Science.gov

Sample records for academic training climate

  1. Climate Change Adaptation Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A list of on-line training modules to help local government officials and those interested in water management issues better understand how the changing climate affects the services and resources they care about

  2. Academic Interventions Bank Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Tom; Torrens, Meg

    This paper describes development of a bank of interventions in response to individual student needs identified by Student Study Teams (SSTs) in the Horry County (South Carolina) school district. It also describes the training of SST members in the selection, application, and monitoring of each intervention. Following a survey that identified basic…

  3. 22 CFR 62.73 - Academic training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Academic training. 62.73 Section 62.73 Foreign... Visitor Information System (SEVIS) § 62.73 Academic training. (a) Students meeting the definition listed... responsible officer or alternate responsible officer, engage in academic training pursuant to § 62.23(f)....

  4. Climate Change and Water Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To take action on climate impacts, practitioners must understand how climate change will effect their region, and the country. Training provided here by EPA and partners allow users to better grasp the issues and make decisions based on current science.

  5. Postdoctoral Training Aligned with the Academic Professoriate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybarczyk, Brian; Lerea, Leslie; Lund, P. Kay; Whittington, Dawayne; Dykstra, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Postdoctoral training in the biological sciences continues to be an important credential for academic careers. Traditionally, this training is focused on an independent research experience. In this article, we describe a postdoctoral training program designed to prepare postdoctoral scholars for the responsibilities of an academic career that…

  6. Postdoctoral Training Aligned with the Academic Professoriate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybarczyk, Brian; Lerea, Leslie; Lund, P. Kay; Whittington, Dawayne; Dykstra, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Postdoctoral training in the biological sciences continues to be an important credential for academic careers. Traditionally, this training is focused on an independent research experience. In this article, we describe a postdoctoral training program designed to prepare postdoctoral scholars for the responsibilities of an academic career that…

  7. 22 CFR 62.73 - Academic training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Academic training. 62.73 Section 62.73 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) § 62.73 Academic training. (a) Students meeting the definition...

  8. 22 CFR 62.73 - Academic training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Academic training. 62.73 Section 62.73 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) § 62.73 Academic training. (a) Students meeting the definition...

  9. 22 CFR 62.73 - Academic training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Academic training. 62.73 Section 62.73 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) § 62.73 Academic training. (a) Students meeting the definition...

  10. 22 CFR 62.73 - Academic training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Academic training. 62.73 Section 62.73 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) § 62.73 Academic training. (a) Students meeting the definition...

  11. The Role of Academic Self-Efficacy as a Mediator Variable between Perceived Academic Climate and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abd-Elmotaleb, Moustafa; Saha, Sudhir K.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the mediating influence of academic self-efficacy on the link between perceived academic climate and academic performance among university students. The participants in the study consist of 272 undergraduate students at the University of Assiut, Assiut, Egypt. A scale to measure perceived academic climate, was developed. To…

  12. Osteopathic postdoctoral training institutions and academic sponsorship.

    PubMed

    Biszewski, Maura

    2013-04-01

    Since July 2012, all osteopathic graduate medical education programs approved by the American Osteopathic Association are academically sponsored by an Osteopathic Postdoctoral Training Institution (OPTI). The author reviews recent activities related to OPTI operations, including OPTI historical data and academic sponsorship changes, revisions to the OPTI Accreditation Handbook, and the 2012 OPTI Workshop. The author also summarizes the new OPTI Mission and Vision Statements, examines OPTI governance, and cites common commendations and deficiencies for reviews completed from 2008 to 2012.

  13. Academic career development in geriatric fellowship training.

    PubMed

    Medina-Walpole, Annette; Fonzi, Judith; Katz, Paul R

    2007-12-01

    Career development is rarely formalized in the curricula of geriatric fellowship programs, and the training of new generations of academic leaders is challenging in the 1 year of fellowship training. To effectively prepare fellows for academic leadership, the University of Rochester's Division of Geriatrics, in collaboration with the Warner School of Graduate Education, created a yearlong course to achieve excellence in teaching and career development during the 1-year geriatric fellowship. Nine interdisciplinary geriatric medicine, dentistry, and psychiatry fellows completed the course in its initial year (2005/06). As participants, fellows gained the knowledge and experience to successfully develop and implement educational initiatives in various formats. Fellows acquired teaching and leadership skills necessary to succeed as clinician-educators in an academic setting and to communicate effectively with patients, families, and colleagues. Fellows completed a series of individual and group education projects, including academic portfolio development, curriculum vitae revision, abstract submission and poster presentation at national meetings, lay lecture series development, and geriatric grand rounds presentation. One hundred percent of fellows reported that the course positively affected their career development, with six of nine fellows choosing academic careers. The course provided opportunities to teach and assess all six of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education core competencies. This academic career development course was intended to prepare geriatric fellows as the next generation of academic leaders as clinician-teacher-scholars. It could set a new standard for academic development during fellowship training and provide a model for national dissemination in other geriatric and subspecialty fellowship programs.

  14. Academic Social Climate--A Key Aspect in Architectural Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Casakin, Hernan

    2015-01-01

    The present research investigates academic social climate in architectural studies as perceived by students. It studies the importance that the various measures of academic social climate have in the studio and in architectural classes. It also investigates the relation between the personal background of students and their sense of academic social…

  15. Academic Social Climate--A Key Aspect in Architectural Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Casakin, Hernan

    2015-01-01

    The present research investigates academic social climate in architectural studies as perceived by students. It studies the importance that the various measures of academic social climate have in the studio and in architectural classes. It also investigates the relation between the personal background of students and their sense of academic social…

  16. Semiotics in Academic Training of Culturologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makhlina, S. T.

    2016-01-01

    The article puts under the scrutiny the problem of academic training of semiotics as a part of higher education in Russia. An author provides an overview of the origins of semiotic science, its place within humanities and culture studies, paying a special attention to a historical and modern situation in Russia. An important role of semiotic…

  17. Climate Adaptation Training for Natural Resource Professionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, H. L.; Meyer, N.

    2016-02-01

    The University of Minnesota Sea Grant Program and University of Minensota Extension are coordinating the development of a cohort-based training for natural resource professionals that prepares them with essential aptitude, resources and tools to lead climate adaptation activities in their organizations and municipalities. This course is geared toward the growing cadre of natural resources, water, municipal infrastructure, and human resources professionals who are called upon to lead climate adaptation initiatives but lack core training in climate change science, vulnerability assessment, and adaptation planning. Modeled on pre-existing UMN certificate programs, the online course encompasses approximately 40 contact hours of training. Content builds from basic climate mechanics to change science, vulnerability assessment, downscaled climate modeling, ecosystem response to climate change and strategies communicating climate change to diverse audiences. Minnesota as well as national case studies and expertise will anchor core climate adaptation concepts in a relevant context.

  18. Training Future Leaders of Academic Medicine: Internal Programs at Three Academic Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morahan, Page S.; Kasperbauer, Dwight; McDade, Sharon A.; Aschenbrener, Carol A.; Triolo, Pamela K.; Monteleone, Patricia L.; Counte, Michael; Meyer, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews need for internal leadership training programs at academic health centers and describes three programs. Elements common to the programs include small classes, participants from many areas of academic medicine and health care, building on prior experience and training, training conducted away from the institution, short sessions, faculty…

  19. NOAA Climate Users Engagement Using Training Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.; Verdin, J. P.; Jones, J.; Pulwarty, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Climate Services Training Program was initiated in 2001. The training original target audience was NOAA NWS regional and local climate services workforce. As a result of eight-year-long development of the training program, NWS offers two training courses and about 25 online distance learning modules covering various climate topics: climate data and observations, climate variability and change, NWS national and local climate products, their tools, skill, and interpretation. Leveraging climate information and expertise available at all NOAA line offices and partners allows delivery of the most relevant, advanced knowledge and is a very critical aspect of the training program. In 2009 the training program launched a pilot project that expanded the training opportunities for specific user groups. The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) requested a training course with emphasis on Climate, Drought and Remote Sensing for their water resources managers, hydrologists, and engineering staff. The National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) co-sponsored the project. Developing the course NOAA, NIDIS, and DWR staff worked together testing different approaches in order to identify the most appropriate balance between gaps in the target audience climate knowledge and technical level needed for the information communication and delivery. The two-day course was offered in June 2009 for 35 trainees with classroom recording for further dissemination of the training materials in form of online audio-visual presentations (webcasts). The training event brought together NOAA staff and partners from U.S. Geological Survey, the Western Regional Climate Center, NASA, academia, and DWR staff and provided a valuable opportunity for curriculum development and expertise exchange. The course final discussion engaged participants in process of identifying additional climate products and services needed for regional and sector specific

  20. Climate Science Centers: Growing Federal and Academic Expertise in the Nation's Interests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryker, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Department of the Interior's (Interior) natural and cultural resource managers face increasingly complex challenges exacerbated by climate change. In 2009, under Secretarial Order 3289, Interior created eight regional Climate Science Centers managed by the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center and in partnership with universities. Secretarial Order 3289 provides a framework to coordinate climate change science and adaptation efforts across Interior and to integrate science and resource management expertise from Federal, State, Tribal, private, non-profit, and academic partners. In addition to broad research expertise, these Federal/university partnerships provide opportunities to develop a next generation of climate science professionals. These include opportunities to increase the climate science knowledge base of students and practicing professionals; build students' skills in working across the boundary between research and implementation; facilitate networking among researchers, students, and professionals for the application of research to on-the-ground issues; and support the science pipeline in climate-related fields through structured, intensive professional development. In 2013, Climate Science Centers supported approximately 10 undergraduates, 60 graduate students, and 26 postdoctoral researchers. Additional students trained by Climate Science Center-affiliated faculty also contribute valuable time and expertise, and are effectively part of the Climate Science Center network. The Climate Science Centers' education and training efforts have also reached a number of high school students interested in STEM careers, and professionals in natural and cultural resource management. The Climate Science Centers are coordinating to build on each other's successful education and training efforts. Early successes include several intensive education experiences, such as the Alaska Climate Science Center's Girls on

  1. Interrelationships Between Academic Degree Programs and Postdegree Internship Training *

    PubMed Central

    Brodman, Estelle

    1968-01-01

    Differences between postgraduate academic training for medical librarianship and the less formal, nonacademic postgraduate training in this field are described. Strengths and weaknesses of each kind of learning experience are given. PMID:5702317

  2. Global Diversity and Academic Success of Foreign-Trained Academic Neurosurgeons in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Akshitkumar M; Kumar, Nishant Ganesh; Reynolds, Rebecca A; Hale, Andrew T; Wellons, John C; Naftel, Robert P

    2017-08-01

    To quantify the proportion of academic neurosurgeons practicing in the United States who acquired residency training outside of the United States and compare their training backgrounds and academic success with those who received their residency training in the United States. We identified 1338 clinically active academic neurosurgeons from 104 programs that participated in the neurosurgery residency match in the United States in January-February 2015. Their training backgrounds, current academic positions, and history of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant awards between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved from publicly accessible sources. Eighty-four U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) received their residency training in 20 different countries outside of the United States/Puerto Rico, representing all major regions of the world. The majority trained in Canada (n = 48). We found no major differences between the foreign-trained and U.S.-trained neurosurgeons in male:female ratio, year of starting residency, proportion with positions in medical schools ranked in the top 15 by the U.S. News and World Report, general distribution of academic positions, and proportion with an NIH grant. Compared with U.S.-trained academic neurosurgeons, foreign-trained academic neurosurgeons had a significantly higher proportion of Ph.D. degrees (32.1% vs. 12.3%; P < 0.0001) and held more associate professorships (34.5% vs. 23.1%; P = 0.02). The academic practices of the foreign-trained neurosurgeons were widely distributed throughout the United States. A small group of U.S. academic neurosurgeons (6.3%) have acquired residency training outside of the United States, representing all major regions of the world. Their general demographic data and academic accomplishments are comparable to those of U.S.-trained neurosurgeons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Cognitive Training in Academically Deficient ADDH Boys Receiving Stimulant Medication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abikoff, Howard; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-four stimulant-treated, academically deficient, and attention deficit disordered, hyperactive (ADDH) boys (ages 7-12) participated in a 16-week, intensive cognitive training program focusing on academic skills and tasks. Intervention did not enhance self-esteem and there was poor agreement between teacher ratings of academic competence and…

  4. School Climate and Academic Achievement in Suburban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulak, Tracey N.

    2016-01-01

    School climate research has indicated a relationship between the climate of a school and academic achievement. The majority of explanatory models have been developed in urban schools with less attention given to suburban schools. Due to the process of formation of suburban schools, there is a likelihood these campuses differ from the traditional…

  5. School Climate and Academic Achievement in Suburban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulak, Tracey N.

    2016-01-01

    School climate research has indicated a relationship between the climate of a school and academic achievement. The majority of explanatory models have been developed in urban schools with less attention given to suburban schools. Due to the process of formation of suburban schools, there is a likelihood these campuses differ from the traditional…

  6. Results of an Institutional LGBT Climate Survey at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Chester, Sean D; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Eckstrand, Kristen L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the climate and culture experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) employees and students at one large academic medical center. An anonymous, online institutional climate survey was used to assess the attitudes and experiences of LGBT employees and students. There were 42 LGBT and 14 non-LGBT survey participants. Results revealed that a surprisingly large percentage of LGBT individuals experienced pressure to remain "closeted" and were harassed despite medical center policies of non-discrimination. Continuing training, inclusive policies and practices, and the development of mechanisms to address LGBT-specific harassment are necessary for improving institutional climate.

  7. Impact of fellowship training on research productivity in academic ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Grace; Fang, Christina H; Lopez, Santiago A; Bhagat, Neelakshi; Langer, Paul D; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2015-01-01

    To assess whether scholarly impact of academic ophthalmologists, as measured using the h-index, is affected by fellowship training status and to further characterize differences in productivity among the various subspecialties and by departmental rank. A descriptive and correlational design was used. In total, 1440 academic ophthalmologists from 99 ophthalmology training programs were analyzed. The h-index data were obtained from the Scopus database. Faculty members were classified by academic rank and grouped into 10 categories based on fellowship training: anterior segment, corneal and external disease, glaucoma, uveitis and ocular immunology, vitreoretinal disease, ophthalmic plastic surgery, pediatric ophthalmology, neuro-ophthalmology, ophthalmic pathology, and "other." A one-way analysis of variance or Student t test using Microsoft Excel and "R" statistical software were used for comparison of continuous variables, with significance set at p < 0.05. Faculty working in academic ophthalmology residency training programs in the United States whose information is stored in the American Medical Association's Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database. Fellowship-trained ophthalmologists had significantly higher research productivity, as measured using the h-index, than non-fellowship-trained ophthalmologists in this study (p < 0.0005). Academic ophthalmologists trained in vitreoretinal disease or ophthalmic pathology had the highest scholarly productivity compared with those in other ophthalmology subspecialties (p < 0.05). There was a significant increase in scholarly productivity with increasing academic rank from Assistant Professor to Professor (p < 0.05). A significant difference in productivity between fellowship-trained and non-fellowship-trained ophthalmologists existed individually only at the level of Assistant Professor (p < 0.0005). Academic ophthalmologists with fellowship training have significantly higher scholarly output than non-fellowship-trained

  8. Recruiting, Training and Motivating Student Assistants in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantinou, Constantia

    1998-01-01

    Traces the history of student academic library employees and reviews the related literature on the changing role of library student assistants. Highlights include changes in libraries' organizational structures; and administrative issues concerning recruitment, interviewing, training, motivation, and employee retention. (LRW)

  9. Recruiting, Training and Motivating Student Assistants in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantinou, Constantia

    1998-01-01

    Traces the history of student academic library employees and reviews the related literature on the changing role of library student assistants. Highlights include changes in libraries' organizational structures; and administrative issues concerning recruitment, interviewing, training, motivation, and employee retention. (LRW)

  10. Establishing a practice climate in academic settings.

    PubMed

    Peloquin, Suzanne M; Osborne, Karen A

    2003-01-01

    This article describes an innovative educational approach that was introduced and developed in one occupational therapy program, favorably assessed by students, and promoted within the occupational therapy literature. A review of educational literature from other disciplines suggests that the approach characterized as creating a practice climate, may be useful to most allied health educators. We discuss (1) the meaning of the term practice climate, (2) the rationale for creating such a climate in larger classroom sessions, (3) nine process strategies that can establish this climate, and (4) an assessment of the approach by two groups of undergraduate students. Although introduced in a senior-level undergraduate course, the approach has merit for implementation in less advanced courses and in graduate education.

  11. The role of academic institutions in leveraging engagement and action on climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. M.; Palca, J.

    2016-12-01

    Growing global concern over the impact of climate change places climate scientists at the forefront of communicating risks, impacts, and adaptation strategies to non-scientists. Academic institutions can play a leadership role in providing support, incentives, and structures that encourage scientific engagement on this, and other, complex societal and scientific issues. This presentation will focus on `best practices' in supporting university scientists in communicating their science and engaging in thoughtful dialogue with decision makers, managers, media, and public audiences. For example, institutions that can provide significant administrative support for science communication (press officers, training workshops) may decrease barriers between academic science and public knowledge. Additionally, financial (or similar) support in the form of teaching releases and institutional awards can be utilized to acknowledge the time and effort spent in engagement. This presentation will feature examples from universities, professional societies and other institutions where engagement on climate science is structurally encouraged and supported.

  12. Computer Technology and Academic Skill Training for Improving Disabled Students' Academic Performance: Applications and Limitations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severs, Mary K.

    The Educational Center for Disabled Students at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln is designed to improve the academic performance and attitudes toward success of disabled students through computer technology and academic skills training. Adaptive equipment interventions take into account keyboard access and screen and voice output. Non-adaptive…

  13. Impact of fellowship training on research productivity in academic otolaryngology.

    PubMed

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Svider, Peter F; Mauro, Kevin M; Setzen, Michael; Baredes, Soly

    2012-12-01

    Assessment of scholarly productivity as measured by research output is a key component of decisions regarding appointment and advancement in academic otolaryngology. An increasing number of graduating residents are pursuing postresidency fellowships, and evaluation of research productivity among these subspecialists is important in determining their role in academic otolaryngology departments. The h-index is a reliable indicator of research productivity, as it takes into account both quantity and relevance of research contributions. Our objective was to evaluate and compare trends in research productivity among the various otolaryngology subspecialties. Analysis of research productivity trends among otolaryngology subspecialties using the h-index. Faculty members from 92 academic otolaryngology departments were organized by subspecialty and academic rank, and their research productivity, as measured by the h-index, was calculated using the Scopus database. Fellowship-trained otolaryngologists in academic programs had higher h-indices than non-fellowship-trained otolaryngologists. Head and neck surgeons and otologists had significantly higher research productivity than their peers in other otolaryngology subspecialties. Analysis of the subspecialties of chairpersons indicated that 62% were either head and neck surgeons or otologists. Fellowship-trained otolaryngologists had higher h-indices, and faculty members trained in the subspecialties with the highest research productivity were disproportionately represented in positions of leadership within academic otolaryngology, probably reflecting the importance of research contributions in the academic advancement process, although other factors, such as educational contributions and clinical performance, may also be important factors. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Does formal research training lead to academic success in otolaryngology?

    PubMed

    Bobian, Michael R; Shah, Noor; Svider, Peter F; Hong, Robert S; Shkoukani, Mahdi A; Folbe, Adam J; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate whether formalized research training is associated with higher researcher productivity, academic rank, and acquisition of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants within academic otolaryngology departments. Each of the 100 civilian otolaryngology program's departmental websites were analyzed to obtain a comprehensive list of faculty members credentials and characteristics, including academic rank, completion of a clinical fellowship, completion of a formal research fellowship, and attainment of a doctorate in philosophy (PhD) degree. We also recorded measures of scholarly impact and successful acquisition of NIH funding. A total of 1,495 academic physicians were included in our study. Of these, 14.1% had formal research training. Bivariate associations showed that formal research training was associated with a greater h-index, increased probability of acquiring NIH funding, and higher academic rank. Using a linear regression model, we found that otolaryngologists possessing a PhD had an associated h-index of 1.8 points higher, and those who completed a formal research fellowship had an h-index of 1.6 points higher. A PhD degree or completion of a research fellowship was not associated with a higher academic rank; however, a higher h-index and previous acquisition of an NIH grant were associated with a higher academic rank. The attainment of NIH funding was three times more likely for those with a formal research fellowship and 8.6 times more likely for otolaryngologists with a PhD degree. Formalized research training is associated with academic success in otolaryngology. Such dedicated research training accompanies greater scholarly impact, acquisition of NIH funding, and a higher academic rank. NA Laryngoscope, 127:E15-E21, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Classroom Emotional Climate, Student Engagement, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Maria R.; Brackett, Marc A.; Rivers, Susan E.; White, Mark; Salovey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The emotional connections students foster in their classrooms are likely to impact their success in school. Using a multimethod, multilevel approach, this study examined the link between classroom emotional climate and academic achievement, including the role of student engagement as a mediator. Data were collected from 63 fifth- and sixth-grade…

  16. Classroom Emotional Climate, Student Engagement, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Maria R.; Brackett, Marc A.; Rivers, Susan E.; White, Mark; Salovey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The emotional connections students foster in their classrooms are likely to impact their success in school. Using a multimethod, multilevel approach, this study examined the link between classroom emotional climate and academic achievement, including the role of student engagement as a mediator. Data were collected from 63 fifth- and sixth-grade…

  17. Warming the Climate for Women in Academic Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginorio, Angela B.

    This paper contends that the climate or culture of academic science has been chilly to women, ethnic minorities, and people with disabilities. The paper reviews research findings in three areas: (1) numbers of women participating in science education and careers; (2) evidence of precollege patterns for girls and women in science and math; and (3)…

  18. RDA: Training and Continuing Education Needs in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosaka, Yugi; Park, Jung-ran

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at gaining a better understanding of the current state and needs of RDA training among cataloging and metadata practitioners. Using nationwide survey data focusing on the academic library sector, this study finds that while training activities since RDA's release in 2010 show a positive correlation with catalogers' levels of RDA…

  19. School Climate for Academic Success: A Multilevel Analysis of School Climate and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwong, Darren; Davis, Jonathan Ryan

    2015-01-01

    This multilevel study examined the relationship between school climate and academic achievement. Using the Educational Longitudinal Survey (ELS, 2002), and a sample of 16,258 students and 1954 schools nationwide, we found that student-level perception of school climate--especially the student learning environment--was highly predictive of academic…

  20. 5 CFR 410.308 - Training to obtain an academic degree.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Training to obtain an academic degree... REGULATIONS TRAINING Establishing and Implementing Training Programs § 410.308 Training to obtain an academic degree. (a) An agency may authorize training for an employee to obtain an academic degree under...

  1. 5 CFR 410.308 - Training to obtain an academic degree.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Training to obtain an academic degree... REGULATIONS TRAINING Establishing and Implementing Training Programs § 410.308 Training to obtain an academic degree. (a) An agency may authorize training for an employee to obtain an academic degree under...

  2. Academic Optimism and Organizational Climate: An Elementary School Effectiveness Test of Two Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Jonathan Bart

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of two climate constructs in academic optimism and organizational climate as each relates to school effectiveness. Academic optimism is an academic environment comprised of three dimensions: academic emphasis, collective efficacy, and faculty trust (Hoy, Tarter, & Hoy, 2006). The Organizational Climate…

  3. Academic Optimism and Organizational Climate: An Elementary School Effectiveness Test of Two Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeves, Jonathan Bart

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of two climate constructs in academic optimism and organizational climate as each relates to school effectiveness. Academic optimism is an academic environment comprised of three dimensions: academic emphasis, collective efficacy, and faculty trust (Hoy, Tarter, & Hoy, 2006). The Organizational Climate…

  4. The Academic Experiences Survey (AES): Measuring Perceptions of Academic Climate in Liberal Arts Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galotti, Kathleen M.; Clare, Lacey R.; McManus, Courtney; Nixon, Andrea Lisa

    2016-01-01

    In today's educational climate, liberal arts institutions must demonstrate that their educational goals are being met. This paper presents reliability and stability testing of a concise, research-based survey instrument designed to examine student perceptions of academic experiences that is particularly suited to institutions rooted in the liberal…

  5. Challenges facing academic urology training programs: an impending crisis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Chris M; McKenna, Patrick

    2013-03-01

    To determine the most pressing issues facing academic urology training centers. The supply of urologists per capita in the United States continues to decrease. Stricter resident requirements, restriction of resident duty hours, and a Graduate Medical Education (GME) funding cap on resident education has led to significant challenges for academic centers. A 32-question survey was sent to Society of University Urologists members. Respondents defined themselves as academic faculty tenure track, program director, academic chair, program director and academic chair, clinical faculty nontenure track, and community faculty member. A total of 143 of 446 members(32%) responded. A lack of funding was indicated as an obstacle to adding new residency positions (65% respondents) and recruiting new faculty (60% respondents). Residency positions not funded by GME (40% respondents) required either clinical or hospital dollars to support these slots. Most respondents (51%) indicated resident research rotations are funded with clinical dollars. Surgical skills laboratories are commonly used (85% respondents) and are supported mostly with hospital or clinical dollars. The majority of respondents (84%) indicated they would expand simulation laboratories if they had better funding. Other than urodynamics and ultrasound, urology residency training programs reported little income from ancillary dollars. There is a significant workforce shortage within urology training programs. Clinical revenue and hospital funding seem to be the main financial support engines to supplement the GME funding shortage, proficiency training, and faculty salary support for teaching. The current system of GME funding for urology residency programs is not sustainable. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Robotic Surgical Training in an Academic Institution

    PubMed Central

    Chitwood, W. Randolph; Nifong, L. Wiley; Chapman, William H. H.; Felger, Jason E.; Bailey, B. Marcus; Ballint, Tara; Mendleson, Kim G.; Kim, Victor B.; Young, James A.; Albrecht, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective To detail robotic procedure development and clinical applications for mitral valve, biliary, and gastric reflux operations, and to implement a multispecialty robotic surgery training curriculum for both surgeons and surgical teams. Summary Background Data Remote, accurate telemanipulation of intracavitary instruments by general and cardiac surgeons is now possible. Complex technologic advancements in surgical robotics require well-designed training programs. Moreover, efficient robotic surgical procedures must be developed methodically and safely implemented clinically. Methods Advanced training on robotic systems provides surgeon confidence when operating in tiny intracavitary spaces. Three-dimensional vision and articulated instrument control are essential. The authors’ two da Vinci robotic systems have been dedicated to procedure development, clinical surgery, and training of surgical specialists. Their center has been the first United States site to train surgeons formally in clinical robotics. Results Established surgeons and residents have been trained using a defined robotic surgical educational curriculum. Also, 30 multispecialty teams have been trained in robotic mechanics and electronics. Initially, robotic procedures were developed experimentally and are described. In the past year the authors have performed 52 robotic-assisted clinical operations: 18 mitral valve repairs, 20 cholecystectomies, and 14 Nissen fundoplications. These respective operations required 108, 28, and 73 minutes of robotic telemanipulation to complete. Procedure times for the last half of the abdominal operations decreased significantly, as did the knot-tying time in mitral operations. There have been no deaths and few complications. One mitral patient had postoperative bleeding. Conclusion Robotic surgery can be performed safely with excellent results. The authors have developed an effective curriculum for training teams in robotic surgery. After training, surgeons

  7. Robotic surgical training in an academic institution.

    PubMed

    Chitwood, W R; Nifong, L W; Chapman, W H; Felger, J E; Bailey, B M; Ballint, T; Mendleson, K G; Kim, V B; Young, J A; Albrecht, R A

    2001-10-01

    To detail robotic procedure development and clinical applications for mitral valve, biliary, and gastric reflux operations, and to implement a multispecialty robotic surgery training curriculum for both surgeons and surgical teams. Remote, accurate telemanipulation of intracavitary instruments by general and cardiac surgeons is now possible. Complex technologic advancements in surgical robotics require well-designed training programs. Moreover, efficient robotic surgical procedures must be developed methodically and safely implemented clinically. Advanced training on robotic systems provides surgeon confidence when operating in tiny intracavitary spaces. Three-dimensional vision and articulated instrument control are essential. The authors' two da Vinci robotic systems have been dedicated to procedure development, clinical surgery, and training of surgical specialists. Their center has been the first United States site to train surgeons formally in clinical robotics. Established surgeons and residents have been trained using a defined robotic surgical educational curriculum. Also, 30 multispecialty teams have been trained in robotic mechanics and electronics. Initially, robotic procedures were developed experimentally and are described. In the past year the authors have performed 52 robotic-assisted clinical operations: 18 mitral valve repairs, 20 cholecystectomies, and 14 Nissen fundoplications. These respective operations required 108, 28, and 73 minutes of robotic telemanipulation to complete. Procedure times for the last half of the abdominal operations decreased significantly, as did the knot-tying time in mitral operations. There have been no deaths and few complications. One mitral patient had postoperative bleeding. Robotic surgery can be performed safely with excellent results. The authors have developed an effective curriculum for training teams in robotic surgery. After training, surgeons have applied these methods effectively and safely.

  8. Grant opportunities for academic research and training

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2016-08-30

    As an unbiased, multidisciplinary science organization, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is dedicated to the timely, relevant, and impartial study of the health of our ecosystems and environment, our natural resources, the impacts of climate and land-use change, and the natural hazards that affect our lives. Grant opportunities for researchers and faculty to participate in USGS science through the engagement of students are available in the selected programs described in this publication.

  9. Education: Firms Offer Academics Polymer Science Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Provides information on industry-sponsored programs for college faculty and advanced undergraduate students designed to improve polymer science training: these include residency programs for professors available at industrial laboratories, establishment of a Polymer Education Award, newsletter on course materials/sources in polymer science,…

  10. The Hidden Costs of Outdoor Education/Recreation Academic Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisson, Christian

    Academic training programs in the field of outdoor education and recreation have increased considerably in the past few decades, but their true costs are often hidden. A survey of 15 outdoor college programs in the United States and Canada examined special fees associated with outdoor courses. The cost of necessary personal equipment and clothing…

  11. Training Outdoor Educators: Integrating Academic and Professional Demands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Peter; Morgan, Alastair

    In the United Kingdom, outdoor educators have varied backgrounds in terms of academic versus professional outdoor training, and the profession has not agreed upon required qualifications. Multiple influences in the historical development of outdoor education have contributed to this situation. Since the 1970s, several U.K. colleges and…

  12. Academic Peer Instruction: Reference and Training Manual (with Answers)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaritsky, Joyce; Toce, Andi

    2013-01-01

    This manual consists of an introduction to our Academic Peer Instruction (API) program at LaGuardia Community College, a compilation of the materials we have developed and use for training of our tutors (with answers), and a bibliography. API is based on an internationally recognized peer tutoring program, Supplemental Instruction. (Contains 6…

  13. The Academic Training of Two-Year College Mathematics Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Calvin T.

    The academic training needs of two-year college mathematics faculty are discussed in this paper and appropriate courses of study are proposed. After introductory comments on the diversity of two-year college students' needs for mathematics education, an undergraduate course of study appropriate for two-year college math faculty is proposed. This…

  14. The effect of assertiveness training on student's academic anxiety.

    PubMed

    Mohebi, S; Sharifirad, G H R; Shahsiah, M; Botlani, S; Matlabi, M; Rezaeian, M

    2012-03-01

    Academic anxiety is an important educational problem that affects millions of students in colleges and schools over the world each year. Although a low level of anxiety can cause positive motivation for improvement of educational functioning, high levels of it can cause a disturbance in concentration, attention, storage of knowledge, recall and educational reduction. It has also been recently determined that there is a relationship between anxiety and assertiveness. Therefore, this study is an attempt to determine the effect of assertiveness training on reducing anxiety levels in pre-college academic students in Gonabad city in 2008. In this clinical trial study, all the pre-college students of Gonabad city were invited to participate and 89 students were divided into experimental and control groups. There were 3 questionnaires, namely demographic, academic anxiety and assertiveness Rathus questionnaires in which the validity and reliability were calculated and approved. The intervention for the experimental group was 5 sessions of assertiveness training using the PRECEDE model and 1 session for parents and teachers to help and support the intervention program. We had a post-test 8 weeks after the last training session for each group was conducted. The data was analyzed by SPSS. The results showed that anxiety levels and decisiveness in the target group were moderate to high and it is seen as a significant reverse relationship between these two factors (r = -0.69 and p < 0.001). The results also showed that there was a significant anxiety decrease in the experimental group after the intervention. On the one hand, there was a significant increase in decisiveness for both groups, but there was not a significant difference between academic anxiety and assertiveness in the control group.before and after the intervention. Due to a significant decrease in anxiety and increased decisiveness in the experimental group, it can be claimed that assertiveness training is an

  15. [Survey among academic teachers about psychiatric training in France].

    PubMed

    van Effenterre, A; Hanon, C; Llorca, P-M

    2014-06-01

    Given the results of resident psychiatrists' surveys conducted in France over the past 3 years, it has become essential to also examine the opinion of the academic psychiatrists in charge of psychiatry education. To study the teachers point of view on psychiatric training in France, the weaknesses and strengths of the training, recent improvements and problems, and to compare their opinion with that of the residents. A survey was conducted in April 2012 among 125 academic teachers professors hospital practitioners (PU-PH), in child & adolescent psychiatry and adult psychiatry. An anonymous online questionnaire including seven parts and three open questions was sent to the PU-PH. The questionnaire was answered by 79/125 psychiatric PU-PH (63%). Results show that a majority of PU-PH (78%) were willing to maintain a single training pathway including adult psychiatry and child psychiatry with a single diploma, with the addition of a DESC (specific and additional Diploma) in forensic psychiatry (72%) and old age psychiatry (62%). Almost all respondents suggested the implementation of an assessment of teaching and a formal mentorship program. Some aspects of training included more controversial issues: such as the length of the training, the opening of training to private practice physicians, or the European harmonization. The survey stressed some areas of improvement: such training in psychotherapy and research, access to supervision as well as barriers to improved training including an insufficient number of academic practitioners. Compared with other surveys, it emphasized that in addition to the need of diversifying the theoretical (thematic, interactive media and teaching, teachers, etc.) and the practical aspect (training sites), it is essential according to trainees and PU-PH, to implement an efficient supervision during residency. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Students' Academic Climate Perception of the School of Business of a Mexican University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdés-Flores, Patricia; Campos-Rodríguez, Javier Arturo; Sánchez-Franco, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses student perception of the academic climate of the School of Business in a private university in Tijuana, México. With the participation of 257 students out of 348 enrolled in five academic programs, the survey results show that students perceive that the criteria that make up the academic climate occur "Always" in…

  17. Advances of NOAA Training Program in Climate Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    Since 2002, NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Climate Services Division (CSD) has offered numerous training opportunities to NWS staff. After eight-years of development, the training program offers three instructor-led courses and roughly 25 online (distance learning) modules covering various climate topics, such as: climate data and observations, climate variability and change, and NWS national / local climate products (tools, skill, and interpretation). Leveraging climate information and expertise available at all NOAA line offices and partners allows for the delivery of the most advanced knowledge and is a very critical aspect of the training program. The emerging NOAA Climate Service (NCS) requires a well-trained, climate-literate workforce at the local level capable of delivering NOAA's climate products and services as well as providing climate-sensitive decision support. NWS Weather Forecast Offices and River Forecast Centers presently serve as local outlets for the NCS climate services. Trained NWS climate service personnel use proactive and reactive approaches and professional education methods in communicating climate variability and change information to local users. Both scientifically-sound messages and amiable communication techniques are important in developing an engaged dialog between the climate service providers and users. Several pilot projects have been conducted by the NWS CSD this past year that apply the program's training lessons and expertise to specialized external user group training. The technical user groups included natural resources managers, engineers, hydrologists, and planners for transportation infrastructure. Training of professional user groups required tailoring instructions to the potential applications for each group of users. Training technical users identified the following critical issues: (1) knowledge of target audience expectations, initial knowledge status, and potential use of climate information; (2) leveraging

  18. Residency Surgical Training at an Independent Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremiah; Sidwell, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Independent academic medical centers have been training surgeons for more than a century; this environment is distinct from university or military programs. There are several advantages to training at a community program, including a supportive learning environment with camaraderie between residents and faculty, early and broad operative experience, and improved graduate confidence. Community programs also face challenges, such as resident recruitment and faculty engagement. With the workforce needs for general surgeons, independent training programs will continue to play an integral role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Undergraduate medical academic performance is improved by scientific training.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Chong; Liu, Zhongming; Cai, Yunfei; Cao, Xingguo; He, Yushan; Liu, Guoxiang; Miao, Hongming

    2017-09-01

    The effect of scientific training on course learning in undergraduates is still controversial. In this study, we investigated the academic performance of undergraduate students with and without scientific training. The results show that scientific training improves students' test scores in general medical courses, such as biochemistry and molecular biology, cell biology, physiology, and even English. We classified scientific training into four levels. We found that literature reading could significantly improve students' test scores in general courses. Students who received scientific training carried out experiments more effectively and published articles performed better than their untrained counterparts in biochemistry and molecular biology examinations. The questionnaire survey demonstrated that the trained students were more confident of their course learning, and displayed more interest, motivation and capability in course learning. In summary, undergraduate academic performance is improved by scientific training. Our findings shed light on the novel strategies in the management of undergraduate education in the medical school. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):379-384, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  20. Office of Land and Emergency Management (OLEM) Climate Change Adaptation Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This training discusses climate vulnerabilities and methods for incorporating adaptation measures into OLEM programs. This training is meant to follow completion of EPA's Introductory Climate Change Training.

  1. The London Academic Training Scheme: learning research methods through teaching.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, J; Iliffe, S

    1998-04-01

    The London Academic Training Scheme (LATS) provides a 1-year training programme in research methods and teaching for GPs who have recently finished vocational training. This paper describes an adult educational approach to learning about research methods through teaching as part of the LATS trainees' weekly academic programme. We aimed to provide and evaluate a course exploring research methodologies used in primary care by a three-step approach to learning, with trainees taking the main role as teachers. Trainees on the LATS programme met for one afternoon each week for one term. During alternate sessions a pair of trainees would deliver a whole afternoon's seminar on one aspect of primary care research methodology. The teaching of each session was evaluated by the whole group, by academic supervisors and by experts. Sessions were scored by participants for content, style of presentation, educational value and enjoyment on a seven-point rating scale where 1 = no value, 4 = neutral and 7 = very valuable. All sessions scored above 4 and usually above 5 for each aspect. Open comments collected showed that trainees greatly appreciated this self-directed approach to learning and teaching. The active involvement of learners as teachers is a practical and rewarding means of using adult educational principles in providing an academic programme.

  2. 34 CFR 648.61 - How must the academic department supervise the training of fellows?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must the academic department supervise the training... academic department supervise the training of fellows? The institution shall provide to fellows at least one academic year of supervised training in instruction at the graduate or undergraduate level at the...

  3. 34 CFR 648.61 - How must the academic department supervise the training of fellows?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How must the academic department supervise the training... academic department supervise the training of fellows? The institution shall provide to fellows at least one academic year of supervised training in instruction at the graduate or undergraduate level at the...

  4. Developing Climate Resilience Toolkit Decision Support Training Sectio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livezey, M. M.; Herring, D.; Keck, J.; Meyers, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate Resilience Toolkit (CRT) is a Federal government effort to address the U.S. President's Climate Action Plan and Executive Order for Climate Preparedness. The toolkit will provide access to tools and products useful for climate-sensitive decision making. To optimize the user experience, the toolkit will also provide access to training materials. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has been building a climate training capability for 15 years. The target audience for the training has historically been mainly NOAA staff with some modified training programs for external users and stakeholders. NOAA is now using this climate training capacity for the CRT. To organize the CRT training section, we collaborated with the Association of Climate Change Officers to determine the best strategy and identified four additional complimentary skills needed for successful decision making: climate literacy, environmental literacy, risk assessment and management, and strategic execution and monitoring. Developing the climate literacy skills requires knowledge of climate variability and change, as well as an introduction to the suite of available products and services. For the development of an environmental literacy category, specific topics needed include knowledge of climate impacts on specific environmental systems. Climate risk assessment and management introduces a process for decision making and provides knowledge on communication of climate information and integration of climate information in planning processes. The strategic execution and monitoring category provides information on use of NOAA climate products, services, and partnership opportunities for decision making. In order to use the existing training modules, it was necessary to assess their level of complexity, catalog them, and develop guidance for users on a curriculum to take advantage of the training resources to enhance their learning experience. With the development of this CRT

  5. A Research Synthesis of the Associations between Socioeconomic Background, Inequality, School Climate, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkowitz, Ruth; Moore, Hadass; Astor, Ron Avi; Benbenishty, Rami

    2017-01-01

    Educational researchers and practitioners assert that supportive school and classroom climates can positively influence the academic outcomes of students, thus potentially reducing academic achievement gaps between students and schools of different socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds. Nonetheless, scientific evidence establishing directional…

  6. Organisational and Training Factors Affecting Academic Teacher Training Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renta-Davids, Ana-Inés; Jiménez-González, José-Miguel; Fandos-Garrido, Manel; González-Soto, Ángel-Pío

    2016-01-01

    University teacher training has become an important topic in recent years due to the curricular and methodological reforms introduced by the Bologna process. Despite its acknowledged importance, evaluations have been limited to measures of participants' satisfaction, and little is known about its impact on teaching practices. This study seeks to…

  7. Organisational and Training Factors Affecting Academic Teacher Training Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renta-Davids, Ana-Inés; Jiménez-González, José-Miguel; Fandos-Garrido, Manel; González-Soto, Ángel-Pío

    2016-01-01

    University teacher training has become an important topic in recent years due to the curricular and methodological reforms introduced by the Bologna process. Despite its acknowledged importance, evaluations have been limited to measures of participants' satisfaction, and little is known about its impact on teaching practices. This study seeks to…

  8. An academic approach to climate change emergency preparedness.

    PubMed

    Trask, Jeffrey A

    To achieve effective emergency management and business continuity, all hazards should be considered during the planning and preparedness process. In recent years, several new hazards have attracted the attention of Emergency Management and Business Continuity practitioners. Climate change presents a unique challenge. Practitioners must rely on historical data combined with scientific projections to guide their planning and preparedness efforts. This article examines how an academic institution's emergency management programme can plan successfully for this hazard by focusing on best practices in the area of building cross-departmental and cross-jurisdictional relationships. Examples of scientific data related to the hazard of climate change will be presented along with the latest guidance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency encouraging the planning for future hazards. The article presents a functional exercise in which this hazard was prominently featured, and presents testimony from subject matter experts. Recommendations for emergency management and business continuity programmes are so provided.

  9. Climate Change Education at the University of Washington: Bridging Academic Degrees, Departments and Disciplines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, L.; Bertram, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Education on climate change occurs in many departments at large research universities, but providing a coordinated educational experience for students in this topic is challenging. Departmental boundaries, accounting for student credit hours, and curricula inertia create roadblocks to the creation of interdisciplinary curriculum for both graduate and undergraduate students. We describe a hierarchy of interdisciplinary programs that reach students from seniors in high school to graduate students, targeting students from a variety of disciplines. The UWHS (University of Washington in the High School) program allows high school teachers to be trained to teach UW courses to their own high school students at their own school. The students who enroll receive a UW grade and credit for the course (as well as high school credit). A UWHS course on Climate and Climate Change (Atmospheric Sciences 211) was created in 2011 supported by training to high school science teachers on the fundamentals of climate science. For the 2012-13 academic year we anticipate at least 5 schools in Washington State will be offering this course. Once students matriculate at UW, 211 serves as a prerequisite for the Climate Minor that began in 2011. The minor is hosted by the departments of Atmospheric Sciences, Earth and Space Sciences and Oceanography, offering instruction in three focus areas: climate chemistry and biology, the physical climate, and past climate and ice. Students also take an integrative seminar where they are required to communicate to both scientific and non-scientific audiences some topic in climate science. Students enrolled in graduate programs at UW can participate in the Graduate Certificate in Climate Science that began 2008. The certificate gives students instruction in climate science covering the same topic areas as the minor and with a capstone project where student communicate some aspect of climate science to a non-physical science audience. Projects have included

  10. Academic training and clinical placement problems to achieve nursing competency

    PubMed Central

    RAHMATI SHARGHI, NARJES; ALAMI, ALI; KHOSRAVAN, SHAHLA; MANSOORIAN, MOHAMMAD REZA; EKRAMI, ALI

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: High quality of care is one of the requirements of nursing which depends on the nursing competency. In this connection, the aim of this research was to determine the problems related to the academic training (nursing' educational program) and clinical practice to achieve competency from the viewpoint of nurses, faculty members, and nursing students. Methods: the study was an analytical cross-sectional one. The sample consisted of the academic staff, the third and the fourth year nursing students and nurses in practice. The instrument of the study was a two-part researcher-made questionnaire with 22 questions in the theoretical- clinical realm to assess  problems related to the theoretical and clinical teaching in nursing, and 23 questions to assess the clinical functions. The questionnaire was validated in terms of both face and content validity. Its reliability, using Cronbach's Alpha coefficient, was 0.72 in the theoretical-clinical and 0.73 in the clinical realm. Both descriptive and analytical statistics were used to analyze the data, using SPSS software. Results: The results of this study indicated that from the participants’ viewpoints, the most important problems in the academic education for nursea to acquire competency were as follows: lack of academic research the clinical period (88.9%), no application of theoretical aspects of the nursing process in practice (85.6%), insufficient knowledgeable and professional educators (81.1%), the use of traditional routine-oriented methods on the wards (75.6%); also insufficient time for performance based on knowledge in relation to  the nurse's workload (86.5%), weakness and usefulness of scientific function encouragement systems in clinic (85.2%), and learnt theoretical subjects not coming into practice in clinical fields after graduation (75.6%). Conclusion: Efforts to reduce the gap between the theoretical and practical (clinical function) knowledge in educational and work environment are

  11. The role of cultural diversity climate in recruitment, promotion, and retention of faculty in academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Price, Eboni G; Gozu, Aysegul; Kern, David E; Powe, Neil R; Wand, Gary S; Golden, Sherita; Cooper, Lisa A

    2005-07-01

    Ethnic diversity among physicians may be linked to improved access and quality of care for minorities. Academic medical institutions are challenged to increase representation of ethnic minorities among health professionals. To explore the perceptions of physician faculty regarding the following: (1) the institution's cultural diversity climate and (2) facilitators and barriers to success and professional satisfaction in academic medicine within this context. Qualitative study using focus groups and semi-structured interviews. Nontenured physicians in the tenure track at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Focus groups and interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and reviewed for thematic content in a 3-stage independent review/adjudication process. Study participants included 29 faculty representing 9 clinical departments, 4 career tracks, and 4 ethnic groups. In defining cultural diversity, faculty noted visible (race/ethnicity, foreign-born status, gender) and invisible (religion, sexual orientation) dimensions. They believe visible dimensions provoke bias and cumulative advantages or disadvantages in the workplace. Minority and foreign-born faculty report ethnicity-based disparities in recruitment and subtle manifestations of bias in the promotion process. Minority and majority faculty agree that ethnic differences in prior educational opportunities lead to disparities in exposure to career options, and qualifications for and subsequent recruitment to training programs and faculty positions. Minority faculty also describe structural barriers (poor retention efforts, lack of mentorship) that hinder their success and professional satisfaction after recruitment. To effectively manage the diversity climate, our faculty recommended 4 strategies for improving the psychological climate and structural diversity of the institution. Soliciting input from faculty provides tangible ideas regarding interventions to improve an institution's diversity

  12. The Role of Cultural Diversity Climate in Recruitment, Promotion, and Retention of Faculty in Academic Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Price, Eboni G; Gozu, Aysegul; Kern, David E; Powe, Neil R; Wand, Gary S; Golden, Sherita; Cooper, Lisa A

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ethnic diversity among physicians may be linked to improved access and quality of care for minorities. Academic medical institutions are challenged to increase representation of ethnic minorities among health professionals. OBJECTIVES To explore the perceptions of physician faculty regarding the following: (1) the institution's cultural diversity climate and (2) facilitators and barriers to success and professional satisfaction in academic medicine within this context. DESIGN Qualitative study using focus groups and semi-structured interviews. PARTICIPANTS Nontenured physicians in the tenure track at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. APPROACH Focus groups and interviews were audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, and reviewed for thematic content in a 3-stage independent review/adjudication process. RESULTS Study participants included 29 faculty representing 9 clinical departments, 4 career tracks, and 4 ethnic groups. In defining cultural diversity, faculty noted visible (race/ethnicity, foreign-born status, gender) and invisible (religion, sexual orientation) dimensions. They believe visible dimensions provoke bias and cumulative advantages or disadvantages in the workplace. Minority and foreign-born faculty report ethnicity-based disparities in recruitment and subtle manifestations of bias in the promotion process. Minority and majority faculty agree that ethnic differences in prior educational opportunities lead to disparities in exposure to career options, and qualifications for and subsequent recruitment to training programs and faculty positions. Minority faculty also describe structural barriers (poor retention efforts, lack of mentorship) that hinder their success and professional satisfaction after recruitment. To effectively manage the diversity climate, our faculty recommended 4 strategies for improving the psychological climate and structural diversity of the institution. CONCLUSIONS Soliciting input from faculty provides tangible

  13. IAI Training in Climate and Health in the Americas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, J. L.

    2007-05-01

    The Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research (IAI) has addressed training in climate and health in the Americas in two major ways. First, IAI supports students to engage in research training. A multi-country health activity funded by IAI was the collaborative research network (CRN) on Diagnostics and Prediction of Human Health Impacts in the Tropical Americas, which focused principally on the effect of El Nino/Southern Oscillation and other aspects of climate variability on mosquito-borne diseases malaria and dengue. The CRN involved students in Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela, Colombia and Jamaica. The CRN was also linked to other climate and health projects that used a similar approach. Second, IAI organizes training institutes to expand the network of global change research scientists and facilitate the transfer of global change research into practice. The IAI Training Institute on Climate and Health in the Americas was held on November 7 - 18, 2005 at the University of the West Indies in Kingston, Jamaica, engaging participants from the CRN and other programs in the Americas. The Training Institute's central objective was to help strengthen local and regional capacity to address the impacts of climate variability and climate change on human health in the populations of the Americas, particularly Latin America and the Caribbean. The Training Institute had three core components: Science; Applications; and Proposal Development for Seed Grants. Recommendations for future Training Institutes included incorporating new technologies and communicating with policy-makers to develop more proactive societal strategies to manage risks.

  14. School Climate, Family Structure, and Academic Achievement: A Study of Moderation Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Meagan; Voight, Adam; Renshaw, Tyler L.; Eklund, Katie

    2015-01-01

    School climate has been lauded for its relationship to a host of desirable academic, behavioral, and social-emotional outcomes for youth. The present study tested the hypothesis that school climate counteracts youths' home-school risk by examining the moderating effects of students' school climate perceptions on the relationship between family…

  15. School Climate, Family Structure, and Academic Achievement: A Study of Moderation Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Meagan; Voight, Adam; Renshaw, Tyler L.; Eklund, Katie

    2015-01-01

    School climate has been lauded for its relationship to a host of desirable academic, behavioral, and social-emotional outcomes for youth. The present study tested the hypothesis that school climate counteracts youths' home-school risk by examining the moderating effects of students' school climate perceptions on the relationship between family…

  16. EPA Provides Training to Help Communities Prepare for Climate Change

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - As part of President Obama's Climate Action Plan, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today released an online training module to help local government officials take actions to increase their communities' resiliency to a chan

  17. Development of an academic training program in insurance medicine.

    PubMed

    Donceel, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We outline the aims and content of an inter-university academic training program in insurance medicine in Flanders, Belgium. The program leads to the diploma of "Master of Insurance Medicine and Medico-legal Expertise." The program was re-organized in 2005-2006 and is accessible for physicians who want to practice social and/or private insurance medicine as their main medical profession or as an accessory activity. The aim of education is to prepare insurance physicians to provide high quality assessments, advice and decisions. The combined education in both social and private insurance medicine offers a broad perspective on the discipline and promotes collaboration within the specialty. The recent recognition of Insurance Medicine as a medical specialty in Belgium strengthens the position of insurance physicians as they collaborate with other medical specialists and with the management of insurance companies or the social security institute.

  18. Promoting and Sustaining an Institutional Climate of Academic Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academic Senate for California Community Colleges, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This Academic Senate paper is in response to two resolutions from Fall 2005 concerning academic dishonesty. One resolution, 14.02, "Student Cheating," sought clarification on a System Office legal position that limits the ability of local faculty to fail a student for a single incident of academic dishonesty, and pending the result of…

  19. Self-Instruction Training to Increase Academic Performance of Educationally Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee; Scarpati, Stan

    1984-01-01

    In two experiments, self-instruction training for educationally handicapped children consisted of general self-instruction components and explicit instruction in task components. For both experiments the training improved academic performance. It was concluded that successful academic performance occurs when self-instructional statements integrate…

  20. The Impacts of Postdoctoral Training on Scientists' Academic Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Xuhong

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the dynamics of postdoctoral training affecting scientists' academic employment, focusing on timing and prestige dimensions. Postdoc training proves beneficial to academic employment--more so in less prestigious departments than in top ones. Postdoc duration is subject to diminishing returns. The benefits of training…

  1. Multicultural Environments of Academic versus Internship Training Programs: Lessons to Be Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Heather J.; Krumm, Angela J.; Gonzales, Rufus R.; Gunter, Kensa K.; Paez, Karen N.; Zygowicz, Sharon D.; Haggins, Kristee L.

    2011-01-01

    Psychology training programs have a responsibility to train multiculturally competent psychologists. Predoctoral interns were surveyed to compare the multicultural environment of academic and internship programs. Internship programs were perceived as more multicultural than were academic programs. Factors contributing to differences are examined,…

  2. The Impacts of Postdoctoral Training on Scientists' Academic Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Xuhong

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the dynamics of postdoctoral training affecting scientists' academic employment, focusing on timing and prestige dimensions. Postdoc training proves beneficial to academic employment--more so in less prestigious departments than in top ones. Postdoc duration is subject to diminishing returns. The benefits of training…

  3. Multicultural Environments of Academic versus Internship Training Programs: Lessons to Be Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Heather J.; Krumm, Angela J.; Gonzales, Rufus R.; Gunter, Kensa K.; Paez, Karen N.; Zygowicz, Sharon D.; Haggins, Kristee L.

    2011-01-01

    Psychology training programs have a responsibility to train multiculturally competent psychologists. Predoctoral interns were surveyed to compare the multicultural environment of academic and internship programs. Internship programs were perceived as more multicultural than were academic programs. Factors contributing to differences are examined,…

  4. The ARAMCO Industrial Traiing Centers: Academic Training and College Preparatory Programs: A Descriptive Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ARAMCO Services Co., Houston, TX.

    The report describes the components of the educational program provided by the Industrial Training Centers of the Training and Career Development Organization of ARAMCO (Arabian American Oil Company) in Saudi Arabia. ARAMCO provides in-house academic or job skills training to over 15,000 employees. Characteristics of the company's training program…

  5. Chinese high school students' academic stress and depressive symptoms: gender and school climate as moderators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyang; Lu, Zuhong

    2012-10-01

    In a sample of 368 Chinese high school students, the present study examined the different effects of Chinese high school students' academic stress on their depressive symptoms and the moderating effects of gender and students' perceptions of school climate on the relationships between their academic stress and depressive symptoms. Regression mixture model identified two different kinds of subgroups in the effects of students' academic stress on their depressive symptoms. One subgroup contained 90% of the students. In this subgroup, the students' perceptions of academic stress from lack of achievement positively predicted their depressive symptoms. For the other 10% of the students, academic stress did not significantly predict their depressive symptoms. Next, multinomial regression analysis revealed that girls or students who had high levels of achievement orientation were more likely to be in the first subgroup. The findings suggested that gender and students' perceptions of school climate could moderate the relationships between Chinese high school students' academic stress and their depressive symptoms.

  6. Why Try? Achievement Motivation and Perceived Academic Climate among Latino Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Natalie J.; Kuperminc, Gabriel P.

    2010-01-01

    Elliot and McGregor's (2001) 2 x 2 model of achievement motivation (mastery approach, mastery-avoidance, performance-approach and performance-avoidance) was used among 143 Latino adolescents to examine how achievement motivation changes over time, and whether perception of academic climate influences eventual academic outcomes. A series of…

  7. Why Try? Achievement Motivation and Perceived Academic Climate among Latino Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Natalie J.; Kuperminc, Gabriel P.

    2010-01-01

    Elliot and McGregor's (2001) 2 x 2 model of achievement motivation (mastery approach, mastery-avoidance, performance-approach and performance-avoidance) was used among 143 Latino adolescents to examine how achievement motivation changes over time, and whether perception of academic climate influences eventual academic outcomes. A series of…

  8. Feeding the pipeline: academic skills training for predental students.

    PubMed

    Markel, Geraldine; Woolfolk, Marilyn; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2008-06-01

    This article reports the outcomes of an evaluation conducted to determine if an academic skills training program for undergraduate predental students from underrepresented minority backgrounds increased the students' standardized academic skills test scores for vocabulary, reading comprehension, reading rates, spelling, and math as well as subject-specific test results in biology, chemistry, and physics. Data from standardized academic skill tests and subject-specific tests were collected at the beginning and end of the 1998 to 2006 Pipeline Programs, six-week summer enrichment programs for undergraduate predental students from disadvantaged backgrounds. In total, 179 students (75.4 percent African American, 7.3 percent Hispanic, 5.6 percent Asian American, 5 percent white) attended the programs during these nine summers. Scores on the Nelson-Denny Reading Test showed that the students improved their vocabulary scores (percentile ranks before/after: 46.80 percent/59.56 percent; p<.001), reading comprehension scores (47.21 percent/62.67 percent; p<.001), and reading rates (34.01 percent/78.31 percent; p<.001) from the beginning to the end of the summer programs. Results on the Wide Range Achievement Test III showed increases in spelling (73.58 percent/86.22 percent; p<.001) and math scores (56.98 percent/81.28 percent; p<.001). The students also improved their subject-specific scores in biology (39.07 percent/63.42 percent; p<.001), chemistry (20.54 percent/51.01 percent; p<.001), and physics (35.12 percent/61.14 percent; p<.001). To increase the number of underrepresented minority students in the dental school admissions pool, efforts are needed to prepare students from disadvantaged backgrounds for this process. These data demonstrate that a six-week enrichment program significantly improved the academic skills and basic science knowledge scores of undergraduate predental students. These improvements have the potential to enhance the performance of these students

  9. Academic self-efficacy mediates the effects of school psychological climate on academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Høigaard, Rune; Kovač, Velibor Bobo; Øverby, Nina Cecilie; Haugen, Tommy

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of proximal and distal constructs on adolescent's academic achievement through self-efficacy. Participants included 482 ninth- and tenth- grade Norwegian students who completed a questionnaire designed to assess school-goal orientations, organizational citizenship behavior, academic self-efficacy, and academic achievement. The results of a bootstrapping technique used to analyze relationships between the constructs indicated that school-goal orientations and organizational citizenship predicted academic self-efficacy. Furthermore, school-goal orientation, organizational citizenship, and academic self-efficacy explained 46% of the variance in academic achievement. Mediation analyses revealed that academic self-efficacy mediated the effects of perceived task goal structure, perceived ability structure, civic virtue, and sportsmanship on adolescents' academic achievements. The results are discussed in reference to current scholarship, including theories underlying our hypothesis. Practical implications and directions for future research are suggested.

  10. Validation method training: nurses' experiences and ratings of work climate.

    PubMed

    Söderlund, Mona; Norberg, Astrid; Hansebo, Görel

    2014-03-01

    Training nursing staff in communication skills can impact on the quality of care for residents with dementia and contributes to nurses' job satisfaction. Changing attitudes and practices takes time and energy and can affect the entire nursing staff, not just the nurses directly involved in a training programme. Therefore, it seems important to study nurses' experiences of a training programme and any influence of the programme on work climate among the entire nursing staff. To explore nurses' experiences of a 1-year validation method training programme conducted in a nursing home for residents with dementia and to describe ratings of work climate before and after the programme. A mixed-methods approach. Twelve nurses participated in the training and were interviewed afterwards. These individual interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed, then analysed using qualitative content analysis. The Creative Climate Questionnaire was administered before (n = 53) and after (n = 56) the programme to the entire nursing staff in the participating nursing home wards and analysed with descriptive statistics. Analysis of the interviews resulted in four categories: being under extra strain, sharing experiences, improving confidence in care situations and feeling uncertain about continuing the validation method. The results of the questionnaire on work climate showed higher mean values in the assessment after the programme had ended. The training strengthened the participating nurses in caring for residents with dementia, but posed an extra strain on them. These nurses also described an extra strain on the entire nursing staff that was not reflected in the results from the questionnaire. The work climate at the nursing home wards might have made it easier to conduct this extensive training programme. Training in the validation method could develop nurses' communication skills and improve their handling of complex care situations. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. School climate, peer victimization, and academic achievement: results from a multi-informant study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weijun; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Brittain, Heather L; McDougall, Patricia; Krygsman, Amanda; Smith, David; Cunningham, Charles E; Haltigan, J D; Hymel, Shelley

    2014-09-01

    School-level school climate was examined in relation to self-reported peer victimization and teacher-rated academic achievement (grade point average; GPA). Participants included a sample of 1,023 fifth-grade children nested within 50 schools. Associations between peer victimization, school climate, and GPA were examined using multilevel modeling, with school climate as a contextual variable. Boys and girls reported no differences in victimization by their peers, although boys had lower GPAs than girls. Peer victimization was related to lower GPA and to a poorer perception of school climate (individual-level), which was also associated with lower GPA. Results of multilevel analyses revealed that peer victimization was again negatively associated with GPA, and that lower school-level climate was associated with lower GPA. Although no moderating effects of school-level school climate or sex were observed, the relation between peer victimization and GPA remained significant after taking into account (a) school-level climate scores, (b) individual variability in school-climate scores, and (c) several covariates--ethnicity, absenteeism, household income, parental education, percentage of minority students, type of school, and bullying perpetration. These findings underscore the importance of a positive school climate for academic success and viewing school climate as a fundamental collective school outcome. Results also speak to the importance of viewing peer victimization as being harmfully linked to students' academic performance. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. School Climate, Peer Victimization, and Academic Achievement: Results from a Multi-Informant Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Weijun; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Brittain, Heather L.; McDougall, Patricia; Krygsman, Amanda; Smith, David; Cunningham, Charles E.; Haltigan, J. D.; Hymel, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    School-level school climate was examined in relation to self-reported peer victimization and teacher-rated academic achievement (grade point average; GPA). Participants included a sample of 1,023 fifth-grade children nested within 50 schools. Associations between peer victimization, school climate, and GPA were examined using multilevel modeling,…

  13. School Climate, Peer Victimization, and Academic Achievement: Results from a Multi-Informant Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Weijun; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Brittain, Heather L.; McDougall, Patricia; Krygsman, Amanda; Smith, David; Cunningham, Charles E.; Haltigan, J. D.; Hymel, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    School-level school climate was examined in relation to self-reported peer victimization and teacher-rated academic achievement (grade point average; GPA). Participants included a sample of 1,023 fifth-grade children nested within 50 schools. Associations between peer victimization, school climate, and GPA were examined using multilevel modeling,…

  14. Perception of Classroom Climate, Use of WebCT, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Genevieve Marie

    2006-01-01

    The current investigation sought to understand the relationships between college student perception of classroom climate, use of WebCT, and academic achievement. Fifty-three college students provided three categories of predictor and criterion measures: (1) rating scale responses that assessed perception of seven dimensions of classroom climate,…

  15. Building the Capacity for Climate Services: Thoughts on Training Next Generation Climate Science Integrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfin, G. M.; Brugger, J.; Gordon, E. S.; Barsugli, J. J.; Rangwala, I.; Travis, W.

    2015-12-01

    For more than a decade, stakeholder needs assessments and reports, including the recent National Climate Assessment, have pointed out the need for climate "science translators" or "science integrators" who can help bridge the gap between the cultures and contexts of researchers and decision-makers. Integration is important for exchanging and enhancing knowledge, building capacity to use climate information in decision making, and fostering more robust planning for decision-making in the context of climate change. This talk will report on the characteristics of successful climate science integrators, and a variety of models for training the upcoming generation of climate science integrators. Science integration characteristics identified by an experienced vanguard in the U.S. include maintaining credibility in both the scientific and stakeholder communities, a basic respect for stakeholders demonstrated through active listening, and a deep understanding of the decision-making context. Drawing upon the lessons of training programs for Cooperative Extension, public health professionals, and natural resource managers, we offer ideas about training next generation climate science integrators. Our model combines training and development of skills in interpersonal relations, communication of science, project implementation, education techniques and practices - integrated with a strong foundation in disciplinary knowledge.

  16. 42 CFR 21.31 - Eligibility; all grades; academic and professional education and professional training and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... education and professional training and experience. 21.31 Section 21.31 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... grades; academic and professional education and professional training and experience. The Surgeon General... the education, training, and experience required under this subpart, and evidence thereof, shall be of...

  17. Profiles of Student Perceptions of School Climate: Relations with Risk Behaviors and Academic Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Kathan; Konold, Timothy; Cornell, Dewey

    2016-06-01

    School climate has been linked to a variety of positive student outcomes, but there may be important within-school differences among students in their experiences of school climate. This study examined within-school heterogeneity among 47,631 high school student ratings of their school climate through multilevel latent class modeling. Student profiles across 323 schools were generated on the basis of multiple indicators of school climate: disciplinary structure, academic expectations, student willingness to seek help, respect for students, affective and cognitive engagement, prevalence of teasing and bullying, general victimization, bullying victimization, and bullying perpetration. Analyses identified four meaningfully different student profile types that were labeled positive climate, medium climate-low bullying, medium climate-high bullying, and negative climate. Contrasts among these profile types on external criteria revealed meaningful differences for race, grade-level, parent education level, educational aspirations, and frequency of risk behaviors. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  18. Workplace Climate and Peer Support as Determinants of Training Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Harry J.

    2010-01-01

    Although billions of dollars are spent annually on training and development, much about the transfer processes is not well understood. This study investigated the interaction of workplace climate and peer support on the transfer of learning in a corporate field setting. Supervisor ratings of performance on several skill dimensions were obtained…

  19. Academic Self-Efficacy Mediates the Effects of School Psychological Climate on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Høigaard, Rune; Kovac, Velibor Bobo; Øverby, Nina Cecilie; Haugen, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of proximal and distal constructs on adolescent's academic achievement through self-efficacy. Participants included 482 ninth-and tenth-grade Norwegian students who completed a questionnaire designed to assess school-goal orientations, organizational citizenship behavior, academic self-efficacy, and academic…

  20. Is the Academic Climate Chilly? The Views of Women Academic Chemists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Jessica; Stockard, Jean; Lewis, Priscilla; Richmond, Geraldine

    2010-01-01

    The statistical picture of the gender composition of chemistry as reported in national data indicates that women are underrepresented in academe in comparison to their representation in the field as a whole. This article presents data on the perceptions and views of a broad cross-section of women in academic chemistry departments and provides some…

  1. Academic Self-Efficacy Mediates the Effects of School Psychological Climate on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Høigaard, Rune; Kovac, Velibor Bobo; Øverby, Nina Cecilie; Haugen, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of proximal and distal constructs on adolescent's academic achievement through self-efficacy. Participants included 482 ninth-and tenth-grade Norwegian students who completed a questionnaire designed to assess school-goal orientations, organizational citizenship behavior, academic self-efficacy, and academic…

  2. An Evaluation of Academic Training Program (ÖYP) from Professional Socialisation and Identity Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tülübas, Tijen; Göktürk, Söheyda

    2017-01-01

    Academic identity is significant in terms of taking the responsibilities of professional roles and performing them adequately. Identity formation starts from the early socialisation experiences of graduate students and develops on what they have acquired during this process. Therefore, Academic Training Program is significant for determining the…

  3. Providing Staff Training and Programming to Support People with Disabilities: An Academic Library Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannen, Michelle H.; Milewski, Steven; Mack, Thura

    2017-01-01

    This case study explores services academic libraries provide to students with disabilities and the impact these can have on the success and experience of these students. The study focuses on staff training and outreach programming. The authors examine the academic library literature surrounding these topics, provide examples of programming…

  4. CAEP 2016 Academic Symposium on Education Scholarship: Training our Future Clinician Educators in Emergency Medicine.

    PubMed

    Woods, Robert A; Artz, Jennifer D; Carrière, Benoit; Field, Simon; Huffman, James; Dong, Sandy L; Bhanji, Farhan; Yiu, Stella; Smith, Sheila; Mengual, Rose; Hicks, Chris; Frank, Jason

    2017-05-01

    To develop consensus recommendations for training future clinician educators (CEs) in emergency medicine (EM). A panel of EM education leaders was assembled from across Canada and met regularly by teleconference over the course of 1 year. Recommendations for CE training were drafted based on the panel's experience, a literature review, and a survey of current and past EM education leaders in Canada. Feedback was sought from attendees at the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP) annual academic symposium. Recommendations were distributed to the society's Academic Section for further feedback and updated by a consensus of the expert panel. Recommendations were categorized for one of three audiences: 1) Future CEs; 2) Academic departments and divisions (AD&D) that support training to fulfill their education leadership goals; and 3) The CAEP Academic Section. Advanced medical education training is recommended for any emergency physician or resident who pursues an education leadership role. Individuals should seek out mentorship in making decisions about career opportunities and training options. AD&D should regularly perform a needs assessment of their future CE needs and identify and encourage potential individuals who fulfill education leadership roles. AD&D should develop training opportunities at their institution, provide support to complete this training, and advocate for the recognition of education scholarship in their institutional promotions process. The CAEP Academic Section should support mentorship of future CEs on a national scale. These recommendations serve as a framework for training and supporting the next generation of Canadian EM medical educators.

  5. Authoritative School Climate, Number of Parents at Home, and Academic Achievement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Francis L; Eklund, Katie; Cornell, Dewey G

    2016-11-03

    School climate is widely recognized as an important factor in promoting student academic achievement. The current study investigated the hypothesis that a demanding and supportive school climate, based on authoritative school climate theory, would serve as a protective factor for students living with 1 or no parents at home. Using a statewide sample of 56,508 middle school students from 415 public schools in 1 state, results indicated that student perceptions of disciplinary structure, academic demandingness, and student support all had positive associations with student self-reported grade point average (GPA). In addition, findings showed that academic expectations and student support were more highly associated with GPA for students not living with any parent. Implications for policy and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Academic Freedom in Athletic Training Education: Food for Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Ellen K.; Berry, David C.; Lowry, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Academic freedom is defined as the "freedom of the individual scholar to pursue truth wherever it leads, without fear of punishment or of termination of employment for having offended some political, methodological, religious, or social orthodoxy." Currently there is paucity of literature addressing the issue of academic freedom specific to…

  7. Academic Freedom in Athletic Training Education: Food for Thought

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Ellen K.; Berry, David C.; Lowry, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Academic freedom is defined as the "freedom of the individual scholar to pursue truth wherever it leads, without fear of punishment or of termination of employment for having offended some political, methodological, religious, or social orthodoxy." Currently there is paucity of literature addressing the issue of academic freedom specific to…

  8. Relationship Between Grit with Academic Performance and Attainment of Postgraduate Training in Pharmacy Students

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Rae R.; Ho, Jackie; Perry, Paul J.; Tang, Terrill T.; Ip, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To determine if Grit-S scores correlate with academic success in a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program, as well as the pursuit and attainment of pharmacy postgraduate (residency or fellowship) training. Methods. A 28-item survey was administered to third- and fourth-year (P3 and P4) pharmacy students. Variables queried included Grit-S score, demographics, pharmacy experience prior to the PharmD program, and factors that may affect academic performance during didactic coursework. Didactic coursework GPA was used as a surrogate for academic success. Information about pursuit and attainment of a postgraduate training position was also documented and used in the analyses. Results. There was no significant correlation between Grit-S scores and variables related to academic success. However, students were more likely to pursue postgraduate training with higher academic success and higher Grit-S. Lastly, students with higher Grit-S were also more likely to obtain a postgraduate training position. Conclusion. Grit-S scores correlated with the pursuit and successful attainment of postgraduate training, but not with academic success during the didactic years of a PharmD program. PMID:28630508

  9. Testing the Causal Links between School Climate, School Violence, and School Academic Performance: A Cross-Lagged Panel Autoregressive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benbenishty, Rami; Astor, Ron Avi; Roziner, Ilan; Wrabel, Stephani L.

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores the causal link between school climate, school violence, and a school's general academic performance over time using a school-level, cross-lagged panel autoregressive modeling design. We hypothesized that reductions in school violence and climate improvement would lead to schools' overall improved academic performance.…

  10. Testing the Causal Links between School Climate, School Violence, and School Academic Performance: A Cross-Lagged Panel Autoregressive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benbenishty, Rami; Astor, Ron Avi; Roziner, Ilan; Wrabel, Stephani L.

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores the causal link between school climate, school violence, and a school's general academic performance over time using a school-level, cross-lagged panel autoregressive modeling design. We hypothesized that reductions in school violence and climate improvement would lead to schools' overall improved academic performance.…

  11. The Impact of Principal Perception on Student Academic Climate and Achievement in High School: How Does It Measure Up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urick, Angela; Bowers, Alex J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the independent direct effects of student and principal perceptions of academic climate on student achievement in high school. To date, few studies have considered the influence of principal perceptions of academic climate on student achievement. In the present study, we test a set of two-level hierarchical…

  12. Academic Advisers: Perceptions of Training and Professional Development at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study utilizing in-depth interviews examined academic advisers' perceptions of training and professional development resources at a Midwestern U.S. community college. In addition, the study examined the availability and accessibility of training and professional development resources at the community college. The study sought…

  13. Cognitive Skills Training Improves Listening and Visual Memory for Academic and Career Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erland, Jan

    The Mem-ExSpan Accelerative Cognitive Training System (MESACTS) is described as a cognitive skills training program for schools, businesses, and industry. The program achieves extraordinary academic results in reading and mathematics with 1 semester of input 4 days a week for 30 minutes a day. Intensive versions of the program accelerate…

  14. Implementing Expertise-Based Training Methods to Accelerate the Development of Peer Academic Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The field of expertise studies offers several models from which to develop training programs that accelerate the development of novice performers in a variety of domains. This research study implemented two methods of expertise-based training in a course to develop undergraduate peer academic coaches through a ten-week program. An existing…

  15. Errorless Academic Compliance Training: A School-Based Application for Young Students with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducharme, Joseph M.; Ng, Olivia

    2012-01-01

    Errorless academic compliance training is a graduated, noncoercive approach to treating oppositional behavior in children. In the present study, three teaching staff in a special education classroom were trained to conduct this intervention with three male students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. During baseline, staff delivered a range…

  16. Academic Advisers: Perceptions of Training and Professional Development at Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study utilizing in-depth interviews examined academic advisers' perceptions of training and professional development resources at a Midwestern U.S. community college. In addition, the study examined the availability and accessibility of training and professional development resources at the community college. The study sought…

  17. Graduate Education and Training at the Intersection of Water, Climate, Ecosystems, and People

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denning, S.; Ramirez, J. A.; Poff, L.; Grigg, N.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2010, an interdisciplinary group of researchers have worked with a talented and energetic group of graduate students at Colorado State University on issues at the intersection of water with climate, ecosystems, and people. Over 20 graduate students and 15 faculty from nearly a dozen Departments were involved. Research and training were offered in hydrology, ecology, economics, political science, biology, and atmospheric science. We mapped student research on a triangular conceptual framework. At the vertices of the triangle are climate, ecosystems, and people; water is at the center. Our guiding principle was that students should be trained along the sides of the triangle (e.g., climate/water/ecosystems or ecosystems/water/people) rather than at the vertices. We developed four new academic core courses and students engaged in significant collaborative research projects and professional development activities in addition to their dissertation projects. Student engagement and achievement was very high. In addition, vibrant new collaborations have emerged among faculty across the Departments involved.

  18. Unmasking Students' Sense of Academic Supportiveness and Climate: Results from Field Testing the AEL MASC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowley, Kimberly S.; Copley, Lisa; Howley, Caitlin W.; Voelkel, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The AEL Measure of Academic Supportiveness and Climate (AEL MASC) was developed as part of the MAACK Pilot Schools project currently underway at AEL. MAACK stands for Maximizing Achievement for African American Children in Kanawha. The AEL MASC was designed to determine students' perceptions about themselves as students and about their school…

  19. How Does School Climate Impact Academic Achievement? An Examination of Social Identity Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Katherine J.; Lee, Eunro; Turner, Isobel; Bromhead, David; Subasic, Emina

    2017-01-01

    In explaining academic achievement, school climate and social belonging (connectedness, identification) emerge as important variables. However, both constructs are rarely explored in one model. In the current study, a social psychological framework based on the social identity perspective (Turner, Hogg, Oakes, Reicher, & Wetherell, 1987) is…

  20. How Does School Climate Impact Academic Achievement? An Examination of Social Identity Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Katherine J.; Lee, Eunro; Turner, Isobel; Bromhead, David; Subasic, Emina

    2017-01-01

    In explaining academic achievement, school climate and social belonging (connectedness, identification) emerge as important variables. However, both constructs are rarely explored in one model. In the current study, a social psychological framework based on the social identity perspective (Turner, Hogg, Oakes, Reicher, & Wetherell, 1987) is…

  1. Action, an "Encompassing Ethic" and Academics in the Midst of the Climate Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plowright, Susan

    2016-01-01

    In the midst of a crisis like the climate crisis and calls for "all hands on deck", what do academics, as a microcosm of humanity, see? In Hannah Arendt's terms, an "abyss of freedom" to act or a paralysing "abyss of nothingness"? Some from the academy themselves, including Tamboukou, Apple and Bourdieu, make…

  2. Action, an "Encompassing Ethic" and Academics in the Midst of the Climate Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plowright, Susan

    2016-01-01

    In the midst of a crisis like the climate crisis and calls for "all hands on deck", what do academics, as a microcosm of humanity, see? In Hannah Arendt's terms, an "abyss of freedom" to act or a paralysing "abyss of nothingness"? Some from the academy themselves, including Tamboukou, Apple and Bourdieu, make…

  3. The Relationships among School Types, Teacher Efficacy Beliefs, and Academic Climate: Perspective from Asian Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chong, Wan Har; Klassen, Robert M.; Huan, Vivien S.; Wong, Isabella; Kates, Allison Diane

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored how prior student achievement, through school types, predicted teacher self- and collective efficacy and perceived academic climate of 222 middle school teachers in Singapore. Teachers assigned to high-track and regular middle schools differed in their perception of self- and collective efficacy to promote organizational…

  4. Perceptions matter: faculty caring, campus racial climate and academic performance.

    PubMed

    Torregosa, Marivic B; Ynalvez, Marcus Antonius; Morin, Karen H

    2016-04-01

    Examine the influence of students' perception of faculty caring on academic performance and the moderating role of students' perceptions of campus racial climate. There is limited knowledge on how students' perceptions of faculty caring, campus racial climate and academic performance are linked. Understanding this nexus is crucial to improving nursing education. Secondary analysis of a cross-sectional data obtained from seven undergraduate nursing programs in Texas, USA. Data were from 385 students enrolled in Medical-Surgical 1 over three semesters (March 2010-December 2010). Six sets of factor analytic scores derived from 31 original perceptions of faculty caring items served as predictors; one set of scores derived from seven original perceptions of campus racial climate items served as moderating variable in a regression model. Numeric grade was the outcome variable. Perception of faculty having a positive outlook/compassion had an enhancing effect on performance. As students' perceptions of campus racial climate became increasingly discriminating, the positive association between perceptions of faculty's trust in students' judgment and academic performance became increasingly strong. Results highlight ways by which students' perception of micro-level social reality (dyadic interaction) might interact with their perception of meso-level social reality (social environment) to influence their academic performance. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Relationships among School Types, Teacher Efficacy Beliefs, and Academic Climate: Perspective from Asian Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chong, Wan Har; Klassen, Robert M.; Huan, Vivien S.; Wong, Isabella; Kates, Allison Diane

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored how prior student achievement, through school types, predicted teacher self- and collective efficacy and perceived academic climate of 222 middle school teachers in Singapore. Teachers assigned to high-track and regular middle schools differed in their perception of self- and collective efficacy to promote organizational…

  6. An Evaluation of Training for Lay Providers in the Use of Motivational Interviewing to Promote Academic Achievement among Urban Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Patricia; Ward, Nadia L.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined training outcomes for lay service providers who participated in a motivational interviewing (MI) training program designed to help increase intrinsic motivation and academic achievement among urban, low-income minority youth. Seventeen lay academic advisors received 16 hours of workshop training in MI. Additionally, two 2-hour…

  7. Effects of training about academic accommodations on perceptions and intentions of health science faculty.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Nancy Vandewiele

    2010-01-01

    According to the 2000 U.S. Census, one out of 12 children and teenagers (ages 5 to 20) living in the United States has a physical or mental disability. This statistic indicates that the number of students requiring academic accommodations in postsecondary education will continue to grow throughout the next decade. The literature suggests that faculty who are not well informed on how to provide reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities may develop negative attitudes that create additional barriers for these students. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether training faculty about academic accommodations affected their willingness to provide academic accommodations to students with disabilities. In order to evaluate this question, a faculty-training workshop was developed and conducted. Participants were faculty at a midwestern U.S. university in the College of Associated Health Careers who elected to participate in a 4-hour training session on providing academic accommodations to students with disabilities. The results of the study suggest that both knowledge and attitudes (willingness, perceptions, and intentions) of faculty improved as a result of the intervention, which in turn can have a positive impact on students enrolled in their courses. This article describes the training methods used in the training workshop and the methods participants identified as making the most impact on their intentions, perceptions, and willingness to provide academic accommodations.

  8. How Is Working Memory Training Likely to Influence Academic Performance? Current Evidence and Methodological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Bergman Nutley, Sissela; Söderqvist, Stina

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is one of our core cognitive functions, allowing us to keep information in mind for shorter periods of time and then work with this information. It is the gateway that information has to pass in order to be processed consciously. A well-functioning WM is therefore crucial for a number of everyday activities including learning and academic performance (Gathercole et al., 2003; Bull et al., 2008), which is the focus of this review. Specifically, we will review the research investigating whether improving WM capacity using Cogmed WM training can lead to improvements on academic performance. Emphasis is given to reviewing the theoretical principles upon which such investigations rely, in particular the complex relation between WM and mathematical and reading abilities during development and how these are likely to be influenced by training. We suggest two possible routes in which training can influence academic performance, one through an effect on learning capacity which would thus be evident with time and education, and one through an immediate effect on performance on reading and mathematical tasks. Based on the theoretical complexity described we highlight some methodological issues that are important to take into consideration when designing and interpreting research on WM training and academic performance, but that are nonetheless often overlooked in the current research literature. Finally, we will provide some suggestions for future research for advancing the understanding of WM training and its potential role in supporting academic attainment. PMID:28223948

  9. How Is Working Memory Training Likely to Influence Academic Performance? Current Evidence and Methodological Considerations.

    PubMed

    Bergman Nutley, Sissela; Söderqvist, Stina

    2017-01-01

    Working memory (WM) is one of our core cognitive functions, allowing us to keep information in mind for shorter periods of time and then work with this information. It is the gateway that information has to pass in order to be processed consciously. A well-functioning WM is therefore crucial for a number of everyday activities including learning and academic performance (Gathercole et al., 2003; Bull et al., 2008), which is the focus of this review. Specifically, we will review the research investigating whether improving WM capacity using Cogmed WM training can lead to improvements on academic performance. Emphasis is given to reviewing the theoretical principles upon which such investigations rely, in particular the complex relation between WM and mathematical and reading abilities during development and how these are likely to be influenced by training. We suggest two possible routes in which training can influence academic performance, one through an effect on learning capacity which would thus be evident with time and education, and one through an immediate effect on performance on reading and mathematical tasks. Based on the theoretical complexity described we highlight some methodological issues that are important to take into consideration when designing and interpreting research on WM training and academic performance, but that are nonetheless often overlooked in the current research literature. Finally, we will provide some suggestions for future research for advancing the understanding of WM training and its potential role in supporting academic attainment.

  10. Rheumatology fellows' perception on training and careers in academia: the American College of Rheumatology Fellow Research and Academic Training Survey.

    PubMed

    2009-02-15

    To examine the perceptions of rheumatology fellows regarding their research training, mentoring, and interest in a career in academia. We solicited by e-mail 386 fellows in the American College of Rheumatology 2005-2006 fellow database to take an anonymous Internet-based survey addressing the topics of research training, mentoring, and interest in an academic career. We received 176 responses (50% response rate after excluding invalid contacts) to the survey. During their training, 58% of fellows reported an interest in academia and 21% in research. There was great satisfaction with mentoring. However, there were concerns about academic salaries, with 50% of respondents stating a preference for a higher paying community position. Furthermore, there were substantial concerns about the difficulty of generating funds to cover salaries. In addition, several respondents viewed an academic career as incompatible with starting a family. Compared with male fellows, female fellows were more likely to want a career in academics, were less concerned about academic salaries, and were more concerned about funding and family life. Despite an interest in academia and satisfaction with current mentoring, several barriers to academia were identified among rheumatology fellows. The concern that academia and family life are incompatible needs further attention. University deans should consider reevaluating promotion programs to make allowances for family and parenting demands. Rheumatology division chairs should better promote the nonfinancial rewards of a career in academia. Programs such as the National Institutes of Health Loan Repayment Program should be strongly advertised to interested applicants with financial concerns.

  11. Project LEAP: Learning-English-for-Academic-Purposes. Training Manual--Year One and Training Manual--Year Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Marguerite Ann, Ed.

    The two training manuals provide activities and exercises intended for use in college-level study groups for students needing assistance with academic English. They were prepared as part of a larger project at California State University at Los Angeles to enhance curricula, instruction, and preparation of students with limited English. In each…

  12. The relationship between academic performanceand pilot performance in a collegiate flight training environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Carolyn A.

    While flight time has commonly been used as a measure of a pilot's skill level, little research has been performed to determine what factors are linked to predicting a pilot's performance, particularly in a training environment. If a dependable link was found, prediction of how well an individual would do in flight training would be possible. Time, money and resources could be focused on individuals who are more likely to succeed in pilot training. Therefore, this study was designed to determine if a relationship between GPA and pilot performance exists, in order to determine if academic performance can serve as a predictor of pilot performance in a training environment. The use of historical records from Middle Tennessee State University's Aerospace Department, which included GPA information and flight training records information, was used evaluate this relationship. Results of the study indicate a statistically significant modest correlation between academic performance and pilot performance between some of the variable pairings.

  13. Training NOAA Staff on Effective Communication Methods with Local Climate Users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.; Mayes, B.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2002 NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Climate Services Division (CSD) offered training opportunities to NWS staff. As a result of eight-year-long development of the training program, NWS offers three training courses and about 25 online distance learning modules covering various climate topics: climate data and observations, climate variability and change, NWS national and local climate products, their tools, skill, and interpretation. Leveraging climate information and expertise available at all NOAA line offices and partners allows delivery of the most advanced knowledge and is a very critical aspect of the training program. NWS challenges in providing local climate services includes effective communication techniques on provide highly technical scientific information to local users. Addressing this challenge requires well trained, climate-literate workforce at local level capable of communicating the NOAA climate products and services as well as provide climate-sensitive decision support. Trained NWS climate service personnel use proactive and reactive approaches and professional education methods in communicating climate variability and change information to local users. Both scientifically-unimpaired messages and amiable communication techniques such as story telling approach are important in developing an engaged dialog between the climate service providers and users. Several pilot projects NWS CSD conducted in the past year applied the NWS climate services training program to training events for NOAA technical user groups. The technical user groups included natural resources managers, engineers, hydrologists, and planners for transportation infrastructure. Training of professional user groups required tailoring the instructions to the potential applications of each group of users. Training technical user identified the following critical issues: (1) Knowledge of target audience expectations, initial knowledge status, and potential use of climate

  14. Training Programs That Facilitate Lasting Change in Student Academic Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Brad

    2014-01-01

    A range of evidence suggests that changing a person's pattern of behaviour is extremely difficult, with past behaviour being one of the strongest predictors of future behaviour. This is particularly evident in the university setting where students tend to use the same academic processes they have used throughout their schooling despite any…

  15. Agricultural Entrepreneurship Orientation: Is Academic Training a Missing Link?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammadinezhad, Soodeh; Sharifzadeh, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the importance of academic courses on agricultural entrepreneurship. Design/methodology/approach: Modified global entrepreneurship and development index (GEDI) was used to determine entrepreneurial dimensions among 19 graduated students of agricultural colleges resided in Iran. Fuzzy analytical…

  16. Training Programs That Facilitate Lasting Change in Student Academic Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Brad

    2014-01-01

    A range of evidence suggests that changing a person's pattern of behaviour is extremely difficult, with past behaviour being one of the strongest predictors of future behaviour. This is particularly evident in the university setting where students tend to use the same academic processes they have used throughout their schooling despite any…

  17. Integrating Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Men in Academic Nursing Training.

    PubMed

    Haron, Yafa; Azuri, Pazit

    2016-11-01

    As part of the national plan for integrating the ultra-Orthodox Jewish population in academic studies and in order to promote its labor force participation, the Tel Aviv-Yaffo Academic College School for Nursing Sciences created a BSN program specifically for ultra-Orthodox men, for the first time in Israel. Ultra-Orthodox students' entry into the academic world requires the program to be culturally sensitive without compromising on quality standards. The structure and context may be ultra-Orthodox, but the contents and learning experience expose the students to a different worldview than that of their religious studies. The ultra-Orthodox way of life requires adjustments also in the area of learning aids. Most important, the students are exposed to the Internet for the first time, and some of them are even unable to use a computer. The students in the first class of male ultra-Orthodox nursing students are the pioneers of this community. Their academic success in the first stage-and integration in the labor market in the second-is a test of the national labor force integration project. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Psychodiagnostic Training in the Academic Setting: Past and Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shemberg, Kenneth; Keeley Stuart

    1970-01-01

    All schools granting the PhD in clinical psychology were surveyed. Findings indicate shifts away from training in projectives with a corresponding increase in emphasis on objective approaches. Newer programs are deemphasizing training in diagnostics in general. Reprints from Kenneth Shemberg, Department of Psychology, Bowling Green State…

  19. Student Workers: Cross Training in the Academic Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Lani Hall; Oswald, Tina A.; Renfro, Margie

    2007-01-01

    Libraries rely heavily on student workers for the day-to-day running of the library. Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas is no different. We report on Steen Library's training efforts to staff several public service points as well as keep materials on the shelves by cross-training student employees.

  20. Student Workers: Cross Training in the Academic Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Lani Hall; Oswald, Tina A.; Renfro, Margie

    2007-01-01

    Libraries rely heavily on student workers for the day-to-day running of the library. Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas is no different. We report on Steen Library's training efforts to staff several public service points as well as keep materials on the shelves by cross-training student employees.

  1. Qualitative Evaluation of Teacher Training, Academic Subject Teachers Section.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Swedish Board of Education, Stockholm.

    This newsletter reports on project KUL-A, an evaluation of the procedure and effectiveness of teacher training in Sweden. The newsletter contains descriptions of the educational process in Sweden, descriptions of instruments for testing the effectiveness of teacher training, and a brief summary of the evaluations to this time. It is indicated that…

  2. Training the Person of the Therapist in an Academic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aponte, Harry J.; Powell, Frankie Denise; Brooks, Stephanie; Watson, Marlene F.; Litzke, Cheryl; Lawless, John; Johnson, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Drexel University's Couple and Family Therapy Department recently introduced a formal course on training the person of a therapist. The course is based on Aponte's Person-of-the-Therapist Training Model that up until now has only been applied in private, nonacademic institutes with postgraduate therapists. The model attempts to put into practice a…

  3. Academic and social integration on campus among sexual minority students: the impacts of psychological and experiential campus climate.

    PubMed

    Woodford, Michael R; Kulick, Alex

    2015-03-01

    A heterosexist campus climate can increase risk for mental health problems for sexual minority students; however, the relationship between campus climate for sexual minorities and academic outcomes remains understudied. Using a sample of sexual minority respondents extracted from a campus climate survey conducted at a large university in the Midwest, we examine relationships between multiple dimensions of psychological and experiential campus climate for sexual minorities with academic integration (academic disengagement, grade-point average [GPA]) and social integration (institutional satisfaction, acceptance on campus). We also investigate the protective role of engagement with informal academic and peer-group systems. Findings suggest campus climate affects sexual minority students' integration. In multivariate analyses, perceptions of whether lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people could be open about their sexual identity was positively associated with acceptance on campus; personal heterosexist harassment was positively associated with academic disengagement and negatively with GPA. Students' informal academic integration (instructor relations) and informal social integration (LGB friends) demonstrated influential main effects but did not moderate any of the climate-outcome relationships. Researchers should further explore the relationships between climate and academic outcomes among sexual minority students, both collectively and among specific sub-groups, and address the role of other protective factors.

  4. Training Future Dentists for an Academic Career: A Three-Tiered Model.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Zsuzsa; Albani, Sarah E; Wankiiri-Hale, Christine

    2016-05-01

    The anticipated shortage of dental faculty presents a challenge for dental education as it will greatly impact the training of the next generation of practicing dentists. One way to alleviate shortages is to identify students who are interested in an academic career at the predoctoral level and provide them with training in teaching, research, and leadership. Based on available evidence, formal programs offer the best way to introduce students to academia as a viable career path. A well-designed program can also equip interested students with the necessary skills and basic knowledge to facilitate starting an academic career. The University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine has developed a three-tiered model for providing its dental students with exposure to and training in academic dentistry. The three tiers reflect differing levels of commitment: 1) a two-year academic career track program, 2) academic career track elective courses, and 3) extracurricular activities. The aim of this study was to provide an initial assessment of the program's overall effectiveness. Data were collected using student and faculty surveys and student applications for the two-year academic career track program. The data gathered included characteristics of, and feedback from, students taking the elective courses, as well as student and faculty feedback about student teacher effectiveness. The study found overall positive responses to the three-tiered program from faculty, students, and student teachers at this initial stage. Whether these students ultimately become faculty members (the ultimate goal of the program) will be assessed in the future.

  5. Increasing the ranks of academic researchers in mental health: a multisite approach to postdoctoral fellowship training.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Ruth; Cassidy-Eagle, Erin L; Beaudreau, Sherry A; Eyler, Lisa T; Gray, Heather L; Giese-Davis, Janine; Hubbard, Jeffrey; Yesavage, Jerome A

    2010-01-01

    This report highlights the use of multisite training for psychiatry and psychology postdoctoral fellows developing careers in academic clinical research in the field of mental health. The objective is to describe a model of training for young investigators to establish independent academic clinical research careers, including (1) program structure and eligibility, (2) program goals and development of a multisite curriculum, (3) use of technology for implementing the program across multiple sites, and (4) advantages and challenges of this multisite approach. In 2000, in collaboration with the Veterans Affairs (VA) Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Centers (MIRECCs), the VA Office of Academic Affiliations launched the Special Fellowship Program in Advanced Psychiatry and Psychology. Each of the 10 currently participating VA sites across the United States is affiliated with a MIRECC and an academic medical institution. In the first five years of this fellowship program, 83 fellows (34 psychiatrists and 49 psychologists) have participated. The success of this multisite approach is evidenced by the 58 fellows who have already graduated from the program: 70% have entered academic clinical research positions, and over 25 have obtained independent extramural grant support from the VA or the National Institutes of Health. Multisite training results in a greater transfer of knowledge and capitalizes on the nationwide availability of experts, creating unique networking and learning opportunities for trainees. The VA's multisite fellowship program plays a valuable role in preparing substantial numbers of psychiatry and psychology trainees for a range of academic clinical research and leadership positions in the field of mental health.

  6. Organizational Context and Female Faculty's Perception of the Climate for Women in Academic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Carapinha, René; McCracken, Caitlin M; Warner, Erica T; Hill, Emorcia V; Reede, Joan Y

    2017-05-01

    Gender inequalities in the careers of faculty in academic medicine could partially be attributed to an organizational climate that can exclude or be nonsupportive of women faculty. This study explores the climate for women faculty from a systems perspective at the organizational and individual levels based on the perceptions of women faculty. Race differences were also investigated. Cross-sectional survey data from women faculty (N = 3127) at 13 purposively sampled medical schools and an institutional assessment of organizational characteristics were used. Organizational factors related to the climate for women were identified using bivariate statistics. The association between perceived climate for women and organizational characteristics, individual perceptions of the work environment and individual career, and personal characteristics with control variables were investigated using hierarchical linear regression models. Organizational effects by race/ethnicity were estimated using interaction terms. The climate for women faculty varied across institutions and by classification as minority-serving institutions (MSIs). Respondent's report of existence of an office for women's affairs, trust in leadership, and satisfaction with mentoring were positively associated with the climate for women. Perceived workplace discrimination and work-family conflict were inversely associated with a positive climate. No race/ethnicity differences were observed in the multivariable analysis. The climate for women faculty in academic medicine should not be regarded constant across organizations, specifically between MSIs and non-MSIs. Efforts to advance a positive climate for women could focus on improving trust in leadership, increasing support for structures/offices for women, and mitigating perceived discrimination and work-family conflict.

  7. School climate, family structure, and academic achievement: a study of moderation effects.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Meagan; Voight, Adam; Renshaw, Tyler L; Eklund, Katie

    2015-03-01

    School climate has been lauded for its relationship to a host of desirable academic, behavioral, and social-emotional outcomes for youth. The present study tested the hypothesis that school climate counteracts youths' home-school risk by examining the moderating effects of students' school climate perceptions on the relationship between family structure (i.e., two-parent, one-parent, foster-care, and homeless households), and academic performance (i.e., self-reported [grade point average] GPA). The present sample consisted of 902 California public high schools, including responses from over 490,000 students in Grades 9 and 11. Results indicated that, regardless of family structure, students with more positive school climate perceptions self-reported higher GPAs. Youths with two-parent, one-parent, and homeless family structures displayed stepwise, linear improvements in self-reported GPA as perceptions of climate improved. Foster-care students' positive school climate perceptions had a weaker effect on their self-reported GPA compared with students living in other family structures. A unique curvilinear trend was found for homeless students, as the relationship between their school climate perceptions and self-reported GPA was stronger at lower levels. Overall, the moderation effect of positive school climate perceptions on self-reported GPA was strongest for homeless youth and youth from one-parent homes, suggesting that school climate has a protective effect for students living in these family structures. A protective effect was not found for youth in foster-care. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  8. Integrated surgical academic training in the UK: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Blencowe, Natalie S; Glasbey, James C; McElnay, Philip J; Bhangu, Aneel; Gokani, Vimal J; Harries, Rhiannon L

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to explore variations in the provision of integrated academic surgical training across the UK. This is an online cross-sectional survey (consisting of 44 items with a range of free-text, binomial and 5-point Likert scale responses) developed by the Association of Surgeons in Training. A self-reported survey instrument was distributed to academic surgical trainees across the UK (n=276). 143 (51.9%) responses were received (81% male, median age: 34 years), spanning all UK regions and surgical specialties. Of the 143 trainees, 29 were core trainees (20.3%), 99 were specialty trainees (69.2%) and 15 (10.5%) described themselves as research fellows. The structure of academic training varied considerably, with under a third of trainees receiving guaranteed protected time for research. Despite this, however, 53.1% of the respondents reported to be satisfied with how their academic training was organised. Covering clinical duties during academic time occurred commonly (72.7%). Although most trainees (n=88, 61.5%) met with their academic supervisor at least once a month, six (4.2%) never had an academic supervisory meeting. Most trainees (n=90, 62.9%) occupied a full-time rota slot and only 9.1% (n=13) described their role as 'supernumerary'. Although 58.7% (n=84) of the trainees were satisfied with their clinical competence, 37.8% (n=54) felt that clinical time focused more on service provision than the acquisition of technical skills. 58 (40.6%) had experienced some form of negative sentiment relating to their status as an academic trainee. Integrated academic training presents unique challenges and opportunities within surgery. This survey has identified variation in the quality of current programmes, meaning that the future provision of integrated surgical academic training should be carefully considered. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is

  9. A Longitudinal Study on Children's Music Training Experience and Academic Development

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Ma, Weiyi; Gong, Diankun; Hu, Jiehui; Yao, Dezhong

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the relation between long-term music training and child development based on 250 Chinese elementary school students' academic development of first language (L1), second language (L2), and mathematics. We found that musician children outperformed non-musician children only on musical achievement and second language development. Additionally, although music training appeared to be correlated with children's final academic development of L1, L2, and mathematics, it did not independently contribute to the development of L1 or mathematical skills. Our findings suggest caution in interpreting the positive findings on the non-musical cognitive benefits of music learning. PMID:25068398

  10. A longitudinal study on children's music training experience and academic development.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hua; Ma, Weiyi; Gong, Diankun; Hu, Jiehui; Yao, Dezhong

    2014-07-28

    This study examined the relation between long-term music training and child development based on 250 Chinese elementary school students' academic development of first language (L1), second language (L2), and mathematics. We found that musician children outperformed non-musician children only on musical achievement and second language development. Additionally, although music training appeared to be correlated with children's final academic development of L1, L2, and mathematics, it did not independently contribute to the development of L1 or mathematical skills. Our findings suggest caution in interpreting the positive findings on the non-musical cognitive benefits of music learning.

  11. Mentor training within academic health centers with Clinical and Translational Science Awards.

    PubMed

    Abedin, Zainab; Rebello, Tahilia J; Richards, Boyd F; Pincus, Harold Alan

    2013-10-01

    Multiple studies highlight the benefits of effective mentoring in academic medicine. Thus, we sought to quantify and characterize the mentoring practices at academic health centers (AHCs) with Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA). Here we report findings pertaining specifically to mentor training at the level of the KL2 mentored award program, and at the broader institutional level. We found only four AHCs did not provide any form of training. One-time orientation was most prevalent at the KL2 level, whereas formal face-to-face training was most prevalent at the institutional level. Despite differences in format usage, there was general consensus at both the KL2 and institutional level about the topics of focus of face-to-face training sessions. Lower-resource training formats utilized at the KL2 level may reveal a preference for preselection of qualified mentors, while institutional selection of resource-heavy formats may be an attempt to raise the mentoring qualifications of the academic community as a whole. The present work fits into the expanding landscape of academic mentoring literature and sets the framework for future longitudinal, outcome studies focused on identifying the most efficient strategies to develop effective mentors.

  12. Influence of music training on academic examination-induced stress in Thai adolescents.

    PubMed

    Laohawattanakun, Janejira; Chearskul, Supornpim; Dumrongphol, Hattaya; Jutapakdeegul, Nuanchan; Yensukjai, Juntima; Khumphan, Nipaporn; Niltiean, Songwit; Thangnipon, Wipawan

    2011-01-10

    Several pieces of evidence suggest that academic examinations fulfill the classical requirement of a psychological stressor. Academic examinations represent a stressful challenge to many students, but studies on examination-dependent corticosteroid response, a sensitive physiological indicator of a stress response, are inconsistent. In addition, several studies showed that music can decrease cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels, and other studies have found that music also may enhance a variety of cognitive functions, such as attention, learning, communication and memory. The present study investigated cortisol response in saliva of Thai adolescents taking academic examinations and analyzed the differences of the stress response between musician and control subjects. Also, we observed whether the academic examination-dependent corticosteroid response affected learning and memory in the test subjects, which comprised 30 musician and 30 control students, age ranging from 15 to 17 years. Mathematical examinations were used as the stressor. Pre- and post-academic examination saliva cortisol levels were measured including self-estimated stress levels. Results showed that the pre-academic examination saliva cortisol concentrations of the musician group are significantly lower than those of the control group, whereas there is no difference in the stress inventory scores. Interestingly, among students with grade point average (GPA) of >3.50, pre-academic examination cortisol levels are significantly lower in the musician compared with control group. This study suggests that under academic examination-induced stress condition, music training can reduce saliva cortisol level in Thai adolescents.

  13. Influence of academic training in endodontics and implantology on decision-making in undergraduate students.

    PubMed

    Pineda, Kenneth; Bueno, Rufino; Alvarado, Carlos; Abella, Francesc; Roig, Miguel; Duran-Sindreu, Fernando

    2017-06-23

    To evaluate the effect of academic training on decision-making in a group of undergraduates who have undergone training in endodontics and implantology. A single group of undergraduate dentistry students (n = 65) was given a survey consisting of 15 endodontic cases. Each case included periapical radiographs and clinical photographs. Students were asked to select one of the eight proposed treatments. In their 4th year, the students first responded to the survey after completing endodontics. One year later, after completing their studies in implantology, the same students completed the same survey again. Under the conditions of this study, differences in undergraduate training significantly affected treatment decisions. Undergraduate decision-making was affected by academic training. © 2017 Australian Society of Endodontology Inc.

  14. Strategies to promote a climate of academic integrity and minimize student cheating and plagiarism.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, Craig L

    2006-01-01

    Student academic misconduct is a growing problem for colleges and universities, including those responsible for preparing health professionals. Although the implementation of honor codes has had a positive impact on this problem, further reduction in student cheating and plagiarism can be achieved only via a comprehensive strategy that promotes an institutional culture of academic integrity. Such a strategy must combine efforts both to deter and detect academic misconduct, along with fair but rigorous application of sanctions against such behaviors. Methods useful in preventing or deterring dishonest behaviors among students include early integrity training complemented with course-level reinforcement, faculty role-modeling, and the application of selected testing/assignment preventive strategies, including honor pledges and honesty declarations. Giving students more responsibility for oversight of academic integrity also may help address this problem and better promote the culture needed to uphold its principles. Successful enforcement requires that academic administration provide strong and visible support for upholding academic integrity standards, including the provision of a clear and fair process and the consistent application of appropriate sanctions against those whose conduct is found to violate these standards.

  15. Neighborhood crime and school climate as predictors of elementary school academic quality: a cross-lagged panel analysis.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Dana Charles; Roy, Amanda L; Sirkman, Gabriel M

    2013-09-01

    Past research has found negative relationships between neighborhood structural disadvantage and students' academic outcomes. Comparatively little work has evaluated the associations between characteristics of neighborhoods and schools themselves. This study explored the longitudinal, reciprocal relationships between neighborhood crime and school-level academic achievement within 500 urban schools. Results revealed that higher neighborhood crime (and particularly violent crime) predicted decreases in school academic achievement across time. School climate emerged as one possible mechanism within this relationship, with higher neighborhood crime predicting decreases in socioemotional learning and safety, but not academic rigor. All three dimensions of school climate were predictive of changes in academic achievement. Although this research supports a primarily unidirectional hypothesis of neighborhoods' impacts on embedded settings, additional work is needed to understand these relationships using additional conceptualizations of neighborhood climate.

  16. Relationships Among Student, Staff, and Administrative Measures of School Climate and Student Health and Academic Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gase, Lauren N; Gomez, Louis M; Kuo, Tony; Glenn, Beth A; Inkelas, Moira; Ponce, Ninez A

    2017-05-01

    School climate is an integral part of a comprehensive approach to improving the well-being of students; however, little is known about the relationships between its different domains and measures. We examined the relationships between student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate to understand the extent to which they were related to each other and student outcomes. The sample included 33,572 secondary school students from 121 schools in Los Angeles County during the 2014-2015 academic year. A multilevel regression model was constructed to examine the association between the domains and measures of school climate and 5 outcomes of student well-being: depressive symptoms or suicidal ideation, tobacco use, alcohol use, marijuana use, and grades. Student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate were weakly correlated. Strong associations were found between student outcomes and student reports of engagement and safety, while school staff reports and administrative measures of school climate showed limited associations with student outcomes. As schools seek to measure and implement interventions aimed at improving school climate, consideration should be given to grounding these efforts in a multidimensional conceptualization of climate that values student perspectives and includes elements of both engagement and safety. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  17. Education, training, and academic experience of newly hired, first-time pharmacy faculty members.

    PubMed

    Wanat, Matthew A; Fleming, Marc L; Fernandez, Julianna M; Garey, Kevin W

    2014-06-17

    Objective. To describe the education, training, and academic experiences of newly hired faculty members at US colleges and schools of pharmacy during the 2012-2013 academic year. Methods. A survey regarding education, training, and academic experiences was conducted of all first-time faculty members at US colleges and schools of pharmacy hired during the 2012-2013 academic year. Results. Pharmacy practice faculty members accounted for the majority (68.2%) of new hires. Ambulatory care was the most common pharmacy specialty position (29.8%). Most new faculty members had a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) as their terminal degree (74.8%), and 88.3% of pharmacy practice faculty members completed a residency. Of new faculty members who responded to the survey, 102 (67.5%) had at least 3 prior academic teaching, precepting, or research experiences. Conclusion. New faculty members were hired most frequently for clinical faculty positions at the assistant professor level and most frequently in the specialty of ambulatory care. Prior academic experience included precepting pharmacy students, facilitating small discussions, and guest lecturing.

  18. Education, Training, and Academic Experience of Newly Hired, First-Time Pharmacy Faculty Members

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Marc L.; Fernandez, Julianna M.; Garey, Kevin W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the education, training, and academic experiences of newly hired faculty members at US colleges and schools of pharmacy during the 2012-2013 academic year. Methods. A survey regarding education, training, and academic experiences was conducted of all first-time faculty members at US colleges and schools of pharmacy hired during the 2012-2013 academic year. Results. Pharmacy practice faculty members accounted for the majority (68.2%) of new hires. Ambulatory care was the most common pharmacy specialty position (29.8%). Most new faculty members had a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) as their terminal degree (74.8%), and 88.3% of pharmacy practice faculty members completed a residency. Of new faculty members who responded to the survey, 102 (67.5%) had at least 3 prior academic teaching, precepting, or research experiences. Conclusion. New faculty members were hired most frequently for clinical faculty positions at the assistant professor level and most frequently in the specialty of ambulatory care. Prior academic experience included precepting pharmacy students, facilitating small discussions, and guest lecturing. PMID:24954932

  19. Cognitive and Academic Gains as a Result of Cognitive Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckey, Alicia J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test Feuersetein's Structural Cognitive Modifiability model by evaluating changes in cognitive skills and reading scores after participation in one of two cognitive skills training programs. The Woodcock Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities and Tests of Achievement, 3 rd editions were used as evaluation tools.…

  20. Cognitive and Academic Gains as a Result of Cognitive Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luckey, Alicia J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test Feuersetein's Structural Cognitive Modifiability model by evaluating changes in cognitive skills and reading scores after participation in one of two cognitive skills training programs. The Woodcock Johnson Tests of Cognitive Abilities and Tests of Achievement, 3 rd editions were used as evaluation tools.…

  1. Academic Odyssey: The Training of an African Sociologist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woldemikael, Tekle M.

    1988-01-01

    Traces the author's experiences in a Eurocentric graduate training program relative to institutional pressures, cultural conflict, interactionism, and U.S. racism. Concludes that experiences caused an intellectual shift to viewpoint of a marginal Black sociologist who focuses upon the experiences and history of persons of African descent in the…

  2. Modernizing Research Training-Education and Science Policy between Profession, Discipline and Academic Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleiklie, Ivar; Hostaker, Roar

    2004-01-01

    This article argues that the way in which research training is affected by national policies aiming at modernizing graduate education is shaped by the way in which national characteristics of state policies, academic institutions and disciplines interact. The argument is applied in an analysis of the consequences of policy changes and higher…

  3. Academic Remedial Training: A Language Skills Development Program for U.S. Navy Recruits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Harry L.; And Others

    Noting that the program is primarily a reading and verbal skills program for adult learners, this paper describes the Academic Remedial Training (ART) Program of the U.S. Navy. The first section of the paper discusses the historical background of the program. The second section describes the reading skills component and the verbal skills component…

  4. Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral-Theory-Based Skill Training on Academic Procrastination Behaviors of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toker, Betül; Avci, Rasit

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral theory (CBT) psycho-educational group program on the academic procrastination behaviors of university students and the persistence of any training effect. This was a quasi-experimental research based on an experimental and control group pretest, posttest, and followup test model.…

  5. Authentic Leadership for Teacher's Academic Optimism: Moderating Effect of Training Comprehensiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srivastava, Anugamini Priya; Dhar, Rajib Lochan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to analyse the impact of authentic leadership (AL) on academic optimism (AO) through the mediating role of affective commitment (AC). As this study also examines the moderating role of training comprehensiveness (TC) in strengthening the relation between AC and AO. Design/methodology/approach: Data were collected from…

  6. Online Academic-Integrity Mastery Training May Improve Students' Awareness of, and Attitudes toward, Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Guy J.; Gouldthorp, Bethanie; Thomas, Emma F.; O'Brien, Geraldine M.; Correia, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Some evidence has emerged in recent years that plagiarism can be reduced through the use of online mastery tests that are designed to train introductory psychology students in awareness of academic integrity and referencing conventions. Although these studies demonstrated a reduction in incidents of plagiarism they did not directly examine whether…

  7. Relationship between Past Academic Performance and Results of Specialty In-Training Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronai, Ann K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Records of 63 medical school graduates were examined for predictors of achievement on in-training examinations in anesthesia and orthopedic surgery. The previous academic records were found to contain little to predict examination results, and the correlation between college nonscience subjects and exam performance was negative. (Author/MSE)

  8. Operationalizing, Instilling, and Assessing Counseling Psychology Training Values Related to Diversity in Academic Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winterowd, Carrie L.; Adams, Eve M.; Miville, Marie L.; Mintz, Laurie B.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we operationalize the values outlined in "The Counseling Psychology Model Training Values Statement Addressing Diversity" (henceforth the "Values Statement") by identifying virtues and dispositions for trainees and trainers in academic programs. We describe specific strategies that program faculty may use to help instill these…

  9. Online Academic-Integrity Mastery Training May Improve Students' Awareness of, and Attitudes toward, Plagiarism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Guy J.; Gouldthorp, Bethanie; Thomas, Emma F.; O'Brien, Geraldine M.; Correia, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Some evidence has emerged in recent years that plagiarism can be reduced through the use of online mastery tests that are designed to train introductory psychology students in awareness of academic integrity and referencing conventions. Although these studies demonstrated a reduction in incidents of plagiarism they did not directly examine whether…

  10. Collaborative Academic Training of Psychiatrists and Psychologists in VA and Medical School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaturo, Douglas J.; Huszonek, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors review the background and contemporary strengths of Dean's Committee Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in the collaborative academic training of psychiatrists and psychologists. Methods: The authors discuss the problems and prospects of the current health care environment as it impacts the behavioral health treatment of…

  11. 42 CFR 21.31 - Eligibility; all grades; academic and professional education and professional training and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Eligibility; all grades; academic and professional education and professional training and experience. 21.31 Section 21.31 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PERSONNEL COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Appointment § 21.31 Eligibility; all...

  12. 42 CFR 21.31 - Eligibility; all grades; academic and professional education and professional training and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Eligibility; all grades; academic and professional education and professional training and experience. 21.31 Section 21.31 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PERSONNEL COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Appointment § 21.31 Eligibility; all...

  13. 42 CFR 21.31 - Eligibility; all grades; academic and professional education and professional training and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Eligibility; all grades; academic and professional education and professional training and experience. 21.31 Section 21.31 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PERSONNEL COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Appointment § 21.31 Eligibility; all...

  14. Chat Reference Training after One Decade: The Results of a National Survey of Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Christopher; Paladino, Emily Bounds; Davis, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The first comprehensive national survey of all academic libraries in the United States which were conducting chat reference service was carried out to determine: what practices were being used to prepare personnel for chat reference service, what competencies were being taught, how and why training practices may have changed over time, and what…

  15. 42 CFR 21.31 - Eligibility; all grades; academic and professional education and professional training and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Eligibility; all grades; academic and professional education and professional training and experience. 21.31 Section 21.31 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PERSONNEL COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Appointment § 21.31 Eligibility;...

  16. Collaborative Academic Training of Psychiatrists and Psychologists in VA and Medical School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaturo, Douglas J.; Huszonek, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors review the background and contemporary strengths of Dean's Committee Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in the collaborative academic training of psychiatrists and psychologists. Methods: The authors discuss the problems and prospects of the current health care environment as it impacts the behavioral health treatment of…

  17. Relationship between Past Academic Performance and Results of Specialty In-Training Examinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronai, Ann K.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Records of 63 medical school graduates were examined for predictors of achievement on in-training examinations in anesthesia and orthopedic surgery. The previous academic records were found to contain little to predict examination results, and the correlation between college nonscience subjects and exam performance was negative. (Author/MSE)

  18. Implementing a robotics curriculum at an academic general surgery training program: our initial experience.

    PubMed

    Winder, Joshua S; Juza, Ryan M; Sasaki, Jennifer; Rogers, Ann M; Pauli, Eric M; Haluck, Randy S; Estes, Stephanie J; Lyn-Sue, Jerome R

    2016-09-01

    The robotic surgical platform is being utilized by a growing number of hospitals across the country, including academic medical centers. Training programs are tasked with teaching their residents how to utilize this technology. To this end, we have developed and implemented a robotic surgical curriculum, and share our initial experience here. Our curriculum was implemented for all General Surgical residents for the academic year 2014-2015. The curriculum consisted of online training, readings, bedside training, console simulation, participating in ten cases as bedside first assistant, and operating at the console. 20 surgical residents were included. Residents were provided the curriculum and notified the department upon completion. Bedside assistance and operative console training were completed in the operating room through a mix of biliary, foregut, and colorectal cases. During the fiscal years of 2014 and 2015, there were 164 and 263 robot-assisted surgeries performed within the General Surgery Department, respectively. All 20 residents completed the online and bedside instruction portions of the curriculum. Of the 20 residents trained, 13/20 (65 %) sat at the Surgeon console during at least one case. Utilizing this curriculum, we have trained and incorporated residents into robot-assisted cases in an efficient manner. A successful curriculum must be based on didactic learning, reading, bedside training, simulation, and training in the operating room. Each program must examine their caseload and resident class to ensure proper exposure to this platform.

  19. Impact of fellowship training on research productivity in academic neurological surgery.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Nitin; Clark, Scott; Svider, Peter F; Couldwell, William T; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Liu, James K

    2013-12-01

    An increasing number of neurological surgeons have sought fellowship training in recent years, and previous analyses have suggested these practitioners are more likely to pursue an academic career. Scholarly productivity is a key component in academic advancement. We used the h-index to evaluate whether fellowship training impacts research productivity and whether any differences exist in scholarly output among practitioners in the various neurosurgical subspecialties. Online listings from academic neurological surgery departments were used to organize faculty by academic rank and fellowship training. Using the Scopus database, we calculated the h-index for 869 full-time clinical faculty. Mean h-index did not differ between fellowship- and nonfellowship-trained practitioners (h = 12.6 vs. 13.0, P = 0.96). When organized by academic rank, the difference between h-indices of those who completed fellowships was substantially greater at all ranks, with statistical significance at the associate professor rank (P = 0.003). Upon further examination by individual subspecialties, significant differences in relative research impact were noted (P < 0.0001). The stereotactic and functional fellowship was found to have the greatest mean h-index score, whereas the trauma/critical care fellowship had the lowest. No significant difference existed between the mean h-index scores of neurological surgeons who completed fellowships and those who did not. However, when stratified by academic rank, a trend was observed showing greater mean h-index scores for those who completed fellowships. This trend persists across nearly all subspecialties. Overall, being a senior faculty member corresponds with a greater h-index score, regardless of whether a fellowship was completed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. How Are Middle School Climate and Academic Performance Related across Schools and over Time? REL 2017-212

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voight, Adam; Hanson, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    A growing number of educators concur that, in order to improve student academic performance, schools need to focus not only on students' academic needs but also on their social, emotional, and material needs (Piscatelli & Lee, 2011). As a result, school climate--the social, emotional, and physical characteristics of a school community (Cohen,…

  1. Building Commitment: An Examination of Learning Climate Congruence and the Affective Commitment of Academics in an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southcombe, Amie; Fulop, Liz; Carter, Geoff; Cavanagh, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between learning climate congruence and the affective commitment of university academics. The strategy of inquiry for this research is quantitative, involving a non-experimental design for the survey research. A non-probability sample of 900 academics from a large Australian university was…

  2. Subscription to Norms and Counternorms of Academic Research: The Effects of Departmental Structure and Climate. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Melissa S.; Louis, Karen Seashore

    This study examined the extent to which graduate students in science and engineering fields subscribe to the norms of research behavior which have been the basis of the freedom, self-direction, and self-regulation which characterize academic research. In particular the study focused on the relationship between academic departments' climates and…

  3. Building Commitment: An Examination of Learning Climate Congruence and the Affective Commitment of Academics in an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southcombe, Amie; Fulop, Liz; Carter, Geoff; Cavanagh, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between learning climate congruence and the affective commitment of university academics. The strategy of inquiry for this research is quantitative, involving a non-experimental design for the survey research. A non-probability sample of 900 academics from a large Australian university was…

  4. Nuclear-related training and education offered by academic institutions (less-than-baccalaureate degree)

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, L.

    1982-01-01

    Current projections indicate that in addition to the 10,100 technician positions and 6100 existing operator positions in the nuclear power industry, another 9100 technicians and 9700 operators will be required over the next decade. With 56 nuclear plants currently in operation and an additional 35 plants under construction, it is essential that trained technical personnel be available for employment in the nuclear utilities. Because of the growing demand for technicians in the nuclear utility industry, this report has been prepared to identify the nuclear-related, less-than-baccalaureate, technical educational programs provided by academic institutions and to ascertain both the current number of students and the maximum number that could be trained, given present staff and facilities. The data serve as a gauge for the proportion of technician training required by the nuclear industry that can be provided by academic institutions.

  5. Does Formal Research Training Lead to Academic Success in Plastic Surgery? A Comprehensive Analysis of U.S. Academic Plastic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Joseph; Ameri, Afshin; Susarla, Srinivas M; Reddy, Sashank; Soni, Ashwin; Tong, J W; Amini, Neda; Ahmed, Rizwan; May, James W; Lee, W P Andrew; Dorafshar, Amir

    2016-01-01

    It is currently unknown whether formal research training has an influence on academic advancement in plastic surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether formal research training was associated with higher research productivity, academic rank, and procurement of extramural National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding in plastic surgery, comparing academic surgeons who completed said research training with those without. This was a cross-sectional study of full-time academic plastic surgeons in the United States. The main predictor variable was formal research training, defined as completion of a postdoctoral research fellowship or attainment of a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD). The primary outcome was scientific productivity measured by the Hirsh-index (h-index, the number of publications, h that have at least h citations each). The secondary outcomes were academic rank and NIH funding. Descriptive, bivariate, and multiple regression statistics were computed. A total of 607 academic surgeons were identified from 94 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited plastic surgery training programs. In all, 179 (29.5%) surgeons completed formal research training. The mean h-index was 11.7 ± 9.9. And, 58 (9.6%) surgeons successfully procured NIH funding. The distribution of academic rank was the following: endowed professor (5.4%), professor (23.9%), associate professor (23.4%), assistant professor (46.0%), and instructor (1.3%). In a multiple regression analysis, completion of formal research training was significantly predictive of a higher h-index and successful procurement of NIH funding. Current evidence demonstrates that formal research training is associated with higher scientific productivity and increased likelihood of future NIH funding. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cognitive Priming and Cognitive Training: Immediate and Far Transfer to Academic Skills in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, Bruce E; Iseli, Markus; Leon, Seth; Zaggle, William; Rush, Cynthia; Goodman, Annette; Esat Imal, A.; Bo, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive operations are supported by dynamically reconfiguring neural systems that integrate processing components widely distributed throughout the brain. The inter-neuronal connections that constitute these systems are powerfully shaped by environmental input. We evaluated the ability of computer-presented brain training games done in school to harness this neuroplastic potential and improve learning in an overall study sample of 583 second-grade children. Doing a 5-minute brain-training game immediately before math or reading curricular content games increased performance on the curricular content games. Doing three 20-minute brain training sessions per week for four months increased gains on school-administered math and reading achievement tests compared to control classes tested at the same times without intervening brain training. These results provide evidence of cognitive priming with immediate effects on learning, and longer-term brain training with far-transfer or generalized effects on academic achievement. PMID:27615029

  7. The training, careers, and work of Ph.D. physical scientists: Not simply academic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Steven J.; Pedersen-Gallegos, Liane; Riegle-Crumb, Catherine

    2002-11-01

    We present an in-depth portrait of the training, careers, and work of recent Ph.D. physical scientists. Use of specialized training varies widely, with about half often using knowledge of their Ph.D. specialty area in their jobs. The use of specialized training does not, however, correlate with job satisfaction. In this and other important measures, there are relatively few differences between "academics" and "nonacademics." Important job skills for all employment sectors include writing, oral presentation, management, data analysis, designing projects, critical thinking, and working in an interdisciplinary context. Rankings given by respondents of graduate training in some of these skill areas were significantly lower than the importance of these skills in the workplace. We also found that the rated quality of graduate training varies relatively little by department or advisor. Finally, although nonacademic aspirations among graduate students are fairly common, these do not appear to be well supported while in graduate school.

  8. Multidisciplinary Investigations of Climate Change in Mexico: Reports from a Collaborative Academic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endfield, G. H.

    2007-05-01

    Unusually severe or prolonged drought ranks among the most devastating of climate changes in Mexico, and has contributed to wildfires, crop failure, livestock death and famine across the country throughout its history and pre- history (Liverman, 1999; Florescano, 1980). Some of these droughts are thought to be associated with the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) - the most prominent signal in inter-annual climate variability in Mexico and the subject of increasing interest following the effects of the severe El Niño of 1997-98 (Magaña et al., 2003). Obtaining detailed records of droughts and gaining a better understanding of how rainfall variability has affected Mexico's populations in the past, and is affecting society today, are essential steps toward designing appropriate drought preparedness, mitigation and relief programmes both in Mexico and other vulnerable regions of the world (ISDR, 2002). This paper reports on the development of Collaborative Academic Network entitled "Multi-disciplinary investigations of climate change in Mexico". The network represents an important research initiative, funded by the Leverhulme Trust, involving individuals from Mexico, the United Kingdom and the United States with established reputations for research in complementary methodological approaches to understanding climate change and drought in Mexico. The aim of the network is to draw on internationally recognised expertise in dendroclimatology, palaeolimnology, climate history and modern climatology, with the following objectives: - to improve understanding of the climatic mechanisms that cause drought across Mexico and how these vary spatially; - to identify past, present and future impacts of, and responses to, drought in Mexico; - to develop a more comprehensive understanding of climate change and its impacts across Mexico on a range of time scales. Here I report on the progress of the network so far in its aims to facilitate the integration and development of

  9. Scientific writing training for academic physicians of diverse language backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Carrie; Deming, Stephanie P; Notzon, Beth; Cantor, Scott B; Broglio, Kristine R; Pagel, Walter

    2009-04-01

    Research articles are the coin of the realm for anyone working in academia, and success or failure to publish determines a biomedical researcher's career path. At the same time, the dramatic increase in foreign faculty and trainees in U.S. academia, as well as in international scientific collaboration, adds another dimension to this developmental vacuum: limited English-language skills. Paradoxically, few programs exist to develop and support the skills needed to accomplish the vital task of writing English-language research articles, which does not come naturally to most. To better prepare all trainees for research careers, editors in the Department of Scientific Publications at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center created an in-depth training program that would target the writing skills gap effectively. Instruction focused on structure, rhetorical organization, and the conventions of biomedical publishing. More than 300 trainees have participated in 22 workshops. Results of a survey of 46 participants at 6 months to 2.5 years after workshop completion indicated that participants from all language backgrounds believed the course to have improved their writing (97.8% strongly agreed or agreed), made it easier to begin a manuscript (80.4%), and helped them to get published (56.8%), with nonnative speakers of English reporting somewhat greater perceived benefit than native English speakers. On the basis of these results, the authors conclude that researchers of varied linguistic backgrounds appreciate the need for, and benefit from, instruction in the conventions of scientific writing.

  10. Errorless academic compliance training: a school-based application for young students with autism.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Joseph M; Ng, Olivia

    2012-09-01

    Errorless academic compliance training is a graduated, noncoercive approach to treating oppositional behavior in children. In the present study, three teaching staff in a special education classroom were trained to conduct this intervention with three male students diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders. During baseline, staff delivered a range of academic and other classroom requests and recorded student compliance. A hierarchy of compliance probabilities was then calculated, ranging from Level 1 (requests yielding high levels of compliance) to Level 4 (those typically yielding noncompliance). At treatment initiation, teaching staff delivered high densities of Level 1 requests and provided reinforcement for compliance. Subsequent request levels were faded in over time, at a slow enough rate to ensure continued high compliance. By intervention end, all three students demonstrated substantially improved compliance to classroom requests that had commonly yielded noncompliance before intervention. Covariant improvement in on-task skills was also evident.

  11. The effect of hypnotic training programs on the academic performance of students.

    PubMed

    De Vos, H M; Louw, D A

    2006-10-01

    The main objective of the present study was to empirically verify the effect of hypnotic training programs on the academic performance of students. A pre and posttest design was used. Two experimental and two control groups (total sample N=119) of volunteer second year psychology students at the University of Stellenbosch in South Africa comprised the sample. One of the experimental groups was exposed to active alert hypnosis and the other to relaxation hypnosis. One control group was exposed to progressive relaxation, while the other did not receive any intervention. The participants' April grades were used as a pretest, while their June grades served as a posttest. The two hypnotic training programs had a significant effect on the academic achievement of the participants, which was not found in the control groups. Regarding the efficacy of the two programs, however, no significant difference was found.

  12. Academic training of nursing professionals and its relevance to the workplace 1

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Maria del Carmen Barbera; Cecagno, Diana; Llor, Ana Myriam Seva; de Siqueira, Hedi Crecencia Heckler; Montesinos, Maria José López; Soler, Loreto Maciá

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the training nursing professionals receive and its relevance to the workplace, as well as professional demand for continuous education. METHODOLOGY: this was a descriptive observational study using a questionnaire entitled "Training and Adaptation of the Nursing Professional to the Workplace" available at: http://enfermeriadocente.es for nursing professionals. RESULTS: 53.8% of nurses do not consider the training received to be relevant to the needs of the workplace and 94.2% reported that linking academic education to the workplace impacts on the quality of care provided. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing professionals think that continuous education needs to be adjusted to their jobs and careers. Education should be viewed as a continuum, which begins with training. PMID:26312632

  13. Academic interventional nephrology: a model for training, research, and patient care.

    PubMed

    Roy-Chaudhury, Prabir; Yevzlin, Alexander; Bonventre, Joseph V; Agarwal, Anil; Almehmi, Ammar; Besarab, Anatole; Dwyer, Amy; Hentschel, Dirk M; Kraus, Michael; Maya, Ivan; Pflederer, Timothy; Schon, Donald; Wu, Steven; Work, Jack

    2012-03-01

    Dialysis vascular access dysfunction is currently a huge clinical problem. We believe that comprehensive academic-based dialysis vascular access programs that go all the way from basic and translational science investigation to clinical research to a dedicated curriculum and opportunities in vascular access for nephrologists in training are essential for improving dialysis vascular access care. This paper reviews the fundamental concepts and requirements for us to move toward this vision.

  14. Emergency radiology fellowship training in the USA: a web-based survey of academic programs.

    PubMed

    Cox, Mougnyan; Hansberry, David; Balasubramanya, Rashmi; Li, Zhengteng; Gandhe, Ashish; Selvarajan, Santosh; Sharma, Pranshu

    2017-02-01

    Interest in emergency radiology as a distinct subspecialty within radiology continues to rise in the USA and globally. While acute care imaging has been performed since the earliest days of the specialty, fellowship training in emergency radiology is a relatively new phenomenon. The purpose of this study was to examine the current status of emergency radiology training in the USA, using data derived from the official websites of US residency training programs. The most current list of radiology residency programs participating in the 2017 match was obtained from the official Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) website. The total number of emergency radiology fellowships was recorded after visiting available websites of each academic radiology program. The total number of subspecialty fellowships offered by each academic radiology program was also recorded. There were 12 confirmed emergency radiology fellowships offered in the USA for a combined total of 22 fellowship positions. Eleven programs were 1 year in duration, with one program offering a one- or two-year option. One hundred eight of the 174 (approximately 62 %) surveyed academic radiology programs offered at least one subspecialty fellowship. Emergency radiology fellowships are on the rise, paralleling the growth of emergency radiology as a distinct subspecialty within radiology.

  15. Simulation Crisis Team Training Effect on Rural Hospital Safety Climate (SIMCRITTER)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    crisis team training course? Lecture Roles & Goals Video Score Sheet Graphs Continue Home My Portfolio Course Catalog Calendar About Us Links News My...facilitated delivery of multiple new simulation based programs. Crisis Team Training was conducted for 45 members of the Hospital Cardiac Arrest Response...TITLE: Simulation Crisis Team Training Effect on Rural Hospital Safety Climate (SIMCRITTER) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Benjamin W

  16. School Climate, Teacher-Child Closeness, and Low-Income Children's Academic Skills in Kindergarten.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, Amy E; Friedman-Krauss, Allison H; Raver, C Cybele; Jones, Stephanie M; Pess, Rachel A

    In this study we used data on a sample of children in the Chicago Public Schools in areas of concentrated poverty-related disadvantage to examine associations between school climate and low-income children's language/literacy and math skills during the transition to kindergarten. We also explored whether teacher-child closeness moderated these associations. Multilevel modeling analyses conducted using a sample of 242 children nested in 102 elementary schools revealed that low adult support in the school was significantly associated with children's poorer language/literacy and math skills in kindergarten. Teacher-child closeness predicted children's higher language/literacy and math scores and moderated the association between low adult support and children's academic skills. Among children who were high on closeness with their teacher, those in schools with high levels of adult support showed stronger language/literacy and math skills. There were no significant associations between adult support and the academic skills of children with medium or low levels of teacher-child closeness. Results shed light on the importance of adult support at both school and classroom levels in promoting low-income children's academic skills during the transition to kindergarten.

  17. Combined Training of One Cognitive and One Metacognitive Strategy Improves Academic Writing Skills.

    PubMed

    Wischgoll, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Academic writing is a challenging task. Expert writers apply various writing skills as they anticipate the reader's view of their text while paying attention to structure and content. Research in the high school setting shows that the acquisition of writing skills can be supported by single-strategy training. However, research in higher education is scarce. We tested whether the development of academic writing skills can also be effectively supported by training single strategies or even combined strategies. As metacognition is an important skill for advanced and adult learners, we focused in this study on the benefit of combined cognitive strategies with and without a metacognitive strategy. An experiment including three conditions was conducted (N = 60 German-speaking psychology undergraduates, M = 22.8, SD = 4.4), which lasted for three hours. Each group received a modeling intervention of a basic cognitive strategy on the application of text structure knowledge. Two groups received an additional modeling intervention with either a cognitive strategy treatment on text summarization or a metacognitive strategy treatment on self-monitoring the writing process. One group received no further strategy treatment. Prior knowledge and learning outcomes were measured with a specially developed test on academic writing skills. In addition, all participants wrote an abstract of an empirical article. We found that learners who received the additional self-monitoring strategy intervention benefited significantly more in terms of acquisition of academic writing skills and the quality of their texts than learners who did not receive this intervention. Thus, the results underline the importance of self-monitoring strategies in academic writing. Implications and further research opportunities are discussed.

  18. Combined Training of One Cognitive and One Metacognitive Strategy Improves Academic Writing Skills

    PubMed Central

    Wischgoll, Anke

    2016-01-01

    Academic writing is a challenging task. Expert writers apply various writing skills as they anticipate the reader’s view of their text while paying attention to structure and content. Research in the high school setting shows that the acquisition of writing skills can be supported by single-strategy training. However, research in higher education is scarce. We tested whether the development of academic writing skills can also be effectively supported by training single strategies or even combined strategies. As metacognition is an important skill for advanced and adult learners, we focused in this study on the benefit of combined cognitive strategies with and without a metacognitive strategy. An experiment including three conditions was conducted (N = 60 German-speaking psychology undergraduates, M = 22.8, SD = 4.4), which lasted for three hours. Each group received a modeling intervention of a basic cognitive strategy on the application of text structure knowledge. Two groups received an additional modeling intervention with either a cognitive strategy treatment on text summarization or a metacognitive strategy treatment on self-monitoring the writing process. One group received no further strategy treatment. Prior knowledge and learning outcomes were measured with a specially developed test on academic writing skills. In addition, all participants wrote an abstract of an empirical article. We found that learners who received the additional self-monitoring strategy intervention benefited significantly more in terms of acquisition of academic writing skills and the quality of their texts than learners who did not receive this intervention. Thus, the results underline the importance of self-monitoring strategies in academic writing. Implications and further research opportunities are discussed. PMID:26941671

  19. Graduate training in Earth science across borders and disciplines: ArcTrain -"Processes and impacts of climate change in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Canadian Arctic"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Rüdiger; Kucera, Michal; Walter, Maren; de Vernal, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Due to a complex set of feedback processes collectively known as "polar amplification", the Arctic realm is expected to experience a greater-than-average response to global climate forcing. The cascades of feedback processes that connect the Arctic cryosphere, ocean and atmosphere remain incompletely constrained by observations and theory and are difficult to simulate in climate models. Our capacity to predict the future of the region and assess the impacts of Arctic change processes on global and regional environments hinges on the availability of interdisciplinary experts with strong international experience and understanding of the science/society interface. This is the basis of the International Research Training Group "Processes and impacts of climate change in the North Atlantic Ocean and the Canadian Arctic - ArcTrain", which was initiated in 2013. ArcTrain aims to educate PhD students in an interdisciplinary environment that combines paleoclimatology, physical oceanography, remote sensing and glaciology with comprehensive Earth system modelling, including sea-ice and ice-sheet components. The qualification program for the PhD students includes joint supervision, mandatory research residences at partner institutions, field courses on land and on sea (Floating University), annual meetings and training workshops and a challenging structured training in expert skills and transferrable skills. Its aim is to enhance the career prospects and employability of the graduates in a challenging international job market across academic and applied sectors. ArcTrain is a collaborative project at the University of Bremen and the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven. The German part of the project is designed to continue for nine years and educate three cohorts of twelve PhD students each. The Canadian partners comprise a consortium of eight universities led by the GEOTOP cluster at the Université du Québec à Montréal and including

  20. Describing the learning climate of general practice training: the learner's perspective.

    PubMed

    Smith, Victor Charles; Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon

    2009-11-01

    The learning climate is an important aspect of educational environments that impacts on learner satisfaction, stress and attitudes to learning. Quality management of educational environments has traditionally focused on teacher development and aspects of the environment that are easily quantifiable. This study describes the learning climate of GP training practices from the perspective of the learners. The information can be used to inform a learner-centred and evidence-based system of quality management. Further development of the themes could produce a quantitative tool, to provide data on the learning climate of GP training practices. This could assist in the quality management of GP training in the UK.

  1. Academic requirements for Certificate of Completion of Training in surgical training: Consensus recommendations from the Association of Surgeons in Training/National Research Collaborative Consensus Group.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mathew J; Bhangu, A; Blencowe, Natalie S; Nepogodiev, D; Gokani, Vimal J; Harries, Rhiannon L; Akinfala, M; Ali, O; Allum, W; Bosanquet, D C; Boyce, K; Bradburn, M; Chapman, S J; Christopher, E; Coulter, I; Dean, B J F; Dickfos, M; El Boghdady, M; Elmasry, M; Fleming, S; Glasbey, J; Healy, C; Kasivisvanathan, V; Khan, K S; Kolias, A G; Lee, S M; Morton, D; O'Beirne, J; Sinclair, P; Sutton, P A

    2016-11-01

    Surgical trainees are expected to demonstrate academic achievement in order to obtain their certificate of completion of training (CCT). These standards are set by the Joint Committee on Surgical Training (JCST) and specialty advisory committees (SAC). The standards are not equivalent across all surgical specialties and recognise different achievements as evidence. They do not recognise changes in models of research and focus on outcomes rather than process. The Association of Surgeons in Training (ASiT) and National Research Collaborative (NRC) set out to develop progressive, consistent and flexible evidence set for academic requirements at CCT. A modified-Delphi approach was used. An expert group consisting of representatives from the ASiT and the NRC undertook iterative review of a document proposing changes to requirements. This was circulated amongst wider stakeholders. After ten iterations, an open meeting was held to discuss these proposals. Voting on statements was performed using a 5-point Likert Scale. Each statement was voted on twice, with ≥80% of votes in agreement meaning the statement was approved. The results of this vote were used to propose core and optional academic requirements for CCT. Online discussion concluded after ten rounds. At the consensus meeting, statements were voted on by 25 delegates from across surgical specialties and training-grades. The group strongly favoured acquisition of 'Good Clinical Practice' training and research methodology training as CCT requirements. The group agreed that higher degrees, publications in any author position (including collaborative authorship), recruiting patients to a study or multicentre audit and presentation at a national or international meeting could be used as evidence for the purpose of CCT. The group agreed on two essential 'core' requirements (GCP and methodology training) and two of a menu of four 'additional' requirements (publication with any authorship position, presentation

  2. The Direct and Moderating Role of School Interpersonal Climate on Children's Academic Outcomes in the Context of Whole-School, Social-Emotional Learning Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Juliette K.; Aber, J. Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    A positive school climate is characterized by a supportive, orderly, and fair interpersonal climate. Children's perceptions of interpersonal climate and school safety are associated with several academic and behavioral adjustment outcomes. The current study has two goals: (1) to better understand the contribution of school interpersonal climate to…

  3. A Cluster-Randomised, Controlled Trial of the Impact of Cogmed Working Memory Training on Both Academic Performance and Regulation of Social, Emotional and Behavioural Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, Caitlin; Westwell, Martin S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: We explored whether school-based Cogmed Working Memory Training (CWMT) may optimise both academic and psychological outcomes at school. Training of executive control skills may form a novel approach to enhancing processes that predict academic achievement, such as task-related attention, and thereby academic performance, but also has…

  4. A Cluster-Randomised, Controlled Trial of the Impact of Cogmed Working Memory Training on Both Academic Performance and Regulation of Social, Emotional and Behavioural Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, Caitlin; Westwell, Martin S.

    2017-01-01

    Background: We explored whether school-based Cogmed Working Memory Training (CWMT) may optimise both academic and psychological outcomes at school. Training of executive control skills may form a novel approach to enhancing processes that predict academic achievement, such as task-related attention, and thereby academic performance, but also has…

  5. Climate change: what competencies and which medical education and training approaches?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Much research has been devoted to identifying healthcare needs in a climate-changing world. However, while there are now global and national policy statements about the importance of health workforce development for climate change, little has been published about what competencies might be demanded of practitioners in a climate-changing world. In such a context, this debate and discussion paper aims to explore the nature of key competencies and related opportunities for teaching climate change in medical education and training. Particular emphasis is made on preparation for practice in rural and remote regions likely to be greatly affected by climate change. Discussion The paper describes what kinds of competencies for climate change might be included in medical education and training. It explores which curricula, teaching, learning and assessment approaches might be involved. Rather than arguing for major changes to medical education and training, this paper explores well established precedents to offer practical suggestions for where a particular kind of literacy--eco-medical literacy--and related competencies could be naturally integrated into existing elements of medical education and training. Summary The health effects of climate change have, generally, not yet been integrated into medical education and training systems. However, the necessary competencies could be taught by building on existing models, best practice and innovative traditions in medicine. Even in crowded curricula, climate change offers an opportunity to reinforce and extend understandings of how interactions between people and place affect health. PMID:20429949

  6. Academic health departments as training sites for future public health leaders: a partnership model in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Ceraso, Marion; Swain, Geoffrey R; Vergeront, James M; Oliver, Thomas R; Remington, Patrick L

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, 2 Wisconsin academic health departments partnered with the School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison to strengthen the public health workforce through a service-learning program that prepares the next generation of leaders while addressing local public health needs. The Wisconsin Population Health Service Fellowship annually provides 4 to 6 master's or doctorally trained fellows with 2-year service-learning placements in health departments and community-based organizations. Placement communities benefit from fellows' contributions to a broad range of public health issues, including chronic and communicable disease prevention, health equity, community practice, and policy and systems change. Academic health departments and the UW School of Medicine and Public Health enjoy additional program benefits, along with the advantages that accrue to the fellows themselves. For the academic health departments, this includes increased organizational capacity, generation of resources for public health, and a stronger and more diverse public health workforce. The success of the partnership depends upon shared decision making and management, written agreements to clarify partner expectations, shared financial and in-kind contributions, and collaboration on program evaluation and dissemination. By building upon their respective organizational strengths, Wisconsin's academic health departments and the UW School of Medicine and Public Health have developed a successful model for transforming talented, highly motivated young professionals into confident, emerging public health leaders with the cutting-edge skills and connections necessary to improve population health outcomes and advance health equity.

  7. Improving Academic Performance and Working Memory in Health Science Graduate Students Using Progressive Muscle Relaxation Training.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Kurt K; Blyler, Diane

    Research involving working memory has indicated that stress and anxiety compete for attentional resources when a person engages in attention-dependent cognitive processing. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of perceived stress and state anxiety on working memory and academic performance among health science students and to explore whether the reduction of stress and anxiety was achieved through progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) training. A convenience sample of 128 graduate students participated in this study. Using an experimental pretest-posttest design, we randomly assigned participants to a PMR group or a control group. Results indicated that PMR reduced state anxiety, F(1, 126) = 15.58, p < .001, thereby freeing up working memory and leading to improved academic performance in the treatment group. The results of this study contribute to the literature on Attentional Control Theory by clarifying the process through which working memory and anxiety affect cognitive performance.

  8. Academic training in radiation safety awareness and practice among Iranian residents/fellows

    PubMed Central

    Safi, Morteza; Aerab-Sheibani, Hossein; Namazi, Mohammad Hassan; Vakili, Hossein; Saadat, Habibollah

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the current state of radiation safety awareness and practice among Iranian radiology/cardiology residents. Methods In this cross-sectional study, 725 Iranian cardiology/radiology fellows/residents (685 residents and 40 fellows) were studied. Radiation safety awareness and practice were assessed using a 13-item survey questionnaire. Based on academic trainings provided in their medical centres, the subjects were divided into two groups (trained vs untrained). Results Trained residents/fellows had better performance compared with untrained ones regarding awareness of radiation dealing instructions, knowing safety experts of their centres (43.8% vs 20.1%, p<0.001) and their contact information (38.4% vs 11.4%, p<0.001), date of the last CBC (complete blood count) checking (15.1% vs 2.5%, p<0.001), use of lead glass (61.6% vs 41.8%, p=0.003), apron (94.5% vs 90%, p=0.016) and radiation shield (71.2% vs 46.2%, p<0.001). Conclusions Awareness/practice of Iranian cardiology/radiology residents/fellows about radiation exposure safety issues is not acceptable currently. Those who received formal training courses at their academic centres about the safety measures had significantly better knowledge compared with those who did not. It is suggested that radiation safety training be offered at the beginning of residency/fellowship for residents/fellows in a comprehensive and uniform way throughout medical universities. PMID:27326189

  9. Prediction of Academic Achievement in an NATA-Approved Graduate Athletic Training Education Program

    PubMed Central

    Keskula, Douglas R.; Sammarone, Paula G.; Perrin, David H.

    1995-01-01

    The Purpose of this investigation was to determine which information used in the applicant selection process would best predict the final grade point average of students in a National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA) graduate athletic training education program. The criterion variable used was the graduate grade-point average (GPAg) calculated at the completion of the program of study. The predictor variables included: 1) Graduate Record Examination-Quantitative (GRE-Q) scores; and 2) Graduate Record Examination-Verbal (GRE-V) scores, 3) preadmission grade point average (GPAp), 4) total athletic training hours (hours), and 5) curriculum or internship undergraduate athletic training education (program). Data from 55 graduate athletic training students during a 5-year period were evaluated. Stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated that GPAp was a significant predictor of GPAg, accounting for 34% of the variance. GRE-Q, GRE-V, hours, and program did not significantly contribute individually or in combination to the prediction of GPAg. The results of this investigation suggest that, of the variables examined, GPAp is the best predictor of academic success in an NATA-approved graduate athletic training education program. PMID:16558312

  10. Surgical Residency Training at a University-Based Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Rebecca L; Morris, Jon B; Kelz, Rachel R

    2016-02-01

    The past two decades have been witness to some of the most dynamic changes that have occurred in surgical education in all of its history. Political policies, social revolution, and the competing priorities of a new generation of surgical trainees are defining the needs of modern training paradigms. Although the university-based academic program's tripartite mission of clinical service, research, and education has remained steadfast, the mechanisms for achieving success in this mission necessitate adaptation and innovation. The resource-rich learning environment and the unique challenges that face university-based programs contribute to its ability to generate the future leaders of the surgical workforce.

  11. Synergy between On-the-job Training and Academic Education in the Case of a Newly Created Part-time Engineering Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchio, Dominique; Adnot, Jerome; Arditi, Irene

    1997-01-01

    Part-time vocational engineering curricula aim to transform experienced higher technicians into engineering managers. This is done by making use of previous experience in working positions and adding training in new situations. Job training is combined with academic training through courses and activities at an academic institution. Describes ways…

  12. Improving staff perception of a safety climate with crew resource management training.

    PubMed

    Kuy, SreyRam; Romero, Ramon A L

    2017-06-01

    Communication failure is one of the top root causes in patient safety adverse events. Crew resource management (CRM) is a team building communication process intended to improve patient safety by improving team dynamics. First, to describe implementation of CRM in a Veterans Affair (VA) surgical service. Second, to assess whether staff CRM training is related to improvement in staff perception of a safety climate. Mandatory CRM training was implemented for all surgical service staff at a VA Hospital at 0 and 12 mo. Safety climate questionnaires were completed by operating room staff at a baseline, 6 and 12 mo after the initial CRM training. Participants reported improvement on all 27 points on the safety climate questionnaire at 6 mo compared with the baseline. At 12 mo, there was sustained improvement in 23 of the 27 areas. This is the first published report about the effect of CRM training on staff perception of a safety climate in a VA surgical service. We demonstrate that CRM training can be successfully implemented widespread in a surgical program. Overall, there was improvement in 100% of areas assessed on the safety climate questionnaire at 6 mo after CRM training. By 1 y, this improvement was sustained in 23 of 27 areas, with the areas of greatest improvement being the performance of briefings, collaboration between nurses and doctors, valuing nursing input, knowledge about patient safety, and institutional promotion of a patient safety climate. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Examining reciprocal influences among family climate, school attachment, and academic self-regulation: Implications for school success.

    PubMed

    Xia, Mengya; Fosco, Gregory M; Feinberg, Mark E

    2016-06-01

    Guided by family systems and ecological theories, this study examined the multicontextual implications of family, school, and individual domains for adolescents' school success. The first goal of this study was to examine reciprocal influences among family climate, school attachment, and academic self-regulation (ASR) during the middle school years. The second goal was to test the relative impact of each of these domains on adolescents' school adjustment and academic achievement after the transition to high school. We applied a cross-lag structural equation modeling approach to longitudinal data from 979 students in the 6th grade and their families, followed over 5 measurement occasions, from 6th through 9th grade. Controlling for family income, parent education, and adolescent gender, the results revealed reciprocal relationships between the family climate and school attachment over time; both of these factors were related to increases in ASR over time. In turn, ASR was a robust predictor of academic success, with unique associations with school adjustment and academic achievement. Family climate and school adjustment had modest to marginal associations with school adjustment, and no association with academic achievement. Applications of these findings for family school interventions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Examining Early Adolescents' Peer Climate Using Descriptive and Status Norms on Academic Engagement and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shin, Huiyoung

    2017-01-01

    This study is aimed to gain insights into adolescents' classroom peer climate by examining descriptive and status norms of academic and social behaviors. Descriptive norm was assessed as the average score for each behavior and status norm was assessed using the correlation between each behavior and social status within each classroom. Expanded…

  15. Classroom Management, School Staff Relations, School Climate, and Academic Achievement: Testing A Model with Urban High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Lindsey T.; Polk, Elizabeth; Keys, Christopher B.; McMahon, Susan D.

    2016-01-01

    Urban learning environments pose distinct instructional challenges for teachers and administrators, and can lead to lower achievement compared to suburban or rural schools. Today's educational climate increasingly emphasises a need for positive academic outcomes, often measured by standardised tests, on which student educational opportunities,…

  16. College Climate and Teacher-Trainee's Academic Work in Selected Colleges of Education in the Ashanti Region of Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adjei, Augustine; Dontoh, Samuel; Baafi-Frimpong, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating the extent to which College climate (Leadership roles/practices and Class size) impact on academic work of Teacher-trainees. A survey research design was used for the study because it involved a study of relatively large population who were purposively and randomly selected. A sample size of 322 out of the…

  17. Classroom Management, School Staff Relations, School Climate, and Academic Achievement: Testing A Model with Urban High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Back, Lindsey T.; Polk, Elizabeth; Keys, Christopher B.; McMahon, Susan D.

    2016-01-01

    Urban learning environments pose distinct instructional challenges for teachers and administrators, and can lead to lower achievement compared to suburban or rural schools. Today's educational climate increasingly emphasises a need for positive academic outcomes, often measured by standardised tests, on which student educational opportunities,…

  18. Retention of Faculty of Color in Rehabilitation Counselor Education as It Relates to Their Perception of the Academic Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minor, Tameika D.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between demographic characteristics, perceptions of the academic climate, and the employment continuation plans of tenured and tenure-track faculty of color in CORE accredited rehabilitation counselor education (RCE) programs. Furthermore, this study aims to identify which factors best predict the…

  19. Retention of Faculty of Color in Rehabilitation Counselor Education as It Relates to Their Perception of the Academic Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minor, Tameika D.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between demographic characteristics, perceptions of the academic climate, and the employment continuation plans of tenured and tenure-track faculty of color in CORE accredited rehabilitation counselor education (RCE) programs. Furthermore, this study aims to identify which factors best predict the…

  20. [Depressive symptomatology and alcohol-related problems during the academic training of medical students].

    PubMed

    Valle, Rubén; Sánchez, Elard; Perales, Alberto

    2013-03-01

    In order to evaluate the frequency of depressive symptomatology (DS) and alcohol-related problems (ARP) during the academic training of medical students from Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, a cross-sectional study was conducted among students from first to sixth year of career. The Zung Self-Rating depression scale was used to evaluate DS and the CAGE questionnaire to evaluate ARP. 23.3% of participants had DS, and 7.3% had ARP. We found that the frequency of DS and ARP was higher among students in the first years of career. We recommend it is necessary to take action in the prevention and detection of these disorders from the first years of training of medical students.

  1. Impact of Subspecialty Fellowship Training on Research Productivity Among Academic Plastic Surgery Faculty in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Therattil, Paul J.; Chung, Stella; Lee, Edward S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The impact of subspecialty fellowship training on research productivity among academic plastic surgeons is unknown. The authors’ aim of this study was to (1) describe the current fellowship representation in academic plastic surgery and (2) evaluate the relationship between h-index and subspecialty fellowship training by experience and type. Methods: Academic plastic surgery faculty (N = 590) were identified through an Internet-based search of all ACGME-accredited integrated and combined residency programs. Research output was measured by h-index from the Scopus database as well as a number of peer-reviewed publications. The Kruskal-Wallis test, with a subsequent Mann-Whitney U test, was used for statistical analysis to determine correlations. Results: In the United States, 72% (n = 426) of academic plastic surgeons had trained in 1 or more subspecialty fellowship program. Within this cohort, the largest group had completed multiple fellowships (28%), followed by hand (23%), craniofacial (22%), microsurgery (15%), research (8%), cosmetic (3%), burn (2%), and wound healing (0.5%). Higher h-indices correlated with a research fellowship (12.5; P < .01) and multiple fellowships (10.4; P < .01). Craniofacial-trained plastic surgeons demonstrated the next highest h-index (9.8), followed by no fellowship (8.4), microsurgery (8.3), hand (7.7), cosmetic (5.2), and burn (5.1). Conclusion: Plastic surgeons with a research fellowship or at least 2 subspecialty fellowships had increased academic productivity compared with their colleagues. Craniofacial-trained physicians also demonstrated a higher marker for academic productivity than multiple other specialties. In this study, we show that the type and number of fellowships influence the h-index and further identification of such variables may help improve academic mentorship and productivity within academic plastic surgery. PMID:26664673

  2. Perceived Openness of Climate during Training and Transfer Motivation: Testing Two Short and Simple Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenmuller, Andreas; Frey, Dieter; Kerschreiter, Rudolf; Tattersall, Andrew J.; Traut-Mattausch, Eva; Fischer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Transfer of soft skills (e.g. communication skills) to work situations is one of the most important outcomes of training. However, research suggests that there is less than optimal transfer of training to actual work behavior. A potential reason for this is a pessimistic perception of openness of climate (OOC). Perceived OOC refers to the extent…

  3. Perceived Openness of Climate during Training and Transfer Motivation: Testing Two Short and Simple Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenmuller, Andreas; Frey, Dieter; Kerschreiter, Rudolf; Tattersall, Andrew J.; Traut-Mattausch, Eva; Fischer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Transfer of soft skills (e.g. communication skills) to work situations is one of the most important outcomes of training. However, research suggests that there is less than optimal transfer of training to actual work behavior. A potential reason for this is a pessimistic perception of openness of climate (OOC). Perceived OOC refers to the extent…

  4. Capturing students' learning experiences and academic emotions at an interprofessional training ward.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, Hanna; Ponzer, Sari; Johansson, Unn-Britt; Benson, Lina; Karlgren, Klas

    2013-03-01

    An important goal for interprofessional education (IPE) in clinical settings is to support healthcare students in collaboratively developing their understanding of interprofessional teamwork. The aim of this study was to investigate students' learning experiences and academic emotions as they occur in actual context in relation to collaborative and trialogical activities during a clinical IPE course. The contextual activity sampling system methodology was used to collect data via mobile phones. Thirty-seven healthcare students (medical, nursing, physiotherapy and occupational therapy) reported their experiences, learning activities and academic emotions several times a day via their mobile phones during their 2-week course at an interprofessional training ward (IPTW). The results provided understanding of the students' experiences of their academic emotions and how they created new knowledge collaboratively. These collaborative knowledge creation activities occurred mostly when students from different professions were collaborating as a team (e.g. discussing patient care or participating in a ward round) and were also significantly related to optimal experiences, i.e. "flow" (high challenge in combination with high competence). In conclusion, these results emphasize the importance of collaboration among students during IPTW courses. Our results might help to optimize the design of IPE learning activities in clinical healthcare contexts.

  5. Integrating climate change considerations into forest management tools and training

    Treesearch

    Linda M. Nagel; Christopher W. Swanston; Maria K. Janowiak

    2010-01-01

    Silviculturists are currently facing the challenge of developing management strategies that meet broad ecological and social considerations in spite of a high degree of uncertainty in future climatic conditions. Forest managers need state-of-the-art knowledge about climate change and potential impacts to facilitate development of silvicultural objectives and...

  6. Junior pharmacy faculty members' perceptions of their exposure to postgraduate training and academic careers during pharmacy school.

    PubMed

    Hagemeier, Nicholas E; Murawski, Matthew M

    2012-04-10

    To determine the perceptions of junior pharmacy faculty members with US doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) degrees regarding their exposure to residency, fellowship, and graduate school training options in pharmacy school. Perceptions of exposure to career options and research were also sought. A mixed-mode survey instrument was developed and sent to assistant professors at US colleges and schools of pharmacy. Usable responses were received from 735 pharmacy faculty members. Faculty members perceived decreased exposure to and awareness of fellowship and graduate education training as compared to residency training. Awareness of and exposure to academic careers and research-related fields was low from a faculty recruitment perspective. Ensuring adequate exposure of pharmacy students to career paths and postgraduate training opportunities could increase the number of PharmD graduates who choose academic careers or other pharmacy careers resulting from postgraduate training.

  7. A Profile of Academic Training Program Directors and Chairs in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Lynn D.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To identify objective characteristics and benchmarks for program leadership in academic radiation oncology. Methods and Materials: A study of the 87 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education radiation oncology training program directors (PD) and their chairs was performed. Variables included age, gender, original training department, highest degree, rank, endowed chair assignment, National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding, and Hirsch index (H-index). Data were gathered from online sources such as departmental websites, NIH RePORTER, and Scopus. Results: There were a total of 87 PD. The median age was 48, and 14 (16%) were MD/PhD. A total of 21 (24%) were female, and rank was relatively equally distributed above instructor. Of the 26 professors, at least 7 (27%) were female. At least 24 (28%) were working at the institution from which they had received their training. A total of 6 individuals held endowed chairs. Only 2 PD had active NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 12 (range, 0-51) but the index dropped to 9 (range, 0-38) when those who served as both PD and chair were removed from the group. A total of 76 chairs were identified at the time of the study. The median age was 55, and 9 (12%) were MD/PhD. A total of 7 (9%) of the chairs were female, and rank was professor for all with the exception of 1 who was listed as “Head” and was an associate professor. Of the 76 chairs, at least 10 (13%) were working at the institution from which they received their training. There were a total of 21 individuals with endowed chairs. A total of 13 (17%) had NIH funding in 2012. The median H-index was 29 (range, 3-60). Conclusions: These data provide benchmarks for individuals and departments evaluating leadership positions in the field of academic radiation oncology. Such data are useful for evaluating leadership trends over time and comparing academic radiation oncology with other specialties.

  8. Building Training Curricula for Accelerating the Use of NOAA Climate Products and Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva-Livezey, M. M.; Meyers, J. C.; Stevermer, A.; Abshire, W. E.; Beller-Simms, N.; Herring, D.

    2016-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) plays a leading role in U.S. intergovernmental efforts on the Climate Data Initiative and the Climate Resilience Toolkit (CRT). CRT (http://toolkit.climate.gov/) is a valuable resource that provides tools, information, and subject matter expertise to decision makers in various sectors, such as agriculture, water resources and transportation, to help them build resilience to our changing climate. In order to make best use of the toolkit and all the resources within it, a training component is critical. The training section helps building users' understanding of the data, science, and impacts of climate variability and change. CRT identifies five steps in building resilience that includes use of appropriate tools to support decision makers depending on their needs. One tool that can be potentially integrated into CRT is NOAA's Local Climate Analysis Tool (LCAT), which provides access to trusted NOAA data and scientifically-sound analysis techniques for doing regional and local climate studies on climate variability and climate change. However, in order for LCAT to be used effectively, we have found an iterative learning approach using specific examples to train users. For example, for LCAT application in analysis of water resources, we use existing CRT case studies for Arizona and Florida water supply users. The Florida example demonstrates primary sensitivity to climate variability impacts, whereas the Arizona example takes into account longer- term climate change. The types of analyses included in LCAT are time series analysis of local climate and the estimated rate of change in the local climate. It also provides a composite analysis to evaluate the relationship between local climate and climate variability events such as El Niño Southern Oscillation, the Pacific North American Index, and other modes of climate variability. This paper will describe the development of a training module for use of LCAT and

  9. The Impact of Role Conflict, Role Ambiguity and Organizational Climate on the Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Research-Intensive Universities in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, John

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on academics in research-intensive universities in the UK and explores their perceptions of organizational climate, role conflict, role ambiguity and job satisfaction. The findings suggest that the universities have multiple organizational climates. Three organizational climate types -- the Clan, the Hierarchy and the Adhocracy…

  10. The Impact of Role Conflict, Role Ambiguity and Organizational Climate on the Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff in Research-Intensive Universities in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, John

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on academics in research-intensive universities in the UK and explores their perceptions of organizational climate, role conflict, role ambiguity and job satisfaction. The findings suggest that the universities have multiple organizational climates. Three organizational climate types -- the Clan, the Hierarchy and the Adhocracy…

  11. Measuring the Climate of Training in Saudi Arabia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer, Richard G.

    1981-01-01

    One practitioner's experience in setting up on-the-job training in Saudi Arabia is described, including training materials, cultural environment, and the Saudi work ethic. In a related article, off-duty life for Americans is discussed, including dress for women and men, cultural aspects, and entertainment. (CT)

  12. Assisting Undergraduate Physician Assistant Training in Psychiatry: The Role of Academic Psychiatry Departments.

    PubMed

    Rakofsky, Jeffrey J; Ferguson, Britnay A

    2015-12-01

    Physician assistants (PAs) are medical professionals who practice medicine with the supervision of a physician through delegated autonomy. PA school accreditation standards provide limited guidance for training PAs in psychiatry. As a result, PA students may receive inconsistent and possibly inadequate exposure to psychiatry. Providing broad and in-depth exposure to the field of psychiatry is important to attract PA students to pursue careers in psychiatry and provide a possible solution to the shortage of psychiatrists nationwide. Additionally, this level of exposure will prepare PA students who pursue careers in other fields of medicine to recognize and address their patient's psychiatric symptoms in an appropriate manner. This training can be provided by an academic department of psychiatry invested in the education of PA students. We describe a training model implemented at our university that emphasizes psychiatrist involvement in the preclinical year of PA school and full integration of PA students into the medical student psychiatry clerkship during the clinical years. The benefits and challenges to implementing this model are discussed as well.

  13. The clinical academic workforce in Australia and New Zealand: report on the second binational summit to implement a sustainable training pathway.

    PubMed

    Windsor, John; Garrod, Tamsin; Talley, Nicholas J; Tebbutt, Carmel; Churchill, James; Farmer, Elizabeth; Baur, Louise; Smith, Julian A

    2017-04-01

    There has been a decline in the proportion of clinical academics compared with full-time clinicians, since 2004. A Working Party was established to help develop and implement a model for the training of clinical academics. After a highly successful first summit in 2014 that summarised the challenges faced by clinical academics in Australia and New Zealand, a second summit was convened late in 2015 to report on progress and to identify key areas for further action. The second summit provided survey results that identified the varied training pathways currently offered to clinical academics and the institutions willing to be involved in developing improved pathways. A literature review also described the contributions that clinical academics make to the health sector and the challenges faced by this workforce sector. Current training pathways created for clinical academics by Australasian institutions were presented as examples of what can be done. The perspectives of government and research organisations presented at the summit helped define how key stakeholders can contribute. Following the summit, there was a strong commitment to continue to work towards developing a sustainable and defined training pathway for clinical academics. The need for a coordinated and integrated approach was highlighted. Some key objectives were agreed upon for the next phase, including identifying and engaging key advocates within government and leading institutions; publishing and profiling the contributions of successful clinical academics to healthcare outcomes; defining the stages of a clinical academic training pathway; and establishing a mentoring programme for training clinical academics.

  14. Influence of training institution on academic affiliation and productivity among plastic surgery faculty in the United States.

    PubMed

    Gast, Katherine M; Kuzon, William M; Adelman, Eric E; Waljee, Jennifer F

    2014-09-01

    Educational processes that encourage a career in academic plastic surgery remain unclear. The authors' study aim was to examine the impact of training institution on the pursuit of a career in academic plastic surgery. Academic plastic surgery faculty (n = 838) were identified through an Internet-based search of all 94 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency and fellowship training programs. Academic productivity was determined by number of peer-reviewed publications and Scopus h-index. Linear and logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the correlation between attributes after adjusting for the clustering of surgeons within programs. In the United States, 39 percent of plastic surgeons in academic practice are trained in only 11 programs, 30 percent of faculty remained at training institutions, and 39 percent were affiliated with a private practice model. Faculty from frequently represented training programs were more likely to pursue fellowship training (OR, 1.32; 95 percent CI, 1.00 to 1.75), have higher h-indices (9.0 versus 5.4; p < 0.001), and have a greater number of peer-reviewed articles (46.6 versus 24.3; p < 0.001). Higher h-indices were correlated with male sex (7.1 versus 4.7; p < 0.001), fellowship training (7.3 versus 6.1; p < 0.05), and no private practice affiliation (5.2 versus 7.8; p < 0.001). Female surgeons represented 14.1 percent of academic plastic surgeons, were younger based on the median year of board certification (2005 versus 2000; p < 0.05), and were more likely to be on the tenure track (66.9 percent versus 57.2 percent; p < 0.05) and at the assistant professor level (73.1 percent versus 43.6 percent; p < 0.05). Identification of educational processes that encourage a career in academic practice may improve resident mentorship and resident interest in academic plastic surgery.

  15. Tetrahedron of medical academics: reasons for training in management, leadership and informatics.

    PubMed

    Martins, Henrique

    2009-06-01

    Medical school professors and lecturers are often called to be practicing clinicians, researchers in their own field, in addition to executing their education and curricular responsibilities. Some further accumulate healthcare management responsibilities. These areas pose conflicting demands on time and intellectual activity, but despite their apparent differences, knowledge and skills from management, leadership and informatics may prove useful in helping to smooth these conflicts and hence increase personal effectiveness in these areas. This article tries to clarify some concepts and advance why training in management, leadership and health informatics would seem particularly useful for the medical academic. As opposed to the idea of educational dispersion/specialization, the concept of an integrative tetrahedronal education framework is advanced as a way to plan workshops and other faculty development activities which could be implemented transnationally as well as locally.

  16. Academic Resilience and Achievement: Self-Motivational Resources That Guide Faculty Participation in Instructional Technology Training at a Mexican University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montero-Hernandez, Virginia; Levin, John; Diaz-Castillo, Maribel

    2014-01-01

    This study uses narrative analysis to understand the ways in which Mexican university faculty members used their self-motivational resources to persist in an instructional technology training program within adverse work conditions. The methodology included interviews and participant observation. Findings suggest that faculty's academic resilience…

  17. The Relationship between Teacher Training, Intervention Strategies, and Students' Academic Achievement in the Classroom with K-5 ADHD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    The primary intent of this study was to explore the effect between teachers' training, intervention strategies, and the academic achievement of K-5 ADHD students. The study design employed a mixed research design. The quantitative method focused on collecting data from certified regular and special-education teachers. Additionally, effects were…

  18. Effects of Adaptive Training on Working Memory and Academic Achievement of Children with Learning Disabilities: A School-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Rhonda Phillips

    2013-01-01

    Research has suggested many children with learning disabilities (LD) have deficits in working memory (WM) that hinder their academic achievement. Cogmed RM, a computerized intervention, uses adaptive training over 25 sessions and has shown efficacy in improving WM in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a variety of…

  19. The Relationship between Teacher Training, Intervention Strategies, and Students' Academic Achievement in the Classroom with K-5 ADHD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    The primary intent of this study was to explore the effect between teachers' training, intervention strategies, and the academic achievement of K-5 ADHD students. The study design employed a mixed research design. The quantitative method focused on collecting data from certified regular and special-education teachers. Additionally, effects were…

  20. Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps Career Academies and Their Impact on Academic Achievement in Urban Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely, Sheryl Austin

    2012-01-01

    Low attendance, poor behavior, low test scores, and low graduation rates among at-risk students have created a concern in urban school districts. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the impact of Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) Academy programs on students' academic performance. The theoretical foundation of the research…

  1. The Effect of Training in Instructional Designer Competencies on Teachers' Planning Routine and Their Students' Academic Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darwazeh, Afnan N.

    A class of 37 in-service government school teachers from the Nablus (Palestine) district was studied to investigate the effects of 18 hours of training in Instructional Designer's Competencies (IDC) on teachers' planning routine, and their students' academic achievement. A questionnaire measured IDC in five domains: analysis, design,…

  2. Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps Career Academies and Their Impact on Academic Achievement in Urban Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely, Sheryl Austin

    2012-01-01

    Low attendance, poor behavior, low test scores, and low graduation rates among at-risk students have created a concern in urban school districts. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the impact of Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) Academy programs on students' academic performance. The theoretical foundation of the research…

  3. Academic Resilience and Achievement: Self-Motivational Resources That Guide Faculty Participation in Instructional Technology Training at a Mexican University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montero-Hernandez, Virginia; Levin, John; Diaz-Castillo, Maribel

    2014-01-01

    This study uses narrative analysis to understand the ways in which Mexican university faculty members used their self-motivational resources to persist in an instructional technology training program within adverse work conditions. The methodology included interviews and participant observation. Findings suggest that faculty's academic resilience…

  4. Effects of Adaptive Training on Working Memory and Academic Achievement of Children with Learning Disabilities: A School-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Rhonda Phillips

    2013-01-01

    Research has suggested many children with learning disabilities (LD) have deficits in working memory (WM) that hinder their academic achievement. Cogmed RM, a computerized intervention, uses adaptive training over 25 sessions and has shown efficacy in improving WM in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a variety of…

  5. Navigating a Transdisciplinary Research Project with a Non-Traditional Academic Background: Climate Change, Soil Health and Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basche, A.

    2014-12-01

    The Climate and Corn-based Cropping Systems Coordinated Agriculture Project (CSCAP) is a collaboration of 150+ team members spanning a range of scientific disciplinary backgrounds. The project goal is to produce collaborative research, education and extension aimed at mitigating and adapting Midwest cropping systems to climate variability and change. My PhD work in Agronomy and Sustainable Agriculture is a part of the CSCAP although my prior academic background was in applied climate science and biology, thus proposing a potential challenge to the new academic landscape. Further, graduate students within CSCAP are a part of a natural experiment in how the next generation of scientists operates in a transdisciplinary environment. As part of my leadership in the CSCAP, I helped to develop a "roadmap" document outlining the learning opportunities available to students. This document was meant to underscore the skills and experiences that will aid us in future collaborative research projects. Through these leadership experiences, I believe that the underpinning of any successful collaborative research project requires time: to develop relationships, earn trust and develop shared understandings and respect for different academic backgrounds.

  6. Role of collaborative academic partnerships in surgical training, education, and provision.

    PubMed

    Riviello, Robert; Ozgediz, Doruk; Hsia, Renee Y; Azzie, Georges; Newton, Mark; Tarpley, John

    2010-03-01

    The global disparities in both surgical disease burden and access to delivery of surgical care are gaining prominence in the medical literature and media. Concurrently, there is an unprecedented groundswell in idealism and interest in global health among North American medical students and trainees in anesthesia and surgical disciplines. Many academic medical centers (AMCs) are seeking to respond by creating partnerships with teaching hospitals overseas. In this article we describe six such partnerships, as follows: (1) University of California San Francisco (UCSF) with the Bellagio Essential Surgery Group; (2) USCF with Makerere University, Uganda; (3) Vanderbilt with Baptist Medical Center, Ogbomoso, Nigeria; (4) Vanderbilt with Kijabe Hospital, Kenya; (5) University of Toronto, Hospital for Sick Children with the Ministry of Health in Botswana; and (6) Harvard (Brigham and Women's Hospital and Children's Hospital Boston) with Partners in Health in Haiti and Rwanda. Reflection on these experiences offers valuable lessons, and we make recommendations of critical components leading to success. These include the importance of relationships, emphasis on mutual learning, the need for "champions," affirming that local training needs to supersede expatriate training needs, the value of collaboration in research, adapting the mission to locally expressed needs, the need for a multidisciplinary approach, and the need to measure outcomes. We conclude that this is an era of cautious optimism and that AMCs have a critical opportunity to both shape future leaders in global surgery and address the current global disparities.

  7. Situated learning in translation research training: academic research as a reflection of practice.

    PubMed

    Risku, Hanna

    2016-01-02

    Situated learning has become a dominant goal in the translation classroom: translation didactics is being developed in a learner-, situation- and experience-based direction, following constructivist and participatory teaching philosophies. However, the explicit use of situated approaches has, so far, not been the centre of attention in translation theory teaching and research training. As a consequence, translation theory often remains unconnected to the skills learned and topics tackled in language-specific translation teaching and the challenges experienced in real-life translation practice. This article reports on the results of an exploratory action research project into the teaching of academic research skills in translation studies at Master's level. The goal of the project is to develop and test possibilities for employing situated learning in translation research training. The situatedness perspective has a double relevance for the teaching project: the students are involved in an authentic, ongoing research project, and the object of the research project itself deals with authentic translation processes at the workplace. Thus, the project has the potential to improve the expertise of the students as both researchers and reflective practitioners.

  8. Situated learning in translation research training: academic research as a reflection of practice

    PubMed Central

    Risku, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Situated learning has become a dominant goal in the translation classroom: translation didactics is being developed in a learner-, situation- and experience-based direction, following constructivist and participatory teaching philosophies. However, the explicit use of situated approaches has, so far, not been the centre of attention in translation theory teaching and research training. As a consequence, translation theory often remains unconnected to the skills learned and topics tackled in language-specific translation teaching and the challenges experienced in real-life translation practice. This article reports on the results of an exploratory action research project into the teaching of academic research skills in translation studies at Master’s level. The goal of the project is to develop and test possibilities for employing situated learning in translation research training. The situatedness perspective has a double relevance for the teaching project: the students are involved in an authentic, ongoing research project, and the object of the research project itself deals with authentic translation processes at the workplace. Thus, the project has the potential to improve the expertise of the students as both researchers and reflective practitioners. PMID:27499805

  9. Improving perceptions of teamwork climate with the Veterans Health Administration medical team training program.

    PubMed

    Carney, Brian T; West, Priscilla; Neily, Julia B; Mills, Peter D; Bagian, James P

    2011-01-01

    There are differences between nurse and physician perceptions of teamwork. The purpose of this study was to determine whether these differences would be reduced with medical team training (MTT). The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire was administered to nurses and physicians working in the operating rooms of 101 consecutive hospitals before and at the completion of an MTT program. Responses to the 6 teamwork climate items on the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire were analyzed using nonparametric testing. At baseline, physicians had more favorable perceptions on teamwork climate items than nurses. Physicians demonstrated improvement on all 6 teamwork climate items. Nurses demonstrated improvement in perceptions on all teamwork climate items except "Nurse input is well received." Physicians still had a more favorable perception than nurses on all 6 teamwork climate items at follow-up. Despite an improvement in perceptions by physicians and nurses, baseline nurse-physician differences persisted at completion of the Veterans Health Administration MTT Program.

  10. The Effects of Organizational Climate Factors on Industrial Training Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richey, Rita C.

    An extensive evaluation was conducted of a training program on industrial safety that was designed to change employee attitudes and behaviors in relation to energy control and power lockout (ECPL), i.e., closing down an assembly line while completing diagnostic or repair tasks. The research question was aimed at determining the effects of entry…

  11. A Training Partnership Focused on Climate Change Impact on Water Resources and Coastal Vulnerabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, W. E.; Brekke, L. D.; Arnold, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Beginning in 2010 the COMET® Program (www.comet.ucar.edu), a part of the UCAR Community Programs (UCP) at UCAR, entered into partnership with several Climate Change and Water Working Group (CCAWWG, http://www.ccawwg.us/) agencies to pilot a new training program. With funding coming from the Bureau of Reclamation and the US Army Corps of Engineers, a series of self-paced online lessons and live courses targeted at technical climate change and water science professionals have already been delivered. Since it's release in 2012, the first self-paced lesson developed under this partnership entitled, "Preparing Hydro-climate Inputs for Climate Change in Water Resource Planning", has been taken over 2600 times. Users have come from federal, state, and local agencies as well as academia, government and private sectors around the US as well as from other countries. Additionally, the most popular multi-day course, Hydrologic Impacts Under Climate Change (HIUCC), has been offered to a diverse audience in both residence and virtual formats. This presentation provides an overview of the training materials developed through this partnership as well as plans for future offerings. A recommended set of lessons for all users who wish explore the open materials will be highlighted, including excerpts from the newest materials covering climate change influences on water temperature for inland streams and watershed and channel sedimentation. These self-paced, online materials are currently freely available on the of the MetEd Web site (http://www.meted.ucar.edu) via the "Education & Training", "Climate" topic area. Users interested in directly accessing the materials can take these and many other lessons at http://meted.ucar.edu/climate. Additionally, the presentation highlights opportunities for learners to register for ongoing multi-day courses taught both live in person and at a distance. Now, in the beginning of the 6th year of partnership, new initiatives to train non

  12. Improving the Campus Climate for Students with Disabilities through the Use of Online Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junco, Reynol; Salter, Daniel W.

    2004-01-01

    As one strategy to improve the campus climate for students with disabilities, the Project Opportunity and Access online training program was evaluated for its ability to change the attitudes of faculty and student affairs staff. The Attitudes Towards Disabled Persons Scale was used to measure attitudes towards individuals with disabilities.…

  13. Impact of Function, Experience, and Training of School District Police on School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the impact that function, experience, and training of Independent School District School Resource Officers (ISD SROs) have on school climate. The participants were ISD SROs (n = 172) and teachers (n = 162) located in middle and high schools in Texas. Method: The Role of Law…

  14. Impact of Function, Experience, and Training of School District Police on School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the impact that function, experience, and training of Independent School District School Resource Officers (ISD SROs) have on school climate. The participants were ISD SROs (n = 172) and teachers (n = 162) located in middle and high schools in Texas. Method: The Role of Law…

  15. High School Athletes' Perceptions of the Motivational Climate in Their Off-Season Training Programs.

    PubMed

    Chamberlin, Jacob M; Fry, Mary D; Iwasaki, Susumu

    2017-03-01

    Chamberlin, JM, Fry, MD, and Iwasaki, S. High school athletes' perceptions of the motivational climate in their off-season training programs. J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 736-742, 2017-Athletes benefit tremendously from working hard in off-season training (OST) because it sets them up to avoid injuries and perform their best during the season. Ironically, many athletes struggle to stay motivated to participate regularly in this training. Research has highlighted the benefits for athletes perceiving a caring and task-involving climate, where they gauge their success based on their personal effort and improvement, and perceive each member of the team is treated with mutual kindness and respect. Athletes who perceive a caring and task-involving climate on their teams are more likely to report greater adaptive motivational responses. Research has not currently examined athletes' perceptions of the climate in OST programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between athletes' perceptions of the climate in an OST program and their motivational responses. High school athletes (N = 128; 90 males 35 females; mean age = 15.3 years) participating in summer OST programs completed a survey that included measures of intrinsic motivation, commitment, their valuing OST, feeling like it is their decision to participate in OST, their perceptions that their teammates take OST seriously, and attendance. A canonical correlation revealed that athletes, who perceived a highly caring and task-involving climate reported higher intrinsic motivation, value of and commitment to OST; attendance; and perceived teammates take OST seriously. Results suggest that creating a caring and task-involving climate in OST programs may help athletes optimize their motivation to participate in important strength and conditioning programs.

  16. An evaluation of training for lay providers in the use of Motivational Interviewing to promote academic achievement among urban youth

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Patricia; Ward, Nadia L.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined training outcomes for lay service providers who participated in a Motivational Interviewing (MI) training program designed to help increase intrinsic motivation and academic achievement among urban low-income and minority youth. Seventeen lay academic advisors received 16 hours of training in MI. Two, two-hour booster sessions plus five, two- hour weekly group supervision sessions were conducted with lay advisors over a period of seven months. One-hundred percent of lay advisors (n =17) participated in all training, booster sessions and assessments. Seventy-one percent of lay advisors (n=12) completed all group supervision sessions and submitted tapes for review. MI training was associated with increased knowledge of MI principles among lay service providers; increased proficiency in responding to simulated clients in an MI consistent style; increased use of MI adherent behaviors in sessions with real clients and maintenance of high motivation to use MI from pretest to posttest. Although lay advisors increased their knowledge of MI, further training is required for advisors to increase competence in delivering MI. Overall, Implications for using MI in the context of school-based settings is discussed. PMID:26356248

  17. An evaluation of training for lay providers in the use of Motivational Interviewing to promote academic achievement among urban youth.

    PubMed

    Simon, Patricia; Ward, Nadia L

    This study examined training outcomes for lay service providers who participated in a Motivational Interviewing (MI) training program designed to help increase intrinsic motivation and academic achievement among urban low-income and minority youth. Seventeen lay academic advisors received 16 hours of training in MI. Two, two-hour booster sessions plus five, two- hour weekly group supervision sessions were conducted with lay advisors over a period of seven months. One-hundred percent of lay advisors (n =17) participated in all training, booster sessions and assessments. Seventy-one percent of lay advisors (n=12) completed all group supervision sessions and submitted tapes for review. MI training was associated with increased knowledge of MI principles among lay service providers; increased proficiency in responding to simulated clients in an MI consistent style; increased use of MI adherent behaviors in sessions with real clients and maintenance of high motivation to use MI from pretest to posttest. Although lay advisors increased their knowledge of MI, further training is required for advisors to increase competence in delivering MI. Overall, Implications for using MI in the context of school-based settings is discussed.

  18. The Impact of Training Students How to Write Introductions for Academic Essays: An Exploratory, Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gavin T. L.; Marshall, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    Successful academic writing requires strong command of the rhetorical moves that orient the reader to the theme and substantive material of an academic essay. Effective control of the introduction leads to better overall writing. The goal of this study was to devise and evaluate a pedagogy for teaching the writing of academic essay introductions.…

  19. Postgraduate Research Students and Academic Integrity: "It's about Good Research Training"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmud, Saadia; Bretag, Tracey

    2013-01-01

    Findings from a study on academic integrity at Australian universities challenge the presumption that postgraduate research students have prior knowledge of academic integrity. A review of online academic integrity policy in 39 Australian universities found that one in five policies had no mention of higher degree by research (HDR) students.…

  20. Postgraduate Research Students and Academic Integrity: "It's about Good Research Training"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahmud, Saadia; Bretag, Tracey

    2013-01-01

    Findings from a study on academic integrity at Australian universities challenge the presumption that postgraduate research students have prior knowledge of academic integrity. A review of online academic integrity policy in 39 Australian universities found that one in five policies had no mention of higher degree by research (HDR) students.…

  1. Computer-Based Approach to the Navy’s Academic Remedial Training, Project PREST (Performance-Related Enabling Skills Training): A Cost-Effectiveness Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    multiplying deviation scores by the test -form reliability ( Kuder - Richardson 20), and then converting back to raw scores. 7 _______ . . .. -o o•. . o... Education and Training (N-5) &contracted for the development and test of a computer-based approach, hereafter referred to as the Performance-related Enabling...RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS-1963-A .. . . . .. - . . . . . . NPROC SR 81-18 MAY 1981 COMPUTER-BASED APPROACH TO THE NAVY’S ACADEMIC

  2. Beyond the "Chilly Climate": Eliminating Bias against Women and Fathers in Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joan C.; Alon, Tamina; Bornstein, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    It's no secret that academe is a challenging place to work, but those challenges are exacerbated when the academic also has family responsibilities. The scholarly world, so focused on achievement, advancement, and endless competition to break new ground, continues to advance at a glacial pace when it comes to the support and retention of women.…

  3. Beyond the "Chilly Climate": Eliminating Bias against Women and Fathers in Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Joan C.; Alon, Tamina; Bornstein, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    It's no secret that academe is a challenging place to work, but those challenges are exacerbated when the academic also has family responsibilities. The scholarly world, so focused on achievement, advancement, and endless competition to break new ground, continues to advance at a glacial pace when it comes to the support and retention of women.…

  4. The influence of staff training on the violence prevention and management climate in psychiatric inpatient units.

    PubMed

    Björkdahl, A; Hansebo, G; Palmstierna, T

    2013-04-01

    Violence prevention and management is an important part of inpatient psychiatric nursing and specific staff training is regarded essential. The training should be based on primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. In Stockholm, Sweden, the Bergen model is a staff-training programme that combines this preventive approach with the theoretical nursing framework of the City model that includes three staff factors: positive appreciation of patients, emotional regulation and effective structure. We evaluated this combination of the Bergen and City models on the violence prevention and management climate in psychiatric inpatient wards. A 13-item questionnaire was developed and distributed to patients and staff in 41 wards before the staff was trained and subsequently to 19 of these wards after training. Data analyses included factor analysis, Fisher's exact test and Mann-Whitney U-test. The result showed that the staff on trained wards had a more positive perception of four of the items and the patients of one item. These items reflected causes of patient aggression, ward rules, the staff's emotional regulation and early interventions. The findings suggest that a focus on three levels of prevention within a theoretical nursing framework may promote a more positive violence prevention and management climate on wards. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  5. The Armstrong Institute: An Academic Institute for Patient Safety and Quality Improvement, Research, Training, and Practice.

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Holzmueller, Christine G; Molello, Nancy E; Paine, Lori; Winner, Laura; Marsteller, Jill A; Berenholtz, Sean M; Aboumatar, Hanan J; Demski, Renee; Armstrong, C Michael

    2015-10-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) could advance the science of health care delivery, improve patient safety and quality improvement, and enhance value, but many centers have fragmented efforts with little accountability. Johns Hopkins Medicine, the AMC under which the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Johns Hopkins Health System are organized, experienced similar challenges, with operational patient safety and quality leadership separate from safety and quality-related research efforts. To unite efforts and establish accountability, the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality was created in 2011.The authors describe the development, purpose, governance, function, and challenges of the institute to help other AMCs replicate it and accelerate safety and quality improvement. The purpose is to partner with patients, their loved ones, and all interested parties to end preventable harm, continuously improve patient outcomes and experience, and eliminate waste in health care. A governance structure was created, with care mapped into seven categories, to oversee the quality and safety of all patients treated at a Johns Hopkins Medicine entity. The governance has a Patient Safety and Quality Board Committee that sets strategic goals, and the institute communicates these goals throughout the health system and supports personnel in meeting these goals. The institute is organized into 13 functional councils reflecting their behaviors and purpose. The institute works daily to build the capacity of clinicians trained in safety and quality through established programs, advance improvement science, and implement and evaluate interventions to improve the quality of care and safety of patients.

  6. Technology-Driven and Innovative Training for Sustainable Agriculture in The Face of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishart, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    Innovative training in 'Sustainable Agriculture' for an increasingly STEM-dependent agricultural sector will require a combination of approaches and technologies for global agricultural production to increase while offsetting climate change. Climate change impacts the water resources of nations as normal global weather patterns are altered during El Nino events. Agricultural curricula must incorporate awareness of 'climate change' in order to find novel ways to (1) assure global food security; (2) improve soil productivity and conservation; (3) improve crop yields and irrigation; (4) inexpensively develop site specific principles of crop management based on variable soil and associated hydrological properties; and (5) improve precision farming. In February 2015, Central State University (CSU), Ohio became an 1890 Land-Grant institution vital to the sustainability of Ohio's agricultural sector. Besides agricultural extension, the agriculture curriculum at CSU integrates multidisciplinary courses in science, technology engineering, agriculture, and mathematics (STEAM). The agriculture program could benefit from a technology-driven, interdisciplinary soil science course that promotes climate change education and climate literacy while being offered in both a blended and collaborative learning environment. The course will focus on the dynamics of microscale to mesoscale processes occurring in farming systems, those of which impact climate change or could be impacted by climate change. Elements of this course will include: climate change webinars; soil-climate interactions; carbon cycling; the balance of carbon fluxes between soil storage and atmosphere; microorganisms and soil carbon storage; paleoclimate and soil forming processes; geophysical techniques used in the characterization of soil horizons; impact of climate change on soil fertility; experiments; and demonstrations.

  7. Minority Pre-service Teachers' and Faculty Training on Climate Change Education in Delaware State University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbay, G.; Fox-Lykens, R.; Veron, D. E.; Rogers, M.; Merrill, J.; Harcourt, P.; Mead, H.

    2015-12-01

    Delaware State University is working toward infusing undergraduate education with climate change science and enhancing the climate change learning content of pre-service teacher preparation programs as part of the MADE-CLEAR project (www.madeclear.org). Faculty development workshops have been conducted to prepare and educate a cadre of faculty from different disciplines in global climate science literacy. Following the workshops, the faculty participants have integrated climate literacy tenets into their existing curriculum. Follow up meetings have helped the faculty members to use specific content in their curriculum such as greenhouse gases, atmospheric CO2, sea level rise, etc. Additional training provided to the faculty participants in pedagogical methods of climate change instruction to identify common misconceptions and barriers to student understanding. Some pre-service teachers were engaged in summer internships and learned how to become messenger of climate change science by the state parks staff during the summer. Workshops were offered to other pre-service teachers to teach them specific climate change topics with enhanced hands-on laboratory activities. The participants were provided examples of lesson plans and guided to develop their own lesson plans and present them. Various pedagogical methods have been explored for teaching climate change content to the participants. The pre-service teachers found the climate content very challenging and confusing. Training activities were modified to focus on targeted topics and modeling of pedagogical techniques for the faculty and pre-service teachers. Program evaluation confirms that the workshop participant show improved understanding of the workshop materials by the participants if they were introduced few climate topics. Learning how to use hands-on learning tools and preparing lesson plans are two of the challenges successfully implemented by the pre-service teachers. Our next activity includes pre

  8. Lessons Learned From a Community–Academic Initiative: The Development of a Core Competency–Based Training for Community–Academic Initiative Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Sergio; Kapadia, Smiti; Islam, Nadia; Cusack, Arthur; Kwong, Sylvia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Despite the importance of community health workers (CHWs) in strategies to reduce health disparities and the call to enhance their roles in research, little information exists on how to prepare CHWs involved in community–academic initiatives (CAIs). Therefore, the New York University Prevention Research Center piloted a CAI–CHW training program. Methods. We applied a core competency framework to an existing CHW curriculum and bolstered the curriculum to include research-specific sessions. We employed diverse training methods, guided by adult learning principles and popular education philosophy. Evaluation instruments assessed changes related to confidence, intention to use learned skills, usefulness of sessions, and satisfaction with the training. Results. Results demonstrated that a core competency–based training can successfully affect CHWs’ perceived confidence and intentions to apply learned content, and can provide a larger social justice context of their role and work. Conclusions. This program demonstrates that a core competency–based framework coupled with CAI-research–specific skill sessions (1) provides skills that CAI–CHWs intend to use, (2) builds confidence, and (3) provides participants with a more contextualized view of client needs and CHW roles. PMID:22594730

  9. Lessons learned from a community-academic initiative: the development of a core competency-based training for community-academic initiative community health workers.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Yumary; Matos, Sergio; Kapadia, Smiti; Islam, Nadia; Cusack, Arthur; Kwong, Sylvia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2012-12-01

    Despite the importance of community health workers (CHWs) in strategies to reduce health disparities and the call to enhance their roles in research, little information exists on how to prepare CHWs involved in community-academic initiatives (CAIs). Therefore, the New York University Prevention Research Center piloted a CAI-CHW training program. We applied a core competency framework to an existing CHW curriculum and bolstered the curriculum to include research-specific sessions. We employed diverse training methods, guided by adult learning principles and popular education philosophy. Evaluation instruments assessed changes related to confidence, intention to use learned skills, usefulness of sessions, and satisfaction with the training. Results demonstrated that a core competency-based training can successfully affect CHWs' perceived confidence and intentions to apply learned content, and can provide a larger social justice context of their role and work. This program demonstrates that a core competency-based framework coupled with CAI-research-specific skill sessions (1) provides skills that CAI-CHWs intend to use, (2) builds confidence, and (3) provides participants with a more contextualized view of client needs and CHW roles.

  10. Air, Ocean and Climate Monitoring Enhancing Undergraduate Training in the Physical, Environmental and Computer Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hope, W. W.; Johnson, L. P.; Obl, W.; Stewart, A.; Harris, W. C.; Craig, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Faculty in the Department of Physical, Environmental and Computer Sciences strongly believe in the concept that undergraduate research and research-related activities must be integrated into the fabric of our undergraduate Science and Technology curricula. High level skills, such as problem solving, reasoning, collaboration and the ability to engage in research, are learned for advanced study in graduate school or for competing for well paying positions in the scientific community. One goal of our academic programs is to have a pipeline of research activities from high school to four year college, to graduate school, based on the GISS Institute on Climate and Planets model.

  11. Air, Ocean and Climate Monitoring Enhancing Undergraduate Training in the Physical, Environmental and Computer Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hope, W. W.; Johnson, L. P.; Obl, W.; Stewart, A.; Harris, W. C.; Craig, R. D.

    2000-01-01

    Faculty in the Department of Physical, Environmental and Computer Sciences strongly believe in the concept that undergraduate research and research-related activities must be integrated into the fabric of our undergraduate Science and Technology curricula. High level skills, such as problem solving, reasoning, collaboration and the ability to engage in research, are learned for advanced study in graduate school or for competing for well paying positions in the scientific community. One goal of our academic programs is to have a pipeline of research activities from high school to four year college, to graduate school, based on the GISS Institute on Climate and Planets model.

  12. EdGCM: Research Tools for Training the Climate Change Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, M. A.; Sohl, L. E.; Zhou, J.; Sieber, R.

    2011-12-01

    Climate scientists employ complex computer simulations of the Earth's physical systems to prepare climate change forecasts, study the physical mechanisms of climate, and to test scientific hypotheses and computer parameterizations. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 4th Assessment Report (2007) demonstrates unequivocally that policy makers rely heavily on such Global Climate Models (GCMs) to assess the impacts of potential economic and emissions scenarios. However, true climate modeling capabilities are not disseminated to the majority of world governments or U.S. researchers - let alone to the educators who will be training the students who are about to be presented with a world full of climate change stakeholders. The goal is not entirely quixotic; in fact, by the mid-1990's prominent climate scientists were predicting with certainty that schools and politicians would "soon" be running GCMs on laptops [Randall, 1996]. For a variety of reasons this goal was never achieved (nor even really attempted). However, around the same time NASA and the National Science Foundation supported a small pilot project at Columbia University to show the potential of putting sophisticated computer climate models - not just "demos" or "toy models" - into the hands of non-specialists. The Educational Global Climate Modeling Project (EdGCM) gave users access to a real global climate model and provided them with the opportunity to experience the details of climate model setup, model operation, post-processing and scientific visualization. EdGCM was designed for use in both research and education - it is a full-blown research GCM, but the ultimate goal is to develop a capability to embed these crucial technologies across disciplines, networks, platforms, and even across academia and industry. With this capability in place we can begin training the skilled workforce that is necessary to deal with the multitude of climate impacts that will occur over the coming decades. To

  13. Academic affiliated training centers in humanitarian health, Part I: program characteristics and professionalization preferences of centers in North America.

    PubMed

    Burkle, Frederick M; Walls, Alexa E; Heck, Joan P; Sorensen, Brian S; Cranmer, Hilarie H; Johnson, Kirsten; Levine, Adam C; Kayden, Stephanie; Cahill, Brendan; VanRooyen, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    The collaborative London based non-governmental organization network ELRHA (Enhancing Learning and Research for Humanitarian Assistance) supports partnerships between higher education institutions and humanitarian organizations worldwide with the objective to enhance the professionalization of the humanitarian sector. While coordination and control of the humanitarian sector has plagued the response to every major crisis, concerns highlighted by the 2010 Haitian earthquake response further catalyzed and accelerated the need to ensure competency-based professionalization of the humanitarian health care work force. The Harvard Humanitarian Initiative sponsored an independent survey of established academically affiliated training centers in North America that train humanitarian health care workers to determine their individual training center characteristics and preferences in the potential professionalization process. The survey revealed that a common thread of profession-specific skills and core humanitarian competencies were being offered in both residential and online programs with additional programs offering opportunities for field simulation experiences and more advanced degree programs. This study supports the potential for the development of like-minded academic affiliated and competency-based humanitarian health programs to organize themselves under ELRHA's regional "consultation hubs" worldwide that can assist and advocate for improved education and training opportunities in less served developing countries.

  14. Academic research training for a nonacademic workplace: a case study of graduate student alumni who work in conservation.

    PubMed

    Muir, Matthew J; Schwartz, Mark W

    2009-12-01

    Graduate education in conservation biology has been assailed as ineffective and inadequate to train the professionals needed to solve conservation problems. To identify how graduate education might better fit the needs of the conservation workplace, we surveyed practitioners and academics about the importance of particular skills on the job and the perceived importance of teaching those same skills in graduate school. All survey participants (n = 189) were alumni from the University of California Davis Graduate Group in Ecology and received thesis-based degrees from 1973 to 2008. Academic and practitioner respondents clearly differed in workplace skills, although there was considerably more agreement in training recommendations. On the basis of participant responses, skill sets particularly at risk of underemphasis in graduate programs are decision making and implementation of policy, whereas research skills may be overemphasized. Practitioners in different job positions, however, require a variety of skill sets, and we suggest that ever-increasing calls to broaden training to fit this multitude of jobs will lead to a trade-off in the teaching of other skills. Some skills, such as program management, may be best developed in on-the-job training or collaborative projects. We argue that the problem of graduate education in conservation will not be solved by restructuring academia alone. Conservation employers need to communicate their specific needs to educators, universities need to be more flexible with their opportunities, and students need to be better consumers of the skills offered by universities and other institutions.

  15. Parameters of training, academic involvement, and practice setting predictive of retention in combined medical-psychiatric practice.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Edward; Summergrad, Paul; Price, Lori

    2014-08-01

    The authors contrasted physicians trained in both psychiatry and another specialty who continue to practice both specialties vs. those who practice only psychiatry, in terms of their training, academic profile, and practice setting. The authors analyzed survey responses from 132 doubly boarded physicians who vary in whether or not they continue to practice both specialties. Group results were compared using chi square, Fisher exact, and t tests. Of graduates of double-board programs, 79.2% continue in dual practice. Other factors associated with continued combined practice were training in neurology-psychiatry, greater academic involvement, high motivation, practice in a non-public hospital setting, and demonstrated leadership capacity. Double-board training programs have been successful in producing a group of clinicians committed to long-term combined medical-psychiatric practice, but this effect is stronger in psychiatry-neurology than in other types of combined practice. Future research should investigate other practice parameters that foster or impede integrated medical-psychiatric care.

  16. Multispecialty screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) training in an academic medical center: Resident training experience across specialties.

    PubMed

    Clemence, A Jill; Balkoski, Victoria I; Schaefer, Bianca M; Lee, Minsun; Bromley, Nicole; Maisonneuve, Isabelle M; Hamilton, Christopher J; Lukowitsky, Mark R; Poston, John; Hall, Schekeva; Pieterse, Portia; Antonikowski, Angela; Glick, Stanley D

    2016-01-01

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has recently begun to fund programs that train medical residents on how to utilize an evidence-based validated system known as screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for providing early detection and brief treatment of unhealthy substance use. This paper investigates training outcomes of multispecialty SBIRT training at one such program at Albany Medical Center (AMC), one of the initial SAMHSA grantees. Training outcomes were measured across 3 domains of learning: trainee satisfaction, acquired knowledge, and perceived usefulness. The authors explored differences in learning experience by postgraduate year and by specialty. Overall, residents were highly satisfied with the training, and learning outcomes met objectives. Residents' ratings of usefulness did not vary by program year. However, the results indicate that relative to residents in other programs, residents in psychiatry and pediatrics found the training components significantly more useful, whereas emergency medicine residents found training components to have less utility. Residents who found the training relevant to their daily work were more satisfied and more receptive to SBIRT training overall, which may help explain difference scores by program. Residents were highly satisfied with SBIRT skills training, although ratings of usefulness varied by residency program. Specialization by program and on-site modeling by senior faculty may enhance trainee satisfaction and perceived usefulness.

  17. Relationships among Student, Staff, and Administrative Measures of School Climate and Student Health and Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gase, Lauren N.; Gomez, Louis M.; Kuo, Tony; Glenn, Beth A.; Inkelas, Moira; Ponce, Ninez A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: School climate is an integral part of a comprehensive approach to improving the well-being of students; however, little is known about the relationships between its different domains and measures. We examined the relationships between student, staff, and administrative measures of school climate to understand the extent to which they…

  18. School Climate, Teacher-Child Closeness, and Low-Income Children’s Academic Skills in Kindergarten

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, Amy E.; Friedman-Krauss, Allison H.; Raver, C. Cybele; Jones, Stephanie M.; Pess, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we used data on a sample of children in the Chicago Public Schools in areas of concentrated poverty-related disadvantage to examine associations between school climate and low-income children’s language/literacy and math skills during the transition to kindergarten. We also explored whether teacher-child closeness moderated these associations. Multilevel modeling analyses conducted using a sample of 242 children nested in 102 elementary schools revealed that low adult support in the school was significantly associated with children’s poorer language/literacy and math skills in kindergarten. Teacher-child closeness predicted children’s higher language/literacy and math scores and moderated the association between low adult support and children’s academic skills. Among children who were high on closeness with their teacher, those in schools with high levels of adult support showed stronger language/literacy and math skills. There were no significant associations between adult support and the academic skills of children with medium or low levels of teacher-child closeness. Results shed light on the importance of adult support at both school and classroom levels in promoting low-income children’s academic skills during the transition to kindergarten. PMID:26925186

  19. Preventing academic difficulties in preterm children: a randomised controlled trial of an adaptive working memory training intervention – IMPRINT study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Very preterm children exhibit difficulties in working memory, a key cognitive ability vital to learning information and the development of academic skills. Previous research suggests that an adaptive working memory training intervention (Cogmed) may improve working memory and other cognitive and behavioural domains, although further randomised controlled trials employing long-term outcomes are needed, and with populations at risk for working memory deficits, such as children born preterm. In a cohort of extremely preterm (<28 weeks’ gestation)/extremely low birthweight (<1000 g) 7-year-olds, we will assess the effectiveness of Cogmed in improving academic functioning 2 years’ post-intervention. Secondary objectives are to assess the effectiveness of Cogmed in improving working memory and attention 2 weeks’, 12 months’ and 24 months’ post-intervention, and to investigate training related neuroplasticity in working memory neural networks 2 weeks’ post-intervention. Methods/Design This double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 126 extremely preterm/extremely low birthweight 7-year-old children. Children attending mainstream school without major intellectual, sensory or physical impairments will be eligible. Participating children will undergo an extensive baseline cognitive assessment before being randomised to either an adaptive or placebo (non-adaptive) version of Cogmed. Cogmed is a computerised working memory training program consisting of 25 sessions completed over a 5 to 7 week period. Each training session takes approximately 35 minutes and will be completed in the child’s home. Structural, diffusion and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, which is optional for participants, will be completed prior to and 2 weeks following the training period. Follow-up assessments focusing on academic skills (primary outcome), working memory and attention (secondary outcomes) will be conducted at 2 weeks’, 12

  20. Preventing academic difficulties in preterm children: a randomised controlled trial of an adaptive working memory training intervention - IMPRINT study.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Leona; Roberts, Gehan; Doyle, Lex W; Lee, Katherine J; Thompson, Deanne K; Seal, Marc L; Josev, Elisha K; Nosarti, Chiara; Gathercole, Susan; Anderson, Peter J

    2013-09-16

    Very preterm children exhibit difficulties in working memory, a key cognitive ability vital to learning information and the development of academic skills. Previous research suggests that an adaptive working memory training intervention (Cogmed) may improve working memory and other cognitive and behavioural domains, although further randomised controlled trials employing long-term outcomes are needed, and with populations at risk for working memory deficits, such as children born preterm.In a cohort of extremely preterm (<28 weeks' gestation)/extremely low birthweight (<1000 g) 7-year-olds, we will assess the effectiveness of Cogmed in improving academic functioning 2 years' post-intervention. Secondary objectives are to assess the effectiveness of Cogmed in improving working memory and attention 2 weeks', 12 months' and 24 months' post-intervention, and to investigate training related neuroplasticity in working memory neural networks 2 weeks' post-intervention. This double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 126 extremely preterm/extremely low birthweight 7-year-old children. Children attending mainstream school without major intellectual, sensory or physical impairments will be eligible. Participating children will undergo an extensive baseline cognitive assessment before being randomised to either an adaptive or placebo (non-adaptive) version of Cogmed. Cogmed is a computerised working memory training program consisting of 25 sessions completed over a 5 to 7 week period. Each training session takes approximately 35 minutes and will be completed in the child's home. Structural, diffusion and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, which is optional for participants, will be completed prior to and 2 weeks following the training period. Follow-up assessments focusing on academic skills (primary outcome), working memory and attention (secondary outcomes) will be conducted at 2 weeks', 12 months' and 24 months' post-intervention. To

  1. Training Material on Notification Under the Hazardous Waste Generators Academic Laboratories Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance for eligible academic laboratories trying to figure out what the notification requirements are under the Academic Labs Rule 40 CFR 262 subpart K and when filling out RCRA Subtitle C Site Identification Form (8700-12) to obtain an EPA ID number.

  2. Some Suggestions for Academic Writing Instruction at English Teacher Training Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozarska, Magdalena

    2008-01-01

    This article presents practical suggestions and tasks to make it easier to teach second language academic writing at the college level. It discusses the necessity of a warm-up period in which learners produce first drafts in pairs or small groups and do peer error correction. The article offers tasks such as reacting to an academic review,…

  3. Project LEAP: Learning English-for-Academic-Purposes. Training Manual Year Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Marguerite Ann, Ed.

    Project LEAP (Learning English-for-Academic-Purposes) is a three-year faculty development and supplemental instruction partnership to improve the academic literacy skills of native-born, immigrant, and international language minority students. This manual is the third set of faculty development materials produced by the project, presenting…

  4. Transfer of Training in an Academic Leadership Development Program for Program Coordinators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladyshewsky, Richard K.; Flavell, Helen

    2012-01-01

    The higher education sector has increasingly begun to pay more attention to academic leadership. This qualitative study explores how such an investment in a 20-week leadership development program influenced the behaviour of 10 academic staff in the role of program coordinator 6 to 12 months following participation in the program. Otherwise known…

  5. Organizational Infrastructure in the Collegiate Athletic Training Setting, Part III: Benefits of and Barriers in the Medical and Academic Models.

    PubMed

    Eason, Christianne M; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Goodman, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    Academic and medical models are emerging as alternatives to the athletics model, which is the more predominant model in the collegiate athletic training setting. Little is known about athletic trainers' (ATs') perceptions of these models.  To investigate the perceived benefits of and barriers in the medical and academic models.  Qualitative study.  National Collegiate Athletic Association Divisions I, II, and III.  A total of 16 full-time ATs (10 men, 6 women; age = 32 ± 6 years, experience = 10 ± 6 years) working in the medical (n = 8) or academic (n = 8) models.  We conducted semistructured telephone interviews and evaluated the qualitative data using a general inductive approach. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were completed to satisfy data credibility.  In the medical model, role congruency and work-life balance emerged as benefits, whereas role conflict, specifically intersender conflict with coaches, was a barrier. In the academic model, role congruency emerged as a benefit, and barriers were role strain and work-life conflict. Subscales of role strain included role conflict and role ambiguity for new employees. Role conflict stemmed from intersender conflict with coaches and athletics administrative personnel and interrole conflict with fulfilling multiple overlapping roles (academic, clinical, administrative).  The infrastructure in which ATs provide medical care needs to be evaluated. We found that the medical model can support better alignment for both patient care and the wellbeing of ATs. Whereas the academic model has perceived benefits, role incongruence exists, mostly because of the role complexity associated with balancing teaching, patient-care, and administrative duties.

  6. The Survival of Academic Publishing in the Current Political Climate: "Melbourne Studies in Education."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessant, Judith; Stockley, David

    1991-01-01

    The recent history of the academic journal, "Melbourne Studies in Education," whose publication was discontinued because of financial constraints, illustrates the contradictions between the Australian government's stated objectives for intellectual creativity and debate and the economic impact of recent changes in public policy toward…

  7. Launching a Successful Academic High School Experience and Future: Ninth Grade Climate Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Jackie F.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to present a number of academic perspectives for analysis and understanding in the attempt to progress educational situations. Specifically, the study takes a look at student and learning community transition into the high school environment and, ultimately, by doing so help meet graduation goals. Its intent is…

  8. The Representation of Women in Academic Geography: Contexts, Climate and Curricula. Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, Janice; Fortuijn, Joos Droogleever; Raleigh, Clionadh

    2004-01-01

    This Symposium integrates quantitative and qualitative information to assess the representation of women in academic geography in The Netherlands, Catalonia, Hungary and Singapore. It offers comparative commentary on the situation in the United States and additionally a focus on the experiences of a group of women geographers of colour in Canada,…

  9. A Study of Home Environment, Academic Achievement and Teaching Aptitude on Training Success of Pre-Service Elementary Teachers of India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rani, Sunita; Siddiqui, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The primary intend of the study was to explore the relationship of Arts, Science and Commerce stream and training success and the influence of Home Environment, Academic Achievement and Teaching Aptitude on training success of ETE trainees. The study analyzed the numerical data from a survey of 380 teacher trainees of three DIETs of Delhi, India.…

  10. How Can Students' Academic Performance in Statistics Be Improved? Testing the Influence of Social and Temporal-Self Comparison Feedback in a Web-Based Training Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaval, Marine; Michinov, Nicolas; Le Bohec, Olivier; Le Hénaff, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how social or temporal-self comparison feedback, delivered in real-time in a web-based training environment, could influence the academic performance of students in a statistics examination. First-year psychology students were given the opportunity to train for a statistics examination during a semester by…

  11. How Can Students' Academic Performance in Statistics Be Improved? Testing the Influence of Social and Temporal-Self Comparison Feedback in a Web-Based Training Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaval, Marine; Michinov, Nicolas; Le Bohec, Olivier; Le Hénaff, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how social or temporal-self comparison feedback, delivered in real-time in a web-based training environment, could influence the academic performance of students in a statistics examination. First-year psychology students were given the opportunity to train for a statistics examination during a semester by…

  12. Effects of EMG Biofeedback and Relaxation Training in the Prevention of Academic Underachievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Jack G.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    All treatment combinations successfully reduced both somatic and cognitive anxiety symptoms. The grade point average of experimental subjects was significantly higher than that of no-treatment controls. Findings suggest that early intervention for academic anxiety was beneficial. (Author)

  13. Training the "Clinical Scientist" through a Combined Industrial/Academic Fellowship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, J. Heyward; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A 2-year fellowship program providing training in clinical drug research and drug development methodology for pharmacists with clinical experience is described. Industry, university, and hospital research facilities are used as training laboratories. (Author/MSE)

  14. The Trainee in Context: Examining the Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Transfer Climate for Transfer of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sookhai, Fiona; Budworth, Marie-Helene

    2010-01-01

    Trainee perceptions of transfer climate have been found to be an important predictor of transfer of training. Self-efficacy has also been identified as an important individual difference related to transfer. Few studies have examined how these variables work together to enhance or limit performance following training. In a field study of 37…

  15. An Online Approach for Training International Climate Scientists to Use Computer Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarker, M. B.; Mesquita, M. D.; Veldore, V.

    2013-12-01

    With the mounting evidence by the work of IPCC (2007), climate change has been acknowledged as a significant challenge to Sustainable Development by the international community. It is important that scientists in developing countries have access to knowledge and tools so that well-informed decisions can be made about the mitigation and adaptation of climate change. However, training researchers to use climate modeling techniques and data analysis has become a challenge, because current capacity building approaches train researchers to use climate models through short-term workshops, which requires a large amount of funding. It has also been observed that many participants who recently completed capacity building courses still view climate and weather models as a metaphorical 'black box', where data goes in and results comes out; and there is evidence that these participants lack a basic understanding of the climate system. Both of these issues limit the ability of some scientists to go beyond running a model based on rote memorization of the process. As a result, they are unable to solve problems regarding run-time errors, thus cannot determine whether or not their model simulation is reasonable. Current research in the field of science education indicates that there are effective strategies to teach learners about science models. They involve having the learner work with, experiment with, modify, and apply models in a way that is significant and informative to the learner. It has also been noted that in the case of computational models, the installation and set up process alone can be time consuming and confusing for new users, which can hinder their ability to concentrate on using, experimenting with, and applying the model to real-world scenarios. Therefore, developing an online version of capacity building is an alternative approach to the workshop training programs, which makes use of new technologies and it allows for a long-term educational process in a way

  16. Ethnicity and academic performance in UK trained doctors and medical students: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Henry W W; McManus, I C

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the ethnicity of UK trained doctors and medical students is related to their academic performance. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources Online databases PubMed, Scopus, and ERIC; Google and Google Scholar; personal knowledge; backwards and forwards citations; specific searches of medical education journals and medical education conference abstracts. Study selection The included quantitative reports measured the performance of medical students or UK trained doctors from different ethnic groups in undergraduate or postgraduate assessments. Exclusions were non-UK assessments, only non-UK trained candidates, only self reported assessment data, only dropouts or another non-academic variable, obvious sampling bias, or insufficient details of ethnicity or outcomes. Results 23 reports comparing the academic performance of medical students and doctors from different ethnic groups were included. Meta-analyses of effects from 22 reports (n=23 742) indicated candidates of “non-white” ethnicity underperformed compared with white candidates (Cohen’s d=−0.42, 95% confidence interval −0.50 to −0.34; P<0.001). Effects in the same direction and of similar magnitude were found in meta-analyses of undergraduate assessments only, postgraduate assessments only, machine marked written assessments only, practical clinical assessments only, assessments with pass/fail outcomes only, assessments with continuous outcomes only, and in a meta-analysis of white v Asian candidates only. Heterogeneity was present in all meta-analyses. Conclusion Ethnic differences in academic performance are widespread across different medical schools, different types of exam, and in undergraduates and postgraduates. They have persisted for many years and cannot be dismissed as atypical or local problems. We need to recognise this as an issue that probably affects all of UK medical and higher education. More detailed information to track the problem

  17. The influence of student perceptions of school climate on socioemotional and academic adjustment: a comparison of chinese and american adolescents.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yueming; Way, Niobe; Ling, Guangming; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Chen, Xinyin; Hughes, Diane; Ke, Xiaoyan; Lu, Zuhong

    2009-01-01

    This study explored students' perceptions of 3 dimensions of school climate (teacher support, student-student support, and opportunities for autonomy in the classroom) and the associations between these dimensions and adolescent psychological and academic adjustment in China and the United States. Data were drawn from 2 studies involving 706 middle school students (M = 12.26) from Nanjing, China, and 709 middle school students (M = 12.36) from New York City. Findings revealed that students in China perceived higher levels of teacher support, student-student support, and opportunities for autonomy in the classroom than students in the United States. Furthermore, students' perceptions of teacher support and student-student support were positively associated with adolescents' self-esteem and grade point average but negatively associated with depressive symptoms for both Chinese and American adolescents.

  18. Impact of Attention Training on Academic Achievement, Executive Functioning, and Behavior: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Hannah; Gray, Kylie; Ellis, Kirsten; Taffe, John; Cornish, Kim

    2017-03-01

    Children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) experience significant difficulties in attention, learning, executive functions, and behavioral regulation. Emerging evidence suggests that computerized cognitive training may remediate these impairments. In a double blind controlled trial, 76 children with IDD (4-11 years) were randomized to either an attention training (n = 38) or control program (n = 38). Both programs were completed at home over a 5-week period. Outcome measures assessed literacy, numeracy, executive functioning, and behavioral/emotional problems, and were conducted at baseline, post-training, and 3-month follow-up. No training effects were observed at post-training; however, children in the training group showed greater improvements in numeracy skills at the 3-month follow-up. These results suggest that attention training may be beneficial for children with IDD; however, the modest nature of the intervention effects indicate that caution should be taken when interpreting clinical significance.

  19. A Comparison of the Career Maturity, Self Concept and Academic Achievement of Female Cooperative Vocational Office Training Students, Intensive Business Training Students, and Regular Business Education Students in Selected High Schools in Mississippi.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaward, Marty Robertson

    The purpose of this study was to compare the career maturity, self concept, and academic achievement of female students enrolled in intensive business training (IBT), cooperative vocational office training (CVOT), and regular business education programs. A sample of 240 students, equalized into three groups on the basis of IQ scores, were given…

  20. Gore's Nobel May Bring Even More Attention on Campuses to Environmental Issues: Award for Combating Climate Change Implicitly Honors the Work of Academic Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Richard; Monastersky, Richard

    2007-01-01

    When the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced that the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize would be shared by Al Gore, the former U.S. vice president, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the award implicitly celebrated a third party--academic institutions. Much of the research on global warming has come from university scientists, and higher…

  1. Gore's Nobel May Bring Even More Attention on Campuses to Environmental Issues: Award for Combating Climate Change Implicitly Honors the Work of Academic Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Richard; Monastersky, Richard

    2007-01-01

    When the Norwegian Nobel Committee announced that the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize would be shared by Al Gore, the former U.S. vice president, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the award implicitly celebrated a third party--academic institutions. Much of the research on global warming has come from university scientists, and higher…

  2. Work Environment: A Profile of the Social Climate of Nursing Faculty in an Academic Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Jana; May, Barbara; Butell, Sue; Tong, Vivian

    2002-01-01

    The perceptions of 15 full-time and 7 part-time nursing faculty regarding their work environment at a liberal arts college were gathered using the Moos Work Environment Scale. Scores were congruent in 7 of 10 social climate subscales. Widest discrepancies were in the areas of work pressures, physical comfort, and managerial control. (Contains 42…

  3. The Effects of Teacher Perceptions of Administrative Support, School Climate, and Academic Success in Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Lakishia N.

    2015-01-01

    Teacher turnover refers to major changes in teachers' assignments from one school year to the next. Past research has given an overview of several factors of teacher turnover. These factors include the school environment, teacher collaborative efforts, administrative support, school climate, location, salary, classroom management, academic…

  4. The Effects of Teacher Perceptions of Administrative Support, School Climate, and Academic Success in Urban Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Lakishia N.

    2015-01-01

    Teacher turnover refers to major changes in teachers' assignments from one school year to the next. Past research has given an overview of several factors of teacher turnover. These factors include the school environment, teacher collaborative efforts, administrative support, school climate, location, salary, classroom management, academic…

  5. Training for Leadership Roles in Academic Medicine: Opportunities for Psychologists in the AAMC LEAD Program.

    PubMed

    LaPaglia, Donna; Thompson, Britta; Hafler, Janet; Chauvin, Sheila

    2017-06-01

    Psychologists' roles within academic medicine have expanded well beyond research and scholarship. They are active as providers of patient care, medical education, and clinical supervision. Although the number of psychologists in academic health centers continues to grow, they represent a small portion of total medical school faculties. However, with the movement toward collaborative care models, emphasis on interprofessional teams, and increased emphasis on psychological science topics in medical curricula, psychologists are well-positioned to make further contributions. Another path through which psychologists can further increase their contributions and value within academic health centers is to aspire to leadership roles. This article describes the first author's reflections on her experiences in a two-year, cohort-based, educational leadership development certificate program in academic medicine. The cohort was comprised largely of physicians and basic scientists, and a small number of non-physician participants of which the first author was the only clinical psychologist. The insights gained from this experience provide recommendations for psychologists interested in leadership opportunities in academic medicine.

  6. Do programs designed to train working memory, other executive functions, and attention benefit children with ADHD? A meta-analytic review of cognitive, academic, and behavioral outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rapport, Mark D; Orban, Sarah A; Kofler, Michael J; Friedman, Lauren M

    2013-12-01

    Children with ADHD are characterized frequently as possessing underdeveloped executive functions and sustained attentional abilities, and recent commercial claims suggest that computer-based cognitive training can remediate these impairments and provide significant and lasting improvement in their attention, impulse control, social functioning, academic performance, and complex reasoning skills. The present review critically evaluates these claims through meta-analysis of 25 studies of facilitative intervention training (i.e., cognitive training) for children with ADHD. Random effects models corrected for publication bias and sampling error revealed that studies training short-term memory alone resulted in moderate magnitude improvements in short-term memory (d=0.63), whereas training attention did not significantly improve attention and training mixed executive functions did not significantly improve the targeted executive functions (both nonsignificant: 95% confidence intervals include 0.0). Far transfer effects of cognitive training on academic functioning, blinded ratings of behavior (both nonsignificant), and cognitive tests (d=0.14) were nonsignificant or negligible. Unblinded raters (d=0.48) reported significantly larger benefits relative to blinded raters and objective tests (both p<.05), indicating the likelihood of Hawthorne effects. Critical examination of training targets revealed incongruence with empirical evidence regarding the specific executive functions that are (a) most impaired in ADHD, and (b) functionally related to the behavioral and academic outcomes these training programs are intended to ameliorate. Collectively, meta-analytic results indicate that claims regarding the academic, behavioral, and cognitive benefits associated with extant cognitive training programs are unsupported in ADHD. The methodological limitations of the current evidence base, however, leave open the possibility that cognitive training techniques designed to improve

  7. Effects of Relaxation and EMG Training on Academic Achievement of Educable Retarded Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, John L.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Eight educable mentally retarded boys who participated in a ten-week electromyographic biofeedback training evidenced significant gains in cognition, reading achievement, coordination, memory, and handwriting. (CL)

  8. Effects of Relaxation and EMG Training on Academic Achievement of Educable Retarded Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, John L.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Eight educable mentally retarded boys who participated in a ten-week electromyographic biofeedback training evidenced significant gains in cognition, reading achievement, coordination, memory, and handwriting. (CL)

  9. Improved Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors After Implementation of TeamSTEPPS Training in an Academic Emergency Department: A Pilot Report.

    PubMed

    Lisbon, David; Allin, Dennis; Cleek, Carol; Roop, Lori; Brimacombe, Michael; Downes, Courtney; Pingleton, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    TeamSTEPPS is a validated, formal patient safety curriculum created by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) for the development of high-functioning multidisciplinary teams. TeamSTEPPS was implemented in an academic emergency department (ED), including all ED hospital staff as well as physicians and residents. It was hypothesized that extensive interprofessional education combined with implementation of specific tools would increase knowledge of TeamSTEPPS principles, attitudes, and behaviors. The TeamSTEPPS knowledge test and the AHRQ Hospital Survey attitude test were administered at 0, 45, and 90 days after training. Behaviors were evaluated using an observation tool that was developed to document huddle occurrence. Knowledge and attitudes significantly improved 45 days from baseline (P < .05) and were sustained by day 90. In this pilot study, the implementation of TeamSTEPPS training in a multidisciplinary team in an academic ED led to increased knowledge and improved communication attitudes. Adoption of a specific behavior, the huddle, also was observed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Organizational climate with gender equity and burnout among university academics in Japan.

    PubMed

    Taka, Fumiaki; Nomura, Kyoko; Horie, Saki; Takemoto, Keisuke; Takeuchi, Masumi; Takenoshita, Shinichi; Murakami, Aya; Hiraike, Haruko; Okinaga, Hiroko; Smith, Derek R

    2016-12-07

    We investigated relationships between the perception of organizational climate with gender equity and psychological health among 94 women and 211 men in a Japanese private university in 2015 using the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (i.e., personal, work-related and student-related burnout). Perceptions of organizational climate with respect to gender equity were measured with two scales including organizational engagement with a gender equal society in the workplace (consisting of three domains of 'Women utilization', 'Organizational promotion of gender equal society' and 'Consultation service'); and a gender inequality in academia scale that had been previously developed. Multivariable linear models demonstrated significant statistical interactions between gender and perceptions of organizational climate; 'Women utilization' or lack of 'Inequality in academia' alleviated burnout only in women. In consequence of this gender difference, when 'Women utilization' was at a lower level, both personal (p=.038) and work-related (p=.010) burnout scores were higher in women, and the student-related burnout score was lower in women when they perceived less inequality in academia than in men (p=.030). As such, it is suggested organizational fairness for gender equity may be a useful tool to help mitigate psychological burnout among women in academia.

  11. Organizational climate with gender equity and burnout among university academics in Japan

    PubMed Central

    TAKA, Fumiaki; NOMURA, Kyoko; HORIE, Saki; TAKEMOTO, Keisuke; TAKEUCHI, Masumi; TAKENOSHITA, Shinichi; MURAKAMI, Aya; HIRAIKE, Haruko; OKINAGA, Hiroko; SMITH, Derek R.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated relationships between the perception of organizational climate with gender equity and psychological health among 94 women and 211 men in a Japanese private university in 2015 using the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (i.e., personal, work-related and student-related burnout). Perceptions of organizational climate with respect to gender equity were measured with two scales including organizational engagement with a gender equal society in the workplace (consisting of three domains of ‘Women utilization’, ‘Organizational promotion of gender equal society’ and ‘Consultation service’); and a gender inequality in academia scale that had been previously developed. Multivariable linear models demonstrated significant statistical interactions between gender and perceptions of organizational climate; ‘Women utilization’ or lack of ‘Inequality in academia’ alleviated burnout only in women. In consequence of this gender difference, when ‘Women utilization’ was at a lower level, both personal (p=.038) and work-related (p=.010) burnout scores were higher in women, and the student-related burnout score was lower in women when they perceived less inequality in academia than in men (p=.030). As such, it is suggested organizational fairness for gender equity may be a useful tool to help mitigate psychological burnout among women in academia. PMID:27725562

  12. A Collaborative Model for Return to Academics After Concussion: Athletic Training and Speech-Language Pathology.

    PubMed

    Dachtyl, Sarah A; Morales, Pedro

    2017-08-15

    In this article, we describe an academic concussion management protocol designed for grades Pre-K to 12, called Cognitive Return to Exertion (CoRTEx). Collaboration between the speech-language pathologist (SLP) and athletic trainer (AT) is highlighted. A description of CoRTEx is provided, and the need for collaboration is emphasized. A case study illustrates an example of how CoRTEx can be implemented at the individual student level. A total of 165 students went through CoRTEx from the pilot in April 2014 through December 2016. Referrals to CoRTEx were highest for football, blows to the head, and soccer. Anecdotal evidence suggests that CoRTEx provided necessary support for students and their families, although research is needed to provide objective data. CoRTEx and other similar protocols can be used as models for SLPs to create their own academic concussion management protocols. For cases in which the injured student is an athlete, the SLP-AT collaboration is critical to carefully coordinate return to academics and return to play so that students are successful in school, as well as ready to safely return to sport. Suggestions are made for designing research studies that can provide empirical evidence for the efficacy of such academic concussion management protocols.

  13. Bridging the Gap between Industry and Higher Education: Training Academics To Promote Student Teamwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Elisabeth; Rawlins, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the need for college graduates who are prepared for employment and skilled in teamwork, outlines a rationale for the development of groupwork in higher education, and describes a program sponsored by British Petroleum in 10 institutions in England and Scotland to provide academics with professional development in teaching groupwork…

  14. Prediction Modeling for Academic Success in Professional Master's Athletic Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Scott L.; Crawford, Elizabeth; Wilkerson, Gary B.; Rausch, David; Dale, R. Barry; Harris, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Context: A common goal of professional education programs is to recruit the students best suited for the professional career. Selection of students can be a difficult process, especially if the number of qualified candidates exceeds the number of available positions. The ability to predict academic success in any profession has been a challenging…

  15. Four Language Skills Performance, Academic Achievement, and Learning Strategy Use in Preservice Teacher Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawer, Saad Fathy

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the differences in language learning strategies (LLS) use between preservice teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) and Arabic as a second language (ASL). It also examines the relationship between LLS use and language performance (academic achievement and four language skills) among ASL students. The study made use…

  16. Effects of Self-Control and Thinking Tools Training on Academic Performance of Undergraduate Venezuelan Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaber, Guillermo

    This study examined the relative effectiveness of two variations of an elective course on self-control and study behavior in modifying academic performance of freshmen undergraduate students enrolled in the independent studies program of the Universidad Simon Bolivar, in Venezuela. Of the 29 freshmen students selected to participate in this study,…

  17. Four Language Skills Performance, Academic Achievement, and Learning Strategy Use in Preservice Teacher Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shawer, Saad Fathy

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the differences in language learning strategies (LLS) use between preservice teachers of English as a foreign language (EFL) and Arabic as a second language (ASL). It also examines the relationship between LLS use and language performance (academic achievement and four language skills) among ASL students. The study made use…

  18. Academic and Social Skills Pre-requisite to Success in Vocational Training. Perceptions of Vocational Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrod, G. Franklin

    1987-01-01

    A survey completed by 270 vocational teachers identified skills considered prerequisite to success in vocational courses. Important academic skills appear to be (1) basic math, (2) written communication, and (3) measurement. Social skills considered important include (1) getting along with others, (2) taking criticism constructively, and (3)…

  19. A Phenomenological Exploration of Teacher Training Regarding Academically Advanced/High-Ability Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sueker, Carrie Olstad

    2011-01-01

    The needs of academically advanced/high-ability students may not be met in today's schools. When educational needs are not met, students may not reach full potential, may lose intrinsic motivation for learning, and may develop poor work and study habits. The rural school district involved in this study lacks a formal gifted and talented program.…

  20. A Phenomenological Exploration of Teacher Training Regarding Academically Advanced/High-Ability Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sueker, Carrie Olstad

    2011-01-01

    The needs of academically advanced/high-ability students may not be met in today's schools. When educational needs are not met, students may not reach full potential, may lose intrinsic motivation for learning, and may develop poor work and study habits. The rural school district involved in this study lacks a formal gifted and talented program.…

  1. Prediction Modeling for Academic Success in Professional Master's Athletic Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Scott L.; Crawford, Elizabeth; Wilkerson, Gary B.; Rausch, David; Dale, R. Barry; Harris, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Context: A common goal of professional education programs is to recruit the students best suited for the professional career. Selection of students can be a difficult process, especially if the number of qualified candidates exceeds the number of available positions. The ability to predict academic success in any profession has been a challenging…

  2. Bridging the Gap between Industry and Higher Education: Training Academics To Promote Student Teamwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Elisabeth; Rawlins, Mike

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the need for college graduates who are prepared for employment and skilled in teamwork, outlines a rationale for the development of groupwork in higher education, and describes a program sponsored by British Petroleum in 10 institutions in England and Scotland to provide academics with professional development in teaching groupwork…

  3. Role of the Instructor in Maximizing Academic Achievement in Computer-Based Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    nationals. This paper has been reviewed and is approved for publication. J . SCOTT NEWCOMB Contract Monitor HENDRICK W. RUCK, Technical Advisor Training...Reviewed and submitted for publication by J . Scott Newcomb, Chief Training Technology Branch This publication is primarily a working paper. It is

  4. The 2014 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's Education Development Committee (EDC) White Paper on establishing an academic department of Emergency Medicine in India – Guidelines for Staffing, Infrastructure, Resources, Curriculum and Training

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Praveen; Galwankar, Sagar; Kalra, Om Prakash; Bhalla, Ashish; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Sundarakumar, Sundarajan

    2014-01-01

    Emergency medicine services and training in Emergency Medicine (EM) has developed to a large extent in developed countries but its establishment is far from optimal in developing countries. In India, Medical Council of India (MCI) has taken great steps by notifying EM as a separate specialty and so far 20 medical colleges have already initiated 3-year training program in EM. However, there has been shortage of trained faculty, and ambiguity regarding curriculum, rotation policy, infrastructure, teachers’ eligibility qualifications and scheme of examination. Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (ACEE-India) has been a powerful advocate for developing Academic EM in India. The ACEE's Education Development Committee (EDC) was created to chalk out guidelines for staffing, infrastructure, resources, curriculum, and training which may be of help to the MCI and the National Board of Examinations (NBE) to set standards for starting 3-year training program in EM and develop the departments of EM as centers of quality education, research, and treatment across India. This paper has made an attempt to give recommendations so as to provide a uniform framework to the institutions, thus guiding them towards establishing an academic Department of EM for starting the 3-year training program in the specialty of EM. PMID:25114431

  5. Association of academic performance of premedical students to satisfaction and engagement in a short training program: a cross sectional study presenting gender differences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is important that students have a high academic engagement and satisfaction in order to have good academic achievement. No study measures association of these elements in a short training program. This study aimed to measure the correlation between academic achievement, satisfaction and engagement dimensions in a short training program among premedical students. Methods We carried out a cross sectional study, in August 2013, at Cercle d’Etudiants, Ingénieurs, Médecins et Professeurs de Lycée pour le Triomphe de l’Excellence (CEMPLEX) training center, a center which prepares students for the national common entrance examination into medical schools in Cameroon. We included all students attending this training center during last examination period. They were asked to fill out a questionnaire on paper. Academic engagement was measured using three dimensions: vigor, dedication and absorption. Satisfaction to lessons, for each learning subject was collected. Academic achievement was calculated using mean of the score of all learning subjects affected with their coefficient. Pearson coefficient (r) and multiple regression models were used to measure association. A p value < 0.05 was statistically significant. Results In total, 180 students were analyzed. In univariate linear analysis, we found correlation with academic achievement for vigor (r = 0.338, p = 0.006) and dedication (r = 0.287, p = 0.021) only in male students. In multiple regression linear analysis, academic engagement and satisfaction were correlated to academic achievement only in male students (R2 = 0.159, p = 0.035). No correlation was found in female students and in all students. The independent variables (vigor, dedication, absorption and satisfaction) explained 6.8-24.3% of the variance of academic achievement. Conclusion It is only in male students that academic engagement and satisfaction to lessons are correlated to academic achievement in this short

  6. A summary report of the workshop on the 'academic leadership training in the AIMST University, Malaysia'

    PubMed Central

    Premkumar, Rajagopal; Bhore, Subhash J.

    2013-01-01

    In Malaysia, there are 81 (as on February 15, 2013) higher education institutions including satellite branches of the foreign universities. In northern part of the Peninsular Malaysia, AIMST University is the first private not-for-profit university and aims to become a premier private university in the country and the region. The workshop described in this article was designed to develop and enhance the capacity of academic staff-in-leadership-role for the University. This type of workshops may be a good method to enhance the leadership qualities of the head of each unit, department, school and faculty in each university. PMID:24023458

  7. A summary report of the workshop on the 'academic leadership training in the AIMST University, Malaysia'.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Rajagopal; Bhore, Subhash J

    2013-06-01

    In Malaysia, there are 81 (as on February 15, 2013) higher education institutions including satellite branches of the foreign universities. In northern part of the Peninsular Malaysia, AIMST University is the first private not-for-profit university and aims to become a premier private university in the country and the region. The workshop described in this article was designed to develop and enhance the capacity of academic staff-in-leadership-role for the University. This type of workshops may be a good method to enhance the leadership qualities of the head of each unit, department, school and faculty in each university.

  8. Experiences of the gender climate in clinical training - a focus group study among Swedish medical students.

    PubMed

    Kristoffersson, Emelie; Andersson, Jenny; Bengs, Carita; Hamberg, Katarina

    2016-10-26

    Research shows that medical education is characterized by unequal conditions for women and men, but there is a lack of qualitative studies investigating the social processes that enable and maintain gender inequalities that include both male and female students. In this focus group study, we therefore explored male as well as female medical students' experiences of the gender climate - i.e., how beliefs, values, and norms about gender were communicated - during clinical training and how the students dealt with these experiences. Focus group interviews were conducted with 24 medical students (nine men) at Umeå University, Sweden. The interviews were structured around personal experiences in clinical training where the participants perceived that gender had mattered. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The students described gender-stereotyped expectations, discriminatory treatment, compliments, comments, and demeaning jargon. Female students gave more personal and varied examples than the men. The students' ways of handling their experiences were marked by efforts to fit in, for example, by adapting their appearance and partaking in the prevailing jargon. They felt dependent on supervisors and staff, and due to fear of repercussions they kept silent and avoided unpleasant situations and people rather than challenging humiliating jargon or supervisors who were behaving badly. Everyday communication of gender beliefs combined with students' adaptation to stereotyped expectations and discrimination came across as fundamental features through which unequal conditions for male and female students are reproduced and maintained in the clinic. Because they are in a dependent position, it is often difficult for students to challenge problematic gender attitudes. The main responsibility for improvements, therefore, lies with medical school leadership who need to provide students and supervisors with knowledge about gendered processes, discrimination, and

  9. Academic and personality correlates of career indecision in medical students entering training.

    PubMed

    Walters, G D

    1982-11-01

    The academic and personality correlates of medical career indecision were investigated in two separate studies. In the first, the effect of career indecision on academic performance was examined in a group of ninety-eight (eighty male, eighteen female) medical students entering Texas Tech University School of Medicine over a 2-year period. These medical students voluntarily completed the Medical Specialty Preference Inventory (MSPI) as part of a routine preadmission test battery. Subjects were assigned to one of three conditions-decided, high-interest undecided and low-interest undecided--based on results from the MSPI. As predicted, 'low-interest undecided' students achieved significantly lower initial medical school grades relative to 'decided' students, whereas 'high-interest undecided' students did not differ from the 'decided' students. The second study investigated the influence of career indecision upon personality. Subjects for this study were eighty-eight (sixty-six male, twenty-two female) medical students entering Texas Tech University School of Medicine over a 1-year period. These students voluntarily completed the MSPI and several personality measures as part of a pre-admission test battery. The results only partially supported the stated hypotheses. Although 'low-interest undecided' students demonstrated less personal integration compared with 'decided' students, they were no more anxious.

  10. Sleep and Academic Performance in U.S. Military Training and Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Nita Lewis; Shattuck, Lawrence G.; Matsangas, Panagiotis; Dyche, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    This review examines the effects of military training regimes, which might include some degree of sleep deprivation, on sleep-wake schedules. We report a 4-year longitudinal study of sleep patterns of cadets at the United States Military Academy and the consequences of an extension of sleep from 6 to 8 hr per night at the United States Navy's…

  11. Border Crossings: Research Training, Knowledge Dissemination and the Transformation of Academic Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Jurgen

    2005-01-01

    At the crossroads of current innovation policies towards a European Research Area (ERA) and a European Higher Education Area (EHEA) lies an important province of higher learning and research: doctoral training and the further careers of PhD graduates. A considerable number of higher education systems across Europe shift their paradigms for…

  12. Sleep and Academic Performance in U.S. Military Training and Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Nita Lewis; Shattuck, Lawrence G.; Matsangas, Panagiotis; Dyche, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    This review examines the effects of military training regimes, which might include some degree of sleep deprivation, on sleep-wake schedules. We report a 4-year longitudinal study of sleep patterns of cadets at the United States Military Academy and the consequences of an extension of sleep from 6 to 8 hr per night at the United States Navy's…

  13. Effects of Stress Inoculation Training on Anxiety, Stress, and Academic Performance among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiselica, Mark S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined effectiveness of preventive stress inoculation program for adolescents (n=48) that consisted of progressive muscle relaxation, cognitive restructuring, and assertiveness training. Compared with control subjects, trainees showed significantly greater improvements on self-report measures of trait anxiety and stress-related symptoms at…

  14. Making Collaborative Teaching More Effective for Academically Able Students: Recommendations for Implementation and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerber, Paul J.; Popp, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    This article contains a series of recommendations to improve collaborative teaching culled from interviews with administrators, teachers, parents, and students from 10 schools. General recommendations addressing service delivery, administrative, and communication issues are included, along with training recommendations for new and indirectly…

  15. Impact of Attention Training on Academic Achievement, Executive Functioning, and Behavior: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Hannah; Gray, Kylie; Ellis, Kirsten; Taffe, John; Cornish, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) experience significant difficulties in attention, learning, executive functions, and behavioral regulation. Emerging evidence suggests that computerized cognitive training may remediate these impairments. In a double blind controlled trial, 76 children with IDD (4-11 years) were…

  16. A Review and Study on Graduate Training and Academic Hiring of Chemists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuck, Valerie J.; Buckner, Janine P.; Nolan, Susan A.

    2007-01-01

    The experiences, which have contributed to the career choices made by women and under-representation of women on research faculties, are reviewed. It is recommended that chemistry departments take measures to improve graduate school training to make it more hospitable to women and to increase the attractiveness of careers at Research Institutes by…

  17. Effects of Stress Inoculation Training on Anxiety, Stress, and Academic Performance among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiselica, Mark S.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined effectiveness of preventive stress inoculation program for adolescents (n=48) that consisted of progressive muscle relaxation, cognitive restructuring, and assertiveness training. Compared with control subjects, trainees showed significantly greater improvements on self-report measures of trait anxiety and stress-related symptoms at…

  18. La formation aux techniques du travail universitaire et la notion de tache (Training in the Techniques of Academic Work and the Notion of Task).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses questions concerning training students in techniques of academic work and use of the English language in this context. These questions, currently researched at the English Language Center of King Abdulaziz University, focus on the notion of task as a minimal pedagogic unit, and on task-objective coordination criteria. Societe Nouvelle…

  19. Increasing the general level of academic capacity in general practice: introducing mandatory research training for general practitioner trainees through a participatory research process.

    PubMed

    Tulinius, Charlotte; Nielsen, Anni Brit Sternhagen; Hansen, Lars J; Hermann, Christian; Vlasova, Lioudmila; Dalsted, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    To obtain good quality evidence-based clinical work there needs to be a culture of critical appraisal, and strong bridges between the clinical and the academic worlds in general practice. The aim was to educate the general practitioner (GP) trainees to obtain critical appraisal skills, and through the development and implementation of the mandatory programme to gradually empower the GP community to achieve academic capacity by creating a link between the GP researchers and the GP training community. This was done by developing a faculty, giving teaching skills to GP academics, and research skills to GP clinicians; and creating an awareness of the potential benefits of critical appraisal in training GP surgeries. Development and implementation of a faculty and a programme through a participatory action research-inspired project, with process evaluation from the beginning of the planning phase. From 2006 to 2009, we built a teaching faculty of 25 teachers among clinical GPs and GP academics; developed the training programme; and delivered the programme to 95 GP trainees. Some of the GP trainees later showed an interest in more substantial research projects, and GP trainers with no previous association with the research environment started to show an interest through their function as GP trainers. The GP academics of the faculty, however, felt that it was difficult to continue the engagement because of the still increasing demand for published knowledge production in academia. It is possible to support the development of general academic capacity in general practice using participatory design in collaboration with GP academics and clinicians, building bridges between academia and clinical work, as well as within academia between research publication and teaching. There is, however, a generic barrier in the regulation of academia itself.

  20. Research productivity and academic lineage in clinical psychology: who is training the faculty to do research?

    PubMed

    Roy, Kimberlee M; Roberts, Michael C; Stewart, Peter K

    2006-07-01

    This study examined the research productivity of graduates of American Psychological Association accredited, clinical psychology doctoral programs who currently hold faculty positions. Normative averages of aggregated publications over the 2000-2004 five-year period were computed. Rankings based on the mean number of publications produced by graduates of each training program and the number of graduates were significantly correlated with U.S. News and World Report rankings, although some important differences were noted. Programs that have produced a larger number of faculty members were also more highly ranked but there was increased variability for the number of publications produced by the larger numbers of graduates. Objective outcome analyses such as graduates' publications may be preferable to more subjective reputation rankings of programs. Particularly for scientist-practitioner and clinical-scientist training programs, outcome data such as graduates' publications is an important aspect of the programs' continued self-study.

  1. [Practical games as one of the forms for optimizing the academic process in physician postgraduate training].

    PubMed

    Bobrov, V A; Davydova, I V; Bilinskiĭ, E A; Beziuk, N N; Shlykova, N A; Zaĭtseva, V I; Kozlovskiĭ, V I; Aleksandrova, L A

    1998-05-01

    Described in the article is one of the forms of optimization of the instructional process in the postgraduation physician training--"business-like games". Highly skilled, competent position of the teacher who conducts a business-like game secures an active participation in learning of students, helps in opening the mind, broadening the outlook on the problem under consideration, gives much incentive to further independent work on the discussed issues.

  2. Attention–memory training yields behavioral and academic improvements in children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder comorbid with a learning disorder

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Antonio Carlos; Cordeiro, Mara L; Felden, Erico PG; Bara, Tiago S; Benko, Cássia R; Coutinho, Daniele; Martins, Leandra F; Ferreira, Rosilda TC; McCracken, James T

    2017-01-01

    Background Recent studies have suggested that children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may benefit from computerized cognitive training. Therapy implementation is especially complicated when ADHD is associated with learning disorders (LDs). This study tested the efficacy of a computer-based cognitive training program, namely, computerized cognitive training (CCT), in children with ADHD comorbid with an LD (ADHD-LD), with or without psychostimulant medication. Materials and methods After diagnostic evaluations, 27 children with ADHD-LD (8 unmedicated and 19 medicated) participated in CCT, which is intended to improve attention, memory, reasoning, visual processing, and executive functioning. The participants completed 24 1-hour sessions over 3 months. Neuropsychometric and standardized academic test results before and after training were compared to assess treatment efficacy. Shapiro–Wilk normality tests were applied, and subsequent Wilcoxon tests were used to identify significant differences in pre-versus post-training performance. Results After CAT, children diagnosed with ADHD-LD showed 1) improvements in trained skills, measured directly within the software and indirectly by external psychometric tests; 2) improvements in attention, memory, and some executive functioning; 3) improvements in academic performance, particularly in mathematics; and 4) reductions in maladaptive behavioral features. Conclusion The present findings suggest that cognitive training programs should be explored further as potential adjunctive therapies to improve outcomes in children with ADHD-LD. PMID:28740391

  3. Attention-memory training yields behavioral and academic improvements in children diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder comorbid with a learning disorder.

    PubMed

    Farias, Antonio Carlos; Cordeiro, Mara L; Felden, Erico Pg; Bara, Tiago S; Benko, Cássia R; Coutinho, Daniele; Martins, Leandra F; Ferreira, Rosilda Tc; McCracken, James T

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may benefit from computerized cognitive training. Therapy implementation is especially complicated when ADHD is associated with learning disorders (LDs). This study tested the efficacy of a computer-based cognitive training program, namely, computerized cognitive training (CCT), in children with ADHD comorbid with an LD (ADHD-LD), with or without psychostimulant medication. After diagnostic evaluations, 27 children with ADHD-LD (8 unmedicated and 19 medicated) participated in CCT, which is intended to improve attention, memory, reasoning, visual processing, and executive functioning. The participants completed 24 1-hour sessions over 3 months. Neuropsychometric and standardized academic test results before and after training were compared to assess treatment efficacy. Shapiro-Wilk normality tests were applied, and subsequent Wilcoxon tests were used to identify significant differences in pre-versus post-training performance. After CAT, children diagnosed with ADHD-LD showed 1) improvements in trained skills, measured directly within the software and indirectly by external psychometric tests; 2) improvements in attention, memory, and some executive functioning; 3) improvements in academic performance, particularly in mathematics; and 4) reductions in maladaptive behavioral features. The present findings suggest that cognitive training programs should be explored further as potential adjunctive therapies to improve outcomes in children with ADHD-LD.

  4. Climates

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones; Norbert V. DeByle

    1985-01-01

    The broad range of aspen in North America is evidence of its equally broad tolerance of wide variations in climate (Fowells 1965). Given open space for establishment and not too severe competition from other plants, aspen can survive from timberline on the tundra's edge to very warm temperate climates, and from the wet maritime climates of the coasts to very...

  5. Serious-game for water resources management adaptation training to climatic changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Eve; Saulnier, Georges-Marie

    2013-04-01

    Water resources access is a main issue for territorial development to ensure environmental and human well-being. Indeed, sustainable development is vulnerable to water availability and climate change may affect the quantity and temporality of available water resources for anthropogenic water uses. How then to adapt, how to change water management rules and practices and how to involve stakeholders is such process? To prevent water scarcity situations, which may generate conflicts and impacts on ecosystems, it is important to think about a sustainable development where anthropogenic water uses are in good balance with forecasted water resources availability. This implies to raise awareness and involve stakeholders for a sustainable water management. Stakeholders have to think about future territorial development taking into account climate change impacts on water resources. Collaboration between scientists and stakeholders is essential to insure consistent climate change knowledge, well identification of anthropogenic uses, tensions and stakes of the territory. However sharing information on complex questions such as climate change, hydro-meteorological modeling and practical constraints may be a difficult task. Therefore to contribute to an easier debate and to the global training of all the interested actors, a serious game about water management was built. The serious game uses scientist complex models with real data but via a simple and playful web-game interface. The advantage of this interface is that it may help stakeholders, citizen or the target group to raise their understandings of impacts of climate change on water resources and to raise their awareness to the need for a sustainable water management while using state-of-the-art knowledge. The principle of the game is simple. The gamer is a mayor of a city and has to manage the water withdrawals from hydro systems, water distribution and consumption, water retreatment etc. In the same time, a clock is

  6. Structure and dynamics of a wave train along the wintertime Asian jet and its impact on East Asian climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Kaiming; Huang, Gang; Wu, Renguang; Wang, Lin

    2017-04-01

    Based on observational and reanalysis datasets, this study investigates the structure and dynamics of a wave-like atmospheric teleconnection pattern along the wintertime Asian jet and its influence on East Asian climate. Along the jet, the leading empirical orthogonal function (EOF) mode of monthly meridional winds at 250-hPa in winter (December, January, and February) is organized as a wave train with maximum anomalies at upper troposphere. The wave train propagates northeastward from the North Atlantic to Europe, turns southeastward to the Middle East with amplifying amplitude, propagates along the jet to South China, and reaches Japan, which is partly induced by sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the equatorial eastern Pacific and the North Atlantic Oscillation. Over the sector from Europe to the Middle East, the anomalous vortices in the wave train tilt northwestward with height and tilt northeast/southwest in horizontal at 250 hPa, favoring for extracting available potential energy and kinetic energy from mean flows effectively. In addition, there exists a positive feedback between transient eddies and the wave train-related anomalous circulation over the North Atlantic and Europe. These processes help to maintain and amplify the wave train. Moreover, the wave train can exert significant influences on the wintertime climate in East Asia. When it is in the phase with a cyclone (anticyclone) over South China (Japan), rainfall tends to be above normal in South and East China and surface air temperature tends to be above normal around Japan and the Korea peninsula.

  7. A Novel Program Trains Community‐Academic Teams to Build Research and Partnership Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jen; LeBailly, Susan; McGee, Richard; Bayldon, Barbara; Huber, Gail; Kaleba, Erin; Lowry, Kelly Walker; Martens, Joseph; Mason, Maryann; Nuñez, Abel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Community‐Engaged Research Team Support (CERTS) program was developed and tested to build research and partnership capacity for community‐engaged research (CEnR) teams. Led by the Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute (NUCATS), the goals of CERTS were: (1) to help community‐academic teams build capacity for conducting rigorous CEnR and (2) to support teams as they prepare federal grant proposal drafts. The program was guided by an advisory committee of community and clinical partners, and representatives from Chicago's Clinical and Translational Science Institutes. Monthly workshops guided teams to write elements of NIH‐style research proposals. Draft reviewing fostered a collaborative learning environment and helped teams develop equal partnerships. The program culminated in a mock‐proposal review. All teams clarified their research and acquired new knowledge about the preparation of NIH‐style proposals. Trust, partnership collaboration, and a structured writing strategy were assets of the CERTS approach. CERTS also uncovered gaps in resources and preparedness for teams to be competitive for federally funded grants. Areas of need include experience as principal investigators, publications on study results, mentoring, institutional infrastructure, and dedicated time for research. PMID:23751028

  8. A Review and Study on Graduate Training and Academic Hiring of Chemists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuck, Valerie J.; Marzabadi, Cecilia H.; Buckner, Janine P.; Nolan, Susan A.

    2007-02-01

    For the last thirty years there has been a consistent growth in the percentage of doctorates earned by women in chemistry. However, hiring by the top research universities has not paralleled this trend. Identification of the dissertation advisors of the tenured and tenure-track faculty members in 2001 at the top-50 chemistry departments as ranked by the National Research Council (NRC-50) shows that no advisor had more than two female students that later became faculty members at a NRC-50 department. Fifty-four professors, all of whom were male, were found to have trained three or more future faculty members and forty-six percent of these advisors (25/54) did not have one former female student holding a NRC-50 faculty position. Reasons for the low representation of women on research faculties are explored and recommendations are made for actions that would improve the graduate school environment and increase the number of female faculty members.

  9. Innoversity in knowledge-for-action and adaptation to climate change: the first steps of an 'evidence-based climatic health' transfrontier training program.

    PubMed

    Lapaige, Véronique; Essiembre, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear to the international scientific community that climate change is real and has important consequences for human health. To meet these new challenges, the World Health Organization recommends reinforcing the adaptive capacity of health systems. One of the possible avenues in this respect is to promote awareness and knowledge translation in climatic health, at both the local and global scales. Within such perspective, two major themes have emerged in the field of public health research: 1) the development of advanced training adapted to 'global environment' change and to the specific needs of various groups of actors (doctors, nurses, public health practitioners, health care managers, public service managers, local communities, etc) and 2) the development of strategies for implementing research results and applying various types of evidence to the management of public health issues affected by climate change. Progress on these two fronts will depend on maximum innovation in transdisciplinary and transsectoral collaborations. The general purpose of this article is to present the program of a new research and learning chair designed for this double set of developmental objectives - a chair that emphasizes 'innoversity' (the dynamic relationship between innovation and diversity) and 'transfrontier ecolearning for adaptive actions'. The Écoapprentissages, santé mentale et climat collaborative research chair (University of Montreal and Quebec National Public Health Institute) based in Montreal is a center for 'transdisciplinary research' on the transfrontier knowledge-for-action that can aid adaptation of the public health sector, the public mental health sector, and the public service sector to climate change, as well as a center for complex collaborations on evidence-based climatic health 'training'. This program-focused article comprises two main sections. The first section presents the 'general' and 'specific contexts' in which the

  10. Academic Outcomes 2 Years After Working Memory Training for Children With Low Working Memory: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Gehan; Quach, Jon; Spencer-Smith, Megan; Anderson, Peter J; Gathercole, Susan; Gold, Lisa; Sia, Kah-Ling; Mensah, Fiona; Rickards, Field; Ainley, John; Wake, Melissa

    2016-05-02

    Working memory training may help children with attention and learning difficulties, but robust evidence from population-level randomized controlled clinical trials is lacking. To test whether a computerized adaptive working memory intervention program improves long-term academic outcomes of children 6 to 7 years of age with low working memory compared with usual classroom teaching. Population-based randomized controlled clinical trial of first graders from 44 schools in Melbourne, Australia, who underwent a verbal and visuospatial working memory screening. Children were classified as having low working memory if their scores were below the 15th percentile on either the Backward Digit Recall or Mister X subtest from the Automated Working Memory Assessment, or if their scores were below the 25th percentile on both. These children were randomly assigned by an independent statistician to either an intervention or a control arm using a concealed computerized random number sequence. Researchers were blinded to group assignment at time of screening. We conducted our trial from March 1, 2012, to February 1, 2015; our final analysis was on October 30, 2015. We used intention-to-treat analyses. Cogmed working memory training, comprising 20 to 25 training sessions of 45 minutes' duration at school. Directly assessed (at 12 and 24 months) academic outcomes (reading, math, and spelling scores as primary outcomes) and working memory (also assessed at 6 months); parent-, teacher-, and child-reported behavioral and social-emotional functioning and quality of life; and intervention costs. Of 1723 children screened (mean [SD] age, 6.9 [0.4] years), 226 were randomized to each arm (452 total), with 90% retention at 1 year and 88% retention at 2 years; 90.3% of children in the intervention arm completed at least 20 sessions. Of the 4 short-term and working memory outcomes, 1 outcome (visuospatial short-term memory) benefited the children at 6 months (effect size, 0.43 [95% CI, 0

  11. Does Academic Apprenticeship Increase Networking Ties among Participants? A Case Study of an Energy Efficiency Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hytönen, Kaisa; Palonen, Tuire; Lehtinen, Erno; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the requirements of future education in different fields of academic professional activity, a model called Academic Apprenticeship Education was initiated in Finland in 2009. The aim of this article is to analyse the development of expert networks in the context of a 1-year Academic Apprenticeship Education model in the field…

  12. Does Academic Apprenticeship Increase Networking Ties among Participants? A Case Study of an Energy Efficiency Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hytönen, Kaisa; Palonen, Tuire; Lehtinen, Erno; Hakkarainen, Kai

    2014-01-01

    In order to address the requirements of future education in different fields of academic professional activity, a model called Academic Apprenticeship Education was initiated in Finland in 2009. The aim of this article is to analyse the development of expert networks in the context of a 1-year Academic Apprenticeship Education model in the field…

  13. [Looking for the physicians that our countries need: emphasis on communication and training of academics].

    PubMed

    Rosselot, Eduardo

    2003-03-01

    Changes in physicians education and practice induce, nowadays persistent modifications in program's curricula and contents and in learning methodologies, in almost all medical schools and countries. In many of these, and in Chile, this process shows some peculiarities due to the unusual proliferation of medical schools and their differing proposals about the profile of the professional training based on epidemiological considerations and teaching resources. The institutional initiatives leading to reforms, have defined quality and pertinence of these programs and profiles, as it has been the case of the curricular renewal in the University of Chile School of Medicine. Relevant to this reform have been: 1) the introduction of communication skills, pursuing to increase humanistic contents, to improve patient doctor relationship and to accomplish the actual goals of medicine, and 2) capacitating the faculty in the proper disciplines and competencies, for better application of new knowledge and teaching tools to improve learning of the health professionals. Prospective evaluation of these changes will allow us to assess, with best evidence, its definitive role, that is momentarily availed by student's satisfaction.

  14. Providing a setup and opportunities for better training of postdoctoral research fellows in an academic environment.

    PubMed

    Ghayur, Muhammad N

    2008-01-01

    Thousands of young researchers come from different parts of the world every year to take up postdoctoral (postdoc) research fellowship positions in the developed countries. In the US alone, there were 48,601 postdocs in the year 2005 working in different labs in the fields of science, health and engineering. Many pursue this option for lack of other alternatives. Expectedly, these individuals face a lot of difficulties in making this transition from being a student to becoming an employee of an institution. Many institutions are prepared to make this transition and period of stay easy for their fellows while others are not equipped at all. The presence of a postdoc office (established by an institution) or an association (formed by the fellows) can be of immense help to postdocs. Additionally, the availability of institutional professional development and leadership programs can also help to nurture and polish postdoc fellows into future faculty members and valuable members of the community at large. To name a few, these professional development programs can focus on communication and presentation skills, medical education, teaching and learning, bioethics and mentorship. There is an urgent need to address some or all of these issues so that better training environment and opportunities are available to this group of postdoc fellows.

  15. Out on the Web: The Relationship between Campus Climate and GLBT-Related Web-based Resources in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciszek, Matthew P.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between the perceived campus environment for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) students at colleges and universities and how academic libraries have deployed GLBT-related resources on the Web. Recommendations are made for increasing GLBT-related materials and information in academic libraries.…

  16. Academic and Workplace-related Visual Stresses Induce Detectable Deterioration Of Performance, Measured By Basketball Trajectories and Astigmatism Impacting Athletes Or Students In Military Pilot Training.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mc Leod, Roger D.

    2004-03-01

    Separate military establishments across the globe can confirm that a high percentage of their prospective pilots-in-training are no longer visually fit to continue the flight training portion of their programs once their academic coursework is completed. I maintain that the visual stress induced by those intensive protocols can damage the visual feedback mechanism of any healthy and dynamic system beyond its usual and ordinary ability to self-correct minor visual loss of acuity. This deficiency seems to be detectable among collegiate and university athletes by direct observation of the height of the trajectory arc of a basketball's flight. As a particular athlete becomes increasingly stressed by academic constraints requiring long periods of concentrated reading under highly static angular convergence of the eyes, along with unfavorable illumination and viewing conditions, eyesight does deteriorate. I maintain that induced astigmatism is a primary culprit because of the evidence of that basketball's trajectory! See the next papers!

  17. The music therapy clinical intern: performance skills, academic knowledge, personal qualities, and interpersonal skills necessary for a student seeking clinical training.

    PubMed

    Brookins, L M

    1984-01-01

    The music therapy curriculum consists of two distinct parts: the academic phase and the internship. The music therapy student must apply for a clinical internship during the last year of the academic phase, and the student is expected to evolve from student to professional music therapist during the internship phase. The present study sought to determine the skills, knowledge, and qualities clinical training directors considered most important for a prospective intern to possess. The sample population of the survey consisted of 25 clinical training directors from the Great Lakes Region. Results of the survey indicated that piano skills, knowledge of psychology, emotional maturity, and the ability to express needs and feelings were considered most important for the prospective intern to possess.

  18. Parental aspirations for their children's educational attainment: relations to ethnicity, parental education, children's academic performance, and parental perceptions of school climate.

    PubMed

    Spera, Christopher; Wentzel, Kathryn R; Matto, Holly C

    2009-09-01

    This study examined parental aspirations for their children's educational attainment in relation to ethnicity (African American, Asian, Caucasian, Hispanic), parental education, children's academic performance, and parental perceptions of the quality and climate of their children's school with a sample of 13,577 middle and high school parents. All parents had relatively high educational aspirations for their children, and within each ethnic subgroup, parental education and children's academic performance were significantly and positively related to parental aspirations. However, moderating effects were found such that Caucasian parents with lower levels of education had significantly lower educational aspirations for their children than did parents of other ethnicities with similar low levels of education. Although the strength of the relationship between parental perceptions of school-related factors and parental aspirations for their children's educational attainment was not strong, it was most predictive of non-Caucasian parental aspirations for their children.

  19. Academic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Vivian E; Horner, Keith

    2008-07-01

    Since 1988, thirteen dental schools have provided dental undergraduate programmes within the United Kingdom (UK). In 2006, two new dental schools were created supporting dental education in the community. A further new dental school in Scotland will be accepting students in autumn 2008. In the past 25 years, extensive reorganisation of the NHS has resulted in long-term implications for the training of medical and dental academic staff. The number of academic clinicians is below the minimum viable level and external constraints, combined with a lack of suitable applicants, have led to a moratorium on academic recruitment within some Dental Schools. A detailed review of the historical and associated factors which have led to the problems presently besetting academic dentistry are discussed along with the initiatives introduced in the last 10 years to revitalise the speciality. Also, the present and future outlook for academic dentistry in other countries are discussed. Opinion is divided as to the appropriate setting for the training of undergraduate students between those who support community-based dental education and those who believe dental education should remain within research led dental establishments. External factors are moulding an unsatisfactory situation that is proving increasingly unattractive to the potential dental academic and the case for reform is obvious.

  20. The 2015 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's INDO-US Joint Working Group White Paper on Establishing an Academic Department and Training Pediatric Emergency Medicine Specialists in India.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Prashant; Batra, Prerna; Shah, Binita R; Saha, Abhijeet; Galwankar, Sagar; Aggrawal, Praveen; Hassoun, Ameer; Batra, Bipin; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kalra, Om Prakash; Shah, Dheeraj

    2015-01-01

    The concept of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) is virtually nonexistent in India. Suboptimally, organized prehospital services substantially hinder the evaluation, management, and subsequent transport of the acutely ill and/or injured child to an appropriate facility. Furthermore, the management of the ill child at the hospital level is often provided by overburdened providers who, by virtue of their training, lack experience in the skills required to effectively manage pediatric emergencies. Finally, the care of the traumatized child often requires the involvement of providers trained in different specialities, which further impedes timely access to appropriate care. The recent recognition of Doctor of Medicine (MD) in Emergency Medicine (EM) as an approved discipline of study as per the Indian Medical Council Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to introduce PEM as a formal academic program in India. PEM has to be developed as a 3-year superspeciality course (in PEM) after completion of MD/Diplomate of National Board (DNB) Pediatrics or MD/DNB in EM. The National Board of Examinations (NBE) that accredits and administers postgraduate and postdoctoral programs in India also needs to develop an academic program - DNB in PEM. The goals of such a program would be to impart theoretical knowledge, training in the appropriate skills and procedures, development of communication and counseling techniques, and research. In this paper, the Joint Working Group of the Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (JWG-ACEE-India) gives its recommendations for starting 3-year DM/DNB in PEM, including the curriculum, infrastructure, staffing, and training in India. This is an attempt to provide an uniform framework and a set of guiding principles to start PEM as a structured superspeciality to enhance emergency care for Indian children.

  1. The 2015 Academic College of Emergency Experts in Indias INDO-US Joint Working Group White Paper on Establishing an Academic Department and Training Pediatric Emergency Medicine Specialists in India.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Prashant; Batra, Prerna; Shah, Binita R; Saha, Abhijeet; Galwankar, Sagar; Aggrawal, Praveen; Hassoun, Ameer; Batra, Bipin; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kalra, Om Prakash; Shah, Dheeraj

    2015-12-01

    The concept of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) is virtually nonexistent in India. Suboptimally organized prehospital services substantially hinder the evaluation, management, and subsequent transport of the acutely ill and/or injured child to an appropriate facility. Furthermore, the management of the ill child at the hospital level is often provided by overburdened providers who, by virtue of their training, lack experience in the skills required to effectively manage pediatric emergencies. Finally, the care of the traumatized child often requires the involvement of providers trained in different specialities, which further impedes timely access to appropriate care. The recent recognition of Doctor of Medicine in Emergency Medicine as an approved discipline of study as per the Indian Medical Council Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to introduce PEM as a formal academic program in India. PEM has to be developed as a 3 year superspeciality course after completion of MD Diplomate of National Board (DNB) Pediatrics or MD DNB in EM. The National Board of Examinations that accredits and administers postgraduate and postdoctoral programs in India also needs to develop an academic program DNB in PEM. The goals of such a program would be to impart theoretical knowledge, training in the appropriate skills and procedures, development of communication and counseling techniques, and research. In this paper, the Joint Working Group of the Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (JWG ACEE India) gives its recommendations for starting 3 year DM DNB in PEM, including the curriculum, infrastructure, staffing, and training in India. This is an attempt to provide an uniform framework and a set of guiding principles to start PEM as a structured superspeciality to enhance emergency care for Indian children.

  2. The 2015 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's INDO-US Joint Working Group White Paper on Establishing an Academic Department and Training Pediatric Emergency Medicine Specialists in India

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Prashant; Batra, Prerna; Shah, Binita R; Saha, Abhijeet; Galwankar, Sagar; Aggrawal, Praveen; Hassoun, Ameer; Batra, Bipin; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kalra, Om Prakash; Shah, Dheeraj

    2015-01-01

    The concept of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) is virtually nonexistent in India. Suboptimally, organized prehospital services substantially hinder the evaluation, management, and subsequent transport of the acutely ill and/or injured child to an appropriate facility. Furthermore, the management of the ill child at the hospital level is often provided by overburdened providers who, by virtue of their training, lack experience in the skills required to effectively manage pediatric emergencies. Finally, the care of the traumatized child often requires the involvement of providers trained in different specialities, which further impedes timely access to appropriate care. The recent recognition of Doctor of Medicine (MD) in Emergency Medicine (EM) as an approved discipline of study as per the Indian Medical Council Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to introduce PEM as a formal academic program in India. PEM has to be developed as a 3-year superspeciality course (in PEM) after completion of MD/Diplomate of National Board (DNB) Pediatrics or MD/DNB in EM. The National Board of Examinations (NBE) that accredits and administers postgraduate and postdoctoral programs in India also needs to develop an academic program – DNB in PEM. The goals of such a program would be to impart theoretical knowledge, training in the appropriate skills and procedures, development of communication and counseling techniques, and research. In this paper, the Joint Working Group of the Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (JWG-ACEE-India) gives its recommendations for starting 3-year DM/DNB in PEM, including the curriculum, infrastructure, staffing, and training in India. This is an attempt to provide an uniform framework and a set of guiding principles to start PEM as a structured superspeciality to enhance emergency care for Indian children. PMID:26807394

  3. A review of the effectiveness of stress management skills training on academic vitality and psychological well-being of college students

    PubMed Central

    Alborzkouh, P; Nabati, M; Zainali, M; Abed, Y; Shahgholy Ghahfarokhi, F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Carrying out the appropriate psychological interventions to improve vitality and mental well-being is critical. The study was carried out to review the effectiveness of stress management training on the academic life and mental well-being of the students of Shahed University. Methodology: The method used was quasi-experimental with a pretest-posttest plan and control group. Therefore, a total of 40 students of Shahed University of Tehran were selected by a convenience sampling method and were organized into two groups: experimental and control group. Both groups were pretested by using an academic vitality inventory and an 84-question psychological well-being inventory. Then, the experimental group received stress management skills training for ten sessions, and the control group did not receive any intervention. Next, both groups were post-tested, and the data were analyzed with SPSS-21 software by using descriptive and inferential statistical methods. Findings: The findings showed that the stress management skills training significantly contributed to promoting the academic vitality and psychological well-being of students (p < 0.001). Conclusions: It was concluded from this research that teaching the methods for dealing with stress was an effective strategy to help students exposed to high stress and pressure, and this was due to its high efficiency, especially when it was held in groups, had a small cost, and it was accepted by the individuals.

  4. Attracting young academics into the field of psychiatry and psychotherapy in Switzerland--the Zurich 'Study Focus on Psychiatry' and training concept for medical psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gerke, Wolfgang; Rufer, Michael; Schnyder, Ulrich

    2013-08-01

    For several years the demand regarding psychiatrists in Switzerland can only be satisfied by recruiting colleagues from other countries. Given the global increase of mental disorders, initiatives encouraging young academics to choose psychiatry as their speciality, and enhancing the attractiveness of our field, are urgently needed. Two projects for the promotion of young academics are presented in this paper, one working with medical students, the other with residents in psychiatry. The Zurich 'Study Focus on Psychiatry' provides medical students with knowledge and key competencies in psychiatry at an early stage of their undergraduate training. This way, students are offered an opportunity to have a thorough look into psychiatry as a clinical specialism and as a science. The three-year psychotherapy training curriculum in medical psychotherapy provides residents in psychiatry and psychotherapy with specific training in either cognitive behavioural, or psychodynamic, or systemic psychotherapy. Additionally, and independent of the psychotherapeutic orientation they have chosen, all trainees attend joint sessions focusing on generic elements of psychotherapy and facilitating a hands-on transfer of psychotherapeutic principles into their clinical routine. These two projects aim at enhancing the attractiveness of psychiatry and psychotherapy as a speciality, and thus contributing to the promotion of young academics.

  5. A review of the effectiveness of stress management skills training on academic vitality and psychological well-being of college students.

    PubMed

    Alborzkouh, P; Nabati, M; Zainali, M; Abed, Y; Shahgholy Ghahfarokhi, F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Carrying out the appropriate psychological interventions to improve vitality and mental well-being is critical. The study was carried out to review the effectiveness of stress management training on the academic life and mental well-being of the students of Shahed University. Methodology: The method used was quasi-experimental with a pretest-posttest plan and control group. Therefore, a total of 40 students of Shahed University of Tehran were selected by a convenience sampling method and were organized into two groups: experimental and control group. Both groups were pretested by using an academic vitality inventory and an 84-question psychological well-being inventory. Then, the experimental group received stress management skills training for ten sessions, and the control group did not receive any intervention. Next, both groups were post-tested, and the data were analyzed with SPSS-21 software by using descriptive and inferential statistical methods. Findings: The findings showed that the stress management skills training significantly contributed to promoting the academic vitality and psychological well-being of students (p < 0.001). Conclusions: It was concluded from this research that teaching the methods for dealing with stress was an effective strategy to help students exposed to high stress and pressure, and this was due to its high efficiency, especially when it was held in groups, had a small cost, and it was accepted by the individuals.

  6. Innoversity in knowledge-for-action and adaptation to climate change: the first steps of an ‘evidence-based climatic health’ transfrontier training program

    PubMed Central

    Lapaige, Véronique; Essiembre, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear to the international scientific community that climate change is real and has important consequences for human health. To meet these new challenges, the World Health Organization recommends reinforcing the adaptive capacity of health systems. One of the possible avenues in this respect is to promote awareness and knowledge translation in climatic health, at both the local and global scales. Within such perspective, two major themes have emerged in the field of public health research: 1) the development of advanced training adapted to ‘global environment’ change and to the specific needs of various groups of actors (doctors, nurses, public health practitioners, health care managers, public service managers, local communities, etc) and 2) the development of strategies for implementing research results and applying various types of evidence to the management of public health issues affected by climate change. Progress on these two fronts will depend on maximum innovation in transdisciplinary and transsectoral collaborations. The general purpose of this article is to present the program of a new research and learning chair designed for this double set of developmental objectives – a chair that emphasizes ‘innoversity’ (the dynamic relationship between innovation and diversity) and ‘transfrontier ecolearning for adaptive actions’. The Écoapprentissages, santé mentale et climat collaborative research chair (University of Montreal and Quebec National Public Health Institute) based in Montreal is a center for ‘transdisciplinary research’ on the transfrontier knowledge-for-action that can aid adaptation of the public health sector, the public mental health sector, and the public service sector to climate change, as well as a center for complex collaborations on evidence-based climatic health ‘training’. This program-focused article comprises two main sections. The first section presents the ‘general’ and

  7. Academic Inbreeding in Nursing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael H.

    1977-01-01

    Academic inbreeding, the employment for faculty positions of persons who receive their graduate training at the same academic institution, is considered detrimental to an institution's academic environment. Results of a study conducted at 54 universities revealed that almost half the faculty (48 percent) in collegiate nursing programs are drawn…

  8. The Effects of a Warm or Chilly Climate Toward Socioeconomic Diversity on Academic Motivation and Self-Concept.

    PubMed

    Browman, Alexander S; Destin, Mesmin

    2016-02-01

    Persistent academic achievement gaps exist between university students from high and low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds. The current research proposes that the extent to which a university is perceived as actively supporting versus passively neglecting students from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds can influence low-SES students' academic motivation and self-concepts. In Experiments 1 and 2, low-SES students exposed to cues suggestive of an institution's warmth toward socioeconomic diversity demonstrated greater academic efficacy, expectations, and implicit associations with high academic achievement compared with those exposed to cues indicating institutional chilliness. Exploring the phenomenology underlying these effects, Experiment 3 demonstrated that warmth cues led low-SES students to perceive their socioeconomic background as a better match with the rest of the student body and to perceive the university as more socioeconomically diverse than did chilliness cues. Contributions to our understanding of low-SES students' psychological experiences in academic settings and practical implications for academic institutions are discussed. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  9. Community‐Based Participatory Research Skills and Training Needs in a Sample of Academic Researchers from a Clinical and Translational Science Center in the Northeast

    PubMed Central

    DiGirolamo, Ann; Geller, Alan C.; Tendulkar, Shalini A.; Patil, Pratima; Hacker, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To determine the community‐based participatory research (CBPR) training interests and needs of researchers interested in CBPR to inform efforts to build infrastructure for conducting community‐engaged research. Method: A 20‐item survey was completed by 127 academic health researchers at Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, and Harvard affiliated hospitals. Results: Slightly more than half of the participants reported current or prior experience with CBPR (58 %). Across all levels of academic involvement, approximately half of the participants with CBPR experience reported lacking skills in research methods and dissemination, with even fewer reporting skills in training of community partners. Regardless of prior CBPR experience, about half of the respondents reported having training needs in funding, partnership development, evaluation, and dissemination of CBPR projects. Among those with CBPR experience, more than one‐third of the participants wanted a mentor in CBPR; however only 19 % were willing to act as a mentor. Conclusions: Despite having experience with CBPR, many respondents did not have the comprehensive package of CBPR skills, reporting a need for training in a variety of CBPR skill sets. Further, the apparent mismatch between the need for mentors and availability in this sample suggests an important area for development. Clin Trans Sci 2012; Volume #: 1–5 PMID:22686211

  10. Community-based participatory research skills and training needs in a sample of academic researchers from a clinical and translational science center in the Northeast.

    PubMed

    DiGirolamo, Ann; Geller, Alan C; Tendulkar, Shalini A; Patil, Pratima; Hacker, Karen

    2012-06-01

    To determine the community-based participatory research (CBPR) training interests and needs of researchers interested in CBPR to inform efforts to build infrastructure for conducting community-engaged research. A 20-item survey was completed by 127 academic health researchers at Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, and Harvard affiliated hospitals. Slightly more than half of the participants reported current or prior experience with CBPR (58 %). Across all levels of academic involvement, approximately half of the participants with CBPR experience reported lacking skills in research methods and dissemination, with even fewer reporting skills in training of community partners. Regardless of prior CBPR experience, about half of the respondents reported having training needs in funding, partnership development, evaluation, and dissemination of CBPR projects. Among those with CBPR experience, more than one-third of the participants wanted a mentor in CBPR; however only 19 % were willing to act as a mentor. Despite having experience with CBPR, many respondents did not have the comprehensive package of CBPR skills, reporting a need for training in a variety of CBPR skill sets. Further, the apparent mismatch between the need for mentors and availability in this sample suggests an important area for development. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Do Intervention Impacts on Academic Achievement Vary by School Climate? Evidence from a Randomized Trial in Urban Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Meghan P.; Cappella, Elise; O'Connor, Erin E.; McClowry, Sandee G.

    2015-01-01

    Given established links between social-emotional skills and academic achievement, there is growing support for implementing universal social/behavioral interventions in early schooling (Jones & Bouffard, 2012). Advocates have been particularly interested in implementing such programming in low income urban schools where students are likely to…

  12. A Longitudinal Model of School Climate, Social Justice Orientation, and Academic Outcomes among Latina/o Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pérez-Gualdrón, Leyla, M.; Helms, Janet E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Social justice orientation (SJO) is the motivation to promote justice and equity among all in society. Researchers argue that students of Color with high SJO can resist structural racism in their schools/society and have positive academic outcomes. Purpose: In the present study, a longitudinal model of cultural and environmental…

  13. Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Earth's climate may be defined as the global physical condition, averaged over some period of time (typically decades or longer), of the EARTH'S ATMOSPHERE, OCEAN and ice sheets. It is the presence of a relatively dense atmosphere—third among the solid bodies of the solar system—that makes Earth habitable. Without the blanketing of infrared energy radiated from Earth's surface and lower atmospher...

  14. Industrial Relations and Training--Part 1: On Beginning to Change the Industrial Relations Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, John

    1973-01-01

    Authoritarian management from above can no longer impose controls on subordinates. Participative management is now essential to improve organizational efficiency, release individual and group initiative, and make a fundamental improvement in the climate of British industrial relations. (MS)

  15. What is a geriatrician? American Geriatrics Society and Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs end-of-training entrustable professional activities for geriatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Leipzig, Rosanne M; Sauvigné, Karen; Granville, Lisa J; Harper, G Michael; Kirk, Lynne M; Levine, Sharon A; Mosqueda, Laura; Parks, Susan Mockus; Fernandez, Helen M; Busby-Whitehead, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) describe the core work that constitutes a discipline's specific expertise and provide the framework for faculty to perform meaningful assessment of geriatric fellows. This article describes the collaborative process of developing the end-of-training American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs (ADGAP) EPAs for Geriatric Medicine (AGS/ADGAP EPAs). The geriatrics EPAs describes a geriatrician's fundamental expertise and how geriatricians differ from general internists and family practitioners who care for older adults. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. Academic Research in the 21st Century: Maintaining Scientific Integrity in a Climate of Perverse Incentives and Hypercompetition

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Marc A.; Roy, Siddhartha

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Over the last 50 years, we argue that incentives for academic scientists have become increasingly perverse in terms of competition for research funding, development of quantitative metrics to measure performance, and a changing business model for higher education itself. Furthermore, decreased discretionary funding at the federal and state level is creating a hypercompetitive environment between government agencies (e.g., EPA, NIH, CDC), for scientists in these agencies, and for academics seeking funding from all sources—the combination of perverse incentives and decreased funding increases pressures that can lead to unethical behavior. If a critical mass of scientists become untrustworthy, a tipping point is possible in which the scientific enterprise itself becomes inherently corrupt and public trust is lost, risking a new dark age with devastating consequences to humanity. Academia and federal agencies should better support science as a public good, and incentivize altruistic and ethical outcomes, while de-emphasizing output. PMID:28115824

  17. ``I Have Been Given the Power to Teach. The Children Understand Me Very Well.'' The Social and Academic Impact of Deaf Teacher Training in Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Christopher; Corce, Heidi

    2010-02-01

    Kenya has 41 Deaf schools that serve children from Class 1 through secondary school. These schools are all characterised by the fact that they have very few teachers who are fluent in Kenyan sign language. In order to meet the needs of schools and to provide employment opportunities for Deaf Kenyan adults, a small non-governmental organisation identified Deaf secondary school students for training. They received two years of teacher training free of charge. Most have since been awarded teaching contracts by the Kenyan Teacher Service Commission or local school boards. This article reports on results from a preliminary study of the social and academic impacts of this innovation. Results indicate that Deaf teachers are inspirational in the classroom, represent a significant resource for their school communities and are preferred by Deaf students. A follow-up study on the relative learning gains of Deaf students when taught by Deaf teachers is planned once relevant data are available.

  18. Strategies to Support Women in the Academic Physical Sciences: Reflections on Experiences and Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockard, Jean; Lewis, Priscilla A.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a concerted, long-term effort by academic women chemists to provide mentoring and training for their colleagues to survive and change the negative climate of their profession and to develop successful careers in spite of these barriers. Data came from records kept by the group, observations of their…

  19. Strategies to Support Women in the Academic Physical Sciences: Reflections on Experiences and Efforts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockard, Jean; Lewis, Priscilla A.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a concerted, long-term effort by academic women chemists to provide mentoring and training for their colleagues to survive and change the negative climate of their profession and to develop successful careers in spite of these barriers. Data came from records kept by the group, observations of their…

  20. [Does annual simulation training influence the safety climate of a university hospital? : Prospective 5‑year investigation using dimensions of the safety attitude questionnaire].

    PubMed

    St Pierre, M; Gall, C; Breuer, G; Schüttler, J

    2017-10-02

    Simulation-based training with a focus on non-technical skills can have a positive influence on safety relevant attitudes of participants. If an organization succeeds in training sufficient staff, it may experience a positive change in the safety climate. As the effects of a single training are of a transient nature, annual training sessions may lead to an incremental improvement of safety relevant attitudes of employees over time. In spring 2012 the Department of Anesthesia at the University Hospital of Erlangen established an annual simulation-based training for staff members (e.g. consultants, trainee anesthetists and nurse anesthetists). The study aimed to test whether an annual simulation-based training would result in an incremental longitudinal improvement in attitudes towards teamwork, safety and stress recognition. A survey comprising three domains (teamwork climate, safety climate and stress recognition) of the safety attitudes questionnaire (SAQ) and items addressing briefing and speaking up was distributed to all participants in an annual in-house simulation training. Participants filled out the questionnaire in the morning of each training day. The attitudes were measured before the first training series in 2012, 6 months after the first training and then every year (2013-2016). Participants generated a personalized identification code which allowed individuals to be anonymously tracked over time. Results of the 5‑point Likert scale were transformed to a 100-point scale. Results were calculated at the group level and at the individual level. Univariable linear regression was used to calculate mean changes per year. Over a period of 5 years (2012-2016) a total of 255 individuals completed the questionnaire. Each year, 14-20% of all nurse anesthetists and 81-90% of all anesthetists participated in the simulation-based training. As a result of annual staff turnover 16-24% of participants were new staff members. A personalized code allowed the

  1. "Where Do They Come From, and How Are They Trained?" Professional Education and Training of Access Services Librarians in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasulski, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Since the late 1970s, the access services librarian or equivalent position has become commonplace in academic libraries, and degreed professionals have been sought for these positions since the beginning. In 2009, David McCaslin, California Institute of Technology, examined the place of access services in American Library Association-accredited…

  2. "Where Do They Come From, and How Are They Trained?" Professional Education and Training of Access Services Librarians in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krasulski, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Since the late 1970s, the access services librarian or equivalent position has become commonplace in academic libraries, and degreed professionals have been sought for these positions since the beginning. In 2009, David McCaslin, California Institute of Technology, examined the place of access services in American Library Association-accredited…

  3. "Hollywood nurses" in West Germany: biographies, self-images, and experiences of academically trained nurses after 1945.

    PubMed

    Kreutzer, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    The School of Nursing at Heidelberg University was founded in 1953 on the initiative of the Rockefeller Foundation to generate new, scientifically trained nursing elite to advance the professionalization of nursing in West Germany. The "American" concept met massive resistance. Its "superior nursing training" was seen as creating "Hollywood nurses"-a threat to the traditional Christian understanding of good, caring nursing. Intense social conflicts also caused problems with other groups of nurses. The school nevertheless played a very important role as a "cadre academy" in the history of professionalization. Many of the first German professors in the nursing sciences trained or underwent further training in Heidelberg.

  4. Geriatric medicine fellowship programs: a national study from the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs' Longitudinal Study of Training and Practice in Geriatric Medicine.

    PubMed

    Warshaw, Gregg A; Bragg, Elizabeth J; Shaull, Ruth W; Goldenhar, Linda M; Lindsell, Christopher J

    2003-07-01

    This report documents the development and growth of geriatric medicine fellowship training in the United States through 2002. A cross-sectional survey of geriatric medicine fellowship programs was conducted in the fall 2001. All allopathic (119) and osteopathic (7) accredited geriatric medicine fellowship-training programs in the United States were involved. Data were collected using self-administered mailed and Web-based survey instruments. Longitudinal data from the American Medical Association (AMA) and the Association of American Medical Colleges' (AAMC) National Graduate Medical Education (GME) Census, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), and the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) were also analyzed. The survey instrument was designed to gather data about faculty, fellows, program curricula, and program directors (PDs). In addition, annual AMA/AAMC data from 1991 to the present was compiled to examine trends in the number of fellowship programs and the number of fellows. The overall survey response rate was 76% (96 of 126 PDs). Most (54%) of the PDs had been in their current position 4 or more years (range: <1-20 years), and 59% of PDs reported that they had completed formal geriatric medicine fellowship training. The number of fellowship programs and the number of fellows entering programs has slowly increased over the past decade. During 2001-02, 338 fellows were training in allopathic programs and seven in osteopathic programs (all years of training). Forty-six percent (n = 44) of responding programs offered only 1-year fellowship-training experiences. PDs reported that application rates for fellowship positions were stable during the academic years (AYs) 1999-2002, with the median number of applications per first year position available in AY 2000-01 being 10 (range: 1-77). In 2001-02, data from the AMA/AAMC National GME Census indicated a fill rate for first-year geriatric medicine fellowship positions of 69% (259 first

  5. Construction and Analysis of Organization Climate Surveys. Training and Development Research Center Project No. 26.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Gary N.

    Climate surveys are an important diagnostic tool in organization development. The purposes of this paper are to: (1) present the advantages and disadvantages of using a survey as a diagnostic tool, as compared to interviewing, observation, and the use of secondary (preexisting and non-intrusive) information; (2) argue for customized climate…

  6. Ecological Systems Theory: Using Spheres of Influence to Support Small-unit Climate and Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    storming, norming, performing , and adjourning (Tuckman, 1965; Tuckman & Jensen, 1977), the ecological systems approach takes into account organizational ...structure and how various parts of an organization fit together and are expected to function. Organizational structure includes factors and people...understand the factors that influence the behavior, performance , and climate of Soldiers and Army squads. It is also important to understand how to best

  7. Universal Design for Learning: Preparing Secondary Education Teachers in Training to Increase Academic Accessibility of High School English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopes-Murphy, Solange

    2012-01-01

    Although the concept of universal design for learning (UDL) is well understood in the world of architecture and in the area of special education, its use to increase the academic performance of high school English learners (ELs) is not widely explored. To reduce this void, this article presents an overview of the UDL concept and its principles,…

  8. Universal Design for Learning: Preparing Secondary Education Teachers in Training to Increase Academic Accessibility of High School English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopes-Murphy, Solange

    2012-01-01

    Although the concept of universal design for learning (UDL) is well understood in the world of architecture and in the area of special education, its use to increase the academic performance of high school English learners (ELs) is not widely explored. To reduce this void, this article presents an overview of the UDL concept and its principles,…

  9. Implementing Self-Advocacy Training within a Brief Psychoeducational Group to Improve the Academic Motivation of Black Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowden, Angel Riddick

    2009-01-01

    Black adolescents are confronted with ongoing social barriers that affect their academic motivation. School counselors can improve the educational landscape for Black adolescents by employing advocacy competencies in their schools. In this article I describe a brief psychoeducational group that can be used to teach self-advocacy skills to Black…

  10. Implementing Self-Advocacy Training within a Brief Psychoeducational Group to Improve the Academic Motivation of Black Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowden, Angel Riddick

    2009-01-01

    Black adolescents are confronted with ongoing social barriers that affect their academic motivation. School counselors can improve the educational landscape for Black adolescents by employing advocacy competencies in their schools. In this article I describe a brief psychoeducational group that can be used to teach self-advocacy skills to Black…

  11. Library School Programs and the Successful Training of Academic Librarians to Meet Promotion and Tenure Requirements in the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Rickey D.; Kneip, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This article relates an investigation of tenure and promotion practices for librarians at academic institutions. The study employed two surveys. The first survey determined the level of impact on promotion and tenure by recent publication in two top-tier peer-reviewed journals: "College & Research Libraries" and "Journal of…

  12. Putting the Pieces Together: Integration of Academic and Vocational Technical Education. South Dakota Integration Training Model. 2nd Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucker, Marsha; Smith-Rockhold, Gloria; Bemis, Dodie; Wiese, Vickie

    This document is a compilation of materials on integrating academic and vocational technical education. Section 1 presents integration basics, including a definition, its benefits, barriers, conditions required for integration, and models, pros, and cons. Section 2 focuses on curriculum alignment and provides steps for designing an integrated unit…

  13. Library School Programs and the Successful Training of Academic Librarians to Meet Promotion and Tenure Requirements in the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, Rickey D.; Kneip, Jason

    2010-01-01

    This article relates an investigation of tenure and promotion practices for librarians at academic institutions. The study employed two surveys. The first survey determined the level of impact on promotion and tenure by recent publication in two top-tier peer-reviewed journals: "College & Research Libraries" and "Journal of…

  14. Michel Hersen and the Development of Social Skills Training: Historical Perspective of an Academic Scholar and Pioneer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    As a distinguished scholar over the past 45 years, Michel Hersen has left an indelible mark on the field of behavior therapy and clinical psychology. One of his most enduring legacies is his early research work in the area of social skills assessment and training, with special attention to assertiveness training. His basic analogue and clinical…

  15. Salvaging a geriatric medicine academic program in disaster mode-the LSU training program post-Katrina.

    PubMed Central

    Cefalu, Charles A.; Schwartz, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Formal training in geriatric medicine in Louisiana is in its infancy. This article portrays the struggle of the sole functioning geriatric medicine training program and its trials and tribulations in a survival mode, opportunities that come with disaster as well as lessons learned post-Katrina. PMID:17534025

  16. Field Note-Developing Suicide Risk Assessment Training for Hospital Social Workers: An Academic-Community Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharff, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Abigail M.; Lambert, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This article describes 1 large urban pediatric hospital's partnership with a university to provide suicide assessment and management training within its social work department. Social work administrators conducted a department-wide needs assessment and implemented a 2-session suicide assessment training program and evaluation. Respondents…

  17. Michel Hersen and the Development of Social Skills Training: Historical Perspective of an Academic Scholar and Pioneer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    As a distinguished scholar over the past 45 years, Michel Hersen has left an indelible mark on the field of behavior therapy and clinical psychology. One of his most enduring legacies is his early research work in the area of social skills assessment and training, with special attention to assertiveness training. His basic analogue and clinical…

  18. Field Note-Developing Suicide Risk Assessment Training for Hospital Social Workers: An Academic-Community Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharff, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Abigail M.; Lambert, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This article describes 1 large urban pediatric hospital's partnership with a university to provide suicide assessment and management training within its social work department. Social work administrators conducted a department-wide needs assessment and implemented a 2-session suicide assessment training program and evaluation. Respondents…

  19. Mentoring in neurology: filling the residency gap in academic mentoring.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul R; Marsh, Elisabeth B

    2014-03-11

    Effective academic mentoring significantly affects a physician's choice of career, academic productivity, and professional trajectory. The mentoring relationship is necessary for the continued success of medical training. It is critical to cultivate a climate in which mentoring can thrive. In order to improve the quality and outcomes of mentoring, we must adopt a comprehensive plan. There are interventions at every level of training that will ensure that the current cohort of neurologists receives the requisite expertise needed to flourish and inspire future trainees. Professional organizations must articulate a comprehensive vision of mentoring. Institutions must create an infrastructure to support mentors. Mentors should work in active partnerships with their mentees to forge sustained, productive relationships. Mentees must actively contribute to their own mentoring. Proper mentorship will ensure a bright future for academic neurology.

  20. A Decade of Graduate Climate Conferences for Training the Next Generation of Earth Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosengard, S.; Rothenberg, D. A.; Lapo, K. E.; Johnson, L.; Rohr, T.; Perez-Betancourt, D.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2006, the Graduate Climate Conference (GCC) has served as a unique forum for students from diverse fields (both in physical/life and social sciences) to share innovative research relating to the climate system and global change. Organized exclusively by graduate students for graduate students, the conference provides a nurturing environment for attendees to familiarize themselves with the bleeding-edge in climate research, foster scientific connections between and across fields, and initiate new interdisciplinary collaborations. Moreover, the conference's single session format both ensures full exposure to the range of work being presented and provides presenters with a large and engaged audience. Here, we will both elucidate the history and objectives of the conference in addition to showcasing its impact on the younger generation within the climate science community via data and feedback collected from almost a decade of past participants. We will present results quantifying both the high scientific merit of the conference (i.e statistics on the amount of presented work that matriculated into peer reviewed publication, etc.) and the critical opportunity for professional development it provides (i.e. how many students gave their first serious scientific talk at the GCC, what sort professional collaborations developed at the GCC, post-doc fellowships and assistant professorships obtained by participants, etc.). The goal of this work is to illustrate how effective the GCC has been at connecting, educating, and nurturing the future generations of researchers from an extremely diverse set of backgrounds and to share with the community a successful model for future conferences both in the geosciences and the broader scientific community.

  1. Employee Perceptions of an Organization's Learning Climate: Effects of Employee Orientation Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akdere, Mesut; Schmidt, Steven W.

    2008-01-01

    The most important goal of any given training effort is to achieve learning at the individual, group/team, and organizational levels. This study used a repeated measures design to measure the change in employee perception of an organization's learning environment tin a large U.S. manufacturing company. The time period examined included an employee…

  2. Interactions of physical training and heat acclimation. The thermophysiology of exercising in a hot climate.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, Y; McLellan, T M; Shephard, R J

    1997-03-01

    Physical training and heat acclimation are both commonly adopted tactics to improve performance and/or tolerance times when individuals must compete or work in the heat. Potential benefits include: (i) improved aerobic fitness and thus a greater cardiovascular reserve (probably seen mainly after training); (ii) a lower resting body temperature that allows greater heat storage (probably seen mainly after acclimation); (iii) a decreased energy cost of a given intensity of exercise (seen after acclimation and also as the learning component of training); (iv) an enhanced sweating response at a given percentage of maximal effort (probably developed by both treatments); (v) a slower increase in body temperature owing to (iii) and/or (iv) [seen after both treatments]; (vi) a reduced cardiovascular stress because of changes in the autonomic nervous system (probably realised mainly by training), expansion of blood volume (seen after both treatments) and/or a decreased peripheral pooling of blood (probably found after both treatments); and (vii) improved subjective tolerance reflecting a decrease in the relative intensity of a given activity (probably seen mainly after training), a reduction in the physiological strain (found after both treatments) and/or habituation to heat-exercise stress (probably developed by both treatments). Factors affecting improvements in physiological and psychological responses to a given set of conditions include: (i) the individual's initial fitness and acclimatisation to heat; (ii) age, gender, hydration, sleep deprivation, circadian rhythms and in women the menstrual cycle: (iii) use of ergogenic aids such as fluid ingestion, carbohydrate and/or electrolyte replacement and blood doping; (iv) event or test conditions such as the mode of exercise, the severity of environmental heat stress and the type of clothing worn; and (v) treatment conditions such as the intensity, duration and frequency of exercise and/or heat exposure, the length of any

  3. Time Trend in Interest and Satisfaction Towards Clinical Training and Academic Activities Among Early-Career Cardiologists - The Japanese Circulation Society Post-Graduate Training Survey.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Takashi; Kohsaka, Shun; Takei, Yasuyoshi; Fukuda, Keiichi; Ozaki, Yukio; Yamashina, Akira

    2017-09-07

    Satisfaction among early-career cardiologists is a key performance metric for cardiovascular (CV) educational programs. To assess the time trend in the interest and activities of early-career cardiologists regarding their training, we conducted web-based surveys in 2011 and 2015.Methods and Results:Early-career cardiologists were defined as physicians who planned to attend Japanese Circulation Society (JCS) annual meetings within 10 years of graduation. A total of 272 and 177 participants completed the survey for the years 2011 and 2015, respectively. Survey questions were designed to obtain core insights into the workplace, research interests, and demographic profile of respondents. Main outcome measures were satisfaction levels with their training program. The overall satisfaction rate for training was lower in 2015 than 2011; this was largely affected by decreases in the rates of satisfaction for valvular heart disease, ischemic heart disease, advanced heart failure, and congenital heart disease. Moreover, satisfaction with CV training was associated with the volume of invasive procedures such as coronary angiography and percutaneous coronary interventions in 2011 but not 2015. Early-career cardiologists' satisfaction with their training decreased during the study period, especially in the field of evolving subspecialties (e.g., valvular heart disease or advanced heart failure), suggesting that prompt reevaluation of the current educational curriculum is needed to properly adapt to progress in cardiology.

  4. Partnership Among Peers: Lessons Learned From the Development of a Community Organization–Academic Research Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Jewett-Tennant, Jeri; Collins, Cyleste; Matloub, Jacqueline; Patrick, Alison; Chupp, Mark; Werner, James J.; Borawski, Elaine A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Community engagement and rigorous science are necessary to address health issues. Increasingly, community health organizations are asked to partner in research. To strengthen such community organization–academic partnerships, increase research capacity in community organizations, and facilitate equitable partnered research, the Partners in Education Evaluation and Research (PEER) program was developed. The program implements an 18-month structured research curriculum for one mid-level employee of a health-focused community-based organization with an organizational mentor and a Case Western Reserve University faculty member as partners. Methods The PEER program was developed and guided by a community–academic advisory committee and was designed to impact the research capacity of organizations through didactic modules and partnered research in the experiential phase. Active participation of community organizations and faculty during all phases of the program provided for bidirectional learning and understanding of the challenges of community-engaged health research. The pilot program evaluation used qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques, including experiences of the participants assessed through surveys, formal group and individual interviews, phone calls, and discussions. Statistical analysis of the change in fellows’ pre-test and post-test survey scores were conducted using paired sample t tests. The small sample size is recognized by the authors as a limitation of the evaluation methods and would potentially be resolved by including more cohort data as the program progresses. Qualitative data were reviewed by two program staff using content and narrative analysis to identify themes, describe and assess group phenomena and determine program improvements. Objectives The objective of PEER is to create equitable partnerships between community organizations and academic partners to further research capacity in said organizations and

  5. Partnership Among Peers: Lessons Learned From the Development of a Community Organization-Academic Research Training Program.

    PubMed

    Jewett-Tennant, Jeri; Collins, Cyleste; Matloub, Jacqueline; Patrick, Alison; Chupp, Mark; Werner, James J; Borawski, Elaine A

    2016-01-01

    Community engagement and rigorous science are necessary to address health issues. Increasingly, community health organizations are asked to partner in research. To strengthen such community organization-academic partnerships, increase research capacity in community organizations, and facilitate equitable partnered research, the Partners in Education Evaluation and Research (PEER) program was developed. The program implements an 18-month structured research curriculum for one mid-level employee of a health-focused community-based organization with an organizational mentor and a Case Western Reserve University faculty member as partners. The PEER program was developed and guided by a community-academic advisory committee and was designed to impact the research capacity of organizations through didactic modules and partnered research in the experiential phase. Active participation of community organizations and faculty during all phases of the program provided for bidirectional learning and understanding of the challenges of community-engaged health research. The pilot program evaluation used qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques, including experiences of the participants assessed through surveys, formal group and individual interviews, phone calls, and discussions. Statistical analysis of the change in fellows' pre-test and post-test survey scores were conducted using paired sample t tests. The small sample size is recognized by the authors as a limitation of the evaluation methods and would potentially be resolved by including more cohort data as the program progresses. Qualitative data were reviewed by two program staff using content and narrative analysis to identify themes, describe and assess group phenomena and determine program improvements. The objective of PEER is to create equitable partnerships between community organizations and academic partners to further research capacity in said organizations and develop mutually beneficial research

  6. Examining patterns in medication documentation of trade and generic names in an academic family practice training centre.

    PubMed

    Summers, Alexander; Ruderman, Carly; Leung, Fok-Han; Slater, Morgan

    2017-09-22

    Studies in the United States have shown that physicians commonly use brand names when documenting medications in an outpatient setting. However, the prevalence of prescribing and documenting brand name medication has not been assessed in a clinical teaching environment. The purpose of this study was to describe the use of generic versus brand names for a select number of pharmaceutical products in clinical documentation in a large, urban academic family practice centre. A retrospective chart review of the electronic medical records of the St. Michael's Hospital Academic Family Health Team (SMHAFHT). Data for twenty commonly prescribed medications were collected from the Cumulative Patient Profile as of August 1, 2014. Each medication name was classified as generic or trade. Associations between documentation patterns and physician characteristics were assessed. Among 9763 patients prescribed any of the twenty medications of interest, 45% of patient charts contained trade nomenclature exclusively. 32% of charts contained only generic nomenclature, and 23% contained a mix of generic and trade nomenclature. There was large variation in use of generic nomenclature amongst physicians, ranging from 19% to 93%. Trade names in clinical documentation, which likely reflect prescribing habits, continue to be used abundantly in the academic setting. This may become part of the informal curriculum, potentially facilitating undue bias in trainees. Further study is needed to determine characteristics which influence use of generic or trade nomenclature and the impact of this trend on trainees' clinical knowledge and decision-making.

  7. Effects of Climate Change and Urban Development on Army Training Capabilities: Firing Ranges and Maneuver Areas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    Endangered Species . The probability of future species listings may impact the availability of Army training and testing lands and their associated...threatened or endangered species (TES) and by re- quirements to curtail use due to an increased fire risk. Safety fans often overlap with other land...noise, days or hours lost due to heat stress, days lost to high fire risk, areas/times lost to Endangered Species management, and other range uses that

  8. Training

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Drinking Water Academy provides online training and information to ensure that water professionals, public officials, and involved citizens have the knowledge and skills necessary to protect our drinking water supply.

  9. Mindful Climate Action: Health and Environmental Co-Benefits from Mindfulness-Based Behavioral Training

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Bruce; Grabow, Maggie; Middlecamp, Cathy; Mooney, Margaret; Checovich, Mary M.; Converse, Alexander K.; Gillespie, Bob; Yates, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Greenhouse gases from human activities are causing climate change, creating risks for people around the globe. Behaviors involving transportation, diet, energy use, and purchasing drive greenhouse gas emissions, but are also related to health and well-being, providing opportunity for co-benefits. Replacing shorter automobile trips with walking or cycling, or eating plants rather than animals, for example, may increase personal health, while also reducing environmental impact. Mindfulness-based practices have been shown to enhance a variety of health outcomes, but have not been adapted towards environmental purposes. We designed the Mindful Climate Action (MCA) curriculum to help people improve their health while simultaneously lowering their carbon footprints. Combining mindfulness-based practices with the Stages of Change theory, the MCA program aims to: (1) improve personal health and well-being; (2) decrease energy use; (3) reduce automobile use; (4) increase active transport; (5) shift diet towards plant-based foods; and (6) reduce unnecessary purchasing. Mindfulness practices will foster attentional awareness, openness, and response flexibility, supporting positive behavior change. We plan to test MCA in a randomized controlled trial, with rigorous assessment of targeted outcomes. Our long-term goal is to refine and adapt the MCA program to a variety of audiences, in order to enhance public health and environmental sustainability. PMID:28008371

  10. Mindful Climate Action: Health and Environmental Co-Benefits from Mindfulness-Based Behavioral Training.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Bruce; Grabow, Maggie; Middlecamp, Cathy; Mooney, Margaret; Checovich, Mary M; Converse, Alexander K; Gillespie, Bob; Yates, Julia

    2016-10-01

    Greenhouse gases from human activities are causing climate change, creating risks for people around the globe. Behaviors involving transportation, diet, energy use, and purchasing drive greenhouse gas emissions, but are also related to health and well-being, providing opportunity for co-benefits. Replacing shorter automobile trips with walking or cycling, or eating plants rather than animals, for example, may increase personal health, while also reducing environmental impact. Mindfulness-based practices have been shown to enhance a variety of health outcomes, but have not been adapted towards environmental purposes. We designed the Mindful Climate Action (MCA) curriculum to help people improve their health while simultaneously lowering their carbon footprints. Combining mindfulness-based practices with the Stages of Change theory, the MCA program aims to: (1) improve personal health and well-being; (2) decrease energy use; (3) reduce automobile use; (4) increase active transport; (5) shift diet towards plant-based foods; and (6) reduce unnecessary purchasing. Mindfulness practices will foster attentional awareness, openness, and response flexibility, supporting positive behavior change. We plan to test MCA in a randomized controlled trial, with rigorous assessment of targeted outcomes. Our long-term goal is to refine and adapt the MCA program to a variety of audiences, in order to enhance public health and environmental sustainability.

  11. Relationships Between Ice Cloud Properties and Radiative Effects from A-Train Observations and Global Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, B. J.; Mace, G. G.

    2014-12-01

    Using data from the A-Train satellites, we investigate the distribution of clouds and their microphysical and radiative properties in Southeast Asia during the summer monsoon. We find an approximate balance in the top of the atmosphere (TOA) cloud radiative effect, which is largely due to commonly occurring cirrus layers that warm the atmosphere, and less frequent deep layer clouds, which produce a strong cooling at the surface. The distribution of cloud ice water path (IWP) in cirrus layers, obtained from the 2C-ICE CloudSat data product, is highly skewed with a mean value of 170 g m-2 and a median of 16 g m-2. We evaluate the fraction of the total IWP observed by CloudSat and CALIPSO individually and find that both instruments are necessary for describing the overall IWP statistics and particularly the values that are most important to cirrus radiative impact. In examining how cirrus cloud radiative effects at the TOA vary as a function of IWP, we find that cirrus with IWP less than 200 g m-2 produce a net warming. Weighting the distribution of radiative effect by the frequency of occurrence of IWP values, we find that cirrus with IWP around 20 g m-2 contribute most to heating at the TOA. We conclude that the mean IWP is a poor diagnostic of radiative impact. We suggest that climate model intercomparisons with data should focus on the median IWP because that statistic is more descriptive of the cirrus that contribute most to the radiative impacts of tropical ice clouds. Given these findings, we use the A-Train observations to address the issues of IWP occurrence and high cloud forcing in a global climate model (GCM). Our goal is to determine whether the clouds that heat the upper troposphere in the model are the same genre of clouds that heat the upper troposphere in the real atmosphere. First, we define a cloud radiative kernel that's a function of IWP to determine whether the modeled ice clouds produce similar shortwave and longwave radiative effects at the TOA

  12. Global health leadership training in resource-limited settings: a collaborative approach by academic institutions and local health care programs in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nakanjako, Damalie; Namagala, Elizabeth; Semeere, Aggrey; Kigozi, Joanitor; Sempa, Joseph; Ddamulira, John Bosco; Katamba, Achilles; Biraro, Sam; Naikoba, Sarah; Mashalla, Yohana; Farquhar, Carey; Sewankambo, Nelson

    2015-11-18

    Due to a limited health workforce, many health care providers in Africa must take on health leadership roles with minimal formal training in leadership. Hence, the need to equip health care providers with practical skills required to lead high-impact health care programs. In Uganda, the Afya Bora Global Health Leadership Fellowship is implemented through the Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS) and her partner institutions. Lessons learned from the program, presented in this paper, may guide development of in-service training opportunities to enhance leadership skills of health workers in resource-limited settings. The Afya Bora Consortium, a consortium of four African and four U.S. academic institutions, offers 1-year global health leadership-training opportunities for nurses and doctors. Applications are received and vetted internationally by members of the consortium institutions in Botswana, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, and the USA. Fellows have 3 months of didactic modules and 9 months of mentored field attachment with 80% time dedicated to fellowship activities. Fellows' projects and experiences, documented during weekly mentor-fellow meetings and monthly mentoring team meetings, were compiled and analyzed manually using pre-determined themes to assess the effect of the program on fellows' daily leadership opportunities. Between January 2011 and January 2015, 15 Ugandan fellows (nine doctors and six nurses) participated in the program. Each fellow received 8 weeks of didactic modules held at one of the African partner institutions and three online modules to enhance fellows' foundation in leadership, communication, monitoring and evaluation, health informatics, research methodology, grant writing, implementation science, and responsible conduct of research. In addition, fellows embarked on innovative projects that covered a wide spectrum of global health challenges including critical analysis of policy formulation and review processes

  13. Preadmission Criteria as Predictors of Academic Success in Entry-Level Athletic Training and Other Allied Health Educational Programs.

    PubMed

    Platt, Linda S.; Turocy, Paula Sammarone; McGlumphy, Barry E.

    2001-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate preadmission criteria, Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores, and high school grade point average (HSGPA) and to determine the ability of those criteria to predict the college grade point average (CGPA) of graduates from programs in athletic training and 5 other allied health disciplines. DESIGN AND SETTING: Descriptive data, including age, sex, year of graduation, HSGPA, CGPA, and SAT scores (SAT mathematics [SATM], SAT verbal [SATV], and SAT total) were gathered from the files of graduates (1992 to 1997) of allied health education programs. SUBJECTS: The complete records of 373 graduates (244 women and 129 men) of 6 allied health education programs in athletic training, health management systems, occupational therapy, perfusion technology, physician assistant, and physical therapy were used in this study. Subjects with incomplete files were excluded from this study. MEASUREMENTS: We collected data from official college transcripts, official high school transcripts, and SAT scores reported to the university. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Pearson correlation, and stepwise forward regression analyses were used to determine the ability of SATV score, SATM score, and HSGPA to predict CGPA. RESULTS: Both SATV score and HSGPA were found to predict 14% of the variance in student success (CGPA) in all allied health programs; however, only HSGPA was predictive of student success in athletic training (P =.00). Both SATV score and HSGPA were predictive of CGPA in both physical (P =.02 and.03, respectively) and occupational (P =.02 and.00, respectively) therapy graduates; however, they predicted only 12% and 21%, respectively, of the variance in CGPA. The SATM score was predictive of CGPA in both perfusion technology (P =.05) and physician assistant (P =.00) graduates, accounting for 7% and 18% of the variance in outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, HSGPA and SATV score were predictive of student success (CGPA) in the allied health group

  14. Preadmission Criteria as Predictors of Academic Success in Entry-Level Athletic Training and Other Allied Health Educational Programs

    PubMed Central

    Turocy, Paula Sammarone; McGlumphy, Barry E.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate preadmission criteria, Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores, and high school grade point average (HSGPA) and to determine the ability of those criteria to predict the college grade point average (CGPA) of graduates from programs in athletic training and 5 other allied health disciplines. Design and Setting: Descriptive data, including age, sex, year of graduation, HSGPA, CGPA, and SAT scores (SAT mathematics [SATM], SAT verbal [SATV], and SAT total) were gathered from the files of graduates (1992 to 1997) of allied health education programs. Subjects: The complete records of 373 graduates (244 women and 129 men) of 6 allied health education programs in athletic training, health management systems, occupational therapy, perfusion technology, physician assistant, and physical therapy were used in this study. Subjects with incomplete files were excluded from this study. Measurements: We collected data from official college transcripts, official high school transcripts, and SAT scores reported to the university. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Pearson correlation, and stepwise forward regression analyses were used to determine the ability of SATV score, SATM score, and HSGPA to predict CGPA. Results: Both SATV score and HSGPA were found to predict 14% of the variance in student success (CGPA) in all allied health programs; however, only HSGPA was predictive of student success in athletic training (P = .00). Both SATV score and HSGPA were predictive of CGPA in both physical (P = .02 and .03, respectively) and occupational (P = .02 and .00, respectively) therapy graduates; however, they predicted only 12% and 21%, respectively, of the variance in CGPA. The SATM score was predictive of CGPA in both perfusion technology (P = .05) and physician assistant (P = .00) graduates, accounting for 7% and 18% of the variance in outcomes. Conclusions: Overall, HSGPA and SATV score were predictive of student success (CGPA) in the allied health

  15. RDA Implementation and Training Issues across United States Academic Libraries: An In-Depth E-Mail Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jung-ran; Tosaka, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at providing in-depth perspectives on the ways in which cataloging and metadata professionals have coped with RDA training and implementation through an e-mail interview method. Results show that the performance-based, "learn-as-you-go," peer learning method is found by practitioners to be most effective in acquiring and…

  16. RDA Implementation and Training Issues across United States Academic Libraries: An In-Depth E-Mail Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jung-ran; Tosaka, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at providing in-depth perspectives on the ways in which cataloging and metadata professionals have coped with RDA training and implementation through an e-mail interview method. Results show that the performance-based, "learn-as-you-go," peer learning method is found by practitioners to be most effective in acquiring and…

  17. Athletic Training Students' Perceptions of and Academic Preparation in the Use of Psychological Skills in Sport Injury Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamphoff, Cindra S.; Hamson-Utley, J. Jordan; Antoine, Beth; Knutson, Rebecca; Thomae, Jeffrey; Hoenig, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Context: Injured athletes rely on athletic trainers to assist them when recovering from injury. Over the last 20 years, the use of psychological skills to speed recovery has become increasingly popular. Objective: Explore athletic training students' perceptions of the importance and effectiveness of psychological skills in the rehabilitation of…

  18. The "Academization" of the German Qualification System: Recent Developments in the Relationships between Vocational Training and Higher Education in Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Andrä; Kerst, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The traditional German model of skill formation was based on the rather strict segmentation between vocational training and higher education. However, during recent years this differentiation has slowly dissolved, partly by politically motivated developments to increase the permeability between both sectors and partly as a result of latent changes…

  19. Athletic Training Students' Perceptions of and Academic Preparation in the Use of Psychological Skills in Sport Injury Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamphoff, Cindra S.; Hamson-Utley, J. Jordan; Antoine, Beth; Knutson, Rebecca; Thomae, Jeffrey; Hoenig, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Context: Injured athletes rely on athletic trainers to assist them when recovering from injury. Over the last 20 years, the use of psychological skills to speed recovery has become increasingly popular. Objective: Explore athletic training students' perceptions of the importance and effectiveness of psychological skills in the rehabilitation of…

  20. Four Residents' Narratives on Abortion Training: A Residency Climate of Reflection, Support, and Mutual Respect.

    PubMed

    Singer, Janet; Fiascone, Stephen; Huber, Warren J; Hunter, Tiffany C; Sperling, Jeffrey

    2015-07-01

    The decision on the part of obstetrics and gynecology residents to opt in or out of abortion training is, for many, a complex one. Although the public debate surrounding abortion can be filled with polarizing rhetoric, residents often discover that the boundaries between pro-choice and pro-life beliefs are not so neatly divided. We present narratives from four residents, training at a 32-resident program in the Northeast, who have a range of views surrounding abortion. Their stories reveal how some struggle with the real-life experience of providing abortions, while others feel angst over lacking the skills to terminate a life-threatening pregnancy. These residents have found that close relationships with coworkers from all sides of this issue, along with a residency program that encourages open conversation, have fostered understanding. Their narratives demonstrate that reasonable providers can disagree fundamentally and still work effectively with one another and that the close relationships formed in residency can allow both sides to see beyond the black and white of the public abortion debate. Our objectives in this commentary are to encourage a more nuanced discussion of abortion among obstetrician-gynecologists, to describe the aspects of our residency program that facilitate open dialogue and respect across diverse viewpoints, and to demonstrate that the clear distinction between being pro-life and pro-choice often breaks down when one is immediately responsible for the care of pregnant women.

  1. A Project for Developing Programs to Utilize Social Processes to Increase Academic Performance of Handicapped Children and to Train Teachers of the Handicapped in the Systematic Use of Social Processes for Educational Objectives. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mithaug, Dennis E.

    Presented is the final report of a project to increase academic performance and social interaction in 52 retarded or normal children (3-18 years old) through training teachers in the use of three social skills: exchange, competition, and cooperation. The following project objectives are discussed: operational identification of the three social…

  2. The Effectiveness of Training Program Based on the Six Hats Model in Developing Creative Thinking Skills and Academic Achievements in the Arabic Language Course for Gifted and Talented Jordanian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziadat, Ayed H.; Al Ziyadat, Mohammad T.

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a training program based on the six hats model in developing creative thinking skills and academic achievements in the Arabic language for gifted and talented Jordanian students. The study sample consisted of 59 gifted male and female students of the 7th grade from King Abdullah…

  3. A Study of the Association of Attitudes to the Philosophy of Science with Classroom Contexts, Academic Qualification and Professional Training, amongst A-Level Biology Teachers in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwimbi, Eric; Monk, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the association between attitude towards the philosophy of science and academic qualification professional training. Analyzes responses from 33 A-level biology teachers to a questionnaire and reports from teachers in Harare on their school contexts. Suggests that the differential distribution of facilities and resources across school…

  4. On the Same Wavelength but Tuned to Different Frequencies? Perceptions of Academic and Admissions Staff in England and Wales on the Articulation between 14-19 Education and Training and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilde, Stephanie; Wright, Susannah

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the views of staff at higher education institutions on how well 14-19 education and training prepares young people for higher education (HE) study. It draws upon research involving focus groups with approximately 250 academic and admissions staff at 21 higher education institutions in England and Wales. The data collection was…

  5. The Influence of In-Service Training, Seminars and Workshops Attendance by Social Studies Teachers on Academic Performance of Students in Junior Secondary Schools In Cross River State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essien, Ekpenyong Essien; Akpan, Okon Edem; Obot, Imo Martin

    2016-01-01

    This research examined the influence of in-service training, seminar and workshop attendance by social studies teachers on students' academic performance in Cross River State, Nigeria. To achieve the purpose of this study, one hypothesis was formulated to direct the study. Ex-post facto research design was adopted for the study. A sample of five…

  6. A Study of the Association of Attitudes to the Philosophy of Science with Classroom Contexts, Academic Qualification and Professional Training, amongst A-Level Biology Teachers in Harare, Zimbabwe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gwimbi, Eric; Monk, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Investigates the association between attitude towards the philosophy of science and academic qualification professional training. Analyzes responses from 33 A-level biology teachers to a questionnaire and reports from teachers in Harare on their school contexts. Suggests that the differential distribution of facilities and resources across school…

  7. Rapid Development and Deployment of Ebola Readiness Training Across an Academic Health System: The Critical Role of Simulation Education, Consulting, and Systems Integration.

    PubMed

    Phrampus, Paul E; O'Donnell, John M; Farkas, Deborah; Abernethy, Denise; Brownlee, Katherine; Dongilli, Thomas; Martin, Susan

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we describe an Ebola preparedness initiative with implementation across an academic health system. Key stakeholder centers of various disciplines and clinical experts collaborated in the development and design. Subject matter experts in the areas of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization protocols for personal protective equipment donning and doffing conducted initial train-the-trainer sessions for program instructors. These trainers represented a cross-section of key clinical responders and environmental services. Through a parallel development process, a blended learning curriculum consisting of online modules followed by on-site training sessions was developed and implemented in both the simulation laboratory and the actual clinical care spaces in preparation for a Department of Health inspection. Lessons learned included identification of the need for iterative refinement based on instructor and trainee feedback, the lack of tolerance of practitioners in wearing full-body personal protective equipment for extended periods, and the ability of a large system to mount a rapid response to a potential public health threat through leveraging of expertise of its Simulation Program, Center for Quality, Safety and Innovation as well as a wide variety of clinical departments.

  8. Perceived effects of attending physician workload in academic medical intensive care units: a national survey of training program directors.

    PubMed

    Ward, Nicholas S; Read, Richard; Afessa, Bekele; Kahn, Jeremy M

    2012-02-01

    Increases in the size and number of American intensive care units have not been accompanied by a comparable increase in the critical care physician workforce, raising concerns that intensivists are becoming overburdened by workload. This is especially concerning in academic intensive care units where attending physicians must couple teaching duties with patient care. We performed an in-person and electronic survey of the membership of the Association of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Program Directors, soliciting information about patient workload, other hospital and medical education duties, and perceptions of the workplace and teaching environment of their intensive care units. Eighty-four out of a total 121 possible responses were received from program directors or their delegates, resulting in a response rate of 69%. The average daily (SD) census (as perceived by the respondents) was 18.8 ± 8.9 patients, and average (SD) maximum service size recalled was 24.1 ± 9.9 patients. Twenty-seven percent reported no policy setting an upper limit for the daily census. Twenty-eight percent of respondents felt the average census was "too many" and 71% felt the maximum size was "too many." The median (interquartile range) patient-to-attending physician ratio was 13 (10-16). When categorized according to this median, respondents from intensive care units with high patient/physician ratios (n = 31) perceived significantly more time constraints, more stress, and difficulties with teaching trainees than respondents with low patient/physician ratios (n = 40). The total number of non-nursing healthcare workers per patient was similar in both groups, suggesting that having more nonattending physician staff does not alleviate perceptions of overwork and stress in the attending physician. Academic intensive care unit physicians that direct fellowship programs frequently perceived being overburdened in the intensive care unit. Understaffing intensive care units with attending

  9. Field training for permafrost students in the cold-climate conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibman, M.

    2009-04-01

    We all know how complicated is organizing expeditions to the Arctic, especially to the remote areas with continuous permafrost, tundra landscapes, expensive helicopters, and extreme living conditions. But this cannot be the reason to deprive students of studying the nature. There is a serious problem with computer modeling becoming a main research instrument. Often young people involved in such modeling have never seen the object of their modeling. Some of us are "remnants" of the epoch before computer and satellite technologies when field data was the main source of mapping information, small-scale maps were based on field mapping. This knowledge is getting lost with the experts getting retired. This is the reason for involving students into field research as much and as soon as possible. Arctic expeditions often mean absence of usual amenities in living conditions, exposure to weather extremes, bugs and simple meal. These complications make each bit of field data be of high-hourly-rate. That is why teaching the methods of field study is very important, to make each trip most effective and reduce costs of each bit of information. These methods include both science and logistic issues. There are two more aspects in field training: (1) students and teachers from different countries meeting in field learn to identify natural objects and conciliate positions and terminology; and (2) students and teachers from different disciplines learn to conciliate understanding of each others study subjects. Examples of field research stations in Russian Arctic where interdisciplinary studies are ongoing for many years with participation of graduate and postgraduate students show the effectiveness of the above mentioned approach. In the north of West Siberia there are four polygons serving as a base for associated research of permafrost geologists, geographers, biologists, geochemists and more. The system is built in which basic role is shifting from one subject to the other

  10. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Novel Disaster Training Tool for School Nurses: Emergency Triage Drill Kit.

    PubMed

    Burke, Rita V; Goodhue, Catherine J; Berg, Bridget M; Spears, Robert; Barnes, Jill; Upperman, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-01

    As children spend approximately 28% of their day in school and disasters may strike at any time, it is important for school officials to conduct emergency preparedness activities. School nurses, teachers, and staff should be prepared to respond and provide support and first aid treatment. This article describes a collaborative effort within the Los Angeles Unified School District to enhance disaster preparedness. Specifically, the article outlines the program steps and tools developed to prepare staff in mass triage through an earthquake disaster training exercise.

  11. Reading the water table: The interaction between literacy practices and groundwater management training in preparing farmers for climate change in South India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavva, Konda Reddy; Smith, Cristine A.

    2012-06-01

    This article focuses on farmers' use of literacy for individual decision-making on crop-water management and crop choices and investigates how farmer participants perceive the usefulness of Farmer Water School (FWS) training. It draws upon a study conducted with farmers of Kurnool district of Andhra Pradesh, India. This study has demonstrated that literacy skills, while valued, are not a prerequisite for all farmers to improve their groundwater and crop management, as long as training includes (1) the presence of at least some literate farmers, (2) activities that involve learning by doing, and (3) learning in small mixed groups of literate and non-literate participants. The study outcomes are of increasing relevance in the context of climate change and variability, as small and marginal farmers constitute over 87 per cent of Indian farmers. Their inability to cope with consequences of climate change could adversely affect the food security in the country.

  12. Laparoscopic gastric bypass to robotic gastric bypass: time and cost commitment involved in training and transitioning an academic surgical practice.

    PubMed

    Lyn-Sue, Jerome R; Winder, Josh S; Kotch, Shannon; Colello, Jacob; Docimo, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the gold standard procedure for weight loss. This relatively complex procedure has excellent outcomes when performed via laparoscopy. The advent of the DaVinci robotic platform has been a technological advancement. Our goal is to provide information regarding the cost, time commitment, and advantages of transitioning an LRYGB program to an RRYGB program in an academic setting. We retrospectively reviewed the last 25 laparoscopic gastric bypass procedures and the first 25 robotic gastric bypass procedures performed by a single surgeon. We compared clinical outcomes and focused on time and hospital cost during this transition phase. There was no significant demographic difference between the groups. The mean age was 41.7 (RRYGB) years vs 43.4 (LRYGM) years. The mean BMI were similar between groups, 45.3 vs 46.5 kg/m(2) for RRYGB and LRYGB. No anastomotic leaks or mortalities were noted. There was one anastomotic stricture in both groups. Excess weight loss was similar in both groups at 1 year. There was a significant increase in operative time with RRYGB, mean 241 min vs mean 174 min (p = 0.0005). Operative time fell by 25 min after the first 10 cases. The hospital cost was also increased with RRYGB mean $5922 vs $4395 (p = 0.03). Transitioning from a laparoscopic to a robotic practice can be done safely, however, the initial operative times were longer and the hospital cost was higher for robotic gastric bypass. We hope in the future that these will decrease after overcoming the learning and as the technology becomes widespread.

  13. An Industry/Academe Consortium for Achieving 20% wind by 2030 through Cutting-Edge Research and Workforce Training

    SciTech Connect

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Marr, Jeffrey D.G.; Milliren, Christopher; Kaveh, Mos; Mohan, Ned; Stolarski, Henryk; Glauser, Mark; Arndt, Roger

    2013-12-01

    In January 2010, the University of Minnesota, along with academic and industry project partners, began work on a four year project to establish new facilities and research in strategic areas of wind energy necessary to move the nation towards a goal of 20% wind energy by 2030. The project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy with funds made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. $7.9M of funds were provided by DOE and $3.1M was provided through matching funds. The project was organized into three Project Areas. Project Area 1 focused on design and development of a utility scale wind energy research facility to support research and innovation. The project commissioned the Eolos Wind Research Field Station in November of 2011. The site, located 20 miles from St. Paul, MN operates a 2.5MW Clipper Liberty C-96 wind turbine, a 130-ft tall sensored meteorological tower and a robust sensor and data acquisition network. The site is operational and will continue to serve as a site for innovation in wind energy for the next 15 years. Project Areas 2 involved research on six distinct research projects critical to the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 goals. The research collaborations involved faculty from two universities, over nine industry partners and two national laboratories. Research outcomes include new knowledge, patents, journal articles, technology advancements, new computational models and establishment of new collaborative relationships between university and industry. Project Area 3 focused on developing educational opportunities in wind energy for engineering and science students. The primary outcome is establishment of a new graduate level course at the University of Minnesota called Wind Engineering Essentials. The seminar style course provides a comprehensive analysis of wind energy technology, economics, and operation. The course is highly successful and will continue to be offered at the University. The vision of U.S. DOE to

  14. Academic Training of Medical Students in Transfusion Medicine, Hemotherapy, and Hemostasis: Results of a Questionnaire-Based Status Report in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Scharf, Rüdiger E.; Burger, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background As a consequence of the German Transfusion Act and the corresponding Hemotherapeutic Guidelines of the German Medical Association, the National Advisory Committee Blood approved a recommendation (votum 29) in 2003 to specify students’ training in transfusion medicine, hemotherapy, and hemostasis. The objective of this study was to assess the current status of teaching in these fields. Methods A questionnaire-based evaluation was performed at the medical schools in Germany (n = 34). Responses were analyzed by descriptive criteria, except for weekly semester hours of teaching. Results Responses were obtained from 30 medical faculties (88%). Among them, 18 had conducted votum 29 (12 ‘completely’, 6 ‘essentially’), while 7 had done so only ‘in part’ and 5 ‘not at all’. 13 of 30 sites (43%) reported that no faculty-related curriculum in transfusion medicine and hemostasis (hemotherapy) exists. At 28 of 30 medical schools (93%), teaching in transfusion medicine, hemotherapy, and hemostasis is integrated into cross-curricular topics of interdisciplinary programs, including lectures. The corresponding semester hours of teaching per week ranged from 0.5 to 12 h/week. Conclusion Votum 29 is incompletely established. Consequently, academic teaching in transfusion medicine, hemotherapy, and hemostasis requires structural and conceptual improvement to fulfill legal specifications and regulatory constraints. PMID:25254026

  15. The influence of the cultural climate of the training environment on physicians' self-perception of competence and preparedness for practice

    PubMed Central

    Busari, Jamiu O; Verhagen, Eduard AA; Muskiet, Fred D

    2008-01-01

    Background In current supervisory practice, the learning environment in which the training of specialist registrars (SpRs) takes place is important. Examples of such learning environments are the hospital settings and/or geographical locations where training occurs. Our objective was to investigate whether the cultural climate of different learning environments influences physicians' perceived level of competence and preparedness for practice. Methods An electronic questionnaire was sent to an equal group of paediatricians who had trained in clinical settings located in Europe and the Caribbean. 30 items (Likert scale 1–4 = totally disagree-totally agree) were used to measure the level of preparedness of the respondents in 7 physician competencies. Results 42 participants were included for analysis. The distribution of participants in both groups was comparable. The overall perception of preparedness in the Caribbean group was 2.93 (SD = 0.47) and 2.86 (SD = 0.72) in the European group. The European group felt less prepared in the competency as manager 1.81 (SD = 1.06) compared to their Caribbean counterparts 2.72 (SD = 0.66). The difference was significant (p = 0.006). Conclusion The training in the different environments was perceived as adequate and comparable in effect. The learning environment's cultural climate appeared to influence the physician's perception of their competencies and preparedness for clinical practice. PMID:19025586

  16. Assessing School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jonathan; Pickeral, Terry; McCloskey, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Compelling empirical research shows that a positive and sustained school climate promotes students' academic achievement and healthy development. Not surprisingly, a positive school climate also promotes teacher retention, which itself enhances student success. Yet the knowledge of the effects of school climate on learning has not been translated…

  17. Assessing School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jonathan; Pickeral, Terry; McCloskey, Molly

    2009-01-01

    Compelling empirical research shows that a positive and sustained school climate promotes students' academic achievement and healthy development. Not surprisingly, a positive school climate also promotes teacher retention, which itself enhances student success. Yet the knowledge of the effects of school climate on learning has not been translated…

  18. The Effect of a Zoo-Based Experiential Academic Science Program on High School Students' Math and Science Achievement and Perceptions of School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulkerrin, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an 11th-grade and 12th-grade zoo-based academic high school experiential science program compared to a same school-district school-based academic high school experiential science program on students' pretest and posttest science, math, and reading achievement, and student perceptions of…

  19. The Effect of a Zoo-Based Experiential Academic Science Program on High School Students' Math and Science Achievement and Perceptions of School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulkerrin, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an 11th-grade and 12th-grade zoo-based academic high school experiential science program compared to a same school-district school-based academic high school experiential science program on students' pretest and posttest science, math, and reading achievement, and student perceptions of…

  20. Advancing climate literacy in Idaho K-12 schools using STEM education approaches, open source electronics, and Maker culture as vehicles for teacher training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, A. N.; Gelb, L.; Watson, K. A.; Steimke, A.; Chang, C.; Busche, C.; Breidenbach, J.

    2016-12-01

    A climate literate citizenry is essential to the long-term success of climate change adaptation and to enhancing resilience of communities to climate change impacts. In support of a National Science Foundation CAREER award, we developed a teacher training workshop on a project that engages students in creating functioning, low-cost weather stations using open source electronics. The workshop aims to improve climate literacy among K-12 students while providing an authentic opportunity to acquire and hone STEM skills. Each station measures temperature, humidity, barometric pressure, light level, soil moisture, and precipitation occurrence. Our day-long workshop focuses on three elements: (1) providing context on the scientific importance of climate observation, (2) equipping teachers with technical skills needed to assemble and use a station from provided components, and (3) highlighting relevant educational standards met by the weather station activities. The workshop was attended by twelve 4th-9th grade teachers from southwest Idaho, all of whom teach at rural and/or Title I schools. Attendees reported having minimal or no previous experience with open source electronics, but all were able to effectively use their weather station with less than two hours of hands-on training. In written and oral post-workshop reflections teachers expressed a strong desire to integrate these activities into classrooms, but also revealed barriers associated with rigid curricular constraints and risk-averse administrators. Continued evolution of the workshop will focus on: (1) extending the duration and exploratory depth of the workshop, (2) refining pre- and post-assessments and performing longitudinal monitoring of teacher participants to measure short- and long-term efficacy of the workshop, and (3) partnering with colleagues to engage school district administrators in dialog on how to integrate authentic activities like this one into K-12 curriculum.

  1. Flight-Proven Nano-Satellite Architecture for Hands-On Academic Training at the US Air Force Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Craig I.; Sellers, Lt. Jerry, , Col.; Sweeting, Martin, , Sir

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the use of "commercial-off-the-shelf" open-architecture satellite sub-systems, based on the flight- proven "SNAP" nanosatellite platform, to provide "hands-on" education and training at the United States Air Force Academy. The UK's first nanosatellite: SNAP-1, designed and built by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL) and Surrey Space Centre staff - in less than a year - was launched in June 2000. The 6.5 kg spacecraft carries advanced, UK-developed, GPS navigation, computing, propulsion and attitude control technologies, which have been used to demonstrate orbital manoeuvring and full three-axis controlled body stabilisation. SNAP-1's primary payload is a machine vision system which has been used to image the in-orbit deployment of another SSTL-built spacecraft: Tsinghua-1. The highly successful, SNAP-1 mission has also demonstrated how the concept of using a standardised, modular nanosatellite bus can provide the core support units (power system, on-board data-handling and communications systems and standardised payload interface) for a practical nanosatellite to be constructed and flown in a remarkably short time-frame. Surrey's undergraduate and post-graduate students have made a major input to the SNAP concept over the last six years in the context of project work within the Space Centre. Currently, students at the USAF Academy are benefiting from this technology in the context of designing their own nanosatellite - FalconSAT-2. For the FalconSAT-2 project, the approach has been to focus on building up infrastructure, including design and development tools that can serve as a firm foundation to allow the satellite design to evolve steadily over the course of several missions. Specific to this new approach has been a major effort to bound the problem faced by the students. To do this, the program has leveraged the research carried out at the Surrey Space Centre, by "buying into" the SNAP architecture. Through this, the Academy program

  2. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  3. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  4. Integrating Academic and Vocational Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walling, Susan

    The Allied Health Certificate Program at Massachusetts' Bunker Hill Community College has been successfully integrating academic and vocational education since 1986. The integration of English as a Second Language, academic education, and occupational training was a direct response to requests from business and industry for a competitive…

  5. Evolving Best Practice in Learning About Air Quality and Climate Change Science in ACCENT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuepbach, E.

    2008-12-01

    Learning about air quality and climate change science has developed into a transdisciplinary impact generator, moulded by academic-stakeholder partnerships, where complementary skills and competences lead to a culture of dialogue, mutual learning and decision-making. These sweeping changes are mirrored in the evolving best practice within the European Network of Excellence on Atmospheric Composition Change (ACCENT). The Training and Education Programme in ACCENT pursues an integrated approach and innovative avenues to sharing knowledge and communicating air quality and climate change science to various end-user groups, including teachers, policy makers, stakeholders, and the general public. Early career scientists are involved in the process, and are trained to acquire new knowledge in a variety of learning communities and environments. Here, examples of both the open system of teaching within ACCENT training workshops for early career scientists, and the engagement of non-academic audiences in the joint learning process are presented.

  6. A Multi-Sensor Water Vapor, Temperature and Cloud Climate Data Record from the A-Train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetzer, E. J.; Yue, Q.; Wong, S.; Guillaume, A.; Stachnik, R. A.; Wang, T.; Manipon, G.; Kahn, B. H.; Wilson, B. D.; Hua, H.

    2016-12-01

    We are creating a combined data record of clouds, water vapor and atmospheric temperature incorporating all water vapor measurements by A-Train sensors. A data set of combined AIRS/AMSU water vapor and CloudSat cloud observations is currently available. However, these represent only about 1% of all water vapor observations in the A-Train swath, and include less than half the temporal extent of the A-Train (2006-2010 versus 2002-2016). We are currently combining observations from MODIS, AIRS/AMSU, MLS, AMSR-E, CloudSat and CALIPSO. The new record includes every water vapor and temperature observation from AIRS/AMSU, MLS and AMSR-E over the 14 year A-Train lifetime. Our objective is to fully characterize cloud information obtained by A-Train instruments, and relate those cloud characteristics to observed water vapor over the entire A-Train record.

  7. Academic Leaders as Thermostats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kekale, Jouni

    2003-01-01

    University of Jones launched a two-year development and training project on academic management and leadership in the beginning of 2002. Open seminars were arranged for heads for departments, deans and administrative managers. In addition, personnel administration started pilot projects with two departments in co-operation with the Finnish…

  8. Academic Leaders as Thermostats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kekale, Jouni

    2003-01-01

    University of Jones launched a two-year development and training project on academic management and leadership in the beginning of 2002. Open seminars were arranged for heads for departments, deans and administrative managers. In addition, personnel administration started pilot projects with two departments in co-operation with the Finnish…

  9. Effects of Climate Change, Urban Development, and Threatened and Endangered Species Management on Army Training Capabilities: Firing Ranges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    Threatened and Endangered Species Management on Army Training Capabilities Firing Ranges En gi ne er R es ea rc h an d D ev el op m en t Ce nt... Endangered Species Management on Army Training Capabilities Firing Ranges Juliana Wilhoit, Scott Tweddale, Matt Hohmann, David Delaney, Michelle E...impacting an installation’s training areas, and the potential impact of currently listed and species at risk of being listed to the endangered

  10. Effects of Self-Control Training on Study Activity and Academic Performance: An Analysis of Self-Monitoring, Self-Reward, and Systematic-Planning Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greiner, Jerry M.; Karoly, Paul

    1976-01-01

    The relative efficacy of training in self-monitoring, self-reward, and planning as aids to self-control was examined. Subjects received training in a standard study method and received degrees of training in self-control. The group that received training in self-monitoring, self-reward, and planning strategies significantly outperformed other…

  11. Teachers Learning to Research Climate: Development of hybrid teacher professional development to support climate inquiry and research in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odell, M. R.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Kennedy, T.

    2011-12-01

    The GLOBE Program is an international science and education focused on connecting scientists, teachers and students around relevant, local environmental issues. GLOBE's focus during the next two years in on climate, global change and understanding climate from a scientific perspective. The GLOBE Student Climate Research Campaign (SCRFC) will engage youth from around the world in understanding and researching climate through investigations of local climate challenges. GLOBE teachers are trained in implementation of inquiry in the classroom and the use of scientific data collection protocols to develop inquiry and research projects of the Earth System. In preparation for the SCRC, GLOBE teachers will need additional training in climate science, global change and communicating climate science in the classroom. GLOBE's reach to 111 countries around the world requires development of scalable models for training teachers. In June GLOBE held the first teacher professional development workshop (Learning to Research Summer Institute) in a hybrid format with two-thirds of the teachers participating face-to-face and the remaining teachers participating virtually using Adobe Connect. The week long workshop prepared teachers to integrate climate science inquiry and research projects in the classrooms in the 2011-12 academic year. GLOBE scientists and other climate science experts will work with teachers and their students throughout the year in designing and executing a climate science research project. Final projects and research results will be presented in May 2012 through a virtual conference. This presentation will provide the framework for hybrid teacher professional development in climate science research and inquiry projects as well as summarize the findings from this inaugural session. The GLOBE Program office, headquartered in Boulder, is funded through cooperative agreements with NASA and NOAA with additional support from NSF and the U.S. Department of State. GLOBE

  12. The Influence of Climate on the Academic and Athletic Success of Student-Athletes: Results from a Multi-Institutional National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankin, Susan; Merson, Dan; Garvey, Jason C.; Sorgen, Carl H.; Menon, India; Loya, Karla; Oseguera, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Students' perceptions of the campus climate can affect their success and outcomes. Student-athletes' experiences with campus life are unique. The Student-Athletes Climate Study (SACS) is a national study of over 8,000 student athletes from all NCAA sports and divisions. The purpose of the study was to examine the influence of individual and…

  13. The Influence of Climate on the Academic and Athletic Success of Student-Athletes: Results from a Multi-Institutional National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rankin, Susan; Merson, Dan; Garvey, Jason C.; Sorgen, Carl H.; Menon, India; Loya, Karla; Oseguera, Leticia

    2016-01-01

    Students' perceptions of the campus climate can affect their success and outcomes. Student-athletes' experiences with campus life are unique. The Student-Athletes Climate Study (SACS) is a national study of over 8,000 student athletes from all NCAA sports and divisions. The purpose of the study was to examine the influence of individual and…

  14. Academic Jibberish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krashen, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about academic jibberish. Alfie Kohn states that a great deal of academic writing is incomprehensible even to others in the same area of scholarship. Academic Jibberish may score points for the writer but does not help research or practice. The author discusses jibberish as a career strategy that impresses those…

  15. Academic writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  16. 40 CFR 262.207 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Accumulation of Unwanted Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities § 262.207 Training. An eligible academic entity must provide training to all individuals working in a laboratory at the eligible academic entity, as follows: (a) Training for laboratory workers and students must be commensurate...

  17. 40 CFR 262.207 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Accumulation of Unwanted Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities § 262.207 Training. An eligible academic entity must provide training to all individuals working in a laboratory at the eligible academic entity, as follows: (a) Training for laboratory workers and students must be commensurate...

  18. 40 CFR 262.207 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Accumulation of Unwanted Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities § 262.207 Training. An eligible academic entity must provide training to all individuals working in a laboratory at the eligible academic entity, as follows: (a) Training for laboratory workers and students must be commensurate...

  19. 40 CFR 262.207 - Training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Accumulation of Unwanted Material for Laboratories Owned by Eligible Academic Entities § 262.207 Training. An eligible academic entity must provide training to all individuals working in a laboratory at the eligible academic entity, as follows: (a) Training for laboratory workers and students must be commensurate...

  20. Academic detailing.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations.

  1. Studies in Possibilities: Academic Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Judith S.

    The history of higher education in the United States encompasses conflicting attitudes towards those in educational leadership roles: educational leaders should be well-trained academicians who somehow know how to manage, or they should be well-trained managers who somehow know how to be academic. However, community college educational…

  2. Integrating the EMPD with an Alpine altitudinal training set to reconstruct climate variables in Holocene pollen records from high-altitude peat bogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlanetto, Giulia; Badino, Federica; Brunetti, Michele; Champvillair, Elena; De Amicis, Mattia; Maggi, Valter; Pini, Roberta; Ravazzi, Cesare; Vallé, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Temperatures and precipitation are the main environmental factors influencing vegetation and pollen production. Knowing the modern climate optima and tolerances of those plants represented in fossil assemblages and assuming that the relationships between plants and climate in the past are not dissimilar from the modern ones, fossil pollen records offer many descriptors to reconstruct past climate variables. The aim of our work is to investigate the potential of high-altitude pollen records from an Alpine peat bog (TBValter, close to the Ruitor Glacier, Western Italian Alps) for quantitative paleoclimate estimates. The idea behind is that high-altitude ecosystems are more sensitive to climate changes, especially to changes in July temperatures that severely affect the timberline ecotone. Meantime, we met with difficulties when considering the factors involved in pollen dispersal over a complex altitudinal mountain pattern, such as the Alps. We used the EMPD-European Modern Pollen Database (Davis et al., 2013) as modern training set to be compared with our high-altitude fossil site. The EMPD dataset is valuable in that it provides a large geographic coverage of main ecological and climate gradients (at sub-continental scale) but lacks in sampling of altitudinal gradients and high-altitude sites in the Alps. We therefore designed an independent altitudinal training set for the alpine valley hosting our fossil site. 27 sampling plots were selected along a 1700m-elevational transect. In a first step, each plot was provided with (i) 3 moss polsters collected following the guidelines provided by Cañellas-Boltà et al. (2009) and analyzed separately to account for differences in pollen deposition at small scale, (ii) morphometrical parameters obtained through a high-resolution DEM, and (iii) temperature and precipitation were estimated by means of weighted linear regression of the meteorological variable versus elevation, locally evaluated for each site (Brunetti et al

  3. Goal-Setting, Self-Monitoring, and Teacher-Student Conferences and the Relationship with Overall School Climate and Student Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin, Paul Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Programs and reforms have come and gone in the educational arena with little impact on student performance. The problem at the school of study was the students' perception of their sense of belonging and the sense of the school as a community and the students' academic performance did not show adequate growth. The study took place in a mid-western…

  4. Teams-Games-Tournament in the Social Studies Classroom: Effects on Academic Achievement, Student Attitudes, Cognitive Beliefs, and Classroom Climate. Report Number 173.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVries, David L.; And Others

    This study experimentally assessed the effectiveness of two variations of an instructional technique, Teams-Games-Tournament (TGT), in high school American history classes. A 3 x 2 (treatment by teacher) design was employed using intact classes over a 12-week period. TGT proved to have significant positive effects on academic achievement, student…

  5. Goal-Setting, Self-Monitoring, and Teacher-Student Conferences and the Relationship with Overall School Climate and Student Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin, Paul Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Programs and reforms have come and gone in the educational arena with little impact on student performance. The problem at the school of study was the students' perception of their sense of belonging and the sense of the school as a community and the students' academic performance did not show adequate growth. The study took place in a mid-western…

  6. An Overview of Potential Methods for Maintaining Training Area Environments in Arid and Semi-Arid Climates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    Technical Monitor was Mr. Donald Bandel, DAEN-ZCF-B. The following persons made contributions to this study: Eric Anderson, Yakima Firing Center; Martha Blake...Recreation Coordination 2. Phytoplankton Productivity *23. Training Impacts -- 3 subunits 3. Aquatic Pest Plants 4. Fish Economic Value 5. Fish... Economic Values 32. Storm Warning Procedures 33. Training for Storm Preparation 34. Bunter/Trapper/Fishing Quotas 35. Land Area Ownership 36. Land Area

  7. How Academic Is Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    University provision for academic development is well established in the USA, UK and many other countries. However, arrangements for its provision and staffing vary. In Australia, there has been a trend towards professional rather than academic staff appointments. Is this appropriate? In this paper, the domains of academic development work are…

  8. How Academic Is Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    University provision for academic development is well established in the USA, UK and many other countries. However, arrangements for its provision and staffing vary. In Australia, there has been a trend towards professional rather than academic staff appointments. Is this appropriate? In this paper, the domains of academic development work are…

  9. [The improvement of the abilities to maintain motor coordination and equilibrium in the students presenting with the functional disorders of the musculoskeletal system by introducing the elements of therapeutic physical training into the structure of academic schedule of physical education].

    PubMed

    Kapilevich, L V; Davlet'yarova, K V; Ovchinnikova, N A

    The problem of deterioration of the health status in the university students at present remains as topical as it was before being a major cause of impaired working capacity, disability and/or poor social adaptation of the large number of graduates. It has been proposed to introduce a class of therapeutic physical training (TPT) into the schedule of physical education for the students. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the formation of the skills needed to maintain motor coordination and equilibrium in the students presenting with the functional disorders of the musculoskeletal system (MSS) including scoliosis by the introduction of the elements of therapeutic physical training into their academic schedules. The main study group was comprised of 32 students (men) at the age of 18-19 years presenting with the disorders of the musculoskeletal system (type III scoliosis, osteochondropathy, and osteochondrosis). The students of this group received a curriculum aimed at improving their motor skills with the emphasis laid on the selected elements of therapeutic physical training. The control group was composed of 17 students without disorders of the musculoskeletal system who attended the physical education classes following the traditional program. The coordination abilities and balance skills were evaluated based on the analysis with the use of the Stabilan-1 stabilographic apparatus. In addition, the stability test and the Romberg test with open and closed eyes were performed. The results of the study give evidence that the introduction of the elements of therapeutic physical training into the structure of academic schedule of physical education for the students suffering from diseases of the musculoskeletal system has beneficial effect on the parameters of stability and the general ability to maintain the posture and balance. Specifically, in the beginning of the academic year, the students of the main study group presenting with

  10. Applied Climate Education and Training for Agricultural and Natural Resource Management in India, Indonesia, Zimbabwe and Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, D. A.; Clewett, J. F.; Selvaraju, R.; Birch, C.

    2006-01-01

    In parts of the world, including many developing countries, climate variability impacts negatively on agricultural production and natural resource management. Workshops in applied climatology were held in Australia, India, Indonesia and Zimbabwe between 1999 and 2002 to provide farmers and agricultural and meteorological staff a better…

  11. Applied Climate Education and Training for Agricultural and Natural Resource Management in India, Indonesia, Zimbabwe and Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, D. A.; Clewett, J. F.; Selvaraju, R.; Birch, C.

    2006-01-01

    In parts of the world, including many developing countries, climate variability impacts negatively on agricultural production and natural resource management. Workshops in applied climatology were held in Australia, India, Indonesia and Zimbabwe between 1999 and 2002 to provide farmers and agricultural and meteorological staff a better…

  12. Interdisciplinarity, Climate, and Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulwarty, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Interdisciplinarity has become synonymous with all things progressive about research and education. This is so not simply because of a philosophical belief in the heterogeneity of knowledge but because of the scientific and social complexities of problems of major concern. The increased demand for improved climate knowledge and information has increased pressure to support planning under changing rates of extremes event occurrence, is well-documented. The application of useful climate data, information and knowledge requires multiple networks and information services infrastructure that support planning and implementation. As widely quoted, Pasteur's quadrant is a label given to a class of scientific research methodologies that seeks fundamental understanding of scientific problems and, simultaneously, to benefit society-what Stokes called "use-inspired research". Innovation, in this context, has been defined as "the process by which individuals and organizations generate new ideas and put them into practice". A growing number of research institutes and programs have begun developing a cadre of professionals focused on integrating basic and applied research in areas such as climate risk assessment and adaptation. There are now several examples of where researchers and teams have crafted examples that include affected communities. In this presentation we will outline the lessons from several efforts including the PACE program, the RISAs, NIDIS, the Climate Services Information System and other interdisciplinary service-oriented efforts in which the author has been involved. Some early lessons include the need to: Recognize that key concerns of social innovation go beyond the projections of climate and other global changes to embrace multiple methods Continue to train scientists of all stripes of disciplinary norms, but higher education should also prepare students who plan to seek careers outside of academia by increasing flexibility in graduate training programs

  13. Academics' Attitudes towards PhD Students' Teaching: Preparing Research Higher Degree Students for an Academic Career

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jepsen, Denise M.; Varhegyi, Melinda M.; Edwards, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    An exploratory study of 473 academics in a metropolitan university investigated the attitudes of academic supervisors towards training for university teaching for doctoral students. The study investigated academic supervisors' levels of awareness and knowledge of teacher training opportunities, the relative importance of teaching--both lecturing…

  14. On the Causes for and Countermeasures against Academic Corruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yongning, Yuan; Jian, Zhang; Haibo, Wang

    2007-01-01

    Combating corruption is an important condition for bringing about the flourishing of academic research. There are many reasons for the emergence and proliferation of academic corruption today. These are closely related to the long-term lack of training among our country's scholars in modern academic standards and the absence of an academic spirit…

  15. On the Causes for and Countermeasures against Academic Corruption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yongning, Yuan; Jian, Zhang; Haibo, Wang

    2007-01-01

    Combating corruption is an important condition for bringing about the flourishing of academic research. There are many reasons for the emergence and proliferation of academic corruption today. These are closely related to the long-term lack of training among our country's scholars in modern academic standards and the absence of an academic spirit…

  16. Academic emergency medicine in India.

    PubMed

    Pothiawala, Sohil; Anantharaman, Venkataraman

    2013-08-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) was recognized as a specialty by the Medical Council of India (MCI) in July 2009. As India undergoes urbanisation, cost-effective transition from managing infectious diseases to emergency management of trauma and cardio-respiratory diseases is crucial. Trained emergency healthcare workers are needed to respond effectively to these challenges. The objective was to determine the current status of academic EM training and related issues in India, and to discuss those that need to be addressed. The authors conducted electronic literature searches for articles published over an 18 year period from January 1994 to February 2013 using PubMed, Google and Yahoo databases. The references listed in the publications identified from these databases were also reviewed. Electronic literature searches revealed a multitude of 1 to 3 year training programmes, many affiliated with various foreign universities. The majority of these training programmes are offered in private healthcare institutions. MCI recognition has opened the doors for medical colleges to set up Indian specialty training programmes. Two separate Academic Councils are currently looking at EM training. The variety of programmes and separate efforts on academic development begets a need to address the issues of short-term courses being passed off as specialty training programmes, and a need for working together on national curriculum development, certification, accreditation systems and common examinations. The different organisations and academic councils could collaborate to give EM a unified scope for development. © 2013 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  17. Why Training Fails

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salinger, Ruth D.

    1975-01-01

    The report on a U. S. Civil Service Commission study of disincentives to effective training offers a summary of the disincentives process, a training climate check list, and practical suggestions for minimizing impediments. (MW)

  18. Heat acclimatization does not improve VO2max or cycling performance in a cool climate in trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, A; Racinais, S; Jensen, M V; Nørgaard, S J; Bonne, T; Nybo, L

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated if well-trained cyclists improve V ˙ O 2 m a x and performance in cool conditions following heat acclimatization through natural outdoor training in hot conditions. Eighteen trained male cyclists were tested for physiological adaptations, V ˙ O 2 m a x , peak aerobic power output, exercise efficiency, and outdoor time trial (TT) performance (43.4 km in cool environment, ∼5-13 °C) before and after 2 weeks of training in a cool (CON, n = 9) or hot (∼35 °C, HA, n = 9) environment. After heat acclimatization, TT performance in the heat was improved by 16%; however, there was no change in the HA group in V ˙ O 2 m a x (4.79 ± 0.21 L/min vs 4.82 ± 0.35 L/min), peak aerobic power output (417 ± 16 W vs 422 ± 17 W), and outdoor TT performance in cool conditions (300 ± 14 W/69 ± 3 min vs 302 ± 9 W/69 ± 4 min). The present study shows that 2 weeks of heat acclimatization was associated with marked improvements in TT performance in the heat. However, for the well-trained endurance athletes, this did not transfer to an improved aerobic exercise capacity or outdoor TT performance in cool conditions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effects of a Computerized Working Memory Training Program on Working Memory, Attention, and Academics in Adolescents with Severe LD and Comorbid ADHD: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, S. A.; Chaban, P.; Martinussen, R.; Goldberg, R.; Gotlieb, H.; Kronitz, R.; Hockenberry, M.; Tannock, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Youths with coexisting learning disabilities (LD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at risk for poor academic and social outcomes. The underlying cognitive deficits, such as poor working memory (WM), are not well targeted by current treatments for either LD or ADHD. Emerging evidence suggests that WM might be…

  20. Effects of a Computerized Working Memory Training Program on Working Memory, Attention, and Academics in Adolescents with Severe LD and Comorbid ADHD: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, S. A.; Chaban, P.; Martinussen, R.; Goldberg, R.; Gotlieb, H.; Kronitz, R.; Hockenberry, M.; Tannock, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Youths with coexisting learning disabilities (LD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at risk for poor academic and social outcomes. The underlying cognitive deficits, such as poor working memory (WM), are not well targeted by current treatments for either LD or ADHD. Emerging evidence suggests that WM might be…

  1. Vocational Training for Economic Development: A Report on Business/Industry Relationships with Kansas Community Colleges and Area Vocational-Technical Schools, 1990-91 Academic Year.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Board of Education, Topeka. Lifelong Learning Div.

    In order to provide educational opportunities for entry into and advancement within the work force, Kansas' 19 public community colleges and 14 area vocational technical schools (AVTSs) have expanded their offerings to include customized training for businesses and industries within Kansas. Vocational training is also supported by the Kansas…

  2. The academic medical center today.

    PubMed

    Rogers, D E; Blendon, R J

    1984-05-01

    Some recent circumstances, including the nation's economic difficulties, a probable physician surplus, a declining need for acute-care medical beds, and an overwhelming public perception that medical care is too expensive, are creating serious problems for academic medical centers today. To survive, many academic medical centers probably will make certain short-term adaptations that will be viewed as undesirable by many. We suggest four initiatives that may help academic centers maintain their vital national role. These initiatives include becoming major public advocates for the medical care needs of the least fortunate; a sharp reduction in the training of subspecialists; the commitment of more of their faculty practice income to academic research, teaching, and support of low-income students; and refocusing attention on the training of young persons to be the physicians of tomorrow.

  3. Academic Bullies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    Many professors have been traumatized by academic bullies. Unlike bullies at school, the academic bully plays a more subtle game. Bullies may spread rumors to undermine a colleague's credibility or shut their target out of social conversations. The more aggressive of the species cuss out co-workers, even threatening to get physical. There is…

  4. Academic Bullies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    Many professors have been traumatized by academic bullies. Unlike bullies at school, the academic bully plays a more subtle game. Bullies may spread rumors to undermine a colleague's credibility or shut their target out of social conversations. The more aggressive of the species cuss out co-workers, even threatening to get physical. There is…

  5. Academic Advising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Peggy, Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Six programs demonstrating some of the ways colleges and universities are strengthening their advising programs to help students attain liberal educations are described, and an essay by Thomas J. Grites is presented. In "Academic Advising: An Atlas for Liberal Education," Grites defines academic advising as a decision-making process…

  6. Academic Duty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Donald

    This book by a former university president examines the state of the research university faculty, focusing on teaching and how success at teaching can be evaluated; ethical problems in reviewing the work of others, research and how it is supported; outside commitments; and research misconduct. Chapters include: "Academic Freedom, Academic Duty,"…

  7. Building Capacity to Use Earth Observations in Decision Making for Climate, Health, Agriculture and Natural Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, A. W.; Ceccato, P.

    2015-12-01

    In order to fill the gaps existing in climate and public health, agriculture, natural disasters knowledge and practices, the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) has developed a Curriculum for Best Practices in Climate Information. This Curriculum builds on the experience of 10 years courses on 'Climate Information' and captures lessons and experiences from different tailored trainings that have been implemented in many countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America. In this presentation, we will provide examples of training activities we have developed to bring remote sensing products to monitor climatic and environmental information into decision processes that benefited users such as the World Health Organization, Ministries of Health, Ministries of Agriculture, Universities, Research Centers such as CIFOR and FIOCRUZ. The framework developed by IRI to provide capacity building is based on the IDEAS framework: Innovation (research) Around climate impacts, evaluation of interventions, and the value of climate information in reducing risks and maximizing opportunities Demonstration E.g. in-country GFCS projects in Tanzania and Malawi - or El Nino work in Ethiopia Education Academic and professional training efforts Advocacy This might focus on communication of variability and change? We are WHO collaborating center so are engaged through RBM/Global Malaria Programme Service ENACTS and Data library key to this. Country data better quality than NASA as incorporates all relevant station data and NASA products. This presentation will demonstrate how the IDEAS framework has been implemented and lessons learned.

  8. Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De George, Richard T.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that Martin Michaelson's proposal in "Should Untenured as Well as Tenured Faculty Be Guaranteed Academic Freedom? A Few Observations," despite its good intentions, is seriously flawed and if adopted in preference to existing standards will weaken rather than strengthen academic freedom. (EV)

  9. Voluntary drinking and hydration in trained, heat-acclimatized girls exercising in a hot and humid climate.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Brown, Anita M; Ramírez-Marrero, Farah A; Wilk, Boguslaw; Bar-Or, Oded

    2008-05-01

    This study examined the effects of beverage composition on the voluntary drinking pattern, body fluid balance and body temperature responses of heat-acclimatized trained girls exercising intermittently in outdoor conditions (WBGT = 30.9 +/- 0.2 degrees C). Twelve trained, heat-acclimatized girls (age = 10.6 +/- 0.2 years) performed three 3-h sessions, each consisting of four 20-min cycling bouts at 60% VO2max, alternating with 25-min rest. One of three beverages was assigned: unflavored water (W), flavored water (FW) or flavored water plus 6% carbohydrate and 18 mmol/l NaCl (CNa). Drinking was ad libitum. Total intake was similar among conditions (W = 953.3 +/- 107.8 ; FW = 1026.5 +/- 138.1; CNa = 906.4 +/- 107.5 g). A mild hypohydration occurred during the three conditions (W = -1.12%; FW = -0.95%; CNa = -0.74% BW, P > 0.05). Sweat loss, higher than previously reported for sedentary girls, was not different among conditions (W = 1,051.5 +/- 90.8; FW = 979.9 +/- 72.8; CNa = 1,052.7 +/- 52.6 g). The average amount of urine produced (W = 269.8 +/- 85.9; FW = 320.8 +/- 87.2; CNa = 85.6 +/- 9.3 g) was 73 and 68% lower [corrected] during CNa compared to [corrected] FW and W, respectively, [corrected] (CNa vs. FW, P < 0.05), CNa vs W, P = 0.06) [corrected] The increase in rectal temperature, heart rate and all perceptual variables did not differ among conditions. In conclusion, flavoring of the water and addition of 6% carbohydrate plus 18 mmol/l NaCl do not prevent mild hypohydration in trained, heat-acclimatized girls with high sweating rates. However, there is a tendency towards a greater fluid retention with the CNa beverage.

  10. Is Academic Feminism an Oxymoron?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacey, Judith

    2000-01-01

    Discusses paradoxical challenges to the future of academic feminism, noting the growing conservatism of the surrounding political climate and the academy's increasing dependence on technological and managerial forces. Highlights two paradoxes: the growth of transdisciplinary feminist scholarship has generated greater disciplinary specialization,…

  11. Retaining nurses through conflict resolution. Training staff to confront problems and communicate openly can improve the work climate.

    PubMed

    Fowler, A R; Bushardt, S C; Jones, M A

    1993-06-01

    The way nurses resolve conflict may be leading them to quit their jobs or leave the profession altogether. Conflict is inevitable in a dynamic organization. What is important is not to avoid conflict but to seek its resolution in a constructive manner. Organizational conflict is typically resolved through one of five strategies: withdrawal, force, conciliation, compromise, or confrontation. A recent study of nurses in three different hospitals showed that the approach they use most is withdrawal. This might manifest itself in a request to change shifts or assignments and may lead to a job change and, eventually, abandonment of the field altogether. Given this scenario, changing nurses' conflict resolution style may help administrators combat the nursing shortage. Healthcare organizations must examine themselves to determine why nurses so frequently use withdrawal; then they must restructure work relationships as needed. Next, organizations need to increase nurses' awareness of the problem and train them to use a resolution style more conducive to building stable relationships: confrontation. Staff should also be trained in effective communications skills to develop trust and openness in their relationships.

  12. Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Building data is given for the following academic libraries: (1) Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois; (2) Abilene Christian College, Abilene, Texas; (3) University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. (MF)

  13. Academic Village.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Renner Middle School (Plano, Texas) where the sprawling suburbs have been kept at bay while creating the atmosphere of an academic village. Photos and a floor plan are provided. (GR)

  14. Academic Village.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Renner Middle School (Plano, Texas) where the sprawling suburbs have been kept at bay while creating the atmosphere of an academic village. Photos and a floor plan are provided. (GR)

  15. The 1990 Wolf Trap Conference: Academic Freedom and Artistic Expression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohm, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Proceedings of the 1990 Wolf Trap Conference on Academic Freedom and Artistic Expression (Virginia, April 29-May 1) are summarized, focusing on the current climate for the arts, institutional neutrality, the role of the arts in the academic community, scope of protection of the arts, and the academic community as captive audience. (MSE)

  16. Comparison of physical body growth and metabolic and reproductive endocrine functions between north and south climates of Japan in trained Thoroughbred yearling horses.

    PubMed

    Tangyuenyong, Siriwan; Sato, Fumio; Nambo, Yasuo; Murase, Harutaka; Endo, Yoshiro; Tanaka, Tomomi; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Watanabe, Gen

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to compare body growth, metabolic, and reproductive hormonal changes in trained Thoroughbred yearling horses under different climate conditions with and without light supplementation (LS). Thoroughbred yearlings raised at research centers of the Japan Racing Association in Hokkaido (north) or Miyazaki (south) were divided into control and LS groups. In the LS groups, 44 colts and 47 fillies from Hokkaido and 11 colts and 11 fillies from Miyazaki were exposed to LS with an extended photoperiod of 14.5 hr of daylight and 9.5 hr of darkness. One week before and once a month after LS, circulating total thyroxine (T4), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1), prolactin (PRL), cortisol, and progesterone (P4) concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay and fluoroimmunoassay, respectively. Growth parameters, including body weight, height, girth, and cannon bone circumferences, were measured monthly. Hair coat (HC) condition was scored. Under natural conditions, the T4 concentrations of Hokkaido yearlings tended to be higher, whereas the IGF-1 (colt) and PRL levels were significantly lower than those of yearlings in Miyazaki. Growth parameters and HC scores were lower in Hokkaido yearlings. With LS, the PRL and P4 concentrations in Hokkaido and Miyazaki were higher, and the first ovarian activity tended to be earlier than in the controls. Only LS Hokkaido yearlings showed significantly higher HC scores than the controls. Comparing the different climates among the LS yearlings, the levels of PRL and P4 and the HC scores in Hokkaido yearlings increased and reached levels similar to those in Miyazaki yearlings. The body weight and girth increment percentages of Hokkaido yearlings in January dramatically decreased and then eventually increased to levels similar to those of Miyazaki yearlings. This suggested that yearlings in naturally colder Hokkaido exhibit higher basal metabolism to maintain homeostasis. However, providing LS may help to improve growth and

  17. Report on AAPG Industry--Academic Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Robert W.; Matthews, William H., III

    1980-01-01

    Describes a conference sponsored by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) to provide an opportunity for representatives from industry and academe to discuss the training and employment of geoscientists. (Author/SA)

  18. Academic Credit for Work Experience in Maryland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Rolf

    The state of Maryland is the subject of this case study on the awarding of academic credit in local educational agency (LEA)-Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) programs. Three focuses of the report are descriptions of the existing LEA-CETA programs in Maryland that award academic credit and the related local policies and practices,…

  19. Biofeedback and Academic Attainment of LD Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, John L.; Russell, Harold

    1980-01-01

    The study focused on effects of electromyographic (EMG) muscle relaxation training on academic abilities of four learning disabled boys (8 to 13 years old). Ss learned to voluntarily control and decrease forearm muscular tension; and this apparently resulted in an increase in cognitive efficiency, at least as it relates to basic academic areas of…

  20. Academic postgraduate medical education -- an Oxford view.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Kenneth; Pugh, Christopher; Best, Denise

    2014-02-01

    Postgraduate medical education in the UK has gone through a maelstrom of change in the last 20 years; many components have disadvantaged clinical academic training in particular. In this article we summarise some of the changes and describe the advantages of the creation of a dedicated clinical academic graduate school as a response to these changes.