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Sample records for academic unit based

  1. Enrollment Management in Academic Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBiaso, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an understanding of how administrative leaders make decisions regarding enrollment management within academic units at a major research university in the southwestern United States. Key enrollment management functions of recruiting, admissions, marketing, orientation, financial aid/scholarships, academic advising, student…

  2. Bringing Community and Academic Scholars Together to Facilitate and Conduct Authentic Community Based Participatory Research: Project UNITED

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Dwight; Yerby, Lea; Tucker, Melanie; Foster, Pamela Payne; Hamilton, Kara C.; Fifolt, Matthew M.; Hites, Lisle; Shreves, Mary Katherine; Page, Susan B.; Bissell, Kimberly L.; Lucky, Felecia L.; Higginbotham, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Cultural competency, trust, and research literacy can affect the planning and implementation of sustainable community-based participatory research (CBPR). The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight: (1) the development of a CBPR pilot grant request for application; and (2) a comprehensive program supporting CBPR obesity-related grant proposals facilitated by activities designed to promote scholarly collaborations between academic researchers and the community. After a competitive application process, academic researchers and non-academic community leaders were selected to participate in activities where the final culminating project was the submission of a collaborative obesity-related CBPR grant application. Teams were comprised of a mix of academic researchers and non-academic community leaders, and each team submitted an application addressing obesity-disparities among rural predominantly African American communities in the US Deep South. Among four collaborative teams, three (75%) successfully submitted a grant application to fund an intervention addressing rural and minority obesity disparities. Among the three submitted grant applications, one was successfully funded by an internal CBPR grant, and another was funded by an institutional seed funding grant. Preliminary findings suggest that the collaborative activities were successful in developing productive scholarly relationships between researchers and community leaders. Future research will seek to understand the full-context of our findings. PMID:26703675

  3. Bringing Community and Academic Scholars Together to Facilitate and Conduct Authentic Community Based Participatory Research: Project UNITED.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Dwight; Yerby, Lea; Tucker, Melanie; Foster, Pamela Payne; Hamilton, Kara C; Fifolt, Matthew M; Hites, Lisle; Shreves, Mary Katherine; Page, Susan B; Bissell, Kimberly L; Lucky, Felecia L; Higginbotham, John C

    2016-01-01

    Cultural competency, trust, and research literacy can affect the planning and implementation of sustainable community-based participatory research (CBPR). The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight: (1) the development of a CBPR pilot grant request for application; and (2) a comprehensive program supporting CBPR obesity-related grant proposals facilitated by activities designed to promote scholarly collaborations between academic researchers and the community. After a competitive application process, academic researchers and non-academic community leaders were selected to participate in activities where the final culminating project was the submission of a collaborative obesity-related CBPR grant application. Teams were comprised of a mix of academic researchers and non-academic community leaders, and each team submitted an application addressing obesity-disparities among rural predominantly African American communities in the US Deep South. Among four collaborative teams, three (75%) successfully submitted a grant application to fund an intervention addressing rural and minority obesity disparities. Among the three submitted grant applications, one was successfully funded by an internal CBPR grant, and another was funded by an institutional seed funding grant. Preliminary findings suggest that the collaborative activities were successful in developing productive scholarly relationships between researchers and community leaders. Future research will seek to understand the full-context of our findings. PMID:26703675

  4. 25 CFR 39.102 - What is academic base funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What is academic base funding? 39.102 Section 39.102... PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Base and Supplemental Funding § 39.102 What is academic base funding? Academic base funding is the ADM times the weighted student unit....

  5. 25 CFR 39.102 - What is academic base funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is academic base funding? 39.102 Section 39.102... PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Base and Supplemental Funding § 39.102 What is academic base funding? Academic base funding is the ADM times the weighted student unit....

  6. 25 CFR 39.102 - What is academic base funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true What is academic base funding? 39.102 Section 39.102... PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Base and Supplemental Funding § 39.102 What is academic base funding? Academic base funding is the ADM times the weighted student unit....

  7. 25 CFR 39.102 - What is academic base funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What is academic base funding? 39.102 Section 39.102... PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Base and Supplemental Funding § 39.102 What is academic base funding? Academic base funding is the ADM times the weighted student unit....

  8. 25 CFR 39.102 - What is academic base funding?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What is academic base funding? 39.102 Section 39.102... PROGRAM Indian School Equalization Formula Base and Supplemental Funding § 39.102 What is academic base funding? Academic base funding is the ADM times the weighted student unit....

  9. Academic medicine amenities unit: developing a model to integrate academic medical care with luxury hotel services.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David W; Kagan, Sarah H; Abramson, Kelly Brennen; Boberick, Cheryl; Kaiser, Larry R

    2009-02-01

    The interface between established values of academic medicine and the trend toward inpatient amenities units requires close examination. Opinions of such units can be polarized, reflecting traditional reservations about the ethical dilemma of offering exclusive services only to an elite patient group. An amenities unit was developed at the University of Pennsylvania Health System in 2007, using an approach that integrated academic medicine values with the benefits of philanthropy and service excellence to make amenities unit services available to all patients. Given inherent internal political concerns, a broadly based steering committee of academic and hospital leadership was developed. An academically appropriate model was conceived, anchored by four principles: (1) integration of academic values, (2) interdisciplinary senior leadership, (3) service excellence, and (4) recalibrated occupancy expectations based on multiple revenue streams. Foremost is ensuring the same health care is afforded all patients throughout the hospital, thereby overcoming ethical challenges and optimizing teaching experiences. Service excellence frames the service ethic for all staff, and this, in addition to luxury hotel-style amenities, differentiates the style and feel of the unit from others in the hospital. Recalibrated occupancy creates program viability given revenue streams redefined to encompass gifts and patient revenue, including both reimbursement and self-pay. The medical-surgical amenities patient-care unit has enjoyed a successful first year and a growing stream of returning patients and admitting physicians. Implications for other academic medical centers include opportunities to extrapolate service excellence throughout the hospital and to cultivate philanthropy to benefit services throughout the medical center. PMID:19174661

  10. Academic medicine amenities unit: developing a model to integrate academic medical care with luxury hotel services.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David W; Kagan, Sarah H; Abramson, Kelly Brennen; Boberick, Cheryl; Kaiser, Larry R

    2009-02-01

    The interface between established values of academic medicine and the trend toward inpatient amenities units requires close examination. Opinions of such units can be polarized, reflecting traditional reservations about the ethical dilemma of offering exclusive services only to an elite patient group. An amenities unit was developed at the University of Pennsylvania Health System in 2007, using an approach that integrated academic medicine values with the benefits of philanthropy and service excellence to make amenities unit services available to all patients. Given inherent internal political concerns, a broadly based steering committee of academic and hospital leadership was developed. An academically appropriate model was conceived, anchored by four principles: (1) integration of academic values, (2) interdisciplinary senior leadership, (3) service excellence, and (4) recalibrated occupancy expectations based on multiple revenue streams. Foremost is ensuring the same health care is afforded all patients throughout the hospital, thereby overcoming ethical challenges and optimizing teaching experiences. Service excellence frames the service ethic for all staff, and this, in addition to luxury hotel-style amenities, differentiates the style and feel of the unit from others in the hospital. Recalibrated occupancy creates program viability given revenue streams redefined to encompass gifts and patient revenue, including both reimbursement and self-pay. The medical-surgical amenities patient-care unit has enjoyed a successful first year and a growing stream of returning patients and admitting physicians. Implications for other academic medical centers include opportunities to extrapolate service excellence throughout the hospital and to cultivate philanthropy to benefit services throughout the medical center.

  11. Chinese International Students' Academic Stressors in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Kun; Berliner, David C.

    2009-01-01

    No empirical research has focused on understanding the academic stress of Chinese international students in the United States. This qualitative inquiry examines the most stressful aspects of their academic lives in the U.S., how they characterize their academic stress, and what conditions they believe tend to account for their academic stress.…

  12. The Relative Value Unit in academic geriatrics: incentive or impediment?

    PubMed

    Resnick, Neil M; Radulovich, Nichole

    2014-03-01

    Although the number of older adults is rapidly expanding, the number of healthcare professionals trained in geriatrics is small and declining. The reasons are multifaceted, but because responsibility for training such professionals resides largely in academic health centers (AHCs), their support for geriatrics is critical. As AHCs face increasing financial pressure, many are seeking metrics to measure productivity and the Relative Value Unit (RVU) may be the one most commonly selected. Yet little is known about the RVU's effect on geriatric programs. Review of the literature and a survey of the leaders of the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs suggest that the advantages of an RVU-based metric are likely eclipsed by its negative impact on the care of older adults, the ability of academic geriatrics to accomplish its mission, and even the survival of geriatrics. If the RVU is to continue to be used as the index of productivity, it should be modified--by reweighting its codes (or by adding new ones)--and complemented by interventions to ensure patient access, care quality, and efficiency. Because an alternative metric, such as a Patient-based Value Unit may be preferable, this article describes the principles on which one might be based. Regardless, urgent action is required by all stakeholders to address this issue. Without it, the future of academic geriatrics--and with it the innovative care models, research, and training the nation needs to improve care and bend the cost curve--will be difficult if not impossible to sustain.

  13. Examining the Effects of READ 180 with Sixth Grade Students in a Southwest United States School District Based on a Formative Assessment--Measures of Academic Progress--and Its Impact on Leadership Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    An achievement gap in reading existed in a Southwest United States school district with Hispanic, economically disadvantaged, English Language Learners (ELLs), and special education sixth grade students based on Measures of Academic Progress data. This study investigated the effectiveness of the "READ 180" reading intervention program…

  14. Views of academic dentists about careers in academic dentistry in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Goldacre, M; Lee, P; Stear, S; Sidebottom, E; Richards, R

    2000-02-12

    The aim of this paper is to report the views of academic dentists about careers in academic dentistry assessed by method of a postal questionnaire survey. The subjects of the survey were dentists in academic posts in the United Kingdom. The incentives in pursuing an academic career which respondents rated most highly were the opportunity to teach and the variety of work in an academic career. The greatest disincentives were competing pressures from service work, teaching and research, and the difficulty of getting research grants. Many would like to spend more time on research and less on service work and teaching. The length of time required for training, and the quality of training, was a concern, particularly for junior academics. Most respondents rated the enjoyment of their job highly but scored much lower on satisfaction with the time their job left for domestic and leisure activities. By contrast with academic medicine, in academic dentistry there is typically greater emphasis on teaching and less on research. In conclusion, the balance of activities in academic posts, particularly between service work, teaching and research, needs to be regularly reviewed. The development of a more structured training programme for junior academics, which does not disadvantage academic dentists when compared with their NHS colleagues, may be required.

  15. Interprofessional education in academic family medicine teaching units

    PubMed Central

    Price, David; Howard, Michelle; Hilts, Linda; Dolovich, Lisa; McCarthy, Lisa; Walsh, Allyn E.; Dykeman, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT PROBLEM ADDRESSED The new family health teams (FHTs) in Ontario were designed to enable interprofessional collaborative practice in primary care; however, many health professionals have not been trained in an interprofessional environment. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To provide health professional learners with an interprofessional practice experience in primary care that models teamwork and collaborative practice skills. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The 2 academic teaching units of the FHT at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, employ 6 types of health professionals and provide learning environments for family medicine residents and students in a variety of health care professions. Learners engage in formal interprofessional education activities and mixed professional and learner clinical consultations. They are immersed in an established interprofessional practice environment, where all team members are valued and contribute collaboratively to patient care and clinic administration. Other contributors to the success of the program include the physical layout of the clinics, the electronic medical record communications system, and support from leadership for the additional clinical time commitment of delivering interprofessional education. CONCLUSION This academic FHT has developed a program of interprofessional education based partly on planned activities and logistic enablers, and largely on immersing learners in a culture of long-standing interprofessional collaboration. PMID:19752260

  16. Academic Conceptions of a United States Peace Corps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Anne Palmer

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to popular understanding that the United States Peace Corps stemmed from a spontaneous idea generated on the campaign trail to appeal to young voters, John F. Kennedy's celebrated proposal for a federally sponsored, overseas volunteer training programme was drawn from models and theories circulated by American academics. This article…

  17. Academic Season Does Not Influence Cardiac Surgical Outcomes at United States Academic Medical Centers

    PubMed Central

    LaPar, Damien J.; Bhamidipati, Castigliano M.; Mery, Carlos M.; Stukenborg, George J.; Lau, Christine L.; Kron, Irving L.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies have demonstrated the influence of academic season on outcomes in select surgical populations. However, the influence of academic season has not been evaluated nationwide in cardiac surgery. We hypothesized that cardiac surgical outcomes were not significantly influenced by time of year at both cardiothoracic teaching hospitals (TH) and non-cardiothoracic teaching hospitals (NTH) nationwide. Methods From 2003–2007, a weighted 1,614,394 cardiac operations were evaluated using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database. Patients undergoing cardiac operations at TH and NTH were identified using the Association of American Medical College’s Graduate Medical Education Tracking System. Hierarchical multivariable logistic regression analyses were utilized to estimate the effect of academic quarter on risk-adjusted outcomes. Results Mean patient age was 65.9±10.9 years. Females accounted for 32.8% of patients. Isolated coronary artery bypass grafting was the most common operation performed (64.7%) followed by isolated valve replacement (19.3%). The overall incidence of operative mortality and composite postoperative complication rate was 2.9% and 27.9%, respectively. After accounting for potentially confounding risk factors, timing of operation by academic quarter did not independently increase risk-adjusted mortality (p=0.12) or morbidity (p=0.24) at academic medical centers. Conclusions Risk-adjusted mortality and morbidity for cardiac operations are not associated with time of year in the United States at teaching and non-teaching hospitals. Patients should be reassured of the safety of performance of cardiac operations at academic medical centers throughout a given academic year. PMID:21481616

  18. Financial Analysis for Academic Units. AAHE-ERIC/Higher Education Research Report No. 7, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Donald L.

    The state-of-the-art of financial analysis for academic units within institutions of higher education is evaluated with attention directed to: how the cost of an academic unit is determined, how revenue is identified with academic units, how costs are analyzed, how revenues and expenditures are projected, and how the financial efficiency of an…

  19. Using Problem-Based Learning to Explore Unseen Academic Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Shelagh A.; Gallagher, James J.

    2013-01-01

    One goal of the US Department of Education-funded Project Insights was to see if the use of Problem-based Learning (PBL) would encourage students to reveal previously unseen academic potential. Two PBL units were taught to 271 sixth grade students in 13 classrooms. Afterwards, teachers identified students who demonstrated previously unseen…

  20. Work-Based Learning and Academic Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Katherine L.; Moore, David Thornton; Bailey, Thomas R.

    1999-01-01

    A study tested the claim that work-based learning can have positive effects on academic learning. Data were obtained through interviews with faculty, staff, students, and employers, and observation of classroom-based links to the work-based learning components at three sites involved in a work-based learning project. At the three sites, a total of…

  1. Persistence in Expatriate Academic Assignments in the United Arab Emirates: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Gerard D.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored factors that influenced persistence in expatriate academic assignments in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Specifically, the problem that was addressed was an investigation of the reasons why some expatriate academics declared their intent to leave an academic position within one year of arrival while others choose to extend…

  2. Mission-Based Reporting in Academic Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anders, Thomas F.; Hales, Robert E.; Shahrokh, Narriman C.; Howell, Lydia P.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This article describes a data entry and analysis system called Mission-Based Reporting (MBR) that is used to measure faculty and department activities related to specific academic missions and objectives. The purpose of MBR is to provide a reporting tool useful in evaluating faculty effort and in helping chairs 1) to better assess their…

  3. Academic Biliteracy Challenges: Korean Scholars in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Sookyung

    2010-01-01

    Studies on academic biliteracy have had a tendency to focus on multilingual scholars' current status of academic biliteracy and not on their prior experiences in their home countries. However, these experiences are vital to understanding their current status of academic biliteracy because the multilingual scholars' distinctive experiences in…

  4. Contemporary Development of Academic Reference Librarianship in the United States: A 44-Year Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hanrong; Tang, Yingqi; Knight, Carley

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzes job advertisements to identify the contemporary development of academic reference librarianship in the United States. Results show that more job openings, higher educational backgrounds, more duties & responsibilities, and variety of titles were assigned to academic reference librarian positions from 1966 through 2009.…

  5. Assessing Academic Outcomes at the United States Coast Guard Academy: The Role of Student Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezendes, George J.; Gable, Robert K.

    This paper discusses the efforts of the Department of Mathematics at the United States Coast Guard Academy (USCGA) to determine the degree to which their courses support the published academic outcomes of the institution, and presents the results of a survey of student attitudes toward the academic outcomes. A survey questionnaire was developed…

  6. United States academic medical centers: priorities and challenges amid market transformation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Irene M; Anason, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    United States academic medical centers (AMCs) have upheld their long-standing reputation for excellence by teaching and training the next generation of physicians, supporting medical research, providing world-class medical care, and offering breakthrough treatments for highly complex medical cases. In recent years, the pace and direction of change reshaping the American health care industry has created a set of new and profound challenges that AMC leaders must address in order to sustain their institutions. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of 116 leading nonprofit academic medical centers and 276 of their affiliated hospitals, all of which are focused on delivering world-class patient care. Formed in 1984, UHC fosters collaboration with and among its members through its renowned programs and services in the areas of comparative data and analytics, performance improvement, supply chain management, strategic research, and public policy. Each year, UHC surveys the executives of its member institutions to understand the issues they view as most critical to sustaining the viability and success of their organizations. The results of UHC's most recent 2011 member survey, coupled with a 2012 Strategic Health Perspectives Harris Interactive presentation, based in parton surveys of major health care industry stakeholders reveal the most important and relevant issues and opportunities that hospital leaders face today, as the United States health care delivery system undergoes a period of unprecedented transformation. PMID:23484431

  7. United States academic medical centers: priorities and challenges amid market transformation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Irene M; Anason, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    United States academic medical centers (AMCs) have upheld their long-standing reputation for excellence by teaching and training the next generation of physicians, supporting medical research, providing world-class medical care, and offering breakthrough treatments for highly complex medical cases. In recent years, the pace and direction of change reshaping the American health care industry has created a set of new and profound challenges that AMC leaders must address in order to sustain their institutions. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) is an alliance of 116 leading nonprofit academic medical centers and 276 of their affiliated hospitals, all of which are focused on delivering world-class patient care. Formed in 1984, UHC fosters collaboration with and among its members through its renowned programs and services in the areas of comparative data and analytics, performance improvement, supply chain management, strategic research, and public policy. Each year, UHC surveys the executives of its member institutions to understand the issues they view as most critical to sustaining the viability and success of their organizations. The results of UHC's most recent 2011 member survey, coupled with a 2012 Strategic Health Perspectives Harris Interactive presentation, based in parton surveys of major health care industry stakeholders reveal the most important and relevant issues and opportunities that hospital leaders face today, as the United States health care delivery system undergoes a period of unprecedented transformation.

  8. Academic Quality Control: The Case of College Programs on Military Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Stephen K.

    The quality of college programs at 13 U.S. military bases and the activities of various agencies for maintaining quality control were evaluated. Based on site visits to military bases in the continental United States and Hawaii in 1978, some academic programs appeared to have few standards and practices that promote quality. It is claimed that…

  9. Social Identity and the Shift of Student Affairs Staff to the Academic Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mader, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the phenomenon of student affairs professionals working at Arizona State University who shifted from a student affairs unit to perform similar work in an academic unit. The conceptual framework for this exploration was social identity theory (Tajfel, 1974), which asserts that individuals develop a self-concept or image that…

  10. Legal Bases for Dealing with Academic Dishonesty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bricault, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Academic dishonesty poses a threat to the goals of every educational institution. This article draws heavily from current literature and case law to provide an overview of academic dishonesty, paying particular attention to associated legal aspects, such as due process, the content and communication of policies, sanctions, prevention, and…

  11. Burnout in United States Academic Chairs of Radiation Oncology Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Kusano, Aaron S.; Thomas, Charles R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Formenti, Silvia C.; Hahn, Stephen M.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Mittal, Bharat B.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to determine the self-reported prevalence of burnout in chairs of academic radiation oncology departments, to identify factors contributing to burnout, and to compare the prevalence of burnout with that seen in other academic chair groups. Methods and Materials: An anonymous online survey was administered to the membership of the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiation Oncology Programs (SCAROP). Burnout was measured with the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). Results: Questionnaires were returned from 66 of 87 chairs (76% response rate). Seventy-nine percent of respondents reported satisfaction with their current positions. Common major stressors were budget deficits and human resource issues. One-quarter of chairs reported that it was at least moderately likely that they would step down in the next 1 to 2 years; these individuals demonstrated significantly higher emotional exhaustion. Twenty-five percent of respondents met the MBI-HSS criteria for low burnout, 75% for moderate burnout, and none for high burnout. Group MBI-HSS subscale scores demonstrated a pattern of moderate emotional exhaustion, low depersonalization, and moderate personal accomplishment, comparing favorably with other specialties. Conclusions: This is the first study of burnout in radiation oncology chairs with a high response rate and using a validated psychometric tool. Radiation oncology chairs share similar major stressors to other chair groups, but they demonstrate relatively high job satisfaction and lower burnout. Emotional exhaustion may contribute to the anticipated turnover in coming years. Further efforts addressing individual and institutional factors associated with burnout may improve the relationship with work of chairs and other department members.

  12. Unseen Workers in the Academic Factory: Perceptions of Neoracism among International Postdocs in the United States and the United Kingdom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, Brendan; Lee, Jenny J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, Brendan Cantwell and Jenny J. Lee examine the experiences of international postdocs and their varying career paths in the current political economy of academic capitalism through the lens of neoracism. Using in-depth interviews with science and engineering faculty and international postdocs in the United States and the United…

  13. Academic Service Units and University Policy Formulation: A Functional Survival Model for the 1980s. AIR Forum 1981 Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoemaker, Daniel Paul

    The way in which university academic service units evolved historically is considered, a theoretical framework is outlined representing the present organizational relationship between the managerial perspective of these units and the university policy-making perspective, and a model is proposed for integrating academic service units into…

  14. An Emerging Typology of Academic Interdisciplinary Gerontology Centers in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertz, Judith E.; Douglass, Carolinda; Johnson, Angela; Richmond, Shirley S.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the organization, characteristics or services offered by academic interdisciplinary gerontology centers located in higher education institutions. This article presents a description and an emerging typology of academic interdisciplinary gerontology centers based on information collected from the Websites of 47 centers. The…

  15. Comparing academic and community-based hospitalists.

    PubMed

    Malkenson, David; Siegal, Eric M; Leff, Jared A; Weber, Rachel; Struck, Rhonda

    2010-01-01

    In 2006, hospitalist programs were formally introduced at both an academic and community hospital in the same city providing an opportunity to study the similarities and differences in workflows in these two settings. The data were collected using a time-flow methodology allowing the two workflows to be compared quantitatively. The results showed that the hospitalists in the two settings devoted similar proportions of their workday to the task categories studied. Most of the time was spent providing indirect patient care followed by direct patient care, travel, personal, and other. However, after adjusting for patient volumes, the data revealed that academic hospitalists spent significantly more time per patient providing indirect patient care (Academic: 54.7 +/- 11.1 min/patient, Community: 41.9 +/- 9.8 min/patient, p < 0.001). Additionally, we found that nearly half of the hospitalists' time at both settings was spent multitasking. Although we found subtle workflow differences between the academic and community programs, their similarities were more striking as well as greater than their differences. We attribute these small differences to the higher case mix index at the academic program as well greater complexity and additional communication hand-offs inherent to a tertiary academic medical center. It appears that hospitalists, irrespective of their work environment, spend far more time documenting, communicating and coordinating care than they do at the bedside raising the question, is this is a necessary feature of the hospitalist care model or should hospitalists restructure their workflow to improve outcomes?

  16. Reducing intraoperative red blood cell unit wastage in a large academic medical center

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Gina M.; Woods, Marcella C.; France, Daniel J.; Austin, Thomas M.; Deegan, Robert J.; Paroskie, Allison; Booth, Garrett S.; Young, Pampee P.; Dmochowski, Roger R.; Sandberg, Warren S.; Pilla, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The wastage of red blood cell (RBC) units within the operative setting results in significant direct costs to health care organizations. Previous education-based efforts to reduce wastage were unsuccessful at our institution. We hypothesized that a quality and process improvement approach would result in sustained reductions in intraoperative RBC wastage in a large academic medical center. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Utilizing a failure mode and effects analysis supplemented with time and temperature data, key drivers of perioperative RBC wastage were identified and targeted for process improvement. RESULTS Multiple contributing factors, including improper storage and transport and lack of accurate, locally relevant RBC wastage event data were identified as significant contributors to ongoing intraoperative RBC unit wastage. Testing and implementation of improvements to the process of transport and storage of RBC units occurred in liver transplant and adult cardiac surgical areas due to their history of disproportionately high RBC wastage rates. Process interventions targeting local drivers of RBC wastage resulted in a significant reduction in RBC wastage (p <0.0001; adjusted odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.15–0.39), despite an increase in operative case volume over the period of the study. Studied process interventions were then introduced incrementally in the remainder of the perioperative areas. CONCLUSIONS These results show that a multidisciplinary team focused on the process of blood product ordering, transport, and storage was able to significantly reduce operative RBC wastage and its associated costs using quality and process improvement methods. PMID:26202213

  17. Indiana's Academic Standards: United States History--Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This booklet clearly spells out what students should know and be able to do in United States History. Examples are given to help students understand what is required to meet the standards. Students should review this guide with their teachers and share it with their parents and family. This two-semester course builds upon concepts developed in…

  18. The Spatial Evolution of Academic Geography in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorschner, Donald L.; Marten, Robert O.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes the establishment, expansion, and contraction of geography departments at the college and university level beginning in the late 1800s and concluding with the present decade. Reports that in the 1980s the total number of geography departments in the United States decreased for the first time. (DB)

  19. Academic Integrity at the United States Air Force Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derby, LeAnn

    2006-01-01

    In troubled times, where threats to honor abound, it is essential that people support students who may have been enculturated in social dishonesty. The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) has worked hard to put in place a number of supports to help cadets to grow beyond social norms where dishonesty may be tolerated. The academy seeks to…

  20. Organisational Culture and Values and the Adaptation of Academic Units in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Zilwa, Deanna

    2007-01-01

    This study explores connections between the organisational culture and values of academic units in Australian universities and their efforts to adapt to external environmental pressures. It integrates empirical findings from case studies with theories of organisational culture and values and adaptation. It identifies seven dimensions of academic…

  1. Development of Academic Audit in the United Kingdom: A Pharmacy Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, Paul S. J.

    1993-01-01

    The process of academic program evaluation in pharmacy in the United Kingdom is described, focusing on the accrediting role of the Royal Pharmaceutical Society, other existing peer review mechanisms, national developments in program evaluation, and school-level components of program quality assessment. (MSE)

  2. Aristotelian-Inspired Model for Curtailing Academic Dishonesty in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Maria A.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation explores the growing epidemic of academic dishonesty in the United States in order to propose an Aristotelian-inspired model for developing moral character to curtail this epidemic. The task is laid out in four parts. Chapter one responds to the problem of "akrasia," adopting a modified version of Devin Henry's…

  3. The Impossibilities of Neutrality: Other Geopolitical Metaphors for Academic Development Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Trevor; Manathunga, Catherine; Potter, Michael K.; Wuetherick, Brad

    2012-01-01

    This paper responds to the occasionally stated imperative in some contexts to be neutral as part of being an academic development unit (ADU). For over a decade at separate professional meetings of developers, two of the authors have heard the refrain that they need to be--or at least be perceived to be--"the Switzerland" of their campuses.…

  4. Utilization of Telecommunications by Academic and School Libraries in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niehaus, Carl A.

    As a part of the NASA sponsored program on the application of communication satellites to educational development, a study was made of the utilization of telecommunications by academic and school libraries in the United States and the potential for future utilization by these institutions. The five basic functions performed by all…

  5. The Role of Emotional Intelligence in the Academic Success of United Arab Emirates University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahammed, Shaima; Abdullah, Abdullah S.; Hassane, Sofoh H.

    2011-01-01

    Psycho-educational researchers have often suggested that Emotional Intelligence (EI) is critical to academic success (Drago, 2004; La Civita, 2003), yet there is hardly any research that has ever addressed the question in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between EI as conceptualized by Mayer…

  6. Characterizing Twitter Communication--A Case Study of International Engineering Academic Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Engineering academic units might engage with social media for a range of purposes including for general communication with students, staff, alumni, other important stakeholders and the wider community at large; for student recruitment and for marketing and promotion more generally. This paper presents an investigation into the use of Twitter by…

  7. The Higher Education Academic Readiness of Students in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Ronald; McChesney, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined the state of United States student academic readiness for higher education from a global perspective utilizing data from the Organization of Economic and Co-operation and Development (OECD) and Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which tests over a half a million 15 year old student's skills and knowledge.…

  8. In from the Margins: The Essential Role of Faculty in Transforming a Professional Studies Unit into an Academic Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Anthony L.

    2010-01-01

    The article addresses the effective use of full-time and part-time faculty in transforming an institutionalized marginalized professional studies unit into an academic unit with greater academic credibility, as perceived by traditional colleagues and accreditors. Recommendations are supported by a case study narrative from the experiences of the…

  9. Practice-based research: necessary intersection between academics and practice.

    PubMed

    Darden, Paul M

    2008-08-01

    Practice-based research networks are an exciting way for pediatric practitioners to contribute to the knowledge necessary to provide the best care to their patients. Academic pediatricians should view research networks a necessary and essential aspect of clinical research.

  10. Academic Outcome Measures of a Dedicated Education Unit Over Time: Help or Hinder?

    PubMed

    Smyer, Tish; Gatlin, Tricia; Tan, Rhigel; Tejada, Marianne; Feng, Du

    2015-01-01

    Critical thinking, nursing process, quality and safety measures, and standardized RN exit examination scores were compared between students (n = 144) placed in a dedicated education unit (DEU) and those in a traditional clinical model. Standardized test scores showed that differences between the clinical groups were not statistically significant. This study shows that the DEU model is 1 approach to clinical education that can enhance students' academic outcomes.

  11. Differences in Academic Achievement of Students Involved in Extracurricular Activities in Seventh-Day Adventist Schools in the United States and Bermuda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandiford, Anderson P.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined differences in the academic performance of students in grades 6, 7, 8, 9, and 11 in Seventh-day Adventist schools in the United States and Bermuda based on their level of involvement in school music organizations--band or choir--and school sports--varsity or intramural--as measured by standardized achievement and ability tests.…

  12. Becoming In/Competent Learners in the United States: Refugee Students' Academic Identities in the Figured World of Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bal, Aydin

    2014-01-01

    A practice-based dialectic theory of identity was used in this study to explore the cultural-historical context of an urban charter school in which a group of newly arrived Muslim Turk refugee students' academic identities were formed. The school, located in the Southwestern United States, was founded by a global Islamist movement.…

  13. African American adolescents' academic persistence: a strengths-based approach.

    PubMed

    Butler-Barnes, Sheretta T; Chavous, Tabbye M; Hurd, Noelle; Varner, Fatima

    2013-09-01

    African American adolescents are faced with the challenge to be successful academically, even though they may experience racial discrimination within school settings. Unfortunately, relatively little scholarship explores how African American adolescents draw on personal and cultural assets to persist and thrive in the face of discriminatory experiences. Additionally, little research has explored the buffering role of assets (e.g., racial pride, self-efficacy, and self-acceptance) on the relationship between school-based racial discriminatory experiences and the academic persistence of African American adolescents. Participants in the current study included 220 (58 % girls) socioeconomically diverse African American adolescents. Latent class analysis was utilized to identify clusters based on participants' racial pride, self-efficacy, and self-acceptance. Three cluster groups were identified. The majority of the students belonged to the average group in which adolescents reported average levels of the three study assets. Adolescents in the higher group reported higher assets relative to their peers in the study and those in the lower group reported lower strength-based assets relative to their peers. Results indicated that school-based racial discrimination was associated with lower levels of academic persistence. Additionally, adolescents in the higher assets group reported higher academic persistence in comparison to the average and low group. Our model reflected a promotive but not protective influence of adolescents' assets on their academic persistence.

  14. The gender imbalance in academic medicine: a study of female authorship in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Reena; Rajashekhar, Praveen; Lavin, Victoria L; Parry, Joanne; Attwood, James; Holdcroft, Anita; Sanders, David S

    2009-01-01

    Summary Objectives A shortfall exists of female doctors in senior academic posts in the United Kingdom. Career progression depends on measures of esteem, including publication in prestigious journals. This study investigates gender differences in first and senior authorship in six peer-reviewed British journals and factors that are associated with publication rates. Design and main outcome measures Data was collected on United Kingdom first and senior authors who had published in the British Medical Journal, Lancet, British Journal of Surgery, Gut, British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and the Archives of Diseases in Childhood. Authorship and gender were quantified for 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000 and 2004 (n=6457). In addition, selected questions from the Athena Survey of Science Engineering and Technology (ASSET2006), web-based doctor's self-report of publications were also analysed (n=1162). Results Female first authors increased from 10.5% in 1970 to 36.5% in 2004 (p<0.001) while female senior authors only increased from 12.3% to 16.5% (p=0.046). Within individual journals, the largest rise was in British Journal of Obstetric and Gynaecology with 4.5- and 3-fold increases for first and senior authors, respectively. In contrast, female senior authors marginally declined in Gut and Lancet by 2.8% and 2.2%, respectively. ASSET2006 identified that female respondents who were parents were less likely to have publications as sole (p=0.02) and joint authors (p<0.001) compared to male respondents. Female respondents with care responsibilities for parents/partner also had less publications as lead authors compared to those without carer responsibilities (p<0.001). Conclusion The increase in UK female first authors is encouraging. In contrast, there is considerable lag and in some specialties a decline in female senior authors. Factors that could narrow the gender gap in authorship should be sought and addressed. PMID:19679736

  15. Academic promotion and tenure in U.S. family medicine units.

    PubMed

    Holloway, R L; Hale, K L; Rakel, R E

    1989-05-01

    The authors interviewed by telephone the heads (or their representatives) of 101 of the 120 family practice units in U.S. medical schools in 1987. Each respondent was asked for his or her personal perceptions of the relative importances of research, teaching, patient care, and administrative activities in the academic promotion process. Respondents were also asked for their views of their units' and institutions' perceptions of the importances of the same four activities in the promotion process, as well as other related questions about promotion and tenure. The findings indicate that there is still a significant incongruence between the value structure of most family practice units and that of their institutions but that many family practice units are beginning to achieve parity of promotion and tenure with other departments in their institutions. PMID:2713010

  16. Concept-Based Grammar Teaching: An Academic Responds to Azar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Kent

    2007-01-01

    This response to Azar (this volume) intends to discuss from an academic's perspective the main points raised in her paper (i.e., grammar-based instruction and its relation to focus on form and error correction) and, to encourage a more concept-based approach to grammar instruction (CBT). A CBT approach to language development argues that the…

  17. A Web-Based Decision Support Tool for Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feghali, Tony; Zbib, Imad; Hallal, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Student advising is an important and time-consuming effort in academic life. This paper attempts to solve a technology-based "last mile" problem by developing and evaluating a web-based decision support tool (the Online Advisor) that helps advisors and students make better use of an already present university student information system. Two…

  18. Expatriate Academic Staff in the United Arab Emirates: The Nature of Their Work Experiences in Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ann E.; Chapman, David W.; Farah, Samar; Wilson, Elisabeth; Ridge, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    As many countries expand their higher education systems, they must attract, support, and retain qualified academic staff. This paper focuses on the United Arab Emirates (UAE) as a case study of a nation drawing on large numbers of mostly expatriate faculty working in short-term academic appointments. The paper begins by considering the national…

  19. The Status of Academic Libraries in the United States: Results from the 1996 Academic Library Survey with Historical Comparisons. Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahalan, Maggie; Mansfield, Wendy; Justh, Natalie

    This report describes the status of academic libraries in 1996, based on results of the 1996 Academic Library Survey, a part of the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) of the National Center for Education Statistics. The report presents detailed tabulations for 1996 and historical comparisons with previous years. Topics covered…

  20. Prevention and recovery in early psychosis (PREP(®)): building a public-academic partnership program in Massachusetts, United States.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Brina; Zimmet, Suzanna V; Meyer, Eric C; Friedman-Yakoobian, Michelle; Monteleone, Thomas; Jude Leung, Y; Guyer, Margaret E; Rood, Laura Logue; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Seidman, Larry J

    2013-04-01

    Recently, there has been increasing emphasis on early intervention (EI) for psychotic disorders. EI programs in public mental health settings have been established in countries such as Australia, the United Kingdom, and Canada. However, there are relatively few EI programs in the United States (U.S.). Here we describe the conceptual origins and practical development of the PREP program, i.e., Prevention and Recovery in Early Psychosis, as it evolved in a public academic psychiatry setting in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S. PREP developed over a decade through a partnership between the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health and academic institutions within the Harvard Department of Psychiatry. We discuss the evolution, programmatic features, funding mechanisms, staffing, and the role of clinical training in PREP. The key principles in developing the PREP Program include the focus on early, evidence based, person-centered and phase-specific, integrated and continuous, comprehensive care. This program has served as a foundation for the emergence of related services at our institution, including a research clinic treating those at clinical high risk or within the putative "prodromal" period preceding frank psychosis. This account offers one possible blueprint for the development of EI programs despite the lack in the U.S. of a national mandate for EI or prevention-based mental health programs. PMID:23466116

  1. Self-esteem and academic achievement: a comparative study of adolescent students in England and the United States

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Margaret Zoller; Gerard, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing mixed methodology, this paper investigates the relationship between self-esteem and academic achievement for young adolescents within two Western cultural contexts: the United States and England. Quantitative and qualitative data from 86 North American and 86 British adolescents were utilized to examine the links between self-esteem and academic achievement from the beginning to the end of their academic year during their 11th–12th year of age. For both samples, quantitative results demonstrated that fall self-esteem was related to multiple indicators of later year academic achievement. While country differences emerge by the end of the year, math appears to have a consistent relationship with self-esteem in both country contexts. Qualitative analyses found some support for British students’ self-perceptions as more accurately reflecting their academic experience than the students from the United States. PMID:24068853

  2. Chemical Information in Scirus and BASE (Bielefeld Academic Search Engine)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bendig, Regina B.

    2009-01-01

    The author sought to determine to what extent the two search engines, Scirus and BASE (Bielefeld Academic Search Engines), would be useful to first-year university students as the first point of searching for chemical information. Five topics were searched and the first ten records of each search result were evaluated with regard to the type of…

  3. Exploring Students' Perceptions of Academically Based Living-Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawrzynski, Matthew R.; Jessup-Anger, Jody Elizabeth; Stolz, Katherine; Helman, Cynthia; Beaulieu, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study employed focus group interviews to explore students' perceptions of three well established academically based living-learning communities at a large, land-grant university in the Midwest. Three themes merged that illustrated students' perceptions of a culture that promoted seamless learning, a scholarly environment, and an…

  4. Academic Referencing of Internet-Based Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Gordon; Greenhill, Anita

    1995-01-01

    Proposes the development of a consistent bibliographical referencing method for citing information retrieved from Internet-based resources. Presents examples of citations for information retrieved via World Wide Web, gopher, file transfer protocol, USENET News, electronic journals distributed by listservs, and electronic mail. (JMV)

  5. Developing a clinical trial unit to advance research in an academic institution.

    PubMed

    Croghan, Ivana T; Viker, Steven D; Limper, Andrew H; Evans, Tamara K; Cornell, Alissa R; Ebbert, Jon O; Gertz, Morie A

    2015-11-01

    Research, clinical care, and education are the three cornerstones of academic health centers in the United States. The research climate has always been riddled with ebbs and flows, depending on funding availability. During a time of reduced funding, the number and scope of research studies have been reduced, and in some instances, a field of study has been eliminated. Recent reductions in the research funding landscape have led institutions to explore new ways to continue supporting research. Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN has developed a clinical trial unit within the Department of Medicine, which provides shared resources for many researchers and serves as a solution for training and mentoring new investigators and study teams. By building on existing infrastructure and providing supplemental resources to existing research, the Department of Medicine clinical trial unit has evolved into an effective mechanism for conducting research. This article discusses the creation of a central unit to provide research support in clinical trials and presents the advantages, disadvantages, and required building blocks for such a unit.

  6. Developing a clinical trial unit to advance research in an academic institution.

    PubMed

    Croghan, Ivana T; Viker, Steven D; Limper, Andrew H; Evans, Tamara K; Cornell, Alissa R; Ebbert, Jon O; Gertz, Morie A

    2015-11-01

    Research, clinical care, and education are the three cornerstones of academic health centers in the United States. The research climate has always been riddled with ebbs and flows, depending on funding availability. During a time of reduced funding, the number and scope of research studies have been reduced, and in some instances, a field of study has been eliminated. Recent reductions in the research funding landscape have led institutions to explore new ways to continue supporting research. Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN has developed a clinical trial unit within the Department of Medicine, which provides shared resources for many researchers and serves as a solution for training and mentoring new investigators and study teams. By building on existing infrastructure and providing supplemental resources to existing research, the Department of Medicine clinical trial unit has evolved into an effective mechanism for conducting research. This article discusses the creation of a central unit to provide research support in clinical trials and presents the advantages, disadvantages, and required building blocks for such a unit. PMID:26454064

  7. University-Based Teleradiology in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Tim B.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews the University of Arizona’s more than 15 years of experience with teleradiology and provides an overview of university-based teleradiology practice in the United States (U.S.). In the U.S., teleradiology is a major economic enterprise with many private for-profit companies offering national teleradiology services (i.e., professional interpretation of radiologic studies of all types by American Board of Radiology certified radiologists). The initial thrust for teleradiology was for after-hours coverage of radiologic studies, but teleradiology has expanded its venue to include routine full-time or partial coverage for small hospitals, clinics, specialty medical practices, and urgent care centers. It also provides subspecialty radiologic coverage not available at smaller medical centers and clinics. Many U.S. university-based academic departments of radiology provide teleradiology services usually as an additional for-profit business to supplement departmental income. Since academic-based teleradiology providers have to compete in a very demanding marketplace, their success is not guaranteed. They must provide timely, high-quality professional services for a competitive price. Academic practices have the advantage of house officers and fellows who can help with the coverage, and they have excellent subspecialty expertise. The marketplace is constantly shifting, and university-based teleradiology practices have to be nimble and adjust to ever-changing situations. PMID:27429270

  8. Web-based Academic Roadmaps for Careers in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, D. P.; Veeger, A. I.; Grossman-Garber, D.

    2007-12-01

    To a greater extent than most science programs, geology is underrepresented in K-12 curricula and the media. Thus potential majors have scant knowledge of academic requirements and career trajectories, and their idea of what geologists do--if they have one at all--is outdated. We have addressed these concerns by developing a dynamic, web-based academic roadmap for current and prospective students, their families, and others who are contemplating careers in the geosciences. The goals of this visually attractive "educational pathway" are to not only improve student recruitment and retention, but to empower student learning by creating better communication and advising tools that can render our undergraduate program transparent for learners and their families. Although we have developed academic roadmaps for four environmental and life science programs at the University of Rhode Island, we focus here on the roadmap for the geosciences, which illustrates educational pathways along the academic and early-career continuum for current and potential (i.e., high school) students who are considering the earth sciences. In essence, the Geosciences Academic Roadmap is a "one-stop'" portal to the discipline. It includes user- friendly information about our curriculum, outcomes (which at URI are tightly linked to performance in courses and the major), extracurricular activities (e.g., field camp, internships), careers, graduate programs, and training. In the presentation of this material extensive use is made of streaming video, interviews with students and earth scientists, and links to other relevant sites. Moreover, through the use of "Hot Topics", particular attention is made to insure that examples of geoscience activities are not only of relevance to today's students, but show geologists using the modern methods of the discipline in exciting ways. Although this is a "work-in-progress", evaluation of the sites, by high school through graduate students, has been strongly

  9. Assessing the Role of RCM in Decision-Making about Discontinuing Academic Programs and Restructuring Academic Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Louis J.

    2011-01-01

    The path of growth and development for many American colleges and universities is to add new programs, majors, minors, departments, institutes, and centers to their academic portfolios in order to meet new demands and pursue new knowledge. Their source of funding is primarily through raising tuition rates and increasing non-tuition financial…

  10. Changes in Early Adolescents' Sense of Responsibility to their Parents in the United States and China: Implications for Academic Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantz, Eva M.; Qin, Lili; Wang, Qian; Chen, Huichang

    2011-01-01

    This research examined American and Chinese children's sense of responsibility to their parents during early adolescence, with a focus on its implications for children's academic functioning. Four times over the seventh and eighth grades, 825 children (mean age = 12.73 years) in the United States and China reported on their sense of responsibility to their parents. Information on children's academic functioning was also collected from children as well as school records. Although children's sense of responsibility to their parents declined over the seventh and eighth grades in the United States, this was not the case in China. In both countries, children's sense of responsibility was predictive of enhanced academic functioning among children over time. PMID:21466541

  11. Using Academic Literacies and Genre-Based Models for Academic Writing Instruction: A "Literacy" Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingate, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Three writing development initiatives carried out at King's College London UK are discussed in this article to illustrate the need to draw on different theoretical models to create effective methods of teaching academic writing. The sequence of initiatives resembles a journey: the destination is to develop academic writing programmes suitable for…

  12. Self-Esteem and Academic Achievement: A Comparative Study of Adolescent Students in England and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Margaret Zoller; Gerard, Jean M.

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing mixed methodology, this paper investigates the relationship between self-esteem and academic achievement for young adolescents within two Western cultural contexts: the United States and England. Quantitative and qualitative data from 86 North American and 86 British adolescents were utilized to examine the links between self-esteem and…

  13. Changes in Early Adolescents' Sense of Responsibility to Their Parents in the United States and China: Implications for Academic Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomerantz, Eva M.; Qin, Lili; Wang, Qian; Chen, Huichang

    2011-01-01

    This research examined American and Chinese children's sense of responsibility to their parents during early adolescence, with a focus on its implications for children's academic functioning. Four times over the seventh and eighth grades, 825 children (mean age = 12.73 years) in the United States and China reported on their sense of responsibility…

  14. An Empirical Study of Implementing an Academic Unit Planning Tool: Implications for Institutional Research and Management. AIR Forum Paper 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyataki, Glenn K.

    The need to focus upon the organizational factors and consequences of a technological innovation is discussed and the outcome of the pilot implementation of the Academic Unit Planning Manual (AUPM) are reported. The primary intent of the AUPM, a tool developed at the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS), is to assist…

  15. An Investigation of the Relationship between a Computer-Based Method and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stayner, Mindy L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate the relationship between a computer-based learning (CBL) method and academic performance, controlling for independent, non-academic and academic confounding, variables of high school GPA, college GPA, marital status, number of dependents, age, gender, race, level of education, and semester…

  16. Work-Based Learning and Academic Skills. IEE Working Paper No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Katherine L.; Moore, David Thornton; Bailey, Thomas R.

    The claim that work-based experience improves students' academic performance was examined through a study of the academic progress of 25 high school and community college student interns employed in various health care workplaces. Data were collected from the following activities: (1) review of the literature on academic reinforcement and academic…

  17. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application.

  18. The academic base for general practice: the case for change.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J; Wilson, A; Fraser, R; Gray, D P

    1993-01-01

    University departments of general practice and the postgraduate education system for general practice have developed separately over the past 30 years. This separation is now impeding the academic development of the discipline and causes difficulties with recruitment and career progression. These problems could be eased by the creation of integrated departments. This would establish a critical mass for research and educational development, allow human and other resources to be used more flexibly and effectively, and provide a strong base for undergraduate education, vocational training, higher professional training, and continuing education. It could encourage collaborative ventures with other disciplines and also lead to higher standards of patient care. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:8401096

  19. The characteristics of patients frequently admitted to academic medical centers in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Mark V.; Carrier, Danielle; Hensley, Laurie; Thomas, Stephen; Cerese, Julie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The recent intense attention to hospital readmissions and their implications for quality, safety, and reimbursement necessitates understanding specific subsets of readmitted patients. Frequently admitted patients, defined as patients who are admitted 5 or more times within 1 year, may have some distinguishing characteristics that require novel solutions. METHODS A comprehensive administrative database (University HealthSystem Consortium's Clinical Data Base/Resource Manager™) was analyzed to identify demographic, social, and clinical characteristics of frequently admitted patients in 101 US academic medical centers. RESULTS We studied 28,291 frequently admitted patients with 180,185 admissions over a 1‐year period (2011–2012). These patients comprise 1.6% of all patients, but account for 8% of all admissions and 7% of direct costs. Their admissions are driven by multiple chronic conditions; compared to other hospitalized patients, they have significantly more comorbidities (an average of 7.1 vs 2.5), and 84% of their admissions are to medical services. A minority, but significantly more than other patients, have comorbidities of psychosis or substance abuse. Moreover, although they are slightly more likely than other patients to be on Medicaid or to be uninsured (27.6% vs 21.6%), nearly three‐quarters have private or Medicare coverage. CONCLUSIONS Patients who are frequently admitted to US academic medical centers are likely to have multiple complex chronic conditions and may have behavioral comorbidities that mediate their health behaviors, resulting in acute episodes requiring hospitalization. This information can be used to identify solutions for preventing repeat hospitalization for this small group of patients who consume a highly disproportionate share of healthcare resources. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2015;10:563–568. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Hospital Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Hospital

  20. Academic English Teaching for Postgraduates Based on Self-Regulated Learning Environment: A Case Study of Academic Reading Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This study selects postgraduate students in the first grade as the participants, based on their needs analysis, classroom presentations and performance of assignments completion, through the methodology of case study, the results show that students at the university level even the graduate levels still struggle with academic English. Thus, this…

  1. Intellect and Public Life: Essays on the Social History of Academic Intellectuals in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bender, Thomas

    Eight essays discuss the relation of urban patterns of intellectual life and academic forms of higher learning. Themes that run through the essays include: the increasing incorporation of academic culture into the center of American life, socially and intellectually, is accompanied and causally related to a progressive impoverishment of the public…

  2. Academic Achievement Trajectories of Adolescents from Mexican and East Asian Immigrant Families in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeong, Yu-Jin; Acock, Alan C.

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on the National Educational Longitudinal Survey 1988 (NELS:88), this study identified (1) the growth pattern of academic achievement of adolescent children from Mexican and East Asian immigrant families; (2) investigated to what extent ethnicity and family capital influenced the trajectories in the academic achievement of children from…

  3. College Sports-Related Injuries - United States, 2009-10 Through 2013-14 Academic Years.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Marshall, Stephen W; Dompier, Thomas P; Corlette, Jill; Klossner, David A; Gilchrist, Julie

    2015-12-11

    Sports-related injuries can have a substantial impact on the long-term health of student-athletes. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) monitors injuries among college student-athletes at member schools. In academic year 2013-14, a total of 1,113 member schools fielded 19,334 teams with 478,869 participating student-athletes in NCAA championship sports (i.e., sports with NCAA championship competition) (1). External researchers and CDC used information reported to the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (NCAA-ISP) by a sample of championship sports programs to summarize the estimated national cumulative and annual average numbers of injuries during the 5 academic years from 2009-10 through 2013-14. Analyses were restricted to injuries reported among student-athletes in 25 NCAA championship sports. During this period, 1,053,370 injuries were estimated to have occurred during an estimated 176.7 million athlete-exposures to potential injury (i.e., one athlete's participation in one competition or one practice). Injury incidence varied widely by sport. Among all sports, men's football accounted for the largest average annual estimated number of injuries (47,199) and the highest competition injury rate (39.9 per 1,000 athlete-exposures). Men's wrestling experienced the highest overall injury rate (13.1 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.2 per 1,000). Among women's sports, gymnastics had the highest overall injury rate (10.4 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.0 per 1,000), although soccer had the highest competition injury rate (17.2 per 1,000). More injuries were estimated to have occurred from practice than from competition for all sports, with the exception of men's ice hockey and baseball. However, injuries incurred during competition were somewhat more severe (e.g., requiring ≥7 days to return to full participation) than those acquired during practice. Multiple strategies are employed by NCAA and others to reduce the number of injuries in

  4. College Sports-Related Injuries - United States, 2009-10 Through 2013-14 Academic Years.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Zachary Y; Marshall, Stephen W; Dompier, Thomas P; Corlette, Jill; Klossner, David A; Gilchrist, Julie

    2015-12-11

    Sports-related injuries can have a substantial impact on the long-term health of student-athletes. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) monitors injuries among college student-athletes at member schools. In academic year 2013-14, a total of 1,113 member schools fielded 19,334 teams with 478,869 participating student-athletes in NCAA championship sports (i.e., sports with NCAA championship competition) (1). External researchers and CDC used information reported to the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program (NCAA-ISP) by a sample of championship sports programs to summarize the estimated national cumulative and annual average numbers of injuries during the 5 academic years from 2009-10 through 2013-14. Analyses were restricted to injuries reported among student-athletes in 25 NCAA championship sports. During this period, 1,053,370 injuries were estimated to have occurred during an estimated 176.7 million athlete-exposures to potential injury (i.e., one athlete's participation in one competition or one practice). Injury incidence varied widely by sport. Among all sports, men's football accounted for the largest average annual estimated number of injuries (47,199) and the highest competition injury rate (39.9 per 1,000 athlete-exposures). Men's wrestling experienced the highest overall injury rate (13.1 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.2 per 1,000). Among women's sports, gymnastics had the highest overall injury rate (10.4 per 1,000) and practice injury rate (10.0 per 1,000), although soccer had the highest competition injury rate (17.2 per 1,000). More injuries were estimated to have occurred from practice than from competition for all sports, with the exception of men's ice hockey and baseball. However, injuries incurred during competition were somewhat more severe (e.g., requiring ≥7 days to return to full participation) than those acquired during practice. Multiple strategies are employed by NCAA and others to reduce the number of injuries in

  5. Making Value-Based Payment Work for Academic Health Centers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Harold D

    2015-10-01

    Under fee-for-service payment systems, physicians and hospitals can be financially harmed by delivering higher-quality, more efficient care. The author describes how current "value-based purchasing" initiatives fail to address the underlying problems in fee-for-service payment and can be particularly problematic for academic health centers (AHCs). Bundled payments, warranties, and condition-based payments can correct the problems with fee-for-service payments and enable physicians and hospitals to redesign care delivery without causing financial problems for themselves. However, the author explains several specific actions that are needed to ensure that payment reforms can be a "win-win-win" for patients, purchasers, and AHCs: (1) disconnecting funding for teaching and research from payment for service delivery, (2) providing predictable payment for essential hospital services, (3) improving the quality and efficiency of care at AHCs, and (4) supporting collaborative relationships between AHCs and community providers by allowing each to focus on their unique strengths and by paying AHC specialists to assist community providers in diagnosis and treatment. With appropriate payment reforms and a commitment by AHCs to redesign care delivery, medical education, and research, AHCs could provide the leadership needed to improve care for patients, lower costs for health care purchasers, and maintain the financial viability of both AHCs and community providers. PMID:26266462

  6. Practitioners' Perceptions of the Academic Preparation of Funeral Directors and Embalmers in the Context of Changing Death Care Preferences in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LuBrant, Michael Paul

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated practitioners' perceptions of the a) importance, b) academic preparation related to, and c) adequacy of, funeral service education at academic programs accredited by the American Board of Funeral Service Education (ABFSE) in the context of changing death care preferences in the United States. Participants in this…

  7. Evidence-based appointment and promotion of academic faculty at the University of Chicago.

    PubMed

    Feder, Martin E; Madara, James L

    2008-01-01

    The authors report how one academic medical center (AMC) and associated nonclinical departments implemented evidence-based academic criteria and an evidence-based academic vetting process, which may be models for other institutions. In 2004-2005, The University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences and Pritzker School of Medicine reconceptualized its appointment, promotion, and tenure criteria to recognize all forms of scholarship as equally legitimate bases for academic tenure. The revised criteria also accommodate differences in academic effort consistent with varying clinical demands. Implementation of these criteria, however, necessitated revised practices in providing objective evidence and analysis of their satisfaction. Three complementary mechanisms now yield excellent evidence and analysis. The first, electronic forms (e-forms) comprise highly specific response items with embedded instructions, advice, and rationale. The e-forms encourage candidates and departments to provide the evidence that subsequent review needs to evaluate appointment or promotion proposals. Unexpectedly, the e-forms have been coopted as effective mechanisms for faculty development. Second, a faculty dean of academic affairs, a regular faculty member, was appointed to provide robust academic authority and perspective to the process. Third, the promotion and tenure advisory committee was restricted to evaluating academic criteria, and from considerations of institutional value. This change interposed a "firewall" between academic and institutional review. These changes have attenuated dissatisfaction with the appointments and promotions process both within and outside the AMC. PMID:18162758

  8. Antenna unit and radio base station therewith

    DOEpatents

    Kuwahara, Mikio; Doi, Nobukazu; Suzuki, Toshiro; Ishida, Yuji; Inoue, Takashi; Niida, Sumaru

    2007-04-10

    Phase and amplitude deviations, which are generated, for example, by cables connecting an array antenna of a CDMA base station and the base station, are calibrated in the baseband. The base station comprises: an antenna apparatus 1; couplers 2; an RF unit 3 that converts a receive signal to a baseband signal, converts a transmit signal to a radio frequency, and performs power control; an A/D converter 4 for converting a receive signal to a digital signal; a receive beam form unit 6 that multiplies the receive signal by semi-fixed weight; a despreader 7 for this signal input; a time-space demodulator 8 for demodulating user data; a despreader 9 for probe signal; a space modulator 14 for user data; a spreader 13 for user signal; a channel combiner 12; a Tx calibrater 11 for controlling calibration of a signal; a D/A converter 10; a unit 16 for calculation of correlation matrix for generating a probe signal used for controlling an Rx calibration system and a TX calibration system; a spreader 17 for probe signal; a power control unit 18; a D/A converter 19; an RF unit 20 for probe signal; an A/D converter 21 for signal from the couplers 2; and a despreader 22.

  9. Quality Assurance Peer Review Chart Rounds in 2011: A Survey of Academic Institutions in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, Yaacov Richard; Whiton, Michal A.; Symon, Zvi; Wuthrick, Evan J.; Doyle, Laura; Harrison, Amy S.; Dicker, Adam P.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: In light of concerns regarding the quality of radiation treatment delivery, we surveyed the practice of quality assurance peer review chart rounds at American academic institutions. Methods and Materials: An anonymous web-based survey was sent to the chief resident of each institution across the United States. Results: The response rate was 80% (57/71). The median amount of time spent per patient was 2.7 minutes (range, 0.6-14.4). The mean attendance by senior physicians and residents was 73% and 93%, respectively. A physicist was consistently present at peer review rounds in 66% of departments. There was a close association between attendance by senior physicians and departmental organization: in departments with protected time policies, good attendance was 81% vs. 31% without protected time (p = 0.001), and in departments that documented attendance, attending presence was 69% vs. 29% in departments without documentation (p < 0.05). More than 80% of institutions peer review all external beam therapy courses; however, rates were much lower for other modalities (radiosurgery 58%, brachytherapy 40%-47%). Patient history, chart documentation, and dose prescription were always peer reviewed in >75% of institutions, whereas dosimetric details (beams, wedges), isodose coverage, intensity-modulated radiation therapy constraints, and dose-volume histograms were always peer reviewed in 63%, 59%, 42%, and 50% of cases, respectively. Chart rounds led to both minor (defined as a small multileaf collimator change/repeated port film) and major (change to dose prescription or replan with dosimetry) treatment changes. Whereas at the majority of institutions changes were rare (<10% of cases), 39% and 11% of institutions reported that minor and major changes, respectively, were made to more than 10% of cases. Conclusion: The implementation of peer review chart rounds seems inconsistent across American academic institutions. Brachytherapy and radiosurgical procedures are

  10. Cooperative Learning and the Academically Talented Student. Research-Based Decision Making Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Ann

    The research base on cooperative learning was examined for its applicability to academically talented students. Common types of cooperative learning are described with highlights of the model characteristics as they apply to academically talented students. The models include: Teams-Games-Tournament (TGT); Student Teams Achievement Divisions…

  11. Web-Based Adaptive Testing System (WATS) for Classifying Students Academic Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jaemu; Park, Sanghoon; Kim, Kwangho

    2012-01-01

    Computer Adaptive Testing (CAT) has been highlighted as a promising assessment method to fulfill two testing purposes: estimating student academic ability and classifying student academic level. In this paper, assessment for we introduced the Web-based Adaptive Testing System (WATS) developed to support a cost effective assessment for classifying…

  12. The Effectiveness of Adopting E-Readers to Facilitate EFL Students' Process-Based Academic Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Hui-Chun; Young, Shelley Shwu-Ching

    2015-01-01

    English as Foreign Language (EFL) students face additional difficulties for academic writing largely due to their level of language competency. An appropriate structural process of writing can help students develop their academic writing skills. This study explored the use of the e-readers to facilitate EFL students' process-based academic…

  13. Parents' Involvement in Children's Learning in the United States and China: Implications for Children's Academic and Emotional Adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Cecilia Sin-Sze; Pomerantz, Eva M.

    2011-01-01

    This research examined parents' involvement in children's learning in the United States and China. Beginning in seventh grade, 825 American and Chinese children (mean age = 12.74 years) reported on their parents' involvement in their learning as well as their parents' psychological control and autonomy support every six months until the end of eighth grade. Information on children's academic and emotional adjustment was obtained. American (vs. Chinese) parents' involvement was associated less with their control and more with their autonomy support. Despite these different associations, parents' heightened involvement predicted children's enhanced engagement and achievement similarly in the United States and China. However, it predicted enhanced perceptions of competence and positive emotional functioning more strongly in the United States than China. PMID:21418057

  14. Candid Reflections on the Departure of Black Women Faculty from Academe in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambers, Crystal Renee

    2012-01-01

    Critical content analysis is used to identify content within blogs, exposing views within academe that reinforce and normalize racist, sexist, and interactively racist and sexist perspectives. The two themes explored here are unfairness and subjectivities within personnel processes and the qualifications of Black women faculty, as raised through a…

  15. Bioterrorism Threats Must Unite Academe and the U.S. Intelligence Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Elizabeth Rindskopf

    2004-01-01

    The National Research Council recently issued a report that suggested ways in which to improve the management of potentially dangerous biomedical research in both academe and private industry, without unduly restricting scientists in their research activities. Here, the author shares her views on the report as well as the estrangement of the…

  16. Library Automation: A Survey of Leading Academic and Public Libraries in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Thomas W., Jr.; And Others

    Results of this survey of 26 public and academic libraries of national stature show that the country's major libraries are fully committed to automating their library operations. Major findings of the survey show that: (1) all libraries surveyed are involved in automation; (2) all libraries surveyed have automated their catalogs and bibliographic…

  17. Is the United States Really Losing the International Horse Race in Academic Achievement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boe, Erling E.; Shin, Sujie

    2005-01-01

    It is widely believed and lamented that U.S. students perform poorly on international comparisons of academic achievement. For example, Edward Silver reports that U.S. seventh- and eighth-grade students performed poorly on the mathematics section of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS 1995) and that this indicates "a…

  18. Deepening Our Understanding of Academic Inbreeding Effects on Research Information Exchange and Scientific Output: New Insights for Academic Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horta, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of academic inbreeding in relation to academic research, and proposes a new conceptual framework for its analysis. We find that mobility (or lack of) at the early research career stage is decisive in influencing academic behaviors and scientific productivity. Less mobile academics have more inward oriented…

  19. The Effects of Using Problem-Based Learning in Science and Technology Teaching upon Students' Academic Achievement and Levels of Structuring Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inel, Didem; Balim, Ali Gunay

    2010-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the impact of the problem-based learning method used in science and technology teaching upon elementary school students' construction levels for the concepts concerning the "Systems in Our Body" unit in the science and technology course and their academic achievement. To this end, during the four-week…

  20. Productive Academic Talk during Inquiry-Based Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2013-01-01

    This study reports on the types of academic talk that contribute to enhanced explanatory responses, reasoning, problem-solving and learning. The study involved 10 groups of 3-4 students who were provided with one of three linguistic tools (i.e. Cognitive Questioning, Philosophy for Children and Collaborative Strategic Reading (CSR)) to scaffold…

  1. Concordance-Based Glosses for Academic Vocabulary Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of online textual glosses enhanced with modified corpus-extracted sentences presented in concordance lines and textual glosses enhanced with dictionary definitions drawn from an online learner's dictionary for academic vocabulary learning at higher proficiency levels. Particularly, the study aimed to determine…

  2. School-Based Health Centers and Academic Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly on School-Based Health Care, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Poor academic outcomes and high dropout rates are major concerns of educators, policy makers, and parents alike--and poor health severely limits a child's motivation and ability to learn. Recent research confirms that "health disparities affect educational achievement". Improving students' health is integral to education reform. "School-Based…

  3. Fibre based integral field unit constructional techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Graham J.

    2006-06-01

    Presented here is a selected overview of constructional techniques and principles that have been developed and implemented at the University of Durham in the manufacture of successful fibre-based integral field units. The information contained herein is specifically intended to highlight the constructional methods that have been devised to assemble an efficient fibre bundle. Potential pitfalls that need to be considered when embarking upon such a deceptively simple instrument are also discussed.

  4. A single unit lymphoma experience: outcome in a Cape Town academic centre.

    PubMed

    Wood, Lucille; Robinson, Rowan; Gavine, Lindsey; Juritz, June; Jacobs, Peter

    2007-08-01

    To document outcome in Hodgkin and other lymphomas from a privately based academic centre the clinical records from 253 consecutive referrals were analysed. Diagnosis was according to World Health Organization criteria, prognosis assigned by the international index and therapy risk-stratified with results subject to appropriate statistical methodology. None of these patients underwent transplantation. For the cohort the median age was 55 years (range 11-94) and 63% were male. Constitutional symptoms were present in 22%; a quarter had previous chemotherapy and a third some form of irradiation prior to referral. Fifty-seven percent were stage I or II and 21% had nodal disease above and below the diaphragm whilst in the remainder cells were present in the circulation and this included the subset of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia -- small lymphocytic lymphoma. Positron emission scanning was not available for these studies. Median survival for the cohort is 3.2 years and reduced to 1.3 years by the presence of unexplained fever, sweating or inappropriate weight loss. Further adverse factors included any prior treatment, intermediate or high-grade histopathology, risk factors defined by the International Prognostic Index as well as late Rai stages. Analysed by disease category Hodgkin lymphoma (n=17) when managed according to the German Study Group protocols and hairy cell leukaemia (n=10) treated with two chlorodeoxyadenosine -- both had a stable plateau in excess of 90%. The corresponding figures for follicular variants (n=31) was 72% in the low risk and 58% in the remainder when treated with cyclophosphamide, vincristine and prednisone. Curves for the aggressive or diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n=44) fell initially to 48%, but relapse continued in stages III and IV to the current level of 18% when receiving cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, vincristine and prednisone on the 21-day schedule. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia -- small lymphocytic lymphoma (n=58) were

  5. Profiling first-year students in STEM programs based on autonomous motivation and academic self-concept and relationship with academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Van Soom, Carolien; Donche, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The low success rate of first-year college students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs has spurred many academic achievement studies in which explanatory factors are studied. In this study, we investigated from a person-oriented perspective whether different motivational and academic self-concept profiles could be discerned between male and female first-year college students in STEM and whether differences in early academic achievement were associated with these student groups. Data on autonomous motivation, academic self-concept, and early academic achievement of 1,400 first-year STEM college students were collected. Cluster analyses were used to distinguish motivational profiles based on the relative levels of autonomous motivation and academic self-concept for male and female students. Differences in early academic achievement of the various profiles were studied by means of ANCOVA. Four different motivational profiles were discerned based on the dimensions of autonomous motivation (A) and academic self-concept (S): students scoring high and respectively low on both dimensions (HA-HS or LA-LS), and students scoring high on one dimension and low on the other (HA-LS or LA-HS). Also gender differences were found in this study: male students with high levels of academic self-concept and autonomous motivation had higher academic achievement compared to male students with low levels on both motivational dimensions. For female students, motivational profiles were not associated with academic achievement. The findings partially confirm the internal and external validity of the motivational theories underpinning this study and extend the present insights on identifying subgroup(s) of at risk students in contemporary STEM programs at university level.

  6. Profiling First-Year Students in STEM Programs Based on Autonomous Motivation and Academic Self-Concept and Relationship with Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Van Soom, Carolien; Donche, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The low success rate of first-year college students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs has spurred many academic achievement studies in which explanatory factors are studied. In this study, we investigated from a person-oriented perspective whether different motivational and academic self-concept profiles could be discerned between male and female first-year college students in STEM and whether differences in early academic achievement were associated with these student groups. Data on autonomous motivation, academic self-concept, and early academic achievement of 1,400 first-year STEM college students were collected. Cluster analyses were used to distinguish motivational profiles based on the relative levels of autonomous motivation and academic self-concept for male and female students. Differences in early academic achievement of the various profiles were studied by means of ANCOVA. Four different motivational profiles were discerned based on the dimensions of autonomous motivation (A) and academic self-concept (S): students scoring high and respectively low on both dimensions (HA-HS or LA-LS), and students scoring high on one dimension and low on the other (HA-LS or LA-HS). Also gender differences were found in this study: male students with high levels of academic self-concept and autonomous motivation had higher academic achievement compared to male students with low levels on both motivational dimensions. For female students, motivational profiles were not associated with academic achievement. The findings partially confirm the internal and external validity of the motivational theories underpinning this study and extend the present insights on identifying subgroup(s) of at risk students in contemporary STEM programs at university level. PMID:25390942

  7. The college journey and academic engagement: how metaphor use enhances identity-based motivation.

    PubMed

    Landau, Mark J; Oyserman, Daphna; Keefer, Lucas A; Smith, George C

    2014-05-01

    People commonly talk about goals metaphorically as destinations on physical paths extending into the future or as contained in future periods. Does metaphor use have consequences for people's motivation to engage in goal-directed action? Three experiments examine the effect of metaphor use on students' engagement with their academic possible identity: their image of themselves as academically successful graduates. Students primed to frame their academic possible identity using the goal-as-journey metaphor reported stronger academic intention, and displayed increased effort on academic tasks, compared to students primed with a nonacademic possible identity, a different metaphoric framing (goal-as-contained-entity), and past academic achievements (Studies 1-2). This motivating effect persisted up to a week later as reflected in final exam performance (Study 3). Four experiments examine the cognitive processes underlying this effect. Conceptual metaphor theory posits that an accessible metaphor transfers knowledge between dissimilar concepts. As predicted in this paradigm, a journey-metaphoric framing of a possible academic identity transferred confidence in the procedure, or action sequence, required to attain that possible identity, which in turn led participants to perceive that possible identity as more connected to their current identity (Study 4). Drawing on identity-based motivation theory, we hypothesized that strengthened current/possible identity connection would mediate the journey framing's motivating effect. This mediational process predicted students' academic engagement (Study 5) and an online sample's engagement with possible identities in other domains (Study 6). Also as predicted, journey framing increased academic engagement particularly among students reporting a weak connection to their academic possible identity (Study 7).

  8. Family physician clinical compensation in an academic environment: moving away from the relative value unit

    PubMed Central

    Lochner, Jennifer; Trowbridge, Elizabeth; Kamnetz, Sandra; Pandhi, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Primary care physician compensation structures have remained largely volume-based, lagging behind changes in reimbursement that increasingly include population approaches such as capitation, bundled payments, and care management fees. We describe a population health-based physician compensation plan developed for two departmental family medicine faculty groups (residency teaching clinic faculty and community clinic faculty) along with outcomes before and after the plan’s implementation. Methods An observational study was conducted. A pre-post email survey assessed satisfaction with the plan, salary, and salary equity. Physician retention, panel size, and relative value unit (RVU) productivity metrics also were assessed before and after the plan’s implementation. Results Before implementation of the new plan, 18% of residency faculty and 33% of community faculty were satisfied or very satisfied with compensation structure. After implementation, those numbers rose to 47% for residency physicians and 74% for community physicians (p<0.01). Satisfaction with the amount of compensation also rose from 33% to 68% for residency faculty and from 26% to 87% for community faculty (p<0.01). For both groups, panel size per clinical full-time equivalent increased and RVUs moved closer to national benchmarks. RVUs decreased for residency faculty and increased for community faculty. Conclusions Aligning a compensation plan with population health delivery by moving rewards away from RVU productivity and towards panel management resulted in improved physician satisfaction and retention, as well as larger panel sizes. RVU changes were less predictable. Physician compensation is an important component of care model redesign that emphasizes population health. PMID:27272423

  9. Placing a Value on Academic Work: The Development and Implementation of a Time-Based Academic Workload Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, John; Fluck, Andrew; Jetson, Tim

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed case study of the development and implementation of a quantifiable academic workload model in the education faculty of an Australian university. Flowing from the enterprise bargaining process, the Academic Staff Agreement required the implementation of a workload allocation model for academics that was quantifiable…

  10. Why Are Students (Not) Motivated to Change Academic Procrastination? An Investigation Based on the Transtheoretical Model of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunschel, Carola; Schopenhauer, Lena

    2015-01-01

    In light of the drawbacks of academic procrastination, it is surprising that not all students want to decrease academic procrastination. To find out why students are motivated (or not) to change academic procrastination, we investigated the characteristics of 377 German students with different motivations to change based on the Transtheoretical…

  11. Association of weekly strength exercise frequency and academic performance among students at a large university in the United States.

    PubMed

    Keating, Xiaofen Deng; Castelli, Darla; Ayers, Suzan F

    2013-07-01

    The study aimed to examine (a) the association between weekly strength exercise frequency and grade point average (GPA), and (b) the demographic characteristics of weekly strength exercise frequency among undergraduate students at a large southern state university in the United States. Health behavior data (N = 1125) collected by the American College Health Association at the university in 2008 were analyzed. Analysis of variance was used to investigate weekly strength exercise frequency differences in GPA, sex, ethnicity, and year in university. The results revealed that those who more frequently engaged in strength exercise had significantly higher GPA. There was a significant difference in weekly strength exercise frequency by sex and ethnicity. Findings suggest that regular engagement in strength exercise may not only have physical health benefits but is also associated with academic achievement in high education. There is a need to further investigate the mechanism of strength exercise on GPA among university students.

  12. Music Educator Vacancies in Faith-Based K-12 Schools in the United States: 2013-2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hash, Phillip M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze and summarize characteristics of music educator vacancies in faith-based K-12 schools in the United States for the 2013-2014 academic year. Data extracted from placement notices and supplemental sources included demographic information, job responsibilities, and employment requirements for 153 listings in…

  13. Comparable sustained virologic suppression between community and academic-based HIV care settings

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Carolyn; Heo, Moonseong; Peshansky, Alex; Umanski, Galina; Meissner, Paul; Voss, Cindy; Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States is evolving due to factors including aging and geographical diffusion. Provider shortages are also driving the restructuring of HIV care delivery away from specialized settings, and family medicine providers may play a larger role in the future. We attempted to compare the effectiveness of HIV treatment delivered at community versus hospital care settings. Methods The outcome of interest was sustained virologic suppression defined as two consecutive HIV-1 RNA measurements ≤ 400 copies/mL within one year after antiretroviral initiation. We used data from the multi-state HIV Research Network cohort to compare sustained virologic suppression outcomes among 15,047 HIV-infected adults followed from 2000–2008 at five community- and eight academic hospital-based ambulatory care sites. Community-based sites were mostly staffed by family medicine and general internal medicine physicians with HIV expertise whereas hospital sites were primarily staffed by infectious disease subspecialists. Multivariate mixed-effects logistic regression controlling for potential confounding variables was applied to account for clustering effects of study sites. Results In an unadjusted analysis, the rate of sustained virologic suppression was significantly higher among subjects treated in the community-based care settings: 1,646/2,314 (71.1%) vs. 8,416/12,733 (66.1%) (p < 0.01). In the adjusted multivariate model with potential confounding variables, the rate was higher, although not statistically significant, in the community-based settings (AOR = 1.26, 95% CI 0.73–2.16). Conclusion Antiretroviral therapy can be delivered effectively through community-based treatment settings. This finding is potentially important for new program development to shift HIV care into community-based settings as the landscape of accountable care, health reform, and HIV funding and resources evolves. PMID:25567825

  14. The transition to competency-based pediatric training in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Halah; Al Tatari, Hossam; Holmboe, Eric S

    2015-04-01

    Although competency-based medical education has become the standard for physician training in the West, many developing countries have not yet adopted competency-based training. In 2009 in the United Arab Emirates, the government regulatory and operational authorities for healthcare in Abu Dhabi mandated a wide-scale reform of the emirate's postgraduate residency programs to the competency-based framework of the newly formed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-International (ACGME-I). This article briefly describes the rationale for competency-based medical education and provides an overview of the transition from traditional, time-based residency training to competency-based postgraduate medical education for the Pediatrics residency programs in Abu Dhabi. We will provide data on the initial impact of this transition on resident performance and patient outcomes in a Pediatrics residency program in an academic medical center in the United Arab Emirates.

  15. Academic Outcomes in High-School Students after a Concussion: A Retrospective Population-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Kelly; Hutchison, Michael G.; Selci, Erin; Leiter, Jeff; Chateau, Daniel; Ellis, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many concussion symptoms, such as headaches, vision problems, or difficulty remembering or concentrating may deleteriously affect school functioning. Our objective was to determine if academic performance was lower in the academic calendar year that students sustain a concussion compared to the previous year when they did not sustain a concussion. Methods Using Manitoba Health and Manitoba Education data, we conducted a population-based, controlled before-after study from 2005–2006 to 2010–2011 academic years. Grade 9–12 students with an ICD9/10 code for concussion were matched to non-concussed controls. Overall changes in grade point average (GPA) were compared for the academic year prior to the concussion to the academic year the concussion occurred (or could have occurred among non-concussed matched students). Results Overall, 8240 students (1709 concussed, 6531 non-concussed students) were included. Both concussed and non-concussed students exhibited a lower overall GPA from one year to the next. Having sustained a concussion resulted in a -0.90% (95% CI: -1.88, 0.08) reduction in GPA. Over the same period, non-concussed matched students’ GPA reduced by -0.57% (95% CI: -1.32, 0.19). Students who sustained a concussion during high school were just as likely to graduate within four years as their non-concussed peers (ORadj: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.73, 1.02). Conclusions We found that, at a population level, a concussion had minimal long-term effects on academic performance during high school. While academic accommodations and Return-to-Learn programs are an important component of pediatric concussion management, research is needed to identify risk factors for poor academic performance after a concussion and who should receive these programs. PMID:27764223

  16. Collaborative Writing among Second Language Learners in Academic Web-Based Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Greg; Bikowski, Dawn; Boggs, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates Web-based, project oriented, many-to-many collaborative writing for academic purposes. Thirty-eight Fulbright scholars in an orientation program at a large Midwestern university used a Web-based word processing tool to collaboratively plan and report on a research project. The purpose of this study is to explore and…

  17. Activity-Based Costing in User Services of an Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis-Newman, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    The rationale for using Activity-Based Costing (ABC) in a library is to allocate indirect costs to products and services based on the factors that most influence them. This paper discusses the benefits of ABC to library managers and explains the steps involved in implementing ABC in the user services area of an Australian academic library.…

  18. Web-Based OPACs in Indian Academic Libraries: A Functional Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapoor, Kanta; Goyal, O. P.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to provide a comparative analysis of the functionality of five web-based OPACs available in Indian academic libraries. Design/methodology/approach: Same-topic searches were carried out by three researchers on the web-based OPACs of Libsys, VTLS's iPortal, NewGenLib, Troodon, and Alice for Windows, implemented in five…

  19. The Effect of Web-Based Portfolio Use on Academic Achievement and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzeller, Cem Oktay

    2012-01-01

    The web-based portfolio emerged as a result of the influence of technological developments on educational practices. In this study, the effect of the web-based portfolio building process on academic achievement and retention is explored. For this purpose, a study platform known as a computer-assisted personal development portfolio was designed for…

  20. Latino Parent Home-Based Practices that Bolster Student Academic Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mena, Jasmine A.

    2011-01-01

    Home-based parental involvement practices (i.e., educational encouragement, monitoring, and support) and their impact on students' academic persistence were investigated with a sample of 137, ninth-grade Latino students in a northeast high school. Structural Equation Modeling results indicate that the relationship between home-based parental…

  1. HydroUnits: A Python-based Physical Units Management Tool in Hydrologic Computing Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celicourt, P.; Piasecki, M.

    2015-12-01

    While one objective of data management systems is to provide the units when annotating the collected data, another is that the units must be correctly manipulated during conversion steps. This is not a trivial task however and the units conversion time and errors for large datasets can be quite expensive. To date, more than a dozen Python modules have been developed to deal with units attached to quantities. However, they fall short in many ways and also suffer from not integrating with a units controlled vocabulary. Moreover, none of them permits the encoding of some complex units defined in the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Sciences, Inc.'s Observations Data Model (CUAHSI ODM) as a vectorial representation for storage demand reduction and does not incorporate provision to accommodate unforeseen standards-based units. We developed HydroUnits, a Python-based units management tool for three specific purposes: encoding of physical units in the Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS) as defined in the IEEE 1451.0 standard, performing dimensional analysis and on-the-fly conversion of time series allowing users to retrieve data from a data source in a desired equivalent unit while accommodating unforeseen and user-defined units. HydroUnits differentiates itself to existing tools by a number of factors including the implementation approach adopted, the adoption of standard-based units naming conventions and more importantly the emphasis on units controlled vocabularies which are a critical aspect of units treatment. Additionally, HydroUnits supports unit conversion for quantities with additive scaling factor, and natively supports time series conversion and takes leap years into consideration for units consisting of the time dimension (e.g., month, minute). Due to its overall implementation approach, HydroUnits exhibits a high level of versatility that no other tool we are aware of has achieved.

  2. Academic health centers and care of undocumented immigrants in the United States: servant leaders or uncourageous followers?

    PubMed

    Acosta, David A; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2014-04-01

    Public dialogue and debate about the health care overhaul in the United States is centered on one contentious question: Is there a moral obligation to ensure that all people (including undocumented immigrants) within its borders have access to affordable health care? For academic health centers (AHCs), which often provide safety-net care to the uninsured, this question has moral and social implications. An estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States (80% of whom are Latino) are uninsured and currently prohibited from purchasing exchange coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, even at full cost. The authors attempt to dispel the many misconceptions and distorted assumptions surrounding the use of health services by this vulnerable population. The authors also suggest that AHCs need to recalibrate their mission to focus on social accountability as well as the ethical and humanistic practice of medicine for all people, recognizing the significance of inclusion over exclusion in making progress on population health and health care. AHCs play a crucial role, both in educational policy and as a safety-net provider, in reducing health disparities that negatively impact vulnerable populations. Better health for all is possible through better alignment, collaboration, and partnering with other AHCs and safety-net providers. Through servant leadership, AHCs can be the leaders that this change imperative demands.

  3. Academic health centers and care of undocumented immigrants in the United States: servant leaders or uncourageous followers?

    PubMed

    Acosta, David A; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio

    2014-04-01

    Public dialogue and debate about the health care overhaul in the United States is centered on one contentious question: Is there a moral obligation to ensure that all people (including undocumented immigrants) within its borders have access to affordable health care? For academic health centers (AHCs), which often provide safety-net care to the uninsured, this question has moral and social implications. An estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the United States (80% of whom are Latino) are uninsured and currently prohibited from purchasing exchange coverage under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, even at full cost. The authors attempt to dispel the many misconceptions and distorted assumptions surrounding the use of health services by this vulnerable population. The authors also suggest that AHCs need to recalibrate their mission to focus on social accountability as well as the ethical and humanistic practice of medicine for all people, recognizing the significance of inclusion over exclusion in making progress on population health and health care. AHCs play a crucial role, both in educational policy and as a safety-net provider, in reducing health disparities that negatively impact vulnerable populations. Better health for all is possible through better alignment, collaboration, and partnering with other AHCs and safety-net providers. Through servant leadership, AHCs can be the leaders that this change imperative demands. PMID:24556781

  4. 19th-century academic examinations for physicians in the United States Army Medical Department.

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, A P

    1994-01-01

    During the latter half of the 19th century, the United States Army commissioned medical officers or hired civilian physicians to serve its troops. The civilian physician signed a contract for services, and the candidate for a commission was subjected to rigorous examinations before becoming an officer. The rigorous testing of prospective medical officers was necessary because of the lack of standardization in the education of physicians. Examples of the test, statistics, and individual records show how the Army dealt with unqualified candidates. Images PMID:8048241

  5. Investigating the Academic Motivations and Social Experiences of Students from the People's Republic of China Pursuing Graduate Degrees in the United States of America: A Participatory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Brad Demetrius

    2010-01-01

    There is limited research addressing how graduate students from the People's Republic of China (PRC) are supported academically or socially while studying in the United States of America (U.S.). The purpose of this study was to address this gap in the literature by utilizing a participatory action research model in order to collaborate with…

  6. Creating a Supportive Teaching Culture in the Research University Context: Strategic Partnering and Interdisciplinary Collaboration between a Teaching Center and Academic Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Marie Kendall; Ralston, Patricia A. S.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Schreck, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes 2 "strategic partnering" and "interdisciplinary collaboration" case studies between a Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) and an academic unit at a mid-sized metropolitan research university in the American Midwest. These faculty development partnerships were developed to meet the unique needs of faculty…

  7. Use of the MBTI as a Predictor of Successful Academic and Military Performance at the United States Coast Guard Academy. Report 10-93.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, John C., III

    This study provides an analysis of a random sample of 100 cadets from the United States Coast Guard Academy class of 1993. Emphasis is placed on the cadets' academic achievements, their military performance, and their resignation status to determine whether the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) preferences can be used to predict success in these…

  8. Iraq. A Study of the Educational System of Iraq and a Guide to the Academic Placement of Students in Educational Institutions of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, James S.

    The Iraq educational system is described along with guidance for academic placement of students in United States educational institutions. Six chapters include: (1) introduction (i.e. background data, historical development, responsibility for education, and language of instruction); (2) institutions supervised by the Ministry of Education…

  9. Unit-based incident reporting and root cause analysis: variation at three hospital unit types

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Cordula; Merten, Hanneke; Zwaan, Laura; Lubberding, Sanne; Timmermans, Danielle; Smits, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To minimise adverse events in healthcare, various large-scale incident reporting and learning systems have been developed worldwide. Nevertheless, learning from patient safety incidents is going slowly. Local, unit-based reporting systems can help to get faster and more detailed insight into unit-specific safety issues. The aim of our study was to gain insight into types and causes of patient safety incidents in hospital units and to explore differences between unit types. Design Prospective observational study. Setting 10 emergency medicine units, 10 internal medicine units and 10 general surgery units in 20 hospitals in the Netherlands participated. Patient safety incidents were reported by healthcare providers. Reports were analysed with root cause analysis. The results were compared between the 3 unit types. Results A total of 2028 incidents were reported in an average reporting period of 8 weeks per unit. More than half had some consequences for patients, such as a prolonged hospital stay or longer waiting time, and a small number resulted in patient harm. Significant differences in incident types and causes were found between unit types. Emergency units reported more incidents related to collaboration, whereas surgical and internal medicine units reported more incidents related to medication use. The distribution of root causes of surgical and emergency medicine units showed more mutual similarities than those of internal medicine units. Conclusions Comparable incidents and causes have been found in all units, but there were also differences between units and unit types. Unit-based incident reporting gives specific information and therefore makes improvements easier. We conclude that unit-based incident reporting has an added value besides hospital-wide or national reporting systems that already exist in various countries. PMID:27329443

  10. An investigation of the efficacy of acceptance-based behavioral therapy for academic procrastination.

    PubMed

    Glick, Debra M; Orsillo, Susan M

    2015-04-01

    Procrastination among college students is both prevalent and troublesome, harming both academic performance and physical health. Unfortunately, no "gold standard" intervention exists. Research suggests that psychological inflexibility may drive procrastination. Accordingly, interventions using acceptance and mindfulness methods to increase psychological flexibility may decrease procrastination. This study compared time management and acceptance-based behavioral interventions. College students' predictions of how much assigned reading they should complete were compared to what they did complete. Procrastination, anxiety, psychological flexibility, and academic values were also measured. Although a trend suggested that time management intervention participants completed more reading, no group differences in procrastination were revealed. The acceptance-based behavioral intervention was most effective for participants who highly valued academics. Clinical implications and future research are discussed. PMID:25688905

  11. An investigation of the efficacy of acceptance-based behavioral therapy for academic procrastination.

    PubMed

    Glick, Debra M; Orsillo, Susan M

    2015-04-01

    Procrastination among college students is both prevalent and troublesome, harming both academic performance and physical health. Unfortunately, no "gold standard" intervention exists. Research suggests that psychological inflexibility may drive procrastination. Accordingly, interventions using acceptance and mindfulness methods to increase psychological flexibility may decrease procrastination. This study compared time management and acceptance-based behavioral interventions. College students' predictions of how much assigned reading they should complete were compared to what they did complete. Procrastination, anxiety, psychological flexibility, and academic values were also measured. Although a trend suggested that time management intervention participants completed more reading, no group differences in procrastination were revealed. The acceptance-based behavioral intervention was most effective for participants who highly valued academics. Clinical implications and future research are discussed.

  12. Research-Based Teaching Unit on the Tides. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viiri, Jouni; Saari, Heikki

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new research-based learning unit for tides to be used in lower secondary schools. The learning unit was based on the scientific theory of tides, textbooks, and also an analysis of students' conceptions. Descriptions are included of the content and the teaching-learning activities of the unit. The teacher talk…

  13. Patient consent to observation. Responses to requests for written consent in an academic family practice unit.

    PubMed Central

    Shafir, M. S.; Silversides, C.; Waters, I.; MacRury, K.; Frank, J. W.; Becker, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine patient rates of consent to observation and response to being asked for written consent. DESIGN: Patients were asked to provide written consent for a supervising physician to observe a resident performing a physical examination, or for both direct observation and videotaping of the visit. After the visit, all patients were interviewed, and patients who had given written consent completed a questionnaire. SETTING: The family practice unit at a teaching hospital affiliated with the University of Toronto. PARTICIPANTS: A representative sample of new and returning patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient consent to observation or videotaping. RESULTS: Most patients (92.2%) agreed to be observed. Of those asked only for consent to observe, 97.3% agreed. Of those asked for consent to observe and videotape, 85.2% agreed. When specifically asked, 22% of patients who agreed to observation expressed concerns. CONCLUSION: We must devise clear policies and procedures for obtaining patient consent that are both sensitive to patients' concerns and administratively effective. PMID:7580386

  14. Students' Critical Thinking Ability: Description Based on Academic Level and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zetriuslita, Hj.; Ariawan, Rezi; Nufus, Hayatun

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to describe students' critical thinking ability based on the level academic and gender. The populations of this study were 132 students participating in five classes of Calculus course. The research data obtained through technical tests and interview techniques. This study found that the high level of capability, both male…

  15. An Internet-based Expert System for Selecting an Academic Major: www.MyMajors.com.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grupe, Fritz H.

    2002-01-01

    Describes an Internet-based expert system found at http://www.MyMajors.com which provides advice to high school students or college freshmen who are seeking assistance in selecting a potential major by emulating a professional academic advisor. Highlights include computer-assisted advisement programs; knowledge acquisition; evaluating expert…

  16. Characteristics of Team-Based Organization Introduced to Academic Libraries in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Hye-Young

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to analyze characteristics of a team-based organization introduced lately to many academic libraries in South Korea. The major areas of exploration included the introduction of the team approach, team empowerment, leadership of team leaders, open communication, and the director's commitment. The study used a survey design…

  17. Early career academic researchers and community-based participatory research: wrestling match or dancing partners?

    PubMed

    Lowry, Kelly Walker; Ford-Paz, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Early career faculty members at academic medical centers face unique obstacles when engaging in community-based participatory research (CBPR). Challenges and opportunities for solutions pertaining to mentorship, time demands, unfamiliarity of colleagues with CBPR approaches, ethical review regulations, funding, and publication and promotion are discussed. PMID:24330696

  18. Measure for Measure: How Proficiency-Based Accountability Systems Affect Inequality in Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Jennifer; Sohn, Heeju

    2014-01-01

    How do proficiency-based accountability systems affect inequality in academic achievement? This article reconciles mixed findings in the literature by demonstrating that three factors jointly determine accountability's impact. First, by analyzing student-level data from a large urban school district, we find that when educators face…

  19. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction for Academic Evaluation Anxiety: A Naturalistic Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dundas, Ingrid; Thorsheim, Torbjørn; Hjeltnes, Aslak; Binder, Per Einar

    2016-01-01

    Mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) for academic evaluation anxiety and self-confidence in 70 help-seeking bachelor's and master's students was examined. A repeated measures analysis of covariance on the 46 students who completed pretreatment and posttreatment measures (median age = 24 years, 83% women) showed that evaluation anxiety and…

  20. A Standard-Based Model for Adaptive E-Learning Platform for Mauritian Academic Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanaksabee, P.; Odit, M. P.; Ramdoyal, A.

    2011-01-01

    The key aim of this paper is to introduce a standard-based model for adaptive e-learning platform for Mauritian academic institutions and to investigate the conditions and tools required to implement this model. The main forces of the system are that it allows collaborative learning, communication among user, and reduce considerable paper work.…

  1. Characteristics of and Implications for Students Participating in Alternate Assessments Based on Alternate Academic Achievement Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Jacqueline Farmer; Towles-Reeves, Elizabeth; Kleinert, Harold L.; Kleinert, Jane O'Regan; Thomas, Megan Kleine-Kracht

    2011-01-01

    Little research has precisely defined the population of students participating in alternate assessments based on alternate academic achievement standards (AA-AAAS). Therefore, the purpose of this article is twofold: (a) explicate the findings of a multistate study examining the characteristics of the population of students participating in…

  2. Characteristics of States' Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards in 2008. Synthesis Report 72

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albus, Deb; Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Thurlow, Martha L.; Cormier, Damien

    2009-01-01

    In April 2007, Federal No Child Left Behind regulations were finalized that provided states with additional flexibility for assessing some students with disabilities. The regulations allowed states to offer another assessment option, alternate assessments based on modified academic achievement standards (AA-MAS). States are not required to have…

  3. Functional Competency Development Model for Academic Personnel Based on International Professional Qualification Standards in Computing Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tumthong, Suwut; Piriyasurawong, Pullop; Jeerangsuwan, Namon

    2016-01-01

    This research proposes a functional competency development model for academic personnel based on international professional qualification standards in computing field and examines the appropriateness of the model. Specifically, the model consists of three key components which are: 1) functional competency development model, 2) blended training…

  4. The Effect of Brain Based Learning on Academic Achievement: A Meta-Analytical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gozuyesil, Eda; Dikici, Ayhan

    2014-01-01

    This study's aim is to measure the effect sizes of the quantitative studies that examined the effectiveness of brain-based learning on students' academic achievement and to examine with the meta-analytical method if there is a significant difference in effect in terms of the factors of education level, subject matter, sampling size, and…

  5. Consultation-Based Academic Interventions for Children with ADHD: Effects on Reading and Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPaul, George J.; Jitendra, Asha K.; Volpe, Robert J.; Tresco, Katy E.; Lutz, J. Gary; Vile Junod, Rosemary E.; Cleary, Kristi S.; Flammer, Lizette M.; Mannella, Mark C.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the relative efficacy of two consultation-based models for designing academic interventions to enhance the educational functioning of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Children (N = 167) meeting DSM-IV criteria for ADHD were randomly assigned to one of two consultation…

  6. Technical Adequacy and Acceptability of Curriculum-Based Measurement and the Measures of Academic Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    January, Stacy-Ann A.; Ardoin, Scott P.

    2015-01-01

    Curriculum-based measurement in reading (CBM-R) and the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) are assessment tools widely employed for universal screening in schools. Although a large body of research supports the validity of CBM-R, limited empirical evidence exists supporting the technical adequacy of MAP or the acceptability of either measure for…

  7. Evidence-Based Practice for Teaching Academics to Students with Severe Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spooner, Fred; Knight, Victoria F.; Browder, Diane M.; Smith, Bethany R.

    2012-01-01

    A review of the literature was conducted for articles published between 2003 and 2010 to build a case for the degree to which evidence-based practices were documented for teaching academic skills to students with severe developmental disabilities. This review extended earlier comprehensive work in literacy, mathematics, and science for the…

  8. Addressing the Academic and Social Needs of Young Male Students through School-Based Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alston, Curtis E.

    2013-01-01

    This study addressed the problem within the U.S. public school system to sustainably meet the academic and social needs of its African American male students. The administrative team of the elementary school in this study desired an evaluation of a school-based male mentoring program that was designed to address these needs. The program, Gentlemen…

  9. Children's Agentive Orientations in Play-Based and Academically Focused Preschools in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng Pui-Wah, Doris; Reunamo, Jyrki; Cooper, Paul; Liu, Karen; Vong, Keang-ieng Peggy

    2015-01-01

    The article describes a comparative case study on children's agentive orientations in two Hong Kong preschools, one is play-based and the other is academically focused. Agentive orientations were measured using Reunamo's interview tool, which focuses on children's uses of accommodative and agentive orientations in everyday situations. The findings…

  10. Facilitating Metacognitive Processes of Academic Genre-Based Writing Using an Online Writing System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeh, Hui-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have investigated how metacognitive processes foster the application of genre knowledge to students' academic writing. This is largely due to its internal and unobservable characteristics. To bridge this gap, an online writing system based on metacognition, involving the stages of planning, monitoring, evaluating, and revising, was…

  11. Inequality in Academic Performance and Juvenile Convictions: An Area-Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabates, Ricardo; Feinstein, Leon; Shingal, Anirudh

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the links between inequality in academic performance and juvenile conviction rates for violent crime, stealing from another person, burglary in a dwelling and racially motivated offences. We use area-based aggregate data to model this relationship. Our results show that, above and beyond impacts of absolute access to…

  12. Exploring the Struggle of Balancing Academics, Religion, and Mission at Faith-Based Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Learty Letroy

    2014-01-01

    Leaders at faith-based institutions struggle to provide equitable attention to academics, religious heritage, and the secular mission of the institution; as a result, leaders find themselves mitigating conflict that arises from this imbalance (Brackney, 2004; Ecklund, Park, & Veliz, 2008; Witek, 2009). The purposes of this study were: (a) to…

  13. Modifiers in BASE and MICASE: A Matter of Academic Cultures or Lecturing Styles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chia-Yen

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the occurrence of modifiers in a variety of settings, especially academic research writing and casual spoken contexts. This study extends previous research in two ways: (1) it examines pragmatic force modifiers (PFMs) (and) in lectures in BASE and MICASE in order to reveal their functions specific to the…

  14. The Cost of Library Services: Activity-Based Costing in an Australian Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Peter; Ellis-Newman, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    Explains activity-based costing (ABC), discusses the benefits of ABC to library managers, and describes the steps involved in implementing ABC in an Australian academic library. Discusses the budgeting process in universities, and considers benefits to the library. (Author/LRW)

  15. An Evidence-Based Practice Model across the Academic and Clinical Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolter, Julie A.; Corbin-Lewis, Kim; Self, Trisha; Elsweiler, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This tutorial is designed to provide academic communication sciences and disorders (CSD) programs, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, with a comprehensive instructional model on evidence-based practice (EBP). The model was designed to help students view EBP as an ongoing process needed in all clinical decision making. The three facets…

  16. School-Based Mentoring Programs: Using Volunteers to Improve the Academic Outcomes of Underserved Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Amanda; Grossman, Jean Baldwin; DuBois, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research suggests that school-based mentoring programs like those offered by Big Brothers Big Sisters of America (BBBSA) yield small but statistically significant improvements in the academic performance of mentored students and in their beliefs in their own scholastic efficacy. The present study uses data from a randomized control trial…

  17. Creating Fee-Based Online Services: A New Role for Academic Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trehub, Aaron

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of the impact of the Internet on libraries focuses on librarians as creators and marketers of new online services. Describes two fee-based online services at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and concludes that academic libraries have the ability to create new online services, especially reference services. (Author/LRW)

  18. A Fee-Based Model: Administrative Considerations in an Academic Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungarelli, Donald L.; Grant, Mary McNierney

    1983-01-01

    Relates experiences of Center of Business Research (CBR) in C. W. Post Center, Long Island University, as practical demonstration of performing business service in an academic library setting. Changing role of librarians, background of CBR, CBR's commitment, CBR corporate membership, administration of fee-based services, and membership revenue are…

  19. The Effect of Inquiry-Based Learning Method on Students' Academic Achievement in Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of inquiry-based learning method on students' academic achievement in sciences lesson. A total of 40 fifth grade students from two different classes were involved in the study. They were selected through purposive sampling method. The group which was assigned as experimental group was…

  20. Effect of Learning Cycle Approach-Based Science Teaching on Academic Achievement, Attitude, Motivation and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uyanik, Gökhan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of learning cycle approach-based teaching on academic achievement, attitude, motivation and retention at primary school 4th grade science lesson. It was conducted pretest-posttest quasi-experimental design in this study. The study was conducted on a total of 65 students studying in two different…

  1. The Effect of Teaching Strategy Based on Multiple Intelligences on Students' Academic Achievement in Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdi, Ali; Laei, Susan; Ahmadyan, Hamze

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of Teaching Strategy based on Multiple Intelligences on students' academic achievement in sciences course. Totally 40 students from two different classes (Experimental N = 20 and Control N = 20) participated in the study. They were in the fifth grade of elementary school and were selected…

  2. Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral-Theory-Based Skill Training on Academic Procrastination Behaviors of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toker, Betül; Avci, Rasit

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral theory (CBT) psycho-educational group program on the academic procrastination behaviors of university students and the persistence of any training effect. This was a quasi-experimental research based on an experimental and control group pretest, posttest, and followup test model.…

  3. Navigating Uncharted Waters: An Accelerated Content-Based English for Academic Purposes Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Kelly; Thomas, Michelle; Schuemann, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, Miami Dade College received a $1.9 million Title V grant from the US Department of Education to develop an Accelerated Content-Based English for Academic Purposes (EAP) track called Project ACE for ESL students. The ACE curriculum is anchored by the principles of flexibility, contextualization, and faculty buy-in--critical matters given…

  4. United Kingdom: Medical Laboratory Science, Occupational Therapy, Physiotherapy. A Study of These Programs and a Guide to the Academic Placement of Students from These Programs in Educational Institutions of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolis, Alan M.; Monahan, Thomas J.

    Medical laboratory science, occupational therapy, and physiotherapy programs in the United Kingdom (U.K.) are described, and guidelines concerning the academic placement of students from these programs who wish to study in U.S. institutions are provided. For each of the programs, attention is directed to the relevant professional bodies, career…

  5. Academic Job Placements in Library and Information Science Field: A Case Study Performed on ALISE Web-Based Postings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abouserie, Hossam Eldin Mohamed Refaat

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated and analyzed the state of academic web-based job announcements in Library and Information Science Field. The purpose of study was to get in depth understanding about main characteristics and trends of academic job market in Library and Information science field. The study focused on web-based version announcement as it was…

  6. The Evolution of the Protections of Tenure in Relation to Academic Freedom in the United States and Its Interpretation in the United States Legal System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzog, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    The concept of academic freedom and tenure has been a point of discussion between university faculty and administration since these concepts were established by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) in their 1915 Declaration of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure. Within this dissertation the history of these two issues…

  7. Sleep and academic performance in later adolescence: results from a large population-based study.

    PubMed

    Hysing, Mari; Harvey, Allison G; Linton, Steven J; Askeland, Kristin G; Sivertsen, Børge

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the association between sleep duration and sleep patterns and academic performance in 16-19 year-old adolescents using registry-based academic grades. A large population-based study from Norway conducted in 2012, the youth@hordaland-survey, surveyed 7798 adolescents aged 16-19 years (53.5% girls). The survey was linked with objective outcome data on school performance. Self-reported sleep measures provided information on sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep deficit and bedtime differences between weekday and weekend. School performance [grade point average (GPA)] was obtained from official administrative registries. Most sleep parameters were associated with increased risk for poor school performance. After adjusting for sociodemographic information, short sleep duration and sleep deficit were the sleep measures with the highest odds of poor GPA (lowest quartile). Weekday bedtime was associated significantly with GPA, with adolescents going to bed between 22:00 and 23:00 hours having the best GPA. Also, delayed sleep schedule during weekends was associated with poor academic performance. The associations were somewhat reduced after additional adjustment for non-attendance at school, but remained significant in the fully adjusted models. In conclusion, the demonstrated relationship between sleep problems and poor academic performance suggests that careful assessment of sleep is warranted when adolescents are underperforming at school. Future studies are needed on the association between impaired sleep in adolescence and later functioning in adulthood. PMID:26825591

  8. Academic Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Brian G.

    The strength of academic freedom has always depended upon historical circumstances. In the United States, higher education began with institutions founded and controlled by religious sects. The notion of who gets educated and to what ends expanded as American democracy expanded. By the 1980's, legitimate calls for equality became a general…

  9. Can improving working memory prevent academic difficulties? a school based randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Low academic achievement is common and is associated with adverse outcomes such as grade repetition, behavioural disorders and unemployment. The ability to accurately identify these children and intervene before they experience academic failure would be a major advance over the current 'wait to fail' model. Recent research suggests that a possible modifiable factor for low academic achievement is working memory, the ability to temporarily store and manipulate information in a 'mental workspace'. Children with working memory difficulties are at high risk of academic failure. It has recently been demonstrated that working memory can be improved with adaptive training tasks that encourage improvements in working memory capacity. Our trial will determine whether the intervention is efficacious as a selective prevention strategy for young children at risk of academic difficulties and is cost-effective. Methods/Design This randomised controlled trial aims to recruit 440 children with low working memory after a school-based screening of 2880 children in Grade one. We will approach caregivers of all children from 48 participating primary schools in metropolitan Melbourne for consent. Children with low working memory will be randomised to usual care or the intervention. The intervention will consist of 25 computerised working memory training sessions, which take approximately 35 minutes each to complete. Follow-up of children will be conducted at 6, 12 and 24 months post-randomisation through child face-to-face assessment, parent and teacher surveys and data from government authorities. The primary outcome is academic achievement at 12 and 24 months, and other outcomes include child behaviour, attention, health-related quality of life, working memory, and health and educational service utilisation. Discussion A successful start to formal learning in school sets the stage for future academic, psychological and economic well-being. If this preventive intervention

  10. Temperament-based learning styles as moderators of academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Horton, C B; Oakland, T

    1997-01-01

    Considerable interest in applications of temperament theory has led to proposals of four temperament-related learning styles. The hypothesis that achievement is higher when instructional strategies utilize methods consistent with students' preferred learning styles was tested using 417 seventh graders, the majority of whom were from minority and low SES families. The hypothesis was not supported; instead, student achievement was significantly higher with instructional strategies designed to promote personalized learning. The need to extend temperament-based learning styles by considering additional qualities that are important to learning is discussed. PMID:9105497

  11. Health and Academic Achievement: Cumulative Effects of Health Assets on Standardized Test Scores among Urban Youth in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ickovics, Jeannette R.; Carroll-Scott, Amy; Peters, Susan M.; Schwartz, Marlene; Gilstad-Hayden, Kathryn; McCaslin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Institute of Medicine (2012) concluded that we must "strengthen schools as the heart of health." To intervene for better outcomes in both health and academic achievement, identifying factors that impact children is essential. Study objectives are to (1) document associations between health assets and academic achievement,…

  12. Academic Majors and Subject-Area Certifications of Health Education Teachers in the United States, 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardina, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify academic preparation and subject-area certifications of K-12 public school staff teaching at least one health education class during 2011-2012 academic year. In general, teachers who are well qualified to teach a subject area are more likely to positively affect student achievement. Methods: Data…

  13. Impact of Increased Academic Intensity on Transfer Rates: An Application of Matching Estimators to Student-Unit Record Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, William R.

    2009-01-01

    The impact of increased academic intensity on transfer rates from community colleges to 4-year institutions has been estimated only from observational data, with the possibility of selection bias. This study uses matching estimators to overcome possible selection bias and estimate the causal impact of increased academic intensity on transfer…

  14. A Standards-Based Thematic Unit: "Crictor"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coblin, Mary Payne; Huss, Dorothy; Kirk, Bonnie; Lonneman, Melissa; Melville, Claire

    1998-01-01

    This unit was created as a result of a summer institute sponsored by the National K-12 Foreign Language Resource Center at Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa. The Center's goal is to improve student learning of foreign languages in kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12). To this end, the Center provides professional support for foreign language…

  15. Partnerships with Academic Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter describes how professional and continuing higher education units can develop and sustain successful partnerships with academic departments in order to deliver educational programs effectively to students.

  16. Perceptions of community-based participatory research in the delta nutrition intervention research initiative:an academic perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lower Mississippi Delta Nutrition Intervention Research Initiative (Delta NIRI) is an academic-community partnership between seven academic institutions and three communities in Mississippi, Arkansas, and Louisiana. A range of community-based participatory methods have been employed to develop susta...

  17. Generation Psy: Student Characteristics and Academic Achievement in a Three-Year Problem-Based Learning Bachelor Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Koning, Bjorn B.; Loyens, Sofie M. M.; Rikers, Remy M. J. P.; Smeets, Guus; van der Molen, Henk T.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the simultaneous impact of demographic, personality, intelligence, and (prior) study performance factors on students' academic achievement in a three-year academic problem-based psychology program. Information regarding students' gender, age, nationality, pre-university education, high school grades, Big Five personality…

  18. Impact of Campus-Based Child Care on the Academic Success of Student-Parents at SUNY Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fadale, LaVerna M.; Winter, Gene M.

    The focus of this study was the relationship between campus-based child care services at the State University of New York (SUNY) community colleges and the academic success of student-parents. Academic success was defined as completion of a degree or certificate program, transfer, or continued enrollment. Data were collected through surveys mailed…

  19. Achieving Academic Goals through Place-Based Learning: Students in Five States Show How To Do It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveland, Elaina

    2003-01-01

    Place-based education roots learning in real issues and needs and helps students become both academic achievers and good citizens. This article profiles programs in five states that are fostering academic achievement. The Alaska Rural Systemic Initiative (AKRSI) links Alaska Native culture and indigenous knowledge with the formal educational…

  20. L2 Learning Opportunities in Different Academic Subjects in Content-Based Instruction -- Evidence in Favour of "Conventional Wisdom"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo, Yuen Yi

    2014-01-01

    Content-based instruction (CBI) adopts a second language (L2) as the medium of instruction for some or all academic subjects to facilitate L2 learning. There seem however, no uniform policies concerning which academic subjects should be taught in L2, in case only some subjects are involved. Conventional wisdom tends to favour Humanities subjects…

  1. Industry and Academic Consortium for Computer Based Subsurface Geology Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. L.; Nunn, J. A.; Sears, S. O.

    2008-12-01

    Twenty two licenses for Petrel Software acquired through a grant from Schlumberger are being used to redesign the laboratory portion of Subsurface Geology at Louisiana State University. The course redesign is a cooperative effort between LSU's Geology and Geophysics and Petroleum Engineering Departments and Schlumberger's Technical Training Division. In spring 2008, two laboratory sections were taught with 22 students in each section. The class contained geology majors, petroleum engineering majors, and geology graduate students. Limited enrollments and 3 hour labs make it possible to incorporate hands-on visualization, animation, manipulation of data and images, and access to geological data available online. 24/7 access to the laboratory and step by step instructions for Petrel exercises strongly promoted peer instruction and individual learning. Goals of the course redesign include: enhancing visualization of earth materials; strengthening student's ability to acquire, manage, and interpret multifaceted geological information; fostering critical thinking, the scientific method; improving student communication skills; providing cross training between geologists and engineers and increasing the quantity, quality, and diversity of students pursuing Earth Science and Petroleum Engineering careers. IT resources available in the laboratory provide students with sophisticated visualization tools, allowing them to switch between 2-D and 3-D reconstructions more seamlessly, and enabling them to manipulate larger integrated data-sets, thus permitting more time for critical thinking and hypothesis testing. IT resources also enable faculty and students to simultaneously work with the software to visually interrogate a 3D data set and immediately test hypothesis formulated in class. Preliminary evaluation of class results indicate that students found MS-Windows based Petrel easy to learn. By the end of the semester, students were able to not only map horizons and faults

  2. Correlates and Economic and Clinical Outcomes of an Adult IV to PO Antimicrobial Conversion Program at an Academic Medical Center in Midwest United States.

    PubMed

    Sallach-Ruma, Rory; Nieman, Jennifer; Sankaranarayanan, Jayashri; Reardon, Tom

    2015-06-01

    The study objectives were to evaluate the correlates and outcomes of a parenteral (IV) to oral (PO) antimicrobial conversion program at a Midwest US Academic Medical Center with the hypothesis that it will be associated with reduced drug costs. Patient-level data (n = 237; sex, race, admission source, admission status, admission severity, risk of mortality [relative expected, admission], and early death) were extracted from the Clinical Data Base/Resource Manager. Medication-level, drug-encounter data (n = 317; antibiotic/dose/route/frequency/duration, conversion status, 10-day IV/PO switch-eligibility criteria) were extracted from patient's hospital medical records. Univariate analyses using chi-square or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for continuous variables showed patients not converted (n = 149) versus converted (n = 88) at some point from IV to PO were more likely to be of white race and had higher risk of relative expected mortality. By applying the unit drug cost (derived from 2010 Thomson Reuters RED BOOK(TM)) and labor costs for IV/PO administration, both per dose, the overall 1-month drug cost-saving estimates in 2010 in US dollars were US$5242 from converting and US$8805 savings missed from not converting 518 and 1387 switch-eligible antibiotic doses, respectively. Despite sample-size limitations, this study demonstrated correlates and missed opportunities to convert antimicrobials from IV to PO, which warrants providers' attention. PMID:24399573

  3. The Influence of Structure on the Function of an Administrative Unit: Single Focus Academic Structure or Multiple Focus Academic Structure--Raising Some of the Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Robert F.; Emmert, Philip

    1990-01-01

    Argues for a multifocused divisional unit versus the traditional single discipline communication department for institutions that are generally small (6 to 10 thousand students) and where enrollments overall have leveled off for both the institution and department. (KEH)

  4. Pell Grants as Performance-Based Aid? An Examination of Satisfactory Academic Progress Requirements in the Nation's Largest Need-Based Aid Program. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schudde, Lauren; Scott-Clayton, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The Federal Pell Grant Program is the nation's largest need-based grant program. While students' initial eligibility for the Pell is based on financial need, renewal of the award is contingent on their making satisfactory academic progress (SAP)--meeting minimum academic standards similar to those proposed in models of performance-based…

  5. Universal power transistor base drive control unit

    DOEpatents

    Gale, Allan R.; Gritter, David J.

    1988-01-01

    A saturation condition regulator system for a power transistor which achieves the regulation objectives of a Baker clamp but without dumping excess base drive current into the transistor output circuit. The base drive current of the transistor is sensed and used through an active feedback circuit to produce an error signal which modulates the base drive current through a linearly operating FET. The collector base voltage of the power transistor is independently monitored to develop a second error signal which is also used to regulate base drive current. The current-sensitive circuit operates as a limiter. In addition, a fail-safe timing circuit is disclosed which automatically resets to a turn OFF condition in the event the transistor does not turn ON within a predetermined time after the input signal transition.

  6. Universal power transistor base drive control unit

    DOEpatents

    Gale, A.R.; Gritter, D.J.

    1988-06-07

    A saturation condition regulator system for a power transistor is disclosed which achieves the regulation objectives of a Baker clamp but without dumping excess base drive current into the transistor output circuit. The base drive current of the transistor is sensed and used through an active feedback circuit to produce an error signal which modulates the base drive current through a linearly operating FET. The collector base voltage of the power transistor is independently monitored to develop a second error signal which is also used to regulate base drive current. The current-sensitive circuit operates as a limiter. In addition, a fail-safe timing circuit is disclosed which automatically resets to a turn OFF condition in the event the transistor does not turn ON within a predetermined time after the input signal transition. 2 figs.

  7. Fuzzy case based reasoning in sports facilities unit cost estimating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zima, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    This article presents an example of estimating costs in the early phase of the project using fuzzy case-based reasoning. The fragment of database containing descriptions and unit cost of sports facilities was shown. The formulas used in Case Based Reasoning method were presented, too. The article presents similarity measurement using a few formulas, including fuzzy similarity. The outcome of cost calculations based on CBR method was presented as a fuzzy number of unit cost of construction work.

  8. Library Research and Statistics. Research on Libraries and Librarianship in 2002; Number of Libraries in the United States and Canada; Highlights of NCES Surveys; Library Acquisition Expenditures, 2001-2002: U.S. Public, Academic, Special, and Government Libraries; LJ Budget Report: A Precarious Holding Pattern; Price Indexes for Public and Academic Libraries; Library Buildings 2002: The Building Buck Doesn't Stop Here.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Mary Jo; Oder, Norman; Halstead, Kent; Fox, Bette-Lee

    2003-01-01

    Includes seven reports that discuss research on libraries and librarianship, including academic, public, and school libraries; awards and grants; number of libraries in the United States and Canada; National Center for Education Statistics results; library expenditures for public, academic, special, and government libraries; library budgets; price…

  9. Academic Vocabulary in Agriculture Research Articles: A Corpus-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Iliana A.; Beck, Silvia C.; Panza, Carolina B.

    2009-01-01

    Recent critical views on the usefulness of a general academic vocabulary have heightened the relevance of developing discipline specific academic wordlists to meet the needs of non-native English writers who must read and publish articles in English. Using Coxhead's (2000) Academic Word List, we set out to identify the academic words in a corpus…

  10. Health and Academic Achievement: Cumulative Effects of Health Assets on Standardized Test Scores Among Urban Youth in the United States*

    PubMed Central

    Ickovics, Jeannette R.; Carroll-Scott, Amy; Peters, Susan M.; Schwartz, Marlene; Gilstad-Hayden, Kathryn; McCaslin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine (2012) concluded that we must “strengthen schools as the heart of health.” To intervene for better outcomes in both health and academic achievement, identifying factors that impact children is essential. Study objectives are to (1) document associations between health assets and academic achievement, and (2) examine cumulative effects of these assets on academic achievement. Methods Participants include 940 students (grades 5 and 6) from 12 schools randomly selected from an urban district. Data include physical assessments, fitness testing, surveys, and district records. Fourteen health indicators were gathered including physical health (eg, body mass index [BMI]), health behaviors (eg, meeting recommendations for fruit/vegetable consumption), family environment (eg, family meals), and psychological well-being (eg, sleep quality). Data were collected 3-6 months prior to standardized testing. Results On average, students reported 7.1 health assets out of 14. Those with more health assets were more likely to be at goal for standardized tests (reading/writing/mathematics), and students with the most health assets were 2.2 times more likely to achieve goal compared with students with the fewest health assets (both p < .001). Conclusions Schools that utilize nontraditional instructional strategies to improve student health may also improve academic achievement, closing equity gaps in both health and academic achievement. PMID:24320151

  11. Surgical Residency Training at a University-Based Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Rebecca L; Morris, Jon B; Kelz, Rachel R

    2016-02-01

    The past two decades have been witness to some of the most dynamic changes that have occurred in surgical education in all of its history. Political policies, social revolution, and the competing priorities of a new generation of surgical trainees are defining the needs of modern training paradigms. Although the university-based academic program's tripartite mission of clinical service, research, and education has remained steadfast, the mechanisms for achieving success in this mission necessitate adaptation and innovation. The resource-rich learning environment and the unique challenges that face university-based programs contribute to its ability to generate the future leaders of the surgical workforce.

  12. Integrating movement in academic classrooms: understanding, applying and advancing the knowledge base.

    PubMed

    Webster, C A; Russ, L; Vazou, S; Goh, T L; Erwin, H

    2015-08-01

    In the context of comprehensive and coordinated approaches to school health, academic classrooms have gained attention as a promising setting for increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary time among children. The aims of this paper are to review the rationale and knowledge base related to movement integration in academic classrooms, consider the practical applications of current knowledge to interventions and teacher education, and suggest directions for future research. Specifically, this paper (i) situates movement integration amid policy and research related to children's health and the school as a health-promoting environment; (ii) highlights the benefits of movement integration; (iii) summarizes movement integration programs and interventions; (iv) examines factors associated with classroom teachers' movement integration; (v) offers strategies for translating research to practice and (vi) forwards recommendations for future inquiry related to the effectiveness and sustainability of efforts to integrate movement into classroom routines. This paper provides a comprehensive resource for developing state-of-the-art initiatives to maximize children's movement in academic classrooms as a key strategy for important goals in both education and public health.

  13. Sample Based Unit Liter Dose Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    JENSEN, L.

    2000-04-13

    The Tank Waste Characterization Program has taken many core samples, grab samples, and auger samples from the single-shell and double-shell tanks during the past 10 years. Consequently, the amount of sample data available has increased, both in terms of quantity of sample results and the number of tanks characterized. More and better data is available than when the current radiological and toxicological source terms used in the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) (FDH 1999a) and the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (FDH 1999b) were developed. The Nuclear Safety and Licensing (NS and L) organization wants to use the new data to upgrade the radiological and toxicological source terms used in the BIO and FSAR. The NS and L organization requested assistance in producing a statistically based process for developing the source terms. This report describes the statistical techniques used and the assumptions made to support the development of a new radiological source term for liquid and solid wastes stored in single-shell and double-shell tanks. The results given in this report are a revision to similar results given in an earlier version of the document (Jensen and Wilmarth 1999). The main difference between the results in this document and the earlier version is that the dose conversion factors (DCF) for converting {mu}Ci/g or {mu}Ci/L to Sv/L (sieverts per liter) have changed. There are now two DCFs, one based on ICRP-68 and one based on ICW-71 (Brevick 2000).

  14. Transplanting Tenure and the (Re)Construction of Academic Freedoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, Anne; Tienari, Janne

    2013-01-01

    In a radical change to modes of academic employment in Finland, a newly merged university is introducing a tenure track system based on examples from the United States. Analyzing texts produced by university strategists, on the one hand, and interviews with staff affected by the system, on the other, we explore how notions of academic freedom are…

  15. Fresh Thinking about Academic Development: Authentic, Transformative, Disruptive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loads, Daphne; Campbell, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    We highlight three ways of conceptualising and enacting academic development: firstly as authentic, practice-based activity, secondly in terms of a new transformative paradigm for academic development units (ADUs), and thirdly as a space for disruption. We illustrate these conceptualisations through our investigation of the practice of internal…

  16. Physically Active Play and Cognition: An Academic Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sattelmair, Jacob; Ratey, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The authors discuss the growing evidence that strenuous physical activity is not only healthy for students but improves their academic performance. Based on such research, they argue that schools in the United States need to stop eliminating physical-education programs under the current political pressures to emphasize academics and instead to…

  17. Affordances for Academics: Using Learning Management Systems to Effectively Manage Large-Enrolment Units in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Timothy; Rankine, Lynnae

    2010-01-01

    Learning Management Systems (LMS) can be used to deliver learning designs that meet students' learning needs. There is a raft of teaching and learning tools that can be enabled in LMS to engage and support learners. The design and ongoing management of these environments rest largely on the knowledge and skills of academic staff. While increasing…

  18. Adult English as a Second Language Students in the United States: Learner Characteristics, Goals, and Academic Writing Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Olga Demin

    2009-01-01

    Adult English as a second language (ESL) students learning English outside of traditional academic settings are an understudied population of second language learners. The purpose of the research reported here is to contribute to meeting the instructional needs of these students more effectively by investigating the relationships between their…

  19. Expanding Research Capacity at United States Universities: A Study of Academic Research and Development Investment from 1990-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantwell, Brendan; Mathies, Charles F.

    2012-01-01

    Growing emphasis has been placed on universities to contribute to the innovation process and as a result academic research and development expenditures have increased in recent years. Nevertheless, little is known about the specific ways in which universities have expanded their research capacity. This paper examines how universities in the United…

  20. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction for Academic Evaluation Anxiety: A Naturalistic Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Dundas, Ingrid; Thorsheim, Torbjørn; Hjeltnes, Aslak; Binder, Per Einar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) for academic evaluation anxiety and self-confidence in 70 help-seeking bachelor’s and master’s students was examined. A repeated measures analysis of covariance on the 46 students who completed pretreatment and posttreatment measures (median age = 24 years, 83% women) showed that evaluation anxiety and self-confidence improved. A growth curve analysis with all 70 original participants showed reductions in both cognitive and emotional components of evaluation anxiety, and that reduction continued postintervention. Although more research is needed, this study indicates that MBSR may reduce evaluation anxiety. PMID:27227169

  1. Child Self-Regulation, Parental Secure Base Scripts, and At-Risk Kindergartners' Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLear, Caitlin; Trentacosta, Christopher J.; Smith-Darden, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Early reading and mathematics skills predict later academic success, and child self-regulation and secure parent-child relationships are both predictors of early academic skills. Self-regulatory and family relationship factors have rarely been studied together as predictors of early academic success in populations of young…

  2. Factors and Conditions Promoting Academic Resilience: A TIMSS-Based Analysis of Five Asian Education Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoval-Hernández, Andrés; Bialowolski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    It is well documented that academic achievement of students from families of low socioeconomic status (SES) tends to be below their more socially advantaged peers. Several studies have identified factors and conditions that facilitate academic success for disadvantaged students (i.e., promote academic resilience). However, one of the main…

  3. Effects of digital game-based learning on student engagement and academic achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Timothy W.

    This experimental study was designed to determine the effect of digital game-based learning on student engagement and academic achievement. The sample was comprised of 34 students enrolled in a secondary Biology class in a rural public school. The study utilized an experimental pretest-posttest design with switching replications. After random assignment, students participated in one of two supplemental learning activities: playing a digital game designed to review science concepts or participating in a lab to review the same concepts. Students subsequently switched activities. Student achievement data were collected on mastery of science concepts, and student engagement data were collected utilizing self- and teacher-reported measures. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures. Results demonstrated that the digital game was as effective as the lab activity at increasing teacher-reported student engagement and academic achievement. These findings may be of interest to school administrators or directors of teacher preparation programs on the potential effectiveness of digital games as a learning tool.

  4. [Time-base sweep unit for polarograph PA-2].

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, A V; Gabdullin, M G

    1998-01-01

    A time-base sweep unit is proposed for a PA-2 polarograph (Czechia). The apparatus as a further development of a series of voltamperometric analyzers of the known mark "LP" has a number of additional modes of polarographic analysis expanding the possibilities of recording the volt-ampere characteristics of the analyzed objects. However, the apparatus cannot solve the problems pertaining to a temporal evaluation of biochemical processes, for estimation of oxygen consumption in particular as it has no a time-base sweep function (I/t), which records only volt-ampere characteristics. In this connection, a time-base sweep unit was elaborated and included into the apparatus complex that provides time-base sweep along the coordinate. The modularity of the proposed elaboration permits its use in other types of polarographs that have no time-base sweep function.

  5. Evolutionary product unit based neural networks for regression.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Estudillo, Alfonso; Martínez-Estudillo, Francisco; Hervás-Martínez, César; García-Pedrajas, Nicolás

    2006-05-01

    This paper presents a new method for regression based on the evolution of a type of feed-forward neural networks whose basis function units are products of the inputs raised to real number power. These nodes are usually called product units. The main advantage of product units is their capacity for implementing higher order functions. Nevertheless, the training of product unit based networks poses several problems, since local learning algorithms are not suitable for these networks due to the existence of many local minima on the error surface. Moreover, it is unclear how to establish the structure of the network since, hitherto, all learning methods described in the literature deal only with parameter adjustment. In this paper, we propose a model of evolution of product unit based networks to overcome these difficulties. The proposed model evolves both the weights and the structure of these networks by means of an evolutionary programming algorithm. The performance of the model is evaluated in five widely used benchmark functions and a hard real-world problem of microbial growth modeling. Our evolutionary model is compared to a multistart technique combined with a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm and shows better overall performance in the benchmark functions as well as the real-world problem.

  6. A Model for Estimating Student Unit Cost and Staffing Requirements for University Academic Programmes with Reference to Kenyan Public Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aduol, F. W. O.

    2001-01-01

    Presents model for estimation of student unit costs and staffing requirements. Begins with specification of a "staff distribution matrix" setting out proportions of staff levels in a given staff category that are needed for a degree level. Student unit cost and staffing requirements are computed through manipulations on the matrix. The model is…

  7. Eielson Air Force Base Operable Unit 2 baseline risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.E.; Jarvis, T.T.; Jarvis, M.R.; Whelan, G.

    1994-10-01

    Operable Unit 2 at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, is one of several operable units characterized by petroleum, oil, and lubricant contamination, and by the presence of organic products floating at the water table, as a result of Air Force operations since the 1940s. The base is approximately 19,270 acres in size, and comprises the areas for military operations and a residential neighborhood for military dependents. Within Operable Unit 2, there are seven source areas. These source areas were grouped together primarily because of the contaminants released and hence are not necessarily in geographical proximity. Source area ST10 includes a surface water body (Hardfill Lake) next to a fuel spill area. The primary constituents of concern for human health include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Monitored data showed these volatile constituents to be present in groundwater wells. The data also showed an elevated level of trace metals in groundwater.

  8. Units Based on Constants: The Redefinition of the International System of Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenger, J.; Ullrich, J. H.

    2016-03-01

    Recent decisions of the General Conference on Weights and Measures of the Metre Convention have opened the door to a fundamental change of the International System of Units, the SI, in 2018. The revised SI will be based on fixing the numerical values of seven defining constants corresponding to the seven traditional base units. This will bring about basic modifications in the definition of the kilogram, the ampere, the kelvin, and the mole and will have consequences for units derived from them. In contrast, the second, the meter, and the candela will not be affected. This paper describes the motivation and rationale behind this endeavor, introduces the new definitions, and reviews the requirements for the redefinitions as well as the status of the experiments that are currently being carried out to fulfill them. Benefits and a wide-reaching impact for the realization and dissemination of the units are anticipated because innovative technologies with ever-increasing accuracy will emerge, enabling the direct realization over widespread measurement ranges without the definitions themselves having to be changed.

  9. Teaching Strategies and Gender Based Learning Environments: How They Relate to Self-Efficacy, Participatory Behaviors, and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Debra

    2013-01-01

    This mixed method participatory action research study investigated the relationships of effective teaching strategies and gender based learning environments to pre-adolescent females' self-efficacy of mathematical ability, classroom participatory behaviors, and academic achievement in the area of mathematics. Research-based teaching…

  10. Socioemotional and Academic Adjustment Among Children with Learning Disorders: The Mediational Role of Attachment-Based Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Yagon, Michal; Mikulincer, Mario

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the role of attachment-based factors (children's attachment style, children's appraisal of teacher as a secure base, and teacher's feelings of closeness to child) in explaining differences in Israeli children's socioemotional adjustment (self-rated sense of coherence, loneliness) and academic functioning (teacher-rated). The…

  11. Evidence-Based Interventions for Immigrant Students Experiencing Behavioral and Academic Problems: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bal, Aydin; Perzigian, Aaron B. T.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present research review is to identify effective, high quality school-based interventions for immigrant students with disabilities or academic and behavioral problems. A systematic review of the literature was conducted to synthesize international research studies. Initial and criteria-based selection processes yielded six…

  12. Evidence-Based Kernels: Fundamental Units of Behavioral Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Embry, Dennis D.; Biglan, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes evidence-based kernels, fundamental units of behavioral influence that appear to underlie effective prevention and treatment for children, adults, and families. A kernel is a behavior-influence procedure shown through experimental analysis to affect a specific behavior and that is indivisible in the sense that removing any of…

  13. Community-Based Presentations in the Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Brian S.; Law, Victor J.

    2005-01-01

    A method for incorporating community­-based oral presentations into the undergraduate chemical engineering unit operations laboratory experience is described. Examples are given of appropriate topics and how these presentations can be incorporated into the experiment sequence. Course evaluations reflect the fact that these presentations are an…

  14. Competency-based medical education and scholarship: Creating an active academic culture during residency.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, James A; Hategan, Ana; Azzam, Amin

    2015-10-01

    The competency-based medical education movement has been adopted in several medical education systems across the world. This has the potential to result in a more active involvement of residents in the educational process, inasmuch as scholarship is regarded as a major area of competency. Substantial scholarly activities are well within the reach of motivated residents, especially when faculty members provide sufficient mentoring. These academically empowered residents have the advantage of early experience in the areas of scholarly discovery, integration, application, and teaching. Herein, the authors review the importance of instituting the germinal stages of scholarly productivity in the creation of an active scholarly culture during residency. Clear and consistent institutional and departmental strategies to promote scholarly development during residency are highly encouraged.

  15. Academic Success in Context-Based Chemistry: Demonstrating fluid transitions between concepts and context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Donna Therese; Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2013-05-01

    Curriculum developers and researchers have promoted context-based programmes to arrest waning student interest and participation in the enabling sciences at high school and university. Context-based programmes aim for student connections between scientific discourse and real-world contexts to elevate curricular relevance without diminishing conceptual understanding. This interpretive study explored the learning transactions in one 11th grade context-based chemistry classroom where the context was the local creek. The dialectic of agency/structure was used as a lens to examine how the practices in classroom interactions afforded students the agency for learning. The results suggest that first, fluid transitions were evident in the student-student interactions involving successful students; and second, fluid transitions linking concepts to context were evident in the students' successful reports. The study reveals that the structures of writing and collaborating in groups enabled students' agential and fluent movement between the field of the real-world creek and the field of the formal chemistry classroom. Furthermore, characteristics of academically successful students in context-based chemistry are highlighted. Research, teaching, and future directions for context-based science teaching are discussed.

  16. The academic, economic and societal impacts of Open Access: an evidence-based review

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Jonathan P.; Waldner, François; Jacques, Damien C.; Masuzzo, Paola; Collister, Lauren B.; Hartgerink, Chris. H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing debates surrounding Open Access to the scholarly literature are multifaceted and complicated by disparate and often polarised viewpoints from engaged stakeholders. At the current stage, Open Access has become such a global issue that it is critical for all involved in scholarly publishing, including policymakers, publishers, research funders, governments, learned societies, librarians, and academic communities, to be well-informed on the history, benefits, and pitfalls of Open Access. In spite of this, there is a general lack of consensus regarding the potential pros and cons of Open Access at multiple levels. This review aims to be a resource for current knowledge on the impacts of Open Access by synthesizing important research in three major areas: academic, economic and societal. While there is clearly much scope for additional research, several key trends are identified, including a broad citation advantage for researchers who publish openly, as well as additional benefits to the non-academic dissemination of their work. The economic impact of Open Access is less well-understood, although it is clear that access to the research literature is key for innovative enterprises, and a range of governmental and non-governmental services. Furthermore, Open Access has the potential to save both publishers and research funders considerable amounts of financial resources, and can provide some economic benefits to traditionally subscription-based journals. The societal impact of Open Access is strong, in particular for advancing citizen science initiatives, and leveling the playing field for researchers in developing countries. Open Access supersedes all potential alternative modes of access to the scholarly literature through enabling unrestricted re-use, and long-term stability independent of financial constraints of traditional publishers that impede knowledge sharing. However, Open Access has the potential to become unsustainable for research communities if

  17. The academic, economic and societal impacts of Open Access: an evidence-based review.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Jonathan P; Waldner, François; Jacques, Damien C; Masuzzo, Paola; Collister, Lauren B; Hartgerink, Chris H J

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing debates surrounding Open Access to the scholarly literature are multifaceted and complicated by disparate and often polarised viewpoints from engaged stakeholders. At the current stage, Open Access has become such a global issue that it is critical for all involved in scholarly publishing, including policymakers, publishers, research funders, governments, learned societies, librarians, and academic communities, to be well-informed on the history, benefits, and pitfalls of Open Access. In spite of this, there is a general lack of consensus regarding the potential pros and cons of Open Access at multiple levels. This review aims to be a resource for current knowledge on the impacts of Open Access by synthesizing important research in three major areas: academic, economic and societal. While there is clearly much scope for additional research, several key trends are identified, including a broad citation advantage for researchers who publish openly, as well as additional benefits to the non-academic dissemination of their work. The economic impact of Open Access is less well-understood, although it is clear that access to the research literature is key for innovative enterprises, and a range of governmental and non-governmental services. Furthermore, Open Access has the potential to save both publishers and research funders considerable amounts of financial resources, and can provide some economic benefits to traditionally subscription-based journals. The societal impact of Open Access is strong, in particular for advancing citizen science initiatives, and leveling the playing field for researchers in developing countries. Open Access supersedes all potential alternative modes of access to the scholarly literature through enabling unrestricted re-use, and long-term stability independent of financial constraints of traditional publishers that impede knowledge sharing. However, Open Access has the potential to become unsustainable for research communities if

  18. Academic hospital staff compliance with a fecal immunochemical test-based colorectal cancer screening program

    PubMed Central

    Vlachonikolou, Georgia; Gkolfakis, Paraskevas; Sioulas, Athanasios D; Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Melissaratou, Anastasia; Moustafa, Giannis-Aimant; Xanthopoulou, Eleni; Tsilimidos, Gerasimos; Tsironi, Ioanna; Filippidis, Paraskevas; Malli, Chrysoula; Dimitriadis, George D; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    AIM To measure the compliance of an Academic Hospital staff with a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program using fecal immunochemical test (FIT). METHODS All employees of “Attikon” University General Hospital aged over 50 years were thoroughly informed by a team of physicians and medical students about the study aims and they were invited to undergo CRC screening using two rounds of FIT (DyoniFOB® Combo H, DyonMed SA, Athens, Greece). The tests were provided for free and subjects tested positive were subsequently referred for colonoscopy. One year after completing the two rounds, participants were asked to be re-screened by means of the same test. RESULTS Among our target population consisted of 211 employees, 59 (27.9%) consented to participate, but only 41 (19.4%) and 24 (11.4%) completed the first and the second FIT round, respectively. Female gender was significantly associated with higher initial participation (P = 0.005) and test completion - first and second round - (P = 0.004 and P = 0.05) rates, respectively. Physician’s (13.5% vs 70.2%, P < 0.0001) participation and test completion rates (7.5% vs 57.6%, P < 0.0001 for the first and 2.3% vs 34%, P < 0.0001 for the second round) were significantly lower compared to those of the administrative/technical staff. Similarly, nurses participated (25.8% vs 70.2%, P = 0.0002) and completed the first test round (19.3% vs 57.6%, P = 0.004) in a significant lower rate than the administrative/technical staff. One test proved false positive. No participant repeated the test one year later. CONCLUSION Despite the well-organized, guided and supervised provision of the service, the compliance of the Academic Hospital personnel with a FIT-based CRC screening program was suboptimal, especially among physicians. PMID:27574556

  19. Perceptions of Collegiate Student-Athletes' Programming Needs Based on Gender, Ethnicity, and Academic Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvan, April Anita

    2010-01-01

    Student-athletes are often disengaged in campus programming due to their academic and athletic commitments. Previous research explored various facets of student-athlete development, particularly academic development in relation to NCAA Division I student-athletes. The purpose of this quantitative, causal-comparative study was to determine…

  20. Genre-Based Curricula: Multilingual Academic Literacy in Content and Language Integrated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses academic literacy in content and language integrated learning (CLIL) secondary education. More precisely, this paper focuses on attempts to meet modern standards for language competences set in areas like Europe, where the notion involves multilingual academic competence. The study centres on new proposals for language…

  1. Fee-Based Services in Academic Libraries: Preliminary Results of a Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnellan, Anne M.; Rasmussen, Lise

    1983-01-01

    Discusses responses of 937 academic library directors who were surveyed to determine whether their libraries provide services to users outside academic community; whether outside users are charged fees; and what services are provided for fee. Extracts of information (services, staff, comments) received from ten universities are highlighted. Survey…

  2. The Admission and Academic Placement of Students from: Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Yemen Arab Republic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, J. K., Ed.

    Information is provided on the educational systems of Bahrain, Oman, Qatar, the United Arab Emirates, and the Yemen Arab Republic in order to assist U.S. colleges and universities as they work with international student agencies and representatives from these countries. For each country, placement recommendations are offered, along with notes to…

  3. Impacts of a Discussion-Based Academic Language Program on Classroom Interactions in 4th through 7th Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRusso, Maria; Jones, Stephanie M.; Kim, Ha Yeon; Kim, James; Donovan, Suzanne; Snow, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory analysis of treatment-control differences in the quality of classroom interactions in 4th through 7th grade urban classrooms. Word Generation (WG) is a research-based academic language program for middle school students designed to teach novel vocabulary and literacy through language arts, math, science, and…

  4. The Effectiveness of Project-Based Learning on Pupils with Learning Difficulties Regarding Academic Performance, Group Work and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filippatou, Diamanto; Kaldi, Stavroula

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses upon the effectiveness of project-based learning on primary school pupils with learning difficulties regarding their academic performance and attitudes towards self efficacy, task value, group work and teaching methods applied. The present study is a part of a larger one that included six Greek fourth-grade primary school…

  5. Using the Computer-Based Academic Assessment System (CASS) To Identify Reading Disability in College Students: A Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cisero, Cheryl A.; And Others

    This research investigates whether the Computer-Based Academic Assessment System (CAAS), a battery of tests examining speed and accuracy at performing component reading skills, would be useful for identifying reading disability in college students. One important question was whether CAAS could distinguish reading disability from non-disability or…

  6. Links for Academic Learning (LAL): A Conceptual Model for Investigating Alignment of Alternate Assessments Based on Alternate Achievement Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Claudia; Wakeman, Shawnee; Browder, Diane M.; Karvonen, Meagan

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an alignment procedure, called Links for Academic Learning (LAL), for examining the degree of alignment of alternate assessments based on alternate achievement standards (AA-AAS) to grade-level content standards and instruction. Although some of the alignment criteria are similar to those used in general education…

  7. State Perspectives on Implementing, or Choosing Not to Implement, an Alternate Assessment Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Porter W.

    2009-01-01

    Since Federal regulations have given states the option to implement alternate assessments based on modified academic achievement standards (AA-MAS) as part of their accountability systems for a small group of students with disabilities, a number of states have made decisions about whether or not to develop and implement such an assessment.…

  8. The Effects of Brain-Based Learning on the Academic Achievement of Students with Different Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duman, Bilal

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of Brain-based learning (BBL) on the academic achievement of students with different learning styles. The study group consists of students from the department of Social Sciences Teacher Education in the Faculty of Education at Mugla University (N=68). In the study, a pre-test-post-test…

  9. "Life Could Be a Dream": What US-Based Management PhD Students Desire in an Initial Academic Appointment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, C. Brian; Feild, Hubert S.; Bedeian, Arthur G.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to first identify the work- and non-work-related criteria US-based management doctoral students consider important in selecting an initial academic appointment, and second, to explore whether gender and race/ethnicity are associated with the importance attached to these criteria. Design/methodology/approach:…

  10. The Impact of Classroom-Based Meditation Practice on Cognitive Engagement, Mindfulness and Academic Performance of Undergraduate College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napora, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the potential of classroom-based meditation practice as a tool to facilitate learning. Moreover, the impact of meditation on cognitive engagement, mindfulness and academic performance of undergraduate college students was investigated. Additionally, the relationships between mindfulness and cognitive engagement, and between…

  11. The Effect of Strategy Instruction Based on the Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach over Reading Comprehension and Strategy Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurses, Meral Ozkan; Adiguzel, Oktay Cem

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of reading strategies instruction based on the Cognitive Academic Language Learning Approach over students' skill to comprehend what they read in French and their use of reading strategies. It has an action research design. Eighteen students studying at French Preparatory Program at Eskisehir Osmangazi…

  12. Academic Standards for Writing: To What Degree Do Standards Signpost Evidence-Based Instructional Practices and Interventions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troia, Gary A.; Olinghouse, Natalie G.; Mo, Ya; Hawkins, Lisa; Kopke, Rachel A.; Chen, Angela; Wilson, Joshua; Stewart, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    Though writing plays an important role in academic, social, and economic success, typical writing instruction generally does not reflect evidence-based practices (EBPs). One potential reason for this is limited signposting of EBPs in standards. We analyzed the content of writing standards from a representative sample of states and the Common Core…

  13. The Effects of Problem-Based Active Learning in Science Education on Students' Academic Achievement, Attitude and Concept Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinoglu, Orhan; Tandogan, Ruhan Özkardes

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of problem-based active learning in science education on students' academic achievement and concept learning. In the study, both quantitative and qualitative research methods were utilized. Quantitative data were obtained via the pre/post-test, treatment-control groups test model. Qualitative data…

  14. Student Experience and Academic Success: Comparing a Student-Centred and a Lecture-Based Course Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severiens, Sabine; Meeuwisse, Marieke; Born, Marise

    2015-01-01

    Past research has shown that, under certain conditions, student-centred and small-scale course programmes result in more academic success. The present study investigates these conditions in further detail. It is examined whether, in comparison to a course programme that is relatively more lecture-based, a student-centred course programme promotes…

  15. Impact of Garden-Based Learning on Academic Outcomes in Schools: Synthesis of Research between 1990 and 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Dilafruz R.; Dixon, P. Scott

    2013-01-01

    What is the impact of garden-based learning on academic outcomes in schools? To address this question, findings across 152 articles (1990-2010) were analyzed resulting in 48 studies that met the inclusion criteria for this synthesis. A review template with operational coding framework was developed. The synthesis results showed a preponderance of…

  16. Evaluating Academic Scientists Collaborating in Team-Based Research: A Proposed Framework.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Madhu; Messinger, Shari; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Goldberg, Judith D; Lindsell, Christopher J; Morton, Sally C; Pollock, Brad H; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Welty, Leah J; Parker, Robert A

    2015-10-01

    Criteria for evaluating faculty are traditionally based on a triad of scholarship, teaching, and service. Research scholarship is often measured by first or senior authorship on peer-reviewed scientific publications and being principal investigator on extramural grants. Yet scientific innovation increasingly requires collective rather than individual creativity, which traditional measures of achievement were not designed to capture and, thus, devalue. The authors propose a simple, flexible framework for evaluating team scientists that includes both quantitative and qualitative assessments. An approach for documenting contributions of team scientists in team-based scholarship, nontraditional education, and specialized service activities is also outlined. Although biostatisticians are used for illustration, the approach is generalizable to team scientists in other disciplines.The authors offer three key recommendations to members of institutional promotion committees, department chairs, and others evaluating team scientists. First, contributions to team-based scholarship and specialized contributions to education and service need to be assessed and given appropriate and substantial weight. Second, evaluations must be founded on well-articulated criteria for assessing the stature and accomplishments of team scientists. Finally, mechanisms for collecting evaluative data must be developed and implemented at the institutional level. Without these three essentials, contributions of team scientists will continue to be undervalued in the academic environment. PMID:25993282

  17. Evaluating Academic Scientists Collaborating in Team-Based Research: A Proposed Framework.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Madhu; Messinger, Shari; Finkelstein, Dianne M; Goldberg, Judith D; Lindsell, Christopher J; Morton, Sally C; Pollock, Brad H; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Welty, Leah J; Parker, Robert A

    2015-10-01

    Criteria for evaluating faculty are traditionally based on a triad of scholarship, teaching, and service. Research scholarship is often measured by first or senior authorship on peer-reviewed scientific publications and being principal investigator on extramural grants. Yet scientific innovation increasingly requires collective rather than individual creativity, which traditional measures of achievement were not designed to capture and, thus, devalue. The authors propose a simple, flexible framework for evaluating team scientists that includes both quantitative and qualitative assessments. An approach for documenting contributions of team scientists in team-based scholarship, nontraditional education, and specialized service activities is also outlined. Although biostatisticians are used for illustration, the approach is generalizable to team scientists in other disciplines.The authors offer three key recommendations to members of institutional promotion committees, department chairs, and others evaluating team scientists. First, contributions to team-based scholarship and specialized contributions to education and service need to be assessed and given appropriate and substantial weight. Second, evaluations must be founded on well-articulated criteria for assessing the stature and accomplishments of team scientists. Finally, mechanisms for collecting evaluative data must be developed and implemented at the institutional level. Without these three essentials, contributions of team scientists will continue to be undervalued in the academic environment.

  18. Folklore of the Miwok Indians (A Primary Unit Based on a Miwok Folktale).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberson, Bliss; Yates, Colombe

    The goal of this primary level teaching unit on the folklore of the Miwok Indians, who once lived in the foothills not far from Yosemite Valley, is to develop in the child academic skills which can be observed and/or measured. The four objectives are that: after hearing the folktale, "How the Great Rocks Grew," which tells how two rocks grew in…

  19. An examination of the validity of the Academic Motivation Scale with a United States business student sample.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kenneth J; Davy, Jeanette A; Rosenberg, Donald L

    2010-04-01

    This study examined alternative seven-, five-, and three-factor structures for the Academic Motivation Scale, with data from a large convenience sample of 2,078 students matriculating in various business courses at three AACSB-accredited regional comprehensive universities. In addition, the invariance of the scale's factor structure between male and female students and between undergraduate and Master's of Business Administration students was investigated. Finally, the internal consistency of the items loading on each of the seven AMS subscales was assessed as well as whether the correlations among the subscales supported a continuum of self-determination. Results for the full sample as well as the targeted subpopulations supported the seven factor configuration of the scale with adequate model fit achieved for all but the MBA student group. The data also generated acceptable internal consistency statistics for all of the subscales. However, in line with a number of previous studies, the correlations between subscales failed to fully support the scale's simplex structure as proposed by self-determination theory.

  20. Outbreak of Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infection in the Haematology Unit of a South African Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mudau, Maanda; Jacobson, Rachael; Minenza, Nadia; Kuonza, Lazarus; Morris, Vida; Engelbrecht, Heather; Nicol, Mark P.; Bamford, Colleen

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe an outbreak of multi-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infections (MRPA-BSI) that occurred in the haematology ward of a tertiary academic hospital in Cape Town, South Africa, and determine risk factors for acquisition of MRPA-BSI. Methods The outbreak investigation included a search for additional cases, review of patient records, environmental and staff screening, molecular typing using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and Multi-locus sequencing (MLST) and a retrospective case-control study. Results Ten MRPA-BSI cases occurred in the haematology ward between January 2010 and January 2011. The case fatality rate was 80%. Staff screening specimens were negative for MRPA and an environmental source was not identified. PFGE showed that 9/10 isolates were related. MLST showed that 3 of these 9 isolates belonged to Sequence type (ST) 233 while the unrelated isolate belonged to ST260. Conclusion We have described an outbreak of MRPA-BSI occurring over an extended period of time among neutropenic haematology patients. Molecular typing confirms that the outbreak was predominantly due to a single strain. The source of the outbreak was not identified, but the outbreak appears to have been controlled following intensive infection control measures. PMID:23516393

  1. Development and Testing of a M-Learning System for the Professional Development of Academics through Design-Based Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keskin, Nilgun Ozdamar; Kuzu, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a mobile learning system for the professional development of academics was developed by design based action research, and the perceptions and experiences of the academics using this system were examined. In the first phase of this design-based action research, the research question was defined. In the second phase, a…

  2. The Effect of a Zoo-Based Experiential Academic Science Program on High School Students' Math and Science Achievement and Perceptions of School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulkerrin, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an 11th-grade and 12th-grade zoo-based academic high school experiential science program compared to a same school-district school-based academic high school experiential science program on students' pretest and posttest science, math, and reading achievement, and student perceptions of…

  3. First policy then science: why a management unit based solely on genetic criteria cannot work.

    PubMed

    Taylor, B L; Dizon, A E

    1999-12-01

    In contrast to the goals of the symposium from which this series of papers originated, we argue that attempts to apply unambiguously defined and general management unit criteria based solely on genetic parameters can easily lead to incorrect management decisions. We maintain that conservation genetics is best served by altering the perspective of data analysis so that decision making is optimally facilitated. To do so requires accounting for policy objectives early in the design and execution of the science. This contrasts with typical hypothesis testing approaches to analysing genetic data for determining population structure, which often aspire to objectivity by considering management objectives only after the analysis is complete. The null hypothesis is generally taken as panmixia with a strong predilection towards avoiding false acceptance of the alternative hypothesis (the existence of population structure). We show by example how defining management units using genetic data and standard scientific analyses that do not consider either the specific management objectives or the anthropogenic risks facing the populations being studied can easily result in a management failure by losing local populations. We then use the same example to show how an 'applied' approach driven by specific objectives and knowledge of abundance and mortality results in appropriate analyses and better decisions. Because management objectives stem from public policy, which differs among countries and among species groups, criteria for defining management units must be specific, not general. Therefore, we conclude that the most productive way to define management units is on a case-by-case basis. We also suggest that creating analytical tools designed specifically to address decision making in a management context, rather than re-tooling academic tools designed for other purposes, will increase and improve the use of genetics in conservation.

  4. Graphics processing unit based computation for NDE applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nahas, C. A.; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Krishnamurthy, C. V.

    2012-05-01

    Advances in parallel processing in recent years are helping to improve the cost of numerical simulation. Breakthroughs in Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) based computation now offer the prospect of further drastic improvements. The introduction of 'compute unified device architecture' (CUDA) by NVIDIA (the global technology company based in Santa Clara, California, USA) has made programming GPUs for general purpose computing accessible to the average programmer. Here we use CUDA to develop parallel finite difference schemes as applicable to two problems of interest to NDE community, namely heat diffusion and elastic wave propagation. The implementations are for two-dimensions. Performance improvement of the GPU implementation against serial CPU implementation is then discussed.

  5. Evidence-based nursing leadership: Evaluation of a Joint Academic-Service Journal Club.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Joanne R; Thompson, Diane; Hobbs, Terry; Niemeyer-Hackett, Nancy Lee; Elpers, Susan

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the importance of evidence-based nursing leadership in the development and evaluation of a joint academic-service nursing leadership journal club. The use of scientific evidence and the embracing of an environment of continuous learning are essential to quality practice; however, nursing leadership has been slow to apply evidence-based practice to their own work. A noontime monthly meeting schedule, incentivized by lunch, was organized as a nursing leadership journal club. Articles were selected and reviewed monthly, and the process was formally evaluated using a written evaluation at the end of year 1. Eighteen articles were appraised by the group with 6 topics identified. Positive results included increased knowledge, competence of the leader, and attainment of goals. Recommendations include revision of goals, plans to share leadership of the group, development of a rigorous evaluation of outcomes, and dissemination of findings. The journal club was valuable in increasing awareness of nursing leadership research, promoting leadership development, and improving competence in the performance of research appraisals. Process improvement and further study are needed to increase understanding regarding the benefits of leadership journal clubs. PMID:21934429

  6. Evidence-based nursing leadership: Evaluation of a Joint Academic-Service Journal Club.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Joanne R; Thompson, Diane; Hobbs, Terry; Niemeyer-Hackett, Nancy Lee; Elpers, Susan

    2011-10-01

    This article describes the importance of evidence-based nursing leadership in the development and evaluation of a joint academic-service nursing leadership journal club. The use of scientific evidence and the embracing of an environment of continuous learning are essential to quality practice; however, nursing leadership has been slow to apply evidence-based practice to their own work. A noontime monthly meeting schedule, incentivized by lunch, was organized as a nursing leadership journal club. Articles were selected and reviewed monthly, and the process was formally evaluated using a written evaluation at the end of year 1. Eighteen articles were appraised by the group with 6 topics identified. Positive results included increased knowledge, competence of the leader, and attainment of goals. Recommendations include revision of goals, plans to share leadership of the group, development of a rigorous evaluation of outcomes, and dissemination of findings. The journal club was valuable in increasing awareness of nursing leadership research, promoting leadership development, and improving competence in the performance of research appraisals. Process improvement and further study are needed to increase understanding regarding the benefits of leadership journal clubs.

  7. Using problem based learning and guided inquiry in a high school acid-base chemistry unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, Katie

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if incorporating problem based learning and guided inquiry would improve student achievement in an acid base unit for high school chemistry. The activities and labs in the unit were modified to be centered around the problem of a fish kill that students investigated. Students also participated in guided inquiry labs to increase the amount of critical thinking and problem solving being done in the classroom. The hypothesis was that the implementation of problem based learning and guided inquiry would foster student learning. Students took a pre-test and post-test on questions covering the objectives of the acid base unit. These assessments were compared to determine the effectiveness of the unit. The results indicate that the unit was effective in increasing student performance on the unit test. This study also analyzed the process of problem based learning. Problem based learning can be an effective method of engaging students in inquiry. However, designing an effective problem based learning unit requires careful design of the problem and enough structure to assure students learn the intended content.

  8. Academic freedom and academic-industry relationships in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Streiffer, Robert

    2006-06-01

    Commercial academic-industry relationships (AIRs) are widespread in biotechnology and have resulted in a wide array of restrictions on academic research. Objections to such restrictions have centered on the charge that they violate academic freedom. I argue that these objections are almost invariably unsuccessful. On a consequentialist understanding of the value of academic freedom, they rely on unfounded empirical claims about the overall effects that AIRs have on academic research. And on a rights-based understanding of the value of academic freedom, they rely on excessively lavish assumptions about the kinds of activities that academic freedom protects.

  9. Academic Blogging: Academic Practice and Academic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkup, Gill

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale study which investigates the role of blogging in professional academic practice in higher education. It draws on interviews with a sample of academics (scholars, researchers and teachers) who have blogs and on the author's own reflections on blogging to investigate the function of blogging in academic practice…

  10. The Structural Consistency of a Six-Factor Model of Academic Self-Concept among Culturally Diverse Preadolescents in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ockey, Gary J.; Abercrombie, Sara

    2013-01-01

    For decades, research has indicated that preadolescents' self-concept is comprised of subject-specific academic factors, a general academic factor, and several nonacademic factors. More recently, there have been some indications that academic self-concept might further be differentiated into competence and affect factors, at least for some…

  11. Women's Advancement in Political Science. A Report on the APSA Workshop on the Advancement of Women in Academic Political Science in the United States (Washington, DC, March 4-5, 2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Political Science Association (NJ1), 2005

    2005-01-01

    In March 2004, the National Science Foundation funded a two-day workshop by the American Political Science Association (APSA) on the advancement of women in academic political science in the United States. The workshop was prompted by an alarming stall in the number of women entering the discipline and persisting through early years of faculty…

  12. The Effect of Group Research and Cooperative Reading-Writing-Application Techniques in the Unit of "What Is the Earth's Crust Made Of?" on The Academic Achievements of the Students and the Permanent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksoy, Gokhan; Gurbuz, Fatih

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of the group research technique and cooperative reading-writing application technique in the science and technology course in the unit of "what is the Earth's crust made of" on the academic achievement of the students and whether the change observed in the student achievement is permanent…

  13. Academic performance and social competence of adolescents: predictions based on effortful control and empathy.

    PubMed

    Zorza, Juan P; Marino, Julián; de Lemus, Soledad; Acosta Mesas, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the predictive power of effortful control (EC) on empathy, academic performance, and social competence in adolescents. We obtained self-report measures of EC and dispositional empathy in 359 students (197 girls and 162 boys) aged between 12 and 14 years. Each student provided information about the prosocial behavior of the rest of his/her classmates and completed a sociogram. At the end of the school year, we calculated the mean grade of each student and the teacher responsible for each class completed a questionnaire on the academic skills of his/her students. The study confirmed the existence of a structural equation model (SEM) in which EC directly predicted academic performance and social competence. Additionally, empathic concern partially mediated the effect of EC on social competence. Finally, social competence significantly predicted academic performance. The article discusses the practical applications of the model proposed.

  14. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  15. Measure for Measure: How Proficiency-Based Accountability Systems Affect Inequality in Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Jennifer; Sohn, Heeju

    2016-01-01

    How do proficiency-based accountability systems affect inequality in academic achievement? This paper reconciles mixed findings in the literature by demonstrating that three factors jointly determine accountability's impact. First, by analyzing student-level data from a large urban school district, we find that when educators face accountability pressure, they focus attention on students closest to proficiency. We refer to this practice as educational triage, and show that the difficulty of the proficiency standard affects whether lower or higher performing students gain most on high-stakes tests used to evaluate schools. Less difficult proficiency standards decrease inequality in high-stakes achievement, while more difficult ones increase it. Second, we show that educators emphasize test-specific skills with students near proficiency, a practice that we refer to as instructional triage. As a result, the effects of accountability pressure differ across high and low-stakes tests; we find no effects on inequality in low-stakes reading and math tests of similar skills. Finally, we provide suggestive evidence that instructional triage is most pronounced in the lowest performing schools. We conclude by discussing how these findings shape our understanding of accountability's impacts on educational inequality. PMID:27122642

  16. Integrating Field-Centered, Project Based Activities with Academic Year Coursework: A Curriculum Wide Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, P. R.; Brown, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Based upon constructivist principles and the recognition that many students are motivated by hands-on activities and field experiences, we designed a new undergraduate curriculum at Lake Superior State University. One of our major goals was to develop stand-alone field projects in most of the academic year courses. Examples of courses impacted include structural geology, geophysics, and geotectonics, Students learn geophysical concepts in the context of near surface field-based geophysical studies while students in structural geology learn about structural processes through outcrop study of fractures, folds and faults. In geotectonics students learn about collisional and rifting processes through on-site field studies of specific geologic provinces. Another goal was to integrate data and samples collected by students in our sophomore level introductory field course along with stand-alone field projects in our clastic systems and sequence stratigraphy courses. Our emphasis on active learning helps students develop a meaningful geoscience knowledge base and complex reasoning skills in authentic contexts. We simulate the activities of practicing geoscientists by engaging students in all aspects of a project, for example: field-oriented project planning and design; acquiring, analyzing, and interpreting data; incorporating supplemental material and background data; and preparing oral and written project reports. We find through anecdotal evidence including student comments and personal observation that the projects stimulate interest, provide motivation for learning new concepts, integrate skill and concept acquisition vertically through the curriculum, apply concepts from multiple geoscience subdisiplines, and develop soft skills such as team work, problem solving, critical thinking and communication skills. Through this projected-centered Lake Superior State University geology curriculum students practice our motto of "learn geology by doing geology."

  17. The academic differences between students involved in school-based robotics programs and students not involved in school-based robotics programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoullos, Michael

    This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N=121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these students was compared to a group of students who were members of school based sports teams and to a group of students who were not part of either of the first two groups. Academic record was defined as overall GPA, English grade, mathematics grade, mathematics-based standardized state exam scores, and attendance rates. All of the participants of this study were students in a large, urban career and technical education high school. As STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) has come to the forefront of educational focus, robotics programs have grown in quantity. Starting robotics programs requires a serious commitment of time, money, and other resources. The benefits of such programs have not been well analyzed. This research study had three major goals: to identify the academic characteristics of students who are drawn to robotics programs, to identify the academic impact of the robotics program during the robotics season, and to identify the academic impact of the robotics program at the end of the school year. The study was a non-experiment. The researchers ran MANOVS, repeated measures analyses, an ANOVA, and descriptive statistics to analyze the data. The data showed that students drawn to robotics were academically stronger than students who did not participate in robotics. The data also showed that grades and attendance did not significantly improve or degrade either during the robotics season or at year-end. These findings are significant because they show that robotics programs attract students who are academically strong. This information can be very useful in high school articulation programs

  18. Relationship-based care in the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Faber, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    At St. Joseph's Regional Medical Center in Paterson, New Jersey, implementation of the Relationship-Based Care (RBC) model of care delivery and enculturation of the philosophy of care embodied in Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring (Watson, 2007) improved patient outcomes and supported quality nursing care across the continuum of care in our organization. The ability of staff nurses to create an atmosphere of professional inquiry that places patients and families at the center of practice supported implementation of RBC in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

  19. Relation of academic support from parents, teachers, and peers to Hong Kong adolescents' academic achievement: the mediating role of academic engagement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jennifer Jun-Li

    2005-05-01

    The author tested a model hypothesizing that students' self-perceived academic support (from parents, teachers, and peers) is related to their achievement directly and indirectly through their own perceived academic engagement. The participants were 270 adolescents (M age = 15.41 years, range = 14-20 years) from 3 grade levels (Forms 3-5, equivalent to Grades 9-11 in the United States) in a Hong Kong secondary school. The school principal and teachers helped to collect data based on these adolescents' responses to a self-report questionnaire, consisting of a demographic profile and 4 scales assessing their self-perceptions of the extent of parental, teacher, and peer support, and their own academic engagement. Academic achievement was measured by self-reported grades in math, English, and Chinese. Structural equation modeling analyses revealed that adolescents' perceived parental, teacher, and peer support were all indirectly related to their academic achievement mediated by their own perceived academic engagement. The strength of the relationships, however, varied by support system, with perceived teacher support to achievement being the strongest, followed closely by perceived parental support, and then perceived peer support. In addition, both perceived parental support and perceived teacher support were directly related to academic achievement. However, perceived teacher support made the most total (direct and indirect) contribution to student achievement. Perceived peer support had the smallest, nonetheless significant, indirect relationship to academic achievement. However, the negative, direct influence of perceived peer support canceled out its positive, indirect influence on academic achievement. PMID:16779945

  20. Performance evaluation of Al-Zahra academic medical center based on Iran balanced scorecard model

    PubMed Central

    Raeisi, Ahmad Reza; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Bakhsh, Roghayeh Mohammadi; Gangi, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    Background: Growth and development in any country's national health system, without an efficient evaluation system, lacks the basic concepts and tools necessary for fulfilling the system's goals. The balanced scorecard (BSC) is a technique widely used to measure the performance of an organization. The basic core of the BSC is guided by the organization's vision and strategies, which are the bases for the formation of four perspectives of BSC. The goal of this research is the performance evaluation of Al-Zahra Academic Medical Center in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, based on Iran BSC model. Materials and Methods: This is a combination (quantitative–qualitative) research which was done at Al-Zahra Academic Medical Center in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2011. The research populations were hospital managers at different levels. Sampling method was purposive sampling in which the key informed personnel participated in determining the performance indicators of hospital as the BSC team members in focused discussion groups. After determining the conceptual elements in focused discussion groups, the performance objectives (targets) and indicators of hospital were determined and sorted in perspectives by the group discussion participants. Following that, the performance indicators were calculated by the experts according to the predetermined objectives; then, the score of each indicator and the mean score of each perspective were calculated. Results: Research findings included development of the organizational mission, vision, values, objectives, and strategies. The strategies agreed upon by the participants in the focus discussion group included five strategies, which were customer satisfaction, continuous quality improvement, development of human resources, supporting innovation, expansion of services and improving the productivity. Research participants also agreed upon four perspectives for the Al-Zahra hospital BSC. In the patients and community

  1. Relationship of TOEFL iBT[R] Scores to Academic Performance: Some Evidence from American Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Yeonsuk; Bridgeman, Brent

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between scores on the TOEFL Internet-Based Test (TOEFL iBT[R]) and academic performance in higher education, defined here in terms of grade point average (GPA). The academic records for 2594 undergraduate and graduate students were collected from 10 universities in the United States. The data consisted of…

  2. Three Studies on the Leadership Behaviors of Academic Deans in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    This three article mixed methods dissertation is titled "Three Studies on the Leadership Behaviors of Academic Deans in Higher Education." Each article is based on a sample of 51 academic deans from a three state region in the Southeastern United States. In the first study, the results of the statistical analyses reinforce the gender…

  3. From "Story" to Argument: The Acquisition of Academic Writing Skills in an Open-Learning Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoadley-Maidment, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    Examines the acquisition of academic writing skills by adult students studying by distance learning in the United Kingdom. Results indicate that the text-based nature of distance leaning affects both the way in which students acquire writing skills and the development of their identity as academic writers. Differences in the learning process were…

  4. Lessons Learned From a Community–Academic Initiative: The Development of a Core Competency–Based Training for Community–Academic Initiative Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    Matos, Sergio; Kapadia, Smiti; Islam, Nadia; Cusack, Arthur; Kwong, Sylvia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Despite the importance of community health workers (CHWs) in strategies to reduce health disparities and the call to enhance their roles in research, little information exists on how to prepare CHWs involved in community–academic initiatives (CAIs). Therefore, the New York University Prevention Research Center piloted a CAI–CHW training program. Methods. We applied a core competency framework to an existing CHW curriculum and bolstered the curriculum to include research-specific sessions. We employed diverse training methods, guided by adult learning principles and popular education philosophy. Evaluation instruments assessed changes related to confidence, intention to use learned skills, usefulness of sessions, and satisfaction with the training. Results. Results demonstrated that a core competency–based training can successfully affect CHWs’ perceived confidence and intentions to apply learned content, and can provide a larger social justice context of their role and work. Conclusions. This program demonstrates that a core competency–based framework coupled with CAI-research–specific skill sessions (1) provides skills that CAI–CHWs intend to use, (2) builds confidence, and (3) provides participants with a more contextualized view of client needs and CHW roles. PMID:22594730

  5. Optimized Laplacian image sharpening algorithm based on graphic processing unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tinghuai; Li, Lu; Ji, Sai; Wang, Xin; Tian, Yuan; Al-Dhelaan, Abdullah; Al-Rodhaan, Mznah

    2014-12-01

    In classical Laplacian image sharpening, all pixels are processed one by one, which leads to large amount of computation. Traditional Laplacian sharpening processed on CPU is considerably time-consuming especially for those large pictures. In this paper, we propose a parallel implementation of Laplacian sharpening based on Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which is a computing platform of Graphic Processing Units (GPU), and analyze the impact of picture size on performance and the relationship between the processing time of between data transfer time and parallel computing time. Further, according to different features of different memory, an improved scheme of our method is developed, which exploits shared memory in GPU instead of global memory and further increases the efficiency. Experimental results prove that two novel algorithms outperform traditional consequentially method based on OpenCV in the aspect of computing speed.

  6. Friction-based energy dissipation unit for circuit breaker

    SciTech Connect

    Kar, R.; Rainer, J.H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a friction-based energy dissipation unit (EDU) that has been designed to introduce supplemental damping into a circuit breaker. The brittle porcelain insulator posts of a 330 kV SF6 breaker were thus subjected to reduced forces from a design earthquake specified to have a peak ground acceleration of 1.05 g. Pull and release tests were performed to determine the dynamic properties, i.e., natural frequency, damping ratio, and mode shapes. Calculations of response of the circuit breaker to the 1940 El Centro N-S component shows that the EDU reduces the bending moment at the base of the porcelain column by a factor of three.

  7. RDA Implementation and Training Issues across United States Academic Libraries: An In-Depth E-Mail Interview Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jung-ran; Tosaka, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at providing in-depth perspectives on the ways in which cataloging and metadata professionals have coped with RDA training and implementation through an e-mail interview method. Results show that the performance-based, "learn-as-you-go," peer learning method is found by practitioners to be most effective in acquiring and…

  8. A study protocol for performance evaluation of a new academic intensive care unit facility: impact on patient care

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Mauricio; Zygun, David A; Harrison, Alexandra; Stelfox, Henry T

    2013-01-01

    Background Healthcare facility construction is increasing because of population demand and the need to replace ageing infrastructure. Research suggests that there may be a relationship between healthcare environment and patient care. To date, most evaluations of new healthcare facilities are derived from techniques used in other industries and focus on physical, financial and architectural performance. However, few studies have evaluated the impact of healthcare facility design on processes and outcomes of patient care. Study aims The primary objective of this study was to investigate the impact of relocation to a new intensive care unit (ICU) facility on clinical performance measures. This study also proposes to develop and test a framework for facility performance evaluation using accepted ICU design guidelines and Donabedian's model for healthcare quality. Methods and analysis We will utilise a mixed-methods, observational, retrospective, controlled, before-and-after design to take advantage of the quasiexperimental conditions created with the construction of a new ICU facility in Calgary, Canada. For the qualitative substudy, we will conduct individual interviews with end-users to understand their impressions and experiences with the new environment and perform thematic analysis. For the quantitative substudy, we will compare process of care indicators and patient outcomes for the 12-month period before and after relocation to the new facility. Two other local ICU facilities that did not undergo structural change during the study period will serve as controls. We will triangulate qualitative and quantitative results utilising a novel framework. Ethics and dissemination The results of this study will contribute in understanding the impact of new ICU facilities on clinical performance measures centred on patients, their families and healthcare providers. The framework will complement existing building performance evaluation techniques and help healthcare

  9. Students' Motivation to Access Academic Advising Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Marcus A.

    2009-01-01

    The interrelationships between motivation for choosing a program of study, intention to access academic advisors, academic difficulty, and actual appointments with academic advisors were based on student self-reports of motivation and intentions. In addition, academic achievement measures and data on student access to academic advisors were…

  10. Mission-Focused, Productivity-Based Model for Sustainable Support of Academic Hematology/Oncology Faculty and Divisions

    PubMed Central

    Holcombe, Randall F.; Hollinger, Krista J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Adoption of a mission-focused, productivity-based funds-flow model recognizes faculty activities regardless of their primary mission and incentivizes and financially rewards both academic and clinical productivity. We describe here how such a model could be utilized for an academic division of hematology and medical oncology. Methods: On the basis of our own experience in managing the Division of Hematology/Oncology at the University of California at Irvine, and results of a survey of hematology/oncology division chiefs, a new model was developed with clear definitions of missions (ascertaining faculty effort toward each mission and definition of productivity benchmarks for each), careful identification of revenue streams, and establishment of base and incentive salary support that rewards productivity. Ongoing performance improvement and monitoring was incorporated into the model. Results: A model for sustainable support of hematology/oncology faculty and divisions was developed that was transparent, flexible, and had buy-in from both the faculty and departmental/school administration. Development of the model was supported by a survey of hematology/oncology division chiefs. Conclusion: It is possible to reorganize a faculty practice and salary structure to achieve a mission-focused, productivity-based paradigm. Although the model described is specifically targeted at academic hematology and medical oncology divisions, with modification, it could serve as a framework for other departments or throughout schools of medicine. PMID:20592779

  11. Medical Students' Satisfaction and Academic Performance with Problem-Based Learning in Practice-Based Exercises for Epidemiology and Health Demographics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiménez-Mejías, E.; Amezcua-Prieto, C.; Martínez-Ruiz, V.; Olvera-Porcel, M. C.; Jiménez-Moleón, J. J.; Lardelli Claret, P.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of problem-based learning (PBL) on university students' satisfaction with and academic performance in a course on epidemiology and social and demographic health. The participants in this interventional study were 529 students (272 in the intervention group and 257 in the control group) enrolled in a…

  12. Utilization of geothermal resources at United States Air Force bases

    SciTech Connect

    Grogger, P.K.

    1980-09-01

    The Air Force installations on the continental United States as well as Alaska and Hawaii, were evaluated as to the possibility of utilizing geothermal energy to develop electricity, produce process steam, or heat and/or cool buildings. Twenty-five bases have suspected geothermal resources available. Because of either need or available technology seven installations were rated priority I, six were rated priority II and priority III and IV totaled ten. Geological and geophysical data indicated further investigation of the priority I installations, Saylor Creek Range, Idaho, Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota, Charleston AFB, South Carolina, Kirkland AFB, New Mexico, Vandenberg AFB, California, Luke AFB, Arizona, and Williams AFB, Arizona, should be accomplished as soon as possible. The use of geothermal energy will decrease the need for fossil fuels by the USAF and during times of short supply allow such fuels to be used for the Air Force's primary mission, military defense.

  13. A Curriculum Model: Engineering Design Graphics Course Updates Based on Industrial and Academic Institution Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meznarich, R. A.; Shava, R. C.; Lightner, S. L.

    2009-01-01

    Engineering design graphics courses taught in colleges or universities should provide and equip students preparing for employment with the basic occupational graphics skill competences required by engineering and technology disciplines. Academic institutions should introduce and include topics that cover the newer and more efficient graphics…

  14. Enhancing Quality Learning through Experiences of Research-Based Learning: Implications for Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela; Jewell, Evan

    2012-01-01

    Research into undergraduate research and inquiry in Australian universities was conducted during an Australian Learning and Teaching Council National Teaching Fellowship. In this paper we share experiences of this project as a student and an academic, reflecting on key challenges, including undergraduate research as an immersion experience for…

  15. Predicting Students' Academic Performance Based on School and Socio-Demographic Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiele, Tamara; Singleton, Alexander; Pope, Daniel; Stanistreet, Debbi

    2016-01-01

    Students' trajectories into university are often uniquely dependent on school qualifications though these alone are limited as predictors of academic potential. This study endorses this, examining associations between school grades, school type, school performance, socio-economic deprivation, neighbourhood participation, sex and academic…

  16. Factor-Based Student Rating in Academic Performance in Southern Province of Rwanda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rulinda, Ephrard; Role, Elizabeth; Makewa, Lazarus Ndiku

    2013-01-01

    This study examined students' perception on academic performance using five-factor ratings namely, principal's instructional leadership, school climate, school facilities, teachers' effectiveness and family support. Data for this study were collected from selected Parent's Private Seventh-Day Adventist Secondary Schools (PPSDASS) in Southern…

  17. Comparison of Efficiency Measures for Academic Interventions Based on Acquisition and Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Matthew K.; Sterling-Turner, Heather E.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated the importance of examining the instructional efficiency of academic interventions and has defined efficiency as the number of items learned per instructional minute. Maintenance of the skill is also an important instructional goal, however. Therefore, the current study compared efficiency metrics using initial…

  18. Exploring Students' Intention to Use LINE for Academic Purposes Based on Technology Acceptance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van De Bogart, Willard; Wichadee, Saovapa

    2015-01-01

    The LINE application is often conceived as purely social space; however, the authors of this paper wanted to determine if it could be used for academic purposes. In this study, we examined how undergraduate students accepted LINE in terms of using it for classroom-related activities (e.g., submit homework, follow up course information queries,…

  19. Improving Academic Achievement of Students with Problematic Attendance by Implementing a Multisystemic School-Based Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kay, James Edward

    2010-01-01

    This study addressed the problem of poor attendance adversely affecting grades and learning. Current school policies do not address problematic attendance for all school-aged children, perpetuating trends of academic failure. The research objective was to determine if unexcused absences had a greater negative impact on a high-stakes test compared…

  20. Upgrading a ColdFusion-Based Academic Medical Library Staff Intranet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Hart, Robert; Ingrassia, Barbara; Mayotte, Kerry; Palmer, Lisa A.; Powell, Julia

    2010-01-01

    This article details the process of upgrading and expanding an existing academic medical library intranet to include a wiki, blog, discussion forum, and photo collection manager. The first version of the library's intranet from early 2002 was powered by ColdFusion software and existed primarily to allow staff members to author and store minutes of…

  1. Predicting the Motivation in College-Aged Learning Disabled Students Based on the Academic Motivation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luna, Alberto D.

    2013-01-01

    Given the paucity of research on factors associated with motivation in learning disabled college students, the present study investigated the motivation levels in college students with learning disabilities. The Academic Motivation Scale (AMS) has been validated cross-nationally and across all educational age groups of students having various…

  2. A Multilevel Multivariate Analysis of Academic Performances in College Based on NCAA Student-Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, John J.; Paskus, Thomas S.; Boker, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    This is an application of contemporary multilevel regression modeling to the prediction of academic performances of 1st-year college students. At a first level of analysis, the data come from N greater than 16,000 students who were college freshman in 1994-1995 and who were also participants in high-level college athletics. At a second level of…

  3. An Examination of the Relationship between Language-Based Instructional Strategies and Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haubrich, Melissa K.

    2010-01-01

    Programs representing various instructional strategies have been designed and implemented in public schools to teach non-English speaking students. This study addressed the relative effectiveness of two strategies designed to enhance non-English speaking students' chances of academic success. The research problem was: Do language-based…

  4. Performance-Based Incentives and the Behavior of Accounting Academics: Responding to Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moya, Soledad; Prior, Diego; Rodríguez-Pérez, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    When laws change the rules of the game, it is important to observe the effects on the players' behavior. Some effects can be anticipated while others are difficult to enunciate before the law comes into force. In this paper we have analyzed articles authored by Spanish accounting academics between 1996 and 2005 to assess the impact of a change in…

  5. Intercultural Education and Academic Achievement: A Framework for School-Based Policies in Multilingual Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The paper reviews quantitative and qualitative research evidence regarding the relationship between intercultural education and academic achievement among students from socially marginalized communities. Intercultural education is conceptualized as including a focus both on generating understanding and respect for diverse cultural traditions and…

  6. Institutional Strategies That Foster Academic Integrity: A Faculty-­Based Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Sebastian; Jones, Edward; Lathrop, Anna H.

    2014-01-01

    In recognition that student academic misconduct is a complex issue that requires a holistic and institutional approach, this case study explores the impact of an intervention strategy adopted by the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences (comprised of approximately 80 faculty and an average of 3,240 undergraduate students) at Brock University, St.…

  7. Planning and Evaluation of New Academic Library Services by Means of Web-Based Conjoint Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Reinhold; Hermelbracht, Antonia

    2006-01-01

    New product development is an omnipresent challenge to modern libraries in the information age. Therefore, we present the design and selected results of a comprehensive research project aiming at the systematic and user-oriented planning of academic library services by means of conjoint analysis. The applicability of the analytical framework used…

  8. Linguistic Markers of Stance in Early and Advanced Academic Writing: A Corpus-Based Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aull, Laura L.; Lancaster, Zak

    2014-01-01

    This article uses corpus methods to examine linguistic expressions of stance in over 4,000 argumentative essays written by incoming first-year university students in comparison with the writing of upper-level undergraduate students and published academics. The findings reveal linguistic stance markers shared across the first-year essays despite…

  9. Data Base Royalty Fees and the Growth of Online Search Services in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, John Brewster; Knapp, Sara D.

    1981-01-01

    Views increasing costs in the form of royalties as an obstacle to the development of online services in academic libraries. Increased volume, creative pricing, and alternate charging algorithms are suggested for containing costs. Comments of vendors and database producers are included. (RAA)

  10. Performance-Based Music Ensembles' Effects on Academic Achievement: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Timothy Francis

    2013-01-01

    As increasing student achievement levels for all learners continues to drive the focus of education, identifying strategies and opportunities to accomplish this goal becomes progressively more important. This study explored the concepts of self-efficacy, self-efficacy for self-regulated learning, and self-efficacy for academic achievement in…

  11. Unit-based interprofessional leadership models in six US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Christopher S; King, Emmanuel; Stein, Jason; Robinson, Edmondo; Salameh, Mohammad; O'Leary, Kevin J

    2014-08-01

    The landscape of hospital-based care has shifted to place greater emphasis on improving quality and delivering value. In response, hospitals and healthcare organizations must reassess their strategies to improve care delivery in their facilities and beyond. Although these institutional goals may be defined at the executive level, implementation takes place at local sites of care. To lead these efforts, hospitals need to appoint effective leaders at the frontlines. Hospitalists are well poised to take on the role of the local clinical care improvement leader based on their experiences as direct frontline caregivers and their integral roles in hospital-wide quality and safety initiatives. A unit-based leadership model consisting of a medical director paired with a nurse manager has been implemented in several hospitals to function as an effector arm in response to the changing landscape of inpatient care. We provide an overview of this new model of leadership and describe the experiences of 6 hospitals that have implemented it. PMID:24799385

  12. Academic writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  13. Academic Jibberish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krashen, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about academic jibberish. Alfie Kohn states that a great deal of academic writing is incomprehensible even to others in the same area of scholarship. Academic Jibberish may score points for the writer but does not help research or practice. The author discusses jibberish as a career strategy that impresses those…

  14. Is There a Relationship between Physical Fitness and Academic Achievement? Positive Results from Public School Children in the Northeastern United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomitz, Virginia R.; Slining, Meghan M.; McGowan, Robert J.; Mitchell, Suzanne E.; Dawson, Glen F.; Hacker, Karen A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To determine relationships between physical fitness and academic achievement in diverse, urban public school children. Methods: This cross-sectional study used public school data from 2004 to 2005. Academic achievement was assessed as a passing score on Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) achievement tests in…

  15. A Preliminary Investigation into the Effect of Standards-Based Grading on the Academic Performance of African-American Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradbury-Bailey, Mary

    With the implementation of No Child Left Behind came a wave of educational reform intended for those working with student populations whose academic performance seemed to indicate an alienation from the educational process. Central to these reforms was the implementation of standards-based instruction and their accompanying standardized assessments; however, in one area reform seemed nonexistent---the teacher's gradebook. (Erickson, 2010, Marzano, 2006; Scriffiny, 2008). Given the link between the grading process and achievement motivation, Ames (1992) suggested the use of practices that promote mastery goal orientation. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of standards-based grading system as a factor contributing to mastery goal orientation on the academic performance of urban African American students. To determine the degree of impact, this study first compared the course content averages and End-of-Course-Test (EOCT) scores for science classes using a traditional grading system to those using a standards-based grading system by employing an Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA). While there was an increase in all grading areas, two showed a significant difference---the Physical Science course content average (p = 0.024) and ix the Biology EOCT scores (p = 0.0876). These gains suggest that standards-based grading can have a positive impact on the academic performance of African American students. Secondly, this study examined the correlation between the course content averages and the EOCT scores for both the traditional and standards-based grading system; for both Physical Science and Biology, there was a stronger correlation between these two scores for the standards-based grading system.

  16. The Effect of a Zoo-Based Experiential Academic Science Program on High School Students' Math and Science Achievement and Perceptions of School Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulkerrin, Elizabeth A.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of an 11th-grade and 12th-grade zoo-based academic high school experiential science program compared to a same school-district school-based academic high school experiential science program on students' pretest and posttest science, math, and reading achievement, and student perceptions of program relevance, rigor, and relationships. Science coursework delivery site served as the study's independent variable for the two naturally formed groups representing students (n = 18) who completed a zoo-based experiential academic high school science program and students (n = 18) who completed a school-based experiential academic high school science program. Students in the first group, a zoo-based experiential academic high school science program, completed real world, hands-on projects at the zoo while students in the second group, those students who completed a school-based experiential academic high school science program, completed real world, simulated projects in the classroom. These groups comprised the two research arms of the study. Both groups of students were selected from the same school district. The study's two dependent variables were achievement and school climate. Achievement was analyzed using norm-referenced 11th-grade pretest PLAN and 12th-grade posttest ACT test composite scores. Null hypotheses were rejected in the direction of improved test scores for both science program groups---students who completed the zoo-based experiential academic high school science program (p < .001) and students who completed the school-based experiential academic high school science program (p < .001). The posttest-posttest ACT test composite score comparison was not statistically different ( p = .93) indicating program equipoise for students enrolled in both science programs. No overall weighted grade point average score improvement was observed for students in either science group, however, null hypotheses were

  17. Dental unit waterlines disinfection using hypochlorous acid-based disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Shajahan, Irfana Fathima; Kandaswamy, D; Srikanth, Padma; Narayana, L Lakshmi; Selvarajan, R

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of a new disinfectant to disinfect the dental unit waterlines. Materials and Methods: New dental unit waterlines were installed in 13 dental chairs, and biofilm was allowed to grow for 10 days. Disinfection treatment procedure was carried out in the 12 units, and one unit was left untreated. The dental unit waterlines were removed and analyzed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) (TESCAN VEGA3 SBU). Result: On examination, SEM images showed that there was no slime layer or bacterial cells seen in any of the 12 cut sections obtained from the treated dental waterlines which mean that there was no evident of biofilm formation. Untreated dental unit waterlines showed a microbial colonization with continuous filamentous organic matrix. There was significant biofilm formation in the control tube relative to the samples. Conclusion: The tested disinfectant was found to be effective in the removal of biofilm from the dental unit waterlines. PMID:27563184

  18. Evidence-based kernels: fundamental units of behavioral influence.

    PubMed

    Embry, Dennis D; Biglan, Anthony

    2008-09-01

    This paper describes evidence-based kernels, fundamental units of behavioral influence that appear to underlie effective prevention and treatment for children, adults, and families. A kernel is a behavior-influence procedure shown through experimental analysis to affect a specific behavior and that is indivisible in the sense that removing any of its components would render it inert. Existing evidence shows that a variety of kernels can influence behavior in context, and some evidence suggests that frequent use or sufficient use of some kernels may produce longer lasting behavioral shifts. The analysis of kernels could contribute to an empirically based theory of behavioral influence, augment existing prevention or treatment efforts, facilitate the dissemination of effective prevention and treatment practices, clarify the active ingredients in existing interventions, and contribute to efficiently developing interventions that are more effective. Kernels involve one or more of the following mechanisms of behavior influence: reinforcement, altering antecedents, changing verbal relational responding, or changing physiological states directly. The paper describes 52 of these kernels, and details practical, theoretical, and research implications, including calling for a national database of kernels that influence human behavior.

  19. Evidence-based Kernels: Fundamental Units of Behavioral Influence

    PubMed Central

    Biglan, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes evidence-based kernels, fundamental units of behavioral influence that appear to underlie effective prevention and treatment for children, adults, and families. A kernel is a behavior–influence procedure shown through experimental analysis to affect a specific behavior and that is indivisible in the sense that removing any of its components would render it inert. Existing evidence shows that a variety of kernels can influence behavior in context, and some evidence suggests that frequent use or sufficient use of some kernels may produce longer lasting behavioral shifts. The analysis of kernels could contribute to an empirically based theory of behavioral influence, augment existing prevention or treatment efforts, facilitate the dissemination of effective prevention and treatment practices, clarify the active ingredients in existing interventions, and contribute to efficiently developing interventions that are more effective. Kernels involve one or more of the following mechanisms of behavior influence: reinforcement, altering antecedents, changing verbal relational responding, or changing physiological states directly. The paper describes 52 of these kernels, and details practical, theoretical, and research implications, including calling for a national database of kernels that influence human behavior. PMID:18712600

  20. CBCT-based bone quality assessment: are Hounsfield units applicable?

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, R; Singer, S R; Mupparapu, M

    2015-01-01

    CBCT is a widely applied imaging modality in dentistry. It enables the visualization of high-contrast structures of the oral region (bone, teeth, air cavities) at a high resolution. CBCT is now commonly used for the assessment of bone quality, primarily for pre-operative implant planning. Traditionally, bone quality parameters and classifications were primarily based on bone density, which could be estimated through the use of Hounsfield units derived from multidetector CT (MDCT) data sets. However, there are crucial differences between MDCT and CBCT, which complicates the use of quantitative gray values (GVs) for the latter. From experimental as well as clinical research, it can be seen that great variability of GVs can exist on CBCT images owing to various reasons that are inherently associated with this technique (i.e. the limited field size, relatively high amount of scattered radiation and limitations of currently applied reconstruction algorithms). Although attempts have been made to correct for GV variability, it can be postulated that the quantitative use of GVs in CBCT should be generally avoided at this time. In addition, recent research and clinical findings have shifted the paradigm of bone quality from a density-based analysis to a structural evaluation of the bone. The ever-improving image quality of CBCT allows it to display trabecular bone patterns, indicating that it may be possible to apply structural analysis methods that are commonly used in micro-CT and histology. PMID:25315442

  1. How Academic Is Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    University provision for academic development is well established in the USA, UK and many other countries. However, arrangements for its provision and staffing vary. In Australia, there has been a trend towards professional rather than academic staff appointments. Is this appropriate? In this paper, the domains of academic development work are…

  2. An ACCESS-based academic attending physician and resident rotation evaluation database.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, T D; Hartquist, B A

    1994-01-01

    A database of residents' evaluations of their Internal Medicine (IM) rotations and attending physicians (APs) was created using ACCESS (Microsoft). The IM attendings and the corresponding inpatient or outpatient rotations from three academic settings (county hospital, VA, and University) are ranked by 130 different residents. For APs, reports show rotation specific, year average and, for comparison, all-AP aggregate values. For rotations, reports provide estimates of workload, didactic teaching, and overall desirability. Free text comments may be provided for all evaluations.

  3. Appreciative Assessment in Academic Advising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Ye; Hutson, Bryant

    2016-01-01

    Academic advising is one of the key functions in higher education. While there has been a development of advising practices in the past decade, the assessment of academic advising practices is far from satisfactory. In this article, we review major academic advising approaches and key characteristics of quality assessment practices. Based on the…

  4. Urban 5th Graders Conceptions during a Place-Based Inquiry Unit on Watersheds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endreny, Anna Henderson

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine how 33 urban 5th grade students' science conceptions changed during a place-based inquiry unit on watersheds. Research on watershed and place-based education was used as a framework to guide the teaching of the unit as well as the research study. A teacher-researcher designed the curriculum, taught the unit and…

  5. The Reluctant Academic: Early-Career Academics in a Teaching-Orientated University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on research into academic identities amongst early-career academics in a UK post-1992, teaching-orientated university. Literature around academic identity suggests five major academic roles: teaching, research, management, writing and networking. However, this appears to be a picture of an established mid-career academic in a…

  6. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  7. An exploration of the impact of reform-based science instruction on second graders' academic achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Valeisha Michelle

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether possible relationships might exist between the quality of reform-based science instruction and science and reading achievement in second grade. The study also examined separately possible interactions between quality of instruction and gender and race. The study involved an analysis of data previously collected in a larger one-group pre/post test study of a science instructional intervention (ISI Science) (Connor et al., 2010). In the original study, six teachers and two graduate assistants taught two science units designed based upon constructivist principles and reform-based practices. Using the 5-E Learning Cycle (Bybee, 1997), reading and science were integrated into each lesson. Videotapes were made of all lessons and science and reading achievement data were collected. For the current study, dependent achievement variables were science achievement measured by the Iowa Science Test; reading comprehension, by the Woodcock Passage Comprehension; and vocabulary, by the Iowa Vocabulary. Pre- and post-tests scores on the dependent measures were available for 96 children from the original study. Quality of instruction was measured using the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP) (Sawanda & Piburn, 2000). Videotapes of 24 science lessons from the larger study were analyzed using the RTOP. Reliability of ratings for the RTOP in the study was determined to be .96. No significant results were found for relations between instructional quality (RTOP) and any of the achievement variables although significant pre to post increases on all three measures were observed. No differences by race or gender were found. This latter finding was noteworthy given the research in science identifying both gender and race differences in science achievement. Recommendations for future research and teacher education are discussed.

  8. Applying activity-based costing to the nuclear medicine unit.

    PubMed

    Suthummanon, Sakesun; Omachonu, Vincent K; Akcin, Mehmet

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have shown the feasibility of using activity-based costing (ABC) in hospital environments. However, many of these studies discuss the general applications of ABC in health-care organizations. This research explores the potential application of ABC to the nuclear medicine unit (NMU) at a teaching hospital. The finding indicates that the current cost averages 236.11 US dollars for all procedures, which is quite different from the costs computed by using ABC. The difference is most significant with positron emission tomography scan, 463 US dollars (an increase of 96%), as well as bone scan and thyroid scan, 114 US dollars (a decrease of 52%). The result of ABC analysis demonstrates that the operational time (machine time and direct labour time) and the cost of drugs have the most influence on cost per procedure. Clearly, to reduce the cost per procedure for the NMU, the reduction in operational time and cost of drugs should be analysed. The result also indicates that ABC can be used to improve resource allocation and management. It can be an important aid in making management decisions, particularly for improving pricing practices by making costing more accurate. It also facilitates the identification of underutilized resources and related costs, leading to cost reduction. The ABC system will also help hospitals control costs, improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, and manage their resources better. PMID:16102243

  9. Applying activity-based costing to the nuclear medicine unit.

    PubMed

    Suthummanon, Sakesun; Omachonu, Vincent K; Akcin, Mehmet

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have shown the feasibility of using activity-based costing (ABC) in hospital environments. However, many of these studies discuss the general applications of ABC in health-care organizations. This research explores the potential application of ABC to the nuclear medicine unit (NMU) at a teaching hospital. The finding indicates that the current cost averages 236.11 US dollars for all procedures, which is quite different from the costs computed by using ABC. The difference is most significant with positron emission tomography scan, 463 US dollars (an increase of 96%), as well as bone scan and thyroid scan, 114 US dollars (a decrease of 52%). The result of ABC analysis demonstrates that the operational time (machine time and direct labour time) and the cost of drugs have the most influence on cost per procedure. Clearly, to reduce the cost per procedure for the NMU, the reduction in operational time and cost of drugs should be analysed. The result also indicates that ABC can be used to improve resource allocation and management. It can be an important aid in making management decisions, particularly for improving pricing practices by making costing more accurate. It also facilitates the identification of underutilized resources and related costs, leading to cost reduction. The ABC system will also help hospitals control costs, improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, and manage their resources better.

  10. Standards-Based Reform in the United States: History, Research, and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Laura S.; Stecher, Brian M.; Yuan, Kun

    2008-01-01

    Although becoming widespread, especially in view of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and without a universally-accepted definition, most discussions of standards-based reforms (SBR) include certain commonalities, including: (1) Academic expectations for students; (2) Alignment of key elements of the educational system to promote attainment of these…

  11. The Importance of Unitization for Familiarity-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Colleen M.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    It is often assumed that recollection is necessary to support memory for novel associations, whereas familiarity supports memory for single items. However, the levels of unitization framework assumes that familiarity can support associative memory under conditions in which the components of an association are unitized (i.e., treated as a single…

  12. Intellectual Disabilities and Mental Health: United States-Based Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlot, Lauren; Beasley, Joan B.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, research directed specifically at improving our understanding of the psychiatric assessment and treatment of individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) has grown, yet lags far behind efforts for typically developing children and adults. In the United States, a lack of a national approach to the mental health problems of…

  13. Micro-cogeneration units based on Stirling engine for heating and their real operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čierny, Jaroslav; Patsch, Marek

    2014-08-01

    This article was deal with micro-cogeneration units based on Stirling engine. We watched problematic of real working Stirling engine. The article also contain hookup of unit constructed at University of Zilina.

  14. KINEMATIC ANALYSIS OF MODULAR, TRUSS-BASED MANIPULATOR UNITS

    SciTech Connect

    Salerno, R. J.

    1994-06-01

    Decontamination and Dismantling (D&D) activities within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) require a long reach manipulator with a large load capacity. Variable Geometry Trusses (VGTs) are a unique class of mechanical structures which allow the advantages of truss structures for large scale applications to be applied to large robotic manipulators. Individual VGT units may be assembled to create a modular, long-reach, truss-type manipulator. Each module of such a manipulator system is either a static truss section or one of several possible VGT geometries. While many potential applications exist for this technology, the present work is largely motivated by the need for generic robotic systems for remote manipulation. A manipulator system based on VGT modules provides several advantages. The reconfigurable nature of the manipulator system allows it to be adapted on site to unforeseen conditions. The kinematic redundancy of the manipulator enables it to work effectively even in a highly obstructed workspace. The parallel structure of the truss modules enables the manipulator to be withdrawn in the event of a structural failure. Finally, the open framework of the modules provides a clear, protected passageway for control and power cabling, waste conveyance, or other services required at the end effector. As is implied in a truss structure, all primary members of a VGT are ideally loaded in pure tension or compression. This results in an extremely stiff and strong manipulator system with minimal overall weight. Careful design of the joints of a VGT is very important to the overall stiffness and accuracy of the structure, as several links (as many as six) are joined together at each joint. The greatest disadvantage to this approach to manipulator design has traditionally been that the kinematics of VGT structures are complex and poorly understood. This report specifically addresses the kinematics of several possible geometries for the individual VGT units. Equations and

  15. University Reforms and Academic Governance: Reports of the 2000 Three-Nation Workshop on Academic Governance (Tokyo, Japan, February 24-25, 2000). RIHE International Publication Series No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arimoto, Akira, Ed.

    This report contains papers presented at the Three-Nation Workshop on Academic Governance by participants from the United States, Switzerland, and Japan. These papers are based on comparative studies of a survey topic originally developed in Japan. The papers are: (1) "Comparative Study of Academic Governance: Its Purpose and Framework" (keynote…

  16. Environmental and economic suitability of forest biomass-based bioenergy production in the Southern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Puneet

    This study attempts to ascertain the environmental and economic suitability of utilizing forest biomass for cellulosic ethanol production in the Southern United States. The study is divided into six chapters. The first chapter details the background and defines the relevance of the study along with objectives. The second chapter reviews the existing literature to ascertain the present status of various existing conversion technologies. The third chapter assesses the net energy ratio and global warming impact of ethanol produced from slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) biomass. A life-cycle assessment was applied to achieve the task. The fourth chapter assesses the role of emerging bioenergy and voluntary carbon markets on the profitability of non-industrial private forest (NIPF) landowners by combining the Faustmann and Hartmann models. The fifth chapter assesses perceptions of four stakeholder groups (Non-Government Organization, Academics, Industries, and Government) on the use of forest biomass for bioenergy production in the Southern United States using the SWOT-AHP (Strength, Weakness, Opportunity, and Threat-Analytical Hierarchy Process) technique. Finally, overall conclusions are made in the sixth chapter. Results indicate that currently the production of cellulosic ethanol is limited as the production cost of cellulosic ethanol is higher than the production cost of ethanol derived from corn. However, it is expected that the production cost of cellulosic ethanol will come down in the future from its current level due to ongoing research efforts. The total global warming impact of E85 fuel (production and consumption) was found as 10.44 tons where as global warming impact of an equivalent amount of gasoline (production and consumption) was 21.45 tons. This suggests that the production and use of ethanol derived from slash pine biomass in the form of E85 fuel in an automobile saves about 51% of carbon emissions when compared to gasoline. The net energy ratio

  17. [A web-based e-learning tool in academic teaching of trauma surgery. First experiences and evaluation results].

    PubMed

    Citak, M; Haasper, C; Behrends, M; Kupka, T; Kendoff, D; Hüfner, T; Matthies, H K; Krettek, C

    2007-04-01

    There are lots of possibilities for universities to offer contents of teaching to students by the Internet. Often the students can download slides or a special lecture note from the intranet of the university. Another way is to make a movie of the lecture and post this lecture movie on the Internet. In the Hanover Medical School we employed an alternative. It was developed by the Trauma Surgery Clinic and the Institute of Medical Informatics at the Hanover Medical School. Our goal was to use just one web-based content resource for the lecture and for the work at home. The Institute of Medical Informatics used a web-based content management system (CMS) Schoolbook to implement this e-learning application.Since October 2005 the Trauma Surgery Schoolbook has been used in the lecture on trauma surgery in all terms, and we evaluated the academic year 2005/2006. The results of the evaluation showed us that the students were very interested in using this e-learning application. The possibility to reinforce the learning material at home is a good chance for the students. Also the organisation of lectures was improved because the materials were all in one place. The lecturer needs to learn several new tasks, but we also got a positive response. Our experiences of the last academic year showed that it was a good way to use one web-based content resource for teaching and learning in the context of a lecture. PMID:17295021

  18. Increasing Male Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Barbara Talbert

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind legislation has brought greater attention to the academic performance of American youth. Its emphasis on student achievement requires a closer analysis of assessment data by school districts. To address the findings, educators must seek strategies to remedy failing results. In a mid-Atlantic district of the Unites States,…

  19. The importance of unitization for familiarity-based learning.

    PubMed

    Parks, Colleen M; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2015-05-01

    It is often assumed that recollection is necessary to support memory for novel associations, whereas familiarity supports memory for single items. However, the levels of unitization framework assumes that familiarity can support associative memory under conditions in which the components of an association are unitized (i.e., treated as a single coherent item). In the current study we tested two critical assumptions of this framework. First, does unitization reflect a specialized form of learning or is it simply a form of semantic or elaborative encoding, and, second, can the beneficial effects of unitization on familiarity be observed for across-domain associations or are they limited to creating new associations between items that are from the same stimulus domains? Unitization was found to increase associative recognition but not item recognition. It affected familiarity more than recollection, increased associative but not item priming, and was dissociable from levels of processing effects. Moreover, unitization effects were found to be particularly effective in supporting face-word and fractal-sound pairs. The current results indicate that unitization reflects a specialized form of learning that supports associative familiarity of within- and across-domain associations.

  20. The importance of unitization for familiarity-based learning

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Colleen M.; Yonelinas, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that recollection is necessary to support memory for novel associations, whereas familiarity supports memory for single items. However, the levels of unitization (LOU) framework assumes that familiarity can support associative memory under conditions in which the components of an association are unitized (i.e., treated as a single coherent item). In the current study we test two critical assumptions of this framework. First, does unitization reflect a specialized form of learning or is it simply a form of semantic or elaborative encoding, and, second, can the beneficial effects of unitization on familiarity be observed for across-domain associations or are they limited to creating new associations between items that are from the same stimulus domains? Unitization was found to increase associative recognition but not item recognition, it affected familiarity more so than recollection, it increased associative but not item priming, and it was dissociable from levels of processing effects. Moreover, unitization effects were found to be particularly effective in supporting face-word and fractal-sound pairs. The current results indicate that unitization reflects a specialized form of learning that supports associative familiarity of within- and across-domain associations. PMID:25329077

  1. Academic and Professional Career Outcomes of Medical School Graduates Who Failed USMLE Step 1 on the First Attempt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDougle, Leon; Mavis, Brian E.; Jeffe, Donna B.; Roberts, Nicole K.; Ephgrave, Kimberly; Hageman, Heather L.; Lypson, Monica L.; Thomas, Lauree; Andriole, Dorothy A.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine the academic and professional outcomes of medical school graduates who failed the United States Licensing Examination Step 1 on the first attempt. This retrospective cohort study was based on pooled data from 2,003 graduates of six Midwestern medical schools in the classes of 1997-2002. Demographic, academic, and…

  2. School Mental Health Early Interventions and Academic Outcomes for At-Risk High School Students: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iachini, Aidyn L.; Brown, Elizabeth Levine; Ball, Annahita; Gibson, Jennifer E.; Lize, Steven E.

    2015-01-01

    The current educational policy context in the United States necessitates that school-based programs prioritize students' academic outcomes. This review examined the quantitative research on school mental health (SMH) early interventions and academic outcomes for at-risk high school students. Seven articles met the inclusion criteria for this…

  3. A Genre-Based Analysis on the Introductions of Research Articles Written by Indonesian Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arsyad, Safnil

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to search for the occurrence of communicative and subcommunicative units and to identify the linguistic features commonly used by the authors to realize the communicative and subcommunicative units. Three groups of English RAs by Indonesian speakers were chosen for this study: 10 RAs from engineering science, ten…

  4. Tri-band small monopole antenna based on SRR units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehata, Gehan; Mohanna, Mahmoud; Rabeh, Mohammed Lotfy

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel design for a tri-band monopole antenna coupled with metamaterial units is introduced. The proposed antenna was designed to cover WiMAX (2.5, 3.5) and WLAN (5.2) bands. In our proposal, a coplanar waveguide (CPW) fed circular-disk monopole antenna is coupled with three split ring resonator (SRR) units which exist on its back side. In our design a monopole antenna and SRR units are designed first to resonate at 5.2 GHz and 2.5 GHz respectively. In addition, antenna is loaded with post to force resonance at 3.5 GHz. SRR units are used for 2.5 GHz resonance to miniaturize antenna size, and our proposed antenna considered an electrically small antenna (ESA) at its first resonance frequency. Simulated and measured results exhibit a good agreement that validate our design.

  5. Computer and microswitch-based programs to improve academic activities by six children with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Stasolla, Fabrizio; Damiani, Rita; Perilli, Viviana; D'Amico, Fiora; Caffò, Alessandro O; Stella, Anna; Albano, Vincenza; Damato, Concetta; Leone, Antonia Di

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at extending the use of assistive technology (i.e. microswitch such as a pressure sensor, interface and laptop) with a new setup, allowing six children with cerebral palsy and extensive motor disabilities to improve their academic activities during classroom. A second objective of the study was to assess a maintenance/generalization phase, occurring three months after the end of the intervention, at participants' homes, involving their parents. A third purpose of the study was to monitor the effects of the intervention program on the indices of positive participations (i.e. constructive engagement) of participants involved. Finally, a social validation procedure involving 36 support teachers as raters was conducted. The study was carried out according to a multiple probe design across behaviours followed by maintenance/generalization phase for each participant. That is, the two behaviours (i.e. choice among academic disciplines and literacy) were learned first singly, then combined together. Results showed an increasing of the performances for all participants involved during intervention phases. Furthermore, during maintenance phase participants consolidated their results. Moreover, positive participation augmented as well. Support teachers, involved in the social validation assessment, considered the combined intervention as more favourable with respect to those singly learned. Clinical, educational and practical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:26196086

  6. Upgraded gravity anomaly base of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, Gordon R.; Hildenbrand, T.G.; Kucks, R.; Roman, D.; Hittelman, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    A concerted effort to compile an upgraded gravity anomaly database, grid, and map for the United States by the end of 2002 is under way. This effort can be considered as the first step in building a data system for gravity measurements, and it builds on existing collaborative efforts. This paper outlines the strategy for assembling the individual map and digital products related to the United States gravity database.

  7. Evaluation of a Community-Based Participatory Research Consortium from the Perspective of Academics and Community Service Providers Focused on Child Health and Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pivik, Jayne R.; Goelman, Hillel

    2011-01-01

    A process evaluation of a consortium of academic researchers and community-based service providers focused on the health and well-being of children and families provides empirical and practice-based evidence of those factors important for community-based participatory research (CBPR). This study draws on quantitative ratings of 33 factors…

  8. Academic Freedom in the 21st Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, William G.; Lechuga, Vicente M.

    2005-01-01

    Throughout the 20th century, academic freedom was a foundational value for the academy in the United States. The concept of academic freedom pertains to the right of faculty to enjoy considerable autonomy in their research and teaching. The assumption that drives academic freedom is that the country benefits when faculty are able to search for…

  9. Enhancing Academic Achievement for Children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Evidence from School-Based Intervention Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jitendra, Asha K.; DuPaul, George J.; Someki, Fumio; Tresco, Katy E.

    2008-01-01

    Although children with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) exhibit significant academic difficulties in school settings, considerably less attention is devoted to remediating their academic problems when compared to behavioral and social difficulties. The purpose of this article is to review empirically supported academic interventions…

  10. Gender Diversity Strategy in Academic Departments: Exploring Organizational Determinants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Xuhong; Johnson, Japera; Bozeman, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Full inclusion of women into the academics remains a daunting challenge in the United States. The situation is particularly acute within science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields where the underrepresentation of women and their career disadvantages attract a great deal of attention. Based on a dataset combining a survey of…

  11. Academic Bullies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    Many professors have been traumatized by academic bullies. Unlike bullies at school, the academic bully plays a more subtle game. Bullies may spread rumors to undermine a colleague's credibility or shut their target out of social conversations. The more aggressive of the species cuss out co-workers, even threatening to get physical. There is…

  12. Academic Decathlon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of California School Administrators.

    This position paper from the Research, Evaluation, and Accreditation Committee of the Association of California School Administrators (ACSA) presents a description of the Academic Decathlon program and offers recommendations for improving the program and ways that ACSA can assist the program. The description of the Academic Decathlon, a ten-event…

  13. Equilibrium II: Acids and Bases. Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). Unit P3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inner London Education Authority (England).

    This unit on equilibrium is one of 10 first year units produced by the Independent Learning Project for Advanced Chemistry (ILPAC). The unit, which consists of two levels, focuses on the application of equilibrium principles to equilibria involving weak acids and bases, including buffer solutions and indicators. Level one uses Le Chatelier's…

  14. Student Academic Services: Academic Affairs and Student Affairs Working Together for Student Development at Eastern New Mexico University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Richard

    This report discusses the Student Academic Services (SAS) project at Eastern New Mexico University. It looks at how student development efforts have been augmented at the university. SAS is based on student development philosophy, fundamental to which is an understanding that the human individual functions as a unit, and his/her diverse features…

  15. Factors that Determine Academic Versus Private Practice Career Interest in Radiation Oncology Residents in the United States: Results of a Nationwide Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Daniel T.; Shaffer, Jenny L.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wilson, Lynn D.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine what factors US radiation oncology residents consider when choosing academic or nonacademic careers. Methods and Materials: A 20-question online survey was developed and sent to all US radiation oncology residents to assess factors that influence their career interest. Residents were asked to rate their interest in academics (A) versus private practice (PP) on a 0 (strong interest in A) to 100 (strong interest in PP) scale. Responses were classified as A (0-30), undecided (40-60), and PP (70-100). Residents were also asked to rank 10 factors that most strongly influenced their career interest. Results: Three hundred thirty-one responses were collected, of which 264 were complete and form the basis for this analysis. Factors that correlated with interest in A included having a PhD (P=.018), postgraduate year level (P=.0006), research elective time (P=.0003), obtaining grant funding during residency (P=.012), and number of publications before residency (P=.0001), but not number of abstracts accepted in the past year (P=.65) or publications during residency (P=.67). The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in A were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) research opportunities during residency. The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in PP were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) academic pressure and obligations. Conclusions: Interest in A correlated with postgraduate year level, degree, and research time during residency. Publications before but not during residency correlated with academic interest, and baseline interest was the most influential factor. These data can be used by residency program directors to better understand what influences residents' career interest.

  16. Preparing new nurse graduates for practice in multiple settings: a community-based academic-practice partnership model.

    PubMed

    West, Nikki; Berman, Audrey; Karshmer, Judith; Prion, Susan; Van, Paulina; Wallace, Jonalyn

    2014-06-01

    Responding to local and national concerns about the nursing workforce, the California Institute for Nursing and Health Care worked with private and public funders and community health care partners to establish community-based transition-to-practice programs for new RN graduates unable to secure nursing positions in the San Francisco Bay Area. The goals were to retain new RN graduates in nursing and further develop their skills and competencies to increase their employability. Leaders from academic and inpatient, ambulatory, and community-based practice settings, as well as additional community partners, collaboratively provided four 12- to 16-week pilot transition programs in 2010-2011. A total of 345 unemployed new nurse graduates enrolled. Eighty-four percent of 188 respondents to a post-program survey were employed in inpatient and community settings 3 months after completion. Participants and clinical preceptors also reported increases in confidence and competence.

  17. Retention of Underrepresented Minority Faculty: Strategic Initiatives for Institutional Value Proposition Based on Perspectives from a Range of Academic Institutions

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Joseph A.; Montgomery, Beronda L.; Martinez Acosta, Veronica G.

    2015-01-01

    The student and faculty make-up of academic institutions does not represent national demographics. Racial and ethnic minorities are disproportionately underrepresented nationally, and particularly at predominantly white institutions (PWIs). Although significant efforts and funding have been committed to increasing points of access or recruitment of under-represented minority (URM) students and faculty at PWIs, these individuals have not been recruited and retained at rates that reflect their national proportions. Underrepresentation of URMs is particularly prevalent in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) disciplines. This reality represents a national crisis given a predicted shortage of workers in STEM disciplines based on current rates of training of all individuals, majority and URM, and the intersection of this limitation with persistent challenges in the recruitment, training, retention and advancement of URMs who will soon represent the largest pool of future trainees. An additional compounding factor is the increasingly disproportionate underrepresentation of minorities at higher professorial and administrative ranks, thus limiting the pool of potential mentors who are correlated with successful shepherding of URM students through STEM training and development. We address issues related to improving recruitment and retention of URM faculty that are applicable across a range of academic institutions. We describe challenges with recruitment and retention of URM faculty and their advancement through promotion in the faculty ranks and into leadership positions. We offer specific recommendations, including identifying environmental barriers to diversity and implementing strategies for their amelioration, promoting effective and innovative mentoring, and addressing leadership issues related to constructive change for promoting diversity. PMID:26240521

  18. A Standards-Based Thematic Unit: "Cuadros de Familia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parvis-Condon, Katia; Kleinman, Donna; Brown, Joseph; Roa, Angela

    1998-01-01

    This unit was created as a result of a summer institute sponsored by the National K-12 Foreign Language Resource Center at Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa. The Center's goal is to improve student learning of foreign languages in kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12). In the summer of 1996, the Center offered the Culture and Children's…

  19. Is There a Relationship between Body Mass Index, Fitness, and Academic Performance? Mixed Results from Students in a Southeastern United States Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wingfield, Robert Joshua; Graziano, Paulo A.; McNamara, Joseph P. H., Janicke, David M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between body mass index (BMI), physical fitness, and academic performance in elementary school students. Specifically, BMI and scores on the President's Challenge Physical Activity and Fitness Awards Program, a physical fitness test, were compared to reading and mathematics scores on the…

  20. Switzerland: A Study of the Educational System of Switzerland and a Guide to the Academic Placement of Students from Switzerland in Educational Institutions of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Karlene N.

    The educational system of Switzerland is described, and guidelines concerning the academic placement of students who wish to study in U.S. institutions are provided. After describing primary and secondary education, attention is directed to teacher training, tertiary education, and training in the health fields. Specific considerations include:…

  1. Academic and Military Programs of the Five Service Academies. Report to the Congress by the Comptroller General of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staats, Elmer B.

    The academic and military programs of the five service academies are reviewed and found generally to produce qualified officers, but several aspects of their program could be improved. It is noted that only the Naval and Merchant Marine Academies require a comprehensive examination to evaluate students' professional competence before graduation…

  2. [An Analysis of El Camino College Students According to Their Majors, Perceptions of Academic Relevancy, and Unit and Grade Point Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garlock, Jerry

    These three separate studies of students at El Camino College (California) discuss their majors, perceptions of academic relevancy, and grade point characteristics. Sub-groups of students (freshman/sophomore, full-time/part-time) are compared according to their major divisions (physical sciences, fine arts, natural sciences, etc.) and also…

  3. Parameter correction method for dual position-sensitive-detector-based unit.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shuai; Hu, Pengcheng; Ding, XueMei; Tan, JiuBin

    2016-05-20

    A dual position-sensitive-detector (PSD)-based unit can be used for angular measurements of a multi-degree-of-freedom measurement system and a laser interferometry-based sensing and tracking system. In order to ensure the precision of incident beam direction measurement for a PSD-based unit, model and autoreflection alignment methods for correction of PSD-based unit parameters are proposed. Experimental results demonstrate the deviations between the angular measurements obtained using a dual PSD-based unit and an autocollimator varied by 70″, 20″, and 1″ for three runs of the autoreflection alignment method, respectively, and the model method deviations all varied by 1″ in the 1000″ measurement range for three runs. It is therefore concluded that the model method is more reliable than the autoreflection alignment method for ensuring the accuracy of a dual PSD-based unit. PMID:27411134

  4. Parameter correction method for dual position-sensitive-detector-based unit.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shuai; Hu, Pengcheng; Ding, XueMei; Tan, JiuBin

    2016-05-20

    A dual position-sensitive-detector (PSD)-based unit can be used for angular measurements of a multi-degree-of-freedom measurement system and a laser interferometry-based sensing and tracking system. In order to ensure the precision of incident beam direction measurement for a PSD-based unit, model and autoreflection alignment methods for correction of PSD-based unit parameters are proposed. Experimental results demonstrate the deviations between the angular measurements obtained using a dual PSD-based unit and an autocollimator varied by 70″, 20″, and 1″ for three runs of the autoreflection alignment method, respectively, and the model method deviations all varied by 1″ in the 1000″ measurement range for three runs. It is therefore concluded that the model method is more reliable than the autoreflection alignment method for ensuring the accuracy of a dual PSD-based unit.

  5. Fuel Cell Based Auxiliary Power Unit for Refrigerated Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Kriston P.

    2014-09-02

    This is the annual report for the Market Transformation project as required by DOE EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office. We have been provided with a specific format. It describes the work that was done in developing fuel-cell powered Transport Refrigeration Units for Reefer Trucks. It describes the progress that has been made by Nuvera and Plug Power as they develop and ultimately demonstrate this technology in real world application.

  6. 76 FR 39885 - Risk-Based Targeting of Foreign Flagged Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODUs)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Risk-Based Targeting of Foreign Flagged Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODUs) AGENCY... Office of Vessel Activities Policy Letter 11-06, Risk-Based Targeting of Foreign Flagged Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODUs). This policy letter announces changes to the Coast Guard's system used to...

  7. Academic Village.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Renner Middle School (Plano, Texas) where the sprawling suburbs have been kept at bay while creating the atmosphere of an academic village. Photos and a floor plan are provided. (GR)

  8. Women in Academic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Thibault, George E

    2016-08-01

    More than a decade ago, women achieved parity with men in the number of matriculants to medical school, nearly one-third of the faculty of medical schools were women, and there were some women deans and department chairs. These trends were promising, but today there are still significant differences in pay, academic rank, and leadership positions for women compared with men in academic medicine. Though there has been progress in many areas, the progress is too slow to achieve previously recommended goals, such as 50% women department chairs by 2025 and 50% women deans by 2030.The author points to the findings presented in the articles from the Research Partnership on Women in Biomedical Careers in this issue, as well as research being published elsewhere, as an evidence base for the ongoing discussion of gender equity in academic medicine. More attention to culture and the working environment will be needed to achieve true parity for women in academic medical careers.

  9. Differences in academic performance and self-regulated learning based on level of student participation in supplemental instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Ana C.

    This study examined differences in academic performance and self-regulated learning based on levels of student participation in Supplemental Instruction (SI) sessions in two introductory undergraduate biology and chemistry courses offered at University of Central Florida in the Spring 2006 semester. The sample consisted of 282 students enrolled in the biology class and 451 students enrolled in chemistry. Academic performance was measured using students' final course grades and rates of withdrawal from the courses. The self-regulated learning constructs of motivation, cognition, metacognition, and resource management were measured using the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ). Relationships between students' gender and ethnic background and levels of SI participation were also analyzed in this research. Findings in both biology and chemistry courses revealed a statistically significant decrease in student motivation from beginning to end of semester. In chemistry, frequent SI participants also showed statistically significantly higher levels of motivation at the end of the semester than occasional and non-SI participants. There were no statistically significant gains in cognitive, metacognitive, and resource management strategies from beginning to end of semester. However, statistically significant differences in resource management were observed at the end of the semester among SI attendance groups in both courses. Students in the high SI attendance group were more likely to use learning resources than those who did not participate regularly or did not participate at all. Statistically significant differences in academic performance based on students' SI participation were found in both biology and chemistry courses. Frequent SI participants had significantly higher final percentage grades and were more likely to receive grades of A, B, or C, than those who either did not attend SI regularly of did not participate at all. They were also less

  10. Examining Academic and Administrative Productivity Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middaugh, Michael F.; Hollowell, David E.

    1992-01-01

    The "academic ratchet and administrative lattice" framework for examining costs and productivity in college administration is applied to the University of Delaware. The productivity of academic units is analyzed quantitatively and issues in overstaffing and overbudgeting of administrative units are discussed. Faculty staffing trends from 1984-85…

  11. Academic detailing.

    PubMed

    Shankar, P R; Jha, N; Piryani, R M; Bajracharya, O; Shrestha, R; Thapa, H S

    2010-01-01

    There are a number of sources available to prescribers to stay up to date about medicines. Prescribers in rural areas in developing countries however, may not able to access some of them. Interventions to improve prescribing can be educational, managerial, and regulatory or use a mix of strategies. Detailing by the pharmaceutical industry is widespread. Academic detailing (AD) has been classically seen as a form of continuing medical education in which a trained health professional such as a physician or pharmacist visits physicians in their offices to provide evidence-based information. Face-to-face sessions, preferably on an individual basis, clear educational and behavioural objectives, establishing credibility with respect to objectivity, stimulating physician interaction, use of concise graphic educational materials, highlighting key messages, and when possible, providing positive reinforcement of improved practices in follow-up visits can increase success of AD initiatives. AD is common in developed countries and certain examples have been cited in this review. In developing countries the authors have come across reports of AD in Pakistan, Sudan, Argentina and Uruguay, Bihar state in India, Zambia, Cuba, Indonesia and Mexico. AD had a consistent, small but potentially significant impact on prescribing practices. AD has much less resources at its command compared to the efforts by the industry. Steps have to be taken to formally start AD in Nepal and there may be specific hindering factors similar to those in other developing nations. PMID:21209521

  12. Team-based learning in the gross anatomy laboratory improves academic performance and students' attitudes toward teamwork.

    PubMed

    Huitt, Tiffany W; Killins, Anita; Brooks, William S

    2015-01-01

    As the healthcare climate shifts toward increased interdisciplinary patient care, it is essential that students become accomplished at group problem solving and develop positive attitudes toward teamwork. Team-based learning (TBL) has become a popular approach to medical education because of its ability to promote active learning, problem-solving skills, communication, and teamwork. However, its documented use in the laboratory setting and physical therapy education is limited. We used TBL as a substitute for one-third of cadaveric dissections in the gross anatomy laboratories at two Doctor of Physical Therapy programs to study its effect on both students' perceptions and academic performance. We surveyed students at the beginning and completion of their anatomy course as well as students who had previously completed a traditional anatomy course to measure the impact of TBL on students' perceptions of teamwork. We found that the inclusion of TBL in the anatomy laboratory improves students' attitudes toward working with peers (P < 0.01). Non-TBL students had significantly lower attitudes toward teamwork (P < 0.01). Comparison of academic performance between TBL and non-TBL students revealed that students who participated in TBL scored significantly higher on their first anatomy practical examination and on their head/neck written examination (P < 0.001). When asked to rate their role in a team, a 10.5% increase in the mean rank score for Problem Solver resulted after the completion of the TBL-based anatomy course. Our data indicate that TBL is an effective supplement to cadaveric dissection in the laboratory portion of gross anatomy, improving both students' grades and perceptions of teamwork.

  13. Team-based learning in the gross anatomy laboratory improves academic performance and students' attitudes toward teamwork.

    PubMed

    Huitt, Tiffany W; Killins, Anita; Brooks, William S

    2015-01-01

    As the healthcare climate shifts toward increased interdisciplinary patient care, it is essential that students become accomplished at group problem solving and develop positive attitudes toward teamwork. Team-based learning (TBL) has become a popular approach to medical education because of its ability to promote active learning, problem-solving skills, communication, and teamwork. However, its documented use in the laboratory setting and physical therapy education is limited. We used TBL as a substitute for one-third of cadaveric dissections in the gross anatomy laboratories at two Doctor of Physical Therapy programs to study its effect on both students' perceptions and academic performance. We surveyed students at the beginning and completion of their anatomy course as well as students who had previously completed a traditional anatomy course to measure the impact of TBL on students' perceptions of teamwork. We found that the inclusion of TBL in the anatomy laboratory improves students' attitudes toward working with peers (P < 0.01). Non-TBL students had significantly lower attitudes toward teamwork (P < 0.01). Comparison of academic performance between TBL and non-TBL students revealed that students who participated in TBL scored significantly higher on their first anatomy practical examination and on their head/neck written examination (P < 0.001). When asked to rate their role in a team, a 10.5% increase in the mean rank score for Problem Solver resulted after the completion of the TBL-based anatomy course. Our data indicate that TBL is an effective supplement to cadaveric dissection in the laboratory portion of gross anatomy, improving both students' grades and perceptions of teamwork. PMID:24799448

  14. Bridging the Academic and Vocational Divide--A Case Study on Work-based Learning in the UK NHS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Christopher; Wilson, Valerie

    2000-01-01

    Outlines development by the United Kingdom's National Health Service Training Division (NHSTD) of a set of national standards for Information Management and Technology (IM&T) professionals in health care. Describes the technical-rational and "professional artistry" models of education and gives an overview of the Professional Awards based on the…

  15. National geochemical data base; PLUTO geochemical data base for the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baedecker, Philip A.; Grossman, Jeffrey N.; Buttleman, Kim P.

    1998-01-01

    The PLUTO CD-ROM data base contains inorganic geothermal data obtained by the analytical laboratories of the Geologic Division of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the United States, including Hawaii and Alaska, in support of USGS program activities requiring chemical data. This CD-ROM was produced in accordance with the ISO 9660 standard and can be accessed by any computer system that has the appropriate software to read the ISO 9660 discs; however, the disc is intended for use in a DOS environment.

  16. Documentation of chemotherapy infusion preparation costs in academic- and community-based oncology practices.

    PubMed

    Brixner, Diana I; Oderda, Gary M; Nickman, Nancy A; Beveridge, Roy; Jorgenson, James A

    2006-03-01

    Significant changes in Medicare reimbursement for outpatient oncology services were proposed as part of the Medicare Modernization Act of 2003. The purpose of this study was to identify the "true cost" associated with drug-related handling for the preparation and delivery of chemotherapy doses to estimate the impact of changing reimbursement schema by Medicare. Two academic medical outpatient infusion centers and 2 community cancer centers provided data used to estimate all costs (excluding drug cost) associated with the preparation of chemotherapy doses. The data included both fixed costs (drug storage, space, equipment, and information resources) and variable costs (insurance management, inventory, waste management, pharmacy staff payroll, supplies, and shipping). The average cost for the preparation of chemotherapy doses across all sites was dollar 34.27 (range, dollar 32.08-dollar 41.23). A time-and-motion study was also performed to determine what tasks were conducted by pharmacy staff and how much time was spent in the preparation of the top 15 chemotherapeutic drugs and regimens used in the 4 sites. Data from the 4 centers was projected to show that if 3,990,495 million chemotherapy infusions were administered to a national Medicare population in 2003, when multiplied by the average cost of preparation for infusions determined by the current study (dollar 34.27), the estimated total annual cost to Medicare for chemotherapy preparation by pharmacists is dollar 136,754,263.65. The pharmacists spent most of their days (90% or more) performing tasks directly related to the preparation of these agents. These data provide scientific support for the consideration of appropriate reimbursement for chemotherapy services provided by pharmacists to Medicare beneficiaries. PMID:16507268

  17. Growing Isolation Frustrates Iranian Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labi, Aisha

    2008-01-01

    Before the Islamic Revolution of 1979, Iranian graduate students and academics frequently studied or worked in the United States. That year, for example, the 51,300 Iranian students in the United States were the single largest group of foreign students in the country. Many, if not most, Iranian professors received their doctorates from American…

  18. The Horizontal and Vertical Fragmentation of Academic Work and the Challenge for Academic Governance and Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Glen A.

    2013-01-01

    Academic work has become increasingly fragmented. The horizontal fragmentation of the profession into disciplinary tribes has been accompanied by the increasing participation of student affairs and educational development professionals located outside the academic units but are actively engaged in academic work, such as supporting teaching and…

  19. Locus of Control, Academic Self-Concept, and Academic Dishonesty among High Ability College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinn, Anne N.; Boazman, Janette

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the current study were to evaluate a measure of academic dishonesty and examine high ability college students' loci of control and its effect on behaviors of academic dishonesty, as moderated by academic self-concept. A total of 357 high ability college students enrolled at two universities in the southwestern United States…

  20. Can the United States afford a lunar base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keaton, Paul W.

    1988-01-01

    Establishing a lunar base will require steady funding for a decade or two. The question addressed is whether such a large space project is affordable at this time. The relevant facts and methodology are presented so that the reader may formulate independent answers. It is shown that a permanent lunar base can be financed without increasing NASA's historical budgetary trend.

  1. Can the United States afford a lunar base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keaton, Paul W.

    1988-03-01

    Establishing a lunar base will require steady funding for a decade or two. The question addressed is whether such a large space project is affordable at this time. The relevant facts and methodology are presented so that the reader may formulate independent answers. It is shown that a permanent lunar base can be financed without increasing NASA's historical budgetary trend.

  2. Use of a Web-Based Academic Alert System for Identification of Underachieving Students at an Urban Research Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Early alert strategies are an increasingly common way to address students' ongoing needs for greater academic and social engagement by enabling a positive campus environment and appropriate academic support; Kuh et al. find these to be necessary engagement conditions. Young and Fry show the benefits of student metacognition, or awareness of…

  3. Out on the Web: The Relationship between Campus Climate and GLBT-Related Web-based Resources in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciszek, Matthew P.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between the perceived campus environment for gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) students at colleges and universities and how academic libraries have deployed GLBT-related resources on the Web. Recommendations are made for increasing GLBT-related materials and information in academic libraries.…

  4. Academic Achievement of African American Boys: A City-Wide, Community-Based Investigation of Risk and Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fantuzzo, John; LeBoeuf, Whitney; Rouse, Heather; Chen, Chin-Chih

    2012-01-01

    In light of persistent Black-White achievement gaps for boys, this study examined publicly monitored risks believed to be associated with being behind academically for an entire subpopulation of African American boys in a large urban public school district. Also examined were indicators of academic engagement hypothesized to mediate the relations…

  5. Helping Students and the Bottom Line: Creating a Module-Based Academic Program to Drive SEM Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Jeffrey P.

    2012-01-01

    The chief academic officer to whom the author once reported gave him the freedom to be creative in implementing their institution's then-new, three-year strategic enrollment management (SEM) plan. For the fall 2010 semester, they had already exceeded projected net-tuition dollar amounts for the entire academic year. Just five months prior to…

  6. The Changing Landscape of Alternate Assessments Based on Modified Academic Achievement Standards: An Analysis of Early Adopters of AA-MASs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazarus, Sheryl S.; Thurlow, Martha L.

    2009-01-01

    Several states had an assessment that they considered to be an alternate assessment based on modified academic achievement standards (AA-MAS) in place, or in development, when the April 2007 federal regulations on modified achievement standards were finalized. This article uses publicly available information collected by the National Center on…

  7. The Effects of Synchronous Text-Based Computer-Mediated Communication Tasks on the Development of L2 and Academic Literacy: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jinrong

    2012-01-01

    The dissertation examines how synchronous text-based computer-mediated communication (SCMC) tasks may affect English as a Second Language (ESL) learners' development of second language (L2) and academic literacy. The study is motivated by two issues concerning the use of SCMC tasks in L2 writing classes. First, although some of the alleged…

  8. "Disqus" Website-Based Commenting as an e-Research Method: Engaging Doctoral and Early-Career Academic Learners in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilburn, Daniel; Earley, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This article presents an adaptation of established qualitative research methods for online focus groups by using the "Disqus" website-based commenting platform as a medium for discussion among doctoral and early-career academic learners. Facilities allowing Internet users to comment on the content of web pages are increasingly popular on…

  9. An Investigation of Taiwan University Students' Perceptions of Online Academic Help Seeking, and Their Web-Based Learning Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Kun-Hung; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate Taiwan University students' perceptions (including experience, confidence and preference) of online academic help seeking (OAHS) and students' level of web-based learning self-efficacy (WLSE). Two instruments, OAHS questionnaire, consisting of "information searching," "formal" and "informal query" scales,…

  10. Relationship between Web-Based Learning Time outside the Classroom and Academic Achievement in German as a Tertiary Language by the Students on Vocational High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanbay, Orhan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this empirical research is to investigate the relationship between web-based learning time and academic achievement in German. 36 learners of L3 German with L1 Turkish and L2 English from Vocational High School of Kahta at Adiyaman University were the participants of this study. The empirical process of the study continued 6 weeks…

  11. Assessing the Impact of School-Based Health Centers on Academic Achievement and College Preparation Efforts: Using Propensity Score Matching to Assess School-Level Data in California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bersamin, Melina; Garbers, Samantha; Gaarde, Jenna; Santelli, John

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the association between school-based health center (SBHC) presence and school-wide measures of academic achievement and college preparation efforts. Publicly available educational and demographic data from 810 California public high schools were linked to a list of schools with an SBHC. Propensity score matching, a method to…

  12. The Role of Institutional, Family and Peer-Based Discourses and Practices in the Construction of Students' Socio-Academic Trajectories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poveda, David; Jociles, Maria Isabel; Franze, Adela; Moscoso, Maria Fernanda; Calvo, Albano

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we discuss findings from multi-level ethnography conducted in a secondary school located in Madrid (Spain). The study focuses on the variety of institutional, family and peer-based factors that contribute to the construction of students' socio-academic trajectories. In particular, we attempt to understand the role these social…

  13. From Expectations to Experiences: Using a Structural Typology to Understand First-Year Student Outcomes in Academically Based Living-Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawrzynski, Matthew R.; Jessup-Anger, Jody E.

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study investigated to what extent noncognitive variables (e.g., expectations for college) and the college environment (i.e., academically based living-learning communities) influence students' college experience. This research goes beyond grouping all living-learning students into one category, which has dominated much of the…

  14. Students' Perceptions of Computer-Based Learning Environments, Their Attitude towards Business Statistics, and Their Academic Achievement: Implications from a UK University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, ThuyUyen H.; Charity, Ian; Robson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates students' perceptions of computer-based learning environments, their attitude towards business statistics, and their academic achievement in higher education. Guided by learning environments concepts and attitudinal theory, a theoretical model was proposed with two instruments, one for measuring the learning environment and…

  15. A Feasibility Study for the Development of Fee Based Services in Academic Libraries: Report to the Vice President for Business and Finance, Memphis State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, John E.

    This study is designed to illuminate some of the issues, options, and activities related to developing fee based information services at a large academic library, and to suggest the feasibility of developing such services at Memphis State University Libraries. The basis for the study is the realization that libraries, through automation, a changed…

  16. A Study of Problem-Based Learning Content Acquisition and Academic Achievement in Career and Technical Education Courses at the Middle-School Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation study was to determine if a relationship existed between problem-based learning (PBL) content acquisition and academic achievement on teacher-made tests in Career and Technical Education (CTE) courses at the middle school level. The study sample consisted of 20 seventh-grade students enrolled in a CTE keyboarding…

  17. The Effectiveness of Self-Regulated Learning Scaffolds on Academic Performance in Computer-Based Learning Environments: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    This meta-analysis examined research on the effects of self-regulated learning scaffolds on academic performance in computer-based learning environments from 2004 to 2015. A total of 29 articles met inclusion criteria and were included in the final analysis with a total sample size of 2,648 students. Moderator analyses were performed using a…

  18. The Effects of Project-Based Learning on Students' Academic Achievement, Attitude, and Retention of Knowledge: The Subject of "Electricity in Our Lives"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karaçalli, Saide; Korur, Fikret

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the effects of project-based learning on students' academic achievement, attitude, and retention of knowledge in relation to the subject of "Electricity in Our Lives" in a fourth-grade science course. The study was conducted in a quasi-experimental design as a "pre-test, post-test with…

  19. An explanatory model of academic achievement based on aptitudes, goal orientations, self-concept and learning strategies.

    PubMed

    Miñano Pérez, Pablo; Castejón Costa, Juan-Luis; Gilar Corbí, Raquel

    2012-03-01

    As a result of studies examining factors involved in the learning process, various structural models have been developed to explain the direct and indirect effects that occur between the variables in these models. The objective was to evaluate a structural model of cognitive and motivational variables predicting academic achievement, including general intelligence, academic self-concept, goal orientations, effort and learning strategies. The sample comprised of 341 Spanish students in the first year of compulsory secondary education. Different tests and questionnaires were used to evaluate each variable, and Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) was applied to contrast the relationships of the initial model. The model proposed had a satisfactory fit, and all the hypothesised relationships were significant. General intelligence was the variable most able to explain academic achievement. Also important was the direct influence of academic self-concept on achievement, goal orientations and effort, as well as the mediating ability of effort and learning strategies between academic goals and final achievement. PMID:22379697

  20. An explanatory model of academic achievement based on aptitudes, goal orientations, self-concept and learning strategies.

    PubMed

    Miñano Pérez, Pablo; Castejón Costa, Juan-Luis; Gilar Corbí, Raquel

    2012-03-01

    As a result of studies examining factors involved in the learning process, various structural models have been developed to explain the direct and indirect effects that occur between the variables in these models. The objective was to evaluate a structural model of cognitive and motivational variables predicting academic achievement, including general intelligence, academic self-concept, goal orientations, effort and learning strategies. The sample comprised of 341 Spanish students in the first year of compulsory secondary education. Different tests and questionnaires were used to evaluate each variable, and Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) was applied to contrast the relationships of the initial model. The model proposed had a satisfactory fit, and all the hypothesised relationships were significant. General intelligence was the variable most able to explain academic achievement. Also important was the direct influence of academic self-concept on achievement, goal orientations and effort, as well as the mediating ability of effort and learning strategies between academic goals and final achievement.

  1. Academic Success in Context-Based Chemistry: Demonstrating Fluid Transitions between Concepts and Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Donna Therese; Ritchie, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Curriculum developers and researchers have promoted context-based programmes to arrest waning student interest and participation in the enabling sciences at high school and university. Context-based programmes aim for student connections between scientific discourse and real-world contexts to elevate curricular relevance without diminishing…

  2. Empirically Based School Interventions Targeted at Academic and Mental Health Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; Olin, S. Serene; Kerker, Bonnie D.; Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Crowe, Maura; Saka, Noa

    2007-01-01

    This review examines empirically based studies of school-based mental health interventions. The review identified 64 out of more than 2,000 articles published between 1990 and 2006 that met methodologically rigorous criteria for inclusion. Of these 64 articles, only 24 examined both mental health "and" educational outcomes. The majority of…

  3. Gas-engine-based, low-emission cogeneration units

    SciTech Connect

    Chellini, R.

    1994-04-01

    Continental Energy Systems (CES) of Westmalle, Belgium, has been specializing, since its foundation in 1983, in the supply of cogeneration packages in the 50-300 KW power range. CES activity is mainly concentrated in the transformation of Valmet, Scania, Iveco and MAN diesel engines into spark-ignited engines capable of running on natural gas, CNG, LPG, biogas, landfill gas, etc. In the upper power range they also package Waukesha gas engines supplied from the Dutch plant of the American engine manufacturer. The new closed-loop combustion control system allows engines in the naturally-aspirated or turbocharged configuration with catalytic converters to operate well below Euro 2 limits. In fact, these engines already comply with 1995 CARB (California Air Resources Board) emission limits and with those that will become mandatory in Europe with the 1996 step. The new system still makes use of conventional components for metering and mixing functions, but these are considered as three separate devices; the electronic control unit, the oxygen sensor and an actuator enabling closed loop air/fuel ratio control. 4 figs.

  4. A Study of Designing an Inquiry-Based Unit in Mathematics and Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyjur, Patti; Li, Qing

    2010-01-01

    This paper looks at the design process of an inquiry-based mathematics and science unit in two urban grade nine classes. Three teachers who teach in an urban, all-girls' junior high school collaborated with math/science and educational experts to design and implement the unit. Results showed the following: teachers needed to be flexible regarding…

  5. Computer Aided Drafting Curriculum for Vocational Drafting. A Competency Based Unit of Instruction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peck, Greg

    This document contains (1) the final report of a project to develop a computer-aided drafting (CAD) curriculum and (2) a competency-based unit of instruction for use with the CADAPPLE system. The final report states the problem and project objective, presents conclusions and recommendations, and includes survey instruments. The unit is designed…

  6. Tradition and Change in Modern Morocco, An Instructional Unit Based on Film Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, E. Jefferson

    The learning unit for grade levels 8, 9, or 10 is based upon viewing and discussing the film "Morocco: Chaoui Faces His Future." Among the learning objectives of the unit are the following: (1) to expand inquiry skills and the ability to formulate concepts, generalizations, and hypotheses; (2) to introduce the student to the interplay of forces of…

  7. Nanoconstructions based on double-stranded DNA molecules and their applications as optical biosensing units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, M. A.; Kazankov, G. M.; Sergeeva, V. S.; Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    2006-02-01

    We describe the formation and the properties of biosensing units based on the cholesteric liquid-crystalline dispersions of the double-stranded nucleic acid molecules. The resulting biosensing units are proved to be sensitive to the presence of some relevant chemical or biological compounds in a liquid to be analyzed.

  8. Flocking-based Document Clustering on the Graphics Processing Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Potok, Thomas E; Patton, Robert M; ST Charles, Jesse Lee

    2008-01-01

    Abstract?Analyzing and grouping documents by content is a complex problem. One explored method of solving this problem borrows from nature, imitating the flocking behavior of birds. Each bird represents a single document and flies toward other documents that are similar to it. One limitation of this method of document clustering is its complexity O(n2). As the number of documents grows, it becomes increasingly difficult to receive results in a reasonable amount of time. However, flocking behavior, along with most naturally inspired algorithms such as ant colony optimization and particle swarm optimization, are highly parallel and have found increased performance on expensive cluster computers. In the last few years, the graphics processing unit (GPU) has received attention for its ability to solve highly-parallel and semi-parallel problems much faster than the traditional sequential processor. Some applications see a huge increase in performance on this new platform. The cost of these high-performance devices is also marginal when compared with the price of cluster machines. In this paper, we have conducted research to exploit this architecture and apply its strengths to the document flocking problem. Our results highlight the potential benefit the GPU brings to all naturally inspired algorithms. Using the CUDA platform from NIVIDA? we developed a document flocking implementation to be run on the NIVIDA?GEFORCE 8800. Additionally, we developed a similar but sequential implementation of the same algorithm to be run on a desktop CPU. We tested the performance of each on groups of news articles ranging in size from 200 to 3000 documents. The results of these tests were very significant. Performance gains ranged from three to nearly five times improvement of the GPU over the CPU implementation. This dramatic improvement in runtime makes the GPU a potentially revolutionary platform for document clustering algorithms.

  9. Adding to the Education Debt: Depressive Symptoms Mediate the Association between Racial Discrimination and Academic Performance in African Americans.

    PubMed

    English, Devin; Lambert, Sharon F; Ialongo, Nicholas S

    2016-08-01

    Although the United States faces a seemingly intractable divide between white and African American academic performance, there remains a dearth of longitudinal research investigating factors that work to maintain this gap. The present study examined whether racial discrimination predicted the academic performance of African American students through its effect on depressive symptoms. Participants were a community sample of African American adolescents (N=495) attending urban public schools from grade 7 to grade 9 (Mage=12.5). Structural equation modeling revealed that experienced racial discrimination predicted increases in depressive symptoms 1year later, which, in turn, predicted decreases in academic performance the following year. These results suggest that racial discrimination continues to play a critical role in the academic performance of African American students and, as such, contributes to the maintenance of the race-based academic achievement gap in the United States. PMID:27425564

  10. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers.

  11. A Science and Technology Excursion-based Unit of Work: The Human Body.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Laura

    2000-01-01

    Presents a unit of work based on a few systems of the human body. Stretches students' learning beyond the classroom into the local community by going on an excursion to Kalgoorlie Regional Hospital. (ASK)

  12. Academic Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durant, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As colleges and universities become even more complex organizations, advancement professionals need to have the skills, experience, and academic credentials to succeed in this ever-changing environment. Advancement leaders need competencies that extend beyond fundraising, alumni relations, and communications and marketing. The author encourages…

  13. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally negative practice.…

  14. Academic Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Burton R.

    With fragmentation the dominant trend in academic settings around the world, the larger wholes of profession, enterprise, and system are less held together by integrative ideology. Strong ideological bonding is characteristic of the parts, primarily the disciplines. The larger aggregations are made whole mainly by formal superstructure, many…

  15. Academic Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, William R.

    The internal politics of colleges and the influence of a current emphasis on efficiency on the traditional independence of the academician are analyzed. It is suggested that the academician does not work in the same differentiated, and therefore interdependent, way as someone in industry or a bureaucracy. Academic activity is segmented, which…

  16. Cosmetology/Hairstyling. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Marie

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  17. Exploring Academic Teachers' Continuance toward the Web-Based Learning System: The Role of Causal Attributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Ming-Chien; Chang, I.-Chiu; Hwang, Hsin-Ginn

    2011-01-01

    The Expectation Confirmation Model (ECM) is a popular model used to explain the continuance of information system usage. However, past studies have found that the ECM, based on extrinsic motivations (e.g. perceived usefulness, user satisfaction), has limitations insofar as people often have both intrinsic and extrinsic motivations simultaneously.…

  18. Computer-Based Scaffolding to Facilitate Students' Development of Expertise in Academic Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proske, Antje; Narciss, Susanne; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2012-01-01

    Research on expert performance suggests that deliberate practice provides optimal opportunities for expertise development. This study examined whether the provision of computer-based scaffolding (CBS) guiding deliberate practice facilitates students' development of writing expertise. A CBS environment "escribo" was designed to externally support…

  19. Interior Design. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guarini, Michael

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  20. Automotive Mechanics. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Desmond

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  1. Design Drafting. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharkey, Jeff

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  2. Food Services. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vastano, Josephine; And Others

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  3. Plumbing and Heating. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahieu, Louis

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  4. Custom Cabinetmaking. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Kenneth

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  5. An Exploration of the Impact of Reform-Based Science Instruction on Second Graders' Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Valeisha Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether possible relationships might exist between the quality of reform-based science instruction and science and reading achievement in second grade. The study also examined separately possible interactions between quality of instruction and gender and race. The study involved an analysis of data…

  6. Auto Body Repair. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormsbee, Robert

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  7. Academic Accreditation of Work-Based Learning in the Construction Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLernon, Tim; Hughes, David

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the contribution of work-based learning (WBL) to the education of construction students. The research draws on the experiences of part-time students and students on sandwich courses in a School of the Built Environment. The sandwich courses include a year in industry as the penultimate year of a four-year programme. This WBL…

  8. Electrical Trades. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannone, Richard

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  9. Fashion Merchandising. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Edwina

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  10. Commercial Art. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vassallo, Thomas

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  11. Dental Assisting. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattia, Nancy

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  12. Rational Emotive Behavior Based on Academic Procrastination Prevention: Training Programme of Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Düsmez, Ihsan; Barut, Yasar

    2016-01-01

    The research is an experimental study which has experimental and control groups, and based on pre-test, post-test, monitoring test model. Research group consists of second and third grade students of Primary School Education and Psychological Counseling undergraduate programmes in Giresun University Faculty of Educational Sciences. The research…

  13. Operationalizing Levels of Academic Mastery Based on Vygotsky's Theory: The Study of Mathematical Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nezhnov, Peter; Kardanova, Elena; Vasilyeva, Marina; Ludlow, Larry

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested the possibility of operationalizing levels of knowledge acquisition based on Vygotsky's theory of cognitive growth. An assessment tool (SAM-Math) was developed to capture a hypothesized hierarchical structure of mathematical knowledge consisting of procedural, conceptual, and functional levels. In Study 1, SAM-Math was…

  14. School-Based Mentoring Programs: Using Volunteers to Improve the Academic Outcomes of Underserved Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Amanda; Grossman, Jean; DuBois, David

    2015-01-01

    Prior research on mentoring relationships outside of school does point toward relationship closeness and related indicators of the emotional quality of the mentor-protégé tie as important influences on youth outcomes. There is preliminary evidence that this may also be the case for School Based Mentoring (SBM), or at least that closeness promotes…

  15. Marine Trades. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Alan

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  16. Entrepreneur Program. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Maria, Richard

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The document consists of matrices that describe the relationship of vocational skills to basic communication, mathematics, and science skills within the entrepreneur…

  17. Welding. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Terry

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; preface; a…

  18. Setting up a Fee-Based Information Service in an Academic Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloutier, C.

    2005-01-01

    In response to local demand, the University of Calgary Library established a fee-based information service for non-university clientele. The benefits from this service have been both intangible and financial. This article reviews the planning and implementation of the service and its future directions.

  19. Building Trades. COM-LINK. Competency Based Vocational Curricula with Basic Skills and Academic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gudzak, Raymond

    This competency-based module uses the Ocean County (New Jersey) Vocational-Technical Schools curriculum-infused model for infusing basic skills instruction into vocational education. The model demonstrates the relationship of vocational skills to communication, mathematics, and science. The document begins with a philosophy statement; a preface; a…

  20. 2015 Stewardship Science Academic Programs Annual

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Terri; Mischo, Millicent

    2015-02-01

    The Stockpile Stewardship Academic Programs (SSAP) are essential to maintaining a pipeline of professionals to support the technical capabilities that reside at the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) national laboratories, sites, and plants. Since 1992, the United States has observed the moratorium on nuclear testing while significantly decreasing the nuclear arsenal. To accomplish this without nuclear testing, NNSA and its laboratories developed a science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program to maintain and enhance the experimental and computational tools required to ensure the continued safety, security, and reliability of the stockpile. NNSA launched its academic program portfolio more than a decade ago to engage students skilled in specific technical areas of relevance to stockpile stewardship. The success of this program is reflected by the large number of SSAP students choosing to begin their careers at NNSA national laboratories.

  1. Academic Labor Markets and Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breneman, David W., Ed.; Youn, Ted I. K., Ed.

    As part of the Stanford Series on Education and Public Policy, academic careers and academic labor markets in American higher education are examined from a perspective based on both economic reasoning and sociological analysis. Research common to both fields is considered in a series of 10 essays that discuss the following subjects: "Studies of…

  2. Transforming Administration in Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honea, Sion M.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the traditional hierarchical administrative structure in academic libraries. Also analyzes some of its features, and questions specific principles of management in order to propose a more balanced organizational type based on organizational behavior and leadership that will best enable academic libraries to meet challenges. (PEN)

  3. Transnational Academic Mobility and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jons, Heike

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines to what extent the participation of researchers in transnational academic mobility, their experiences and perceived outcomes vary by gender. Based on longitudinal statistics, original survey data and semi-structured interviews with former visiting researchers in Germany, the paper shows that the academic world of female…

  4. Calculating super efficiency of DMUs for ranking units in data envelopment analysis based on SBM model.

    PubMed

    Zanboori, E; Rostamy-Malkhalifeh, M; Jahanshahloo, G R; Shoja, N

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of methods for ranking decision making units (DMUs), among which calculating super efficiency and then ranking the units based on the obtained amount of super efficiency are both valid and efficient. Since most of the proposed models do not provide the projection of Pareto efficiency, a model is developed and presented through this paper based on which in the projection of Pareto-efficient is obtained, in addition to calculating the amount of super efficiency. Moreover, the model is unit invariant, and is always feasible and makes the amount of inefficiency effective in ranking.

  5. Not for industry only: medical students and office-based academic detailing the PIVOT (Pregnant women Influenza Vaccine Optimization Team) initiative.

    PubMed

    Blitz, Daina A; Mallen, Jonathan R; Kwiatkowski, Thomas G; Rabin, Jill M; Dlugacz, Yosef D; Silverman, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Academic detailing is a method of educational outreach that utilizes individualized encounters with physicians to broach specific medical issues in an evidence-based and quality-driven manner. Medical students utilized the matter of influenza vaccination during pregnancy as a lens through which to explore the methods of academic detailing in a community setting. Structured and customized dialogues between North Shore-LIJ affiliated obstetricians and Hofstra North Shore-LIJ medical students were conducted regarding the disparity between the proportion of providers that recommend the vaccine and the percentage of pregnant women being vaccinated annually. Ultimately the project aimed to increase vaccine-carrying rates throughout office based practices in the community, while establishing a viable method for up-to-date information exchange between practicing physicians and academic medicine. While the extent of affected change is currently being quantified, the project proved successful insofar as academic detailing allowed the students to gain access to physicians, and engage in compelling and educational conversations. Both the physicians and students felt these interactions were valuable and well worth continuing. The goal for the future is to expand these practices to other pressing public health issues while continuing to refine the technique.

  6. Overcoming Resistance to Achievement-based Unit Grading in Secondary Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Randall

    2008-01-01

    Achievement-based unit grading in secondary physical education is not commonly practiced due to resistance to grading students based on learning, performance, or achievement. Traditional grading practices based on managerial factors, such as attendance and good behavior, and on "pseudo-accountability" do little to make students accountable for…

  7. Academic food-supply veterinarians: future demand and likely shortages.

    PubMed

    Bruce Prince, J; Andrus, David M; Gwinner, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The future demand for and potential shortages of food-supply veterinarians have been the subject of much concern. Using the Delphi forecasting method in a three-phase Web-based survey process, a panel of experts identified the trends and issues shaping the demand for and supply of academic food-animal veterinarians, then forecasted the likely future demand and shortages of food-supply veterinarians employed in academic institutions in the United States and Canada through 2016. The results indicate that there will be increasing future demand and persistent shortages of academic food-supply veterinarians unless current trends are countered with targeted, strategic action. The Delphi panel also evaluated the effectiveness of several strategies for reversing current trends and increasing the number of food-supply veterinarians entering into academic careers. Academic food-supply veterinarians are a key link in the system that produces food-supply veterinarians for all sectors (private practice, government service, etc.); shortages in the academic sector will amplify shortages wherever food-supply veterinarians are needed. Even fairly small shortages have significant public-health, food-safety, animal-welfare, and bio-security implications. Recent events demonstrate that in an increasingly interconnected global economic food supply system, national economies and public health are at risk unless an adequate supply of appropriately trained food-supply veterinarians is available to counter a wide variety of threats ranging from animal and zoonotic diseases to bioterrorism. PMID:17220489

  8. Academic food-supply veterinarians: future demand and likely shortages.

    PubMed

    Bruce Prince, J; Andrus, David M; Gwinner, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    The future demand for and potential shortages of food-supply veterinarians have been the subject of much concern. Using the Delphi forecasting method in a three-phase Web-based survey process, a panel of experts identified the trends and issues shaping the demand for and supply of academic food-animal veterinarians, then forecasted the likely future demand and shortages of food-supply veterinarians employed in academic institutions in the United States and Canada through 2016. The results indicate that there will be increasing future demand and persistent shortages of academic food-supply veterinarians unless current trends are countered with targeted, strategic action. The Delphi panel also evaluated the effectiveness of several strategies for reversing current trends and increasing the number of food-supply veterinarians entering into academic careers. Academic food-supply veterinarians are a key link in the system that produces food-supply veterinarians for all sectors (private practice, government service, etc.); shortages in the academic sector will amplify shortages wherever food-supply veterinarians are needed. Even fairly small shortages have significant public-health, food-safety, animal-welfare, and bio-security implications. Recent events demonstrate that in an increasingly interconnected global economic food supply system, national economies and public health are at risk unless an adequate supply of appropriately trained food-supply veterinarians is available to counter a wide variety of threats ranging from animal and zoonotic diseases to bioterrorism.

  9. Expanding the range of 'druggable' targets with natural product-based libraries: an academic perspective.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Renato A; Wurst, Jacqueline M; Tan, Derek S

    2010-06-01

    Existing drugs address a relatively narrow range of biological targets. As a result, libraries of drug-like molecules have proven ineffective against a variety of challenging targets, such as protein-protein interactions, nucleic acid complexes, and antibacterial modalities. In contrast, natural products are known to be effective at modulating such targets, and new libraries are being developed based on underrepresented scaffolds and regions of chemical space associated with natural products. This has led to several recent successes in identifying new chemical probes that address these challenging targets.

  10. Goal orientation and its relationship to academic success in a laptop-based BScN program.

    PubMed

    Goldsworthy, Sandra J; Goodman, Bill; Muirhead, Bill

    2005-01-01

    This longitudinal study, conducted within a laptop-based BScN program examines the relationship of goal orientation profiles to comfort with technology and academic success. In phase 1 of this study, 101 first year nursing students completed an on line survey. The measurement tools used were Goal Orientation Assessment, Multiple Intelligences Learning Inventory and a locally developed Technology Comfort survey. Results showed that students were predominantly high in the mastery goal orientation profile. Males had a higher comfort level with technology. Age was inversely related to comfort with technology. An unexpected finding was that grade point average was inversely related to comfort with use of technology. The data did not support the commonly held belief that today's students are uniformly well-skilled and comfortable with new technologies. This study will continue over the next three years and will allow comparison of variables over time. Specific teaching interventions may be developed to accommodate varying learning and motivational styles in relation to comfort with technology.

  11. Goal orientation and its relationship to academic success in a laptop-based BScN program.

    PubMed

    Goldsworthy, Sandra J; Goodman, Bill; Muirhead, Bill

    2005-01-01

    This longitudinal study, conducted within a laptop-based BScN program examines the relationship of goal orientation profiles to comfort with technology and academic success. In phase 1 of this study, 101 first year nursing students completed an on line survey. The measurement tools used were Goal Orientation Assessment, Multiple Intelligences Learning Inventory and a locally developed Technology Comfort survey. Results showed that students were predominantly high in the mastery goal orientation profile. Males had a higher comfort level with technology. Age was inversely related to comfort with technology. An unexpected finding was that grade point average was inversely related to comfort with use of technology. The data did not support the commonly held belief that today's students are uniformly well-skilled and comfortable with new technologies. This study will continue over the next three years and will allow comparison of variables over time. Specific teaching interventions may be developed to accommodate varying learning and motivational styles in relation to comfort with technology. PMID:16646917

  12. Automated Web-Based Request Mechanism for Workflow Enhancement in an Academic Customer-Focused Biorepository

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Benjamin J.; Brink, Amy; Holtschlag, Victoria L.

    2012-01-01

    Informatics systems, particularly those that provide capabilities for data storage, specimen tracking, retrieval, and order fulfillment, are critical to the success of biorepositories and other laboratories engaged in translational medical research. A crucial item—one easily overlooked—is an efficient way to receive and process investigator-initiated requests. A successful electronic ordering system should allow request processing in a maximally efficient manner, while also allowing streamlined tracking and mining of request data such as turnaround times and numerical categorizations (user groups, funding sources, protocols, and so on). Ideally, an electronic ordering system also facilitates the initial contact between the laboratory and customers, while still allowing for downstream communications and other steps toward scientific partnerships. We describe here the recently established Web-based ordering system for the biorepository at Washington University Medical Center, along with its benefits for workflow, tracking, and customer service. Because of the system's numerous value-added impacts, we think our experience can serve as a good model for other customer-focused biorepositories, especially those currently using manual or non-Web–based request systems. Our lessons learned also apply to the informatics developers who serve such biobanks. PMID:23386921

  13. The Academic Chairperson's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creswell, John W.; And Others

    This book champions the importance of chairing an academic department (or division) and focuses attention on the strategies "excellent" chairs use in building a positive work environment for faculty and releasing individual faculty potential. The framework is based on human, organizational, and career development; systems theory; and interpersonal…

  14. Academic tenure and higher education in the United States: implications for the dental education workforce in the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Melanie R

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews the literature related to the evolution and implementation of academic tenure (AT) in U.S. higher education. It is intended to highlight AT implications for the recruitment, retention, and development of the dental education workforce in the twenty-first century and the need for this workforce to implement change in dental education. The dental education workforce is shrinking, and a further decrease is projected, yet the demand for dental education is increasing. AT is becoming increasingly controversial, and the proportion of tenured to nontenured (i.e., contingent) faculty is declining within an already shrinking faculty pool. Confusion regarding the definition of scholarship and its relationship to research and publishing further confounds discussions about AT. Whether the principles of academic freedom and due process require tenure for their preservation in a democratic society is open to question. In view of competing time demands and increasing pressure to publish and apply for grants, factors including the seven-year probationary period for tenure, the decreased availability of tenured positions, and the often perceived inequities between tenured and contingent (i.e., nontenured track) faculty may pose an obstacle to faculty recruitment and retention. These factors may severely limit the diversity and skill mix of the dental education workforce, resulting in a decrease in staffing flexibility that appears to be needed in the twenty-first century. Politics, increasing dependence on grant funding by some institutions, resistance to change, and insufficient mentoring are all stimulating discussions about the future of tenure and its implications for U.S. dental education. PMID:17389570

  15. Facing the fear of failure: An explorative qualitative study of client experiences in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program for university students with academic evaluation anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hjeltnes, Aslak; Binder, Per-Einar; Moltu, Christian; Dundas, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate the subjective experiences of 29 university students who participated in an 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program for academic evaluation anxiety. Participants who self-referred to the Student Counseling Service underwent individual semi-structured interviews about how they experienced the personal relevance and practical usefulness of taking the MBSR program. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed through a team-based explorative-reflective thematic approach based on a hermeneutic-phenomenological epistemology. Five salient patterns of meaning (themes) were found: (1) finding an inner source of calm, (2) sharing a human struggle, (3) staying focused in learning situations, (4) moving from fear to curiosity in academic learning, and (5) feeling more self-acceptance when facing difficult situations. We contextualize these findings in relation to existing research, discuss our own process of reflexivity, highlight important limitations of this study, and suggest possible implications for future research.

  16. Facing the fear of failure: An explorative qualitative study of client experiences in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program for university students with academic evaluation anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hjeltnes, Aslak; Binder, Per-Einar; Moltu, Christian; Dundas, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate the subjective experiences of 29 university students who participated in an 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program for academic evaluation anxiety. Participants who self-referred to the Student Counseling Service underwent individual semi-structured interviews about how they experienced the personal relevance and practical usefulness of taking the MBSR program. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed through a team-based explorative-reflective thematic approach based on a hermeneutic-phenomenological epistemology. Five salient patterns of meaning (themes) were found: (1) finding an inner source of calm, (2) sharing a human struggle, (3) staying focused in learning situations, (4) moving from fear to curiosity in academic learning, and (5) feeling more self-acceptance when facing difficult situations. We contextualize these findings in relation to existing research, discuss our own process of reflexivity, highlight important limitations of this study, and suggest possible implications for future research. PMID:26297629

  17. Facing the fear of failure: An explorative qualitative study of client experiences in a mindfulness-based stress reduction program for university students with academic evaluation anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Hjeltnes, Aslak; Binder, Per-Einar; Moltu, Christian; Dundas, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate the subjective experiences of 29 university students who participated in an 8-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program for academic evaluation anxiety. Participants who self-referred to the Student Counseling Service underwent individual semi-structured interviews about how they experienced the personal relevance and practical usefulness of taking the MBSR program. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed through a team-based explorative–reflective thematic approach based on a hermeneutic-phenomenological epistemology. Five salient patterns of meaning (themes) were found: (1) finding an inner source of calm, (2) sharing a human struggle, (3) staying focused in learning situations, (4) moving from fear to curiosity in academic learning, and (5) feeling more self-acceptance when facing difficult situations. We contextualize these findings in relation to existing research, discuss our own process of reflexivity, highlight important limitations of this study, and suggest possible implications for future research. PMID:26297629

  18. Academic Incentives for Faculty Participation in Community-based Participatory Research

    PubMed Central

    Nyden, Philip

    2003-01-01

    Recognizing the need to overcome the obstacles of traditional university- and discipline-oriented research approaches, a variety of incentives to promote community-based participatory research (CBPR) are presented. Experiences of existing CBPR researchers are used in outlining how this methodological approach can appeal to faculty: the common ground shared by faculty and community leaders in challenging the status quo; opportunities to have an impact on local, regional, and national policy; and opening doors for new research and funding opportunities. Strategies for promoting CBPR in universities are provided in getting CBPR started, changing institutional practices currently inhibiting CBPR, and institutionalizing CBPR. Among the specific strategies are: development of faculty research networks; team approaches to CBPR; mentoring faculty and students; using existing national CBPR networks; modifying tenure and promotion guidelines; development of appropriate measures of CBPR scholarship; earmarking university resources to support CBPR; using Institutional Review Boards to promote CBPR; making CBPR-oriented faculty appointments; and creating CBPR centers. PMID:12848841

  19. Special Education Students Improve Academic Performance through Problem-Based Learning and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, S.; Kintsch, A.

    2003-12-01

    Boulder High School Special Education students work in teams on donated wireless computers to solve problems created by global climate change. Their text is Richard Somerville's The Forgiving Air. They utilize Wheeling Jesuit University's remote sensing web site and private computer bulletin board. Their central source for problem-based learning (PBL) is www.cotf.edu, NASA's Classroom of the Future Global Change web site. As a result, students not only improve their abilities to write, read, do math and research, speak, and work as team members, they also improve self-esteem, resilience, and willingness to take more challenging classes. Two special education students passed AP exams, Calculus and U.S. Government, last spring and Jay Matthews of Newsweek rates Boulder High as 201st of the nation's top 1000 high schools.

  20. Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Academic Institutional Change and the Problem of Collective Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellstrom, Tomas

    2004-01-01

    This paper argues that some of the current trends affecting academe impede on key institutional structures, or sets of interrelated norms for academic conduct, which are necessary for sustaining collective action among academics. In this sense academics and academic units may find themselves "between a rock and a hard place'', that is with new…

  1. Predictive validity of curriculum-based measurement and teacher ratings of academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Kettler, Ryan J; Albers, Craig A

    2013-08-01

    Two alternative universal screening approaches to identify students with early learning difficulties were examined, along with a combination of these approaches. These approaches, consisting of (a) curriculum-based measurement (CBM) and (b) teacher ratings using Performance Screening Guides (PSGs), served as predictors of achievement tests in reading and mathematics. Participants included 413 students in grades 1, 2, and 3 in Tennessee (n=118) and Wisconsin (n=295) who were divided into six subsamples defined by grade and state. Reading and mathematics achievement tests with established psychometric properties were used as criteria within a concurrent and predictive validity framework. Across both achievement areas, CBM probes shared more variance with criterion measures than did teacher ratings, although teacher ratings added incremental validity among most subsamples. PSGs tended to be more accurate for identifying students in need of assistance at a 1-month interval, whereas CBM probes were more accurate at a 6-month interval. Teachers indicated that (a) false negatives are more problematic than are false positives, (b) both screening methods are useful for identifying early learning difficulties, and (c) both screening methods are useful for identifying students in need of interventions. Collectively, these findings suggest that the two types of measures, when used together, yield valuable information about students who need assistance in reading and mathematics.

  2. Strategic Expansion Models in Academic Radiology.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Rajni; Yang, Wei T; Tannir, Habib; Parikh, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In response to economic pressures, academic institutions in the United States and their radiology practices, are expanding into the community to build a larger network, thereby driving growth and achieving economies of scale. These economies of scale are being achieved variously via brick-and-mortar construction, community practice acquisition, and partnership-based network expansion. We describe and compare these three expansion models within a 4-part framework of: (1) upfront investment; (2) profitability impact; (3) brand impact; and (4) risk of execution. PMID:26786029

  3. Strategic Expansion Models in Academic Radiology.

    PubMed

    Natesan, Rajni; Yang, Wei T; Tannir, Habib; Parikh, Jay

    2016-03-01

    In response to economic pressures, academic institutions in the United States and their radiology practices, are expanding into the community to build a larger network, thereby driving growth and achieving economies of scale. These economies of scale are being achieved variously via brick-and-mortar construction, community practice acquisition, and partnership-based network expansion. We describe and compare these three expansion models within a 4-part framework of: (1) upfront investment; (2) profitability impact; (3) brand impact; and (4) risk of execution.

  4. Web-based data and knowledge sharing between stroke units and general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Quaglini, Silvana; Caffi, Ezio; Boiocchi, Lorenzo; Panzarasa, Silvia; Cavallini, Anna; Micieli, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    We describe a telemedicine application for emergency management in Stroke Units, where prompt decisions must be taken, often knowing neither the clinical history nor the stroke symptoms onset modality. We have designed and implemented an Information and Communication Technology architecture for the situation in which a general practitioner is called for a suspected stroke and provides for the admission to a Stroke Unit. By means of a palmtop and a wireless Internet connection, he can send to the Stroke Unit the demographic data, the list of the patient's problems, current and/or recent therapies, and a guideline-based stroke-specific form with the objective examination results. In this way, the Stroke Unit team is alerted and informed before the patient arrival, and can manage the urgency at the best. The proposal involved 20 general practitioners and one Stroke Unit in the Lombardia Region, Italy.

  5. Establishment of a Medical Academic Word List

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jing; Liang, Shao-lan; Ge, Guang-chun

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports a corpus-based lexical study of the most frequently used medical academic vocabulary in medical research articles (RAs). A Medical Academic Word List (MAWL), a word list of the most frequently used medical academic words in medical RAs, was compiled from a corpus containing 1 093 011 running words of medical RAs from online…

  6. Examining the Public Face of Academic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Language is an important way of presenting an identity, either individual or group. This paper explores the language used in the presentation of the identity of academic development. The study is based on an analysis of websites from academic development centres in the UK and Australia and outlines the public ways in which academic developers…

  7. [Operational Management of Multidisciplinary Organ-Based Tumor Units in Our Cancer Center].

    PubMed

    Kato, Hiroaki; Tsujie, Masanori; Ichimura, Noriko; Yukawa, Masao; Inoue, Masatoshi

    2016-05-01

    Owing to the advances in diagnosis and treatment, it is imperative to develop a multidisciplinary approach for the management of cancer patients. In our cancer center, multidisciplinary organ-based tumor units have been organized for team medical care. These units consist of cancer specialists from multiple departments including medical oncology, surgery, radiology, histopathology, and nursing. Members of each unit regularly conduct meetings to discuss diagnostic and therapeutic aspects, as well as to report the progress of cancer patients. Co-operation with the counseling and support center, utilization of the computerized medical record system, and using brochures for advertisement, all play important roles in adequate management of multidisciplinary organ-based tumor units. PMID:27210090

  8. Denmark. A Study of the Educational System of Denmark and Guide to the Academic Placement of Students in Educational Institutions in the United States. PIER World Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolston, Valerie A.; Dickey, Karlene N.

    This volume offers a full country study of the structure and content of the educational system of Denmark, together with a formal set of placement recommendations for Danish students wishing to study in the United States. Chapter 1 introduces the volume with descriptions of Denmark and its people, government, the government's role in education,…

  9. Italy: A Study of the Educational System of Italy and a Guide to the Academic Placement of Students from Italy in Educational Institutions of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capobianco, Joseph P.

    The educational system of Italy is described, and placement recommendations concerning students who want to study in the United States are presented. After a description of preschool, elementary, and middle school education, the different types of upper-secondary education system are considered (i.e., the lyceums, teacher training, and technical…

  10. From Academic Imperialism to the Civil Commons: Institutional Possibilities for Responding to the United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumner, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    The United Nations Decade of Education for Sustainable Development signals an unparalleled opportunity to link education with sustainability. But in the age of corporate globalization, will education bow to the external pressures that have always sought to subordinate it to vested interests, or will it reach beyond these narrow confines to the…

  11. An ancient relation between units of length and volume based on a sphere.

    PubMed

    Zapassky, Elena; Gadot, Yuval; Finkelstein, Israel; Benenson, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    The modern metric system defines units of volume based on the cube. We propose that the ancient Egyptian system of measuring capacity employed a similar concept, but used the sphere instead. When considered in ancient Egyptian units, the volume of a sphere, whose circumference is one royal cubit, equals half a hekat. Using the measurements of large sets of ancient containers as a database, the article demonstrates that this formula was characteristic of Egyptian and Egyptian-related pottery vessels but not of the ceramics of Mesopotamia, which had a different system of measuring length and volume units. PMID:22470489

  12. An Ancient Relation between Units of Length and Volume Based on a Sphere

    PubMed Central

    Zapassky, Elena; Gadot, Yuval; Finkelstein, Israel; Benenson, Itzhak

    2012-01-01

    The modern metric system defines units of volume based on the cube. We propose that the ancient Egyptian system of measuring capacity employed a similar concept, but used the sphere instead. When considered in ancient Egyptian units, the volume of a sphere, whose circumference is one royal cubit, equals half a hekat. Using the measurements of large sets of ancient containers as a database, the article demonstrates that this formula was characteristic of Egyptian and Egyptian-related pottery vessels but not of the ceramics of Mesopotamia, which had a different system of measuring length and volume units. PMID:22470489

  13. Public Entrepreneurs and the Adoption of Broad-Based Merit Aid beyond the Southeastern United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingle, William Kyle; Petroff, Ruth Ann

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of broad-based merit aid adoption in the southeastern United States has been well noted in the literature. However, there are states that have adopted broad-based merit aid programs outside of the Southeast. Guided by multiple theoretical frameworks, including innovation diffusion theory (e.g., Gray, 1973, 1994; Rogers, 2003),…

  14. The effect of unit-based simulation on nurses' identification of deteriorating patients.

    PubMed

    Disher, Jocelyn; Burgum, Angela; Desai, Anisha; Fallon, Cynthia; Hart, Patricia L; Aduddell, Kathie

    2014-01-01

    Patients are admitted to healthcare organizations with multiple, complex conditions that can lead to acute deterioration events. It is imperative that nurses are adequately trained to recognize and respond appropriately to these events to ensure positive patient outcomes. The purpose of this pilot research study was to examine the effects of a unit-based, high-fidelity simulation initiative on cardiovascular step-down unit registered nurses' identification and management of deteriorating patients.

  15. Coverage Evaluation of the Academic Library Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marston, Christopher C.

    The Academic Libraries Survey (ALS) was established in 1966 to collect concise information on library resources, services, and expenditures for the entire population of academic libraries in the United States. The ALS is conducted every 2 years as a cooperative venture of the U.S. Department of Education and the Department of Commerce, Bureau of…

  16. A Shift towards Academic Capitalism in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauppinen, Ilkka; Kaidesoja, Tuukka

    2014-01-01

    Academic capitalism is currently a widely studied topic amongst higher education scholars, especially in the United States. This paper demonstrates that the theory of academic capitalism also provides a fruitful perspective for analysing the restructuring of Finnish higher education since the 1990s, although with reservations. It will be argued…

  17. Teaching the Conventions of Academic Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thonney, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Given the current emphasis on disciplinary discourses, it's not surprising that so little recent attention has been devoted to identifying conventions that are universal in academic discourse. In this essay, the author argues that there are shared features that unite academic writing, and that by introducing these features to first-year students…

  18. Developing New Academic Developers: Doing before Being?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kensington-Miller, Barbara; Brailsford, Ian; Gossman, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A small group of new academic developers reflected on their induction into the profession and wondered if things could have been done differently. The researchers decided to question the directors of three tertiary academic development units about how they recruited new developers, what skills and competences they looked for and how they inducted…

  19. Promoting Academic Integrity in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehm, Pamela J.; Justice, Madeline; Weeks, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to identify best practice initiatives that contribute to academic integrity and reduce scholastic dishonesty in higher education. Chief academic affairs officers (CAOs) or provosts at four year public and private colleges/universities and community colleges in the United States were surveyed. Four initiatives were found…

  20. Academic Trajectories of Newcomer Immigrant Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suarez-Orozco, Carola; Gaytan, Francisco X.; Bang, Hee Jin; Pakes, Juliana; O'Connor, Erin; Rhodes, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Immigration to the United States presents both challenges and opportunities that affect students' academic achievement. Using a 5-year longitudinal, mixed-methods approach, we identified varying academic trajectories of newcomer immigrant students from Central America, China, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Mexico. Latent class growth curve…

  1. Hegemony, Big Money and Academic Independence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This article considers whether a threat is posed to academic independence in corporate universities by the United States Studies Centre (USSC) at the University of Sydney. The USSC rapidly worked its way into Australia's oldest university, building a unique governance structure in which a private business lobby vets senior academics and controls…

  2. The Effect of POGIL on Academic Performance and Academic Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Gale, S.; Boisselle, L. N.

    2015-01-01

    POGIL (Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning) is a collaborative learning technique that employs guided inquiry within a cyclic system of exploration, concept invention, and application. This action research explores students' academic performance on a unit of organic chemistry work taught using POGIL, in addition to the effect of POGIL on…

  3. Information-seeking Behavior During Residency Is Associated With Quality of Theoretical Learning, Academic Career Achievements, and Evidence-based Medical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Oussalah, Abderrahim; Fournier, Jean-Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Braun, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Data regarding knowledge acquisition during residency training are sparse. Predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements and evidence-based medical practice during residency are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional study on residents and attending physicians across several residency programs in 2 French faculties of medicine. We comprehensively evaluated the information-seeking behavior (I-SB) during residency using a standardized questionnaire and looked for independent predictors of theoretical learning quality, academic career achievements, and evidence-based medical practice among I-SB components using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Between February 2013 and May 2013, 338 fellows and attending physicians were included in the study. Textbooks and international medical journals were reported to be used on a regular basis by 24% and 57% of the respondents, respectively. Among the respondents, 47% refer systematically (4.4%) or frequently (42.6%) to published guidelines from scientific societies upon their publication. The median self-reported theoretical learning quality score was 5/10 (interquartile range, 3–6; range, 1–10). A high theoretical learning quality score (upper quartile) was independently and strongly associated with the following I-SB components: systematic reading of clinical guidelines upon their publication (odds ratio [OR], 5.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.77–17.44); having access to a library that offers the leading textbooks of the specialty in the medical department (OR, 2.45, 95% CI, 1.33–4.52); knowledge of the specialty leading textbooks (OR, 2.12; 95% CI, 1.09–4.10); and PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.01–3.73). Research Master (M2) and/or PhD thesis enrolment were independently and strongly associated with the following predictors: PubMed search skill score ≥5/10 (OR, 4.10; 95% CI, 1.46–11.53); knowledge of the leading medical journals of the

  4. The Academic Differences between Students Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs and Students Not Involved in School-Based Robotics Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koumoullos, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This research study aimed to identify any correlation between participation in afterschool robotics at the high school level and academic performance. Through a sample of N = 121 students, the researcher examined the grades and attendance of students who participated in a robotics program in the 2011-2012 school year. The academic record of these…

  5. A group-based tasks allocation algorithm for the optimization of long leave opportunities in academic departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyono Obono, S. D.; Basak, Sujit Kumar

    2011-12-01

    The general formulation of the assignment problem consists in the optimal allocation of a given set of tasks to a workforce. This problem is covered by existing literature for different domains such as distributed databases, distributed systems, transportation, packets radio networks, IT outsourcing, and teaching allocation. This paper presents a new version of the assignment problem for the allocation of academic tasks to staff members in departments with long leave opportunities. It presents the description of a workload allocation scheme and its algorithm, for the allocation of an equitable number of tasks in academic departments where long leaves are necessary.

  6. I Get to Use an iPod in School? Using Technology-Based Advance Organizers to Support the Academic Success of English Learners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, Elsa S.; Mathison, Carla

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the impact of technology-based advance organizers (TBAOs) on the academic performance of 240 4th grade English learners (ELs) participating in a science class in School in the Park (SITP), a museum-school collaboration. While SITP provides a rich, hands-on learning environment, ELs face significant linguistic challenges in their ability to access the dense academic language and concepts provided in SITP's English only curriculum, thus negatively impacting ELs' engagement and learning. The TBAOs were designed in response to this issue. The study investigated two forms of treatment: TBAOs viewed on individual handheld mobile devices (HMDs), specifically iPods; and, TBAOs viewed as a whole class on DVD. The study utilized both qualitative and quantitative data sources, including a pre- and posttest, hands-on and performance-based assessments, as well as focus interviews. Results showed a significant interaction effect between group assignment, language status and application assessments, indicating ELs performed significantly better in the treatment groups. Students who used the HMD instead of the DVD or no treatment improved their total scores significantly on hands-on, performance-based measurements. Differences between treatment and control groups' performance on pre-/posttests approached significance. Furthermore, students reported TBAOs supported learning by introducing new material, introducing and reviewing daily academic vocabulary, and helping them anticipate behavioral and procedural expectations of hands-on activities. Classroom and museum educators reported an increase in the treatment groups' motivation and engagement. The study provided important implications in the use and power of learner-controlled technology in supporting ELs' linguistic and academic success.

  7. Contradictions in Irish Academic Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerrams, Steve; Donovan, John

    2005-01-01

    The conditions that govern academic research vary greatly from country to country and research in the Republic of Ireland was and remains markedly different from that of its larger European neighbours and the United States. Despite the quality of its education system and the excellent reputation of its universities, until recently Ireland had…

  8. Ruminations on the Academic Afterlife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dustin, Daniel; Lamke, Gene; Murphy, James; McDonald, Cary; Wright, Brett; Harper, Jack

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the academic afterlife of a purposive sample of 12 recreation, park, and leisure studies educators from a variety of universities throughout the United States and Canada is discussed. The paper begins with a brief review of the literature on successful aging. That literature's insights are then applied to the lived experiences of…

  9. Global Trends in Academic Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, William K.; Finkelstein, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Even before the current global economic crisis, discontent with the governance of higher education institutions was widespread among faculty in the United States and throughout the world. Drawing from the 2007 Changing Academic Profession (CAP) survey of faculty in seventeen countries, the authors examine faculty perceptions of the current state…

  10. Studies in Possibilities: Academic Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Judith S.

    The history of higher education in the United States encompasses conflicting attitudes towards those in educational leadership roles: educational leaders should be well-trained academicians who somehow know how to manage, or they should be well-trained managers who somehow know how to be academic. However, community college educational…

  11. Academic Freedom: A Lawyer's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Academic freedom is central to ideas of higher education, yet in the United Kingdom it is facing challenges from changing managerial approaches within some universities and changing governmental expectations. Universities are increasingly expected to focus upon knowledge which can be shown to have value and to exploit the results of academic…

  12. Peer Effects in Academic Cheating

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrell, Scott E.; Malmstrom, Frederick V.; West, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Using self-reported academic cheating from the classes of 1959 through 2002 at the three major United States military service academies (Air Force, Army, and Navy), we measure how peer cheating influences individual cheating behavior. We find higher levels of peer cheating result in a substantially increased probability that an individual will…

  13. Physical education, school physical activity, school sports and academic performance

    PubMed Central

    Trudeau, François; Shephard, Roy J

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper is to review relationships of academic performance and some of its determinants to participation in school-based physical activities, including physical education (PE), free school physical activity (PA) and school sports. Methods Linkages between academic achievement and involvement in PE, school PA and sport programmes have been examined, based on a systematic review of currently available literature, including a comprehensive search of MEDLINE (1966 to 2007), PSYCHINFO (1974 to 2007), SCHOLAR.GOOGLE.COM, and ERIC databases. Results Quasi-experimental data indicate that allocating up to an additional hour per day of curricular time to PA programmes does not affect the academic performance of primary school students negatively, even though the time allocated to other subjects usually shows a corresponding reduction. An additional curricular emphasis on PE may result in small absolute gains in grade point average (GPA), and such findings strongly suggest a relative increase in performance per unit of academic teaching time. Further, the overwhelmingly majority of such programmes have demonstrated an improvement in some measures of physical fitness (PF). Cross-sectional observations show a positive association between academic performance and PA, but PF does not seem to show such an association. PA has positive influences on concentration, memory and classroom behaviour. Data from quasi-experimental studies find support in mechanistic experiments on cognitive function, pointing to a positive relationship between PA and intellectual performance. Conclusion Given competent providers, PA can be added to the school curriculum by taking time from other subjects without risk of hindering student academic achievement. On the other hand, adding time to "academic" or "curricular" subjects by taking time from physical education programmes does not enhance grades in these subjects and may be detrimental to health. PMID:18298849

  14. Challenges to academic psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Pardes, H; Pincus, H A

    1983-09-01

    Economic constraints, effects of retrenchments in federal health policy, and increased competition for resources are challenging all sectors of academic medicine. Departments of psychiatry are at particular risk during this era for reasons including the lack of a sound research and research training base in many psychiatry departments; the small number of students entering the field and implications therein for the availability of residency slots in psychiatry; and patterns of allocating resources within academic medical centers which, combined with biases in reimbursement policy toward cognitively based specialties, threaten the economic strength of psychiatric departments. A conceptual model based on marketing principles is proposed to aid in identifying and capitalizing on the unique strengths of the field.

  15. Acceleration of integral imaging based incoherent Fourier hologram capture using graphic processing unit.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyeong-Min; Kim, Hee-Seung; Hong, Sung-In; Lee, Sung-Keun; Jo, Na-Young; Kim, Yong-Soo; Lim, Hong-Gi; Park, Jae-Hyeung

    2012-10-01

    Speed enhancement of integral imaging based incoherent Fourier hologram capture using a graphic processing unit is reported. Integral imaging based method enables exact hologram capture of real-existing three-dimensional objects under regular incoherent illumination. In our implementation, we apply parallel computation scheme using the graphic processing unit, accelerating the processing speed. Using enhanced speed of hologram capture, we also implement a pseudo real-time hologram capture and optical reconstruction system. The overall operation speed is measured to be 1 frame per second.

  16. Assessing the Roles of Student Engagement and Academic Emotions within Middle School Computer- Based Learning in College-Going Pathways

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Pedro, Maria Ofelia Z.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation research focuses on assessing student behavior, academic emotions, and knowledge from a middle school online learning environment, and analyzing their potential effects on decisions about going to college. Using students' longitudinal data ranging from their middle school, to high school, to postsecondary years, I leverage…

  17. A Web-Based EFL Writing Environment as a Bridge between Academic Advisers and Junior Researchers: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Barry Lee

    2013-01-01

    In the age of "publish or perish," publishing academic journal articles is a must, not only for professors but also for graduate students in Taiwan. Increasingly, Taiwanese research universities are requiring masters and PhD students to write theses and dissertations in English, with an added caveat for PhD students to publish two or more articles…

  18. One Small Droplet: News Media Coverage of Peer-Reviewed and University-Based Education Research and Academic Expertise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yettick, Holly

    2015-01-01

    Most members of the American public will never read this article. Instead, they will obtain much of their information about education from the news media. Yet little academic research has examined the type or quality of education research and expertise they will find there. Through the lens of gatekeeping theory, this mixed-methods study aims to…

  19. The Impact of School Libraries on Academic Achievement: A Research Study Based on Responses from Administrators in Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lance, Keith Curry; Rodney, Marcia J.; Schwarz, Bill

    2010-01-01

    Where administrators value strong library programs and can see them doing their part for student success, students are more likely to thrive academically. This is the over-arching conclusion that can be drawn from the latest study of the impact of school libraries--this one in Idaho. The study included survey responses from 176 principals and…

  20. An Appraisal of the Industrial Cooperative Education Program Based on Selected Characteristics of the Students and Their Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Nancy S.

    As a part of a series describing participants in the cooperative education option of the technical program at Macomb County Community College, this report compares the academic achievements, demographics, and employment characteristics of a random sample of 63 co-op respondents and 69 non co-op respondents from the original study population. Co-op…

  1. "La Importancia de la Hermandad Latina": Examining the Psychosociocultural Influences of Latina-Based Sororities on Academic Persistence Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delgada-Guerro, Marla; Gloria, Alberta M.

    2013-01-01

    Using a psychosociocultural (PSC) approach, we examined how self-beliefs, social support, and cultural fit influenced the academic persistence decisions of 115 Latina sorority members. Upper-division Latinas reported higher self-efficacy than lower-division Latinas; however, lower-division students reported higher college stress and more perceived…

  2. Are SSATs and GPA Enough? A Theory-Based Approach to Predicting Academic Success in Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grigorenko, Elena L.; Jarvin, Linda; Diffley, Ray; Goodyear, Julie; Shanahan, Edward J.; Sternberg, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Two studies were carried out to predict academic success in the highly competitive environment of a private preparatory school, Choate Rosemary Hall. The 1st study focused on the question of whether there are indicators beyond middle school grade-point average (GPA) and standardized test scores that might enhance the validity of measures for…

  3. Mission-Based Management in Higher Education: How Do Academic Department Chairpersons Align Decision-Making with Their Organizational Mission?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlavac, Craig

    2012-01-01

    The academic department chairperson continues to face significant challenges in the administration of the contemporary university. Due to retrenchment resultant from the 2008 Global Financial Crisis (GFC), higher education has already faced significant financial cutbacks, and more reductions seem inevitable. Particularly susceptible are…

  4. Effects of Adaptive Training on Working Memory and Academic Achievement of Children with Learning Disabilities: A School-Based Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Rhonda Phillips

    2013-01-01

    Research has suggested many children with learning disabilities (LD) have deficits in working memory (WM) that hinder their academic achievement. Cogmed RM, a computerized intervention, uses adaptive training over 25 sessions and has shown efficacy in improving WM in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and a variety of…

  5. The Potential of Research-Based Learning for the Creation of Truly Inclusive Academic Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Pete; Rust, Chris

    2011-01-01

    The academic community in higher education is becoming increasingly fragmented, with arguably the greatest fault line between research and teaching. This paper argues that, through the reinvention of the undergraduate curriculum to focus on student engagement in research and research-type activities, a truly inclusive community of academic…

  6. School-Based Intervention for Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Effects on Academic, Social, and Behavioural Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuPaul, George J.; Weyandt, Lisa L.

    2006-01-01

    Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) exhibit significant academic, social, and behavioural difficulties in school settings. This article reviews empirical findings regarding the effects of classroom interventions for students with ADHD. Three major types of interventions are reviewed including behavioural (e.g., token…

  7. Perceived Behavioral and Academic Competence in Middle Childhood: Influences of a Community-Based Youth Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudley, Cynthia

    This paper reports findings from a longitudinal study that investigated ways in which a comprehensive youth development program could support social and academic competence and reduce aggression in middle childhood for students living in public housing. Children residing in public housing complexes in southern California who participated in a 4H…

  8. Assessing the Impact of School-Based Health Centers on Academic Achievement and College Preparation Efforts: Using Propensity Score Matching to Assess School-Level Data in California.

    PubMed

    Bersamin, Melina; Garbers, Samantha; Gaarde, Jenna; Santelli, John

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the association between school-based health center (SBHC) presence and school-wide measures of academic achievement and college preparation efforts. Publicly available educational and demographic data from 810 California public high schools were linked to a list of schools with an SBHC. Propensity score matching, a method to reduce bias inherent in nonrandomized control studies, was used to select comparison schools. Regression analyses, controlling for proportion of English-language learners, were conducted for each outcome including proportion of students participating in three College Board exams, graduation rates, and meeting university graduation requirements. Findings suggest that SBHC presence is positively associated with college preparation outcomes but not with academic achievement outcomes (graduation rates or meeting state graduation requirements). Future research must examine underlying mechanisms supporting this association, such as school connectedness. Additional research should explore the role that SBHC staff could have in supporting college preparation efforts.

  9. Assessing the Impact of School Based Health Centers on Academic Achievement and College Preparation Efforts: Using Propensity Score Matching to Assess School-Level Data in California

    PubMed Central

    Bersamin, Melina; Garbers, Samantha; Gaarde, Jenna; Santelli, John

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the association between School-Based Health Center (SBHC) presence and school-wide measures of academic achievement and college preparation efforts. Publicly available educational and demographic data from 810 California public high schools were linked to a list of schools with an SBHC. Propensity score matching, a method to reduce bias inherent in non-randomized control studies, was used to select comparison schools. Regression analyses, controlling for proportion of English Language Learners, was conducted for each outcome including: proportion of students participating in three College Board Exams, graduation rates, and meeting University graduation requirements. Findings suggest that SBHC presence is positively associated with college preparation outcomes, but not with academic achievement outcomes (graduation rates or meeting state graduation requirements). Future research must examine underlying mechanisms supporting this association, such as school connectedness. Additional research should explore the role that SBHC staff could have in supporting college preparation efforts. PMID:27009589

  10. An academic, business, and community alliance to promote evidence-based public health policy: the case of primary seat belt legislation.

    PubMed

    Goldzweig, Irwin A; Schlundt, David G; Moore, Wayne E; Smith, Patricia E; Zoorob, Roger J; Levine, Robert S

    2013-08-01

    An academic, business, and community alliance comprising 285 organizations, including 43 national groups represented on a Blue Ribbon Panel organized by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation, targeted Arkansas, Florida, Mississippi, Minnesota, Tennessee, and Wisconsin for high involvement/intervention consisting of community organization and other political action to support passage of primary seat belt laws. State-level alliance activities began in January 2003. All six states enacted a primary seat belt law between 2004 and 2009. From January 2003 to May 2010, passage of primary legislation was 4.5 times as likely (95% CI 1.90, 10.68) in states with high versus low alliance involvement. Positive interaction between high alliance involvement and offers of federal incentives may have occurred as well. This evidence of success suggests that academic-business-community alliances for action to promote evidence-based public health policy may be effective.

  11. A Novel Service-Oriented Professional Development Program for Research Assistants at an Academic Hospital: A Web-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Koleoglou, Kyle John; Holland, Jennifer Elysia; Hutchinson, Eliza Haapaniemi; Nang, Quincy Georgdie; Mehta, Clare Marie; Tran, Chau Minh; Fishman, Laurie Newman

    2015-01-01

    Background Research assistants (RAs) are hired at academic centers to staff the research and quality improvement projects that advance evidence-based medical practice. Considered a transient population, these young professionals may view their positions as stepping-stones along their path to graduate programs in medicine or public health. Objective To address the needs of these future health professionals, a novel program—Program for Research Assistant Development and Achievement (PRADA)—was developed to facilitate the development of desirable professional skill sets (ie, leadership, teamwork, communication) through participation in peer-driven service and advocacy initiatives directed toward the hospital and surrounding communities. The authors hope that by reporting on the low-cost benefits of the program that other institutions might consider the utility of implementing such a program and recognize the importance of acknowledging the professional needs of the next generation of health care professionals. Methods In 2011, an anonymous, Web-based satisfaction survey was distributed to the program membership through a pre-established email distribution list. The survey was used to evaluate demographics, level of participation and satisfaction with the various programming, career trajectory, and whether the program's goals were being met. Results Upon the completion of the survey cycle, a 69.8% (125/179) response rate was achieved with the majority of respondents (94/119, 79.0%) reporting their 3-year goal to be in medical school (52/119, 43.7%) or nonmedical graduate school (42/119, 35.3%). Additionally, most respondents agreed or strongly agreed that PRADA had made them feel more a part of a research community (88/117, 75.2%), enhanced their job satisfaction (66/118, 55.9%), and provided career guidance (63/117, 53.8%). Overall, 85.6% of respondents (101/118) agreed or strongly agreed with recommending PRADA to other research assistants. Conclusions High

  12. State Soil Geographic (STATSGO) Data Base for the Conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwarz, Gregory E.; Alexander, R.B.

    1995-01-01

    USSOILS is an Arc 7.0 coverage containing hydrology-relevant information for 10,498 map units covering the entire conterminous United States. The coverage was compiled from individual State coverages contained in the October 1994 State Soil Geographic (STATSGO) Data Base produced on CD-ROM. The geo-dataset USSOILS.PAT relates (on the basis of a map unit identifier) the 10,498 map units to 78,518 polygons. The scale of the geo-dataset is 1:250,000. The INFO attribute table USSOILS.MUID_ATTS contains selected variables from the STATSGO data set for 10,501 map units (an extra 3 map units are contained in the attribute table that are not in the geo-dataset - see the 'Procedures' section below), including: the map unit identifier, a 2-character state abbreviation, available water capacity of the soil, percent clay in the soil, the actual k-factor used in the water erosion component of the universal soil loss equation, the organic material in soil, soil permeability, cumulative thickness of all soil layers, hydrologic characteristics of the soil, quality of drainage, surface slope, liquid limit of the soil, share of a map unit having hydric soils, and the annual frequency of flooding. To facilitate mapping the attribute data, the narrative section below contains instructions for transferring the information contained in the attribute table USSOILS.MUID_ATTS to the polygon attribute table USSOILS.PAT. STATSGO United States Soil Water Capacity Clay Organic material Permeability Infiltration Drainage Hydric Flood frequency Slope

  13. Sensitivity analysis of land unit suitability for conservation using a knowledge-based system.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Hope C; Bourgeron, Patrick S; Reynolds, Keith M

    2010-08-01

    The availability of spatially continuous data layers can have a strong impact on selection of land units for conservation purposes. The suitability of ecological conditions for sustaining the targets of conservation is an important consideration in evaluating candidate conservation sites. We constructed two fuzzy logic-based knowledge bases to determine the conservation suitability of land units in the interior Columbia River basin using NetWeaver software in the Ecosystem Management Decision Support application framework. Our objective was to assess the sensitivity of suitability ratings, derived from evaluating the knowledge bases, to fuzzy logic function parameters and to the removal of data layers (land use condition, road density, disturbance regime change index, vegetation change index, land unit size, cover type size, and cover type change index). The amount and geographic distribution of suitable land polygons was most strongly altered by the removal of land use condition, road density, and land polygon size. Removal of land use condition changed suitability primarily on private or intensively-used public land. Removal of either road density or land polygon size most strongly affected suitability on higher-elevation US Forest Service land containing small-area biophysical environments. Data layers with the greatest influence differed in rank between the two knowledge bases. Our results reinforce the importance of including both biophysical and socio-economic attributes to determine the suitability of land units for conservation. The sensitivity tests provided information about knowledge base structuring and parameterization as well as prioritization for future data needs.

  14. Aligning clinical compensation with clinical productivity: design and implementation of the financial value unit (FVU) system in an academic department of internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Stites, Steven; Steffen, Patrick; Turner, Scott; Pingleton, Susan

    2013-07-01

    A new metric was developed and implemented at the University of Kansas School of Medicine Department of Internal Medicine, the financial value unit (FVU). This metric analyzes faculty clinical compensation compared with clinical work productivity as a transparent means to decrease the physician compensation variability and compensate faculty equitably for clinical work.The FVU is the ratio of individual faculty clinical compensation compared with their total work relative value units (wRVUs) generated divided by Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) salary to wRVUs of a similar MGMA physician.The closer the FVU ratio is to 1.0, the closer clinical compensation is to that of an MGMA physician with similar clinical productivity. Using FVU metrics to calculate a faculty salary gap compared with MGMA median salary and wRVU productivity, a divisional production payment was established annually.From FY 2006 to FY 2011, both total faculty numbers and overall clinical activity increased. With the implementation of the FVU, both clinical productivity and compensation increased while, at the same time, physician retention rates remained high. Variability in physician compensation decreased. Dramatic clinical growth was associated with the alignment of clinical work and clinical compensation in a transparent and equable process.

  15. Academic Leadership and Departmental Headship in Turbulent Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, D. Gareth

    2011-01-01

    Leadership of academic units, in the guise of headship of departments, is crucial for the ongoing well-being of academic life and yet it remains a contested role. This paper argues for the role of heads of department (HODs) as academic leaders, with the managerial side of the role occupying an important but subsidiary place in its overall focus.…

  16. Interactions Between the Academic Business Library and Research Data Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Terrence B.; Nicholson, Shawn W.

    2004-01-01

    The use of numeric data has historical significance in the research of many academic disciplines, but today it is burgeoning. Responses from academic business librarians to a 33-item questionnaire are the basis for this study that investigates the interactions between academic business libraries and other local units supplying numeric data…

  17. Foreign-born Peers and Academic Performance.

    PubMed

    Conger, Dylan

    2015-04-01

    The academic performance of foreign-born youth in the United States is well studied, yet little is known about whether and how foreign-born students influence their classmates. In this article, I develop a set of expectations regarding the potential consequences of immigrant integration across schools, with a distinction between the effects of sharing schools with immigrants who are designated as English language learners (ELL) and those who are not. I then use administrative data on multiple cohorts of Florida public high school students to estimate the effect of immigrant shares on immigrant and native-born students' academic performance. The identification strategy pays careful attention to the selection problem by estimating the effect of foreign-born peers from deviations in the share foreign-born across cohorts of students attending the same school in different years. The assumption underlying this approach is that students choose schools based on the composition of the entire school, not on the composition of each entering cohort. The results of the analysis, which hold under several robustness checks, indicate that foreign-born peers (both those who are ELL and those who are non-ELL) have no effect on their high school classmates' academic performance.

  18. [Science and research in academic plastic surgery in Germany].

    PubMed

    Giunta, R E; Machens, H-G

    2009-12-01

    Plastic surgery has passed through a very positive evolution in the last decades on the solid fundament of constantly developing academic plastic surgery. Aim of this paper is an objective evaluation of the current status of academic plastic surgery regarding research topics, currently available ressources and scientific outcome based on a questionnaire. The return rate of the questionnaire in academic departments was 92%. Main topics in research besides wound healing were topics from regenerative medicine such as tissue engineering, biomaterials, genetherapy and angiogenesis with the main focus on skin and fat tissues. In the past five years a total of 25 million Euros of third party research grants were raised. Research relied mainly on interdisciplinary research facilities. Regarding the scientific outcome more than 200 scientific papers were published in basic science research journals having an impactfactor higher than two. These results clearly demonstrate that plastic surgery is scientifically highly productive in academic surroundings where independent departments are established. Considering that independent units of plastic surgery exist in a relatively small number of all 36 university hospitals in germany, it has to be claimed for further independent departments so to provide adequate research facilities for further evolution of academic plastic surgery. PMID:20029742

  19. Geoecology: a county-level environmental data base for the conterminous United States

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.J.; Emerson, C.J.; Nungesser, M.K.

    1980-09-01

    The Geoecology Data Base represents a unique compilation of computerized environmental data for research and development needs. Environmental assessment and planning for energy development require rapid access to data at appropriate spatial and temporal scales. In the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), we have developed an integrated data base of diverse environmental resource information from extant sources. Data are stored at the county level of resolution for the conterminous United States with some data available for subcounty units within larger, more diverse eastern counties. The Geoecology Data Base contains selected data on terrain and soils, water resources, forestry, vegetation, agriculture, land use, wildlife, air quality, climate, natural areas, and endangered species. Basic files on human population are also included to complement the environmental files. Data are stored in metric-SI units. The Geoecology Data Base is currently fulfilling diverse ongoing research needs while it is being expanded and updated as needs and new data are identified. This report is both a documentation and a user's guide to the Geoecology Data Base. It describes the Data Base design, illustrates applications, provides examples of accessing the Data Base, and gives general information on the data set contents.

  20. Revealing β-relaxation mechanism based on energy distribution of flow units in metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Shang, B. S.; Sun, Y. T.; Zhu, Z. G.; Guan, P. F.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2016-04-01

    The β-relaxation, which is the source of the dynamics in glass state and has practical significance to relaxation and mechanical properties of glasses, has been an open question for decades. Here, we propose a flow unit perspective to explain the structural origin and evolution of β-relaxation based on experimentally obtained energy distribution of flow units using stress relaxation method under isothermal and linear heating modes. Through the molecular dynamics simulations, we creatively design various artificial metallic glass systems and build a direct relation between β-relaxation behavior and features of flow units. Our results demonstrate that the β-relaxation in metallic glasses originates from flow units and is modulated by the energy distribution of flow units, and the density and distribution of flow units can effectively regulate the β-relaxation behavior. The results provide a better understanding of the structural origin of β-relaxation and also afford a method for designing metallic glasses with obvious β-relaxation and better mechanical properties.