaud, Daniel; Beamish, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Developing online teaching skills can occur through involvement in learn-by-doing strategies, which incorporates informal, organic or need-driven strategies. Such processes are sometimes labeled as "bottom-up" staff development processes. In other contexts, teaching staff are formally directed to develop online teaching skills through a…

  15. Motivations, Expectations, and Experiences of Expatriate Academic Staff on an International Branch Campus in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li; Hall, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of non-Chinese academic staff working on an international branch campus in China. The article presents findings from an interview study that explored the expectations of expatriate staff and what motivated them to want to work abroad. The second part of the article reports on whether and how these expectations…

  16. Factors Challenging and Supporting Scholarly Activity for Academic Staff in a Regional Australian University Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, John; Bowling, Alison; Griffiths, Jean; Blair, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    With expectations of academic staff to achieve high quality teaching and research outputs as performance measures it is timely to explore how staff perceive they are being supported to meet these ends. This article presents findings of a multi-method study that explored influences impacting on the quality and quantity of scholarly activity being…

  17. Factors Challenging and Supporting Scholarly Activity for Academic Staff in a Regional Australian University Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, John; Bowling, Alison; Griffiths, Jean; Blair, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    With expectations of academic staff to achieve high quality teaching and research outputs as performance measures it is timely to explore how staff perceive they are being supported to meet these ends. This article presents findings of a multi-method study that explored influences impacting on the quality and quantity of scholarly activity being…

  18. Motivations, Expectations, and Experiences of Expatriate Academic Staff on an International Branch Campus in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li; Hall, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of non-Chinese academic staff working on an international branch campus in China. The article presents findings from an interview study that explored the expectations of expatriate staff and what motivated them to want to work abroad. The second part of the article reports on whether and how these expectations…

  19. Providing Staff Training and Programming to Support People with Disabilities: An Academic Library Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannen, Michelle H.; Milewski, Steven; Mack, Thura

    2017-01-01

    This case study explores services academic libraries provide to students with disabilities and the impact these can have on the success and experience of these students. The study focuses on staff training and outreach programming. The authors examine the academic library literature surrounding these topics, provide examples of programming…

  20. The Effectiveness of Academic Workload Models in an Institution: A Staff Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, John D. J.; Fluck, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    The demands on academic staff are increasing to the point where effective mechanisms for the allocation of their work are now necessary. Despite the inherent difficulties of categorising academic work, nearly all enterprise agreements at Australian universities include a clause designed to avoid work overload. Through a questionnaire, the…

  1. Mentoring for Business Engagement as Continuing Professional Development of University Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helyer, Ruth; Lee, Dionne

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports an innovative continuing professional development (CPD) project for academic staff in a UK university. The aim of the project is to develop academics' skills in relating to the business environment. The project has a number of strands, but the principal focus of this paper is upon a mentoring initiative. Much CPD in universities…

  2. The Career Perceptions of Academic Staff and Human Resource Discourses in English Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Tony; Taylor, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper sets out findings from research that considered the interplay between English national policy developments in human resources management in higher education and the personal stories of academic staff as career participants. Academic careers are pursued in an institutional and national policy context but it was not clear that the formal…

  3. The Career Perceptions of Academic Staff and Human Resource Discourses in English Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Tony; Taylor, John

    2009-01-01

    This paper sets out findings from research that considered the interplay between English national policy developments in human resources management in higher education and the personal stories of academic staff as career participants. Academic careers are pursued in an institutional and national policy context but it was not clear that the formal…

  4. Mentoring for Business Engagement as Continuing Professional Development of University Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helyer, Ruth; Lee, Dionne

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports an innovative continuing professional development (CPD) project for academic staff in a UK university. The aim of the project is to develop academics' skills in relating to the business environment. The project has a number of strands, but the principal focus of this paper is upon a mentoring initiative. Much CPD in universities…

  5. A Case Study of Academic Staff Integration in a Post-Merger Chinese University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Yuzhuo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to discover and better understand through a case study, the phenomenon of academic staff integration in a post-merger Chinese university. The analysis was undertaken by using a cultural framework derived from relevant literature. The results indicate that adjustments to academic values and beliefs, "the cultural…

  6. The Effectiveness of Academic Workload Models in an Institution: A Staff Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, John D. J.; Fluck, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    The demands on academic staff are increasing to the point where effective mechanisms for the allocation of their work are now necessary. Despite the inherent difficulties of categorising academic work, nearly all enterprise agreements at Australian universities include a clause designed to avoid work overload. Through a questionnaire, the…

  7. 41 CFR 102-3.125 - How should agencies consider the roles of advisory committee members and staff?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... consider the roles of advisory committee members and staff? 102-3.125 Section 102-3.125 Public Contracts... How should agencies consider the roles of advisory committee members and staff? FACA does not assign... critical roles in achieving the goals and objectives assigned to advisory committees. Agency heads...

  8. 32 CFR 705.15 - Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... or staff members of civilian news media. 705.15 Section 705.15 National Defense Department of Defense... REGULATIONS § 705.15 Employment of Navy personnel as correspondents or staff members of civilian news media... personnel as the Secretary of the Navy may authorize can act as correspondents for civilian media. (b...

  9. Exploring Death Anxiety and Burnout Among Staff Members Who Work In Outpatient Hemodialysis Units.

    PubMed

    Lee, Valerie L; King, Anita H

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient hemodialysis unit staff members are at risk for psychological stress, including death anxiety, unresolved grieving, and burnout, due tofrequent interactions with chronically ill patients who have a high mortality rate. Experiencing death anxiety and burnout may impair the ability to build interpersonal relationships, decrease job satisfaction, and impact quality of patient care. A quantitative study to evaluate the effect of educational classes on the level of death anxiety and burnout among hemodialysis caregivers revealed a decrease in participants' level of death anxiety and a decrease in emotional exhaustion in one area that was directly related to the work environment Information from the study can be used to decrease psychological stress through education and support for staff members who work in the hemodialysis unit environment.

  10. Nursing Staff Members Mental's Health and Factors Associated with the Work Process: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Selene Cordeiro; Lopes de Souza, Sandra; Botelho Sougey, Everton; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Elayne Cristina; Costa do Nascimento, José Jailson; Formiga, Mariana Bandeira; Batista de Souza Ventura, Luciana; Duarte da Costa Lima, Murilo; Silva, Antonia Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    The mental health of nursing staff members influences the work process outcomes. Identify the work related factors that harms the nursing team's mental health. Databases PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL and MEDLINE, by mating between the indexed descriptors in MeSH terms "mental health" and "occupational health nursing". 783 articles were rescued to give a final sample of 18 articles. Integrative review in order to identify factors associated with the work process of the nursing staff that negatively affects mental health. The main associated factors were work demands, psychological demands, violence, aggression, poor relationships with administrators, accidents involving the risk of exposure to HIV, stress and errors in the execution of labor activities. The main findings regarding the nursing staff's mental health were post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, stress, major depressive episode and generalized anxiety disorder. Occupational nurses need to understand the complexities of mental health problems and substance use among nursing staff members to recognize, identify and care for workers at risk and offer adequate mental health care. Although the researches interests in this theme have increased, proving that all these factors contribute to the risk to mental health of nursing professionals, the protective measures and care are being neglected by managers in both private and public network . The health of nursing workers in question here is one more challenge for a profession that takes care of others in need, therefore, requires some caring with their own health.

  11. Telling Tales: A Narrative Research Study of the Experiences of New International Academic Staff at an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Wendy; Myatt, Paula

    2011-01-01

    As the transnational movement of academics continues to increase, some are arguing it is time to look more closely at the challenges faced by new international academic staff. This article reports on a narrative research study exploring the experiences and perceptions of eight international academic staff at a large, research-intensive university…

  12. Telling Tales: A Narrative Research Study of the Experiences of New International Academic Staff at an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Wendy; Myatt, Paula

    2011-01-01

    As the transnational movement of academics continues to increase, some are arguing it is time to look more closely at the challenges faced by new international academic staff. This article reports on a narrative research study exploring the experiences and perceptions of eight international academic staff at a large, research-intensive university…

  13. Online Professional Development for Academic Staff: Putting the Curriculum First.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Niall; Staley, Alan

    2001-01-01

    The Learning Methods Unit (LMU) at University of Central England (UCE) has adopted a curriculum-based approach to incorporating learning technology into professional development courses for university staff. The "Problems at Crumpton" web site described in this article uses technology to implement a problem-centered curriculum, enabling…

  14. Engaging Academic Staff in Transnational Teaching: The Job Satisfaction Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toohey, Danny; McGill, Tanya; Whitsed, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Transnational education (TNE) is an important facet of the international education learning and teaching landscape. Ensuring academics are positively engaged in TNE is a challenging but necessary issue for this form of educational provision if the risks inherent in TNE are to be successfully mitigated. This article explores job satisfaction for…

  15. Supervisory Rotation: Impact on an Academic Library Reference Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perdue, Bob; Piotrowski, Chris

    The results of a managerial rotation program in a medium-sized academic library reference department are presented. After meeting certain minimal eligibility requirements, librarians in this department take turns on a 2-year cycle serving as head of the department. This case study is used as a model to assess both the advantages and disadvantages…

  16. Supervisory Rotation: Impact on an Academic Library Reference Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perdue, Bob; Piotrowski, Chris

    The results of a managerial rotation program in a medium-sized academic library reference department are presented. After meeting certain minimal eligibility requirements, librarians in this department take turns on a 2-year cycle serving as head of the department. This case study is used as a model to assess both the advantages and disadvantages…

  17. Casual Academic Staff in an Australian University: Marginalised and Excluded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Suzanne; Burgess, John; Connell, Julia; Groen, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the Australian workforce has become more casualised, with approximately one-quarter of the workforce in casual employment today. One of the highest users of casual employees is the higher education sector, where casual academics (referred to as sessionals in the Australian context) are estimated to account for 50% of the…

  18. Professional Staff Turnover in Academic Libraries: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Dee Ann; Sartori, Eva

    1988-01-01

    Presents a model of the interaction of external, work related, and internal factors that may influence the decision of academic library professionals to leave the library. The results of a survey that examined factors related to a decision to leave a library are reported, and further research is suggested. (CLB)

  19. Casual Academic Staff in an Australian University: Marginalised and Excluded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Suzanne; Burgess, John; Connell, Julia; Groen, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the Australian workforce has become more casualised, with approximately one-quarter of the workforce in casual employment today. One of the highest users of casual employees is the higher education sector, where casual academics (referred to as sessionals in the Australian context) are estimated to account for 50% of the…

  20. The Continuing Education Needs of Academic Staff: Senior College Staff in TAFE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mageean, Pauline

    Interviews intended to discover the best ways of meeting the continuing education needs of senior Technical and Further Education (TAFE) staff were conducted with 250 individuals from 17 TAFE colleges throughout Australia. The study population consisted of principals, deputy principals, department heads, and heads of schools who spend 50 percent…

  1. School staff members experience and knowledge in the reporting of potential child and youth victimization.

    PubMed

    Greco, Ana M; Guilera, Georgina; Pereda, Noemí

    2017-07-22

    Victimization has been widely demonstrated to have negative consequences in minors. Most crimes against children go unreported and victims tend to reach adulthood without receiving any of the available specialized support. Studies have highlighted the unique role of school workers in early detection and reporting of possible cases of victimization, and have also found high rates of underreporting by school staff. The present study analyzes the underreporting of child and youth victimization suspicions among school staff and aims to identify variables related to its detection and reporting. One hundred and eighty-four school staff members (83.7% females, M=42.6years old, SD=11.7) from 17 different schools completed a self-administered questionnaire designed to record their knowledge and experience regarding the detection and reporting of potential victimization cases. Over 74% of the school workers had suspected at least one situation of victimization during their careers, but only 27% had actually reported these concerns. Higher rates of reporting were significantly associated with male gender, more years of experience, and awareness of five common misconceptions. Reporting behavior could be predicted by gender, years of experience and two statements assessing respondents' knowledge of victimization. In order to increase early reporting of possible cases of victimization, it is necessary to overcome certain misconceptions, raise awareness among school staff, design new training programs or interventions, and adapt the school dynamics in the light of these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Biochemical and immunological effects of ionizing radiation in radiology staff members].

    PubMed

    Serhatlioğlu, Selami; Oğur, Erkin; Ozan, A Tevfik; Gürsu, Ferit; Gödekmerdan, Ahmet; Ayar, Ahmet

    2004-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of occupational exposures to long term low-dose ionizing radiation on blood biochemistry and immunity levels of the radiology staff. Fifty-one subjects, aged between 21-57 years (30.06+/-7.02 years), working in the department of radiology were enrolled to this study. Twenty-five subjects (49.1%) were female and 26 (50.9%) were male. Control group consisted of 40 healthy non-smoking subjects aged between 20-60 years (mean 31.5+/-5.75) who had never been exposed to radiation; 19 (47.5%) of these were female and 21 (52.5%) male. Venous blood samples were obtained from the radiology staff and control group and immunological and biochemical analysis of samples were performed. CD4+ T-lymphocyte ratio, and serum total IgA, IgG, IgM and C3, C4 levels were lower in the radiology staff compared to the controls. Serum triglycerides and paraoxonase activities were increased in the radiology staff (p<0.05). In radiology workers exposed to long-term low-dose ionizing radiation, levels of the CD4+ T lymphocytes, total immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), C3 and C4 levels were lower, while serum trygliceride levels and paraoxonase activities were significantly higher (p<0.05). IgA and IgM levels of smoker radiology workers were significantly lower than non-smoker radiology workers (p<0.05). Since the staff members of department of radiology are vulnerable to the side effects in parallel to the dose of radiation being exposed, we think that in addition to avoiding radiation as much as possible, they should have periodical blood biochemistry and immune function tests.

  3. Attitudes of Pakistani community members and staff toward people with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Patka, Mazna; Keys, Christopher B; Henry, David B; McDonald, Katherine E

    2013-01-01

    The acceptance and inclusion of persons with intellectual disability can vary across cultures, and understanding attitudes can provide insight into such variation. To our knowledge, no previous study has explored attitudes toward people with intellectual disability among Pakistani community members and disability service providers. We administered the Community Living Attitudes Scale (Henry et al., 1996), a measure of attitudes toward people with intellectual disability developed in the United States, to 262 community members and 190 disability service providers in Pakistan. Confirmatory factor analysis found a 4-factor solution (empowerment, similarity, exclusion, and sheltering) fit the Pakistani sample. More positive attitudes were observed in staff serving people with intellectual disability, females, Christians, Hindus, Sunnis, and people with greater education. We discuss implications for research, theory, and practice.

  4. Job Motivation and Job Satisfaction among Academic Staff in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankovska, Gordana; Angelkoska, Slagana; Osmani, Fadbi; Grncarovska, Svetlana Pandiloska

    2017-01-01

    Education is the most important organization of a nation; it plays a significant role in the development of any country. Universities create and cultivate knowledge for the sake of building a modern world. The academic staff is the key resource within higher education institutions. A positive and healthy university structure results in increased…

  5. Contrasting Views of Induction: The Experiences of New Academic Staff and Their Heads of Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staniforth, David; Harland, Tony

    2006-01-01

    This article focuses on the induction experiences of new academic staff and the role of their head of department in this process. Respondents reflected on personal experiences and their narratives give a fine-grained account of the same event from two contrasting perspectives. We expected to find that the heads would be key figures in the…

  6. The Impact of the Bologna Process on Academic Staff in Ukraine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Marta A.; Chapman, David W.; Rumyantseva, Nataliya L.

    2012-01-01

    Academic staff in Ukraine face a convergence of institutional and professional pressures precipitated by a national economic crisis, projected declines in enrolment and dramatic changes to institutional procedures as institutions implement the Bologna Process. This article examines the extent to which these pressures are reshaping the way academic…

  7. Academic Staff's Perspectives upon Student Plagiarism: A Case Study at a University in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    Much of the previous research concerning student plagiarism has been conducted in Anglo-American settings. The present paper reports a case study of academic staff's perspectives upon student plagiarism at a university in Hong Kong. Based on interviews with 16 instructors, the study focused on the teachers' views and pedagogical practices,…

  8. The E-Balanced Scorecard (e-BSC) for Measuring Academic Staff Performance Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, May Leen; Hamid, Suraya; Ijab, Mohamad Taha; Soo, Hsaio Pei

    2009-01-01

    This research paper is a pilot study that investigated the suitability of adopting an automated balanced scorecard for managing and measuring the performance excellence of academic staffs in the higher education setting. A comprehensive study of related literature with requirements elicited from the target population in a selected premier…

  9. Perspectives on Academic Staff Involvement in the Acquisition and Implementation of Educational Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habib, Laurence; Johannesen, Monica

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study using both quantitative and qualitative data to uncover the extent and nature of the involvement of academic staff in the processes of acquisition and implementation of educational technologies. Actor-network theory (ANT) is used to inform the design of the study and the analysis of the data. Three main…

  10. Fostering School Connectedness: Improving Student Health and Academic Achievement. Information for Teachers and Other School Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Students feel more connected to their school when they believe that the adults and other students at school not only care about how well they are learning, but also care about them as individuals. Young people who feel connected to school are more likely to succeed academically and make healthy choices. All school staff, including teachers,…

  11. Academic Staff Performance and Workload in Higher Education in the UK: The Conceptual Dichotomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Higher education in the UK is under increasing pressure to manage the workload of its academic staff in a way that maximises the outputs from teaching and research. The emergence of this trend can be traced back to 1989 and the government legislation that introduced neo-liberal managerialism into the sector mirroring the laissez-faire approach to…

  12. The Increased Role of Foreign-Born Academic Staff in US Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Karen L.; Yang, Lijing

    2014-01-01

    An increasingly globalised world means that higher education institutions are employing a diverse set of academic staff from across the world, and a better understanding of these scholars and their work roles is important for effective teaching, learning, and institutional management. Using the most recent data available from the "National…

  13. For Better or Worse: Using Wikis and Blogs for Staff Communication in an Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Kristen; Del Bosque, Darcy

    2010-01-01

    This case study from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, University Libraries, which has one main library, three branches, and more than 110 staff, illustrates one approach to using new technologies as additional methods for internal communication. At large academic libraries, communication within the organization can be challenging. The…

  14. Academic Staff's Perspectives upon Student Plagiarism: A Case Study at a University in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Yongyan

    2015-01-01

    Much of the previous research concerning student plagiarism has been conducted in Anglo-American settings. The present paper reports a case study of academic staff's perspectives upon student plagiarism at a university in Hong Kong. Based on interviews with 16 instructors, the study focused on the teachers' views and pedagogical practices,…

  15. Academic Integrity: An Awareness and Development Issue for Students and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Ursula

    2005-01-01

    University plagiarism policies aimed at assuring academic integrity provide for increased vigilance and disciplinary procedures to deal with transgressions. Many policies also include guidelines to teaching staff to ensure that students are adequately informed about the meaning of plagiarism and its consequences, and about methods of citing within…

  16. The E-Balanced Scorecard (e-BSC) for Measuring Academic Staff Performance Excellence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, May Leen; Hamid, Suraya; Ijab, Mohamad Taha; Soo, Hsaio Pei

    2009-01-01

    This research paper is a pilot study that investigated the suitability of adopting an automated balanced scorecard for managing and measuring the performance excellence of academic staffs in the higher education setting. A comprehensive study of related literature with requirements elicited from the target population in a selected premier…

  17. For Better or Worse: Using Wikis and Blogs for Staff Communication in an Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Kristen; Del Bosque, Darcy

    2010-01-01

    This case study from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, University Libraries, which has one main library, three branches, and more than 110 staff, illustrates one approach to using new technologies as additional methods for internal communication. At large academic libraries, communication within the organization can be challenging. The…

  18. Outsourcing Academic Development in Higher Education: Staff Perceptions of an International Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Kerry; Hughes, Kate; Stephens, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly, higher education support services are being outsourced. Our case study was of a program from a global, USA-based, non-profit organisation. From in-depth interviews, we investigated staff perceptions of academic development workshops and the efficacy of outsourcing to a transnational tertiary-support program. We found that…

  19. Academic Staff Views of Quality Systems for Teaching and Learning: A Hong Kong Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John; Saram, Don Darshi De

    2005-01-01

    The "Teaching and Learning Quality Process Review" (TLQPR) recently completed in Hong Kong had an emphasis on education quality work. This paper analyses how, from the perspective of academic staff in one university in Hong Kong, the good intentions embedded in that idea are enhanced or subverted by the broader ?quality system setting in…

  20. The Increased Role of Foreign-Born Academic Staff in US Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Karen L.; Yang, Lijing

    2014-01-01

    An increasingly globalised world means that higher education institutions are employing a diverse set of academic staff from across the world, and a better understanding of these scholars and their work roles is important for effective teaching, learning, and institutional management. Using the most recent data available from the "National…

  1. Academic Staff Views of Quality Systems for Teaching and Learning: A Hong Kong Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John; Saram, Don Darshi De

    2005-01-01

    The "Teaching and Learning Quality Process Review" (TLQPR) recently completed in Hong Kong had an emphasis on education quality work. This paper analyses how, from the perspective of academic staff in one university in Hong Kong, the good intentions embedded in that idea are enhanced or subverted by the broader ?quality system setting in…

  2. Perspectives on Academic Staff Involvement in the Acquisition and Implementation of Educational Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habib, Laurence; Johannesen, Monica

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study using both quantitative and qualitative data to uncover the extent and nature of the involvement of academic staff in the processes of acquisition and implementation of educational technologies. Actor-network theory (ANT) is used to inform the design of the study and the analysis of the data. Three main…

  3. Research Cultures in English and Scottish University Education Departments: An Exploratory Study of Academic Staff Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Chris; Wilson, Michael; Humes, Walter

    2011-01-01

    The paper reports the findings of a small-scale qualitative investigation into academic staff perceptions of research cultures across 10 English and Scottish university education departments. The study sheds light on four interrelated issues: the nature of research cultures, perceived facilitators, perceived constraints and the emotional landscape…

  4. Stress among Academic Staff and Students' Satisfaction of Their Performances in Payame Noor University of Miandoab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabari, Kamran; Moradi Sheykhjan, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Present study examined the relationship between stress among academic staff and students' satisfaction of their performances in Payame Noor University (PNU) of Miandoab City, Iran in 2014. The methodology of the research is descriptive and correlation that descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Statistical Society…

  5. Effect of nonviolent self-defense training on male psychiatric staff members' aggression and fear.

    PubMed

    Phillips, D; Rudestam, K E

    1995-02-01

    Male staff members at two state psychiatric hospitals were trained in nonviolent self-defense skills for dealing with potentially assaultive patients to determine whether such training could reduce the number of assaults and episodes of patient restraint. Three groups of male staff received didactic training, didactic and physical skills training, or no training in the nonviolent self-defense skills of protective profile, repel, and push-off, as well as in evasive movement. Effects of the training were evaluated using the Buss-Durkee Hostility-Guilt Inventory; a questionnaire about clinical experience and sports training; judges' evaluations of physical skill, aggression, and fear; a self-report questionnaire about the value of nonaggressive responses and felt fear and aggression; and a follow-up questionnaire about posttraining assaults. Behaviorally expressed fear and aggression were significantly reduced among staff who received both didactic and physical skills training. The other two groups showed no significant changes in this area. During the two weeks after training, subjects trained in physical and didactic skills were involved in 23 percent fewer assaults than those who received only didactic training and 20 percent fewer assaults than those who received no training. The development of increased skill in nonviolent physical techniques of self-defense was strongly correlated with an increase in the value placed on the use of the skills and on nonviolent outcomes.

  6. Investigation of the Relationship between Physical Activity Level and Healthy Life-Style Behaviors of Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkmen, Mutlu; Ozkan, Ali; Kul, Murat; Bozkus, Taner

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the relationship of physical activity (PA) level and healthy life-style behaviors in academic staff in Bartin University, Turkey. The short form of International Physical Activity Questionnaire was administered for the determination of physical activity level of academic staff. Their PA levels were…

  7. Investigation of the Relationship between Physical Activity Level and Healthy Life-Style Behaviors of Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkmen, Mutlu; Ozkan, Ali; Kul, Murat; Bozkus, Taner

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the relationship of physical activity (PA) level and healthy life-style behaviors in academic staff in Bartin University, Turkey. The short form of International Physical Activity Questionnaire was administered for the determination of physical activity level of academic staff. Their PA levels were…

  8. Innovative and Traditional Elements in the Work of Academic Staff: The Views of Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurgena, Inese; Cedere, Dagnija; Keviša, Ingrida

    2015-01-01

    The academic staff of the institutions of higher education plays a key role in the implementation of innovations in the study process. This article aims to analyze the views of students, pre-service teachers, on the role of innovations and traditions in the work of the academic staff at their institution of higher education. The survey data from…

  9. Academic staff perspectives of formative assessment in nurse education.

    PubMed

    Koh, Lai Chan

    2010-07-01

    High quality formative assessment has been linked to positive benefits on learning while good feedback can make a considerable difference to the quality of learning. It is proposed that formative assessment and feedback is intricately linked to enhancement of learning and has to be interactive. Underlying this proposition is the recognition of the importance of staff perspectives of formative assessment and their influence on assessment practice. However, there appears to be a paucity of literature exploring this area relevant to nurse education. The aim of the research was to explore the perspectives of twenty teachers of nurse education on formative assessment and feedback of theoretical assessment. A qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews was adopted. The interview data were analysed and the following themes identified: purposes of formative assessment, involvement of peers in the assessment process, ambivalence of timing of assessment, types of formative assessment and quality of good feedback. The findings offer suggestions which may be of value to teachers facilitating formative assessment. The conclusion is that teachers require changes to the practice of formative assessment and feedback by believing that learning is central to the purposes of formative assessment and regarding students as partners in this process.

  10. Coping with Violence in Mental Health Care Settings: Patient and Staff Member Perspectives on De-escalation Practices.

    PubMed

    Berring, Lene Lauge; Pedersen, Liselotte; Buus, Niels

    2016-10-01

    This multiple case study explored de-escalation processes in threatening and violent situations based on patients and staff members perspectives. Our post hoc analysis indicated that de-escalation included responsive interactions influenced by the perspectives of both patients and staff members. We assembled their perspectives in a mental model consisting of three interdependent stages: (1) memories and hope, (2) safety and creativity and (3) reflective moments. The data indicated that both patients and staff strived for peaceful solutions and that a dynamic and sociological understanding of de-escalation can foster shared problem solving in violent and threatening situations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Post-traumatic stress disorder following patient assaults among staff members of mental health hospitals: a prospective longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Richter, Dirk; Berger, Klaus

    2006-04-10

    Violence by patients against staff members in mental health institutions has become an important challenge. Violent attacks may not only cause bodily injuries but can also have posttraumatic consequences with high rates of stress for mental health staff. This study prospectively assessed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in employees who were severely assaulted by patients in nine German state mental health institutions. During the study period of six months 46 assaulted staff members were reported. Each staff member was interviewed three times after the violent incident, using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), a widely used PTSD research tool, as well as the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist--Civilian (PCL-C). In the baseline assessment following an assault by a patient, eight subjects (17%) met the criteria for PTSD. After two and six months, three and four subjects respectively still met diagnosis criteria. A small minority of assaulted employees suffer from PTSD for several months after a patient assault.

  12. Academic staff promotion in higher education by using Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saaludin, Nurashikin; Harun, Suriyati; Wahab, Siti Zahariah Abdul; Yahya, Yasmin

    2016-10-01

    The academic staff promotional system varies according to the nature of the work and designation within an organization. It is vital to enhance the system in local higher education standard to an international education standard. In Universiti Kuala Lumpur (UniKL); teaching and supervision, research and publication, administration and management, professional contribution to the society and scholarly recognition are the main criteria being used in appraising its staff. The purpose of this study is to improve the method of academic staff promotional system by using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). In AHP, pair wise comparison is used to obtain the weightage score for every candidate. The results show that by implementing the new system, UniKL will be able to better produce academic staff who are responsive to the university's mission and vision. The qualified candidates will be based on the highest overall score. The reliability level of the results obtained in this study is less than 0.1 of the inconsistency ratio (CR).

  13. Academic staff recruitment and retention challenges at the University of Botswana medical school.

    PubMed

    Kebaetse, Maikutlo; Mokone, Gaonyadiwe George; Badlangana, Ludo; Mazhani, Loeto

    2016-06-17

    Sub-Saharan Africa has a greater share of the global burden of disease, poverty, and inadequate human resources for health compared with other regions of the world. Botswana, as other regional countries, is failing to successfully recruit and retain academics at its medical school. To document the medical school's staff recruitment and retention trends and challenges, and to propose possible solutions. This was a descriptive research study involving review and analysis of the University of Botswana medical school's staff number targets, actual numbers on post, and other relevant publicly available university documents. The numbers and country of origin of staff recruited from 2008 to 2013 were recorded. Net staff gain or loss per year was then calculated. Student numbers were analysed and related to staff availability. As there was a multilevel change in university management in 2011, the periods and events before and after April 2011 were analysed. Publicly available University of Botswana documents about the university's organisational structure, policies, and processes were reviewed. Over a 5-year period, the school recruited 74 academics worldwide; 30 of them left the school. Retention was a greater challenge than recruitment. The school had difficulty recruiting locals and senior academics, regardless of specialty. It appears that staff loss occurred regardless of country of origin. The authors suggest that multilevel change in management was one of the most likely contributors to the school's recruitment and retention challenges. The University of Botswana must comprehensively address these.

  14. Becoming and Being an Academic: The Perspectives of Chinese Staff in Two Research-Intensive UK Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Xiaoli; Di Napoli, Roberto; Borg, Michaela; Maunder, Rachel; Fry, Heather; Walsh, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an interview study investigating the experiences of academic acculturation (a process of mutual influence and enrichment with regard to academic practice) of a group of Chinese academic staff in two research-intensive UK universities. Following a systematic content-based analysis, three major themes emerged as salient,…

  15. Donor-derived tuberculosis after solid organ transplantation in two patients and a staff member.

    PubMed

    Bucher, J N; Schoenberg, M B; Freytag, I; Lange, U; Hofmann-Thiel, S; Guba, M O; Werner, J; Eder, A; Schelling, G; Stangl, M

    2016-06-01

    Because of global mobility and migration resulting in a growing diversity of the donor pool, the risk for donor-derived tuberculosis in solid organ transplant recipients becomes more and more relevant, even in countries with a low overall tuberculosis incidence. Here, we describe a case series of donor-derived tuberculosis in 2 of 3 solid organ transplant recipients and one medical staff member in Germany resulting in the death of one recipient. This case series highlights the relevance of this topic to clinicians. It advocates for a better communication between organ procurement organizations and transplant centers regarding donor information and transplant recipient outcome. Furthermore, it underpins the necessity for a standardized critical incident reporting system in the german transplant system to improve short- and long-term recipient's safety, health and survival.

  16. The value of life story work for staff, people with dementia and family members.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Aidín

    2017-05-31

    Dementia is a term used to describe a collection of symptoms that include problems with memory, self-care, reasoning and communication. Care interventions that focus on preserving people's dignity and identity are therefore essential. Using Driscoll's reflective model to guide critical thinking, this article reflects on the use of one intervention, namely life story work, to promote person-centred care for people with dementia. It explores the value or effect of life story work for healthcare staff, the person with dementia and family members. It also highlights best practice guidelines that are useful to consider to promote its optimal success as an intervention in dementia care, for example, instigating it early in the dementia journey and embedding it in a supportive culture. It is important to highlight to nursing students the many positive aspects of incorporating life story work into practice.

  17. Workplace Violence and Perceptions of Safety Among Emergency Department Staff Members: Experiences, Expectations, Tolerance, Reporting, and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Copeland, Darcy; Henry, Melissa

    Workplace violence (WPV) is a widely recognized problem in emergency departments (EDs). The majority of WPV studies do not include nonclinical staff and do not address expectations of violence, tolerance to violence, or perceptions of safety. Among a multidisciplinary sample of ED staff members, specific study aims were to (a) describe exposure to WPV; (b) describe perceptions of safety, tolerance to violence, and expectation of violence; (c) describe reporting behaviors and perceived barriers to reporting violence; (d) examine relationships between demographic variables, experiences of violence, tolerance to violence, perceptions of safety, and reporting behaviors; and (e) identify perceptions of viable interventions to improve workplace safety. A cross-sectional design was used to survey ED staff members in a Level 1 Shock Trauma center. Eleven disciplines were represented in 147 completed surveys; 88% of respondents reported exposure to WPV in the previous 6 months. Members of every discipline reported exposure to WPV; 98% of the sample felt safe at work and 64% felt violence was an expected part of the job. Most violence was not reported, primarily because "nobody was hurt." Emergency department staff members expected and experienced violence; nevertheless, there was a widespread perception of safety. Perceptions of safety and reasons for not reporting did not mirror previous findings. The WPV exposure is not isolated to clinical staff members and occurs even when prevention strategies are in place. The definition of WPV and the individual's interpretation of the event might preclude reporting.

  18. The After-Death Call to Family Members: Academic Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LoboPrabhu, Sheila; Molinari, Victor; Pate, Jennifer; Lomax, James

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors discuss clinical and teaching aspects of a telephone call by the treating clinician to family members after a patient dies. Methods: A MEDLINE search was conducted for references to an after-death call made by the treating clinician to family members. A review of this literature is summarized. Results: A clinical application…

  19. Education, training, and academic experience of newly hired, first-time pharmacy faculty members.

    PubMed

    Wanat, Matthew A; Fleming, Marc L; Fernandez, Julianna M; Garey, Kevin W

    2014-06-17

    Objective. To describe the education, training, and academic experiences of newly hired faculty members at US colleges and schools of pharmacy during the 2012-2013 academic year. Methods. A survey regarding education, training, and academic experiences was conducted of all first-time faculty members at US colleges and schools of pharmacy hired during the 2012-2013 academic year. Results. Pharmacy practice faculty members accounted for the majority (68.2%) of new hires. Ambulatory care was the most common pharmacy specialty position (29.8%). Most new faculty members had a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) as their terminal degree (74.8%), and 88.3% of pharmacy practice faculty members completed a residency. Of new faculty members who responded to the survey, 102 (67.5%) had at least 3 prior academic teaching, precepting, or research experiences. Conclusion. New faculty members were hired most frequently for clinical faculty positions at the assistant professor level and most frequently in the specialty of ambulatory care. Prior academic experience included precepting pharmacy students, facilitating small discussions, and guest lecturing.

  20. Education, Training, and Academic Experience of Newly Hired, First-Time Pharmacy Faculty Members

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Marc L.; Fernandez, Julianna M.; Garey, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the education, training, and academic experiences of newly hired faculty members at US colleges and schools of pharmacy during the 2012-2013 academic year. Methods. A survey regarding education, training, and academic experiences was conducted of all first-time faculty members at US colleges and schools of pharmacy hired during the 2012-2013 academic year. Results. Pharmacy practice faculty members accounted for the majority (68.2%) of new hires. Ambulatory care was the most common pharmacy specialty position (29.8%). Most new faculty members had a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) as their terminal degree (74.8%), and 88.3% of pharmacy practice faculty members completed a residency. Of new faculty members who responded to the survey, 102 (67.5%) had at least 3 prior academic teaching, precepting, or research experiences. Conclusion. New faculty members were hired most frequently for clinical faculty positions at the assistant professor level and most frequently in the specialty of ambulatory care. Prior academic experience included precepting pharmacy students, facilitating small discussions, and guest lecturing. PMID:24954932

  1. Motivational Climate, Staff and Members' Behaviors, and Members' Psychological Well-Being at a National Fitness Franchise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Theresa C.; Fry, Mary D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between members' perceptions of staff's behaviors, motivational climate, their own behaviors, commitment to future exercise, and life satisfaction in a group-fitness setting. The theory-driven hypothesized mediating role of perceptions of the climate was also tested.…

  2. Nursing home staff members' subjective frames of reference on residents' achievement of ego integrity: A Q-methodology study.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sun-Young; Chang, Sung-Ok

    2017-02-28

    To discover the structure of the frames of reference for nursing home staff members' subjective judgment of residents' achievement of ego integrity. Q-methodology was applied. Twenty-eight staff members who were working in a nursing home sorted 34 Q-statements into the shape of a normal distribution. A centroid factor analysis and varimax rotation, using the PQ-method program, revealed four factors: identifying clues to residents' positive acceptance of their whole life span, identifying residents' ways of enjoying their current life, referencing residents' attitudes and competencies toward harmonious relationships, and identifying residents' integrated efforts to establish self-esteem. These subjective frames of reference need to be investigated in order to improve the relationships with nursing home residents and their quality of life. Consequently, the fundamental monitoring tools to help staff members make subjective judgments can be formed. © 2017 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  3. Staff Member Reactions to Same-Gender, Resident-to-Resident Sexual Behavior Within Long-Term Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Ahrendt, Andrew; Sprankle, Eric; Kuka, Alex; McPherson, Keagan

    2016-10-13

    The current study assesses ageism and heterosexism relating to older adult sexual activity within long-term care facilities. To assess caregiver reactions, 153 residential care facility staff members read one of three vignettes. Each vignette described a scenario in which a staff member walks in on two residents (male/female, male/male, or female/female) engaging in sexual activity. Although no main effects were discovered for vignette type, exploratory analyses revealed that the facility where participants were employed was significantly related to their ratings of approval. Furthermore, an interaction effect between vignette and facility types was also discovered for caregivers' approval of sexual activity among residents. Additionally, a strong overall approval rating of older adult sexuality was reported by staff members. The results of this study warrant that further research is necessary regarding older adults' perception of caregiver bias, as well as further investigation of caregivers' perceptions of older adults' sexual activity.

  4. 'It's in the eyes': how family members and care staff understand awareness in people with severe dementia.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Catherine; Clare, Linda; Jelley, Hannah; Bruce, Errollyn; Woods, Bob

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we explored how family members and care staff understand awareness in people with severe dementia and what this awareness means to them. We conducted four focus groups between 2007 and 2009 in the UK with 11 family members and 12 care staff. Transcripts of the focus groups were analysed using thematic analysis. A model of awareness emerged in which the perceived level of awareness in the person with dementia was influenced by an interaction between attributes of the person with dementia and the environment, with expressions of awareness being hindered by environmental factors and facilitated through appropriate stimulation. Awareness did fluctuate, and differences in interpretations of awareness were linked to the meaning assigned to particular kinds of responses. For family members, awareness was intrinsically linked to their emotional connection with the person with dementia. For care staff, identifying signs of awareness helped them to do their job and enabled them to feel that they had connected with the person with dementia. The findings of this study suggest that care staff would benefit from training both on identifying awareness and on providing suitable activities for people with severe dementia. Care staff and family members would also benefit from greater sharing of information about the person with dementia. This could help to enhance quality of life for person with dementia and improve quality of care.

  5. Strategic Planning Effectiveness in Jordanian Universities: Faculty Members' and Academic Administrators' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Omari, Aieman Ahmad; Salameh, Kayed M.

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to explore the faculty and academic administrators' perception of strategic planning effectiveness (SPE) in a reform environment, measuring the impact of university type, gender, and job role. A total of 338 faculty members and 183 academic administrators who enrolled during the first semester of the 2007-08 term at a public and a…

  6. How much do residential aged care staff members know about the nutritional needs of residents?

    PubMed

    Beattie, Elizabeth; O'Reilly, Maria; Strange, Elise; Franklin, Sara; Isenring, Elisabeth

    2014-03-01

    Undernutrition, weight loss and dehydration are major clinical issues for people with dementia in residential care, with excessive weight loss contributing to increased risk of frailty, immobility, illness and premature morbidity. This paper discusses a nutritional knowledge and attitudes survey conducted as part of a larger project focused on improving nutritional intake of people with dementia within a residential care facility in Brisbane, Australia. The specific aims of the survey were to identify (i) knowledge of the nutritional needs of aged care facility residents; (ii) mealtime practices; and (iii) attitudes towards mealtime practices and organisation. A survey based on those used in other healthcare settings was completed by 76 staff members. The survey included questions about nutritional knowledge, opinions of the food service, frequency of feeding assistance provided and feeding assessment practices. Nutritional knowledge scores ranged from 1 to 9 of a possible 10, with a mean score of 4.67. While 76% of respondents correctly identified risk factors associated with malnutrition in nursing home residents, only 38% of participants correctly identified the need for increased protein and energy in residents with pressure ulcers, and just 15% exhibited correct knowledge of fluid requirements. Further, while nutritional assessment was considered an important part of practice by 83% of respondents, just 53% indicated that they actually carried out such assessments. Identified barriers to promoting optimal nutrition included insufficient time to observe residents (56%); being unaware of residents' feeding issues (46%); poor knowledge of nutritional assessments (44%); and unappetising appearance of food served (57%). An important step towards improving health and quality of life for residents of aged care facilities would be to enhance staff nutritional awareness and assessment skills. This should be carried out through increased attention to both preservice

  7. Encountering Anger in the Emergency Department: Identification, Evaluations and Responses of Staff Members to Anger Displays

    PubMed Central

    Arik, Cheshin; Anat, Rafaeli; Arie, Eisenman

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anger manifestations in emergency departments (EDs) occur daily, interrupting workflow and exposing staff to risk. Objectives. How staff assess and recognize patients' angry outbursts in EDs and elucidate responses to anger expressions, while considering effects of institution guidelines. Methods. Observations of staff patient interaction in EDs and personal interviews of staff (n = 38) were conducted. Two questionnaires were administered (n = 80 & n = 144). Assessment was based mainly on regression statistic tests. Results. Staff recognizes two types of anger displays. Magnitude of anger expressions were correlated with staff's fear level. Staff's responses ranged from ignoring incidents, giving in to patients' requests or immediately calling security. When staff felt fear and became angry they tended to call security. Staff was more likely to ignore anger when incident responsibility was assigned to patients. Discussion. Anger encounters are differentiated according to intensity level, which influences interpretations and response. Organizational policy has an effect on staff's response. Conclusions. Staff recognizes anger at varying levels and responds accordingly. The level of danger staff feels is a catalyst in giving in or calling security. Call security is influenced by fear, and anger. Permanent guidelines can help staff in responding to anger encounters. PMID:22919497

  8. Encountering anger in the emergency department: identification, evaluations and responses of staff members to anger displays.

    PubMed

    Arik, Cheshin; Anat, Rafaeli; Arie, Eisenman

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anger manifestations in emergency departments (EDs) occur daily, interrupting workflow and exposing staff to risk. Objectives. How staff assess and recognize patients' angry outbursts in EDs and elucidate responses to anger expressions, while considering effects of institution guidelines. Methods. Observations of staff patient interaction in EDs and personal interviews of staff (n = 38) were conducted. Two questionnaires were administered (n = 80 & n = 144). Assessment was based mainly on regression statistic tests. Results. Staff recognizes two types of anger displays. Magnitude of anger expressions were correlated with staff's fear level. Staff's responses ranged from ignoring incidents, giving in to patients' requests or immediately calling security. When staff felt fear and became angry they tended to call security. Staff was more likely to ignore anger when incident responsibility was assigned to patients. Discussion. Anger encounters are differentiated according to intensity level, which influences interpretations and response. Organizational policy has an effect on staff's response. Conclusions. Staff recognizes anger at varying levels and responds accordingly. The level of danger staff feels is a catalyst in giving in or calling security. Call security is influenced by fear, and anger. Permanent guidelines can help staff in responding to anger encounters.

  9. Exploring Faculty Members' Motivation and Persistence in Academic Service-Learning Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Alexa; Newman, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study provides a theoretical framework for understanding faculty members' motivation to persist in utilizing academic service-learning pedagogy. Twenty-four faculty members from a private liberal arts university in the southeastern United States were interviewed about the benefits and challenges of teaching academic…

  10. Need for ethics support in healthcare institutions: views of Dutch board members and ethics support staff.

    PubMed

    Dauwerse, Linda; Abma, Tineke; Molewijk, Bert; Widdershoven, Guy

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the need for ethics support in Dutch healthcare institutions in order to understand why ethics support is often not used in practice and which factors are relevant in this context. This study had a mixed methods design integrating quantitative and qualitative research methods. Two survey questionnaires, two focus groups and 17 interviews were conducted among board members and ethics support staff in Dutch healthcare institutions. Most respondents see a need for ethics support. This need is related to the complexity of contemporary healthcare, the contribution of ethics support to the core business of the organisation and to the surplus value of paying structural attention to ethical issues. The need for ethics support is, however, not unconditional. Reasons for a lacking need include: aversion of innovations, negative associations with the notion of ethics support service, and organisational factors like resources and setting. There is a conditioned need for ethics support in Dutch healthcare institutions. The promotion of ethics support in healthcare can be fostered by focusing on formats which fit the needs of (practitioners in) healthcare institutions. The emphasis should be on creating a (culture of) dialogue about the complex situations which emerge daily in contemporary healthcare practice.

  11. Human parvovirus B19 infection among hospital staff members after contact with infected patients.

    PubMed

    Bell, L M; Naides, S J; Stoffman, P; Hodinka, R L; Plotkin, S A

    1989-08-24

    In the spring and summer of 1988, two separate outbreaks of an illness with a rash resembling erythema infectiosum occurred among members of the nursing staff of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The sources were two adolescent patients with sickle cell disease and aplastic crisis who had unsuspected parvovirus infection. Tests for IgM and IgG antibodies to parvovirus B19 were positive in both patients, and electron microscopical examination showed parvovirus-like particles in the early serum samples. Of 40 health care workers exposed to infected patients, 12 (30 percent) were infected, 2 (5 percent) were possibly infected, 8 (20 percent) had evidence of a past infection with B19, and 18 (45 percent) remained seronegative. Attack rates among the susceptible contacts were 36 percent in the first outbreak and at least 38 percent in the second. Clinical symptoms began a mean of 12.6 days after exposure and included malaise, rash, and joint pain. We conclude that hospital workers are at risk of contracting nosocomial erythema infectiosum from patients with parvovirus-associated aplastic crisis. We recommend that all patients with hereditary hemolytic anemias who are admitted with a febrile illness be evaluated for aplasia and promptly placed in respiratory and contact isolation if aplastic crisis is suspected.

  12. The Impact of Occupational Stress on Academic and Administrative Staff, and on Students: An Empirical Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ablanedo-Rosas, Jose Humberto; Blevins, Randall C.; Gao, Hongman; Teng, Wen-Yuan; White, Joann

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the impact of occupational stress among academic staff, administrative staff, and students in a well-established US university environment. The results show that there are different correlations associated with stress such as organisational demand, health issues, and stress management. Findings suggest that occupational…

  13. The Impact of Occupational Stress on Academic and Administrative Staff, and on Students: An Empirical Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ablanedo-Rosas, Jose Humberto; Blevins, Randall C.; Gao, Hongman; Teng, Wen-Yuan; White, Joann

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the impact of occupational stress among academic staff, administrative staff, and students in a well-established US university environment. The results show that there are different correlations associated with stress such as organisational demand, health issues, and stress management. Findings suggest that occupational…

  14. The Globalisation of Higher Education and the Sojourner Academic: Insights into Challenges Experienced by Newly Appointed International Academic Staff in a UK University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    The increasingly diverse nature of the higher education academic community in the United Kingdom is under-researched and under-theorised. This article presents an exploratory study of the lived experiences of newly appointed international academic staff as expressed in their written reflections on their professional practice and interpreted by the…

  15. NAIS Member School Tuition Fees, Teacher Salaries, Administrator and Staff Salaries, 1986-87. NAIS Statistics, Fall 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Independent Schools, Boston, MA.

    This report is compiled from information provided by National Association of Independent Schools member schools in a 1986 survey of school tuitions and staff salaries. Of the 900 schools in the United States and Canada that were surveyed, 853, or 94.8 percent, responded. The report is organized in five sections. Section 1 summarizes survey results…

  16. A Study of Faculty, Administrative, and Staff Perceptions of the Climate for Shared Governance at Appalachian College Association Member Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Tanya L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how faculty, administrators, and staff perceived the climate for shared governance at 36 member institutions of the Appalachian College Association (ACA), based on standards for sound shared governance in higher education as outlined by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP). Numerous…

  17. Conversations among Black Staff Members at a Historically White Afrikaans University Campus on Issues of Race, Social Justice and Reconciliation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nel, Willy

    2012-01-01

    In an ethnographically designed study, guided by a critical community psychology framework, Black staff members at a historically White Afrikaans university campus conducted email conversations relating to issues of race, social justice and reconciliation. The conversations were initiated by the author (Black) who mainly used prompts found in the…

  18. A Study of Faculty, Administrative, and Staff Perceptions of the Climate for Shared Governance at Appalachian College Association Member Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Tanya L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how faculty, administrators, and staff perceived the climate for shared governance at 36 member institutions of the Appalachian College Association (ACA), based on standards for sound shared governance in higher education as outlined by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP). Numerous…

  19. Increasing the Usage of a School District Web Site by Training Staff and Community Members in Its Use and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willome, Mike

    This goal of this project was to create a public school district World Wide Web site that staff and community members would use more frequently. The project included three solutions. First, 33 one-on-one and small-group training sessions were conducted to increase awareness and improve Web services. A Web-site advisory committee, which developed…

  20. Expatriate Academic Staff in the United Arab Emirates: The Nature of Their Work Experiences in Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ann E.; Chapman, David W.; Farah, Samar; Wilson, Elisabeth; Ridge, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    As many countries expand their higher education systems, they must attract, support, and retain qualified academic staff. This paper focuses on the United Arab Emirates (UAE) as a case study of a nation drawing on large numbers of mostly expatriate faculty working in short-term academic appointments. The paper begins by considering the national…

  1. Expatriate Academic Staff in the United Arab Emirates: The Nature of Their Work Experiences in Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ann E.; Chapman, David W.; Farah, Samar; Wilson, Elisabeth; Ridge, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    As many countries expand their higher education systems, they must attract, support, and retain qualified academic staff. This paper focuses on the United Arab Emirates (UAE) as a case study of a nation drawing on large numbers of mostly expatriate faculty working in short-term academic appointments. The paper begins by considering the national…

  2. Implementing a video-based intervention to empower staff members in an autism care organization: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alex; Finch, Tracy; Kolehmainen, Niina; James, Deborah

    2016-10-21

    Implementing good-quality health and social care requires empowerment of staff members within organizations delivering care. Video Interaction Guidance (VIG) is an intervention using positive video feedback to empower staff through reflection on practice. This qualitative study explored the implementation of VIG within an autism care organization in England, from the perspective of staff members undergoing training to deliver VIG. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 7 participants working within the organization (5 staff undergoing training to deliver VIG; 2 senior managers influencing co-ordination of training). Participants were asked about their views of VIG and its implementation. The topic guide was informed by Normalization Process Theory (NPT). Data were analysed inductively and emerging issues were related to NPT. Five broad themes were identified: (1) participants reported that they and other staff did not understand VIG until they became involved, initially believing it would highlight negative rather than positive practice; (2) enthusiastic feedback from staff who had been involved seemed to encourage other staff to become involved; (3) key implementation challenges included demands of daily work and securing managers' support; (4) ideas for future practice arising from empowerment through VIG seemed difficult to realise within an organizational culture reportedly unreceptive to creative ideas from staff; (5) individuals' emotional responses to implementation seemed beyond the reach of NPT, which focused more upon collective processes. Implementation of VIG may require recognition that it is not a 'quick fix'. Peer advocacy may be a fruitful implementation strategy. Senior managers may need to experience VIG to develop their understanding so that they can provide appropriate implementation support. NPT may lack specificity to explain how individual agency weaves with collective processes and social systems to embed

  3. The Blue Book for Members of the Teaching Staff. Wesleyan University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT.

    The 1975-76 faculty handbook for Wesleyan University covers: (1) the charter; (2) college body constitution; (3) academic standards; (4) academic freedom; (5) tenure; (6) student rights; (7) academic regulations; (8) faculty benefits; (9) insurance programs; (10) sabbatical leave and leaves of absence; (11) student privileges; (12) tuition…

  4. Immigrants with dementia in Swedish residential care: an exploratory study of the experiences of their family members and Nursing staff.

    PubMed

    Rosendahl, Sirpa Pietilä; Söderman, Mirkka; Mazaheri, Monir

    2016-01-16

    Worldwide, there is a growing population of older people who develop dementia in a country other than that of their origin. When their dementia has reached an advanced stage, residential care is most often needed. People with dementia in Sweden are often cared for in group homes. For immigrants, this may mean a linguistically challenging care environment for both healthcare staff and the patients' family members. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of family members and professional caregivers regarding the care provided to immigrants with dementia in group homes in Sweden. An exploratory, descriptive study with a qualitative approach was chosen. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine professional caregivers and five family members of people with dementia with Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian and Ingrian backgrounds; all were chosen purposefully. All people with dementia had lost their Swedish language skills as their second language. The data was analysed using qualitative content analysis. Three main categories and seven subcategories were identified. The first main category: A new living situation comprised the subcategories: adjusting to new living arrangements and expectations regarding activities and traditional food at the group home, the second main category: Challenges in communication with the subcategories: limited communication between the immigrant with dementia and the Swedish-speaking nursing staff and the consequences of linguistic misunderstandings and nuanced communication in a common language and the third main category: The role of the family member at the group home with the subcategories: a link to the healthy life story of the family member with dementia and an expert and interpreter for the nursing staff. The family member played a crucial role in the lives of immigrants with dementia living in a group home by facilitating communication between the nursing staff and the PWD and also by making

  5. Issues Facing Academic Library Consortia and Perceptions of Members of the Illinois Digital Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Sam; Dorst, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the role of consortia in academic libraries, specifically the Illinois Digital Academic Library (IDAL), and describes a study conducted by the IDAL that investigated issues surrounding full text database research including stability of content, vendor communication, embargo periods, publisher concerns, quality of content, linking and…

  6. The opinions and attitudes of dental school academic staff towards oral healthcare education for older adults.

    PubMed

    Haresaku, S; Mariño, R; Naito, T; Morgan, M V

    2016-08-01

    The term 'oral health care for older adults' has various interpretations, and its meaning is not clear among dental school academic staff. Additionally, there are no theoretical or practical stand-alone courses on oral health care for older adults in Japanese dental schools. To improve oral health care education, we investigated the opinions and attitudes toward oral health care education for older adults among academic staff in dental schools. Data were collected in seven dental schools from May to September 2013 via an online questionnaire survey. Five-hundred-fifty-eight academics (428 male, 130 female) participated (response rate 57%). The average number of years since they had completed a university degree was 20.2 (SD 10.2) years. The majority (Over 90%) of participants perceived that oral health care should be provided in nursing facilities, hospitals, and at home. Its treatments and instructions should include, not only methods of keeping good oral hygiene, but also improvement of oral function such as swallowing training and salivary glands massage. The majority (84.2%) suggested oral health care education should be combined as a one-credit, stand-alone course. Findings indicate that dental academics have an understanding the need for a course in oral health care for older adults. Participants supported the need for further development of education in oral health care for older adults' in Japan, as a separate course on its own right. However there were some different views about content by teaching field. The need for a national core program for teaching oral health care education was suggested.

  7. Post-traumatic stress disorder following patient assaults among staff members of mental health hospitals: a prospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Dirk; Berger, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Background Violence by patients against staff members in mental health institutions has become an important challenge. Violent attacks may not only cause bodily injuries but can also have posttraumatic consequences with high rates of stress for mental health staff. This study prospectively assessed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in employees who were severely assaulted by patients in nine German state mental health institutions. Methods During the study period of six months 46 assaulted staff members were reported. Each staff member was interviewed three times after the violent incident, using the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), a widely used PTSD research tool, as well as the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist – Civilian (PCL-C). Results In the baseline assessment following an assault by a patient, eight subjects (17%) met the criteria for PTSD. After two and six months, three and four subjects respectively still met diagnosis criteria. Conclusion A small minority of assaulted employees suffer from PTSD for several months after a patient assault. PMID:16606454

  8. Faculty and Staff Member Benefits from Involvement in Living-Learning Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Cliff; Janosik, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the benefits that faculty and student affairs staff gain from being involved in Living-Learning Programs (LLPs) and to explore any differences between the two groups. Faculty and student affairs staff (N = 268) report gaining intrinsic benefits more often than extrinsic benefits from their involvement in…

  9. Occupational Well-Being of School Staff Members: A Structural Equation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saaranen, Terhi; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Vertio, Harri

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a theoretical basis for the promotion of school staff's occupational well-being. The "Content Model for the Promotion of School Community Staff's Occupational Well-being" describes the four aspects of the promotion of occupational well-being ("working conditions", "worker and work",…

  10. Is restraint a 'necessary evil' in mental health care? Mental health inpatients' and staff members' experience of physical restraint.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Ceri; Rouse, Lorna; Rae, Sarah; Kar Ray, Manaan

    2017-10-01

    Restraint in mental health care has negative consequences, and guidelines/policies calling for its reduction have emerged internationally. However, there is tension between reducing restraint and maintaining safety. In order to reduce restraint, it is important to gain an understanding of the experience for all involved. The aim of the present study was to improve understanding of the experience of restraint for patients and staff with direct experience and witnesses. Interviews were conducted with 13 patients and 22 staff members from one UK National Health Service trust. The overarching theme, 'is restraint a necessary evil?', contained subthemes fitting into two ideas represented in the quote: 'it never is very nice but…it's a necessary evil'. It 'never is very nice' was demonstrated by the predominantly negative emotional and relational outcomes reported (distress, fear, dehumanizing, negative impact on staff/patient relationships, decreased job satisfaction). However, a common theme from both staff and patients was that, while restraint is 'never very nice', it is a 'necessary evil' when used as a last resort due to safety concerns. Mental health-care providers are under political pressure from national governments to reduce restraint, which is important in terms of reducing its negative outcomes for patients and staff; however, more research is needed into alternatives to restraint, while addressing the safety concerns of all parties. We need to ensure that by reducing or eliminating restraint, mental health wards neither become, nor feel, unsafe to patients or staff. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  11. Multi-institutional study of women and underrepresented minority faculty members in academic pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Spivey, Christina A; Billheimer, Dean; Schlesselman, Lauren S; Flowers, Schwanda K; Hammer, Dana; Engle, Janet P; Nappi, Jean M; Pasko, Mary T; Ross, Leigh Ann; Sorofman, Bernard; Rodrigues, Helena A; Vaillancourt, Allison M

    2012-02-10

    To examine trends in the numbers of women and underrepresented minority (URM) pharmacy faculty members over the last 20 years, and determine factors influencing women faculty members' pursuit and retention of an academic pharmacy career. Twenty-year trends in women and URM pharmacy faculty representation were examined. Women faculty members from 9 public colleges and schools of pharmacy were surveyed regarding demographics, job satisfaction, and their academic pharmacy career, and relationships between demographics and satisfaction were analyzed. The number of women faculty members more than doubled between 1989 and 2009 (from 20.7% to 45.5%), while the number of URM pharmacy faculty members increased only slightly over the same time period. One hundred fifteen women faculty members completed the survey instrument and indicated they were generally satisfied with their jobs. The academic rank of professor, being a nonpharmacy practice faculty member, being tenured/tenure track, and having children were associated with significantly lower satisfaction with fringe benefits. Women faculty members who were tempted to leave academia for other pharmacy sectors had significantly lower salary satisfaction and overall job satisfaction, and were more likely to indicate their expectations of academia did not match their experiences (p<0.05). The significant increase in the number of women pharmacy faculty members over the last 20 years may be due to the increased number of female pharmacy graduates and to women faculty members' satisfaction with their careers. Lessons learned through this multi-institutional study and review may be applicable to initiatives to improve recruitment and retention of URM pharmacy faculty members.

  12. The use of pass/fail grades to assess academic achievement and house staff performance.

    PubMed

    Stimmel, B

    1975-07-01

    The advantages of a formal grading system in assessing a student's capability to practice medicine remain controversial. Students prefer the pass/fail method, while faculty lean toward the traditional approach. The efficacy of a modified pass/fail grading system in detecting superior academic achievement, as well as in predicting house staff performance, was evaluated. Mean scores on the examinations of the National Board of Medical Examiners of students selected fo Alpha Omega Alpha were significantly higher than those of other students, although the faculty was unaware of these results when selecting candidates. Chairmen in institutions where 125 students had served their first graduate year of training felt that 85 percent of the dean's letters summarizing the student's academic performance over a three-year period accurately indicated subsequent performance on the house staff. These results suggest that a modified pass/fail grading system can detect superior students as well as provide relevant information with respect to subsequent performance as a physician.

  13. Hypertension and anthropometry measurement on academic staff at public universities in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifli, Ilya Zulaikha; Abdullah, Mohammad Nasir; Baharuddin, Mohd Sapuan; Arul, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    Hypertension or most commonly known as high blood pressure is a non-communicable disease affecting to health of people with non-detectible cause (primary) and some with determined causes (secondary). The prevalence of hypertension morbidity was very high globally, the consequences of the disease if not been treated is death. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between hypertension and anthropometry measurements such as weight, height and body mass index among academic staff in public universities in Malaysia. The design for this study was cross-sectional and the method for data collection was mailed questionnaire. The initial sample size for this study was 189, therefore, 500 questionnaires were distributed to randomly selected academicians in public universities, colleges and polytechnics in Malaysia. However, only 101 questionnaires were returned and were analysed in this study. The target population were academicians which includes lecturers and senior lecturers in public universities in Malaysia. The methods of analysis employed was logistic regression and frequency analysis. It was found that weight, height and body mass index (BMI) have no significant relationship with hypertension but based on the Crude Odd Ratio, all these three anthropometry measures showed that there were protective risk of hypertension among lecturers and senior lecturers in public university, Malaysia. In a nutshell, there were no evidence to conclude that anthropometry measurements can affect hypertension status among academic staff at public university.

  14. Relationships Among Student, Staff, and Administrative Measures of School Climate and Student Health and Academic Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gase, Lauren N; Gomez, Louis M; Kuo, Tony; Glenn, Beth A; Inkelas, Moira; Ponce, Ninez A

    2017-05-01

    School climate is an integral part of a comprehensive approach to improving the well-being of students; however, little is known about the relationships between its different domains and measures. We examined the relationships between student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate to understand the extent to which they were related to each other and student outcomes. The sample included 33,572 secondary school students from 121 schools in Los Angeles County during the 2014-2015 academic year. A multilevel regression model was constructed to examine the association between the domains and measures of school climate and 5 outcomes of student well-being: depressive symptoms or suicidal ideation, tobacco use, alcohol use, marijuana use, and grades. Student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate were weakly correlated. Strong associations were found between student outcomes and student reports of engagement and safety, while school staff reports and administrative measures of school climate showed limited associations with student outcomes. As schools seek to measure and implement interventions aimed at improving school climate, consideration should be given to grounding these efforts in a multidimensional conceptualization of climate that values student perspectives and includes elements of both engagement and safety. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  15. Academic hospital staff compliance with a fecal immunochemical test-based colorectal cancer screening program.

    PubMed

    Vlachonikolou, Georgia; Gkolfakis, Paraskevas; Sioulas, Athanasios D; Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Melissaratou, Anastasia; Moustafa, Giannis-Aimant; Xanthopoulou, Eleni; Tsilimidos, Gerasimos; Tsironi, Ioanna; Filippidis, Paraskevas; Malli, Chrysoula; Dimitriadis, George D; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos

    2016-08-15

    To measure the compliance of an Academic Hospital staff with a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program using fecal immunochemical test (FIT). All employees of "Attikon" University General Hospital aged over 50 years were thoroughly informed by a team of physicians and medical students about the study aims and they were invited to undergo CRC screening using two rounds of FIT (DyoniFOB(®) Combo H, DyonMed SA, Athens, Greece). The tests were provided for free and subjects tested positive were subsequently referred for colonoscopy. One year after completing the two rounds, participants were asked to be re-screened by means of the same test. Among our target population consisted of 211 employees, 59 (27.9%) consented to participate, but only 41 (19.4%) and 24 (11.4%) completed the first and the second FIT round, respectively. Female gender was significantly associated with higher initial participation (P = 0.005) and test completion - first and second round - (P = 0.004 and P = 0.05) rates, respectively. Physician's (13.5% vs 70.2%, P < 0.0001) participation and test completion rates (7.5% vs 57.6%, P < 0.0001 for the first and 2.3% vs 34%, P < 0.0001 for the second round) were significantly lower compared to those of the administrative/technical staff. Similarly, nurses participated (25.8% vs 70.2%, P = 0.0002) and completed the first test round (19.3% vs 57.6%, P = 0.004) in a significant lower rate than the administrative/technical staff. One test proved false positive. No participant repeated the test one year later. Despite the well-organized, guided and supervised provision of the service, the compliance of the Academic Hospital personnel with a FIT-based CRC screening program was suboptimal, especially among physicians.

  16. "There's a Problem, and We've Got to Face It": How Staff Members Wrestled with Race in an Urban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buehler, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Educators who initiate school reform work often find that attempts to raise student achievement and change school culture are derailed when staff members refuse to address issues of race. At the same time, staff members who collectively resist engaging in discussions of racism and racial inequality may be actively involved in their own individual…

  17. Survey of staff and family members of patients in Bulgarian hospices on the concept of "good death".

    PubMed

    Aleksandrova-Yankulovska, Silviya; ten Have, Henk

    2015-03-01

    The concept of a "good death" has been intensely discussed over the past decades. The objective of this study is to investigate this concept among staff and patients' relatives in 29 Bulgarian hospices and 5 palliative care units. Self-administered questionnaires were completed by 190 members of staff and 216 patients' relatives. Death without pain and suffering and death in one's sleep were leading concepts in both the groups. Staff preferred death in the presence of relatives, while relatives preferred fast and sudden death. Although we were able to define the common concept of a good death as painless and sudden death in one's sleep, death is unique phenomenon and good palliative care should be based on communication with patients about their idea of a good death.

  18. Staff members of community services for people with intellectual disability and severe mental illness: values, attitudes, and burnout.

    PubMed

    Tartakovsky, Eugene; Gafter-Shor, Adi; Perelman-Hayim, Moran

    2013-11-01

    The study focused on the connections between the value preferences, attitudes toward community living, and burnout among staff members of community services for people with intellectual disability (n=126) and severe mental illness (n=96) in Israel. A higher preference for the self-transcendence values and a lower preference for the self-enhancement values were associated with the staff members' positive attitudes toward their clients' empowerment, a higher sense of similarity, and a negative attitude toward exclusion. In addition, a higher preference for the self-transcendence values and a lower preference for the self-enhancement values were associated with a lower level of depersonalization and a higher sense of professional accomplishment. Finally, a more positive attitude toward empowerment, a higher sense of similarity, and a more negative attitude toward exclusion were associated with a lower level of burnout. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Educational Background and Academic Rank of Faculty Members within US Schools of Pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Assemi, Mitra; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Sowinski, Kevin M; Corelli, Robin L

    2016-05-25

    Objective. To characterize the educational background and academic rank of faculty members in US schools of pharmacy, estimate the extent to which they are employed by institutions where they received previous training, and determine whether differences in degree origin and rank exist between faculty members in established (≤1995) vs newer programs. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) faculty database and demographic information from the public domain. Results. Among 5516 faculty members, 50.3% held two or more types of degrees. Established schools had a higher median number of faculty members and a higher mean faculty rank than did newer schools. Conclusion. The difference in mean faculty rank highlights the shortage of experienced faculty members in newer schools. Future research efforts should investigate educational attainment in correlation to other faculty and school characteristics and prospectively track and report trends related to pharmacy faculty members composition.

  20. Educational Background and Academic Rank of Faculty Members within US Schools of Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Sowinski, Kevin M.; Corelli, Robin L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To characterize the educational background and academic rank of faculty members in US schools of pharmacy, estimate the extent to which they are employed by institutions where they received previous training, and determine whether differences in degree origin and rank exist between faculty members in established (≤1995) vs newer programs. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted using the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) faculty database and demographic information from the public domain. Results. Among 5516 faculty members, 50.3% held two or more types of degrees. Established schools had a higher median number of faculty members and a higher mean faculty rank than did newer schools. Conclusion. The difference in mean faculty rank highlights the shortage of experienced faculty members in newer schools. Future research efforts should investigate educational attainment in correlation to other faculty and school characteristics and prospectively track and report trends related to pharmacy faculty members composition. PMID:27293228

  1. When care situations evoke difficult emotions in nursing staff members: an ethnographic study in two Norwegian nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Sandvoll, Anne Marie; Grov, Ellen Karine; Kristoffersen, Kjell; Hauge, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    Caring practice in nursing homes is a complex topic, especially the challenges of meeting the basic needs of residents when their behaviour evokes difficult emotions. Cognitive and physical changes related to aging and disability can contribute to behaviours considered to be unacceptable. For example, resident behaviours such as spitting, making a mess with food or grinding teeth are behaviours that most people do not want to see, hear or experience. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of how nursing home staff members deal with such behaviours in care situations. This article draws on ethnographic data to describe how nursing home staff members manage unpleasant resident behaviours. The study was based on two long-term units in two Norwegian public nursing homes. The Region's Medical Ethics Committee and the Norwegian Social Science Data Services granted approval. In total, 45 participants (37 nursing aides and eight nurses) agreed to participate in this study. Ten of the participants were interviewed at the end of the field study. This study indicates that nursing home staff members experience difficult emotions related to some residents' behaviours. However, they found these feelings difficult to express and rarely verbalized them openly. In addition, they were characterized by a strong obligation to help all residents, despite their own feelings. Therefore, it appears that an inner struggle occurs as a part of everyday practice. Despite these difficult emotions, nursing staff members believed that they needed to manage their responses and continued to offer good care to all residents. These findings extend our understanding of this unarticulated part of nursing home practice.

  2. Multi-Institutional Study of Women and Underrepresented Minority Faculty Members in Academic Pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    Spivey, Christina A.; Billheimer, Dean; Schlesselman, Lauren S.; Flowers, Schwanda K.; Hammer, Dana; Engle, Janet P.; Nappi, Jean M.; Pasko, Mary T.; Ann Ross, Leigh; Sorofman, Bernard; Rodrigues, Helena A.; Vaillancourt, Allison M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine trends in the numbers of women and underrepresented minority (URM) pharmacy faculty members over the last 20 years, and determine factors influencing women faculty members’ pursuit and retention of an academic pharmacy career. Methods. Twenty-year trends in women and URM pharmacy faculty representation were examined. Women faculty members from 9 public colleges and schools of pharmacy were surveyed regarding demographics, job satisfaction, and their academic pharmacy career, and relationships between demographics and satisfaction were analyzed. Results. The number of women faculty members more than doubled between 1989 and 2009 (from 20.7% to 45.5%), while the number of URM pharmacy faculty members increased only slightly over the same time period. One hundred fifteen women faculty members completed the survey instrument and indicated they were generally satisfied with their jobs. The academic rank of professor, being a nonpharmacy practice faculty member, being tenured/tenure track, and having children were associated with significantly lower satisfaction with fringe benefits. Women faculty members who were tempted to leave academia for other pharmacy sectors had significantly lower salary satisfaction and overall job satisfaction, and were more likely to indicate their expectations of academia did not match their experiences (p<0.05). Conclusions. The significant increase in the number of women pharmacy faculty members over the last 20 years may be due to the increased number of female pharmacy graduates and to women faculty members’ satisfaction with their careers. Lessons learned through this multi-institutional study and review may be applicable to initiatives to improve recruitment and retention of URM pharmacy faculty members. PMID:22412206

  3. Academic Crime and Punishment: Faculty Members' Perceptions of and Responses to Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson-Zanartu, Carol; Pena, Elizabeth D.; Cook-Morales, Valerie; Pena, Anna M.; Afshani, Rosalyn; Nguyen, Lynda

    2005-01-01

    Academic dishonesty and its consequences have become increasingly complex. Highly accessible electronic media, profound consequences for misconduct and reporting, and lack of standard practice intensify the issues. We surveyed 270 faculty members to determine whether they had been confronted with plagiarism and if they felt prepared to deal with…

  4. Internationalization of Higher Education and the Impacts on Academic Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedenlier, Svenja; Zawacki-Richter, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Research on internationalization processes in higher education has steadily increased over the past decades. However, there is still a lack of analysis of how these developments have affected higher education and, specifically, the group of academic faculty members. To close this gap, this study explores the effects of internationalization on this…

  5. Internationalization of Higher Education and the Impacts on Academic Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedenlier, Svenja; Zawacki-Richter, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Research on internationalization processes in higher education has steadily increased over the past decades. However, there is still a lack of analysis of how these developments have affected higher education and, specifically, the group of academic faculty members. To close this gap, this study explores the effects of internationalization on this…

  6. Effects of Early Leader-Member Exchange Perceptions on Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacques, Paul H.; Garger, John; Thomas, Michael; Vracheva, Veselina

    2012-01-01

    This study tested a series of hypotheses linking college support and quality of student-instructor relations with outcomes including student efficacy, social connectedness with peers, expectancies and academic performance. Early quality of exchanges with the instructor using Leader-Member Exchange theory was found to be a key indicator of academic…

  7. Analysis of Faculty Members Attitude towards Academic Development Endeavors in Some Selected Ethiopian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seyoum, Yilfashewa

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to analyse the attitudes of faculty members on how the current academic development programs were enacted in selected Ethiopian Universities. With the help of multiple cases design, evidence was gathered from faculty through attitude scale having a reliability index of 0.77. Moreover, a document study including the day-to-day…

  8. Effects of Early Leader-Member Exchange Perceptions on Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacques, Paul H.; Garger, John; Thomas, Michael; Vracheva, Veselina

    2012-01-01

    This study tested a series of hypotheses linking college support and quality of student-instructor relations with outcomes including student efficacy, social connectedness with peers, expectancies and academic performance. Early quality of exchanges with the instructor using Leader-Member Exchange theory was found to be a key indicator of academic…

  9. Academic Teamwork among Members of the National Researchers System in Tamaulipas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzman-Acuña, Teresa; Guzman-Acuña, Josefina; Sánchez-Rodriguez, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the participation of Mexican researchers in the state of Tamaulipas who are members of Mexico's National Researchers System (SNI) and are working in academic groups. The paper also seeks to understand their perceptions in relation to the usefulness of this structured System to their individual research…

  10. Efficacy of communication amongst staff members at plastic and reconstructive surgery section using smartphone and mobile WhatsApp

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Shabeer Ahmad; Rabah, Sari M.; AlFadil, Sara; Dewanjee, Nancy; Najmi, Yahya

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of smartphone and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst the staff of plastic and reconstructive surgery section at tertiary care health facility. Materials and Methods: From January 2012 onwards, the authors used smartphones and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst their team for various aspects of patient management and as a tool for academic endorsements. Results: During the period of this study, there were 116 episodes regarding patient management, which were handled, in a timely fashion by using this application. In addition opinion of rotating residents in the section was sought regarding the efficacy of this method of communication. Overall majority of residents were satisfied with this mode of communication. Conclusions: This new method of communication is an effective method for clinical and academic endorsements. The method is cheap and quick and easy to operate. PMID:24459338

  11. Efficacy of communication amongst staff members at plastic and reconstructive surgery section using smartphone and mobile WhatsApp.

    PubMed

    Wani, Shabeer Ahmad; Rabah, Sari M; Alfadil, Sara; Dewanjee, Nancy; Najmi, Yahya

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the efficacy of smartphone and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst the staff of plastic and reconstructive surgery section at tertiary care health facility. From January 2012 onwards, the authors used smartphones and its WhatsApp application as a communication method amongst their team for various aspects of patient management and as a tool for academic endorsements. During the period of this study, there were 116 episodes regarding patient management, which were handled, in a timely fashion by using this application. In addition opinion of rotating residents in the section was sought regarding the efficacy of this method of communication. Overall majority of residents were satisfied with this mode of communication. This new method of communication is an effective method for clinical and academic endorsements. The method is cheap and quick and easy to operate.

  12. Administrative Staff Members' Job Competency and Their Job Satisfaction in a Korean Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jisun; Shin, Jung Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of administrative staff's job competency on their job satisfaction in a Korean research university. We conceptualized job satisfaction into three subcomponents: satisfaction in the job field, in the workplace, and with the actual task. In the regression analysis, we included demographics, inner…

  13. Comparing Service Priorities between Staff and Users in Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Member Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggars, Damon E.; Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Duffy, Jocelyn S.

    2009-01-01

    Using the results for participating Association of Research Libraries from the 2006 LibQUAL+[R] library service quality survey, we examine the service priorities of library staff (for example, whether desired scores for each survey item are above or below average) and the extent to which they are aligned with the priorities of undergraduates,…

  14. Comparing Service Priorities between Staff and Users in Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Member Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggars, Damon E.; Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Duffy, Jocelyn S.

    2009-01-01

    Using the results for participating Association of Research Libraries from the 2006 LibQUAL+[R] library service quality survey, we examine the service priorities of library staff (for example, whether desired scores for each survey item are above or below average) and the extent to which they are aligned with the priorities of undergraduates,…

  15. Administrative Staff Members' Job Competency and Their Job Satisfaction in a Korean Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jisun; Shin, Jung Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of administrative staff's job competency on their job satisfaction in a Korean research university. We conceptualized job satisfaction into three subcomponents: satisfaction in the job field, in the workplace, and with the actual task. In the regression analysis, we included demographics, inner…

  16. Restraint and Seclusion: The Perspective of Service Users and Staff Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mérineau-Côté, Julie; Morin, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Background: Restrictive measures may have important physical and psychological consequences on all persons involved. The current study examined how these are perceived by persons with intellectual disabilities and staff. Materials and Methods: Interviews were conducted with eight persons with intellectual disabilities who experienced a restrictive…

  17. Early Childhood Teachers' and Staff Members' Perceptions of Nutrition and Physical Activity Practices for Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derscheid, Linda E.; Umoren, Josephine; Kim, So-Yeun; Henry, Beverly W.; Zittel, Lauriece L.

    2010-01-01

    Child care teachers and staff are important influences on preschoolers' nutrition and physical activity habits, and their views may be influenced by education level, years of field experience, and program involvement. For the 360 participants surveyed, responses on 5 of 18 survey items significantly differed by education level (e.g., less…

  18. A Study of Full-Time Student Equivalents for University of Missouri Field Staff Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, William Ed

    The major objective of this study was to determine if an index to indicate the work load of field staff personnel could be developed. The data were collected by the county directors on the basis of information included in the state and federal reports covering the period July 1, 1966 to December 31, 1966. A factor of 450 was used to convert total…

  19. A Case Study of Certified Support Staff Members' Perceptions of Professional Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Tresseler S.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine the perceptions of certified support staff at a Georgia middle school, focusing on their opinions of Professional Learning Communities (PLC), the roles they played in PLCs and the effect PLCs had on their professional practices. This descriptive case study utilized open-ended interviews,…

  20. Restraint and Seclusion: The Perspective of Service Users and Staff Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mérineau-Côté, Julie; Morin, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Background: Restrictive measures may have important physical and psychological consequences on all persons involved. The current study examined how these are perceived by persons with intellectual disabilities and staff. Materials and Methods: Interviews were conducted with eight persons with intellectual disabilities who experienced a restrictive…

  1. Strategies for Working with Library Staff Members in Embracing Change Caused by Library Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Murray

    This paper begins with a discussion of information management as it pertains to the four operations of automated library systems (i.e., acquisitions, cataloging, circulation, and reference). Library staff reactions to library automation change are summarized, including uncertainty, cynicism, and resignation or hope. Common pitfalls that interfere…

  2. Nursing Staff Members Mental’s Health and Factors Associated with the Work Process: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Selene Cordeiro; Lopes de Souza, Sandra; Botelho Sougey, Everton; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Elayne Cristina; Costa do Nascimento, José Jailson; Formiga, Mariana Bandeira; Batista de Souza Ventura, Luciana; Duarte da Costa Lima, Murilo; Silva, Antonia Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Background: The mental health of nursing staff members influences the work process outcomes. Objective: Identify the work related factors that harms the nursing team’s mental health. Methods: Databases PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL and MEDLINE, by mating between the indexed descriptors in MeSH terms “mental health” and “occupational health nursing”. 783 articles were rescued to give a final sample of 18 articles. Integrative review in order to identify factors associated with the work process of the nursing staff that negatively affects mental health. Results: The main associated factors were work demands, psychological demands, violence, aggression, poor relationships with administrators, accidents involving the risk of exposure to HIV, stress and errors in the execution of labor activities. The main findings regarding the nursing staff’s mental health were post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, stress, major depressive episode and generalized anxiety disorder. Conclusion: Occupational nurses need to understand the complexities of mental health problems and substance use among nursing staff members to recognize, identify and care for workers at risk and offer adequate mental health care. Although the researches interests in this theme have increased, proving that all these factors contribute to the risk to mental health of nursing professionals, the protective measures and care are being neglected by managers in both private and public network . The health of nursing workers in question here is one more challenge for a profession that takes care of others in need, therefore, requires some caring with their own health. PMID:28217144

  3. Experiences described by novice teaching academic staff in baccalaureate nursing education: a focus on mentoring.

    PubMed

    Anibas, Melissa; Brenner, Gail Hanson; Zorn, Cecelia R

    2009-01-01

    As the nursing faculty shortage grows, teaching academic staff (TAS) increasingly fill vacant faculty positions. The TAS have limited employment contracts and are usually master's prepared; although they are well grounded in nursing practice, they often are inadequately prepared and minimally supported in an academic teaching position. No study could be found in which the experiences and mentorship of novice TAS in baccalaureate nursing programs were explored. Understanding these issues is essential to guiding approaches that would enhance retention and strengthen the quality of nursing education. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of novice TAS in baccalaureate nursing programs and how those experiences compare to their expectations and needs, with a focus on mentoring experiences. A descriptive qualitative design with focus group interviews was used with 10 participants from three settings participating in the study. Five categories emerged from the data: feelings, preparation for role and expectations, resources, challenges, and mentorship. Implications, a comparison with existing literature, and suggestions for further research are identified.

  4. It's academic: public policy activities among faculty members in a department of medicine.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Douglas B; Greene, Meredith; Bindman, Andrew B

    2013-10-01

    To investigate whether and how faculty members in a department of medicine are engaged in public policy activities. Between February and April 2011, the authors conducted a cross-sectional, Web-based survey of all active Department of Medicine faculty members at the University of California, San Francisco. Survey questions covered demographics, academic role, academic rank, and participation in three specific public policy activities during the past five years: (1) policy-related research, (2) expert advice to government officials, and (3) public policy advocacy in collaboration with organizations outside government. Two hundred twenty of 553 faculty (40%) responded to the survey. One hundred twenty-four faculty members (56% of respondents and 22% of total active faculty) reported that they were engaged in at least one of the three types of policy-related activities: 51 (23%) conducted policy-related research, 67 (30%) provided expert advice to government officials, and 93 (42%) collaborated with organizations to advocate for public policy. Higher faculty rank was significantly associated with faculty members reporting that they were involved in one or more of the three policy activities (P = .04). Academic departments should identify public policy expertise among their faculty and leverage this expertise by facilitating opportunities to develop a shared faculty awareness of their public policy activities, by supporting the establishment of mentoring relationships for less experienced faculty in the area of public policy, and by incorporating standards of excellence for work in public policy into the promotions process.

  5. Model of Work-Related Ill Health of Academic Staff in a South African Higher Education Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothmann, S.; Barkhuizen, N.; Tytherleigh, M. Y.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the relationships between burnout, ill health, job demands and resources, and dispositional optimism in a higher education institution in South Africa. A survey design was used. The study population (N = 279) consisted of academic staff working in a higher education institution. The Maslach Burnout…

  6. The Usefulness of Quality Assurance for University Management and Academic Staff: A Case Study of Finland and Iceland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapakorpi, Arja; Geirsdóttir, Guðrún; Jóhannsdóttir, Gyða

    2013-01-01

    With quality assurance related to the Bologna goals, universities are required to fulfil internationally accepted standardized criteria of quality. This tends to reinforce control in assessment. However, control-oriented evaluations seem to lack meaning for academic staff. The article explored the possibilities and space for improvement-oriented…

  7. The Role of Leadership Practices on Job Stress among Malay Academic Staff: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safaria, Triantoro; bin Othman, Ahmad; Wahab, Muhammad Nubli Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Globalization brings change in all aspect of human life, including in how job and organizations operate. These changes create strain and stress not only among employee at business organization, but also among academic staff. The dean of faculty or department at university has important role in prevent the effects of job stress among the academic…

  8. Trust and Work Place Spirituality on Knowledge Sharing Behaviour: Perspective from Non-Academic Staff of Higher Learning Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Muhammad Sabbir; Osmangani, Aahad M; Daud, Nuraihan Mat; Chowdhury, Abdul Hannan; Hassan, Hasliza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This empirical research aims to add value in the existing research on knowledge sharing, investigate the antecedents of knowledge-sharing behaviour by embedding trust and workplace spirituality variable on non-academic staff from higher learning institution in Malaysia. The role of trust, perceived risk and workplace spirituality towards…

  9. The Usefulness of Quality Assurance for University Management and Academic Staff: A Case Study of Finland and Iceland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapakorpi, Arja; Geirsdóttir, Guðrún; Jóhannsdóttir, Gyða

    2013-01-01

    With quality assurance related to the Bologna goals, universities are required to fulfil internationally accepted standardized criteria of quality. This tends to reinforce control in assessment. However, control-oriented evaluations seem to lack meaning for academic staff. The article explored the possibilities and space for improvement-oriented…

  10. Model of Work-Related Ill Health of Academic Staff in a South African Higher Education Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothmann, S.; Barkhuizen, N.; Tytherleigh, M. Y.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the relationships between burnout, ill health, job demands and resources, and dispositional optimism in a higher education institution in South Africa. A survey design was used. The study population (N = 279) consisted of academic staff working in a higher education institution. The Maslach Burnout…

  11. A Partnership Approach to Developing Student Capacity to Engage and Staff Capacity to Be Engaging: Opportunities for Academic Developers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Roisín; Millard, Luke

    2016-01-01

    Many higher education institutions are adopting learning and teaching approaches that embrace "students as partners". This can be met with trepidation by academic staff and students. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate, through two UK-based institutional case studies, that a partnership approach provides an opportunity for staff…

  12. Trust and Work Place Spirituality on Knowledge Sharing Behaviour: Perspective from Non-Academic Staff of Higher Learning Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahman, Muhammad Sabbir; Osmangani, Aahad M; Daud, Nuraihan Mat; Chowdhury, Abdul Hannan; Hassan, Hasliza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This empirical research aims to add value in the existing research on knowledge sharing, investigate the antecedents of knowledge-sharing behaviour by embedding trust and workplace spirituality variable on non-academic staff from higher learning institution in Malaysia. The role of trust, perceived risk and workplace spirituality towards…

  13. Academic Staff Involvement and Openness to Diversity in International Educational Organisations: Is There a Moderating Effect of Shared Language?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob; Jonasson, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Joint work among academic staff is important for solving the ever-increasing number of complex tasks that are becoming part of everyday activities in higher education. At the same time, diversification and internationalisation may challenge collaboration processes and communication demands. Speaking a shared language consistently could be a way of…

  14. Factors Affecting Motivation and Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff of Universities in South-South Geopolitical Zone of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osakwe, Regina N.

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the factors affecting motivation and job satisfaction of non-management academic staff of universities in South-South geopolitical zone of Nigeria. It employed an expost-facto research design. Three research questions and two hypotheses were raised for the study. A sample of four hundred and fifty non-management academic…

  15. The Impact of the Internationalisation of Higher Education on Academic Staff Development--The Case of Slovenian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetlik, Ivan; Bracek Lalic, Alenka

    2016-01-01

    The internationalisation of higher education has been emphasised in recent decades. As has been frequently stressed, internationalisation has had a value per se since the foundation of medieval universities, yet it can also have wider impacts for the management of higher education institutions and for academic staff especially in the period of…

  16. Structural Equation Models of Management and Decision-Making Styles with Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Malaysian Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amzat, Ismail Hussein; Idris, Datuk Abdul Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effect of management and decision-making styles on the job satisfaction of academic staff in a Malaysian Research University. Design/methodology/approach: The sample consisted of 218 respondents. The instruments used in the study were the Teacher Job Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Decision…

  17. Structural Equation Models of Management and Decision-Making Styles with Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Malaysian Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amzat, Ismail Hussein; Idris, Datuk Abdul Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effect of management and decision-making styles on the job satisfaction of academic staff in a Malaysian Research University. Design/methodology/approach: The sample consisted of 218 respondents. The instruments used in the study were the Teacher Job Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Decision…

  18. The Impact of the Internationalisation of Higher Education on Academic Staff Development--The Case of Slovenian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svetlik, Ivan; Bracek Lalic, Alenka

    2016-01-01

    The internationalisation of higher education has been emphasised in recent decades. As has been frequently stressed, internationalisation has had a value per se since the foundation of medieval universities, yet it can also have wider impacts for the management of higher education institutions and for academic staff especially in the period of…

  19. Academic Staff Involvement and Openness to Diversity in International Educational Organisations: Is There a Moderating Effect of Shared Language?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selmer, Jan; Lauring, Jakob; Jonasson, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Joint work among academic staff is important for solving the ever-increasing number of complex tasks that are becoming part of everyday activities in higher education. At the same time, diversification and internationalisation may challenge collaboration processes and communication demands. Speaking a shared language consistently could be a way of…

  20. A STUDY OF THE EXISTING PRACTICES OF SELECTED COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES RELATING TO ACADEMIC RANKING OF ACCOUNTING TEACHING STAFF.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHAPMAN, LOWELL

    A 90 PERCENT RESPONSE FROM 143 RANDOMLY SELECTED COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES SHOWED A HIGH DEGREE OF CONSISTENCY IN THEIR ACADEMIC RANKING OF THE ACCOUNTING TEACHING STAFF. THE STUDY SOUGHT TO DETERMINE (1) THE INSTITUTIONS' POLICIES FOR ADVANCEMENT ABOVE THE RANK OF ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, AND (2) WHETHER FACTORS SUCH AS TEACHING EXPERIENCE,…

  1. A Partnership Approach to Developing Student Capacity to Engage and Staff Capacity to Be Engaging: Opportunities for Academic Developers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Roisín; Millard, Luke

    2016-01-01

    Many higher education institutions are adopting learning and teaching approaches that embrace "students as partners". This can be met with trepidation by academic staff and students. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate, through two UK-based institutional case studies, that a partnership approach provides an opportunity for staff…

  2. Job Satisfaction and its Influential Factors in Dental Academic Members in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Seraj, B; Ghadimi, S; Mirzaee, M; Ahmadi, R; Bashizadeh, H; Ashofteh-Yazdi, K; SahebJamee, M; Kharazi, MJ; Jahanmehr, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Assessment of job satisfaction of the faculty members and its underlying factors may increase career fulfillment and raise the educational and research productivity, leading to higher quality of dental services at the community level, ultimately improving public oral health status. Aim: This study assessed job satisfaction and its influential factors in dental academic members in Tehran. Subjects and Methods: The job satisfaction level of 203 faculty members was assessed using a Likert scale questionnaire from 0 to 4, with 4 representing very satisfied and 0 not at all satisfied. The analysis of variance was used to compare the responses among dental faculty members of three different universities. The impact of age, gender, academic rank, employment status and the date of employment on the overall faculty job satisfaction was identified by multiple linear regression analysis. Results: The mean professional satisfaction score among faculty members was 1.5 (0.5) out of four. Among the studied underlying factors, only the date of employment was seen to have a statistically significant impact on the faculties’ overall job satisfaction (P= 0.05). There was no difference in job compensation observed between the three dental faculties. Dissatisfying aspects of the academic work included educational and research policies, monetary strategies, quality of leadership and administration, promotion and tenure policies, job security, educational environment, equipments, and facilities. The only satisfying factor was the interaction between faculty colleagues and students. Conclusion: Faculty members of Tehran Dental Schools are dissatisfied with their work environments in Tehran Dental Schools. Issues such as salary and remuneration, facilities, equipments, promotion and tenure policies are strongly believed to account for the dissatisfaction. PMID:24761236

  3. Job satisfaction and its influential factors in dental academic members in tehran, iran.

    PubMed

    Seraj, B; Ghadimi, S; Mirzaee, M; Ahmadi, R; Bashizadeh, H; Ashofteh-Yazdi, K; Sahebjamee, M; Kharazi, Mj; Jahanmehr, M

    2014-03-01

    Assessment of job satisfaction of the faculty members and its underlying factors may increase career fulfillment and raise the educational and research productivity, leading to higher quality of dental services at the community level, ultimately improving public oral health status. This study assessed job satisfaction and its influential factors in dental academic members in Tehran. The job satisfaction level of 203 faculty members was assessed using a Likert scale questionnaire from 0 to 4, with 4 representing very satisfied and 0 not at all satisfied. The analysis of variance was used to compare the responses among dental faculty members of three different universities. The impact of age, gender, academic rank, employment status and the date of employment on the overall faculty job satisfaction was identified by multiple linear regression analysis. The mean professional satisfaction score among faculty members was 1.5 (0.5) out of four. Among the studied underlying factors, only the date of employment was seen to have a statistically significant impact on the faculties' overall job satisfaction (P= 0.05). There was no difference in job compensation observed between the three dental faculties. Dissatisfying aspects of the academic work included educational and research policies, monetary strategies, quality of leadership and administration, promotion and tenure policies, job security, educational environment, equipments, and facilities. The only satisfying factor was the interaction between faculty colleagues and students. Faculty members of Tehran Dental Schools are dissatisfied with their work environments in Tehran Dental Schools. Issues such as salary and remuneration, facilities, equipments, promotion and tenure policies are strongly believed to account for the dissatisfaction.

  4. Perceptions of Academic Staff towards Accommodating Students with Disabilities in a Civil Engineering Undergraduate Program in a University in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayat, Nafisa; Amosun, Seyi Ladele

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of academic staff towards admission of students with disabilities, and their accommodation once accepted into an undergraduate Civil Engineering program in a South African university. Qualitative responses relating to the perceptions of five academic staff were obtained through semi-structured interviews. The…

  5. New Work Demands in Higher Education. A Study of the Relationship between Excessive Workload, Coping Strategies and Subsequent Health among Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melin, Marika; Astvik, Wanja; Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the work conditions in higher education work settings, the academic staff's strategies for handling excessive workload and impact on well-being and work-life balance. The results show that there is a risk that staff in academic work places will start using compensatory coping strategies to deal with…

  6. Written and Non-Written Communication Methods as Correlates of Employee Performance: A Study of Academic Staff of Primary Teachers' Colleges in Central Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byakutaga, Beatrice N. Kasande; Onen, David; Oonyu, Joseph; Kasesene, Edris S.

    2016-01-01

    This study delved into how written and non-written communication methods are correlated with the performance of the academic staff of Primary Teachers' Colleges (PTCs) in Central Uganda. The study was prompted by reportedly the deteriorating performance of the academic staff of most PTCs in the country despite government's efforts to train and…

  7. New Work Demands in Higher Education. A Study of the Relationship between Excessive Workload, Coping Strategies and Subsequent Health among Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melin, Marika; Astvik, Wanja; Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the work conditions in higher education work settings, the academic staff's strategies for handling excessive workload and impact on well-being and work-life balance. The results show that there is a risk that staff in academic work places will start using compensatory coping strategies to deal with…

  8. Do Standard Bibliometric Measures Correlate with Academic Rank of Full-Time Pediatric Dentistry Faculty Members?

    PubMed

    Susarla, Harlyn K; Dhar, Vineet; Karimbux, Nadeem Y; Tinanoff, Norman

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the relationship between quantitative measures of research productivity and academic rank for full-time pediatric dentistry faculty members in accredited U.S. and Canadian residency programs. For each pediatric dentist in the study group, academic rank and bibliometric factors derived from publicly available databases were recorded. Academic ranks were lecturer/instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, and professor. Bibliometric factors were mean total number of publications, mean total number of citations, maximum number of citations for a single work, and h-index (a measure of the impact of publications, determined by total number of publications h that had at least h citations each). The study sample was comprised of 267 pediatric dentists: 4% were lecturers/instructors, 44% were assistant professors, 30% were associate professors, and 22% were professors. The mean number of publications for the sample was 15.4±27.8. The mean number of citations was 218.4±482.0. The mean h-index was 4.9±6.6. The h-index was strongly correlated with academic rank (r=0.60, p=0.001). For this sample, an h-index of ≥3 was identified as a threshold for promotion to associate professor, and an h-index of ≥6 was identified as a threshold for promotion to professor. The h-index was strongly correlated with the academic rank of these pediatric dental faculty members, suggesting that this index may be considered a measure for promotion, along with a faculty member's quality and quantity of research, teaching, service, and clinical activities.

  9. Effective dose to staff members in a positron emission tomography/CT facility using zirconium-89

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Positron emission tomography (PET) using zirconium-89 (89Zr) is complicated by its complex decay scheme. In this study, we quantified the effective dose from 89Zr and compared it with fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG). Methods: Effective dose distribution in a PET/CT facility in Riyadh was calculated by Monte Carlo simulations using MCNPX. The positron bremsstrahlung, the annihilation photons, the delayed gammas from 89Zr and those emissions from 18F-FDG were modelled in the simulations but low-energy characteristic X-rays were ignored. Results: On the basis of injected activity, the dose from 89Zr was higher than that of 18F-FDG. However, the dose per scan from 89Zr became less than that from 18F-FDG near the patient, owing to the difference in injected activities. In the corridor and control rooms, the 89Zr dose was much higher than 18F-FDG, owing to the difference in attenuation by the shielding materials. Conclusion: The presence of the high-energy photons from 89Zr-labelled immuno-PET radiopharmaceuticals causes a significantly higher effective dose than 18F-FDG to the staff outside the patient room. Conversely, despite the low administered activity of 89Zr, it gives rise to a comparable or even lower dose than 18F-FDG to the staff near the patient. This interesting result raises apparently contradictory implications in the radiation protection considerations of a PET/CT facility. Advances in knowledge: To the best of our knowledge, radiation exposure to staff and public in the PET/CT unit using 89Zr has not been investigated. The ultimate output of this study will lead to the optimal design of the facility for routine use of 89Zr. PMID:23934963

  10. Fire/security staff member instructs STS-29 crew on fire extinguisher usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-29 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, crewmembers are trained in procedures to follow in the event of a fire. Here, the crew is briefed on the correct handling of the fire extinguisher by Robert Fife (far left) of NASA's fire / security staff. Pictured, left to right are Pilot John E. Blaha, Commander Michael L. Coats, Mission Specialist (MS) Robert C. Springer, MS James F. Buchli, and MS James P. Bagian. The in fire fighting training took place at JSC's fire training pit across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207.

  11. Knowledge, Skills, and Attitudes in Caring for Older Adults With Advanced Illness Among Staff Members of Long-Term Care and Assisted Living Facilities: An Educational Needs Assessment.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Nina M; Lockman, Kashelle; Grant, Marian; McPherson, Mary Lynn

    2016-05-01

    In long-term care and assisted living facilities, many groups of health care professionals contribute to the work of the health care team. These staff members perform essential, direct patient care activities. An educational needs assessment was conducted to determine the learning needs and preferences of staff members related to providing care for patients with life-limiting illnesses. Staff members placed importance on understanding topics such as principles of palliative care, pain assessment, pain management, and nonpain symptom management. The majority of survey respondents were also interested in learning more about these topics. The results of this educational needs analysis suggest staff members would benefit from a course tailored to these identified educational needs and designed to overcome previously identified educational barriers.

  12. 78 FR 48337 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Members of Congress and Congressional Staff

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... those plans offered on Exchanges. The ACA did not, however, alter the definition of ``employee'' as used... imposes no new requirements on qualified health plans or Exchanges. Prior to the passage of the ACA, there... . . . the only health plans that the Federal Government may make available to Members of Congress...

  13. Attitudes of Pakistani Community Members and Staff toward People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patka, Mazna; Keys, Christopher B.; Henry, David B.; McDonald, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    The acceptance and inclusion of persons with intellectual disability can vary across cultures, and understanding attitudes can provide insight into such variation. To our knowledge, no previous study has explored attitudes toward people with intellectual disability among Pakistani community members and disability service providers. We administered…

  14. Analysis of Drug Information Requested by Medical Students and House Staff Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, A. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    A clinical pharmacy educational program is described. Under the guidance of pharmacy faculty members, senior pharmacy students participate in patient care activities with general internal medicine and internal medicine subspecialty teams consisting of an attending faculty physician, an internal medicine resident, two interns, and four junior or…

  15. Attitudes of Pakistani Community Members and Staff toward People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patka, Mazna; Keys, Christopher B.; Henry, David B.; McDonald, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    The acceptance and inclusion of persons with intellectual disability can vary across cultures, and understanding attitudes can provide insight into such variation. To our knowledge, no previous study has explored attitudes toward people with intellectual disability among Pakistani community members and disability service providers. We administered…

  16. Analysis of Drug Information Requested by Medical Students and House Staff Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, A. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    A clinical pharmacy educational program is described. Under the guidance of pharmacy faculty members, senior pharmacy students participate in patient care activities with general internal medicine and internal medicine subspecialty teams consisting of an attending faculty physician, an internal medicine resident, two interns, and four junior or…

  17. Staff members' negotiation of power in client engagement: analysis of practice within an Australian aged care service.

    PubMed

    Petriwskyj, Andrea; Gibson, Alexandra; Webby, Glenys

    2015-04-01

    With increasing focus on client control and active client roles in aged care service provision, client engagement is highlighted as fundamental to contemporary care practice. Client engagement itself, however, is complex and is impacted by a range of issues including the relationships and power dynamics inherent in the care context. These dynamics do not simply reflect the roles that are available to or taken up by clients; just as important are the roles and positions that staff of aged care services are offered, and take up, in client engagement. This paper presents the findings of a study that explored client engagement practice within a large Australian service provider. Analysis of interview and focus group discussions addressed the ways in which staff were positioned - by both themselves and by clients - in terms of the roles that they hold within engagement practice and the power relations inherent within these. Analysis of power from the dominant policy perspective of choice and control, and the alternative perspective of an ethic of care suggests that power relations within the care context are dynamic, complex and involve on-going negotiation and regulation by clients and staff members in aged care. The use of these two contrasting perspectives reveals a more dynamic and complex understanding of power in care practice than dominant uni-dimensional approaches to critique suggest.

  18. The new economic credentialing: protecting hospitals from competition by medical staff members.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Elizabeth A

    2003-01-01

    This Article addresses hospitals' use of economic criteria to determine an individual's qualifications for staff privileges. Hospitals are resorting to economic conflict-of-interest credentialing policies in an attempt to ensure physician's loyalty and maintain their own economic viability. Physicians, however, argue that entrepreneurial activities are necessary for them to meet the economic challenges posed by declining reimbursements and rising insurance costs. The Article surveys the numerous legal theories that physicians (and, in some cases, the federal government) could employ in attacking these new types of credentialing policies and concludes that, on balance, hospitals should be able to implement their policies in ways that minimize liability in most jurisdictions. The Article concludes by discussing other issues that economic credentialing policies raise, including those implicating tax-exempt status and nonlegal considerations.

  19. Factors Affecting Communication Patterns between Oncology Staff and Family Members of Deceased Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Granot, Tal; Gordon, Noa; Perry, Shlomit; Rizel, Shulamith; Stemmer, Salomon M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Perceptions of the role of oncology medical staff in supporting bereaved families have evolved with the transition to interdisciplinary cancer care. We investigated the interactions between oncology professionals and bereaved families. Methods This cross-sectional study involved all oncology medical staff at the Davidoff Center. Participants were given a questionnaire relating to bereavement follow-up. Responses were measured using a 5-point Likert scale. Results Of 155 staff members, 107 filled questionnaires with <20% missing data and were included in the analysis (α = 0.799; corrected, α = 0.821). Respondents included physicians (35%), nurses (46%), social workers (7%), psychologists (4%), or unspecified (8%); 85% were Jewish, and 60% had ≥10 years of oncology experience. Most respondents thought that contacting bereaved families was important (73%), and that it provided closure for staff (79%); 41% indicated that they contacted >50% of the families of their deceased patients. Contacting bereaved families was considered the responsibility of the physicians (90%), nurses (84%), or social workers (89%). The main barriers to contacting bereaved families were emotional overload (68%) and lack of time (63%); 60% indicated a need for additional communication tools for bereavement follow-up. In a multivariate analysis, profession (physician vs. nurse), primary workplace (outpatient setting vs. other), and self-defined religion were significant variables with respect to the perceived importance of contacting bereaved families and to actually contacting them. Other factors (e.g., age, gender) were non-significant. Conclusions Perspectives regarding bereavement actions differ significantly across medical professions, work settings, and self-defined religions. Additional guidance and education regarding bereavement actions is warranted. PMID:27683075

  20. Industry Relationships Among Academic Institutional Review Board Members: Changes From 2005 Through 2014.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Eric G; Vogeli, Christine; Rao, Sowmya R; Abraham, Melissa; Pierson, Roz; Applebaum, Sandra

    2015-09-01

    For the past decade, more attention and concern has been directed toward financial relationships between the life science industry and physicians. Relationships between industry and institutional review board (IRB) members represent an important subclass that has the potential to broadly influence decisions regarding medical research. To study the nature, extent, and perceived consequences of industry relationships among IRB members in academic health centers and to compare our results with findings from 2005. A survey mailed to IRB members from the 115 most research-intensive medical schools and teaching hospitals in the United States from January 16 through May 16, 2014. The survey included questions identical to those used in 2005. Data analysis was conducted from June through October 2014. The frequency of industry relationships among IRB members and the perceived effect of those relationships on IRB-related activities. We found no significant change in the percentage of IRB members with an industry relationship from 2005 through 2014 (2005: 37.2%; 95% CI, 32.7%-42.0%; 2014: 32.1%; 95% CI, 28.0%-36.4%; P = .09). However, since 2005, the percentage of members who felt another member did not properly disclose a financial relationship decreased from 10.8% (95% CI, 8.0%-14.4%) to 6.7% (95% CI, 4.7%-9.4%) (P = .04), as did the percentage who felt pressure from their institution or department to approve a protocol (2005: 18.6%; 95% CI, 15.0%-22.9%; 2014: 10.0%; 95% CI, 7.6%-13.0%; P < .001). The percentage of members with a conflict of interest who voted on protocols with which they have a conflict has not changed, although the percentage who said they always disclose relationships increased significantly from 54.9% in 2005 (95% CI, 42.2%-66.9%) to 80.0% in 2014 (95% CI, 65.3%-89.4%) (P = .01). We also found evidence of anti-industry bias in the presentation of protocols to the IRB. The results show significant positive progress in the reporting and

  1. Effective Quality Management Requires a Systematic Approach and a Flexible Organisational Culture: A Qualitative Study among Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleijnen, Jan; Dolmans, Diana; Willems, Jos; van Hout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative research examines the similarities and differences between three teaching departments within Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS) in the Netherlands that provide effective and three that provide less effective quality management. What are staff members' conceptions and perceptions of quality, quality management and…

  2. Effective Quality Management Requires a Systematic Approach and a Flexible Organisational Culture: A Qualitative Study among Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleijnen, Jan; Dolmans, Diana; Willems, Jos; van Hout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative research examines the similarities and differences between three teaching departments within Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS) in the Netherlands that provide effective and three that provide less effective quality management. What are staff members' conceptions and perceptions of quality, quality management and…

  3. Targeting Obesity through Health Promotion Programs for School Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Patrick C.; Lohrmann, David K.; Hall, Cougar

    2017-01-01

    Health promotion programs for school staff are an overlooked and under-utilized resource that can lead to reductions in overweight and obesity among teachers and other staff members if implemented properly. In addition to increasing the overall staff wellness, boosting morale, increasing productivity, improving academic achievement, providing…

  4. Targeting Obesity through Health Promotion Programs for School Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Patrick C.; Lohrmann, David K.; Hall, Cougar

    2017-01-01

    Health promotion programs for school staff are an overlooked and under-utilized resource that can lead to reductions in overweight and obesity among teachers and other staff members if implemented properly. In addition to increasing the overall staff wellness, boosting morale, increasing productivity, improving academic achievement, providing…

  5. Exploring Staff Perceptions of Student Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Abbi; Clegg, Sue; Macdonald, Ranald

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents analysis of qualitative data from a research project looking at staff perceptions of plagiarism at a post-1992 university. Twenty-six members of staff from departments and academic schools from across the university took part in open and semi-structured interviews. Analysis shows that variable definitions of plagiarism exist;…

  6. How can hospitals better protect the privacy of electronic medical records? Perspectives from staff members of health information management departments.

    PubMed

    Sher, Ming-Ling; Talley, Paul C; Cheng, Tain-Junn; Kuo, Kuang-Ming

    2017-05-01

    The adoption of electronic medical records (EMR) is expected to better improve overall healthcare quality and to offset the financial pressure of excessive administrative burden. However, safeguarding EMR against potentially hostile security breaches from both inside and outside healthcare facilities has created increased patients' privacy concerns from all sides. The aim of our study was to examine the influencing factors of privacy protection for EMR by healthcare professionals. We used survey methodology to collect questionnaire responses from staff members in health information management departments among nine Taiwanese hospitals active in EMR utilisation. A total of 209 valid responses were collected in 2014. We used partial least squares for analysing the collected data. Perceived benefits, perceived barriers, self-efficacy and cues to action were found to have a significant association with intention to protect EMR privacy, while perceived susceptibility and perceived severity were not. Based on the findings obtained, we suggest that hospitals should provide continuous ethics awareness training to relevant staff and design more effective strategies for improving the protection of EMR privacy in their charge. Further practical and research implications are also discussed.

  7. The impact of ED nurse manager leadership style on staff nurse turnover and patient satisfaction in academic health center hospitals.

    PubMed

    Raup, Glenn H

    2008-10-01

    Nurse managers with effective leadership skills are an essential component to the solution for ending the nursing shortage. Empirical studies of existing ED nurse manager leadership styles and their impact on key nurse management outcomes such as staff nurse turnover and patient satisfaction have not been performed. The specific aims of this study were to determine what types of leadership styles were used by ED nurse managers in academic health center hospitals and examine their influence on staff nurse turnover and patient satisfaction. ED nurse managers were asked to complete the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire and a 10-item researcher defined nurse manager role and practice demographics survey. Completed surveys (15 managers and 30 staff nurses) representing 15 out of 98 possible U.S. academic health centers were obtained. Fisher's exact test with 95% confidence intervals were used to analyze the data. The sample percentage of managers who exhibited Transformational leadership styles and demographic findings of nurse manager age, total years experience and length of time in current position matched current reports in the literature. A trend of lower staff nurse turnover with Transformational leadership style compared to non-Trasformational leadership styles was identified. However, the type of leadership style did not appear to have an effect on patient satisfaction. The ED is an ever-changing, highly regulated, critical-care environment. Effective ED nurse manager leadership strategies are vital to maintaining the standards of professional emergency nursing practice to create an environment that can produce management outcomes of decreased staff nurse turnover, thereby enhancing staff nurse retention and potentially impacting patient satisfaction.

  8. Male Student-Athlete Perceptions of University Academic Staff Expectations: A Qualitative Analysis of Perceptions, Value and Academic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbeck, Teresa A.

    2010-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 male collegiate student-athletes in a revenue-generating sport in an effort to better inform current academic support practitioners how to best serve this population. The inquiry focused on student-athlete perceptions of two areas: (1) perceptions regarding the expectations academic personnel have…

  9. Male Student-Athlete Perceptions of University Academic Staff Expectations: A Qualitative Analysis of Perceptions, Value and Academic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbeck, Teresa A.

    2010-01-01

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 male collegiate student-athletes in a revenue-generating sport in an effort to better inform current academic support practitioners how to best serve this population. The inquiry focused on student-athlete perceptions of two areas: (1) perceptions regarding the expectations academic personnel have…

  10. Investigating the need for scholarly communications positions in Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries member institutions.

    PubMed

    Mears, Kim; Bandy, Sandra L

    2017-04-01

    The role of health sciences librarians has expanded in the scholarly communications landscape as a result of the increase in federal public access mandates and the continued expansion of publishing avenues. This has created the need to investigate whether academic health sciences libraries should have scholarly communications positions to provide education and services exclusively related to scholarly communication topics. A nine-question online survey was distributed through the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) email discussion list to gather preliminary findings from and opinions of directors of health sciences libraries on the need for scholarly communications positions. The survey received a 38% response rate. The authors found that AAHSL members are currently providing scholarly communications services, and 46% of respondents expressed the need to devote a full-time position to this role. Our survey reveals a juxtaposition occurring in AAHSL member libraries. While administrators acknowledge the need to provide scholarly communications services, they often experience budget challenges in providing a full-time position for these services.

  11. Investigating the need for scholarly communications positions in Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries member institutions

    PubMed Central

    Mears, Kim; Bandy, Sandra L.

    2017-01-01

    Background The role of health sciences librarians has expanded in the scholarly communications landscape as a result of the increase in federal public access mandates and the continued expansion of publishing avenues. This has created the need to investigate whether academic health sciences libraries should have scholarly communications positions to provide education and services exclusively related to scholarly communication topics. Methods A nine-question online survey was distributed through the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) email discussion list to gather preliminary findings from and opinions of directors of health sciences libraries on the need for scholarly communications positions. Results The survey received a 38% response rate. The authors found that AAHSL members are currently providing scholarly communications services, and 46% of respondents expressed the need to devote a full-time position to this role. Discussion Our survey reveals a juxtaposition occurring in AAHSL member libraries. While administrators acknowledge the need to provide scholarly communications services, they often experience budget challenges in providing a full-time position for these services. PMID:28377677

  12. Extent of Implementing the Total Quality Management Principles by Academic Departments Heads at Najran University from Faculty Members' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Din, Hesham Moustafa Kamal; Abouzid, Mohamed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the implementing degree of Total Quality Management (TQM) principals by Academic Departmental Heads (ADH) at the Najran University from faculty members' perspectives. It also aimed to determine significant differences between the average estimate of sample section of faculty members about the implementing degree of TQM…

  13. Managing Online Presence in the E-Learning Environment: Technological Support for Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Islam, Nurul; Beer, Martin; Slack, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades the use of E-learning technology increased to such an extent that the role of the traditional academic has been forced to change. Focusing on academics' views, this study examines their interactions in the E-learning environment and whether online learning applications have increased academic workload (Eynon, 2005;…

  14. QuickStats: Distribution of Long-Term Care Staffing* Hours,(†) by Staff Member Type and Sector - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-04-29

    In 2014, aides provided more hours of care in the major sectors of long-term care than the other staffing types shown. Aides accounted for 60% of all staffing hours in nursing homes, compared with licensed practical or vocational nurses (21%), registered nurses (13%), activities staff members (5%), and social workers (2%). Aides accounted for 75% of all staffing hours in residential care communities, in contrast to activities staff members (11%), registered nurses (7%), licensed practical or vocational nurses (6%), and social workers (1%). In adult day services centers, aides provided 41% of all staffing hours, followed by activities staff members (32%), registered nurses (12%), licensed practical or vocational nurses (9%), and social workers (6%).

  15. The Impact of Support Staff on Pupils' "Positive Approaches to Learning" and Their Academic Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatchford, Peter; Bassett, Paul; Brown, Penelope; Martin, Clare; Russell, Anthony; Webster, Rob

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there has been an unprecedented increase in support staff in schools in England and Wales. There were widespread expectations that this will be of benefit to teachers and pupils but there has been little systematic research to address the impact of support staff. This study used a naturalistic longitudinal design to investigate the…

  16. Academic Sojourners, Teaching and Internationalisation: The Experience of Non-UK Staff in a British University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luxon, Tony; Peelo, Moira

    2009-01-01

    Conceptualisations of internationalisation remain limited as long as the implications for pedagogy of an increasingly international teaching staff remain unexamined. Non-UK staff securing posts that involve teaching at British universities face substantial practical, cultural and linguistic challenges that impact on and, in some cases, inhibit,…

  17. Impact of School Sense of Community within a Faith-Based University: Administrative and Academic Staff Perceptions on Institutional Mission and Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Cowman, Shaun E.; Milner, Lauren A.; Gutierrez, Robert E.; Drake, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Academic staff (n = 305) and administrative staff (n = 595) at a large urban, Catholic, and religious order teaching university completed on-line school sense of community, social desirability, and mission-identity plus mission-driven activity measures. Partial correlates (controlling for social desirability) indicated that for both faculty and…

  18. Impact of School Sense of Community within a Faith-Based University: Administrative and Academic Staff Perceptions on Institutional Mission and Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Cowman, Shaun E.; Milner, Lauren A.; Gutierrez, Robert E.; Drake, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Academic staff (n = 305) and administrative staff (n = 595) at a large urban, Catholic, and religious order teaching university completed on-line school sense of community, social desirability, and mission-identity plus mission-driven activity measures. Partial correlates (controlling for social desirability) indicated that for both faculty and…

  19. Academic integrity and plagiarism: perceptions and experience of staff and students in a school of dentistry: a situational analysis of staff and student perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ford, P J; Hughes, C

    2012-02-01

    This project has investigated student and staff perceptions and experience of plagiarism in a large Australian dental school to develop a response to an external audit report. Workshops designed to enhance participants' understanding of plagiarism and to assist with practical ways to promote academic integrity within the school were provided to all students and staff. Anonymous surveys were used to investigate perceptions and experience of plagiarism and to assess the usefulness of the workshops. Most participants felt that plagiarism was not a problem in the school, but a significant number were undecided. The majority of participants reported that the guidelines for dealing with plagiarism were inadequate and most supported the mandatory use of text-matching software in all courses. High proportions of participants indicated that the workshops were useful and that they would consider improving their practice as a result. The study provided data that enhanced understanding of aspects of plagiarism highlighted in the report at the school level and identified areas in need of attention, such as refining and raising awareness of the guidelines and incorporation of text-matching software into courses, as well as cautions to be considered (how text-matching software is used) in planning responsive action. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Impact of the organisational culture on primary care staff members' intention to engage in research and development.

    PubMed

    Morténius, Helena; Baigi, Amir; Palm, Lars; Fridlund, Bengt; Björkelund, Cecilia; Hedberg, Berith

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to understand how organisational culture influences the intentions of primary care staff members (PCSM) to engage in research and development (R&D). The participants (n=30) were PCSM employed in a care centre in south-western Sweden. The study had an observational design with an ethnographic approach. The data were collected by means of observations, interviews and analysis of documents. The results revealed the perceptions of PCSM in two domains, research and clinical practice, both of which existed at three different cultural levels: visible (structures and policy), semi-visible (norms and values) and invisible (taken-for-granted attitudes). It is difficult to conduct a purely objective ethnographic study because the investigation is controlled by its context. However, it is necessary to highlight and discuss the invisible level to improve understanding of negative attitudes and preconceptions related to the implementation of R&D in the clinical setting. By highlighting the invisible level of culture, the management of an organisation has the opportunity to initiate discussion of issues related to concealed norms and values as well as attitudes towards new thinking and change in the primary health context. This paper is one of the very few studies to investigate the influence of organisational culture on the intentions of PCSM to engage in R&D.

  1. Charlotte Todes Stern, staff member of the Workers' Health Bureau: "we were in advance of our time".

    PubMed

    Baxandall, Rosalyn; Dunn, Mary Lee; Slatin, Craig

    2014-11-01

    Charlotte Todes Stern (5/5/1897-11/15/1996) was a radical activist for most her life, beginning with her introduction to YPSL (Young People's Socialist League) during her college years. In 1923, Todes Stern became a staff member of the Workers' Health Bureau (WHB), and two years later she became their Organizing Secretary. She traveled the United States organizing for the WHB until 1927. This is the third of seven interviews with Charlotte Todes Stern, conducted by Rosalyn Baxandall for the Feminist History Research Project. This interview focuses on the Workers' Health Bureau, its formation, early efforts with the Painters' union in New York, its accomplishments and efforts to obtain safer and healthier working conditions for workers throughout industry, and its organization of annual national conferences for occupational health and safety. Todes Stern discusses the conflicts with the American Federation of Labor and the demise of the Bureau. An interview with Grace Burnham McDonald appears on page 327 of this issue.

  2. [The assessment of knowledge about recent tobacco law number 5727 among our university students, academic and administrative staff].

    PubMed

    Gelen, Mehmet Emin; Köksal, Nurhan; Ozer, Ali; Atilla, Nurhan; Cinkara, Müge; Kahraman, Hasan; Ekerbiçer, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    In this study we investigated the level of knowledge and ideas of the university students and staff, about the last stage of Tobacco Law No. 5727, which came into force on 19 July 2009 in our country. This is descriptive questionnaire survey. Study's universe was consisting of the students 2009-2010 academic year studying in our universities and academic and administrative staff. A total of 2271 people were included the study. In our study, smoking prevalence was 21.3%. The prevalence for narghile smoking as 4.8% was the highest among students. 94.9% of participants thought that passive smoking increased the risk for human health. Asked whether the banned places, the most correct answers were; the school (97.0%), bank branches (96.3%) and hospitals (96.2%) as the most incorrect answers were; in the garden of hospital (55.7%), garden of private education (53.4%) and the school playground (46.1%). 87.6% of the participants were supporting the new tobacco law. 61.3% of smokers were supporting the law (p= 0.000). 54.3% of narghile-smokers support the law, and this rate was lower than cigarette smokers. Overall, tobacco law is known and supported between our students and staff. More information and supervision should be given about the banned places like school garden and private course gardens which were the high rate of false knowledge. The support to law among students is lower than staff. Similarly narghile use among students is often more. The community should be informed also about the other tobacco products.

  3. A nurse-physician co-leadership model in psychiatric hospitals: results of a survey among leading staff members in three sites.

    PubMed

    Steinert, Tilman; Goebel, Rita; Rieger, Wolfgang

    2006-12-01

    In three psychiatric hospitals in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany, a physician-nurse shared leadership model was implemented in 1997 by the hospital management. The whole hospital, departments, and single wards are led each by a leadership team consisting of a physician, psychologist or social worker and a nurse, being responsible for organization, staff, and budgets. The consequences for staff opinion in leadership positions were evaluated. All 165 leading staff members of all professional groups were anonymously interviewed with a questionnaire containing 45 items regarding their satisfaction with this new leadership model. The response rate was 79.4%. Overall, the leading staff members were satisfied with the shared leadership model both in their own clinical practice and in general. Non-medical staff members were significantly more in favour of several aspects of shared leadership than physicians, but even the latter reported to be generally satisfied. However, both professional groups estimated leading positions to be only modestly attractive. The results yield some evidence that the change from traditional leadership models to the physician-nurse shared leadership model may have advantages in the management of psychiatric hospitals.

  4. Experiences of Mentorship with Academic Staff Doctoral Candidates at a South African University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strebel, Anna; Shefer, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Given the growing emphasis on academic research output and the challenges encountered in expediting completion of doctoral studies especially, mentorship is increasingly being utilised as a capacity development strategy for supporting scholars to complete post-graduate studies. This article reports on a mentorship project aimed at academic staff…

  5. Experiences of Mentorship with Academic Staff Doctoral Candidates at a South African University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strebel, Anna; Shefer, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Given the growing emphasis on academic research output and the challenges encountered in expediting completion of doctoral studies especially, mentorship is increasingly being utilised as a capacity development strategy for supporting scholars to complete post-graduate studies. This article reports on a mentorship project aimed at academic staff…

  6. Lessons from Star Trek: Engaging Academic Staff in the Internationalisation of the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitsed, Craig; Green, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    One consequence of globalisation is the demand on academics to better prepare students for work and life in an interconnected world through curriculum internationalisation. Many academics are hesitant, resistant, or ill-prepared to engage with curriculum internationalisation. This paper explores how this can be addressed by reconfiguring the way…

  7. Lessons from Star Trek: Engaging Academic Staff in the Internationalisation of the Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitsed, Craig; Green, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    One consequence of globalisation is the demand on academics to better prepare students for work and life in an interconnected world through curriculum internationalisation. Many academics are hesitant, resistant, or ill-prepared to engage with curriculum internationalisation. This paper explores how this can be addressed by reconfiguring the way…

  8. Enhancing Visitors' Interest in Science - A Possibility or A Paradox?. A Study of What Scientific Content Staff Members Focus on When Planning a New Exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsson, Eva

    2009-03-01

    Within the enterprise of science and technology centres there exists explicit aims and ambitions to enhance visitors’ interest in and knowledge about science. Meanwhile, several researchers question the choice of the scientific content in exhibitions when arguing that a too unproblematic view of science commonly is presented. But how do staff members consider what scientific content to include and how this content can be organised in exhibitions? The results from interviews of staff members, responsible for planning and creating new exhibitions, suggest that they consider the scientific content of their exhibitions to a high extent in terms of organizational matters. This means that the staff members tend to not consider discussions about what aspects of science to include or exclude. Further on, the results imply that the relation between science and society risk being implicit to the visitors, whereas the aspect of scientific processes tend to be overlooked when constructing new exhibitions. The staff members express an anxiety in displaying scientific uncertainties or different models of explanations when arguing that this risks confusing the visitors. However, these aspects of science are, in the field of science education, considered crucial in order to create curiosity and interest in science. Does this mean that science and technology centres, through their eagerness to enhance young visitors’ scientific literacy, risk contributing to their detachment from or unconcern for scientific issues?

  9. An Analysis of the Level of Involvement of the County Staff Members by the County Extension Chairman in Decision Making in the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Max Gettys

    This study was to investigate some determinants and effects that relate to the degree of involvement of the county staff members by the County Extension Chairman in decision making. The population included 79 County Extension Chairmen who had been appointed to the position in the county and had been on the job at least one year, and 419 county…

  10. How to Support and Engage Students in Alternative Forms of Education and Training? A Qualitative Study of School Staff Members in Flanders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Praag, Lore; Van Caudenberg, Rut; Nouwen, Ward; Clycq, Noel; Timmerman, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on how students, who for a variety of reasons struggle in mainstream secondary schools, can be supported and engaged by alternative forms of education and training to attain a (formal) qualification. Interviews and focus groups are carried out with school staff members of distinct types of alternative learning arenas in Flanders…

  11. Academic Freedom in Al Al-Bayt University and the Level of Practicing It from the View Point of the Faculty Members Based on Some Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Madi, Bayan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the level of practicing academic freedom by the faculty members of Al al-Bayt University. The study population included all the faculty members (297) of Al al-Bayt University, during the academic year, 2010/2011. The study sample was randomly selected and included 250 faculty members. To achieve the aims of…

  12. Academic Freedom in Al Al-Bayt University and the Level of Practicing It from the View Point of the Faculty Members Based on Some Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Madi, Bayan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the level of practicing academic freedom by the faculty members of Al al-Bayt University. The study population included all the faculty members (297) of Al al-Bayt University, during the academic year, 2010/2011. The study sample was randomly selected and included 250 faculty members. To achieve the aims of…

  13. HIGH PREVALENCE OF Blastocystis spp. INFECTION IN CHILDREN AND STAFF MEMBERS ATTENDING PUBLIC URBAN SCHOOLS IN SÃO PAULO STATE, BRAZIL

    PubMed Central

    REBOLLA, Mayra Frozoni; SILVA, Eliete Maria; GOMES, Jancarlo Ferreira; FALCÃO, Alexandre Xavier; REBOLLA, Maria Vicentina Frozoni; FRANCO, Regina Maura Bueno

    2016-01-01

    After a gastroenteritis outbreak of unknown etiology in the municipality of Sebastião da Grama, SãoPaulo, Brazil, we conducted a parasitological survey to establish the epidemiological profile of enteroparasitosis in children and staff members attending the public urban schools in operation in town. The cross-sectional study evaluated 172 children aged 11 months to 6 years old and 33 staff members aged 19 to 58 years old. Overall, 96 (55.81%) children and 20 (60.61%) staff members were mono-parasitized, while 58 (33.72%) children and 4 (12.12%) workers were poly-parasitized. Protozoa (88.37%; 72.73%) was more prevalent than helminthes (3.48%; 0%) in children and staff members respectively.Blastocystis spp. was the most prevalent parasite in children (86.63%) and staff members (66.67%). The age of 1 year old or less was found to be associated with increased prevalence of giardiasis [OR = 13.04; 95%CI 2.89-58.91; p = 0.00] and public garbage collection was identified as a protective factor against intestinal helminth infections [OR = 0.06; 95%CI 0.00-0.79; p = 0.03]. Although most of the children tested positive for Blastocystis spp. and also presented clinical signs/symptoms (62.2%), this association was not statistically significant [OR = 1.35; 95%CI 0.53-3.44; p = 0.51]. Intestinal parasites still represent a public health concern and this study underscores the importance of further investigations to better understand the pathogenic role of Blastocystis spp. PMID:27074325

  14. [Relations between attitude and practice of smoking and the training program regarding tobacco control among community medical staff members in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Min; Ren, Yan-Jun; Cao, Cheng-Jian; Liu, Bing; Lv, Jun; Li, Li-Ming

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the relations between training and both the attitude and practice on smoking control among community medical staff members in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province. Three representative districts including Xiacheng, Gongshu and Westlake were chosen from Hangzhou city. Questionnaire survey was applied to collect information from the related community medical staff members. The survey mainly contained three aspects: knowledge, attitude and practice regarding smoking control involved in the community medical activities. Availability and application of the resources on smoking cessation were also studied. Logistic regression analysis was applied to explore the factors associated with the smoking control training programs. Differences of rates between groups were assessed with chi-square statistics. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to study the relationships among knowledge, attitude and practice related to smoking control programs, targeted to the community medical staff members. Eight hundred forty-six community medical workers were involved. Sixty-five percent of the community medical staff members had learned related knowledge on smoking control. Proportion of the community medical staff who had taken lessons on smoking control with 3-10 working years was 1.77 times more than the ones with experience less than two years (OR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.25-2.51). Eighty-eight point seven percent of the medical staff who had received smoking control training programs were identified with the consciousness that they should advise the patients to quit smoking, comparing to the proportion 81.60% (Z=-2.87, P=0.00) in the control group. In terms of the practice regarding smoking control, data showed that 21.62% of the medical staff who had received smoking control training programs would provide 'how to quit smoking' to more than 90% of the smoking patients, while the proportion in the control group was 10.65% (Z = -5.68, P = 0.00). The use of drugs, traditional Chinese medicine

  15. Restructuring support staff classification levels for academic health sciences library positions.

    PubMed Central

    McCann, J C; Davis, S E; Trainor, D J; Waller, D K; Greenblatt, R B

    1990-01-01

    Nonprofessional library support staff traditionally hold what are considered to be low-paying, nonchallenging positions. These negative factors make retaining creative and productive employees difficult. This article outlines the approach taken at the Medical College of Georgia's Robert B. Greenblatt, M.D. Library to devise a structure of library staff positions that becomes progressively more demanding. A new nine-level Library Staff Classification Plan resulted. This plan also enables and encourages employees to acquire more skills and to accept more responsibility in order to qualify for higher-level library positions or to advance their present position to receive comparable rewards. The plan expresses the level of responsibilities expected, the employee qualifications desired, and lists representative duties across the spectrum of typical library tasks. PMID:2393758

  16. The Experience of Nursing Instructors and Students on Professional Competency of Nursing Academic Staff: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Hedayat; Mohammadi, Eesa; Ahmadi, Fazollah; Kazemnejad, Anoshiravan; Shorofi, Seyed Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Background: One of the most important purposes of health-oriented educational centers is to train competent nurses. This study was intended to discover the meaning of “competency of nursing academic staff” among nursing students and instructors. Methodology & Methods: A qualitative study using the content analysis approach was conducted. The data was collected through in-depth interviews consisting of 30 individuals and a focus group. Results: Data analysis resulted in the extraction of 15 categories and 6 themes. The themes included ‘providing effective education’, ‘increasing research capability of oneself and that of the students’, ‘promoting managerial competency’, ‘being a cultural and behavioral role model’, ‘motivating and nurturing the students’, and ‘boosting teaching values and disposition’. Conclusion: This study resulted in discovering the real meaning of professional competency among the nursing faculty staff. The findings could be utilized in designing assessment tools for professional competency of nursing academic staff in nursing schools and other medical fields. PMID:24999130

  17. From expert to novice: an exploration of the experiences of new academic staff to a department of adult nursing studies.

    PubMed

    McArthur-Rouse, Fiona J

    2008-05-01

    This study explores the experiences of new academic staff to ascertain what they found difficult about adapting to their new roles and to evaluate the effectiveness of the mentorship system in addressing these difficulties. A semi-structured interview approach was used focusing on prior experiences and reasons for applying for their new post; formal induction and mentorship systems; and main concerns on commencing the new role. All academic staff employed in the department for less than two years were invited to participate with the exception of the researcher's own mentee; six out of seven agreed. The interviews were audio-taped and subjected to thematic analysis. Key themes included a lack of understanding regarding the functioning of the organization and a lack of clarity about the new role and their effectiveness in undertaking it. Participants identified a need for more practical guidance regarding the functional aspects of teaching. Although, they reported positive mentoring experiences these were variable. The study concludes that the transition from expert practitioner to novice lecturer can be problematic. Recommendations for facilitating the process include the introduction of a more robust mentoring system, specific preparation for the mentors, and the development of a positive departmental learning culture.

  18. Personal Safety Practices, Beliefs and Attitudes of Academic Staff on a Small University Campus: Comparison of Males and Females (Part 2)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryden, Pamela J.; Fletcher, Paula C.

    2007-01-01

    The current study reports on a study examining the safety concerns of male and female staff members on a small university campus. A 160-item questionnaire was distributed to 231 staff employees (49 males and 182 females), which asked individuals questions pertaining to socio-demographic information, daily routines and campus activities, awareness…

  19. Effective teamwork in primary healthcare through a structured patient-sorting system - a qualitative study on staff members' conceptions.

    PubMed

    Maun, Andy; Engström, Miriam; Frantz, Anna; Brämberg, Elisabeth Björk; Thorn, Jörgen

    2014-11-28

    Primary healthcare meets increased demands from an aging population concerning quality and availability while concurrently dealing with a growing shortage of general practitioners and imperfect efficiency in healthcare processes. Reorganization and team development can improve quality and performance but projects in primary care frequently do not attain the targeted results. By developing and introducing a structured patient-sorting system a primary healthcare centre in Western Sweden increased its access rate significantly and employed its medical professionals more efficiently. The aim of this study was to explore staff members' conceptions of the structured patient-sorting system in order to gain an inside perspective on this project. In this qualitative study 16 interviews were conducted over a period of two years and data was analysed using a phenomenographic approach to identify the various conceptions of the eleven participants. Three categories of description were identified: The system was conceptualized as 1) a framework for the development of patient-centred processes that were clear and consistent, 2) a promotor of professional development and a shared ideal of cooperative practice and 3) a common denominator and catalyst in conflict management. This study demonstrates that the introduction of a structured patient-sorting system makes it possible for several important change processes to take place concurrently: improvement of healthcare processes, empowerment of professionals and team development. It therefore indicates the importance of an appropriate, contextualized framework to support multiple concomitant quality improvement processes. Knowledge from this study can be used to assist and improve future implementations in primary healthcare centres.

  20. Relationships among Student, Staff, and Administrative Measures of School Climate and Student Health and Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gase, Lauren N.; Gomez, Louis M.; Kuo, Tony; Glenn, Beth A.; Inkelas, Moira; Ponce, Ninez A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: School climate is an integral part of a comprehensive approach to improving the well-being of students; however, little is known about the relationships between its different domains and measures. We examined the relationships between student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate to understand the extent to which they…

  1. Introduction of Formal Performance Appraisal of Academic Staff: The Management Challenges Associated with Effective Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egginton, Bill E.

    2010-01-01

    Historically, higher educational institutions (HEIs) have been independent institutions, backed by an ideology that led staff to expect and enjoy high levels of independence and autonomy, relatively free from any sense of management, commercial responsibility and accountability. However, in recent times, the education sector has been subject to…

  2. Academic Staff Turnover Intention in Madda Walabu University, Bale Zone, South-East Ethiopia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yimer, Ibrahim; Nega, Rahel; Ganfure, Gemechu

    2017-01-01

    Turnover is a voluntary cessation of membership of an organization by an employee. Employee retention is one of the challenges facing several organizations in both the developed and developing countries of the world. It is profitable to proactively react for possible staff turnover intentions. This research was carried out to determine the…

  3. Introduction of Formal Performance Appraisal of Academic Staff: The Management Challenges Associated with Effective Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egginton, Bill E.

    2010-01-01

    Historically, higher educational institutions (HEIs) have been independent institutions, backed by an ideology that led staff to expect and enjoy high levels of independence and autonomy, relatively free from any sense of management, commercial responsibility and accountability. However, in recent times, the education sector has been subject to…

  4. Health services and the treatment of immigrants: data on service use, interpreting services and immigrant staff members in services across Europe.

    PubMed

    Kluge, U; Bogic, M; Devillé, W; Greacen, T; Dauvrin, M; Dias, S; Gaddini, A; Koitzsch Jensen, N; Ioannidi-Kapolou, E; Mertaniemi, R; Puipcinós I Riera, R; Sandhu, S; Sarvary, A; Soares, J J F; Stankunas, M; Straßmayr, C; Welbel, M; Heinz, A; Priebe, S

    2012-06-01

    The number of immigrants using health services has increased across Europe. For assessing and improving the quality of care provided for immigrants, information is required on how many immigrants use services, what interpreting services are provided and whether staff members are from immigrant groups. Structured interviews were conducted with 15 health services (9 primary care, 3 emergency departments, 3 mental health) located in areas with high immigrant populations in each of 16 European countries (n=240). Responses were collected on the availability of data on service use by immigrant patients, the provision of interpreting services and immigrant staff members. Data on service use by immigrants were recorded by only 15% of services. More than 40% of services did not provide any form of interpreting service and 54% of the services reported having no immigrant staff. Mental health services were more likely to use direct interpreting services, and both mental health and emergency services were more likely to have immigrant staff members. For assessing and improving the quality of care provided for immigrants, there is a need to improve the availability of data on service use by immigrants in health services throughout Europe and to provide more consistent access to interpreting services. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Concordance of Family and Staff Member Reports about End of Life in Assisted Living and Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Shayna E.; Williams, Christianna S.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in perspectives that may complicate the process of joint decision making at the end of life, this study determined the agreement of family and staff perspectives about end-of-life experiences in nursing homes and residential care/assisted living communities and whether family and staff roles, involvement in care,…

  6. Intervening in Bullying: Differences across Elementary School Staff Members in Attitudes, Perceptions, and Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williford, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Although a growing body of research has investigated the experiences of certified school staff in antibullying efforts, a dearth of research exists on noncertified staff. To that end, the present study examined differences in attitudes, perceptions, and self-efficacy beliefs to intervene among certified (for example, teachers, counselors, school…

  7. Concordance of Family and Staff Member Reports about End of Life in Assisted Living and Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Shayna E.; Williams, Christianna S.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in perspectives that may complicate the process of joint decision making at the end of life, this study determined the agreement of family and staff perspectives about end-of-life experiences in nursing homes and residential care/assisted living communities and whether family and staff roles, involvement in care,…

  8. Empowering words, disempowering actions: an analysis of interactions between staff members and people with learning disabilities in residents' meetings.

    PubMed

    Jingree, T; Finlay, W M L; Antaki, C

    2006-03-01

    This study examined power dynamics in verbal interactions between care staff and people with learning disabilities. Recordings of residents' meetings in a group home for people with learning disabilities were examined. The analysis showed some of the ways in which power was exercised in verbal interactions between care staff and residents. It was found that staff adopted various techniques to guide the discussion and produce certain kinds of statements and decisions. It could be said that in these cases, the staff were having to decide between two or more conflicting institutional objectives. The effect was that staff contributions sometimes produced interactional patterns which were contrary to the goal of encouraging the residents to speak up and have more say in the management of their home.

  9. Academic Achievement and Personality Traits of Faculty Members of Indian Agricultural Universities: Their Effect on Teaching and Research Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramesh, P.; Reddy, K. M.; Rao, R. V. S.; Dhandapani, A.; Siva, G. Samba; Ramakrishna, A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was undertaken to assess academic achievement, teaching aptitude and research attitude of Indian agricultural universities' faculty, to predict indicators for successful teachers and researchers, and thereby enhancing the quality of higher agricultural education. Methodology: Five hundred faculty members were selected to…

  10. Academic Achievement and Personality Traits of Faculty Members of Indian Agricultural Universities: Their Effect on Teaching and Research Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramesh, P.; Reddy, K. M.; Rao, R. V. S.; Dhandapani, A.; Siva, G. Samba; Ramakrishna, A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The present study was undertaken to assess academic achievement, teaching aptitude and research attitude of Indian agricultural universities' faculty, to predict indicators for successful teachers and researchers, and thereby enhancing the quality of higher agricultural education. Methodology: Five hundred faculty members were selected to…

  11. Academic Staff's Apathy towards Formal Professional Development Programmes at North West University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makunye, M. M.; Pelser, T. G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore reasons for academics' apathy towards formal professional development programmes at North-West University. The research design was essentially descriptive, employing both qualitative and quantitative research techniques to gather and analyse data. Three techniques, namely, questionnaire surveys, analysis of…

  12. Building Staff Capacity through Reflecting on Collaborative Development of Embedded Academic Literacies Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thies, Linda C.

    2016-01-01

    Most Australian universities articulate some policies around the integration of graduate learning outcomes in courses. This paper draws on a Federal Government funded project that adopted a developmental approach to students' acquisition of course learning outcomes, through the embedding of academic literacies in course curricula. The project was…

  13. Academic Drift in Dutch Non-University Higher Education Evaluated: A Staff Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffioen, Didi M. E.; de Jong, Uulkje

    2013-01-01

    In the context of a European knowledge economy, the Dutch non-university institutions systematically develop research activities at a higher frequency than before. With this development, they have been accused of academic drift, of striving to receive a status comparable to traditional universities. This study considers the perceptions of both…

  14. Internationalization within Higher Education and Its Influence on Faculty: Experiences of Turkish Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bedenlier, Svenja

    2017-01-01

    In this article, findings are reported from a phenomenology-oriented study on prolonged international mobility and the effects of internationalization on the professional lives of six academic faculty at a Turkish research university. Drawing on research on international mobility of faculty and the present context of Turkish higher education, this…

  15. Plagiarism, Cultural Diversity and Metaphor--Implications for Academic Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leask, Betty

    2006-01-01

    Plagiarism is a complex, culturally loaded concept which causes much anxiety for both academics and students. Exactly what constitutes plagiarism is dependent on a number of contextual factors. Despite the difficulties associated with defining and detecting plagiarism, it is said to be on the increase, and students from "other cultures"…

  16. Plagiarism, Cultural Diversity and Metaphor--Implications for Academic Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leask, Betty

    2006-01-01

    Plagiarism is a complex, culturally loaded concept which causes much anxiety for both academics and students. Exactly what constitutes plagiarism is dependent on a number of contextual factors. Despite the difficulties associated with defining and detecting plagiarism, it is said to be on the increase, and students from "other cultures"…

  17. Academic Staff's Apathy towards Formal Professional Development Programmes at North West University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makunye, M. M.; Pelser, T. G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore reasons for academics' apathy towards formal professional development programmes at North-West University. The research design was essentially descriptive, employing both qualitative and quantitative research techniques to gather and analyse data. Three techniques, namely, questionnaire surveys, analysis of…

  18. A System of Student Feedback: Considerations of Academic Staff Taken into Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulpiau, Veerle; Masschelein, Evelien; Van Der Stockt, Luc; Verhesschen, Piet; Waeytens, Kim

    2007-01-01

    As a consequence of the suspension of a system of yearly evaluations of individual courses with student questionnaires, the University of Leuven organised a broad consultation of the academic community focussing on what they expect from a system based on student feedback. The study revealed that this community attaches great importance to a clear…

  19. Junior pharmacy faculty members' perceptions of their exposure to postgraduate training and academic careers during pharmacy school.

    PubMed

    Hagemeier, Nicholas E; Murawski, Matthew M

    2012-04-10

    To determine the perceptions of junior pharmacy faculty members with US doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degrees regarding their exposure to residency, fellowship, and graduate school training options in pharmacy school. Perceptions of exposure to career options and research were also sought. A mixed-mode survey instrument was developed and sent to assistant professors at US colleges and schools of pharmacy. Usable responses were received from 735 pharmacy faculty members. Faculty members perceived decreased exposure to and awareness of fellowship and graduate education training as compared to residency training. Awareness of and exposure to academic careers and research-related fields was low from a faculty recruitment perspective. Ensuring adequate exposure of pharmacy students to career paths and postgraduate training opportunities could increase the number of PharmD graduates who choose academic careers or other pharmacy careers resulting from postgraduate training.

  20. The Meaning of Recovery from Co-Occurring Disorder: Views from Consumers and Staff Members Living and Working in Housing First Programming.

    PubMed

    Watson, Dennis P; Rollins, Angela L

    2015-10-01

    The current study seeks to understand the concept of recovery from the perspectives of consumers and staff living and working in a supportive housing model designed to serve those with co-occurring disorder. Interview and focus group data were collected from consumers and staff from four housing programs. Data analyzed using an approach that combined case study and grounded theory methodologies demonstrate that: consumers' and staff members' views of recovery were highly compatible and resistant to abstinence-based definitions of recovery; recovery is personal; stability is a foundation for recovery; recovery is a process; and the recovery process is not linear. These themes are more consistent with mental health-focused conceptions of recovery than those traditionally used within the substance abuse field, and they help demonstrate how recovery can be influenced by the organization of services in which consumers are embedded.

  1. Exploring Community College Students' and Faculty Members' Perceptions on Academic Dishonesty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesser, Donna

    2014-01-01

    Academic dishonesty is a well-documented problem in higher education. While numerous actions and/or behaviors are attributed to threatening academic integrity, the vernacular term used by both students and faculty is "cheating". Although there has been a substantial amount of research on academic integrity and dishonesty in general,…

  2. Quality Assurance of Assessment and Moderation Discourses Involving Sessional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grainger, Peter; Adie, Lenore; Weir, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance is a major agenda in tertiary education. The casualisation of academic work, especially in teaching, is also a quality assurance issue. Casual or sessional staff members teach and assess more than 50% of all university courses in Australia, and yet the research in relation to the role sessional staff play in quality assurance of…

  3. Quality Assurance of Assessment and Moderation Discourses Involving Sessional Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grainger, Peter; Adie, Lenore; Weir, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance is a major agenda in tertiary education. The casualisation of academic work, especially in teaching, is also a quality assurance issue. Casual or sessional staff members teach and assess more than 50% of all university courses in Australia, and yet the research in relation to the role sessional staff play in quality assurance of…

  4. MaRIE 1.0: A briefing to Katherine Richardson-McDaniel, Staff Member for U. S. Senator Martin Heinrich (D-NM)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Cris William

    2015-02-24

    At the request of Katherine Richardson-McDaniel, Staff Member to U.S. Senator Martin Heinrich (D-NM), a high-level briefing was requested about MaRIE 1.0, the Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes effort at Los Alamos National Laboratory. What it would be, the mission need motivation, the scientific challenge, and the current favorable impact on both programs and people are shown in viewgraph form.

  5. A Phenomenological Study: The Identification of Faculty Member Characteristics and Environmental Factors That Influence the Reporting of Student Academic Misconduct at a Private Urban University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupprecht, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    The issue of student academic misconduct, most often seen as cheating or plagiarism, has plagued higher education professionals and institutions for decades. Negative faculty member feelings associated with having to deal with incidents of student academic misconduct are well documented, and only serve to support reasons why faculty members might…

  6. A Phenomenological Study: The Identification of Faculty Member Characteristics and Environmental Factors That Influence the Reporting of Student Academic Misconduct at a Private Urban University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupprecht, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    The issue of student academic misconduct, most often seen as cheating or plagiarism, has plagued higher education professionals and institutions for decades. Negative faculty member feelings associated with having to deal with incidents of student academic misconduct are well documented, and only serve to support reasons why faculty members might…

  7. Higher Education Governance in Europe: Policies, Structures, Funding and Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Coster, Isabelle; Forsthuber, Bernadette; Oberheidt, Stephanie; Parveva, Teodora; Glass, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The role of higher education in the society of knowledge is recognised both at European and Member State levels. This level of education is called upon to make a significant contribution to achieving the Lisbon objectives in terms of growth, prosperity and social cohesion. The European Union "Education and Training 2010" work programme…

  8. Information and communications technology, culture, and medical universities; organizational culture and netiquette among academic staff.

    PubMed

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Iravani, Hoorsana; Abzari, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Netiquette is appropriate behavioral etiquette when communicating through computer networks or virtual space. Identification of a dominant organizational culture and its relationship with a network culture offers applied guidelines to top managers of the university to expand communications and develop and learn organization through the use of the internet. The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between netiquette and organizational culture among faculty members of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Iran. To achieve this aim, the research method in this study was correlational research, which belonged to the category of descriptive survey research. The target population comprised of 594 faculty members of the IUMS, from which a sample of 150 was randomly selected, based on a simple stratified sampling method. For collecting the required data, two researcher-made questionnaires were formulated. Even as the first questionnaire tended to measure the selected sample members' organizational culture according to Rabbin's model (1999), the latter was designed in the Health Management and Economic Research Center (HMERC), to evaluate netiquette. The reliability of the questionnaires was computed by Choronbach's alpha coefficient formula and they happened to be 0.97 and 0.89, respectively. Ultimately, SPSS Version #15 was used for the statistical analysis of the data. The findings revealed that the organizational culture and netiquette were below average level among the sample members, signifying a considerable gap in the mean. In spite of that, there was no significant relationship between netiquette and the organizational culture of the faculty members. Emphasizing the importance of cultural preparation and a network user's training, this research suggests that the expansion of network culture rules among IUMS and organizational official communications, through the use of internet networks, in order to promote university netiquette and

  9. Life satisfaction of people with intellectual disability living in community residences: perceptions of the residents, their parents and staff members.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, C; Rabinovitz, S

    2003-02-01

    Within the literature on quality of life (QoL), life satisfaction (LS) has emerged as a key variable by which to measure perceived well-being, which is referred to as subjective QoL. The LS self-reports of 93 residents with intellectual disability (ID) living in community-based residences were compared with reports about their LS completed by their staff and parents. The residents were interviewed on their LS by social workers who did not belong to the staff of the interviewee's residence. The instrument used was the Life Satisfaction Scale (LSS). Staff and parents completed the short version of the LSS. Residents and staff's LS reports were positively correlated. However, significant differences were found between these two groups of informants when the residents were characterized as high functioning, had a low score in challenging behaviour, worked in an integrative employment setting and lived in an apartment. As opposed to staff/resident discrepancies, no differences were found between parents' and residents' LS reports. If residents cannot to be interviewed about their LS, then the parent is the preferred person to respond on behalf of the resident. The current study highlights the importance of including both objective measures (e.g. functional assessment characteristics) and subjective measures (e.g. LS) in order to get a better understanding of the QoL of people with ID.

  10. Information and communications technology, culture, and medical universities; organizational culture and netiquette among academic staff

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Iravani, Hoorsana; Abzari, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Netiquette is appropriate behavioral etiquette when communicating through computer networks or virtual space. Identification of a dominant organizational culture and its relationship with a network culture offers applied guidelines to top managers of the university to expand communications and develop and learn organization through the use of the internet. The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between netiquette and organizational culture among faculty members of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Iran. Materials and Methods: To achieve this aim, the research method in this study was correlational research, which belonged to the category of descriptive survey research. The target population comprised of 594 faculty members of the IUMS, from which a sample of 150 was randomly selected, based on a simple stratified sampling method. For collecting the required data, two researcher-made questionnaires were formulated. Even as the first questionnaire tended to measure the selected sample members’ organizational culture according to Rabbin's model (1999), the latter was designed in the Health Management and Economic Research Center (HMERC), to evaluate netiquette. The reliability of the questionnaires was computed by Choronbach's alpha coefficient formula and they happened to be 0.97 and 0.89, respectively. Ultimately, SPSS Version #15 was used for the statistical analysis of the data. Results: The findings revealed that the organizational culture and netiquette were below average level among the sample members, signifying a considerable gap in the mean. In spite of that, there was no significant relationship between netiquette and the organizational culture of the faculty members. Conclusion: Emphasizing the importance of cultural preparation and a network user's training, this research suggests that the expansion of network culture rules among IUMS and organizational official communications, through the use of internet

  11. A Combined Conceptual/Data Based Methodology for the Determination of University Departmental Academic, Supporting and Administrative Staff at an International Level of Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legg, Keith

    A generalized methodology is presented for calculating university departmental academic, supporting, and administrative staff for various subject classifications and geographical regions. Emphasis is placed on flexibility to accommodate different types of programs and parametric data are presented to facilitate numerical assessment. The complete…

  12. Attitudes of Academic Staff towards Their Own Work and towards External Evaluation, from the Perspective of Self-Determination Theory: Estonian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seema, Riin; Udam, Maiki; Mattisen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the attitudes of academic staff towards their own work as well as towards external evaluations. The study was based on (1) an analysis of assessment reports of institutional accreditations conducted by the Estonian Quality Agency for Higher and Vocational Education and (2) self-determination theory on…

  13. Sustainable Attitudes and Behaviours amongst a Sample of Non-Academic Staff: A Case Study from an Information Services Department, Griffith University, Brisbane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, G.; O'Callaghan, F.; Knox, K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is seek to characterise sustainable attitudes and behaviours (including recycling and waste minimisation, energy efficiency, water conservation and "green" purchasing) amongst non-academic staff within Griffith University, Queensland. Design/methodology/approach: For this study, the attitudes and…

  14. The "Zurich E-Learning Certificate": A Role Model for the Acquirement of eCompetence for Academic Staff and an Example of a Practical Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volk, Benno; Keller, Stefan Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Since 2002 the "Zurich E-Learning Certificate" offers lecturers and academic staff from the three main universities in Zurich the possibility to take part in a professional development program which supports the acquirement of eCompetence. The program is the result of a cooperation between the University of Zurich (UZH), the Swiss…

  15. Attitudes of Academic Staff towards Their Own Work and towards External Evaluation, from the Perspective of Self-Determination Theory: Estonian Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seema, Riin; Udam, Maiki; Mattisen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the attitudes of academic staff towards their own work as well as towards external evaluations. The study was based on (1) an analysis of assessment reports of institutional accreditations conducted by the Estonian Quality Agency for Higher and Vocational Education and (2) self-determination theory on…

  16. Sustainable Attitudes and Behaviours amongst a Sample of Non-Academic Staff: A Case Study from an Information Services Department, Griffith University, Brisbane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, G.; O'Callaghan, F.; Knox, K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is seek to characterise sustainable attitudes and behaviours (including recycling and waste minimisation, energy efficiency, water conservation and "green" purchasing) amongst non-academic staff within Griffith University, Queensland. Design/methodology/approach: For this study, the attitudes and…

  17. [Application of marketing strategies for the management of public hospitals from the viewpoint of the staff members].

    PubMed

    Riveros S, Jorge; Berné M, Carmen

    2006-03-01

    The implementation of the marketing strategies in public hospitals provides management advantages and improves the relationship between customers and staff. To analyze the application of marketing strategies in a public hospital, from the perspective of the staff. A structured survey that asked about perceptions in 50 items about communication between personnel and customers/users, customer satisfaction, participation in the development of new policies and incentives for efficiency was applied to a stratified sample of the staff. Factorial and regression analyses were performed to define the impact of marketing strategies on the degree of preoccupation and orientation of the organization towards the satisfaction of customer needs. The survey was applied to 74 males and 122 females. The survey showed that the orientation of the hospital towards the satisfaction of its beneficiaries basically depends on the generation of an organizational culture oriented towards them and the implementation of adequate policies in staff management and quality of service. These basic aspects can be accompanied with practices associated to the new marketing approaches such as a market orientation, customer orientation and relational marketing. All these factors presented positive and significant relations. New marketing strategies should be applied, to achieve an efficient and customer oriented hospital management.

  18. Knowledge of Staff Members of Residential Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disability on Medication Administration via Enteral Feeding Tube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joos, E.; Mehuys, E.; Van Bocxlaer, J.; Remon, J. P.; Van Winckel, M.; Boussery, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Guidelines for the safe administration of drugs through enteral feeding tube (EFT) are an important tool to minimise the risk of errors. This study aimed to investigate knowledge of these guidelines among staff of residential care facilities (RCF) for people with ID. Method: Knowledge was assessed using a 13-item self-administered…

  19. Knowledge of Staff Members of Residential Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disability on Medication Administration via Enteral Feeding Tube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joos, E.; Mehuys, E.; Van Bocxlaer, J.; Remon, J. P.; Van Winckel, M.; Boussery, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Guidelines for the safe administration of drugs through enteral feeding tube (EFT) are an important tool to minimise the risk of errors. This study aimed to investigate knowledge of these guidelines among staff of residential care facilities (RCF) for people with ID. Method: Knowledge was assessed using a 13-item self-administered…

  20. Choosing Staff Members Reduces Time in Mechanical Restraint Due to Self-Injurious Behaviour and Requesting Restraint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Craig C.; Lydersen, Tore; Johnson, Paul R.; Weiss, Shannon R.; Marconi, Michael R.; Cleave, Mary L.; Weber, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Background: Using mechanical restraints to protect a person who engaged in dangerous self-injury was decreased by manipulation of an establishing operation involving the client choosing the staff person who would work with her. Materials and Methods: The client was a 28-year-old woman diagnosed with autism, bipolar disorder, static cerebral…

  1. Choosing Staff Members Reduces Time in Mechanical Restraint Due to Self-Injurious Behaviour and Requesting Restraint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Craig C.; Lydersen, Tore; Johnson, Paul R.; Weiss, Shannon R.; Marconi, Michael R.; Cleave, Mary L.; Weber, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Background: Using mechanical restraints to protect a person who engaged in dangerous self-injury was decreased by manipulation of an establishing operation involving the client choosing the staff person who would work with her. Materials and Methods: The client was a 28-year-old woman diagnosed with autism, bipolar disorder, static cerebral…

  2. School staff members' and occupational health nurses' evaluation of the promotion of occupational well-being - with good planning to better practice.

    PubMed

    Saaranen, Terhi; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Turunen, Hannele

    2005-10-01

    This paper describes occupational health nurses' and school staff members' experiences of work ability maintenance carried out at schools and the development of ideas to promote the collaboration between occupational health care and school community and to enhance work ability maintenance. The data were collected in a baseline situation of an action research project to further plan and develop activities. The data were analysed by inductive content analysis. According to the results, school community staff members' work ability maintenance focused on the employee, the school community, school work and the working conditions as well as professional competence. The practical actions involved some individual and school-specific variation, focusing on actions to maintain individual and physical work ability. It seems that the collaboration between the school community and occupational health service for work ability maintenance took place at the individual level, but an obvious need for more structural collaboration emerged by several suggestions made by the participants (e.g. better information exchange between the school and occupational health care, improved collaboration between the school staff and the co-operative partners). The progress in collaboration may lead towards spontaneous collaboration, in which case both actors have the same target and work in a planned, continuous and natural way to ensure work ability maintenance in the school community.

  3. Leisure Activities of University College Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biernat, Elzbieta; Roguski, Karol

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To determine the participation of academic teachers in leisure activities for that group contribute to shaping habits of a large percentage of young people. Material and methods: A group of 52 staff members (about 30%) of a private university college, aged 25-70 years, were interviewed with respect to their participation in sports,…

  4. On the Same Flight: Decentralized Alumni Staff Members Work Apart from Their Central Office but Have the Same Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scully, Maura King

    2011-01-01

    Colleges, schools, and faculties at large universities form strong academic bonds with students. So is it any wonder they want a say in keeping these students engaged as alumni? To provide that input, many larger institutions are decentralizing their alumni operations, meaning that colleges, schools, and faculties have their own alumni staff…

  5. On the Same Flight: Decentralized Alumni Staff Members Work Apart from Their Central Office but Have the Same Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scully, Maura King

    2011-01-01

    Colleges, schools, and faculties at large universities form strong academic bonds with students. So is it any wonder they want a say in keeping these students engaged as alumni? To provide that input, many larger institutions are decentralizing their alumni operations, meaning that colleges, schools, and faculties have their own alumni staff…

  6. Confronting Academic Snobbery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Brian; Sørensen, Majken Jul

    2014-01-01

    Snobbery in academia can involve academics, general staff, students and members of the public, and can be based on degrees, disciplines, cliques and other categories. Though snobbery is seldom treated as a significant issue, it can have damaging effects on morale, research and public image. Strategies against snobbery include avoidance, private…

  7. Two beached pilot whales are rescued by KSC and Sea World staff members near Launch Pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Sea World, Dynamac Life Sciences, and EG&G Protective Services staff tend to a beached whale on the Brevard County shoreline near Kennedy Space Center's Launch Pad 39A. Two pilot whales beached themselves mid-morning on Jan. 20 and were rescued and taken to Marineland near St. Augustine. The two whales, an eight- foot and an 11-foot, bring to six the number of whales being treated at Sea World in Orlando and at Marineland. Nine whales have beached in Brevard County since the beginning of the year.

  8. Two beached pilot whales are rescued by KSC and Sea World staff members near Launch Pad 39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Sea World, Dynamac Life Sciences, and EG&G Protective Services staff tend to a beached whale on the Brevard County shoreline near Kennedy Space Center's Launch Pad 39A. Two pilot whales beached themselves mid-morning on Jan. 20 and were rescued and taken to Marineland near St. Augustine. The two whales, an eight- foot and an 11-foot, bring to six the number of whales being treated at Sea World in Orlando and at Marineland. Nine whales have beached in Brevard County since the beginning of the year.

  9. How hospice staff members prepare family caregivers for the patient’s final days of life: An exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Kehl, Karen A

    2014-01-01

    Background There is widespread agreement that the families of hospice patients need to be prepared for the final days of life, yet current practices preparing families are not well described. Examining the gap between family needs and current practice will inform the development of effective preparatory interventions. Aim The purpose of the study was to describe how hospice clinicians prepare family for the final days of life, including (1) the content of the preparatory information, (2) strategies and timing of preparation, and whether the preparation is tailored, and (3) who prepares families. Design Conventional content analysis guided this study. Individual interviews using semi-structured questions were conducted. Setting/participants In all, 19 hospice clinicians who provided care in the home setting from two hospice agencies in the United States participated. Results Preparatory messages included information on signs of impending death, symptoms, implications of the symptoms, what to expect next, and instructions on what to do. Commonly used strategies included listening, engendering trust, repetition, collaboration with other disciplines, and demonstrations. Staff tailored content and delivery of messages on patient, family, and hospice factors. Preparation usually occurred over time. All hospice staff provided preparatory information, but there are some differences by discipline. Conclusions Most content previous identified as necessary for preparedness is part of the current preparation. The knowledge of the current practice in preparing families can be used to develop systematic means of assessing the factors related to timing and tailoring, which may assist in developing preparatory messages that are effective and timely. PMID:25249240

  10. Academic Alliances: Should You Be a Member of a Teacher Collaborative?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Barry; And Others

    A discussion of the academic alliance movement in foreign languages, in which regional and local groups are formed for the support and promotion of language teachers and programs, is presented. The first section presents a brief general history of the movement, describes the development of the Ohio Valley Foreign Language Alliance at Ohio…

  11. Comparison of flocked and rayon swabs for detection of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus among pathology staff members.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Sabine; Wood, Gillian; Quek, Tricia; Parrott, Christine; Bennett, Catherine M

    2010-08-01

    Comparison of flocked swabs (E-swabs; Copan) to the standard rayon swabs (Copan) was undertaken for detection of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage among staff at Dorevitch Pathology in Heidelberg, Melbourne, Australia. Among 100 volunteers, 36 were found to be colonized with S. aureus by one or both swab results. The prevalence detected by E-swabs was 35%, and the prevalence through rayon swabs was 34% (95% confidence interval [CI] for the difference in proportions, -12 to 14). Thirty-three volunteers tested positive with both types of swabs, while 2 were detected on E-swabs alone and another on rayon swab testing alone. There was no evidence of a significant difference in carriage detected by E-swabs or rayon swabs.

  12. Academic Freedom, Tenure, and Responsibility for Faculty Members in Texas Public Community and Senior Colleges and Universities. Policy Paper 1. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Coll. and Univ. System, Austin. Coordinating Board.

    Modifications are presented to a 1967 document that contained recommendations concerning academic freedom, academic responsibility, and tenure for faculty members in Texas public community and senior colleges and universities. The recommended standards constitute patterns or guidelines and are not binding on any institution and may be varied in…

  13. [Conditioning of community nurse duties towards the patient treated by family doctor--the opinion of family doctor staff members].

    PubMed

    Rogala-Pawelczyk, Grazyna

    2002-01-01

    The team of family doctor is the main link in the basic health care. It consists of community nurses who work according to the plan specifying the health needs of patients. Community nurses fulfil the needs of patients of various age and health conditions. The paper presents a part of studies on the area and activities of community nurses working in the team of family doctor. An attempt was made to answer the following questions: what are the duties of community nurse, what factors make it easy to fulfil the duties and what factors make the work more difficult? The study comprised a few dozen of community nurses and family doctors all over the country. It was carried out from January to April 2001. Two questionnaires were used for community nurses and for family doctors. Medical documentation was also analysed. It gave answers to problem questions: duties of community nurses include: co-operation in diagnosing and treatment, health promotion and education, fulfilment of therapeutic and nursing programme, factors which help to realise the programme include: qualifications, clearly stated duties, equipment, factors which make the work difficult comprise: lack of staff, poor salary, legislation problems, difficulties in self-development, lack of co-operation from patients and their families. No differences in the opinion of both groups on the duties of community nurses were noticed.

  14. Incarceration in the Household: Academic Outcomes of Adolescents with an Incarcerated Household Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Emily Bever; Loper, Ann Booker

    2012-01-01

    The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world, yet there is relatively little information on how the removal of these adults from households impacts the youth who are left behind. This study used a child-centered lens to examine the impact of incarceration on the school outcomes of youth who resided with a family member or…

  15. School Board Member Practices in Governance, Teamwork and Board Development, and Their Sense of Effectiveness in High and Low Math Academic Achievement Districts of New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Kyrie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among New York State school board member attitudes toward components of school board governance and their sense of effectiveness in high and low math academic achievement districts in New York State. The study examined board members' perceptions of their actual practices in policy…

  16. School Board Member Practices in Governance, Teamwork and Board Development, and Their Sense of Effectiveness in High and Low Math Academic Achievement Districts of New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Kyrie

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among New York State school board member attitudes toward components of school board governance and their sense of effectiveness in high and low math academic achievement districts in New York State. The study examined board members' perceptions of their actual practices in policy…

  17. Contemporary Ethics in Relation to Academics and the Use of a Professor's Own Text or Fellow Faculty Member's Text as a Course Requirement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Jack R.; Stryker, Judson P.

    A study was done of higher education faculty members' views of ethics in relation to academics and the use of a professor's own text or a fellow faculty member's text as a course requirement. A questionnaire was sent to 210 accounting professors selected at random of whom 53 percent responded. The response rate alone indicated a widespread…

  18. Employability Enhancement through Formal and Informal Learning: An Empirical Study among Dutch Non-Academic University Staff Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Heijden, Beatrice; Boon, Jo; van der Klink, Marcel; Meijs, Ely

    2009-01-01

    Although learning is generally perceived as a way to improve employees' current job performance, so far, no research has been conducted to explore the possible relationships between formal and informal learning, on the one hand, and employability, on the other. Though contemporary views stress the importance of the job as a powerful learning site,…

  19. Perceptions of Academics towards the Impact of Foundation Universities on Turkish Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erguvan, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of foundation universities on the higher education system of Turkey through perceptions of academic staff in state and foundation universities. In this qualitative research, 15 members of academic staff were interviewed for their perceptions regarding a variety of issues about foundation universities. Analysis of…

  20. What predicts nurse faculty members' intent to stay in the academic organization? A structural equation model of a national survey of nursing faculty.

    PubMed

    Candela, Lori; Gutierrez, Antonio P; Keating, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the relations among several factors regarding the academic context within a nationally representative sample of U.S. nursing faculty. Correlational design using structural equation modeling to explore the predictive nature of several factors related to the academic organization and the work life of nursing faculty. A survey was used to evaluate several aspects of the work life of U.S. nursing faculty members. Nursing faculty members in academic organizations across the U.S. serving at either CCNE- or NLNAC-accredited institutions of higher education. Standard confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the validity of a proposed measurement model, and structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the validity of a structural/latent variable model. Several direct and indirect effects were observed among the factors under investigation. Of special importance, perceptions of nurse administration's support and perceived teaching expertise positively predicted U.S. nursing faculty members' intent to stay in the academic organization. Understanding the way that nursing faculty members' perceptions of the various factors common to the academic context interact with intent to stay in the academic organization is essential for faculty and nursing administrators. This information can assist administrators in obtaining more resources for faculty development to lobby for additional faculty in order to meet the teaching, research, and service missions of the organization; and to personalize relationships with individual faculty members to understand their needs and acknowledge their efforts. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Staff Development for the Continuing Education Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hentschel, Doe

    1990-01-01

    Advocating development for all continuing education staff, the author asserts that staff who understand adult education theory, the goals and visions of the organization, the environmental context of continuing education, and the roles of other staff members will be more effective. Also essential are support mechanisms that facilitate change. (SK)

  2. The University Side of the College Transfer Experience: Insights from University Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGowan, Rosemary A.; Gawley, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    University staff members play a key role in the college articulation process. They implement articulation agreements and shepherd college transfer students through the academic and cultural changes encountered at university. Based on in-depth interviews with university staff, the paper describes five major themes including: transfer credits--the…

  3. The Rise of "Professional Staff" and Demise of the "Non-Academic": A Study of University Staffing Nomenclature Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebalj, Darlene; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2012-01-01

    Concerns regarding the nomenclature of university administration in Australia and the UK have featured in the higher education literature for over a decade. In response, a significant nomenclature shift is occurring, with Australian universities replacing the term "General Staff" to describe all administrative and technical staff, in…

  4. The Rise of "Professional Staff" and Demise of the "Non-Academic": A Study of University Staffing Nomenclature Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebalj, Darlene; Holbrook, Allyson; Bourke, Sid

    2012-01-01

    Concerns regarding the nomenclature of university administration in Australia and the UK have featured in the higher education literature for over a decade. In response, a significant nomenclature shift is occurring, with Australian universities replacing the term "General Staff" to describe all administrative and technical staff, in…

  5. On the Same Wavelength but Tuned to Different Frequencies? Perceptions of Academic and Admissions Staff in England and Wales on the Articulation between 14-19 Education and Training and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilde, Stephanie; Wright, Susannah

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the views of staff at higher education institutions on how well 14-19 education and training prepares young people for higher education (HE) study. It draws upon research involving focus groups with approximately 250 academic and admissions staff at 21 higher education institutions in England and Wales. The data collection was…

  6. Young Economists and Lawyers Learn How To Write an Academic Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruber, Helmut

    A compulsory trainee program for new staff members at the Vienna Business University was established in the academic year 1998/99. In the course of this program new staff members are prepared in the following three areas of their work: research work in their department, especially dissertation writing; teaching classes; and administrative skills.…

  7. A Capacity Building Program to Promote CBPR Partnerships Between Academic Researchers and Community Members

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Michele L.; Culhane-Pera, Kathleen A.; Pergament, Shannon; Call, Kathleen Thiede

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Community-based participatory research (CBPR) adds community perspectives to research and aids translational research aims. There is a need for increased capacity in CBPR but few models exist for how to support the development of community/university partnerships Objective Evaluate an approach to promote nascent CBPR partnerships. Methods Design was a mixed-methods evaluation utilizing interviews, process notes, and open and closed ended survey questions. We trained ten community scholars, matched them with prepared researchers to form seven partnerships, and supported their developing partnerships. Sequential mixed-methods analysis assessed research and partnership processes and identified integrated themes. Results Four of seven partnerships were funded within 15 months; all self-reported their partnerships as successful. Themes were: 1) Motivators contributed to partnership development and resiliency; 2) Partners took on responsibilities that utilized individuals' strengths; 3) Partners grappled with communication, decision-making, and power-dynamics; and 4) Community-university infrastructure was essential to partnership development. Conclusions This program for developing nascent partnerships between academicians and community members may guide others in increasing capacity for CBPR. PMID:22212224

  8. A capacity building program to promote CBPR partnerships between academic researchers and community members.

    PubMed

    Allen, Michele L; Culhane-Pera, Kathleen A; Pergament, Shannon; Call, Kathleen Thiede

    2011-12-01

    Community-based participatory research (CBPR) adds community perspectives to research and aids translational research aims. There is a need for increased capacity in CBPR but few models exist for how to support the development of community/university partnerships. Evaluate an approach to promote nascent CBPR partnerships. Design was a mixed-methods evaluation using interviews, process notes, and open- and close-ended survey questions. We trained 10 community scholars, matched them with prepared researchers to form seven partnerships, and supported their developing partnerships. Sequential mixed-methods analysis assessed research and partnership processes and identified integrated themes. Four of seven partnerships were funded within 15 months; all self-reported their partnerships as successful. Themes were: (1) motivators contributed to partnership development and resiliency; (2) partners took on responsibilities that used individuals' strengths; (3) partners grappled with communication, decision making, and power dynamics; and (4) community-university infrastructure was essential to partnership development. This program for developing nascent partnerships between academicians and community members may guide others in increasing capacity for CBPR. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Poetic Transcription with a Twist: Supporting Early Career Academics through Liminal Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Fiona; Loads, Daphne

    2017-01-01

    As pressures on new academic staff members increase and change, academic developers need to find different ways of working with them. This paper offers for discussion a new way of supporting early career academics in their negotiation of liminality, the betwixt and between space separating old and new roles. We call this innovative approach…

  10. The Challenges Facing Staff Development in Promoting Quality Online Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Debbi

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of an academic professional development program, related to the use of WebCT in teaching programs, and discusses the challenges that have arisen for the members of the staff development team since the original implementation of the program. The training program begins with face-to-face workshops, covering…

  11. Student Achievement Gaps in High-Performing Schools: Differences as a Function of the Professional Staff as a Learning Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Kimberly S.; Meehan, Merrill L.

    This study investigated differences among professional staff members' commitment to continuous learning and improvement in high-performing schools differentiated by student academic performance and disaggregated by race and socioeconomic status. A total of 48 high-performing schools were identified by Kentucky Department of Education staff based…

  12. Pandora's Box: Academic Perceptions of Student Plagiarism in Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland-Smith, Wendy

    2005-01-01

    Plagiarism is viewed by many academics as a kind of Pandora's box--the elements contained inside are too frightening to allow escape for fear of the havoc that may result. Reluctance by academic members of staff to discuss student plagiarism openly may contribute to the often untenable situations we, as teachers, face when dealing with student…

  13. Pandora's Box: Academic Perceptions of Student Plagiarism in Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland-Smith, Wendy

    2005-01-01

    Plagiarism is viewed by many academics as a kind of Pandora's box--the elements contained inside are too frightening to allow escape for fear of the havoc that may result. Reluctance by academic members of staff to discuss student plagiarism openly may contribute to the often untenable situations we, as teachers, face when dealing with student…

  14. Partnering through Staff Rotation in a Multi-Branch Academic Library: One Example at the UCSD Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodson, Kymberly Anne

    2006-01-01

    The article describes a partnership between two of the libraries at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) through which two staff in one library worked part-time at the other during the summer of 2006 in order to maximize staffing efficiency among the units, as well as to realize professional development-related goals for the staff…

  15. Student Affairs Staff Survey of Knowledge of Disability Laws and Recent Legal Decisions. Postsecondary Accommodations for Academic and Career Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bethea, Leslie L.; Thompson, Anne R.

    This document presents survey questions concerning rights of students with disabilities in postsecondary education and the responsibilities and rights of student affairs staff. The survey is intended to provide necessary information about disability laws and recent legal decisions in the context of the increased enrollment of students with…

  16. Monitoring of Working Conditions and the Nature of Their Influence on Health of Students and Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinichenko, Mikhail V.; Kirillov, Andrey V.; Frolova, Elena V.; Kaurova, Olga V.; Makushkin, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research is conditioned by the need to win the competition struggle by certain organizations and area in general. Education has recently become very popular for the training of highly professional staff. However, achieving this goal is possible by means of creation of favorable working and learning conditions, maintaining…

  17. Faculty Members' Lived Experiences with Academic Quality in For-Profit On-Ground Gainful Employment Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booton, Carol M.

    2013-01-01

    Academic quality in for-profit vocational (Gainful Employment) programs is a concern for all stakeholders. However, academic quality is not easily defined. The Department of Education's Gainful Employment Rule defines academic quality With a few easily measured metrics such as student retention and job placement rate, despite the fact that…

  18. Faculty Members' Lived Experiences with Academic Quality in For-Profit On-Ground Gainful Employment Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booton, Carol M.

    2013-01-01

    Academic quality in for-profit vocational (Gainful Employment) programs is a concern for all stakeholders. However, academic quality is not easily defined. The Department of Education's Gainful Employment Rule defines academic quality With a few easily measured metrics such as student retention and job placement rate, despite the fact that…

  19. Work-Related Basic Need Satisfaction as a Predictor of Work Engagement among Academic Staff in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silman, Fatos

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between work-related basic need satisfaction and work engagement. Data were obtained from a total of 203 academics who are employed in various universities of Turkey. In this research Work-Related Basic Need Satisfaction Scale and The Turkish Form of Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were utilized. The data were…

  20. Classroom Management, School Staff Relations, School Climate, and Academic Achievement: Testing A Model with Urban High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Lindsey T.; Polk, Elizabeth; Keys, Christopher B.; McMahon, Susan D.

    2016-01-01

    Urban learning environments pose distinct instructional challenges for teachers and administrators, and can lead to lower achievement compared to suburban or rural schools. Today's educational climate increasingly emphasises a need for positive academic outcomes, often measured by standardised tests, on which student educational opportunities,…

  1. Classroom Management, School Staff Relations, School Climate, and Academic Achievement: Testing A Model with Urban High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Lindsey T.; Polk, Elizabeth; Keys, Christopher B.; McMahon, Susan D.

    2016-01-01

    Urban learning environments pose distinct instructional challenges for teachers and administrators, and can lead to lower achievement compared to suburban or rural schools. Today's educational climate increasingly emphasises a need for positive academic outcomes, often measured by standardised tests, on which student educational opportunities,…

  2. The Prevalence of Job Stress and its Relationship with Burnout Syndrome among the Academic Members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Hedayat; Jariani, Mojgan; Beiranvand, Shorangiz; Saki, Mandana; Aghajeri, Nasrin; Ebrahimzadeh, Farzad

    2016-03-01

    Burnout syndrome is one of the consequences and the results of occupational or job stress emerged in the form of emotional exhaustion feeling, depersonalization and decrement personal accomplishment. The aim of this study was to determine the occupational stress and its relationship with burnout syndrome in the academic members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences. This descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on 111 of the faculty members via multistage sampling. Data were collected by the questionnaire of Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), and Osipow Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI- R). Data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics as well as analytical statistics such as chi square, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann Whitney tests and Pearson correlation coefficient. The results showed that the most of the participants had a low level of burnout three dimensions including emotional burnout (72.1%), depersonalization (81.1%), and the decrement of personal accomplishment (56.8%). Moreover 79.3% of samples had a low occupational stress, but there was a meaningful relationship between occupational stress and dimensions of burnout syndrome with an exception for the intensity of decrement of personal accomplishment. Academic members were in an appropriate condition concerning burnout syndrome and occupational stress. However by applying some strategies to decrease stress and determining stress resources, we can improve their psychological health of academic members.

  3. The Prevalence of Job Stress and its Relationship with Burnout Syndrome among the Academic Members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Nazari, Hedayat; Jariani, Mojgan; Beiranvand, Shorangiz; Saki, Mandana; Aghajeri, Nasrin; Ebrahimzadeh, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Burnout syndrome is one of the consequences and the results of occupational or job stress emerged in the form of emotional exhaustion feeling, depersonalization and decrement personal accomplishment. The aim of this study was to determine the occupational stress and its relationship with burnout syndrome in the academic members of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on 111 of the faculty members via multistage sampling. Data were collected by the questionnaire of Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), and Osipow Occupational Stress Inventory (OSI- R). Data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics as well as analytical statistics such as chi square, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann Whitney tests and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: The results showed that the most of the participants had a low level of burnout three dimensions including emotional burnout (72.1%), depersonalization (81.1%), and the decrement of personal accomplishment (56.8%). Moreover 79.3% of samples had a low occupational stress, but there was a meaningful relationship between occupational stress and dimensions of burnout syndrome with an exception for the intensity of decrement of personal accomplishment. Conclusion: Academic members were in an appropriate condition concerning burnout syndrome and occupational stress. However by applying some strategies to decrease stress and determining stress resources, we can improve their psychological health of academic members. PMID:26989668

  4. Islamic Personal Religiosity as a Moderator of Job Strain and Employee's Well-Being: The Case of Malaysian Academic and Administrative Staff.

    PubMed

    Achour, Meguellati; Mohd Nor, Mohd Roslan; MohdYusoff, Mohd Yakub Zulkifli

    2016-08-01

    Presently, there is increased in research on job strain and the effects of religiosity on employee well-being. Despite increased recognition of religiosity as a moderator of well-being, limited research has focused on Islamic perspective of moderating job strain. This study examines the moderating effects of Islamic personal religiosity on the relationship between job strain and employee well-being in Malaysian universities. One hundred and seventeen (117) Muslim academic and administrative staff from four public universities were sampled. Data were collected via questionnaires, and our findings show that the effect of job strain on well-being is significant for employees and that personal religiosity of employees contributed to alleviating job strain and enhancing well-being. Thus, the study concludes that Islamic personal religiosity moderates the relationship between job strain and employee well-being.

  5. Pulkovskij martirolog: sotrudniki i aspiranty GAO - zhertvy vojny i blokady %t Pulkovo book of martyrs: staff members and graduate students of the main observatory as victum of the war and blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, V. Yu.; Soboleva, T. V.

    The tragedy of war and the blockade of Leningrad did not fail to have its impact on Pulkovo and its inhabitants. Many of the latter did not survive to witness the Victory Day, and the Astronomical Capital of the World - as the Pulkovo Observatory was called in the past - was razed to the ground. To commemorate the staff members of the USSR Academy of Sciences Main (Pulkovo) Observatory that perished in the war, a memorial board has been installed with 13 names engraved on it. Unfortunately, this figure is four times less than the Main Observatory really lost - roughly every third staff member lost his/her life in the war. The paper is the first endeavour to provide the complete and accurate list of losses that the Russian Academy of Sciences Main Observatory bore as a result of the war and blockade. Fifty-three died of hunger during the time of blockade. This mournful list includes astronomers proper as well as graduate students, technical and servicing staff members. It is not the names of Leningrad Pulkovites only that the authors of the above paper mention. Seeking to pay memorial honours to all staff members and graduate students of the Main Observatory who became victims of the war and blockade, the authors also adduce the names of staff members of the Nikolaevsk and Simeiz Branches of the Main Observatory, as well as those who worked in the Observatory before and in the very beginning of the war but were not formally its staff members at the moment they died. Making the names of the perished Pulkovites known is a tribute of commemoration to all Leningraders that were in the city during the blockade. The book of martyrs above is based on the unpublished documents of the Main Observatory Archive and the data extracted from the St. Petersburg Book of Memory, as well as other materials. The names are arranged alphabetically, and the structure of each entry is the same. The paper provides the foreword and comments.

  6. The Status of Education for Sustainable Development in the Faculty of Education, Views from Faculty Members: University of Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabatshwane, T. Tsayang; Bose, Kabita

    2013-01-01

    The paper is based on a study which sought the understanding and appreciation of, and activities on issues of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) amongst the staff of the Faculty of Education, University of Botswana (UB). A survey design was adopted with a questionnaire for collecting data from academic staff members while Heads of…

  7. The Status of Education for Sustainable Development in the Faculty of Education, Views from Faculty Members: University of Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabatshwane, T. Tsayang; Bose, Kabita

    2013-01-01

    The paper is based on a study which sought the understanding and appreciation of, and activities on issues of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) amongst the staff of the Faculty of Education, University of Botswana (UB). A survey design was adopted with a questionnaire for collecting data from academic staff members while Heads of…

  8. Subject Field and Regional Variations in Student/Staff Ratios, Academic Programmes and Recurrent Expenditures. Technical Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredriksen, Birger

    Based on the data obtained from a specially conducted survey of universities in CERI member countries, this report gives a descriptive analysis of interdepartmental and interregional variations in the quantitative aspects of university operations. The data and findings are of a tentative nature since the survey on which the analysis was based…

  9. The Power of Community: How Foster Parents, Teachers, and Community Members Support Academic Achievement for Foster Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Foster children have been identified as one of the most high-risk groups for academic failure in schools today. However, a small number of foster youth are beating the odds by achieving academically. How are they able to overcome tremendous barriers and succeed? This phenomenological study reports the findings of former foster youth and their P-12…

  10. The Power of Community: How Foster Parents, Teachers, and Community Members Support Academic Achievement for Foster Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Foster children have been identified as one of the most high-risk groups for academic failure in schools today. However, a small number of foster youth are beating the odds by achieving academically. How are they able to overcome tremendous barriers and succeed? This phenomenological study reports the findings of former foster youth and their P-12…

  11. 'We're in the sandwich': Aged care staff members' negotiation of constraints and the role of the organisation in enacting and supporting an ethic of care.

    PubMed

    Petriwskyj, Andrea; Gibson, Alexandra; Webby, Glenys

    2015-12-01

    Aged care staff are often seen as holding power in care relationships, particularly in client engagement. Such a perception, however, may limit our understanding and analysis of the dynamics and politics within care spaces. This paper uses interview and focus group data from both staff and clients of an Australian aged care provider to identify the positions given to, and taken up by, staff in client engagement. Focusing on one of these positions, in which staff are seen as managing and negotiating constraints, the paper uses an ethic of care lens to examine the context in which engagement - and this position taking - occurs. Findings reflect the importance of the organisational and systemic context to the practice of care ethics and the potential vulnerability and disempowerment of care giving staff. Implications for the support of staff in client engagement and the role of care organisations beyond structures and processes to an active participant in an ethic of care are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Academic Library Development Program: A Self Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA. University Libraries.

    Results of a 4-month library self-evaluation program conducted by staff members at Carnegie-Mellon University Libraries are reported in this document. The study was conducted using the Academic Library Development Program (ALDP), a self-improvement strategy for libraries to evaluate and develop their performance. The study team consisting of four…

  13. The Academic Library Impact on Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmons, Mark; Wilkinson, Frances C.

    2011-01-01

    What impact does the academic library have on student persistence? This study explores the relationship between traditional library input and output measures of staff, collections, use, and services with fall-to-fall retention and six-year graduation rates at Association of Research Libraries member libraries. When controlling for race/ethnicity…

  14. How Academic Is Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    University provision for academic development is well established in the USA, UK and many other countries. However, arrangements for its provision and staffing vary. In Australia, there has been a trend towards professional rather than academic staff appointments. Is this appropriate? In this paper, the domains of academic development work are…

  15. How Academic Is Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    University provision for academic development is well established in the USA, UK and many other countries. However, arrangements for its provision and staffing vary. In Australia, there has been a trend towards professional rather than academic staff appointments. Is this appropriate? In this paper, the domains of academic development work are…

  16. Balance of academic responsibilities of clinical track pharmacy faculty in the United States: a survey of select American College of Clinical Pharmacy Practice and Research Network Members.

    PubMed

    Nutescu, Edith A; Engle, Janet P; Bathija, Sacheeta; Grim, Shellee A; Chan, Juliana; Mucksavage, Jeffrey J; Ohler, Kirsten H; Tesoro, Eljim P; Thielke, James J; Shapiro, Nancy L; Donnelly, Andrew J; Garofalo, John; DiDomenico, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    To characterize the balance of clinical and academic responsibilities of clinical track pharmacy faculty in the United States and evaluate organizational structures that promote satisfactory balance between these responsibilities. Prospective cross-sectional survey. A 22-item online survey was developed and distributed via Qualtrics software. Clinical faculty members of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy Adult Medicine, Ambulatory Care, Cardiology, Critical Care, Gastrointestinal/Liver/Nutrition, Immunology/Transplantation, Infectious Disease, and Pediatrics Practice and Research Networks (PRNs) were invited to participate via the PRN electronic mailing list. The survey comprised questions related to demographics, organizational structure, and balance of clinical and academic responsibilities. A total of 344 participants responded to some or all of the survey questions. The demographics were relatively equally balanced between faculty at state and private academic institutions, academic rank, and practice setting. Expected and actual effort allocations were similar for each of the clinical and academic responsibilities, with direct patient care and clinical teaching representing more than 50% effort allocation cumulatively. Clinical faculty at state institutions devoted a larger proportion of time to clinical service, whereas clinical faculty at private institutions devoted a greater proportion of time to didactic teaching. When asked about time constraints, 157 (69.8%) of the 225 survey participants responding to this question did not believe they had sufficient time to fulfill their nonclinical academic needs. Clinical faculty who were provided "protected time" away from clinical service had a significantly more favorable opinion of this question. Most of the clinical track pharmacy faculty indicated that they have insufficient time to fulfill their nonclinical academic responsibilities. Provision of protected time may alleviate some of these time

  17. Lessons Learned From a Program Evaluation of a Statewide Continuing Education Program for Staff Members Working in Assisted Living and Adult Day Care Centers in Virginia.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Tracey L; Pryor, Jennifer M; Welleford, E Ayn

    2016-02-01

    The number of older adults residing in assisted living facilities (ALF) and utilizing adult day care services is expanding with the increasing population of older adults. Currently, there are no standardized requirements for continuing education for assisted living and adult day care service staff at a national level. Given that 62% of states within the United States require continuing education for ALF staff and/or administrators, a more formalized system is needed that provides evidence-based gerontological training to enhance the quality of care and services provided to older adults. This article describes the challenges and lessons learned from conducting a program evaluation of a Statewide Training and Continuing Education Program for Assisted Living Facility and Adult Day Care Service staff in Virginia. Survey evaluation data from a 6-year period was examined and a formative program evaluation was conducted. The findings from the survey evaluation and formative evaluation are discussed as are the lessons learned.

  18. The Meaning of Recovery from Co-Occurring Disorder: Views from Consumers and Staff Members Living and Working in Housing First Programming

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, Angela L.

    2015-01-01

    The current study seeks to understand the concept of recovery from the perspectives of consumers and staff living and working in a supportive housing model designed to serve those with co-occurring disorder. Interview and focus group data were collected from consumers and staff from four housing programs. Data analyzed using an approach that combined case study and grounded theory methodologies demonstrate that: consumers’ and staff members’ views of recovery were highly compatible and resistant to abstinence-based definitions of recovery; recovery is personal; stability is a foundation for recovery; recovery is a process; and the recovery process is not linear. These themes are more consistent with mental health-focused conceptions of recovery than those traditionally used within the substance abuse field, and they help demonstrate how recovery can be influenced by the organization of services in which consumers are embedded. PMID:26388709

  19. A before and after study of medical students' and house staff members' knowledge of ACOVE quality of pharmacologic care standards on an acute care for elders unit.

    PubMed

    Jellinek, Samantha P; Cohen, Victor; Nelson, Marcia; Likourezos, Antonios; Goldman, William; Paris, Barbara

    2008-06-01

    The Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) comprehensive set of quality assessment tools for ill older persons is a standard designed to measure overall care delivered to vulnerable elders (ie, those aged > or =65 years) at the level of a health care system or plan. The goal of this research was to quantify the pretest and posttest results of medical students and house staff participating in a pharmacotherapist-led educational intervention that focused on the ACOVE quality of pharmacologic care standards. This was a before and after study assessing the knowledge ofACOVE standards following exposure to an educational intervention led by a pharmacotherapist. It was conducted at the 29-bed Acute Care for Elders (ACE) unit of Maimonides Medical Center, a 705-bed, independent teaching hospital located in Brooklyn, New York. Participants included all medical students and house staff completing a rotation on the ACE unit from August 2004 through May 2005 who completed both the pre-and posttests. A pharmacotherapist provided a 1-hour active learning session reviewing the evidence supporting the quality indicators and reviewed case-based questions with the medical students and house staff. Educational interventions also occurred daily through pharmacotherapeutic consultations and during work rounds. Medical students and house staff were administered the same 15-question, patient-specific, case-based, multiple-choice pre-and posttest to assess knowledge of the standards before and after receiving the intervention. A total of 54 medical students and house staff (median age, 28.58 years; 40 men, 14 women) completed the study. Significantly higher median scores were achieved on the multiple-choice test after the intervention than before (median scores, 14/15 [93.3%] vs 12/15 [80.0%], respectively; P = 0.001). A pharmacotherapist-led educational intervention improved the scores of medical students and house staff on a test evaluating knowledge of evidence

  20. Fortifications for the Front Lines: Tulsa Public Schools Provides Academy to Prepare and Challenge Staff Members Who Keep the Wheels Turning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Marsha

    2005-01-01

    In January 2002, the Tulsa (Oklahoma) Public Schools launched the Learning, Education, and Resource Network (LEARN) Academy, a learning opportunity for its noncertified staff. The academy provides intensive leadership skills development and opportunities. Participants include representatives of transportation, child nutrition, health services,…

  1. Demographic and Academic Factors Affecting Research Productivity at the University of KwaZulu-Natal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North, D.; Zewotir, T.; Murray, M.

    2011-01-01

    Research output affects both the strength and funding of universities. Accordingly university academic staff members are under pressure to be active and productive in research. Though all academics have research interest, all are not producing research output which is accredited by the Department of Education (DOE). We analyzed the demographic and…

  2. Working Paper on Staffing, Services and Organization of Reference Departments in Large Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Paula D.; Landis, Martha

    Data from 43 responses to a questionnaire distributed to the academic members of the RASD Discussion Group in Reference Services in Large Research Libraries are summarized in tables. The purpose of the survey was to reflect patterns of staff size, services, and organization in reference departments in large academic libraries. The tables present…

  3. Ownership & Authorship of Collaborative Academic Work. CAUT Intellectual Property Advisory. Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Association of University Teachers, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this advisory is to assist academic staff members in avoiding conflict over ownership and authorship rights in collaborative academic work. When students, professors, librarians and other researchers work together in teams, they can create fundamental advances in knowledge. Unfortunately, these arrangements are also generating…

  4. Perceptions of academic administrators of the effect of involvement in doctoral programs on faculty members' research and work-life balance.

    PubMed

    Smeltzer, Suzanne C; Sharts-Hopko, Nancy C; Cantrell, Mary Ann; Heverly, Mary Ann; Wise, Nancy; Jenkinson, Amanda

    2017-05-10

    Support for research strongly predicts doctoral program faculty members' research productivity. Although academic administrators affect such support, their views of faculty members' use of support are unknown. We examined academic administrators' perceptions of institutional support and their perceptions of the effects of teaching doctoral students on faculty members' scholarship productivity and work-life balance. An online survey was completed by a random sample of 180 deans/directors of schools of nursing and doctoral programs directors. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, chi-square analysis, and analysis of variance. Deans and doctoral program directors viewed the level of productivity of program faculty as high to moderately high and unchanged since faculty started teaching doctoral students. Deans perceived better administrative research supports, productivity, and work-life balance of doctoral program faculty than did program directors. Findings indicate the need for greater administrative support for scholarship and mentoring given the changes in the composition of doctoral program faculty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Motivating Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tager, Shelley

    2002-01-01

    Camp directors can motivate staff by showing they are valued. Acknowledging positive actions, throwing a staff party, providing relief time, and being a good role model are all good motivators. Weekly staff meetings keep staff informed and provide time to air problems and get feedback. Keeping in touch with staff during the off-season is also…

  6. The Investigation of Challenges in Developing and Implementing New Academic Disciplines in Iranian Universities: Views of the Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghazavi, Mansuoreh; Nasr, Ahmad Reza; Jafari, Ebrahim Mirshah; Mosapour, Neamatollah

    2016-01-01

    The move on decentralization of curriculum development in recent decade has become one of the major tasks in developing scientific fields in Iran. By implementing these programs some drawbacks have become evident. The objective of this study was to identify and assess the existing challenges involved in the development of academic disciplines from…

  7. Sinking or Swimming in the Deep End? Developing Professional Academic Identities as Doctoral Students Chairing Large Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bereznicki, Hannah; Sutherland-Smith, Wendy; Horwood, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Much of the burden of undergraduate teaching in Australian higher education institutions falls to sessional staff and postgraduate students. These members of staff assume high teaching loads and administrative management responsibilities. This paper explores the perspectives of two female academics in the unique position of being the subject…

  8. The End of Life Experience in Long-Term Care: Five Themes Identified by Focus Groups with Residents, Family Members and Staff

    PubMed Central

    Munn, J.C.; Dobbs, D.; Meier, A.; Williams, C.S.; Biola, H.; Zimmerman, S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to examine the end-of-life (EOL) experience in long-term care (LTC) based on input from key stakeholders. Design and Methods The study consisted of ten homogeneous focus groups drawn from a purposive sample of LTC residents (2 groups; total n = 11); family caregivers (2 groups; total n = 19); paraprofessional staff (3 groups; total n = 20); and licensed/registered staff (3 groups; total n = 15) from five nursing homes (NHs) and eight residential care/assisted living (RC/AL) communities in North Carolina. Data were analyzed using grounded theory techniques to elicit manifest and latent themes. Results Five overarching themes emerged: (1) components of a good death in LTC; (2) normalcy of dying in LTC; (3) the role of relationships in the provision and receipt of care; (4) Hospice contributions to care at the EOL in LTC; and (5) stakeholder recommendations for enhancing EOL care in these settings. Underlying these themes is one central category, “closeness,” based on physical proximity and frequency of contact. Implications Findings suggest that promoting collaborative relationships among the four stakeholder groups, increasing social worker involvement, and removing barriers to Hospice may enhance the EOL experience in LTC. PMID:18728298

  9. Assessment of educational criteria in academic promotion: Perspectives of faculty members of medical sciences universities in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Tootoonchi, Mina; Yamani, Nikoo; Changiz, Tahereh; Taleghani, Fariba; Mohammadzadeh, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: One of the important criteria in the promotion of faculty members is in the scope of their educational roles and duties. The purpose of this study was the assessment of reasonability and attainability of educational criteria for scientific rank promotion from the perspective of the faculty members of Medical Sciences Universities in Iran. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was conducted in 2011 in 13 Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran. Through stratified sampling method, 350 faculty members were recruited. A questionnaire developed by the researchers was used to investigate the reasonability and attainability of educational criteria with scores from 1 to 5. The self-administered questionnaire was distributed and collected at each university. The mean and standard deviation of reasonability and attainability scores were calculated and reported by using the SPSS software version 16. Results: Faculty members considered many criteria of educational activities reasonable and available (with a mean score of more than 3). The highest reasonability and attainability have been obtained by the quantity and quality of teaching with the mean scores (3.93 ± 1.15 and 3.82 ± 1.17) and (3.9 ± 1.22 and 4.13 ± 1.06) out of five, respectively. The mean and standard deviation of total scores of reasonability of educational activities were 50.91 ± 14.22 and its attainability was 60.3 ± 13.72 from the total score of 90. Discussion and Conclusion: The faculty members of the Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran considered the educational criteria of promotion moderately reasonable and achievable. It is recommended to revise these criteria and adapt them according to the mission and special conditions of medical universities. Furthermore, providing feedback of evaluations, running educational researches, and implementing faculty development programs are suggested. PMID:25013822

  10. Assessment of educational criteria in academic promotion: Perspectives of faculty members of medical sciences universities in Iran.

    PubMed

    Tootoonchi, Mina; Yamani, Nikoo; Changiz, Tahereh; Taleghani, Fariba; Mohammadzadeh, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    One of the important criteria in the promotion of faculty members is in the scope of their educational roles and duties. The purpose of this study was the assessment of reasonability and attainability of educational criteria for scientific rank promotion from the perspective of the faculty members of Medical Sciences Universities in Iran. This descriptive study was conducted in 2011 in 13 Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran. Through stratified sampling method, 350 faculty members were recruited. A questionnaire developed by the researchers was used to investigate the reasonability and attainability of educational criteria with scores from 1 to 5. The self-administered questionnaire was distributed and collected at each university. The mean and standard deviation of reasonability and attainability scores were calculated and reported by using the SPSS software version 16. Faculty members considered many criteria of educational activities reasonable and available (with a mean score of more than 3). The highest reasonability and attainability have been obtained by the quantity and quality of teaching with the mean scores (3.93 ± 1.15 and 3.82 ± 1.17) and (3.9 ± 1.22 and 4.13 ± 1.06) out of five, respectively. The mean and standard deviation of total scores of reasonability of educational activities were 50.91 ± 14.22 and its attainability was 60.3 ± 13.72 from the total score of 90. The faculty members of the Universities of Medical Sciences in Iran considered the educational criteria of promotion moderately reasonable and achievable. It is recommended to revise these criteria and adapt them according to the mission and special conditions of medical universities. Furthermore, providing feedback of evaluations, running educational researches, and implementing faculty development programs are suggested.

  11. A Single Sex Profession? Female Staff Numbers in Commonwealth Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Helen

    This study of numbers of female academic and administrative staff at universities in British Commonwealth nations was based on staff data collected during 1997-98 for the "Commonwealth Universities' Yearbook." The survey covers 30 nations. Survey results are presented separately for academic staff and administrative staff. For academic…

  12. Developing a Content Strategy for an Academic Library Website

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakiston, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Academic library websites contain a vast amount of complex content and, all too often, there is a lack of established process for creating, updating, and deleting that content. There is no clear vision or purpose to the content, and numerous staff members are expected to maintain content with little guidance. Because of this, many library websites…

  13. Study of Factors Influencing Research Productivity of Agriculture Faculty Members in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedjazi, Yousef; Behravan, Jaleh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between individual, institutional and demographic characteristics on one hand and the research productivity of agriculture faculty members on the other. The statistical population of the research comprises 280 academic staff in agricultural faculties all over Tehran Province. The data…

  14. Study of Factors Influencing Research Productivity of Agriculture Faculty Members in Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedjazi, Yousef; Behravan, Jaleh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between individual, institutional and demographic characteristics on one hand and the research productivity of agriculture faculty members on the other. The statistical population of the research comprises 280 academic staff in agricultural faculties all over Tehran Province. The data…

  15. School staff perspectives on the challenges and solutions to working with court-involved students.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Shantel D; Day, Angelique G; Baroni, Beverly A; Somers, Cheryl L

    2015-06-01

    Court-involved students, such as those in foster care and the juvenile justice system, generally experience high incidences of both acute and chronic trauma, adversely impacting their educational well-being and overall academic trajectory. Utilizing perceptions of teachers and other school staff, this study explores the challenges and needs of school personnel working with this student population. Participants were school personnel employed at a Midwest, urban, public charter school during the 2012-2013 academic year. Focus groups explored the perceptions of school staff members working with court-involved students to develop a staff training curriculum. Focus groups also were conducted after the training intervention to get feedback from participants and identify remaining challenges. Focus group data were analyzed and results were member-checked with study participants. Findings included 7 major themes (14 subthemes) regarding student behaviors that were challenging for school staff to manage. Themes included trauma-related behaviors, attachment-related behaviors, staff preintervention needs, intervention feedback, and staff postintervention needs. Teachers and school staff can play a role in the educational well-being of court-involved youth. However, they need trauma-specific knowledge and resources to be effective. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  16. Preliminary Examination of Safety Issues on a University Campus: Personal Safety Practices, Beliefs & Attitudes of Female Faculty & Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Paula C.; Bryden, Pamela J.

    2007-01-01

    University and college campuses are not immune to acts of violence. Unfortunately there is limited information regarding violence in the academic setting among women employees. As such, the purpose of this exploratory research was to examine issues that female faculty and staff members have about safety on and around campus, including concerns…

  17. Preliminary Examination of Safety Issues on a University Campus: Personal Safety Practices, Beliefs & Attitudes of Female Faculty & Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Paula C.; Bryden, Pamela J.

    2007-01-01

    University and college campuses are not immune to acts of violence. Unfortunately there is limited information regarding violence in the academic setting among women employees. As such, the purpose of this exploratory research was to examine issues that female faculty and staff members have about safety on and around campus, including concerns…

  18. Staff Association Handbook, 1974-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery Coll. Staff Association, Takoma Park, MD.

    This handbook provides a list of Staff Senate and Committee members of the Staff Association of Montgomery College, a copy of the bylaws of the association, and sections of the college's "Policies and Procedures Manual" that affect staff employees. These sections of the manual pertain to: Administrative and Staff Communication;…

  19. Professional Staff Contributions to Positive Student Outcomes: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2013-01-01

    Although professional staff comprise more than half the Australian higher education workforce, typically research has concentrated on the work of academic staff. Professional staff are increasingly researching the working lives of professional staff, adding to the understanding of the work of professional staff and the contributions they make…

  20. Does formal mentoring for faculty members matter? A survey of clinical faculty members.

    PubMed

    Mylona, Elza; Brubaker, Linda; Williams, Valerie N; Novielli, Karen D; Lyness, Jeffrey M; Pollart, Susan M; Dandar, Valerie; Bunton, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    Mentoring relationships, for all medical school faculty members, are an important component of lifelong development and education, yet an understanding of mentoring among medical school clinical faculty members is incomplete. This study examined associations between formal mentoring relationships and aspects of faculty members' engagement and satisfaction. It then explored the variability of these associations across subgroups of clinical faculty members to understand the status of mentoring and outcomes of mentoring relationships. The authors hypothesised that academic clinical faculty members currently in formal mentoring relationships experience enhanced employee engagement and satisfaction with their department and institution. Medical school faculty members at 26 self-selected USA institutions participated in the 2011-2014 Faculty Forward Engagement Survey. Responses from clinical faculty members were analysed for relationships between mentoring status and perceptions of engagement by faculty members. Of the 11 953 clinical faculty respondents, almost one-third reported having a formal mentoring relationship (30%; 3529). Most mentored faculty indicated the relationship was important (86%; n = 3027), and over three-fourths were satisfied with their mentoring experience (77%; n = 2722). Mentored faculty members across ranks reported significantly higher levels of satisfaction and more positive perceptions of their roles in the organisation. Faculty members who were not receiving mentoring reported significantly less satisfaction with their workplace environment and lower overall satisfaction. Mentored clinical faculty members have significantly greater satisfaction with their department and institution. This multi-institutional study provides evidence that fostering mentoring opportunities may facilitate faculty members' satisfaction and engagement, which, in turn, may help medical schools retain high-quality faculty staff committed to the multidimensional

  1. Perspectives: Empowering the Library's Support Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sager, Don, Ed.; Craig, Susan; Medema, Nancy; Runge, Kay K.; Slusar, Linda

    1998-01-01

    Four contributors to this column, including two administrators, a support staff member, and an educator responsible for training technical assistants, discuss training and recognition programs for support staff, with particular emphasis on empowerment strategies that have proven effective. (AEF)

  2. Listening to Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter; Owen, Jane

    Levels of staff satisfaction across the United Kingdom's post-16 sector were examined by distributing a questionnaire at more than 80 further education colleges. The questionnaire elicited 9,515 responses. Study participants rated 38 statements on a 4-point scale. The questions focused on the following areas: (1) faculty members' perceptions of…

  3. Faculty and Staff Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Univ., Lexington. Community Coll. System.

    This booklet is intended to acquaint faculty and staff members with general information about the University of Kentucky community College System, and to explain some of its policies affecting them. The booklet is organized into five sections. Section I contains general information about the system, gives its history, purpose, and a map of the…

  4. Library staff development course.

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, E K

    1981-01-01

    The Moody Medical Library at the University of Texas Medical Branch plans, presents, and evaluates regularly a staff development program for its employees, including librarians and clerical and technical staff. The program's purpose is to provide continuing education for the library staff while concurrently: (1) providing information concerning specific library services and programs; (2) illustrating the interrelationship of the departments and divisions within the library; (3) developing a sense of teamwork and loyalty; and (4) developing job pride. Staff member volunteers teach the various courses. An integral part of the program is an evaluation of the efficacy of its various components using a form developed specifically for this purpose. Participants give the majority of courses an effectiveness rating of 90% or above. PMID:7248595

  5. [Investigation on cognition of zoonosis among veterinary clinical staff].

    PubMed

    Takinami, Kenji

    2005-10-01

    We conducted a survey to determine how much veterinary clinic staff, including veterinary surgeon and veterinary technicians, know about zoonosis. Response was 52.5%. All staff members knew of zoonosis. Staff members who knew what zoonosis meant accounted for 98%. Staff members trained in zoonosis accounted for 75% among veterinary surgeons and 66% among veterinary technicians. Staff members who thought that zoonosis would increase in future accounted for 92% among veterinary surgeons and 79% among veterinary technicians. Staff members who were asked by pet owners about zoonosis accounted for 87% among veterinary surgeons and 51% among veterinary technicians. Staff members who thought veterinary surgeons must report zoonosis to public health centers accounted for 96% among veterinary surgeons and 88% among veterinary technicians. Veterinary clinic staffs thus had correct knowledge and were aware of zoonosis. The network of medical staff and veterinary staff could therefore build on this result.

  6. The Undesirable Behaviors of Students in Academic Classrooms, and the Discipline Strategies Used by Faculty Members to Control Such Behaviors from the Perspective of the College of Education Students in King Saud University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al Qahtani, Norah Saad Sultan

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the undesirable students' behaviors in academic classrooms, and the disciplinary, preventive and therapeutic strategies that will be used by faculty members to control those behaviors from the perspective of the College of Education's students in King Saud University. The results of the study has shown that the…

  7. Staff Caricatures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templeton, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how the author brings staff and students together through an art project that deals with caricatures. The author started with a lesson on caricature, and she made a PowerPoint presentation showcasing the work of Al Hirschfeld. Using photos of the staff, students created portraits and hung them in a main hallway after school.…

  8. Academic Practice in Transition: Hidden Stories of Academic Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchman, Deborah; King, Sharron

    2009-01-01

    Academic work is becoming increasingly restrictive and controlled as tertiary institutions move towards a more corporate managerialistic mode of operating. This paper uses a narrative lens to explore the ways in which academic staff make sense of this new environment. In particular, it compares academic staff's stories of their worklife with the…

  9. Academic Practice in Transition: Hidden Stories of Academic Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchman, Deborah; King, Sharron

    2009-01-01

    Academic work is becoming increasingly restrictive and controlled as tertiary institutions move towards a more corporate managerialistic mode of operating. This paper uses a narrative lens to explore the ways in which academic staff make sense of this new environment. In particular, it compares academic staff's stories of their worklife with the…

  10. NNSA Staff Member Receives NNSA Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, Elaine S.

    2013-04-01

    This article is intended for publication in the NNSA Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) Highlights, a quarterly newsletter available in print and e-form. It will be published on the NNSA website and is intended for public release.

  11. Empowering Engineering College Staff to Adopt Active Learning Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pundak, David; Rozner, Shmaryahu

    2008-04-01

    There is a growing consensus that traditional instruction in basic science courses, in institutions of higher learning, do not lead to the desired results. Most of the students who complete these courses do not gain deep knowledge about the basic concepts and develop a negative approach to the sciences. In order to deal with this problem, a variety of methods have been proposed and implemented, during the last decade, which focus on the "active learning" of the participating students. We found that the methods developed in MIT and NCSU were fruitful and we adopted their approach. Despite research-based evidence of the success of these methods, they are often met by the resistance of the academic staff. This article describes how one institution of higher learning organized itself to introduce significant changes into its introductory science courses, as well as the stages teachers undergo, as they adopt innovative teaching methods. In the article, we adopt the Rogers model of the innovative-decision process, which we used to evaluate the degree of innovation adoption by seven members of the academic staff. An analysis of interview and observation data showed that four factors were identified which influence the degree innovation adoption: (1) teacher readiness to seriously learn the theoretical background of "active learning"; (2) the development of an appropriate local model, customized to the beliefs of the academic staff; (3) teacher expertise in information technologies, and (4) the teachers' design of creative solutions to problems that arose during their teaching.

  12. Amplifying Staff Development through Film: The Case of a University Staff Visit to a Sixth Form College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prowse, Alicia; Sweasey, Penny; Delbridge, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The literature on student transition to university commonly investigates student expectations, perceptions and experiences and rarely focusses on university academic staff viewpoints. The purpose of this paper is to explore the staff development potential of a filmed visit of university academic staff to a sixth form college.…

  13. Preliminary examination of the impact of traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder on self-regulated learning and academic achievement among military service members enrolled in postsecondary education.

    PubMed

    Ness, Bryan M; Vroman, Kerryellen

    2014-01-01

    Delineate the effects of self-reported traumatic brain injury (TBI) or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on self-regulated learning and academic achievement for university-enrolled military Service members. Students (N = 192) from 8 regionally diverse universities, representing an estimated 6% of Service members enrolled across schools. Public universities that are members of the Servicemember Opportunity College consortium. Cross-sectional study evaluating the relationships between self-reported TBI, PTSD, and self-regulated learning variables and their contribution to academic achievement. Self-report of military service; symptoms of TBI and PTSD; self-regulation strategies including effort, time/environment regulation, and academic self-efficacy; and grade point average (GPA). There was no effect of self-reported TBI or PTSD on GPA, effort regulation, or time/environment regulation strategies; however, participants with TBI or PTSD reported significantly lower academic self-efficacy. Multiple regression analysis revealed self-efficacy was the strongest predictor of GPA among all participants, followed by military rank. The sample consisted of high achieving students responsive to a university administrator, which raises the possibility of sampling bias. Because of the low recruitment rate for this study and lack of published research on this subject, replicating the results is necessary before drawing generalizable conclusions about the population.

  14. Staff and Student Perceptions of Plagiarism and Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    Cheating, plagiarism, and other forms of academic misconduct are a significant issue in higher education. In this study, the attitudes of academic staff and students in a 3 year undergraduate nursing program to various forms of academic misconduct were assessed and compared. Forty-nine percent of staff and 39% of students thought that cheating on…

  15. Exploring the Patient and Staff Experience With the Process of Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Elizabeth J.; Kangovi, Shreya; Sha, Christopher; Johnson, Sarah; Chanton, Casey; Carter, Tamala; Grande, David T.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Previous studies suggest that the highest-risk patients value accessible, coordinated primary care that they perceive to be of high technical quality. We have limited understanding, however, of how low-income, chronically ill patients and the staff who care for them experience each individual step in the primary care process. METHODS We conducted qualitative interviews with uninsured or Medicaid patients with chronic illnesses, as well as with primary care staff. We interviewed 21 patients and 30 staff members with a variety of job titles from 3 primary care practices (1 federally qualified health center and 2 academically affiliated clinics).] RESULTS The interviews revealed 3 major issues that were present at all stages of a primary care episode: (1) information flow throughout an episode of care is a frequent challenge, despite systems that are intended to improve communication; (2) misaligned goals and expectations among patients, clinicians, and staff members are often an impediment to providing and obtaining care; and (3) personal relationships are highly valued by both patients and staff. CONCLUSIONS Vulnerable populations and the primary care staff who work with them perceive some of the same challenges throughout the primary care process. Improving information flow, aligning goals and expectations, and developing personal relationships may improve the experience of both patients and staff. PMID:26195680

  16. A Comparative Study of Academic Staff Teaching Activities between Japan and China: Based on National Surveys in 2011-2012. RIHE International Seminar Reports. No. 23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Futao

    2015-01-01

    A review of recent literature suggests that, although academics in several countries (such as Japan, Korea and Germany) now allocate more of their time to research, service activities and administration than they had in the early 1990s (Teichler, Arimoto, and Cummings, 2013), the majority of university professors still spend the largest proportion…

  17. The Impact of Role Conflict, Role Ambiguity and Organizational Climate on the Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Research-Intensive Universities in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, John

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on academics in research-intensive universities in the UK and explores their perceptions of organizational climate, role conflict, role ambiguity and job satisfaction. The findings suggest that the universities have multiple organizational climates. Three organizational climate types -- the Clan, the Hierarchy and the Adhocracy…

  18. The Impact of Role Conflict, Role Ambiguity and Organizational Climate on the Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Research-Intensive Universities in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, John

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on academics in research-intensive universities in the UK and explores their perceptions of organizational climate, role conflict, role ambiguity and job satisfaction. The findings suggest that the universities have multiple organizational climates. Three organizational climate types -- the Clan, the Hierarchy and the Adhocracy…

  19. Exploring the Impact of the Increased Tuition Fees on Academic Staffs' Experiences in Post-92 Universities: A Small-Scale Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Elizabeth A.; Kaye, Linda K.; Blewitt, John

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of the new tuition fee regime in the UK academic session 2012-2013 has resulted in concerns in the Higher Education (HE) community that students' expectations may become unmanageable. Previous research has explored the expectations and experiences of undergraduate psychology students; the current study extended this by considering…

  20. Mindset Change Prerequisite for Academic Excellence: A Case of Four Zimbabwean and South African Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makondo, L.

    2012-01-01

    This article submits that the calibre, attitude and mindset of lecturers/teachers in institutions of Higher Education need drastic improvement and change if academic excellence is to be attainable and sustained in the 21st century. This article builds on the observations by Makondo (2010, 263-276) that most university teaching staff members are…

  1. Mindset Change Prerequisite for Academic Excellence: A Case of Four Zimbabwean and South African Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makondo, L.

    2012-01-01

    This article submits that the calibre, attitude and mindset of lecturers/teachers in institutions of Higher Education need drastic improvement and change if academic excellence is to be attainable and sustained in the 21st century. This article builds on the observations by Makondo (2010, 263-276) that most university teaching staff members are…

  2. Improving the Virtual Reference Experience: How Closely Do Academic Libraries Adhere to RUSA Guidelines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Jessica; Benson, Pete

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the degree to which academic libraries or library staff members throughout the United States adhere to the Guidelines for Virtual Reference Services provided by the Reference & User Services Association (RUSA). The results of the study were analyzed to identify specific areas where improvement is needed…

  3. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  4. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  5. Computer Literacy: Staff Training. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Elizabeth

    A computer-literacy staff training program was designed to provide adult basic education (ABE) instructors and staff with basic computer skills. A curriculum using both Apple IIe computers and IBM personal computers was developed and software obtained. Eight instructors and nine administrative staff members of local literacy programs completed 10…

  6. Transforming Spaces and Identities: The Contributions of Professional Staff to Learning Spaces in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2012-01-01

    Staff are a university's key resource. Typically, research has concentrated on the contribution of academic staff, and has largely overlooked the crucial role of professional staff. However, recently there has been an increase in research by professional staff, about professional staff. In Australia, professional staff comprise more than half the…

  7. Transforming Spaces and Identities: The Contributions of Professional Staff to Learning Spaces in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2012-01-01

    Staff are a university's key resource. Typically, research has concentrated on the contribution of academic staff, and has largely overlooked the crucial role of professional staff. However, recently there has been an increase in research by professional staff, about professional staff. In Australia, professional staff comprise more than half the…

  8. Hearing the Voices of General Staff: A Delphi Study of the Contributions of General Staff to Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2010-01-01

    A university's key resource is its staff, both academic and general. However, relatively little attention has been paid to the work of general staff. Yet general staff comprise more than half the workforce in Australian universities and a more rigorous understanding of the contribution of general staff towards the strategic goals of their…

  9. Hearing the Voices of General Staff: A Delphi Study of the Contributions of General Staff to Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2010-01-01

    A university's key resource is its staff, both academic and general. However, relatively little attention has been paid to the work of general staff. Yet general staff comprise more than half the workforce in Australian universities and a more rigorous understanding of the contribution of general staff towards the strategic goals of their…

  10. Learning Strategy Preferences, Decision-Making Styles, Ways of Knowing, and Cultural Awareness of Members of the National Academic Advising Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Donna K.

    2009-01-01

    Academic advisors help students with the process of decision making, of making sense of their world, of understanding how they go about learning, and of understanding how to appreciate diversity in their world. If advisors are to help students in these areas, academic advisors should be aware of the cognitive processes of how they make sense of…

  11. Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reusswig, James, Ed.; Ponzio, Richard, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Eight essays are presented which reflect current problems, issues, and practices related to the development of teacher and administrator expertise. The authors are school district and public school administrators, faculty of schools of education, and a director of staff development in a state department of education. The topics treated are: (1)…

  12. Academic Capitalism and Academic Culture: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar; Berger, Joseph B.

    2008-01-01

    This case study investigated the impact of academic capitalism on academic culture by examining the perspectives of faculty members in an American academic department with significant industrial funding. The results of this study indicate that faculty members believe that the broad integrity of the academic culture remains unaffected in this…

  13. Staff Development: Enhancing Human Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orlich, Donald C.

    In 10 chapters, this book offers a clear nonlinear vision for continuously preparing professional and classified staff for the purpose of improving schools and student academic achievement. Chapter 1 shows the importance of inservice education and provides a rationale for conducting systematic, if not empirically based, programs. Chapter 2 details…

  14. Staff Exchange in Reference Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testi, Andrea R.; Bordeianu, Sever

    1993-01-01

    Discusses problems and opportunities encountered in implementing staff exchange programs among reference departments of a multibranch academic library, based on experiences at the University of New Mexico. Highlights include communication; collaboration; uniformity of service; implementation criteria; goals; training; workloads and scheduling; and…

  15. Staff and Student Perceptions of an Online Learning Environment: Difference and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stuart; Holt, Dale

    2009-01-01

    Academic staff play a fundamental role in the use of online learning by students. Yet, compared to studies reporting student perspectives on online learning, studies investigating the perspectives of academic staff are much more limited. Perhaps the least common investigations are those that compare the perceptions of academic staff and students…

  16. Collaborating with Staff: Sharing a Common Philosophy, Working To Achieve Common Goals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzman, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    A well-understood camp philosophy motivates the entire staff to work toward a common purpose, which is more meaningful than money. Camp administrators can ensure that staff members implement the camp philosophy by interviewing prospective staff members with the mission in mind, teaching staff the camp's vision, praising staff with specifics,…

  17. Meeting the Challenge of Providing Flexible Learning Opportunities: Considerations for Technology Adoption amongst Academic Staff (Relever le défi de fournir des occasions d'apprentissage flexibles: considérations pour l'adoption de la technologie par le personnel universitaire)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirriahi, Negin; Vaid, Bhuvinder S.; Burns, David P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a subset of findings from a larger study investigating resistance from academic staff to the integration of technology with on-campus foreign language teaching at one North American higher education institution. The study revealed that the factors influencing technology adoption paralleled Davis' Technology Acceptance Model's…

  18. House Staff Well-being

    PubMed Central

    Koran, Lorrin M.; Litt, Iris F.

    1988-01-01

    From a survey of 281 house-staff members of a university medical center, we found that nearly half the respondents were afraid to complain about their training programs and were concerned that their relationship with their partner would not survive the residency. In all, 40% reported that anxiety or depression impaired their performance for a month or more; 12% reported an increased use of alcohol, marijuana, or cocaine; and 7% an increased use of sedatives, stimulants, or opioids. Stressors and dysfunctional behaviors did not differ significantly between male and female house staff, but many women had more tenuous support systems. Married house staff had stronger support systems and less substance abuse, anxiety, and depression. Departments differed widely in house-staff morale, available social supports, and the frequency of dysfunctional behaviors. Residency program directors should assess their house staff's distress and study and initiate means to reduce stress, increase support, and facilitate coping. PMID:3341147

  19. Professional Staff Carve out a New Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekeres, Judy

    2011-01-01

    A 2004 paper, "The invisible workers" by Szekeres, lamented the "invisibility" of professional staff in Australian higher education. Even then, professional staff constituted more than half the university workforce, but they were defined by what they were not (non-academic) and they experienced a high level of frustration in…

  20. Investing in Early Career General Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Carroll

    2009-01-01

    With the greying of the Australian population, it has been widely recognised that active career development for early career academics is essential to the future capacities of universities (Hugo, Daysh, Morris & Rudd, 2004). However, the same has not been acknowledged for general staff, despite general staff comprising more than 50% of staff…

  1. Academic-service partnerships, research, and the South African dental academic.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Elly S; Naidoo, Sudeshni

    2012-09-01

    In South Africa, academic dentistry is managed through joint agreements between the South African Department of Health (DoH) and each university, in a type of academic-service partnership. For this study, dental faculty members were surveyed to ascertain staff attitudes towards academic research in dental schools and to find out whether the joint arrangement impinges upon research activities. A survey was distributed to 200 members of the South African division of the International Association for Dental Research (SA IADR) and the academic staff of the four South African dental schools. One hundred and five responses were obtained for a response rate of 53 percent; most of the respondents were lecturers (26 percent), specialists (17 percent), heads of department (17 percent), or senior lecturers (13 percent). The majority were employed by the DoH (77 percent) and were members of the SA IADR (51 percent). Most reported feeling that research is an important issue in their school (83 percent) and perceived general research output had declined (59 percent). While 79 percent said they were concerned about the decline, many (71 percent) felt there was little they could do about it. The respondents mentioned the following as reasons for the decline: lackluster approach of DoH structures, weak university support, poor research equipment and facilities, inadequate funding, emphasis on service delivery, undergraduate teaching loads, onerous working conditions, and lack of vision, leadership, and governance by senior management. Faculty members' twin obligations of service delivery (required by the DoH) and teaching (required by their institutions) have severely impacted South African academic dental research.

  2. Accelerated Burnout: How Teach for America's Academic Impact Model and Theoretical Culture of Accountability Can Foster Disillusionment among Its Corps Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, T. Jameson

    2014-01-01

    This article seeks to characterize Teach For America's (TFA) theoretical framework as engendering disillusionment among its corps members. Given that the corps members have little to no pedagogical or methods training prior to taking on teaching positions through TFA, the lessons learned during the summer training set the stage for the…

  3. The Nature of Staff - Family Interactions in Nursing Homes: Staff Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Lekan-Rutledge, Deborah; Ammarell, Natalie; Bailey, Donald; Corazzini, Kirsten; Piven, Mary L.; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2008-01-01

    Each year thousands of older adults are admitted to nursing homes. Following admission, nursing home staff and family members must interact and communicate with each other. This study examined relationship and communication patterns between nursing home staff members and family members of nursing home residents, as part of a larger multi-method comparative case study. Here, we report on 6- month case studies of two nursing homes where in-depth interviews, shadowing experiences, and direct observations were completed. Staff members from both nursing homes described staff-family interactions as difficult, problematic and time consuming, yet identified strategies that when implemented consistently, influenced the staff-family interaction positively. Findings suggest explanatory processes in staff-family interactions, while pointing toward promising interventions. PMID:19649311

  4. Staff Involvement and the Public Library Planning Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Annabel K.

    1989-01-01

    Reports the results of a study of two library systems' differing approaches to staff involvement in library planning. The systems' attempts to prepare staff members, keep them informed, and encourage staff participation are described, and the resulting benefits are contrasted. Suggestions for successful staff involvement are offered. (34…

  5. Engaging Students and Staff with Educational Development through Appreciative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadi-Hanifi, Karima; Dagman, Ozlem; Peters, John; Snell, Ellen; Tutton, Caroline; Wright, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Appreciative inquiry (AI) offers a constructive, strengths-based framework for engaging students and staff in the enhancement of academic programmes of study. This paper explores the basis of AI, its potential for educational development and the many agendas it might help address. Students and academic staff involved in an AI project, focused on…

  6. Engaging Students and Staff with Educational Development through Appreciative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadi-Hanifi, Karima; Dagman, Ozlem; Peters, John; Snell, Ellen; Tutton, Caroline; Wright, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Appreciative inquiry (AI) offers a constructive, strengths-based framework for engaging students and staff in the enhancement of academic programmes of study. This paper explores the basis of AI, its potential for educational development and the many agendas it might help address. Students and academic staff involved in an AI project, focused on…

  7. Reorganization of the Yearbook Staffs for the 1980s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vossen, Daniel L.

    1981-01-01

    A diagram of the reorganized yearbook staff, reflective of current emphasis on magazine-style layout designs, and adaptable for colleges, high schools, mid-high schools, and junior high schools. Listings of responsibilities for each integral staff member. (RL)

  8. Academic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Vivian E; Horner, Keith

    2008-07-01

    Since 1988, thirteen dental schools have provided dental undergraduate programmes within the United Kingdom (UK). In 2006, two new dental schools were created supporting dental education in the community. A further new dental school in Scotland will be accepting students in autumn 2008. In the past 25 years, extensive reorganisation of the NHS has resulted in long-term implications for the training of medical and dental academic staff. The number of academic clinicians is below the minimum viable level and external constraints, combined with a lack of suitable applicants, have led to a moratorium on academic recruitment within some Dental Schools. A detailed review of the historical and associated factors which have led to the problems presently besetting academic dentistry are discussed along with the initiatives introduced in the last 10 years to revitalise the speciality. Also, the present and future outlook for academic dentistry in other countries are discussed. Opinion is divided as to the appropriate setting for the training of undergraduate students between those who support community-based dental education and those who believe dental education should remain within research led dental establishments. External factors are moulding an unsatisfactory situation that is proving increasingly unattractive to the potential dental academic and the case for reform is obvious.

  9. Higher Education Staff Development: Directions for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Jennifer; And Others

    This collection of 13 papers offers an international perspective on future directions of staff development at colleges and universities, focusing on academic staff development, higher education teaching networks, and managerial and human resource development. Papers are: (1) "Higher Education Staff Development for the 21st Century: Directions…

  10. Identifying Needs to Develop a PBL Staff Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffin, Prarthana

    2013-01-01

    Staff development is a crucial element for educational intervention. Recognizing the importance of staff development, this study aims to pin-point suitable methodologies in developing a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) academic staff development program for a higher education institute where PBL has become an intervention alternative. The study aims…

  11. Attitudes to LIS education and academic-practitioner liaison: results of a survey of members of the Library Association Health Libraries Group.

    PubMed

    Farmer, J; Richardson, A; Palmer, J

    1998-06-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted by the Library Association Health Libraries Group in October-December 1996. Information practitioners in the health care sector were asked what they considered were the education and research needs of the profession, their opinion of Library and Information Sciences education, and their views on practitioner input to education and research. They were also asked whether they would be prepared to give talks to students and to offer student placements. The results show that there is still a considerable gulf between academics and practitioners, and that although practitioners are enthusiastic about getting more involved in liaison, they are constrained by lack of time and resources. Practical solutions need to be found to encourage greater understanding and closer working relationships, to achieve the benefits of academic-practitioner liaison.

  12. Oncology staff reflections about a 52-year-old staff Christmas choir: constructivist research.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Clare C; Hornby, Colin J; Pearson, Elizabeth J M; Ball, David L

    2010-12-01

    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre has one of the world's most enduring staff Christmas choirs. Commencing in 1956, the choir performs in a cafeteria, patient wards, and outpatient waiting areas before each Christmas. With recent emphasis on oncology staff support needs the choir's relevance warranted investigation. This constructivist research examined what effect the staff Christmas choir had on the choir members and staff bystanders in 2008. Sampling was convenience and purposive. Staff choir members were invited to participate during rehearsals, and staff bystanders were invited at seven choir performances in the hospital. Respondents completed anonymous and semistructured questionnaires and the conductor (of 29 years) was interviewed. The inductive, comparative, and cyclic data analyses were informed by grounded theory and qualitative interrater reliability was performed. Questionnaires from 64 staff were returned. The choir elicited positive emotions, memories, Christmas spirit, hospital community and/or work-life effects for many staff, in a cancer context described as sometimes "overwhelming" and "stressful." Choir members' reactions included stress relief, friendship and feeling rewarded. Bystanders' reactions included feeling uplifted, inspired and moved. Suggestions for future performances were offered, including musical acknowledgement of other religious festivals. Two respondents were concerned about intrusive effects on patients and work practices. A staff Christmas choir supported most choir member and staff bystander respondents in an oncology hospital and is recommended in comparable contexts. Further investigation is warranted to extend understanding about Christmas music's effects in palliative care settings.

  13. Pamphlets involve staff in patient education.

    PubMed

    Matten, M R; McBride, L G

    1980-01-01

    Hospital staff involvement in a patient education program is critical to the program's success. Unfortunately, prepackaged programs, although attractive, ignore this important component. Pamphlet construction can be a convenient way to include various staff members in the development of a patient education program.

  14. Medical staff relations. Creating the nexus.

    PubMed

    Davis, W M

    1989-01-01

    Bonding of the medical staff to the hospital requires a structured leadership effort on the part of all interested groups. The participants should consist of members of the medical staff, the senior administration, and the board of trustees. The pathways to the bonding process require considerable thought, much planning, frank discussion, and, in many cases, a good deal of time to achieve success.

  15. [Prevention of addiction in hospital staff].

    PubMed

    Picchiottino, Frédérique

    2012-11-01

    La Pitié-Salpêtrière-Charles Foix university hospital group (Paris) has set up a task force to help healthcare managers manage a member of staff suffering with addiction. An addiction awareness day is also organised, aimed at all staff, with information stands and a performance by a theatre company.

  16. Abusive Supervision by Academic Supervisors and Postgraduate Research Students' Creativity: The Mediating Role of Leader-Member Exchange and Intrinsic Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meng, Yi; Tan, Jing; Li, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Drawing upon the componential theory of creativity, cognitive evaluation theory and social exchange theory, the study reported in this paper tested a mediating model based on the hypothesis that abusive supervision negatively influences creativity sequentially through leader-member exchange (LMX) and intrinsic motivation. The study employed…

  17. Assessing the Student, Faculty, and Community Partner in Academic Service-Learning: A Categorization of Surveys Posted Online at Campus Compact Member Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Susan; Anderson-Lain, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Service-learning is an instructional strategy used by faculty at hundreds of institutions, including those that are members of Campus Compact, an organization committed to service-learning and community/civic engagement. For this study, researchers examined a variety of online survey assessment tools used in service-learning projects. The…

  18. Union Members Are Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David

    2013-01-01

    Unions serve their members' interests. But union members are also community members, and their interests go well beyond increasing pay and benefits. A local union president has found that his members are best served by participating in a community-wide coalition. Providing eyeglasses to needy students, promoting healthy eating, and increasing…

  19. Staff's Attitudes and Reactions towards Aggressive Behaviour of Clients with Intellectual Disabilities: A Multi-Level Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knotter, Maartje H.; Wissink, Inge B.; Moonen, Xavier M. H.; Stams, Geert-Jan J. M.; Jansen, Gerard J.

    2013-01-01

    Data were collected from 121 staff members (20 direct support staff teams) on background characteristics of the individual staff members and their teams (gender, age, years of work experience, position and education), the frequency and form of aggression of clients with an intellectual disability (verbal or physical), staff members' attitudes…

  20. Staff meeting

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    I would like to invite all members of the CERN Personnel to a meeting on Wednesday 16 January 2008 at 3:00 p.m. Main Auditorium (bldg 500) to convey my best wishes for the new year, to review CERN’s activities during 2007 and to present the perspectives for 2008, the year of the LHC start-up. Closed-circuit transmission of the meeting will be available in the Council Chamber and in the AB Auditorium (Meyrin), the AB Auditorium (Prévessin), the IT Auditorium (Bldg. 31) and the AT Auditorium (Bldg. 30). Simultaneous translation into English will be available in the main Auditorium. Best wishes for the festive season! Robert AYMAR

  1. Academic Libraries, 2000. E.D. Tabs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Nancy; Justh, Natalie M.; Williams, Jeffrey W.

    This report discusses the state of academic libraries in 2000. It defines "academic library" as well as discusses library services, library collections, library staff, library expenditures, and electronic services. (Author/AMT)

  2. Conflict between nursing home staff and residents' families: does it increase burnout?

    PubMed

    Abrahamson, Kathleen; Jill Suitor, J; Pillemer, Karl

    2009-09-01

    In this study, the authors examine the influence of conflict between nursing home staff and family members of residents on staff burnout. Data were collected from interviews with a representative sample of 655 nursing home nurses and nursing assistants. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. Results indicate that conflict with family members increases staff burnout and decreases staff satisfaction. Staff and family conflict increases when staff members feel they do not have enough time to complete required tasks. Level of conflict decreases when staff perceive that family members have care expectations that are similar to their own. Interestingly, staff who have personal experience as family caregivers are more likely to report conflict with family members of residents, a result that necessitates further study. Staff burnout and dissatisfaction affects both individuals and organizations. Policy that addresses staff and family interaction can have an important place in the design and delivery of long-term care.

  3. Evidence Equals Excellence: The application of an evidence-based practice model in an academic medical center.

    PubMed

    Balakas, Karen; Potter, Patricia; Pratt, Elizabeth; Rea, Gail; Williams, Jennifer

    2009-03-01

    An evidence-based practice (EBP) program that is designed to develop mentors in both clinical and academic settings has the potential for transforming a health care organization. This article describes an innovative program, Evidence Equals Excellence, which consists of two components: a clinical practice component for health care clinicians and an academic program for baccalaureate and graduate nursing students. The development of EBP mentors creates a core group of clinicians who can assist fellow staff members apply evidence at the bedside. An academic program prepares new graduates to partner easily with clinical mentors to support and initiate successful practice changes.

  4. Academic Staff in the UAE: Unsettled Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David; Austin, Ann; Farah, Samar; Wilson, Elisabeth; Ridge, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how instructors in United Arab Emirates higher education institutions view their professional employment, the extent of their identification and engagement with their institution, and how their views are shaped by the national and institutional contexts in which they work. Many interviewees felt their professional…

  5. Academic Staff in the UAE: Unsettled Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, David; Austin, Ann; Farah, Samar; Wilson, Elisabeth; Ridge, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated how instructors in United Arab Emirates higher education institutions view their professional employment, the extent of their identification and engagement with their institution, and how their views are shaped by the national and institutional contexts in which they work. Many interviewees felt their professional…

  6. Using School Staff Members to Implement a Childhood Obesity Prevention Intervention in Low-Income School Districts: the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD Project), 2012–2014

    PubMed Central

    Franckle, Rebecca L.; Ganter, Claudia; Falbe, Jennifer; Giles, Catherine; Criss, Shaniece; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Land, Thomas; Gortmaker, Steven L.; Chuang, Emmeline; Davison, Kirsten K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Although evidence-based interventions to prevent childhood obesity in school settings exist, few studies have identified factors that enhance school districts’ capacity to undertake such efforts. We describe the implementation of a school-based intervention using classroom lessons based on existing “Eat Well and Keep Moving” and “Planet Health” behavior change interventions and schoolwide activities to target 5,144 children in 4th through 7th grade in 2 low-income school districts. Methods The intervention was part of the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) project, a multisector community-based intervention implemented from 2012 through 2014. Using mixed methods, we operationalized key implementation outcomes, including acceptability, adoption, appropriateness, feasibility, implementation fidelity, perceived implementation cost, reach, and sustainability. Results MA-CORD was adopted in 2 school districts that were facing resource limitations and competing priorities. Although strong leadership support existed in both communities at baseline, one district’s staff reported less schoolwide readiness and commitment. Consequently, fewer teachers reported engaging in training, teaching lessons, or planning to sustain the lessons after MA-CORD. Interviews showed that principal and superintendent turnover, statewide testing, and teacher burnout limited implementation; passionate wellness champions in schools appeared to offset implementation barriers. Conclusion Future interventions should assess adoption readiness at both leadership and staff levels, offer curriculum training sessions during school hours, use school nurses or health teachers as wellness champions to support teachers, and offer incentives such as staff stipends or play equipment to encourage school participation and sustained intervention activities. PMID:28084989

  7. Classification of Staff Development Programmes and Effects Perceived by Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Rijdt, Catherine; Dochy, Filip; Bamelis, Sofie; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Educational institutions offer diverse staff development programmes to allow staff members to keep up with educational innovations and to guarantee educational quality. The current study investigates by means of a survey and semi-structured interviews whether the teacher perceives staff development as a management model, a shop-floor model or a…

  8. Leading by Example: Health Promotion Programs for School Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Patrick C.; Lohrmann, David K.

    2011-01-01

    Health promotion programs for school staff are an overlooked and underused resource that can reduce overweight and obesity among teachers and other staff members. They can also reduce staff absenteeism, increase productivity, reduce costs associated with health care and disability, and foster a climate that promotes good health schoolwide. An…

  9. You Say Staff Deserve Respect? Energize Your Words with Action!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Karen

    1998-01-01

    Lists 36 tangible ways that child care directors can motivate staff through showing them respect and appreciation. Included are suggestions related to publicly acknowledging staff expertise and training, organizing events for team bonding, recognizing and using staff members' talents, and providing space for organization and planning. (KB)

  10. Suspected Child Maltreatment: Preschool Staff in a Conflict of Loyalty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Birgitta; Janson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the actions of Swedish preschool staff when suspecting the maltreatment of children in their domestic environment, and the staff's further experiences and relations to the family members. Methods: A questionnaire in 2005 to the staff of 189 child groups in community preschools, including 3,100 children. Results: A report…

  11. Staff Survey Results, 2000-2001. E&R Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Wanda N.

    Evaluation and Research (E&R) staff of the Wake County Public Schools (WCPSS), North Carolina, have conducted spring surveys of school staff since 1992. This report contains information from the survey distributed in March 2001. Completed surveys were returned by 5,755 staff members. Survey results indicate that in the year 2000, more staff…

  12. School Staff's Reflections on Truant Students: A Positioning Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, Anne-Sofie M.; Cedersund, Elisabet

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore how school staff members involved in Student Health and Welfare conferences reflect on individual students with high levels of truancy based on their personal relationships. Using positioning analysis, the transcriptions of 15 interviews with staff were analysed. The school staff's reflections on the individual…

  13. Classification of Staff Development Programmes and Effects Perceived by Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Rijdt, Catherine; Dochy, Filip; Bamelis, Sofie; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2016-01-01

    Educational institutions offer diverse staff development programmes to allow staff members to keep up with educational innovations and to guarantee educational quality. The current study investigates by means of a survey and semi-structured interviews whether the teacher perceives staff development as a management model, a shop-floor model or a…

  14. 50 CFR 600.250 - Council member training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... member training. (a) The Secretary shall provide a training course covering a variety of topics relevant... and staff and staff from NMFS regional offices and science centers. To the extent resources allow, the...

  15. 50 CFR 600.250 - Council member training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... member training. (a) The Secretary shall provide a training course covering a variety of topics relevant... and staff and staff from NMFS regional offices and science centers. To the extent resources allow, the...

  16. 50 CFR 600.250 - Council member training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... member training. (a) The Secretary shall provide a training course covering a variety of topics relevant... and staff and staff from NMFS regional offices and science centers. To the extent resources allow, the...

  17. 50 CFR 600.250 - Council member training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... member training. (a) The Secretary shall provide a training course covering a variety of topics relevant... and staff and staff from NMFS regional offices and science centers. To the extent resources allow, the...

  18. Ethics and academic integrity.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2015-01-01

    Academics from across the globe must navigate ever-increasing demands for research, practice, and educational productivity. With the increased demands, nurse faculty must choose value priorities and actions that reflect academic integrity. What does it mean to choose actions that reflect personal integrity in the academic arena? This article begins an important nursing philosophical and theoretical discussion that members and future members of the discipline of nursing must reflect upon and grapple with as they consider what it potentially means to act with straight thinking and integrity in academics.

  19. Indicators of Staff Efficacy in Seven Special Schools in the Sydney Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallance, Roger J.

    2012-01-01

    Staff in Special Schools are seldom the focus of research, yet work with a student group some might consider demanding and stressful. Staff who work in Catholic special Schools are under-represented in the academic literature. The motivation and efficacy of Special School staff were studies in 7 Catholic Special Schools. These staff were observed…

  20. Internal Communication: Staff and Supervisory Roles. SPEC Kit 55.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    Based on a spring 1979 survey on communication in Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member institutions, this Systems and Procedures Exchange Center (SPEC) kit focuses on upward communication from staff to administration by looking at individual responsibilities of staff members and supervisors. Results indicate that the two most commonly…