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Sample records for academic workforce deans

  1. The Resource Handbook for Academic Deans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, George, Ed.

    This book collects 42 papers on the role of the academic dean. Papers are grouped into sections on what a dean is, becoming a dean, curriculum, personnel, legal matters, finances, academic publications, and "real life." The papers are: "The Ethics of Deaning" (Charles Masiello); "Collegial Relations" (Len Clark); "Access to the Dean" (George…

  2. Leadership Styles of Community College Academic Deans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sypawka, William; Mallett, William; McFadden, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The future of the community college system will depend on sound leadership, and its success will rely on how well academic deans effectively direct their units. The study investigated the dean's leadership styles using Bolman and Deal's Leadership Orientation Instrument to discover their primary leadership frame with a focus on how data may be…

  3. Deaning: Middle Management in Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Van Cleve

    The inner structure of campus management is examined to reveal the human side of personnel management, public and student relations, budget planning, affirmative action, faculty politics, salary disputes, and tenure decisions. The analysis depicts the special situation that results from a dean's management of people who not only are the dean's…

  4. Presidents and Deans: A Changing Academic Scene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaines, Francis Pendleton

    An autobiography by Francis Pendleton Gaines, who served as a college president or university dean for 35 years, is presented. Dr. Gaines came from an academic family: his father was president of Washington and Lee University and his uncle was a Hampden-Sydney College president. The account covers his family background, his boyhood and personal…

  5. Gender Differences in Resilience of Academic Deans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the difference in the levels of resilience characteristics between male and female deans within a state university system. Resilience is the ability to operate in a changing environment while consistently maintaining one's effectiveness. This quantitative study utilized the survey, Personal…

  6. Academic Economics: The Academic Dean and Financial Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Susan A.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses deans' responsibilities in financial management, including budget development, budget management, broker of resources, program review, and fundraising. Describes what deans need to know: categories of income, local tax assessment, financing new construction, and key accounting terminology. Looks at key challenges for deans and offers a…

  7. Academic Deans' Views on Curriculum Content in Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graber, David R.; Bellack, Janis P.; Musham, Catherine; O'Neil, Edward H.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of academic deans (n=100) in universities associated with medical and osteopathy schools found that administrators' attitudes about curriculum content are being influenced by changes in health care delivery and an increasingly generalist orientation. There appears to be support for medical school curricula fostering a broader, more…

  8. Leadership Orientations and Conflict Management Styles of Academic Deans in Masters Degree Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimencu, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Previous research suggests that academic deans follow the human relations and structural perspectives in conflict management (Feltner & Goodsell, 1972). However, the position of an academic dean has been described to have undertones that are more political and social than hierarchical and technical. Hence, the current study evaluated the role of…

  9. Three Studies on the Leadership Behaviors of Academic Deans in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    This three article mixed methods dissertation is titled "Three Studies on the Leadership Behaviors of Academic Deans in Higher Education." Each article is based on a sample of 51 academic deans from a three state region in the Southeastern United States. In the first study, the results of the statistical analyses reinforce the gender…

  10. The Role of Academic Deans as Entrepreneurial Leaders in Higher Education Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleverley-Thompson, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    To help address enrollment and financial challenges institutions of higher learning may benefit by having a better understanding of entrepreneurial leadership orientations, or skills, of academic deans. This study revealed several significant correlations between the self-reported entrepreneurial orientations of academic deans in upstate New York,…

  11. The Nexus between Academic Deans and Corporate CEOs: An Opportunity in the Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Mimi; Poch, Susan

    This study points out the similarities between the backgrounds of corporate chief executive officers (CEOs) and academic deans. It notes that most CEOs are fairly well educated white males who rose through the ranks of middle management to reach their current positions; the typical dean has a doctoral degree, has often been a department chair or…

  12. The Importance of Academic Deans' Interpersonal/Negotiating Skills as Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wepner, Shelley B.; Henk, William A.; Clark Johnson, Virginia; Lovell, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    Four academic deans investigated when and how they used interpersonal/negotiating skills to function effectively in their positions. For two full weeks, the deans coded their on-the-job interactions during scheduled meetings, informal meetings, spontaneous encounters/meetings, telephone calls, and select email. Analyses revealed that the…

  13. Physics Academic Workforce Report, 2000. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Stowe, Katie; Czujko, Roman

    This report discusses trends in the physics academic workforce and the implications of these trends for the future academic job market. In March 2000, a survey was sent to 766 U.S. physics departments that grant at least a bachelor's degree in physics, and 725 responses were received, a response rate of 95%. Degree-granting physics departments in…

  14. Physics Academic Workforce Report, 2002. AIP Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Stowe, Katie; Nies, Kimberley

    This report discusses trends in the physics academic workforce and the implications of these trends for the future academic job market. Data are from a survey of physics departments that was completed by 722 departments, a response rate of 94%. The number of physics faculty increased almost 5% since 2000, and much of this growth resulted from…

  15. Improving Informational Resources for Academic Deans and Chairpersons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creswell, John W.; England, Marijane E.

    1994-01-01

    Literature about the roles of college deans and department heads is reviewed, issues confronting these administrators are discussed, and their information needs are examined. A guide to the categories, types, and sources of useful information is provided. (MSE)

  16. Leadership in Higher Education: An Analysis of the Leadership Styles of Academic Deans in Ohio's 13 State-Supported Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrash, Alberta B.

    2009-01-01

    The role of academic deans is critical to the success of higher education academic institutions. However, little is known about the leadership styles of these chief academic officers. This study illustrated the leadership approach of Ohio's academic deans in the 13 state-supported universities. This quantitative study researched and analyzed…

  17. Academic Libraries and High-Impact Practices for Student Retention: Library Deans' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies on retention have highlighted the role of student engagement in influencing students' withdrawal decisions. This study seeks to address how academic libraries affect student retention by examining the perception of academic library deans or directors on the alignment between library services and resources with ten nationally…

  18. Ethical Decision-Making in Academic Administration: A Qualitative Study of College Deans' Ethical Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catacutan, Maria Rosario G.; de Guzman, Allan B.

    2015-01-01

    Ethical decision-making in school administration has received considerable attention in educational leadership literature. However, most research has focused on principals working in secondary school settings while studies that explore ethical reasoning processes of academic deans have been significantly few. This qualitative study aims to…

  19. Leading Schools of Education in the Context of Academic Capitalism: Deans' Responses to State Policy Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Kevin R.; Teitelbaum, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    State education policy changes have contributed to a reduced interest in teaching and a decreased enrollment in education degree programs in North Carolina, USA. Pressure to cut budgets and generate revenue has added to a climate of academic capitalism influencing the ways in which deans lead schools of education. The purpose of this mixed-methods…

  20. Leading the Way: The Role of Presidents and Academic Deans in Fundraising

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodson, J. Bradford

    2010-01-01

    The concept of actively leading constituents, internal and external, is second nature to many university administrators in most areas, except one: fundraising. For many university presidents and academic deans, it's a part of the job that is not well defined or well understood. They know there is an expectation that private funds will flow into…

  1. The Australian Academic Profession in Transition: Addressing the Challenge of Reconceptualising Academic Work and Regenerating the Academic Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bexley, Emmaline; James, Richard; Arkoudis, Sophie

    2011-01-01

    Australia has an ageing academic workforce and the nation's capacity to refresh, build and maintain this workforce during a period of expansion in tertiary education participation needs urgent consideration. To inform possible strategies to recruit and retain academic staff, this study investigates the current attitudes of the academic profession…

  2. A Phenomenological Study of the Preparation and Career Paths of Academic Deans in Church of God Institutions of Theological Education in Latin America and the Caribbean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Contreras Flores, Jenniffer

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the preparation and career paths of academic deans in Church of God (COG) theological institutions located in Latin American and Caribbean. This study used a qualitative research approach and the in-depth interview method for data collection. A group of 14 academic deans that serve in COG theological schools and that…

  3. The Selection of a Dean in an Academic Environment: Are We Getting What We Deserve?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Michael; Shaw, James B.; McPhail, Ruth; Erickson, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the development of the paper was due to the seemingly endless searching for deans to replace the former dean of three to four years. Design/methodology/approach: The paper was developed around the present relevant secondary data. Findings: The key findings of the paper were that deans were being replaced due to the…

  4. Academic workforce trends in community hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Britta L.; Schulkin, Jay; Lawrence, Hal C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Obstetrician-gynecologist faculty workforce studies have been limited to faculty at university training programs. Not much is known about the obstetrician-gynecologist faculty workforce at community programs. Method This study assessed the obstetrician-gynecologist faculty workforce in community training programs via administering surveys to the department chairs. The questionnaire assessed number of current faculty by degree, work status (part-time/full-time), rank, and sub-specialty. Out of 125 programs, 65 responded (52% response rate). Results The mean number of full-time faculty per department in community hospitals was 17 faculty. Two-thirds of community department chairs anticipated an increase in full-time faculty and 43% anticipated an increase in part-time faculty. Like university programs, sub-specialists and Professors (compared to generalists and assistant professors) were more likely to be male. Conclusion There are similarities between the community and university faculty workforce, many of the community program faculty are involved in research. Given the evolving clinical, educational, and research demands on community faculty, it is important to continue to monitor and study community program faculty. PMID:23882350

  5. Toward a Definition of Deaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robillard, Jr., Douglas

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the multitude of tasks that community college academic deans perform and the evolution of the role of dean through the present. Looks at skills required in areas such as productivity and accountability, human relations, and budgeting. Examines current job descriptions and discusses some of the skills that are essential to the dean's…

  6. Building a sustainable clinical academic workforce to meet the future healthcare needs of Australia and New Zealand: report from the first summit meeting.

    PubMed

    Windsor, J; Searle, J; Hanney, R; Chapman, A; Grigg, M; Choong, P; Mackay, A; Smithers, B M; Churchill, J A; Carney, S; Smith, J A; Wainer, Z; Talley, N J; Gladman, M A

    2015-09-01

    The delivery of healthcare that meets the requirements for quality, safety and cost-effectiveness relies on a well-trained medical workforce, including clinical academics whose career includes a specific commitment to research, education and/or leadership. In 2011, the Medical Deans of Australia and New Zealand published a review on the clinical academic workforce and recommended the development of an integrated training pathway for clinical academics. A bi-national Summit on Clinical Academic Training was recently convened to bring together all relevant stakeholders to determine how best to do this. An important part understood the lessons learnt from the UK experience after 10 years since the introduction of an integrated training pathway. The outcome of the summit was to endorse strongly the recommendations of the medical deans. A steering committee has been established to identify further stakeholders, solicit more information from stakeholder organisations, convene a follow-up summit meeting in late 2015, recruit pilot host institutions and engage the government and future funders.

  7. Perceived Professional Development Needs of English-Speaking Evangelical Academic Deans in Africa and Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Leslie J.

    2013-01-01

    This study identified the perceived professional development needs of English-speaking evangelical theological school deans in Africa and Asia, as a basis for evaluating or creating professional development programs for these regions. It answered the question: What are the perceptions of the need for professional development prior to and after…

  8. "Bridge over Troubled Water": Phenomenologizing Filipino College Deans' Ethical Dilemmas in Academic Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catacutan, Maria Rosario G.; de Guzman, Allan B.

    2016-01-01

    This phenomenological study intends to capture and describe Filipino college deans' lived experiences of ethical dilemmas as they carry out their work as administrators. Using semi-structured in-depth interviews and following Collaizzi's method, data was collected and subjected to cool and warm analyses yielding a set of themes and sub-themes that…

  9. The Academic Administrator and the Law: What Every Dean and Department Chair Needs To Know. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, Vol. 26, No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toma, J. Douglas; Palm, Richard L.

    This report examines the role of the college dean or department head in relation to legal issues in higher education. The first section offers principles of the law, the courts, and counsel. It addresses types of legal issues, internal and external sources of the law, deference to academic and behavioral decisions, the distinction between public…

  10. Workforce Development and Renewal in Australian Universities and the Management of Casual Academic Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Robyn; Strachan, Glenda; Peetz, David

    2013-01-01

    Most undergraduate teaching in Australia's universities is now performed by hourly paid staff, and these casual academics form the majority of the academic teaching workforce in our universities. This recent development has significant implications for the careers and working lives of those staff, for other academic staff, and for students,…

  11. A Profile of Dental School Deans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valachovic, Richard W.; Weaver, Richard G.; Haden, N. Karl; Robertson, Paul B.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 53 deans of U.S. dental schools examined: gender and ethnicity; degrees and certificates; primary discipline; age; length of time as dean; academic rank and tenure; time distribution; other responsibilities; lines of authority; job satisfaction; career paths prior to becoming dean; knowledge, skills, and experience considered essential…

  12. Deans' Balancing Acts: Education Leaders and the Challenges They Face.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gmelch, Walter H., Ed.

    This collection of papers addresses the personal challenges academics face in successfully responding to "the call" to academic leadership, focusing on who academic deans are, unique challenges to women deans, stress impacting deans' ability to lead, keys to successful entry into the deanship, organizational strategies for leading successfully,…

  13. The New England Nonprofit Workforce: Still a Secondary Academic Priority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvey, David

    2010-01-01

    The nonprofit sector employs more than 9% of the U.S. workforce, compared with 7% six years ago, when nonprofit executive Stephen Pratt and the author outlined the size and impact of the New England nonprofit sector. The sector's portion of America's employment is poised for growth into double digits in the next decade, especially due to the…

  14. 2004 Physics & Astronomy Academic Workforce. AIP Report, Number R-392.6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivie, Rachel; Guo, Stacy; Carr, Arnell

    2005-01-01

    During the spring of 2004, the Statistical Research Center (SRC) of the American Institute of Physics sent a questionnaire to all 797 degree-granting physics and astronomy departments in the US. The purpose of this questionnaire, "The Academic Workforce Survey," was to determine the number of faculty positions in physics and astronomy, the number…

  15. Using Workforce Strategy to Address Academic Casualisation: A University of Newcastle Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Tina; Germov, John

    2015-01-01

    Casual and sessional academic staff have traditionally been on the margins of institutional life despite the expansion of this cohort across the university sector. This paper details a project to address this lack of recognition through a workforce strategy to engage, support and effectively manage this often neglected cohort of the academic…

  16. When Change Is Set in Stone: An Analysis of Seven Academic Libraries Designed by Perry Dean Rogers & Partners, Architects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosbie, Michael J.; Hickey, Damon D.

    This book presents and appraises seven college and university libraries designed by Perry Dean Rogers & Partners of Boston. The firm has been designing campus libraries for the past 30 years. These projects are the most recent in an oeuvre of some 29 libraries designed and constructed for some 27 colleges and universities around the country. The…

  17. The rural pipeline: building a strong nursing workforce through academic and service partnerships.

    PubMed

    Murray, Maureen Fitzgerald; Havener, Jeanne-Marie; Davis, Patricia S; Jastremski, Connie; Twichell, Martha L

    2011-03-01

    Nurse recruitment and the retention of a high-quality workforce are challenging issues facing rural hospitals and health centers. The Bassett Healthcare Network has met these challenges by building a supportive framework to develop and support nurses at every level of their professional careers. The organization has partnered with local colleges to help staff nurses further their education. These and other partnership endeavors, such as the organization's clinical ladder and collaborative continuing nursing education opportunities, are helping Bassett sustain and grow the nursing workforce across 8 counties in rural upstate New York and develop stronger ties with academic partners.

  18. Who Am I? The Sociologist as Dean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Barbara J.

    2008-01-01

    In some respects, sociologists might seem to be the least obvious candidates for a deanship. They question authority and debunk bureaucracy. Yet they can be found in dean's offices serving successfully. This paper discusses the seeming contradiction between the discipline of sociology and the position of academic dean. It is argued that the…

  19. New Century Scholars: A Mentorship Program to Increase Workforce Diversity in Academic Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Pachter, Lee M; Kodjo, Cheryl

    2015-07-01

    This article describes a program aimed to increase workforce diversity and underrepresented minority (URM) representation in academic pediatric medicine. The New Century Scholars (NCScholars) program is a core program in the Academic Pediatric Association, the largest national organization for academic pediatric generalists. The program selects URM pediatric (or medicine-pediatrics) residents who are interested in academic careers and provides each NCScholar with a junior and senior mentor, as well as travel grants to the Pediatric Academic Societies annual meeting where activities specific to the program are held, and provides ongoing mentorship and career counseling support.The authors discuss the origination, operation, and changes to the program over the first 10 years of its existence, as well as outcome data for the participants in the program. To date, 60 of the 63 NCScholars have finished residency and/or have made postresidency plans, and 38 of these URM pediatricians (63%) have entered academic careers. The authors suggest that this type of mentorship program for URM pediatric trainees can be used as a model for other specialties and medical organizations.

  20. Transactional, Transformational, or Laissez-Faire Leadership: An Assessment of College of Agriculture Academic Program Leaders' (Deans) Leadership Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, David; Rudd, Rick

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if academic program leaders in colleges of agriculture at land-grant institutions use transactional, transformational, and/or laissez-faire leadership styles in performing their duties. Academic program leaders were defined as individuals listed by the National Association of State University and…

  1. Hurricane Dean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Location: The coast of Mexico from Manzanillo to Mazatlan Categorization: Tropical Depression Sustained Winds: 35 mph (56 km/hr)

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared ImageMicrowave Image

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image to access AIRS Weather Snapshot for Hurricane Dean

    Infrared Images Because infrared radiation does not penetrate through clouds, AIRS infrared images show either the temperature of the cloud tops or the surface of the Earth in cloud-free regions. The lowest temperatures (in purple) are associated with high, cold cloud tops that make up the top of the storm. In cloud-free areas the AIRS instrument will receive the infrared radiation from the surface of the Earth, resulting in the warmest temperatures (orange/red).

    Microwave Images In the AIRS microwave imagery, deep blue areas in storms show where the most precipitation occurs, or where ice crystals are present in the convective cloud tops. Outside of these storm regions, deep blue areas may also occur over the sea surface due to its low radiation emissivity. On the other hand, land appears much warmer due to its high radiation emissivity.

    Microwave radiation from Earth's surface and lower atmosphere penetrates most clouds to a greater or lesser extent depending upon their water vapor, liquid water and ice content. Precipitation, and ice crystals found at the cloud tops where strong convection is taking place, act as barriers to microwave radiation. Because of this barrier effect, the AIRS microwave sensor detects only the radiation arising at or above their location in the atmospheric column. Where these barriers are not present, the microwave sensor detects radiation arising throughout the air column and down to the surface. Liquid surfaces (oceans, lakes and rivers) have 'low emissivity' (the signal isn't as strong) and their radiation brightness temperature is

  2. College Deans: Leading from within. American Council on Education/Oryx Press Series on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolverton, Mimi; Gmelch, Walter H.

    This book, based on the National Deans Survey, which was sponsored by the Center for the Study of Academic Leadership and to which 800 deans from all U.S. four-year academic institutions responded, clarifies the nature of the job and its responsibilities. Part 1, Deans--Their Campuses and Colleges, contains two chapters: (1) The Deanship; and (2)…

  3. Exponential growth of dental schools in Chile: effects on academic, economic and workforce issues.

    PubMed

    Cartes-Velásquez, Ricardo Andrés

    2013-01-01

    In the last 30 years, Chile has undergone noteworthy economic development and an exponential growth in the access of its population to higher education. The aim of this paper was to review the changes in academic, economic and workforce issues that occurred as a consequence of the growth in supply of undergraduate dental vacancies between 1997 and 2011. Data collected from the Consejo de Educación Superior - CES, Comisión Nacional de Acreditación - CNA, and Instituto Nacional de Estadísticas de Chile - INE included these variables: number of dental schools, school type (private or traditional, see explanation below), city where the school is located, entry vacancies, total student enrollment, admission scores, percentile rank of dentistry as a university career, tuition fees, accreditation status, and number of inhabitants. There was an exponential increase in dental schools in Chile (5 to 34) that occurred in association with the rise in tuition fees (US$ 3900 to US$ 9800), a deterioration in the academic level of dental students (650 to 550 points in admission scores) and a predicted 77.5% oversupply of dentists by 2025, according to WHO criteria. The exponential increase in dental schools in Chile brought about negative consequences, such as increasing career costs, deterioration in the academic level of dental students, and an oversupply of dentists, associated with lower incomes and possibly leading to unemployment. Additional research should be conducted to determine whether an increase in the number of dentists can improve the population's access to dental care and reduce the oral disease burden.

  4. Herbert E. Hawkes: Columbia's Dean of Deans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fley, Jo Ann

    1979-01-01

    Presents a short biographical essay on Herbert E. Hawkes who died in 1943. Before becoming dean of Columbia College, he had published noteworthy textbooks on mathematics and had taught at Yale and Columbia. His educational and administrative policies are reviewed here. (BEF)

  5. Establishing a Viable Workforce Pipeline of Primary Care Nurse Practitioners: Benefits of a Health System and Academic Partnership.

    PubMed

    Madler, Billie; Helland, Mary

    Maldistribution and shortages of primary care providers, changing reimbursement structures, movement from inpatient to community-based models of care, an aging population, and health care reform lead to increased numbers of patients seeking care. All of these phenomena have a part in creating a health care landscape that requires industry leaders enlist innovative strategies to meet the health care needs of their communities. Delivery of high-quality, efficient care by qualified providers is essential for the success of any health care system. Partnerships between health systems and academic centers of learning to develop a pipeline of providers is one inventive approach that can address primary care workforce needs. The purpose of this article was to share an example of an academic/health care system partnership to address primary care workforce needs in a rural Midwestern region.

  6. The Decisive Difference between Dean and Professor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlmutter, David D.

    2009-01-01

    A friend and fellow academic recently told the author that her dean, who directs a professional school at a state university, spends most of his time at conferences hanging out with professors from his institution, as well as with their graduate students and his co-authors on research papers. She said, and the author agreed, that such habits…

  7. The Importance of Relationships in Deans' Perceptions of Fit: A Person-Environment Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reason, Robert D.; Gmelch, Walter H.

    The perceptions of academic deans of environmental factors that predict their perceived fit at their institutions were studied. The dependent variable was the deans' level of agreement with the statement that the university was a good place to work, a statement operationalized as an indicator of perceived fit. Data were collected from 821 deans as…

  8. Workshop on Excellence Empowered by a Diverse Academic Workforce: Achieving Racial & Ethnic Equity in Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Hassan B.

    2008-02-13

    The purpose of the Workshop 'Excellence Empowered by a Diverse Academic Workforce: Achieving Racial & Ethnic Equity in Chemistry' was to promote the development of a cadre of academic leaders who create, implement and promote programs and strategies for increasing the number of racial and ethnic minorities to equitable proportions on the faculties of departments throughout the academic chemistry community. An important objective of the workshop was to assist in creating an informed and committed community of chemistry leaders who will create, implement and promote programs and strategies to advance racial and ethnic equity in both the faculty and the student body with the goal of increasing the number of U.S. citizen underrepresented minorities (URM) participating in academic chemistry at all levels, with particular focus on the pipeline to chemistry faculty. This objective was met by (1) presentations of detailed data describing current levels of racial and ethnic minorities on the faculties of chemistry departments; (2) frank discussion of the obstacles to and benefits of racial/ethnic diversity in the chemistry professoriate; (3) summary of possible effective interventions and actions; and (4) promotion of the dissemination and adoption of initiatives designed to achieve racial/ethnic equity. Federal programs over the past thirty years have been instrumental in delivering to our universities URM students intending to major in the physical sciences such as chemistry. However, the near absence of URM faculty means that there is also an absence of URM as role models for aspiring students. For example, citing 2003 as a representative year, some statistics reveal the severity of the pipeline shrinkage for U. S. citizen URM starting from chemistry B.S. degrees awarded to the appointment to chemistry faculty. Compared to the URM population of approximately 30% for that year, 67% of the B.S. degrees in chemistry were awarded to white citizens and 17% were awarded to URM

  9. 26. PHOTOCOPY OF CONSTRUCTION PLANSITE PLAN, (DEAN AND DEAN ARCHITECTS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. PHOTOCOPY OF CONSTRUCTION PLAN-SITE PLAN, (DEAN AND DEAN ARCHITECTS, CIRCA 1914) (not a contact print -slight enlargement) - Goodfellowship Building, 1242 Eighty-eighth Avenue, Duluth, St. Louis County, MN

  10. A Profile of Dental School Deans, 2014.

    PubMed

    Haden, N Karl; Ditmyer, Marcia M; Rodriguez, Tobias; Mobley, Connie; Beck, Lynn; Valachovic, Richard W

    2015-10-01

    To develop a profile of current U.S. dental school deans and report their perceptions, challenges, and opportunities that should be addressed in the leadership development programs of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA), data were gathered using a web-based survey organized into seven content areas. In 2014, the deans of all accredited dental schools in the U.S. including Puerto Rico were invited to participate in the survey. The response rate was 86% (56/65). A majority of the deans were male (N=44; 79%) and white/non-Hispanic (N=49; 88%); all reporting degrees held a DDS/DMD (N=54; 100%). Just over half were between the ages of 46 and 55 (N=31; 55%) when they first became a dean. The mean age of these deans was 61.4 years, with a range of 48-72. The respondents reported that school administration/management, fundraising, students, the academic environment, leadership development, and faculty had a high level of influence on their job satisfaction. Communication, conflict resolution, and finance were reported as the most important knowledge areas. A majority reported being better prepared for clinical education and student relations than fundraising and research when they took their positions. They responded that finances and faculty recruitment and retention were their greatest challenges as a dean. Among these respondents, 98% (N=55) reported being satisfied to very satisfied with their job overall. The survey results will inform ADEA’s leadership development programs for the next five to seven years.

  11. Building an Academe and Government Partnership in Workforce Education: Challenges and Possibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Kerri S.; Self, Mary Jo; Bailey, Lucy; Harris, Ed; Halcomb, Starla; Hill, Brent; Shimp, Upton

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, the College of Education at Oklahoma State University began the task of building a partnership with the Defense Ammunition Center (DAC) in McAlester, Oklahoma, and implementing research-driven, experience-based workforce education. In this article, the authors describe unique features and challenges of this multi-year…

  12. 21st Century Workforce Initiatives: Implications for Information Literacy Instruction in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leavitt, Laura L.

    2011-01-01

    This discussion is designed to expose the readers to a selection of educational reform initiatives that fall under the "21st Century Workforce" umbrella. The aims of these initiatives are quite harmonious with the overarching goals of librarianship and the opportunities for librarians to become involved and to demonstrate leadership in this arena…

  13. Challenges in the Establishment of a New Faculty: Experiences of the Founding Deans and Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vatanartiran, Sinem

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: Academic deans play a critical role connecting academic and administrative operations and structures within their respective Faculties and universities. There is a wide array of research about deans, what they do, their leadership skills, challenges, and experiences. However, the research is quite limited in terms of the…

  14. Proceedings, Dean's Day 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Zanner, M.A.

    1999-03-01

    On January 14--15, 1999, Sandia National Laboratories sponsored Deans Day, a conference for the Deans of Engineering and other executive-level representatives from 29 invited universities. Through breakout sessions and a wrap-up discussion, university and Sandia participants identified activities to further develop their strategic relationships. The four primary activities are: (A) concentrate joint efforts on current and future research strengths and needs; (B) attract the best students (at all grade levels) to science and engineering; (C) promote awareness of the need for and work together to influence a national science and technology R and D policy; and (D) enable the universities and Sandia to be true allies, jointly pursuing research opportunities and funding from government agencies and industry.

  15. Partnerships with the Deans: Delivery of the "Whole Product."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Laurie L.; Munn-Fremon, Cheryl

    1995-01-01

    The origins and expansion of the University of Michigan Information Technology Division (ITD) partnership with academic units is described. The program, which began with the university's largest academic unit, features distributed computing and support services. Lessons have been learned concerning deans' attitudes about computing technology and…

  16. An Analysis of Student Success Rates for Academic and Workforce Programs at a Large Texas Community College: Examining Fall 2009 to Spring 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    High, Clennis F.

    2012-01-01

    Student success rates for academic track and workforce track students were examined for thousands of students at a large urban Texas Community College. The study covered fall 2009 through spring 2011, a two year period. Data were collected from the institution's data base regarding students who successfully completed the courses in which they were…

  17. Advanced Technology and the Workforce: An Evolving Agenda for Instructor Preparation. Proceedings of the Annual Rupert N. Evans Symposium on Vocational Education (11th, Monticello, Illinois, May 3-4, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Scott D., Ed.; Evans, John A., Ed.

    These proceedings contain eight presentations: "Welcome from the Dean" (P. David Pearson); "Introduction" (Scott Johnson); "The Changing Workforce" (Alan McClelland); "The Changing Workforce: Implications for Secondary School Programs" (Franzie Loepp); "The Changing Workforce: Implications for Community…

  18. Chinese Dean Demoted over Blog

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Paul

    2007-01-01

    China's People's University has demoted a dean after the well-known scholar criticized university officials and what he termed the "bureaucratization" of the nation's higher-education system. The incident started when Zhang Ming, dean of political science at People's University, posted comments on his popular personal blog in which he…

  19. Answering the Call for a Bachelors-Prepared Nursing Workforce: An Innovative Model for Academic Progression.

    PubMed

    Giddens, Jean; Keller, Teresa; Liesveld, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Forces that have produced national reform of a fragmented, inefficient, and expensive health care services sector have also set the stage for reform of a fragmented, inefficient, and expensive system for nursing education. Changes in health care, health policy, education policy, and funding for public higher education have led to the development of new nursing education models designed to increase the number of baccalaureate-prepared nurses entering the workforce. This article describes the development and implementation of one such model that features a common concept-based curriculum and university-community college partnerships at its core. This plan increases access for nursing students across the state to earn a prelicensure bachelor of science in nursing degree and preserves the integrity and accessibility of associate degree nursing education.

  20. The Minority Voice in Educational Reform: An Analysis by Minority and Women College of Education Deans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castenell, Louis A., Ed.; Tarule, Jill M., Ed.

    This collection of papers examines the issue of minority and female deans in colleges of education, offering the current thinking by a group of minority and female deans of education. Part 1, "Changing Leadership: Tensions within Academic and Social Roles," presents the first four chapters: (1) "Surviving the Middle Passage: The Absent Legacy of…

  1. The Leadership Dimensions of Education Deans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wepner, Shelley B.; D'Onofrio, Antonia; Wilhite, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Education deans in the United States describe their approach to solving leadership problems that were cast as organizational dilemmas. The deans who participated in the study had been education deans for at least 6 to 7 years, indicating that they had avoided the revolving door syndrome of 4.5 years in a single appointment. Deans described their…

  2. The role of academic health centers and their partners in reconfiguring and retooling the existing workforce to practice in a transformed health system.

    PubMed

    Fraher, Erin P; Ricketts, Thomas C; Lefebvre, Ann; Newton, Warren P

    2013-12-01

    Inspired by the Affordable Care Act and health care payment models that reward value over volume, health care delivery systems are redefining the work of the health professionals they employ. Existing workers are taking on new roles, new types of health professionals are emerging, and the health workforce is shifting from practicing in higher-cost acute settings to lower-cost community settings, including patients' homes. The authors believe that although the pace of health system transformation has accelerated, a shortage of workers trained to function in the new models of care is hampering progress. In this Perspective, they argue that urgent attention must be paid to retraining the 18 million workers already employed in the system who will actually implement system change.Their view is shaped by work they have conducted in helping practices transform care, by extensive consultations with stakeholders attempting to understand the workforce implications of health system redesign, and by a thorough review of the peer-reviewed and gray literature. Through this work, the authors have become increasingly convinced that academic health centers (AHCs)-organizations at the forefront of innovations in health care delivery and health workforce training-are uniquely situated to proactively lead efforts to retrain the existing workforce. They recommend a set of specific actions (i.e., discovering and disseminating best practices; developing new partnerships; focusing on systems engineering approaches; planning for sustainability; and revising credentialing, accreditation, and continuing education) that AHC leaders can undertake to develop a more coherent workforce development strategy that supports practice transformation.

  3. Academic tenure and higher education in the United States: implications for the dental education workforce in the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Melanie R

    2007-03-01

    This article reviews the literature related to the evolution and implementation of academic tenure (AT) in U.S. higher education. It is intended to highlight AT implications for the recruitment, retention, and development of the dental education workforce in the twenty-first century and the need for this workforce to implement change in dental education. The dental education workforce is shrinking, and a further decrease is projected, yet the demand for dental education is increasing. AT is becoming increasingly controversial, and the proportion of tenured to nontenured (i.e., contingent) faculty is declining within an already shrinking faculty pool. Confusion regarding the definition of scholarship and its relationship to research and publishing further confounds discussions about AT. Whether the principles of academic freedom and due process require tenure for their preservation in a democratic society is open to question. In view of competing time demands and increasing pressure to publish and apply for grants, factors including the seven-year probationary period for tenure, the decreased availability of tenured positions, and the often perceived inequities between tenured and contingent (i.e., nontenured track) faculty may pose an obstacle to faculty recruitment and retention. These factors may severely limit the diversity and skill mix of the dental education workforce, resulting in a decrease in staffing flexibility that appears to be needed in the twenty-first century. Politics, increasing dependence on grant funding by some institutions, resistance to change, and insufficient mentoring are all stimulating discussions about the future of tenure and its implications for U.S. dental education.

  4. Using Vignettes to Search for Education Deans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wepner, Shelley B.; Wilhite, Stephen C.; D'Onofrio, Antonia

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe how vignettes can be used during an institution's interview process for an education dean. Education deans are confronted with personnel, programmatic, student, and organisational dilemmas on a daily basis. The fundamental responsibilities of the position require education deans to have a strong sense of…

  5. Getting Chalk: Distant Reflections on Deaning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Stuart A.

    1997-01-01

    Although the job of a professional school dean is complex and demanding and the skills it requires are varied, it is important for the dean to acknowledge the limitations of both the job and the individual in it. Only time tells whether innovations, programs, customs, and direction created and nurtured by the dean reflect true leadership by…

  6. Supporting Non-Tenure-Track Faculty at 4-Year Colleges and Universities: A National Study of Deans' Values and Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehrke, Sean J.; Kezar, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the values held by 264 academic deans and the decisions they make pertaining to supporting non-tenure-track faculty (NTTF). Multiple analyses are utilized to examine the prevalence of supportive policies for both full- and part-time NTTF, as well as the extent to which deans' values are associated with the existence of these…

  7. The Changing Academic Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Maxey, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Among the many challenges facing college and university boards, one set of issues often is overlooked: those involving employment of non-tenure-track faculty members and the policies and practices shaping their work. There are a number of compelling reasons why boards not only should become knowledgeable about the relevant policies and practices,…

  8. Academic-correctional health partnerships: preparing the correctional health workforce for the changing landscape-focus group research results.

    PubMed

    Hale, Janet Fraser; Haley, Heather-Lyn; Jones, Judy L; Brennan, Allyson; Brewer, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Providing health care in corrections is challenging. Attracting clinicians can be equally challenging. The future holds a shortage of nurses and primary care physicians. We have a unique opportunity, now, to develop and stabilize our workforce, create a positive image, and enhance quality before the health care landscape changes even more dramatically. Focus groups were conducted with 22 correctional health care professionals divided into three groups: physicians (6), nurses (4), and nurse practitioners/physician assistants (12). Content focused on curricular themes, but additional themes emerged related to recruitment and retention. This article describes recruitment challenges, strategic themes identified, and the proposed initiatives to support a stable, high-quality correctional health workforce.

  9. The Road Taken: A Report on the Career Paths of a Modern Academic Workforce for Faculty Developers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaker, Genevieve G.

    2013-01-01

    Nontenure-track faculty are an increasingly crucial component of the higher education workforce. Much of what we know about this population remains either quantitative or anecdotal and does little to provide in-depth insights directly from the faculty themselves that can be of use for faculty development. This phenomenological, interview-based…

  10. Innovation in Workforce Incentives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-13

    Performance • Superior weapon systems • Cost, Schedule, Performance challenges • Acquisition Improvement & Workforce Incentives • Academic ...statistical difference but both showed a 22% improvement in performance Academic Research on Incentives • Mark Huselid in The Impact of Human Resource...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Defense Acquisition University ,9820 Belvoir Road ,Fort Belvoir,VA,22060 8

  11. An interview with Caroline Dean.

    PubMed

    Dean, Caroline; Vicente, Catarina

    2015-08-15

    Caroline Dean is a plant biologist based at the John Innes Centre in Norwich, UK. She helped to establish Arabidopsis as a model plant organism, and has worked for many years on the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate vernalisation, the process by which plants accelerate their flowering after periods of prolonged cold. We met Caroline at the recent Spring Meeting of the British Society for Developmental Biology. We asked her about her career, her thoughts on the plant field and being awarded this year's FEBS EMBO Women in Science Award.

  12. Dean flow fractionation of chromosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockin, Matt; Sant, Himanshu J.; Capecchi, Mario; Gale, Bruce K.

    2016-03-01

    Efforts to transfer intact mammalian chromosomes between cells have been attempted for more than 50 years with the consistent result being transfer of sub unit length pieces regardless of method. Inertial microfluidics is a new field that has shown much promise in addressing the fractionation of particles in the 2-20 μm size range (with unknown limits) and separations are based upon particles being carried by curving confined flows (within a spiral shaped, often rectangular flow chamber) and migrating to stable "equilibrium" positions of varying distance from a chamber wall depending on the balance of dean and lift forces. We fabricated spiral channels for inertial microfluidic separations using a standard soft lithography process. The concentration of chromosomes, small contaminant DNA and large cell debris in each outlets were evaluated using microscope (60X) and a flow cytometer. Using Dean Flow Fractionation, we were able to focus 4.5 times more chromosomes in outlet 2 compared to outlet 4 where most of the large debris is found. We recover 16% of the chromosomes in outlet #1- 50% in 2, 23% in 3 and 11% in 4. It should be noted that these estimates of recovery do not capture one piece of information- it actually may be that the chromosomes at each outlet are physically different and work needs to be done to verify this potential.

  13. The Education Deanship: Who Is the Dean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyphert, Frederick R.; Zimpher, Nancy Lusk

    This study identifies the personal, professional, and job-related characteristics of deans of schools, colleges, and departments of education. The study was organized to identify and describe: (1) personal characteristics of current deans; (2) professional background characteristics; (3) current professional activity data regarding practicing…

  14. Attitudes of medical school deans toward interprofessional education in Western Pacific Region countries.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bumsuk; Celletti, Francesca; Makino, Takatoshi; Matsui, Hiroki; Watanabe, Hideomi

    2012-11-01

    To examine the attitudes of medical school deans toward interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice (CP), we conducted survey research in the Western Pacific Region. This regional survey was conducted as a collaborative research project with the World Health Organization. A survey was distributed to the medical school deans in Malaysia, the Philippines, Republic of Korea and Japan. Thirty-five surveys were returned from four countries. The survey demonstrated that many medical school deans have positive attitudes toward IPE and CP. However, respondents also reported that it is not easy to introduce interprofessional learning in their academic settings. It is suggested that collaboration between education systems and health systems is needed to introduce IPE in the academic setting. The possible role of international organizations is mentioned. This information helps to identify local efforts on which global health organizations and national governments can build.

  15. Maryland Community College Workforce Training Evaluation and Needs Assessment Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clagett, Craig A.; Alexander, Hershel J.

    In January 1995, the Maryland Association of Deans and Directors of Continuing Education/Community Services undertook a study of all state organizations that had received workforce training under contract arrangements during 1993-94. The study sought to develop a profile of organizations served, determine employer satisfaction with training, and…

  16. Perceptions of General Education Deans and Department Chairs of Their Colleges as Learning Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, May Charmayne

    2014-01-01

    Higher education institutions are being pushed towards increased assessment practices because of rising costs, mass access, new delivery methods, and rising competition on the national and global scale. Academic deans and department heads are at the center of these assessment efforts, and assessment should guide changes within the organization for…

  17. The Training of Deans and Heads of Departments at the University of Trondheim.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bostad, Randi

    1989-01-01

    The University of Trondheim's Norwegian Institute of Technology has redesigned its training program for deans and department heads to enhance the jobs' attractiveness, provide training opportunities, reduce problems of re-integration into the academic career, and introduce professional development talks by department heads with all staff. (MSE)

  18. Supporting the Role of Associate Dean in Universities: An Alternative Approach to Management Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Diane; Floyd, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Located between senior management and academic staff, the role of the Associate Dean in universities appears to be growing in number, complexity and importance in recent years. A role arguably fraught with complexity, it remains largely undefined and under-researched. While little is known about the role in general, less still is known about their…

  19. Deans' Perceptions of AACSB-Endorsed Post-Doctoral Bridge Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauldin, Shawn; McManis, Bruce; Breaux, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International has endorsed 5 Post-Doctoral Bridge (PDB) to Business Programs. The objective of these programs is to prepare PhDs from other academic programs for teaching and research careers in business. The authors solicited feedback from deans of AACSB-accredited business schools…

  20. Business Schools and Resources Constraints: A Task for Deans or Magicians?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Alessio, Fernando A.; Avolio, Beatrice

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges that face the deans of many business schools is obtaining funding for their academic operations and research to sustain world-class educational quality. Business schools raise resources in their own way, but ways of financing strongly vary when comparing educational institutions among world regions. The purpose of this…

  1. Opinions of Community College Deans Regarding Principles of Continuous Quality Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paris, Howard S.; Farmer, Edgar I.

    2000-01-01

    Summarizes the ways in which the Education Pilot Criteria for the Malcolm Baldridge National Quality Award were adapted for use in institutional self-assessment. Presents the perceptions of academic deans in the North Carolina Community College System regarding current and future applications of continuous quality improvement principles in the…

  2. Entrepreneurial Orientation of Community College Workforce Divisions and the Impact of Organizational Structure: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiefen, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    This research focused on how organizational structure of community colleges influenced the entrepreneurial orientation of deans, directors, vice presidents, and vice chancellors of workforce units. Using grounded theory methodology, the researcher identified three emergent theories applicable to both integrated and separate workforce units. These…

  3. The Other Side of Academe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germano, William

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his realizations as he changed careers from a former publisher to a dean of the faculty of humanities and social sciences at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. He describes that his work as a dean in academe is not so much different from his job as a longtime editor. He also relates that…

  4. Dimensions of Managing Academic Affairs in the Community College. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 109. The Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robillard, Douglas, Jr., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    This volume of New Directions for Community Colleges contains the following articles: (1) "Toward a Definition of Deaning," by Douglas Robillard, Jr.; (2) "The Dean as Chief Academic Officer," by John Stuart Erwin; (3) "The Dean and the Faculty," by Hans A. Andrews; (4) "The Dean and the President," by Hans J. Kuss; (5) "Aspects of Difficult…

  5. Finding Your Workforce: The Top 25 Institutions Graduating Latinos in Health Professions and Related Programs by Academic Level. Second in a Series Linking College Completion with U.S. Workforce Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    The population growth, labor force participation, and educational attainment of Latinos in the U.S. influence the composition of the current and future U.S. society, economy, and workforce. In 2012, the Latino population in the United States is the youngest and fastest growing ethnic group, with the highest level of labor force participation…

  6. An Industry/Academe Consortium for Achieving 20% wind by 2030 through Cutting-Edge Research and Workforce Training

    SciTech Connect

    Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Marr, Jeffrey D.G.; Milliren, Christopher; Kaveh, Mos; Mohan, Ned; Stolarski, Henryk; Glauser, Mark; Arndt, Roger

    2013-12-01

    In January 2010, the University of Minnesota, along with academic and industry project partners, began work on a four year project to establish new facilities and research in strategic areas of wind energy necessary to move the nation towards a goal of 20% wind energy by 2030. The project was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy with funds made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. $7.9M of funds were provided by DOE and $3.1M was provided through matching funds. The project was organized into three Project Areas. Project Area 1 focused on design and development of a utility scale wind energy research facility to support research and innovation. The project commissioned the Eolos Wind Research Field Station in November of 2011. The site, located 20 miles from St. Paul, MN operates a 2.5MW Clipper Liberty C-96 wind turbine, a 130-ft tall sensored meteorological tower and a robust sensor and data acquisition network. The site is operational and will continue to serve as a site for innovation in wind energy for the next 15 years. Project Areas 2 involved research on six distinct research projects critical to the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 goals. The research collaborations involved faculty from two universities, over nine industry partners and two national laboratories. Research outcomes include new knowledge, patents, journal articles, technology advancements, new computational models and establishment of new collaborative relationships between university and industry. Project Area 3 focused on developing educational opportunities in wind energy for engineering and science students. The primary outcome is establishment of a new graduate level course at the University of Minnesota called Wind Engineering Essentials. The seminar style course provides a comprehensive analysis of wind energy technology, economics, and operation. The course is highly successful and will continue to be offered at the University. The vision of U.S. DOE to

  7. The state of the art in evaluating the performance of assistant and associate deans as seen by deans and assistant and associate deans.

    PubMed

    Dunning, David G; Durham, Timothy M; Aksu, Mert N; Lange, Brian M

    2008-04-01

    This study explores the little-understood process of evaluating the performance of assistant and associate deans at dental colleges in the United States and Canada. Specifically, this research aimed to identify the methods, processes, and outcomes related to the performance appraisals of assistant/associate deans. Both deans and assistant/associate deans were surveyed. Forty-four of sixty-six deans (66.7 percent) and 227 of 315 assistant/associate deans (72.1 percent) completed surveys with both close-ended and open-ended questions. In addition, ten individuals from each group were interviewed. Results indicate that 75-89 percent of assistant/associate deans are formally evaluated, although as many as 27 percent may lack formal job descriptions. Some recommended best practices for performance appraisal are being used in a majority of colleges. Examples of these best practices are having at least yearly appraisals, holding face-to-face meetings, and setting specific, personal performance objectives/benchmarks for assistant/associate deans. Still, there is much room to improve appraisals by incorporating other recommended practices. Relatively high levels of overall satisfaction were reported by both assistant/associate deans and deans for the process and outcomes of appraisals. Assistant/associate deans rated the value of appraisals to overall development lower than did deans. Qualitative data revealed definite opinions about what constitutes effective and ineffective appraisals, including the use of goal-setting, timeliness, and necessary commitment. Several critical issues related to the results are discussed: differences in perspectives on performance reviews, the importance of informal feedback and job descriptions, the influence of an assistant/associate deans' lack of tenure, and the length of service of deans. Lastly, recommendations for enhancing performance evaluations are offered.

  8. The Dean as Advocate for Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, John J.

    1997-01-01

    Engineering education will be profoundly affected by changes in the U.S. corporate culture, career aspirations of entering college students, research funding sources, and the globalization of engineering design. The engineering school's dean must interpret these strong social pressures for change in curriculum content and operations and serve as…

  9. Dental school deans' perceptions of the organizational culture and impact of the ELAM program on the culture and advancement of women faculty.

    PubMed

    Dannels, Sharon A; McLaughlin, Jean M; Gleason, Katharine A; Dolan, Teresa A; McDade, Sharon A; Richman, Rosalyn C; Morahan, Page S

    2009-06-01

    In 2006, deans of the sixty-four U.S. and Canadian dental schools were surveyed to gain their perspectives on their institutions' organizational culture for faculty, family-friendly policies, processes used by deans to develop faculty leadership, and the impact of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program for Women. The deans reported (52 percent response rate) an improved climate in terms of gender equity, yet recognized that inequities still exist. Of fifteen family-friendly policies, only three were available at more than 50 percent of the schools, with little indication that additional policies were under consideration. The deans reported active engagement in behaviors to develop the leadership of their faculty members. Of the nine processes, 50 percent of the deans indicated three they believed to be particularly effective with women. They agreed that ELAM has had a positive impact on their alumnae and their schools. Results are discussed in terms of how the deans' perceptions compare to faculty perceptions and within the larger context of higher education and other organizations. The responsibility of the dean to shape the dental school's culture, particularly in the face of the changing demographics of dental faculty, adds to the importance of the unique perspective provided by the deans.

  10. Workforce: Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Employment in Hawaii (including hourly and salaried jobs and self-employment) is projected to grow by 14 percent from 2002 to 2012, adding over 78,000 new jobs to the state's economy and growing the workforce from 558,220 to 636,480. The rate of growth is slightly lower than the 15 percent increase projected for the nation as a whole. Over the…

  11. Workforce: Montana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Employment in Montana (including hourly and salaried jobs and self-employment) is projected to grow by 17 percent from 2002 to 2012, adding over 96,000 new jobs to the state's economy and growing the workforce from 554,456 to 651,135. The rate of growth is higher than the 15 percent increase projected for the nation as a whole. Growth will occur…

  12. Diversifying the academic public health workforce: strategies to extend the discourse about limited racial and ethnic diversity in the public health academy.

    PubMed

    Annang, Lucy; Richter, Donna L; Fletcher, Faith E; Weis, Megan A; Fernandes, Pearl R; Clary, Louis A

    2010-01-01

    While public health has gained increased attention and placement on the national health agenda, little progress has been made in achieving a critical mass of underrepresented minority (URM) academicians in the public health workforce. In 2008, a telephone-based qualitative assessment was conducted with URM faculty of schools of public health to discuss this issue. As a result, we present successful strategies that institutional leaders can employ to extend the discourse about addressing limited diversity in the public health academy.

  13. Defense Acquisition Workforce Modernization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Acquisition , Technology & Logistics, 2000). PBSA “involves acquisition strategies, methods, and techniques that describe and communicate measurable ... Acquisition Workforce Distribution of DoD Workforce and Attrition Rates Seperation Rates Distribution of Workforce by Years of Service 38 A final issue... measurement . 14 Provisions within the IMPROVE Act demand greater accountability from the acquisition workforce, improve financial management, expand

  14. The Dean as Colleague: Dean, Student, Faculty, Administrative Relationship. A Compilation of Presentations from the Executive Development Series I: "Have You Ever Thought of Being a Dean?" (1980-1981). Volume III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Colleges of Nursing, Washington, DC.

    The relationships of deans of baccalaureate or higher degree programs of nursing with faculty members, administrators, students, other professionals, and the public are considered by six deans who contributed to a continuing education workshop series. According to Edith H. Anderson, the dean is a colleague of other deans, and to students and…

  15. Follow the Code: Rules or Guidelines for Academic Deans' Behavior?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, Nathaniel J.

    2012-01-01

    In the popular movie series "Pirates of the Caribbean," there is a pirate code that influences how pirates behave in unclear situations, with a running joke about whether the code is either a set of rules or guidelines for behavior. Codes of conduct in any social group or organization can have much the same feel; they can provide clarity and…

  16. Optimal Designs of Staggered Dean Vortex Micromixers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jyh Jian; Chen, Chun Huei; Shie, Shian Ruei

    2011-01-01

    A novel parallel laminar micromixer with a two-dimensional staggered Dean Vortex micromixer is optimized and fabricated in our study. Dean vortices induced by centrifugal forces in curved rectangular channels cause fluids to produce secondary flows. The split-and-recombination (SAR) structures of the flow channels and the impinging effects result in the reduction of the diffusion distance of two fluids. Three different designs of a curved channel micromixer are introduced to evaluate the mixing performance of the designed micromixer. Mixing performances are demonstrated by means of a pH indicator using an optical microscope and fluorescent particles via a confocal microscope at different flow rates corresponding to Reynolds numbers (Re) ranging from 0.5 to 50. The comparison between the experimental data and numerical results shows a very reasonable agreement. At a Re of 50, the mixing length at the sixth segment, corresponding to the downstream distance of 21.0 mm, can be achieved in a distance 4 times shorter than when the Re equals 1. An optimization of this micromixer is performed with two geometric parameters. These are the angle between the lines from the center to two intersections of two consecutive curved channels, θ, and the angle between two lines of the centers of three consecutive curved channels, ϕ. It can be found that the maximal mixing index is related to the maximal value of the sum of θ and ϕ, which is equal to 139.82°. PMID:21747691

  17. The Way Deans Run Their Faculties in Indonesian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngo, Jenny; de Boer, Harry; Enders, Jurgen

    2014-01-01

    Using the theory of reasoned action in combination with the Competing Values Framework of organizational leadership, our study examines how deans at Indonesian universities lead and manage their faculties. Based on a large-scale survey with responses from more than 200 Indonesian deans, the study empirically identifies a number of deanship styles:…

  18. The Educational Crisis in the Preparation of Deans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armiger, Sister Bernadette

    1976-01-01

    Changes in the administrative roles of deans in baccalaureate nursing programs are discussed. These changes require a systematic preservice and inservice education to prepare deans of nursing for more effective practice. Some programs directed towards meeting this need are described briefly. (Author/EC)

  19. The undeaning transition: Toward becoming a former dean.

    PubMed

    Meleis, Afaf Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Stepping up from leadership is a protracted transition that involves a complex set of interactions with many constituents. It begins with making the personal decision to step up to integrating the role of the dean in existing repertoire of roles that the person enacts. Deliberate planning, awareness of phases, challenges, goals and strategies, clear communication, transparency, and supportive interactions enhance the potential of experiencing a smooth and a healthy transition for the dean who is stepping up, the incoming dean, and the organization. The beginning and the ending of the undeaning transition are not definitive, but indicators of a healthy transition could be identified along the way through disengagement from old roles, focused new interactions, engagement in new roles, redefinition of goals, and narratives and dialogues about topics that reflect a new set of goals. The nature of the role of former dean is developed through careful onboarding strategies for the new dean and interactions with a new set of constituents who perceive the dean as a former dean. There are five phases involved in undeaning. These are the decision, the search, the naming of the new dean, the exit, and reclaiming professorial voice.

  20. Organizational, Financial, and Environmental Factors Influencing Deans' Tenure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Rebecca; Bhak, Karyn; Moy, Ernest; Valente, Ernest; Griner, Paul F.

    1998-01-01

    A study of factors influencing tenure of 382 medical school deans from 1985-1994 found that, at the schools that were less healthy financially, were under the same ownership as the primary teaching hospital, and had small faculties, deans tended to have shorter tenures and higher turnover. Possible reasons for these findings and implications for…

  1. In memoriam Dean Otis Cliver 1935-2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Dean O. Cliver, internationally recognized food and environmental virologist, died on May 16, 2011 at his home in Davis, California, after an intense but gallant battle with cancer. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Carolyn Elaine Cliver, children and grandchildren. Dean was born March 2...

  2. Work and Life Balance: Community College Occupational Deans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Jean M.

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on work and life balance from a community college occupational dean perspective. It addresses definitions and concepts of work life and the nature of the role of occupational dean. The themes from this study include the use of time both at work and away from work, work/life crossover, perception of work/life, and work/life…

  3. Academic Leaders as Thermostats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kekale, Jouni

    2003-01-01

    University of Jones launched a two-year development and training project on academic management and leadership in the beginning of 2002. Open seminars were arranged for heads for departments, deans and administrative managers. In addition, personnel administration started pilot projects with two departments in co-operation with the Finnish…

  4. Self-reported leadership styles of deans of baccalaureate and higher degree nursing programs in the United States.

    PubMed

    Broome, Marion E

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a lack of attention in the discipline paid to developing strong academic leaders. It is widely acknowledged that the role of the dean has shifted dramatically over the past two decades, with an increasing emphasis on interaction with and accountability to external constituencies at the university, community, and national levels. The overall purpose of this study was to investigate the self-reported leadership styles, behaviors, and experiences of deans of schools of nursing in the United States. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) was sent to 655 deans who were members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing; 344 returned completed surveys for a return rate of 52.5%. Scores on the transformational scale (n = 321; 20 items) ranged from 2.75 to 4.0, with a mean of 3.79; transactional scores ranged from 1.3 to 4.0, with a mean of 3.3 and mode of 3.5. The passive leadership component was lowest, with a range of 0 to 3.75, mean of 1.1, and mode of 1.0. The highest scores for each dean were then examined and compared across the three components. Seventy-seven percent of the deans' highest scores fell on the transformational, 21% on the transactional, and 2% on the passive-avoidant scale. There were no significant differences in the most commonly reported leadership behaviors by gender, ethnicity, or terminal degree. Deans of nursing, compared with over 3,000 other leaders who have completed the MLQ, ranked in the 80th percentile for self-reported transformative behaviors and outcomes effectiveness. The findings from this sample, who were predominantly female, are congruent with previous research on women leaders. Recommendations for future research leadership development programs are presented.

  5. El Camino College Academic Program Review Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Camino Coll., Torrance, CA.

    This document presents El Camino College's academic program review guidelines as of January 1999. Academic programs are scheduled for full evaluation once every six years and involve a two-year process. By or before the beginning of each fall semester, the Office of Academic Affairs notifies the dean of each division as to which programs are to be…

  6. Public health workforce enumeration.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, Kristine M; Raziano, Amanda; Elliott, Sterling

    2009-05-01

    Comprehensive data on the public health workforce are fundamental to workforce development throughout the public health system. Such information is also a critical data element in public health systems research, a growing area of study that can inform the practice of public health at all levels. However, methodologic and institutional issues challenge the development of comparable indicators for the federal, state, and local public health workforce. A 2006-2007 Association of State and Territorial Health Officials workforce enumeration pilot project demonstrated the issues involved in collecting workforce data. This project illustrated key elements of an institutionalized national system of workforce enumeration, which would be needed for a robust, recurring count that provides a national picture of the public health workforce.

  7. Next generation workforce.

    PubMed

    Swenson, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    The health care industry has become a very complex business. CQsts are rising and resources such as funding and human capital are diminishing. Human capital resources are about to reach true crisis proportions. The vital workforce we have counted on is expected to begin thinning as large numbers of Boomers retire. Not only does this deplete the workforce from a pure numbers perspective, but it also affects intellectual capital and institutional memory. Generational trends and characteristics have affected the workforce environment and will continue to do so as another generation continues to enter the workforce. Generation Y, also tagged Nexter, offers core values that can bring positive changes to the health care workforce. Technology continues to change at lightning speed. Embracing new technology and using it to refine the way we do business will help deliver success. Meaningful strategic plans are needed to change the model of business delivery and employee care in our future workforce.

  8. Integrated Workforce Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, Gary P.

    2000-01-01

    There are several computer-based systems, currently in various phases of development at KSC, which encompass some component, aspect, or function of workforce modeling. These systems may offer redundant capabilities and/or incompatible interfaces. A systems approach to workforce modeling is necessary in order to identify and better address user requirements. This research has consisted of two primary tasks. Task 1 provided an assessment of existing and proposed KSC workforce modeling systems for their functionality and applicability to the workforce planning function. Task 2 resulted in the development of a proof-of-concept design for a systems approach to workforce modeling. The model incorporates critical aspects of workforce planning, including hires, attrition, and employee development.

  9. Fostering the Intellectual and Tribal Spirit: The Role of the Chief Academic Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    His Horse Is Thunder, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces and describes the academic leadership role of the chief academic officer (CAO), also referred to as the academic vice-president, academic dean, or the provost. The CAO is responsible for the development and implementation of all academic programs, including the curriculum content, assessment, instruction quality,…

  10. Dean Flow Dynamics in Low-Aspect Ratio Spiral Microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Nivedita, Nivedita; Ligrani, Phillip; Papautsky, Ian

    2017-01-01

    A wide range of microfluidic cell-sorting devices has emerged in recent years, based on both passive and active methods of separation. Curvilinear channel geometries are often used in these systems due to presence of secondary flows, which can provide high throughput and sorting efficiency. Most of these devices are designed on the assumption of two counter rotating Dean vortices present in the curved rectangular channels and existing in the state of steady rotation and amplitude. In this work, we investigate these secondary flows in low aspect ratio spiral rectangular microchannels and define their development with respect to the channel aspect ratio and Dean number. This work is the first to experimentally and numerically investigate Dean flows in microchannels for Re > 100, and show presence of secondary Dean vortices beyond a critical Dean number. We further demonstrate the impact of these multiple vortices on particle and cell focusing. Ultimately, this work offers new insights into secondary flow instabilities for low-aspect ratio, spiral microchannels, with improved flow models for design of more precise and efficient microfluidic devices for applications such as cell sorting and micromixing. PMID:28281579

  11. Dean Flow Dynamics in Low-Aspect Ratio Spiral Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nivedita, Nivedita; Ligrani, Phillip; Papautsky, Ian

    2017-03-01

    A wide range of microfluidic cell-sorting devices has emerged in recent years, based on both passive and active methods of separation. Curvilinear channel geometries are often used in these systems due to presence of secondary flows, which can provide high throughput and sorting efficiency. Most of these devices are designed on the assumption of two counter rotating Dean vortices present in the curved rectangular channels and existing in the state of steady rotation and amplitude. In this work, we investigate these secondary flows in low aspect ratio spiral rectangular microchannels and define their development with respect to the channel aspect ratio and Dean number. This work is the first to experimentally and numerically investigate Dean flows in microchannels for Re > 100, and show presence of secondary Dean vortices beyond a critical Dean number. We further demonstrate the impact of these multiple vortices on particle and cell focusing. Ultimately, this work offers new insights into secondary flow instabilities for low-aspect ratio, spiral microchannels, with improved flow models for design of more precise and efficient microfluidic devices for applications such as cell sorting and micromixing.

  12. Public health workforce taxonomy.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Matthew L; Beck, Angela J; Coronado, Fátima; Merrill, Jacqueline A; Friedman, Charles P; Stamas, George D; Tyus, Nadra; Sellers, Katie; Moore, Jean; Tilson, Hugh H; Leep, Carolyn J

    2014-11-01

    Thoroughly characterizing and continuously monitoring the public health workforce is necessary for ensuring capacity to deliver public health services. A prerequisite for this is to develop a standardized methodology for classifying public health workers, permitting valid comparisons across agencies and over time, which does not exist for the public health workforce. An expert working group, all of whom are authors on this paper, was convened during 2012-2014 to develop a public health workforce taxonomy. The purpose of the taxonomy is to facilitate the systematic characterization of all public health workers while delineating a set of minimum data elements to be used in workforce surveys. The taxonomy will improve the comparability across surveys, assist with estimating duplicate counting of workers, provide a framework for describing the size and composition of the workforce, and address other challenges to workforce enumeration. The taxonomy consists of 12 axes, with each axis describing a key characteristic of public health workers. Within each axis are multiple categories, and sometimes subcategories, that further define that worker characteristic. The workforce taxonomy axes are occupation, workplace setting, employer, education, licensure, certification, job tasks, program area, public health specialization area, funding source, condition of employment, and demographics. The taxonomy is not intended to serve as a replacement for occupational classifications but rather is a tool for systematically categorizing worker characteristics. The taxonomy will continue to evolve as organizations implement it and recommend ways to improve this tool for more accurate workforce data collection.

  13. Using Technology To Learn and Learning To Use Technology. Hearing before the Committee on Education and the Workforce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and the Workforce.

    This hearing on educational technology includes statements by the following individuals: Vice-Chairman Thomas E. Petri, Committee on Education and the Workforce; Dr. James B. Thomas, Dean, School of Information Sciences and Technology, Pennsylvania State University; Eva Cronin, teacher, Hayes Elementary School (Georgia); Janet Guge, art and French…

  14. Health Workforce Planning

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sawai, Abdulaziz; Al-Shishtawy, Moeness M.

    2015-01-01

    In most countries, the lack of explicit health workforce planning has resulted in imbalances that threaten the capacity of healthcare systems to attain their objectives. This has directed attention towards the prospect of developing healthcare systems that are more responsive to the needs and expectations of the population by providing health planners with a systematic method to effectively manage human resources in this sector. This review analyses various approaches to health workforce planning and presents the Six-Step Methodology to Integrated Workforce Planning which highlights essential elements in workforce planning to ensure the quality of services. The purpose, scope and ownership of the approach is defined. Furthermore, developing an action plan for managing a health workforce is emphasised and a reviewing and monitoring process to guide corrective actions is suggested. PMID:25685381

  15. The Preparation of Academic Library Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Starr

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine the preparation methods experienced by academic library deans and which methods they perceived to be most valuable. Rosser, Johnsrud, and Heck (2000, 2003) defined the theoretical constructs of effective academic leadership upon which this study is based. The instrument--a modified version of…

  16. Dean of Deans: Wilfred Bain and the Rise of the Indiana University School of Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarado, Julieta M.

    2013-01-01

    Leadership for American higher education is increasingly receiving more attention due to the rapidly changing academic world of the twenty-first century. Academic leadership development, thus, warrants serious study and lively discourse. The emergence of music as a fully organized discipline in the twentieth century, and the development of a…

  17. How Prepared Are Academic Administrators? Leadership and Job Satisfaction within US Research Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Tracy L.; Laipple, Joseph S.

    2015-01-01

    A national sample of 1515 university administrators (academic deans, directors, associate deans, and department chairs) completed a survey of leadership skills, preparedness for administrative role, and job satisfaction. Overall, participants felt least well prepared in the areas of developing entrepreneurial revenue, developing metrics to…

  18. In Defense of Foundations: An Open Letter to Deans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deMarrais, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Kathleen deMarrais, professor in the Department of Lifelong Education, Administration and Policy at the University of Georgia, was honored to be invited to contribute to this special issue of "Critical Questions in Education." deMarrais addressed college/university deans to review the role of social foundations in teacher education and…

  19. Dynamics and Dilemmas of the Associate and Assistant Dean Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Shirley A.; Coudret, Nadine A.

    1986-01-01

    The need for and importance of effective leadership in nursing education mandates that individual and institutional efforts be committed to reducing role ambiguity, conflict, and overload in the position of assistant dean, whose role is subject to multiple demands and involved with multiple administrative subsystems. (Author/MSE)

  20. Dean's List: Eleven Habits of Highly Successful College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bader, John B.

    2011-01-01

    With a solid GPA, numerous extracurricular achievements, and an acceptance letter from an excellent college, it seems that all of your hard work in school has paid off. Now what? What can you expect from college life, and how can you get the most out of it? This book answers these questions to help you excel in college. Deans at America's top…

  1. Managing People: A Guide for Department Chairs and Deans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaming, Deryl R., Ed.

    This book is a collection of essays by experienced department chairs, deans, and vice-presidents. Each essay discusses a different aspect of people management in higher education, explaining the issues and offering suggestions and resources. The chapters are: (1) "Understanding Yourself" (Deryl R. Leaming); (2) "Understanding and Communicating…

  2. Selected Bibliographies. Reports of the Deans' Grants: 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond. School of Education.

    Four bibliographies from Dean's Grant Projects (programs designed to prepare regular class teachers to work with mainstreamed handicapped students) are provided. Entries include author's name, title, source, date and pagination information, and, in two of the bibliographies, a brief annotation. The following topics are the central concerns of the…

  3. AACSB Deans' Understanding of Multimedia Copyright Laws and Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatlin, Rebecca; Arn, Joseph V.; Kordsmeier, William

    1999-01-01

    Fewer than 60% of 114 business-education deans answered questions correctly about fair use and the use of copyrighted multimedia materials in instruction. Those with less multimedia experience assumed copyright regulations to be more restrictive than they actually are. (SK)

  4. "Monsters'" Ink: How Walter Dean Myers Made "Frankenstein" Fun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Nathan

    2003-01-01

    Describes an effective but new twist on the use of young adult books as bridges to the classics. Considers how "Frankenstein" is a novel written for today. Aims for his students to see that literature can be a way to discuss important issues. Discusses how to bridge Walter Dean Myers' novel "Monster" to…

  5. The Creative Path: An Interview with Dean Keith Simonton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henshon, Suzanna E.

    2011-01-01

    Dean Keith Simonton received his PhD from Harvard University and is currently Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Davis. His research program concentrates on the cognitive, personality, developmental, and sociocultural factors behind exceptional creativity, leadership, genius, and talent. In this interview,…

  6. Building Bridges: Fund Raising for Deans, Faculty, and Development Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Mary Kay, Ed.

    This publication offers 16 articles by higher education administrators, faculty and development officers on dean and faculty members roles in development work as well as the teamwork and synergy that develop in the best efforts. Following an introduction by George Keller, the articles are as follows: (1) "Institutional Strategic Planning:…

  7. The Wizards of Odds: Leadership Journeys of Education Deans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Larry S., Ed.

    This monograph contains reflections by current and former deans of schools of education on their experiences in providing leadership for change, their attempts at reform, their perceived successes and failures, and the lessons they learned. It opens with a preface by Larry S. Bowen describing the conference that led to the monograph, the…

  8. The Dean's Scholars Program At Wright College: A Preliminary Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph E.

    This study elevated the effectiveness of the Dean's Scholars Programs (DSP) at Wilbur Wright Campus, Chicago City College (Illinois). The program--initiated in September 1966--provided selected freshman and sophomore students with opportunities to prepare for professional study through accelerated courses. The program planners hoped that the…

  9. A Statistical Analysis of Library School Deans' Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpela, Raymond

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the extent to which deans holding office in 1983 in American Library Association (ALA) accredited graduate library education programs fulfilled the expectations of academia and the ALA "Standards'" requirement with respect to sustained productive scholarship and evidence of aptitude for research through…

  10. Bureau of Health Workforce

    MedlinePlus

    ... Programs for health professions schools Health Professions Training Grants to Support Institutions We support the development of ... robust primary care workforce through Health Professions Training Grants that: increase diversity, encourage clinicians to practice in ...

  11. First-Year Experiences of Associate Deans: A Qualitative, Multi-Institutional Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Gary W.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the first-year experiences of new associate deans at doctoral granting, Research I universities. Participants were 24 associate deans from various disciplines at three difference universities who had been in their positions for five years or less. Findings show that the transition into the associate dean position is stressful…

  12. The Educational Dean: An Examination of Behaviors Associated with Special Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arends, Richard I.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The role of the dean in directing a federally funded change project (Dean's Grant project) in schools of education is examined. Categories of specific behaviors of deans include: (1) choreographic behavior; (2) resource allocation; (3) conflict negotiation; (4) advocacy and support behavior; and (5) communication. (JN)

  13. Deans of Career and Technical Education: Charting the Course to Senior Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Shelley Zarovsky

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the essential leadership practices, abilities, and experiences of Deans of Career and Technical Education (CTE) and to consider how these Deans of CTE fit into the succession process of the community college. A qualitative case study was conducted with three dyads of career Deans and their supervising…

  14. A Survey of Career Pathways of Engineering Deans in the United States: Strategies for Leadership Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargrove, S. Keith

    2015-01-01

    The career pathways of deans in higher education seem to follow the traditional model in academia from a senior faculty position and/or department chair. This however may be different from deans in engineering education. The goal of this survey research is to assess the career paths of current Deans of Colleges/Schools of Engineering in the United…

  15. Workforce Training and Education Gaps in Gerontology and Geriatrics: What We Found in New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiden, Robert J.; Horowitz, Beverly P.; Howe, Judith L.

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes data from the 2008 Symposium Charting the Future for New York State Workforce Training and Education in Aging: The Stakeholder Perspective and the 2009 report "Workforce Training and Education: The Challenge for Academic Institutions". This research is the outcome of a collaborative State Society on Aging of New…

  16. Graduate Education Issues and Challenges: Community College Applied and Workforce Baccalaureates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, Deborah L.; Felsher, Rivka A.; Catullo, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The acceptance of community college applied and workforce baccalaureates (AWB) degrees by university graduate level programs has not been adequately vetted by academics and policymakers. Over the past decade and a half, the primary motivation for offering community college baccalaureate degrees was to fulfill unmet needs in the local workforce and…

  17. A Statewide Train-the-Trainer Model for Effective Entrepreneurship and Workforce Readiness Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Nia Imani; Brown, Mananmi; Piechocinski, Alganesh; Wells, Kendra

    2012-01-01

    A statewide youth and adult train-the-trainer model that integrates workforce readiness and entrepreneurship can have a profound effect on young people's academic performance, interest in college, and overall youth development. Participants in workforce and entrepreneurship programs develop personal resources that have value in school, in the…

  18. The Medical Physics Workforce.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne D

    2017-02-01

    The medical physics workforce comprises approximately 24,000 workers worldwide and approximately 8,200 in the United States. The occupation is a recognized, established, and mature profession that is undergoing considerable growth and change, with many of these changes being driven by scientific, technical, and medical advances. Presently, the medical physics workforce is adequate to meet societal needs. However, data are emerging that suggest potential risks of shortages and other problems that could develop within a few years. Some of the governing factors are well established, such as the increasing number of incident cancers thereby increasing workload, while others, such as the future use of radiation treatments and changes in healthcare economic policies, are uncertain and make the future status of the workforce difficult to forecast beyond the next several years. This review examines some of the major factors that govern supply and demand for medical physicists, discusses published projections and their uncertainties, and presents other information that may help to inform short- and long-term planning of various aspects of the future workforce. It includes a description of the general characteristics of the workforce, including information on its size, educational attainment, certification, age distribution, etc. Because the supply of new workers is governed by educational and training pathways, graduate education, post-doctoral training, and residency training are reviewed, along with trends in state and federal support for research and education. Selected professional aspects of the field also are considered, including professional certification and compensation. We speculate on the future outlook of the workforce and provide recommendations regarding future actions pertaining to the future medical physics workforce.

  19. Marginalia: Women in the Academic Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadet, Nancy

    1989-01-01

    Looks at the function and status of women faculty at colleges and universities in the United States. Focuses on how the adjunct faculty position when used as an economizing strategy by administrators places women in permanent disadvantaged and dead-end positions. Reviews adjunct faculty organizational efforts to make demands for pay equity and…

  20. Pediatrician workforce policy statement.

    PubMed

    Basco, William T; Rimsza, Mary E

    2013-08-01

    This policy statement reviews important trends and other factors that affect the pediatrician workforce and the provision of pediatric health care, including changes in the pediatric patient population, pediatrician workforce, and nature of pediatric practice. The effect of these changes on pediatricians and the demand for pediatric care are discussed. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) concludes that there is currently a shortage of pediatric medical subspecialists in many fields, as well as a shortage of pediatric surgical specialists. In addition, the AAP believes that the current distribution of primary care pediatricians is inadequate to meet the needs of children living in rural and other underserved areas, and more primary care pediatricians will be needed in the future because of the increasing number of children who have significant chronic health problems, changes in physician work hours, and implementation of current health reform efforts that seek to improve access to comprehensive patient- and family-centered care for all children in a medical home. The AAP is committed to being an active participant in physician workforce policy development with both professional organizations and governmental bodies to ensure a pediatric perspective on health care workforce issues. The overall purpose of this statement is to summarize policy recommendations and serve as a resource for the AAP and other stakeholders as they address pediatrician workforce issues that ultimately influence the quality of pediatric health care provided to children in the United States.

  1. Motivation and job satisfaction of deans of schools of nursing.

    PubMed

    Lamborn, M L

    1991-01-01

    Factors influencing the job satisfaction of deans of schools of nursing were analyzed using the motivational theory of expectancy. A questionnaire was sent to 595 deans/directors of baccalaureate and higher degree schools of nursing accredited by the National League for Nursing. The three part questionnaire consisted of (1) Demographic data, (2) Motivation and Reward Scales, and (3) The Job Description Index. Significant relationships were found within each job satisfaction variable (P less than or equal to .05). The most significant and numerous relationships were found within the variable of pay or salary. Deans who had long tenure in their administrative positions and were associated with large universities and schools of nursing were also found to be statistically significant (P less than or equal to .05). A direct relationship between the scores on the Motivation and Reward Scale and the scores on the Job Description Index was supported. The individual and collective facets of job satisfaction were positively and significantly correlated (P less than or equal to .05) with motivation, providing support for the theoretical framework that proposes an interdependent relationship. Additional findings from regression analyses suggested that motivation is a significant predictor of job satisfaction.

  2. Training a Multicultural Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Penny

    The materials comprise a 30-hour training package designed to assist workplace supervisors in Australia in understanding the issues and strategies for managing and training a multicultural workforce, particularly when it includes refugees or immigrants of non-English-speaking backgrounds. The course is to be taught by, and these materials are…

  3. Academic Support Systems: A Networked Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingenstein, Kenneth

    1984-01-01

    Academic support systems are characterized as those activities that center around a dean's office--office automation/information systems, institutional research and electronic communication. The basic and design and implementation issues that are encountered in providing these support systems are examined. (Author/MLW)

  4. Fostering Research and Publication in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassen, Catherine; Wahl, Diane

    2014-01-01

    This study concerns administrative support provided to encourage the research and publishing activities of academic librarians working in Association of Research Libraries member libraries. Deans and directors of these libraries were asked to respond to an online survey concerning the support measures that their libraries provide, as well as their…

  5. The Initiative to Move Toward a More Highly Educated Nursing Workforce: Findings from the Kansas Registered Nurse Workforce Survey.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiuhua; Peltzer, Jill; Teel, Cynthia; Pierce, Janet

    2015-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health, recommends increasing the proportion of registered nurses (RNs) with a baccalaureate in nursing (BSN) to 80% by 2020. Kansas lacks a central mechanism to collect current data on the RN workforce; therefore, detailed information about the RN workforce, including current educational level, is unknown. The purposes of the survey were to (a) describe the Kansas RN workforce, (b) examine the relationship between nursing education and employment, (c) compare and contrast the workforce to other states and national data and (d) discuss implications of strategic planning and policy making for nursing education. The on-line Kansas RN Workforce Survey link was sent to 44,568 RNs by e-mail, and the response rate was 15.6% (n = 6,948). The survey consisted of 34 questions on demographics, education, licensing, and employment. Kansas RNs were predominately women (92%) and Caucasian with an average age of 47.7 years. Approximately 46.3% of RNs obtained a BSN as their initial education. Analysis of highest level of nursing education showed that 60.5% of Kansas RNs were at least baccalaureate prepared, with 14.9% obtaining a master's degree or higher. More than 50% of RNs worked in hospitals as staff nurses. RNs with advanced education were more likely to be employed, tended to work in academic settings or ambulatory clinics, and were more likely to be faculty or in management/leadership positions. Overall, the Kansas RN workforce is closer to reaching the 80% baccalaureate-prepared goal recommended by the Future of Nursing report than has been reported. Educational level was closely related to RNs' choices of work settings and positions. Additional work such as promoting academic progression needs to continue to build a more highly educated RN workforce.

  6. Advancement of Women in the Biomedical Workforce: Insights for Success.

    PubMed

    Barfield, Whitney L; Plank-Bazinet, Jennifer L; Austin Clayton, Janine

    2016-08-01

    Women continue to face unique barriers in the biomedical workforce that affect their advancement and retention in this field. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) formed the Working Group on Women in Biomedical Careers to address these issues. Through the efforts of the working group, the NIH funded 14 research grants to identify barriers or to develop and/or test interventions to support women in the biomedical workforce. The grantees that were funded through this endeavor later established the grassroots Research Partnership on Women in Biomedical Careers, and they continue to conduct research and disseminate information on the state of women in academic medicine. This Commentary explores the themes introduced in a collection of articles organized by the research partnership and published in this issue of Academic Medicine. The authors highlight the role that government plays in the advancement of women in academic medicine and highlight the findings put forward in this collection.

  7. Workforce Brief: Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Employment in Colorado (including hourly and salaried jobs and self-employment) is projected to grow by 23 percent from 2002 to 2012, adding some 551,630 new jobs to the state's economy and growing the workforce from 2,355,290 to 2,906,920. The rate of growth is much higher than the 15 percent increase projected for the nation as a whole.…

  8. Forum on Workforce Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    APPEL Mission: To support NASA's mission by promoting individual, team, and organizational excellence in program/project management and engineering through the application of learning strategies, methods, models, and tools. Goals: a) Provide a common frame of reference for NASA s technical workforce. b) Provide and enhance critical job skills. c) Support engineering, program and project teams. d) Promote organizational learning across the agency. e) Supplement formal educational programs.

  9. The case for workforce development in social marketing.

    PubMed

    Pounds, Lea

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health, and the Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice have emphasized the increasing need to train the public health workforce in social marketing. With only 21 U.S. academic institutions offering course work in social marketing and only four institutions offering degrees in social marketing there is a gap between what academic institutions are offering and these recommendations (Kelly, 2013 ). The successful application of social marketing in public health practice relies on academic institutions creating and promoting social marketing-related programs.

  10. Issues in workforce composition analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Koeck, D.C.; Rogers, J.D.

    1996-05-01

    An issue of paramount interest to US industry is the supply and quality of human resources available for this country`s scientific and technological activities. The changing composition of the workforce and the responsibility that an organization has to assure equal opportunity, give rise to various issues. This paper discusses some of the issues associated with the scientific and technical workforce. Specifically, it explores some of the questions pertaining to workforce composition and measures of workforce composition. This paper should be useful to those responsible for personnel policies.

  11. Deans for Impact: Who We Are and What We Stand for

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Karen Symms; Smith, Tom E. C.; Anderson, Charis

    2016-01-01

    A vision statement and call to action from Deans for Impact--a group of deans committing themselves to a set of principles intended to elevate the performance of educator preparation programs and the status of teachers. Their objectives include: Develop a consensus around a professional knowledge base for teachers; create a tighter connection…

  12. How Six Women Deans of Agriculture Have Attained Their Leadership Role: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleihauer, Sarah; Stephens, Carrie; Hart, William E.; Stripling, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    There is a disproportionate ratio of men to women in leadership roles in higher education and agriculture. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the lives of women deans in agriculture in an attempt to conceptualize the leadership styles they have developed as a result of their positions as deans in a predominantly male field. Six…

  13. Life in the Middle: An Exploratory Study of California Community College Instructional Deans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sill, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    This two-phase sequential mixed methods exploratory study examined the perceived skill deficits of instructional deans at California community colleges to better understand the training and development needs that are necessary to support dean success and to prepare them for advancement in a timelier manner. This study is grounded in the…

  14. Emotional Intelligence and Job Satisfaction: The EQ Relationship for Deans of U.S. Business Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coco, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine if a positive relationship existed between Emotional Intelligence and Job Satisfaction for deans of business schools. A secondary purpose was to determine which Emotional Quotient (EQ) competencies were most important for satisfied deans and how these competencies assisted processes related to…

  15. Writing through the Labyrinth of Fears: The Legacy of Walter Dean Myers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatum, Alfred W.

    2015-01-01

    This commentary discusses the legacy of Walter Dean Myers in relationship to advancing writing as an intellectual tool of protection for black male teens. Multiple implications are provided for teachers who want to engage black male teens to write fearlessly to extend the legacy of Walter Dean Myers.

  16. Dean of Women at Historically Black Colleges and Universities: A Story Left Untold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herdlein, Richard; Cali, Christine Frezza; Dina, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    There is a paucity of historical discourse on the distinct contributions of African American women serving as deans of women at historically Black colleges and universities. Using historical research and the case study approach, the analysis focused on three deans of women: Lucy Diggs Slowe--Howard University, Owena Hunter Davis--Johnson C. Smith…

  17. Community College Deans of Instruction: Their Role in Institutional Facilities Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Arthur L. Jr.; Keim, Marybelle C.

    2003-01-01

    Reports on a survey of deans of instruction at 300 community colleges that determined (1) their preparation for facilities and institutional planning; (2) the degree to which they are and should be involved in planning; and (3) challenges and obstacles to planning. A total of 201 deans responded, for a 67% response rate. (Contains nine…

  18. A Comparison of the Views of College of Business Deans and Faculty on Undeserved Authorships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Jennifer L.

    2015-01-01

    Deans and faculty at Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business-accredited colleges of business were surveyed on the extent and impact of the occurrence of undeserved authorships in business journal articles. Eighty percent of the deans and faculty responding acknowledged the occurrence of undeserved authorships in published business…

  19. A Workshop for New Deans of Instruction with Little Background in the Junior College: An Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partridge, Patrick V.

    The objectives of this study were to: (1) explore the need for a workshop to clarify the role of the junior college dean of instruction, particularly for new deans with little or no prior junior college administrative experience; and (2) if such a workshop were needed, determine what content, methods and procedures, and prepared materials would be…

  20. Lodestar of the Faculty: The Increasingly Important Role of Dean of Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zilian, Fred

    2012-01-01

    In the tight budget atmosphere of recent years, schools may have chosen to do without a dean of faculty or, at best, to double- hat another middle manager with this responsibility. This is a mistake. That all private schools do not have a dedicated dean of faculty suggests a lack of emphasis on the very component of the school--the faculty--that…

  1. Dean's Role in Change: The Case of Professional Accreditation Reform of American Collegiate Business Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henninger, Edward A.

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated perceptions of the business school dean's role in implementing the new American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business accreditation standards. Factors supporting or constraining that role, as viewed by deans, management and marketing department chairs, and faculty at four accredited comprehensive universities, were noted.…

  2. Workforce Intermediation for Vulnerable Youth: Workforce Initiatives Discussion Paper #4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper's intention is to spur discussion about the roles of "workforce intermediation" as it relates to youth development and employability. It is certainly not meant to be an exhaustive discussion about either topic. It does, however, intend to further the dialogue on international workforce initiatives and the requisite workforce…

  3. Clinical academic careers: embracing the art and science of nursing.

    PubMed

    Masterson, Abigail; Robb, Liz

    2016-11-23

    Clinical academics make a unique contribution to health research and scholarship by undertaking practice-focused research that offers direct benefits to patient care. The Florence Nightingale Foundation supports the development of research skills in nursing and midwifery through its scholarships and by establishing a network of chairs in clinical nursing practice research. The Florence Nightingale Foundation also provides leadership scholarships to deans and aspiring deans of university faculties of health. It is from these perspectives that the case is made for investment in clinical academic roles and the development of career pathways that embrace the art and science of nursing.

  4. The Primary Dental Care Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neenan, M. Elaine; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study describes the characteristics of the current primary dental care workforce (dentists, hygienists, assistants), its distribution, and its delivery system in private and public sectors. Graduate dental school enrollments, trends in patient visits, employment patterns, state dental activities, and workforce issues related to health care…

  5. Seeking a State Workforce Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, David Jason; Mack, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    New York's workforce system is a complicated entity that engages nearly a dozen state agencies and myriad funding streams originating at the federal and state levels, and operates on the ground in ten economic development regions, 33 designated workforce investment areas, community-based organizations, labor unions and 62 counties. This report…

  6. Implications for an Aging Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahan, Shari; Sturz, Dominick

    2006-01-01

    America's workforce is aging, with over 20% of the workforce expected to be aged 55 and over by the year 2015, an increase of nearly 50% through 2014. As people age, their resistance to harmful exposures is reduced. Injury data suggest that although elderly workers are less likely to be hurt seriously enough to lose worktime, they often take twice…

  7. Early Childhood Workforce Index, 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitebook, Marcy; McLean, Caitlin; Austin, Lea J. E.

    2016-01-01

    The State of the Early Childhood Workforce (SECW) Initiative is a groundbreaking multi-year project to shine a steady spotlight on the nation's early childhood workforce. The SECW Initiative is designed to challenge entrenched ideas and policies that maintain an inequitable and inadequate status quo for early educators and for the children and…

  8. Alumni Perceptions of Workforce Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landrum, R. Eric; Hettich, Paul I.; Wilner, Abby

    2010-01-01

    We surveyed psychology alumni (N = 78) about (a) their preparedness and competency on 54 areas of workforce readiness, (b) changes since graduation on 33 adjectives describing emotional states and personality qualities, and (c) suggestions for universities about how to provide opportunities that enhance workforce success. Among the highest rated…

  9. Protein transmission during Dean vortex microfiltration of yeast suspensions.

    PubMed

    Kluge, T; Rezende, C; Wood, D; Belfort, G

    1999-12-20

    Substantially higher rates of protein and fluid volume transport for microfiltration of yeast suspensions were possible with improved hydrodynamics using centrifugal fluid instabilities called Dean vortices. Under constant permeate flux operation with suspended yeast cells, a helical module exhibited 19 times the filtration capacity of a linear module. For feed containing both BSA and beer yeast under constant transmembrane pressure with diafiltration, about twice as much protein (BSA and other proteins from cell lysis) was transported out of the feed by the helical module as compared with the linear module. The volumetric permeation flux improvements for the helical over the linear module ranged from 18 to 43% for yeast concentrations up to 4.5 dry wt %.

  10. A white dean and black physicians at the epicenter of the civil rights movement.

    PubMed

    deShazo, Richard D; Smith, Robert; Skipworth, Leigh Baldwin

    2014-06-01

    Robert Q. Marston, MD, a gregarious Rhodes and Markel Scholar, native Virginian, and well-connected National Institutes of Health-trained medical scientist found himself the new dean and hospital director of a promising academic medical center at age 38. It was 1961 and the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) in Jackson was, unknown to him, about to be at the geographic center of the struggle for African American civil rights. That struggle would entangle UMMC in a national search for social justice and change the course of American history and American medicine. Shortly after his arrival, the new dean received and refused a written request from the Secretary of the Mississippi Chapter of the National Medical Association (NMA) to make educational venues at the segregated medical center available to black physicians. The same year, UMMC became the primary medical provider for sick and injured Freedom Riders, sit-in and demonstration participants, and others who breached the racial divide defined by the state's feared Sovereignty Commission. That divide was violently enforced by collaboration among law enforcement, Citizens' Councils, and the Ku Klux Klan. The crescendo of the civil rights struggle that attended Marston's arrival included a deadly riot following James Meredith's integration of the Ole Miss campus in Oxford in 1962, the death of National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Field Secretary Medgar Evers at UMMC in 1963, a national controversy over UMMC's role in the autopsies of 3 civil rights workers murdered in Neshoba County, an attempt at limited compliance to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and a federal civil rights complaint against UMMC by the NAACP Legal and Educational Fund in 1965. That complaint noted that UMMC was out of compliance with the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and seriously threatened its federal funding and academic operations. Marston developed a compliance strategy that included the hiring

  11. Tracking the Health of the Geoscience Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, L. M.; Keane, C. M.; Martinez, C. M.

    2008-12-01

    Increased demands for resources and environmental activities, relative declines in college students entering technical fields, and expectations of growth commensurate with society as a whole challenge the competitiveness of the U.S. geoscience workforce. Because of prior business cycles, more than 50% of the workforce needed in natural resource industries in 10 years is currently not in the workforce. This issue is even more acute in government at all levels and in academic institutions. Here, we present a snapshot of the current status of the geoscience profession that spans geoscientists in training to geoscience professionals in government, industry, and academia to understand the disparity between the supply of and demand for geoscientists. Since 1996, only 1% of high school SAT test takers plan to major in geosciences at college. Although the total number of geoscience degrees granted at community colleges have increased by 9% since 1996 , the number of geoscience undergraduate degrees has decreased by 7%. The number of geoscience master's and doctoral degrees have increased 4% and 14% respectively in the same time period. However, by 2005, 68 geoscience departments were consolidated or closed in U.S. universities. Students who graduate with geoscience degrees command competitive salaries. Recent bachelors geoscience graduates earned an average salary of 31,366, whereas recent master's recipients earned an average of 81,300. New geosciences doctorates commanded an average salary of 72,600. Also, fFederal funding for geoscience research has increase steadily from 485 million in 1970 to $3.5 billion in 2005. Economic indicators suggest continued growth in geoscience commodity output and in market capitalization of geoscience industries. Additionally, the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 19% increase in the number of geoscience jobs from 2006 to 2016. Despite the increased demand for geoscientists and increase in federal funding of geoscience research

  12. An emigration versus a globalization perspective of the Lebanese physician workforce: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lebanon is witnessing an increased emigration of physicians. The objective of this study was to understand the perceptions of Lebanese policymakers of this emigration, and elicit their proposals for future policies and strategies to deal with this emigration. Methods We conducted semi-structured individual interviews with the deans of Lebanon’s seven medical schools, the presidents of the two physicians professional associations, and governmental officials. We analyzed the results qualitatively. Results Participants differed in the assessment of the extent and gravity of emigration. Lebanon has a surplus of physicians, driven largely by the over-production of graduates by a growing number of medical schools. Participants cited advantages and disadvantages of the emigration on the personal, financial, medical education system, healthcare system, and national levels. Proposed strategies included limiting the number of students entering medical schools, creating job opportunities for graduating students, and implementing quality standards. Most participants acknowledged the globalization of the Lebanese physician workforce, including exchanges with the Gulf region, exchanges with developed countries, and the involvement of North American medical education institutions in the region. Conclusion Many Lebanese policy makers, particularly deans of medical schools, perceive the emigration of the physician workforce as an opportunity in the context of the globalization of the profession. PMID:22646478

  13. A Study of Dean Vortex Development and Structure in a Curved Rectangular Channel with Aspect Ratio of 40 at Dean Numbers up to 430

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligrani, Phillip M.

    1994-01-01

    Flow in a curved channel with mild curvature, an aspect ratio of 40 to 1, and an inner to outer radius ratio of 0.979 is studied at Dean numbers De ranging from 35 to 430. For positions from the start of curvature ranging from 85 to 145 degrees, the sequence of transition events begins with curved channel Poiseuille flow at De less than 40-64. As the Dean number increases, observations show initial development of Dean vortex pairs, followed by symmetric vortex pairs which, when viewed in spanwise/radial planes, cover the entire channel height (De=90-100). At De from 40 to 125-130, the vortex pairs often develop intermittent waviness in the form of vortex undulations. Splitting and merging of vortex pairs is also observed over the same experimental conditions as well as at higher De. When Dean numbers range from 130 to 185-200, the undulating wavy mode is replaced by a twisting mode with higher amplitudes of oscillation and shorter wavelengths. The twisting wavy mode results in the development of regions where turbulence intensity is locally augmented at Dean numbers from 150 to 185-200, principally in the upwash regions between the two individual vortices which make up each vortex pair. These turbulent regions eventually increase in intensity and spatial extent as the Dean number increases further, until individual regions merge together so that the entire cross section of the channel contains chaotic turbulent motions. When Dean numbers then reach 400-435, spectra of velocity fluctuations then evidence fully turbulent flow.

  14. A 20-Year Perspective on Preparation Strategies and Career Planning of Pharmacy Deans

    PubMed Central

    Plaza, Cecilia M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To provide a longitudinal description of the variety of career paths and preparation strategies of pharmacy deans. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study design using survey research methodology was used. Chief executive officer (CEO) deans at every full and associate member institution of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP) in the United States as of May 1, 2009, were potential subjects. Results The database housed 90.3% (N = 93) of all current (excluding interim/acting) CEO deans. Of the 4 cohorts across time (1991, 1996, 2002, and 2009 snapshots), the 2009 cohort had the highest percentage of deans following either the hierarchical or nontraditional career paths. Conclusions Deans named since 2002 have spent less time collectively in the professoriate than cohorts before them. One reason for this is the increase in the number of deans that followed nontraditional career paths and who spent little or no time in the professoriate prior to their first deanship. This also could be due to the increased demand for individuals to serve as dean due to retirements and the creation of new institutions. PMID:21301596

  15. Geospatial intelligence workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-02-01

    A report on the future U.S. workforce for geospatial intelligence, requested by the U.S. National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA), found that the agency—which hires about 300 scientists and analysts annually—is probably finding sufficient experts to fill the needs in all of its core areas, with the possible exception of geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing. The report by the U.S. National Research Council, released on 25 January, noted that competition for GIS applications analysts is strong. While there appear to be enough cartographers, photogrammetrists, and geodesists to meet NGA's current needs in those core areas, the report cautioned that future shortages in these areas seem likely because of a relatively small number of graduates.

  16. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  17. Engaging local public health system partnerships to educate the future public health workforce.

    PubMed

    Caron, Rosemary M; Hiller, Marc D; Wyman, William J

    2013-04-01

    The Institute of Medicine concluded that keeping the public healthy required a well-educated public health workforce, thus leading to its recommendation that "all undergraduates should have access to education in public health" [2]. In response to this call, the authors examined the current practice, feasibility, and value in strengthening (or building) a functional collaborative model between academic institutions and practitioners from local health departments to educate tomorrow's public health workforce. Local and regional health departments in New England were surveyed to: (1) establish a baseline of existing working relationships between them and nearby academic institutions; (2) examine the barriers that inhibit the development of collaborations with academic partners; (3) assess how they jointly promote public health workforce development; and (4) analyze which essential public health services their partnership addresses. Despite the lack of financial resources often cited for the absence of academic-local health department collaborations, some New England states reported that their academic institution and local public health department partnerships were valued and productive. The authors discuss how effective academic-community collaborations have the potential to facilitate a broad-based appreciation of public health among students via a wide array of public health curricula and applied experiential learning opportunities in public health settings. The authors propose a model for how to combine basic public health lessons with practical experience and leadership offered by local health departments, in order to foster a real understanding of public health, its importance, practice, and relevance in today's society from a public health workforce perspective.

  18. A Comparison of Academic Status Statistics, Fall 1981 to Fall 1983. Report 83-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrott, Marietta

    A comparison of the number and percent of students subject to academic dismissal, academic probation, progress probation, the dean's list (GPA 2.00), and the president's list (GPA 3.00) at College of the Sequoias was drawn for the years 1981, 1982, and 1983. Statistics showed the following changes: (1) the number of students dismissed due to poor…

  19. Colliding Scopes: Seeing Academic Library Leadership through a Lens of Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Lynn N.

    2010-01-01

    Academic libraries routinely negotiate layers of change as embedded organizations in higher education institutions. Facing competing demands with limited resources gave rise to the question: how do academic library deans effectively lead their organizations in times of change? A Delphi Method study was conducted to identify successful leadership…

  20. Wind Energy Workforce Development & Jobs

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2016-11-08

    The United States needs a skilled and qualified wind energy workforce to produce domestic clean power. To assist with wind energy workforce development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory are engaged with several efforts.This presentation by Suzanne Tegen describes these efforts, including a wind industry survey, DOE's Wind Career Map, the DOE Wind Vision report, and an in-depth discussion of the Jobs & Economic Development Impacts Model.

  1. Jonathan Swift (1667-1745): master satirist, eccentric dean and frustrated lover.

    PubMed

    Carter, Richard

    2007-08-01

    Jonathan Swift, Irish author and poet, became an Anglican Dean with a macabre interest in medicine. He wrote 'Verses on the Death of Dr Swift' predicting how his death would be received in Dublin and London.

  2. Attitudes of nursing school deans toward interprofessional education in Western Pacific Region countries.

    PubMed

    Makino, Takatoshi; Nozaki, Shinjiro; Lee, Bumsuk; Matsui, Hiroki; Tokita, Yoshiharu; Shinozaki, Hiromitsu; Watanabe, Hideomi

    2015-01-01

    A previous survey distributed to medical school deans in the Western Pacific Region (WPR) showed positive attitudes toward collaborative practice and interprofessional education (IPE). This study aimed to clarify the present state of IPE and the attitudes of nursing school deans in the WPR. The modified Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale (ATHCTS) and the modified Readiness of healthcare students for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) were used. Unexpectedly, the response rate was less than 20%. Deans of nursing schools with IPE courses showed significantly more positive attitudes than those of schools without IPE courses. The mean score of the modified ATHCTS and RIPLS of deans of nursing schools in rural areas were significantly higher than those in urban areas. Compared with medical schools, nursing schools in the WPR pay less attention to IPE and this may be one of the present characteristics of the region.

  3. Dean C. Bennett d/b/a Affordable Tuckpointing Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Dean C. Bennett d/b/a Affordable Tuckpointing (the Company) is located in Arnold, Missouri. The Complaint involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in St. Louis, Missouri.

  4. The Evolution of the Medical School Deanship: From Patriarch to CEO to System Dean

    PubMed Central

    Schieffler, Danny A; Farrell, Philip M; Kahn, Marc J; Culbertson, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Medical school deanship in the US has evolved during the past 200 years as the complexity of the US health care system has evolved. With the introduction of Medicare and Medicaid and the growth of the National Institutes of Health, the 19th-century and first half of the 20th-century role of the medical school dean as guild master transformed into that of resource allocator as faculty practice plans grew in scope and grew as an important source of medical school and university revenue. By 2000, the role of the medical school dean had transformed into that of CEO, with the dean having control over school mission and strategy, faculty practice plans, education, research dollars, and philanthropy. An alternative path to the Dean/CEO model has developed—the System Dean, who functions as a team player within a broader health system that determines the mission for the medical school and the related clinical enterprise. In this paper, the authors discuss the evolution of the medical school dean with respect to scope of authority and role within the health care system. PMID:28241915

  5. Workforce Development: Community Colleges and One-Stop Centers Collaborate to Meet 21st Century Workforce Needs. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-08-547

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, George A.

    2008-01-01

    In the future, businesses will demand workers with higher-level skills and more education. Community colleges are key providers of career and technical training as well as traditional academic education. These colleges can also play important roles in the one-stop system created by the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), through which a variety of…

  6. Casual Academic Staff in an Australian University: Marginalised and Excluded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Suzanne; Burgess, John; Connell, Julia; Groen, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 25 years, the Australian workforce has become more casualised, with approximately one-quarter of the workforce in casual employment today. One of the highest users of casual employees is the higher education sector, where casual academics (referred to as sessionals in the Australian context) are estimated to account for 50% of the…

  7. Engaging the Workforce - 12347

    SciTech Connect

    Gaden, Michael D.

    2012-07-01

    Likert, Covey, and a number of others studying and researching highly effective organizations have found that performing functions such as problem-solving, decision-making, safety analysis, planning, and continuous improvement as close to the working floor level as possible results in greater buy-in, feelings of ownership by the workers, and more effective use of resources. Empowering the workforce does several things: 1) people put more effort and thought into work for which they feel ownership, 2) the information they use for planning, analysis, problem-solving,and decision-making is more accurate, 3) these functions are performed in a more timely manner, and 4) the results of these functions have more credibility with those who must implement them. This act of delegation and empowerment also allows management more time to perform functions they are uniquely trained and qualified to perform, such as strategic planning, staff development, succession planning, and organizational improvement. To achieve this state in an organization, however, requires a very open, transparent culture in which accurate, timely, relevant, candid, and inoffensive communication flourishes, a situation that does not currently exist in a majority of organizations. (authors)

  8. The globalization of the nursing workforce: Pulling the pieces together.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cheryl B; Sherwood, Gwen D

    2014-01-01

    The "globalization" of health care creates an increasingly interconnected workforce spanning international boundaries, systems, structures, and processes to provide care to and improve the health of peoples around the world. Because nurses comprise a large sector of the global health workforce, they are called upon to provide a significant portion of nursing and health care and thus play an integral role in the global health care economy. To meet global health care needs, nurses often move within and among countries, creating challenges and opportunities for the profession, health care organizations, communities, and nations. Researchers, policy makers, and industry and academic leaders must, in turn, grapple with the impacts of globalization on the nursing and health care workforce. Through this special issue, several key areas for discussion are raised. Although far from exhaustive, our intent is to expand and stimulate intra- and interprofessional conversations raising awareness of the issues, uncover unanticipated consequences, and offer solutions for shaping the nursing and health care workforce of the future.

  9. Building a Quality Workforce: A National Priority for the 21st Century. Conference Proceedings (Milwaukee, Wisconsin, October 23-25, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolin, Rick, Ed.; Green, Lori, Ed.

    Selected titles from a conference on building a quality workforce are as follows: "Action Packed 'Practical Education Now'" (Walters); "Adjusting to Transitions" (Schall, Dluzak); "Adult Literacy" (Nichols); "Aging Workforce" (Stowell et al.); "Artificial Intelligence and Human Performance Technology" (Ruyle); "Basic Academic Skills Problem"…

  10. The CUNY Young Adult Program--Utilizing Social Networking to Foster Interdisciplinary and Cross-Cohort Student Communication during Workforce Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Alissa; Winkler, Christoph; Petersen, Saul

    2010-01-01

    The Center for Economic and Workforce Development (CEWD) at Kingsborough Community College (KCC) is currently working on a workforce development project that contains innovative teaching tools that proved successful in overcoming issues of academic isolation facing the student body. The CUNY Young Adult Program (CYAP) is a partnership of three…

  11. Renormalized dynamics of the Dean-Kawasaki model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidhoodi, Neeta; Das, Shankar P.

    2015-07-01

    We study the model of a supercooled liquid for which the equation of motion for the coarse-grained density ρ (x ,t ) is the nonlinear diffusion equation originally proposed by Dean and Kawasaki, respectively, for Brownian and Newtonian dynamics of fluid particles. Using a Martin-Siggia-Rose (MSR) field theory we study the renormalization of the dynamics in a self-consistent form in terms of the so-called self-energy matrix Σ . The appropriate model for the renormalized dynamics involves an extended set of field variables {ρ ,θ } , linked through a nonlinear constraint. The latter incorporates, in a nonperturbative manner, the effects of an infinite number of density nonlinearities in the dynamics. We show that the contributing element of Σ which renormalizes the bare diffusion constant D0 to DR is same as that proposed by Kawasaki and Miyazima [Z. Phys. B Condens. Matter 103, 423 (1997), 10.1007/s002570050396]. DR sharply decreases with increasing density. We consider the likelihood of a ergodic-nonergodic (ENE) transition in the model beyond a critical point. The transition is characterized by the long-time limit of the density correlation freezing at a nonzero value. From our analysis we identify an element of Σ which arises from the above-mentioned nonlinear constraint and is key to the viability of the ENE transition. If this self-energy would be zero, then the model supports a sharp ENE transition with DR=0 as predicted by Kawasaki and Miyazima. With the full model having nonzero value for this self-energy, the density autocorrelation function decays to zero in the long-time limit. Hence the ENE transition is not supported in the model.

  12. Renormalized dynamics of the Dean-Kawasaki model.

    PubMed

    Bidhoodi, Neeta; Das, Shankar P

    2015-07-01

    We study the model of a supercooled liquid for which the equation of motion for the coarse-grained density ρ(x,t) is the nonlinear diffusion equation originally proposed by Dean and Kawasaki, respectively, for Brownian and Newtonian dynamics of fluid particles. Using a Martin-Siggia-Rose (MSR) field theory we study the renormalization of the dynamics in a self-consistent form in terms of the so-called self-energy matrix Σ. The appropriate model for the renormalized dynamics involves an extended set of field variables {ρ,θ}, linked through a nonlinear constraint. The latter incorporates, in a nonperturbative manner, the effects of an infinite number of density nonlinearities in the dynamics. We show that the contributing element of Σ which renormalizes the bare diffusion constant D(0) to D(R) is same as that proposed by Kawasaki and Miyazima [Z. Phys. B Condens. Matter 103, 423 (1997)]. D(R) sharply decreases with increasing density. We consider the likelihood of a ergodic-nonergodic (ENE) transition in the model beyond a critical point. The transition is characterized by the long-time limit of the density correlation freezing at a nonzero value. From our analysis we identify an element of Σ which arises from the above-mentioned nonlinear constraint and is key to the viability of the ENE transition. If this self-energy would be zero, then the model supports a sharp ENE transition with D(R)=0 as predicted by Kawasaki and Miyazima. With the full model having nonzero value for this self-energy, the density autocorrelation function decays to zero in the long-time limit. Hence the ENE transition is not supported in the model.

  13. Welcoming speech from Dean Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, UMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, Zahari

    2012-09-01

    In the Name of Allah, the Most Beneficent, the Most Merciful. It is with great pleasure that I welcome the participants of the International Conference of Mechanical Engineering Research 2011. The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said 'Acquire knowledge and impart it to the people.' (Al Tirmidhi). The quest for knowledge has been from the beginning of time but knowledge only becomes valuable when it is disseminated and applied to benefit humankind. It is hoped that ICMER 2011 will be a platform to gather and disseminate the latest knowledge in mechanical engineering. Academicians, Scientist, Researchers and practitioners of mechanical engineering will be able to share and discuss new findings and applications of mechanical engineering. It is envisaged that the intellectual discourse will result in future collaborations between universities, research institutions and industry both locally and internationally. In particular it is expected that focus will be given to issues on environmental and energy sustainability. Researchers in the mechanical engineering faculty at UMP have a keen interest in technology to harness energy from the ocean. Lowering vehicle emissions has been a primary goal of researchers in the mechanical engineering faculty and the automotive engineering centre as well including developing vehicles using alternative fuels such as biodiesel and renewable sources such as solar driven electric vehicles. Finally I would like to congratulate the organizing committee for their tremendous efforts in organizing the conference. As I wrote this in the Holy Land of Makkah, I pray to Allah swt that the conference will be a success. Prof. Dr. Zahari Taha CEng, MIED, FASc Dean, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering Universiti Malaysia Pahang

  14. Strategic Decision-Making by Deans in Academic Health Centers: A Framework Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Brianne

    2012-01-01

    This study examines strategic decision-making at the college level in relation to seven theoretical frames. Strategic decisions are those made by top executives, have wide-ranging influence throughout the organization, affect the long-term future of the organization, and are connected to the external environment. The seven decision-making frames…

  15. Academic Deans and Suicidal Individuals: Comparison and Contrast of Selected Behavioral Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiNapoli, Joan B.

    The research question for this dissertation study was: Do behavioral outcomes identified in people who commit suicide exist in people who publicly exhibit productive behavioral outcomes and have not attempted suicide? More specifically, do selective affective and physiological behavioral outcomes identified in people who kill themselves exist is…

  16. Imbalance in the health workforce

    PubMed Central

    Zurn, Pascal; Dal Poz, Mario R; Stilwell, Barbara; Adams, Orvill

    2004-01-01

    Imbalance in the health workforce is a major concern in both developed and developing countries. It is a complex issue that encompasses a wide range of possible situations. This paper aims to contribute not only to a better understanding of the issues related to imbalance through a critical review of its definition and nature, but also to the development of an analytical framework. The framework emphasizes the number and types of factors affecting health workforce imbalances, and facilitates the development of policy tools and their assessment. Moreover, to facilitate comparisons between health workforce imbalances, a typology of imbalances is proposed that differentiates between profession/specialty imbalances, geographical imbalances, institutional and services imbalances and gender imbalances. PMID:15377382

  17. The Crossroads between Workforce and Education

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Kathryn; Lower, Christi L.; Rudman, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Concern is growing among industry leaders that students may not be obtaining the necessary skills for entry into the labor market. To gain an understanding of the perceived disconnect in the skill set of graduates entering the health information workforce, a survey was developed to examine the opinions of educators and employers related to graduate preparedness. The concern related to graduate preparedness is supported by findings in this research study, in which those working in industry and those in academia noted a disconnect between academic training and preparedness to enter the labor market. A statistically significant difference was found between labor leaders and academics in their assessment of graduates' preparation in the areas of technical, communication, and leadership skills. Educators noted higher levels of preparedness of students with regard to professional and technical skills and leadership skills, while both educators and industry respondents noted a need for improved employability skills (e.g., communication skills and workplace etiquette). No difference was found between the two groups with regard to the need to increase apprenticeships and professional practice experience to cover this gap in formal training. Finally, when asked how the federal government might assist with preparing students, more than half of the respondents noted the importance of apprenticeships and funding for these opportunities. PMID:27134612

  18. The Crossroads between Workforce and Education.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Kathryn; Lower, Christi L; Rudman, William J

    2016-01-01

    Concern is growing among industry leaders that students may not be obtaining the necessary skills for entry into the labor market. To gain an understanding of the perceived disconnect in the skill set of graduates entering the health information workforce, a survey was developed to examine the opinions of educators and employers related to graduate preparedness. The concern related to graduate preparedness is supported by findings in this research study, in which those working in industry and those in academia noted a disconnect between academic training and preparedness to enter the labor market. A statistically significant difference was found between labor leaders and academics in their assessment of graduates' preparation in the areas of technical, communication, and leadership skills. Educators noted higher levels of preparedness of students with regard to professional and technical skills and leadership skills, while both educators and industry respondents noted a need for improved employability skills (e.g., communication skills and workplace etiquette). No difference was found between the two groups with regard to the need to increase apprenticeships and professional practice experience to cover this gap in formal training. Finally, when asked how the federal government might assist with preparing students, more than half of the respondents noted the importance of apprenticeships and funding for these opportunities.

  19. Assessment at AACSB Schools: A Survey of Deans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeling, Barbara M.; Miller, Donald S.; Slocombe, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to document the extent to which Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB)-accredited business schools have implemented strategies to improve students' ability to achieve program learning objectives. Assessment of academic programs is increasingly important at AACSB schools. Compliance with…

  20. Workforce planning. Catching the drift.

    PubMed

    Jinks, C; Ong, B N; Paton, C

    1998-09-17

    NHS workforce planning has traditionally ignored the role of doctors and nurses trained in continental Europe and Scandinavia. At present doctors trained in the European Economic Area make up 10 per cent of senior house officers in England and Wales. But the numbers coming to the UK are falling. Falling medical unemployment in Europe will mean these doctors have less incentive to come to the UK, leaving a considerable gap in the NHS workforce. More local research is needed into working patterns and career plans of European-trained nurses and doctors.

  1. An Assessment of the Current US Radiation Oncology Workforce: Methodology and Global Results of the American Society for Radiation Oncology 2012 Workforce Study

    SciTech Connect

    Vichare, Anushree; Washington, Raynard; Patton, Caroline; Arnone, Anna; Olsen, Christine; Fung, Claire Y.; Hopkins, Shane; Pohar, Surjeet

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine the characteristics, needs, and concerns of the current radiation oncology workforce, evaluate best practices and opportunities for improving quality and safety, and assess what we can predict about the future workforce. Methods and Materials: An online survey was distributed to 35,204 respondents from all segments of the radiation oncology workforce, including radiation oncologists, residents, medical dosimetrists, radiation therapists, medical physicists, nurse practitioners, nurses, physician assistants, and practice managers/administrators. The survey was disseminated by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) together with specialty societies representing other workforce segments. An overview of the methods and global results is presented in this paper. Results: A total of 6765 completed surveys were received, a response rate of 19%, and the final analysis included 5257 respondents. Three-quarters of the radiation oncologists, residents, and physicists who responded were male, in contrast to the other segments in which two-thirds or more were female. The majority of respondents (58%) indicated they were hospital-based, whereas 40% practiced in a free-standing/satellite clinic and 2% in another setting. Among the practices represented in the survey, 21.5% were academic, 25.2% were hospital, and 53.3% were private. A perceived oversupply of professionals relative to demand was reported by the physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist segments. An undersupply was perceived by physician's assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses. The supply of radiation oncologists and residents was considered balanced. Conclusions: This survey was unique as it attempted to comprehensively assess the radiation oncology workforce by directly surveying each segment. The results suggest there is potential to improve the diversity of the workforce and optimize the supply of the workforce segments. The survey also provides a benchmark for

  2. Building Workforce Strength: Creating Value through Workforce and Career Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsdon, Ron

    2010-01-01

    This book explores the perspectives of experienced practitioners, sharing ideas about building and sustaining organizational strength through workforce development practices and systems. As the saying goes, a company's greatest resource is its people. When managers really believe that and work to develop organizational capabilities, productivity,…

  3. Building the Workforce of the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González-Rivera, Christian

    2016-01-01

    "Building the Workforce of the Future" is an in-depth, independent report on the first eighteen months of Career Pathways, New York City's sweeping new strategy for workforce development. In November 2014, Mayor de Blasio launched a sweeping new approach to workforce development in New York City. Unlike the previous model, which…

  4. Creating Nursing's New Academic Spaces: Making Dreams Come True.

    PubMed

    Bavier, Anne R; Bavier, Robert N

    2016-01-01

    After a description of the approval process for new construction, this article examines the design-bid-build delivery method because it is the most traditional, by defining and exploring each of the major construction phases: programming, cost estimates, preliminary design, schematic design, design development, construction drawings, bidding/negotiation, construction and, finally, move-in, and occupancy. Viewpoints of key players are examined to understand how the nursing dean in partnership with the architect shepherd nursing's dream into reality. Using a recent building project as an exemplar, Dr. Bavier shares her work as dean, and Mr. Bavier, as an architect specializing in education facilities, shares his planning and design experiences on several academic facilities. The outcome is information and guidance for deans to use their collaboration with the architect and other team members to assure a custom-tailored nursing education facility.

  5. The Twenty-First Century Multiple Generation Workforce: Overlaps and Differences but Also Challenges and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helyer, Ruth; Lee, Dionne

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues around a multiple generational workforce and more specifically, the challenges and benefits for education providers and employers. Design/methodology/approach: Reviewing research papers, analysing academic texts, interrogating market intelligence and contextualising case studies, the…

  6. Preparation, Development, and Transition of Learning-Disabled Students for Workforce Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Donna Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Preparation, Development, and Transition of Learning-Disabled Students for Workforce Success. Donna Elizabeth Williams, 2011: Applied Dissertation, Nova Southeastern University, Abraham S. Fischler School of Education. ERIC Descriptors: Learning Disabilities, Community Based Instruction, Academic Advising, Career Counseling, Career Planning. This…

  7. Central New York's New Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for an Urban Future, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Conducted in late 2008 in partnership with the Greater Syracuse Chamber of Commerce and the Mohawk Valley Chamber of Commerce, this is the largest survey ever taken of Central New York businesses regarding the English language skills of the area workforce. The online survey was emailed to several hundred local businesses; 126 responses were…

  8. Today's Higher Education IT Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bichsel, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    The professionals making up the current higher education IT workforce have been asked to adjust to a culture of increased IT consumerization, more sourcing options, broader interest in IT's transformative potential, and decreased resources. Disruptions that include the bring-your-own-everything era, cloud computing, new management practices,…

  9. Hispanics in Oregon's Workforce, 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Brenda; Wood, Mary

    This report describes the Latino workforce in Oregon, outlining employment, income, education, and unemployment data. A brief history of Hispanics in the state notes that most of Oregon's Hispanics are of Mexican origin and that the state's Hispanic population grew 66 percent between 1990 and 1997. The history of migrant agricultural labor in…

  10. Workforce Readiness: Competencies and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Harold F., Jr., Ed.

    This book, which is intended for professionals in the assessment/evaluation/measurement, vocational and technical education, and educational psychology communities, contains 16 papers examining specifications of work force competencies and assessment of competencies. The following papers are included: "Review of Workforce Readiness…

  11. New and rapid analytical procedure for water content determination: microwave accelerated Dean-Stark.

    PubMed

    Veillet, Sébastien; Tomao, Valérie; Visinoni, Franco; Chemat, Farid

    2009-01-26

    Development of new procedures in analytical chemistry is currently increasingly focussed on reducing the time, cost and energy to carry out routine analyses. The conventional Dean-Stark (CDS) distillation to determine the water content is one of the most commonly used analytical methods and uses large amounts of solvent and energy. A new microwave accelerated Dean-Stark (MADS) distillation is presented as an alternative procedure. Microwaves were applied to a mixture of toluene, Weflon stir bar and olives, and the corresponding water was collected in a Dean-Stark receiver. This procedure permits fast and efficient determination of the water content of olives. Reliability and reproducibility were evaluated using statistical analyses. Different matrices were then used with MADS and the results were compared to CDS. Water determination from olives with MADS was better than that with CDS in terms of energy saving, rapidity (10 min versus 120 min), reproducibility, and cleanliness.

  12. Status of the National Security Workforce

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the status of the national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed by the Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University under a DOE/NNSA grant. This report includes an assessment of the current workforce situation. The national security workforce is an important component of national security for our country. With the increase of global threats of terrorism, this workforce is being called upon more frequently. This has resulted in the need for an increasing number of national security personnel. It is imperative to attract and retain a skilled and competitive national security workforce.

  13. Flow visualization of time-varying structural characteristics of dean vortices in a curved channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bella, David Wayne

    1988-12-01

    The time varying development and structure of Dean vortices were studied using flow visualization. Observations were made over a range of Dean numbers from 40 to 200 using a transparent channel with mild curvature, 40:1 aspect ratio, and an inner to outer radius ratio of 0.979. Seven flow visualization techniques were tried but only one, a wood burning smoke generator, produced usable results. Different vortex characteristics were observed and documented in sequences of photographs spaced one quarter of a second apart at locations ranging from 85 to 135 degrees from the start of curvature. Evidence is presented that supports the twisting/rocking nature of the flow.

  14. The College Dean, or, It's Difficult to Save Your Sanity When You're the Peanut Butter in a Peanut Butter Sandwich

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Richard S.

    1975-01-01

    Changing conditions dictate an active rather than passive role for college deans. Instructional technology can be an effective tool in the dean's active search for information to enable him to effect change in curriculum and instruction. (NHM)

  15. Department of Energy: Nuclear S&T workforce development programs

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, Michelle; Bala, Marsha; Beierschmitt, Kelly; Steele, Carolyn; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Bruozas, Meridith A.

    2016-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories use their expertise in nuclear science and technology (S&T) to support a robust national nuclear S&T enterprise from the ground up. Traditional academic programs do not provide all the elements necessary to develop this expertise, so the DOE has initiated a number of supplemental programs to develop and support the nuclear S&T workforce pipeline. This document catalogs existing workforce development programs that are supported by a number of DOE offices (such as the Offices of Nuclear Energy, Science, Energy Efficiency, and Environmental Management), and by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Naval Reactor Program. Workforce development programs in nuclear S&T administered through the Department of Homeland Security, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Department of Defense are also included. The information about these programs, which is cataloged below, is drawn from the program websites. Some programs, such as the Minority Serving Institutes Partnership Programs (MSIPPs) are available through more than one DOE office, so they appear in more than one section of this document.

  16. Perspectives on public health workforce research.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Carol A Gotway; Summerfelt, Wm Thomas; Roy, Kakoli; Chen, Zhuo Adam; Meltzer, David O; Thacker, Stephen B

    2009-11-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Office of Workforce and Career Development is committed to developing a competent, sustainable, and diverse public health workforce through evidence-based training, career and leadership development, and strategic workforce planning to improve population health outcomes. This article reviews the previous efforts in identifying priorities of public health workforce research, which are summarized as eight major research themes. We outline a strategic framework for public health workforce research that includes six functional areas (ie, definition and standards, data, methodology, evaluation, policy, and dissemination and translation). To conceptualize and prioritize development of an actionable public health research agenda, we constructed a matrix of key challenges in workforce analysis by public health workforce categories. Extensive reviews were conducted to identify valuable methods, models, and approaches to public health workforce research. We explore new tools and approaches for addressing priority areas for public health workforce and career development research and assess how tools from multiple disciplines of social sciences can guide the development of a research framework for advancing public health workforce research and policy.

  17. New Mexico Workforce Development Advisory Team Report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2007-12-31

    This report documents the creation of a Workforce Development Advisory Team as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP), being performed under a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) grant. This report includes a description of the purpose of the advisory team and a list of team members with sector designations. The purpose of the NSPP is to promote national security technologies through business incubation, technology demonstration and validation, and workforce development. Workforce development activities will facilitate the hiring of students to work with professionals in incubator companies, as well as assist in preparing a workforce for careers in national security. The goal of workforce development under the NSPP grant is to assess workforce needs in national security and implement strategies to develop the appropriate workforce. To achieve this goal, it will be necessary to determine the current state of the national security workforce and the educational efforts to train such a workforce. Strategies will be developed and implemented to address gaps and to make progress towards a strong, well-trained workforce available for current and future national security technology employers.

  18. Leading and Managing in Complexity: The Case of South African Deans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seale, Oliver; Cross, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, deanship in universities has become more complex and challenging. Deans in South African universities take up their positions without appropriate training and prior executive experience, and with no clear understanding of the ambiguity and complexity of their roles. This paper calls for appropriate leadership development…

  19. Faculty Transitioning into Associate Dean Positions in Higher Education: Perspectives on Personal and Professional Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the factors and mechanisms by which a faculty member chooses to move into an administrative position in higher education, and to examine their early experiences in associate dean positions. As faculty move into administrative positions they will likely experience a significant shift in their job duties and…

  20. The Role and Value of Global Business Research: Perspective of a Business School Dean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The scope of this article is two-fold. First, it looks at business research in general, in various countries, as a task that the dean wants to have faculty members pursue, to attain goals such as accreditation and ranking with organizations such as the "AACSB," "Equis," the "Financial Times," and "US News &…

  1. A Case Study of College Persistence for the Dean's Future Scholars Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beattie, James W.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study supplemented by quantitative data was employed to explore the understandings that 13 undergraduate students from a single Dean's Future Scholars (DFS) cohort held concerning the contributions of the six major components of DFS to their persistence into the second semester of their sophomore year of college at the…

  2. Privatization of Public Universities: How the Budget System Affects the Decision-Making Strategy of Deans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volpatti, Mark Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In response to lower funding commitments, many public colleges and universities have elected to incorporate decentralized budgeting systems, one of which is Responsibility Center Management (RCM). As public institutions are becoming more dependent on tuition dollars because state appropriations are declining, deans have an increased responsibility…

  3. Reflections on Dean Truman Pierce as Educator, Boss, Mentor and Friend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, J. Foster

    2012-01-01

    The author was invited to submit a reflective piece relative to his relationships with Dean Truman Pierce over the years to be presented on "The 30th Anniversary Celebration of the Truman Pierce Institute" at Auburn University. It was included in the program for the event.

  4. We Were Deans Once ... and Young: Veteran PME Educators Look Back

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Fall 2011 | 91 Views & Analyses We Were Deans Once . . . and Young Veteran PME Educators Look Back Dr. James W. Forsyth Jr.* Dr. Richard R. Muller...snow day? Nothing pleases young- sters more than not going to school, an at- titude that carries forward to college stu- dents who insist they must

  5. Design Thinking and the Deanly Conversation: Reflections on Conversation, Community, and Agency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Katy

    2015-01-01

    The article "Conversation as Inquiry: A Conversation with Instructional Designers" (Campbell, Schwier & Kenny 2006) appeared in the "Journal of Learning Design" Volume 1, Issue 3 in 2006. Nine years on, Professor Katy Campbell, Dean of the Faculty of Extension, University of Alberta, reflects upon the arguments articulated…

  6. Influencing collaborative leadership: an interview with Dean Terry Fulmer. Interview by Jeffrey M. Adams.

    PubMed

    Fulmer, Terry

    2013-02-01

    This department highlights nursing leaders who have demonstrated a commitment to innovation and patient care leadership in practice, policy, research, education and theory. This interview profiles Terry Fulmer, PhD, RN, FAAN, chairperson of the Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellows Advisory Committee and dean of the Bouvé College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University.

  7. The Changing Roles of Online Deans and Department Heads in Small Private Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halupa, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of best practices and challenges for deans and department heads of online programmes in the ever-changing world of higher education. It concentrates on the challenges for small private universities and tertiary education institutions in the United States, Australia, and New Zealand. Department heads must consider…

  8. The Association between Deans of Students' Attitudes toward Suicide and Their Bases of Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majewski, Diane J.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the associations between attitudes toward suicide and bases of power in university administrators known as Deans of Students (DOS). The National Association for Student Personnel Administrators, the professional association of higher education administrators in student affairs, provided the survey population for this study.…

  9. Language Requirements for Baccalaureate Degrees in AACSB-Accredited Schools: Deans' Opinions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arn, Joe; Rogers, Betty S.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 422 deans of accredited business schools found that 71% support foreign language requirements for undergraduate business study; only 54% currently have them; 53% of private schools and 34.5% of public schools have requirements. Spanish is most beneficial and available, followed by Japanese and Chinese. (SK)

  10. Relationship of Medical Students' Admission Interview Scores to Their Dean's Letter Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Frances R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A study found that the admission interview scores for 62 Dartmouth Medical School (New Hampshire) applicants correlated positively with dean's letter ratings given 4 years later and that interview scores were better predictors of ratings than were total Medical College Admission Test scores or science grade point averages. (Author/MSE)

  11. What Rural Education Research is of Most Worth? A Reply to Arnold, Newman, Gaddy, and Dean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Craig B.; Theobald, Paul; Howley, Aimee

    2005-01-01

    Offering a response to the question, "What rural education research is of most worth?", the authors recommend an approach very different from the one taken by Arnold, Newman, Gaddy, and Dean (2005) in their consideration of the rural education research literature. They remind readers that about 150 years ago, Herbert Spencer put a similar…

  12. Making Connections in the Life and Works of Walter Dean Myers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greever, Ellen A.; Austin, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the life and works of acclaimed writer Walter Dean Myers. Describes his struggles growing up, his time in the army, his decision to become a writer, and the father/son relationships in his books. Discusses how Myers' concern for African-American heritage, identity, and pride led to biographies of Sarah Forbes and of Malcolm X. (SR)

  13. Education Dean's Fraud Case Teaches U. of Louisville a Hard Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, David

    2009-01-01

    At the end of 2005, Robert D. Felner was riding high. A well-paid dean at the University of Louisville, he had just secured a $694,000 earmarked grant from the U.S. Department of Education to create an elaborate research center to help Kentucky's public schools. The grant proposal, which Mr. Felner had labored over for months, made some impressive…

  14. Perceived Leadership Soft Skills and Trustworthiness of Deans in Three Malaysian Public Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Keow Ngang; Ariratana, Wallapha; Treputharan, Saowanee

    2013-01-01

    Soft skills comprised both rational and emotional elements, becoming a new focus on leadership, as behavior displayed during interaction with other individuals will affect effective interaction outcomes. This study aimed to examine the leadership soft skills of deans in public universities of Malaysia. This survey designed research was performed…

  15. The Position of the Graduate Dean in Times of an Austerity Budget.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porreco, R. E.

    The immediate future will probably be a time of austerity for graduate education and will demand strong leadership from the graduate deans. Several developments will characterize that period: (1) an overreaction to the Ph.D. glut, such that graduate programs will be indiscriminately condemned for producing unemployables; (2) the shift of emphasis…

  16. Continuous Improvement in Business Education: Insights from the For-Profit Sector and Business School Deans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Allan R.; Chow, Chee W.; Hadad, Kamal M.

    1999-01-01

    The balanced scorecard, a customer-based continuous improvement system, can be applied to business schools. Business deans (n=38) suggested goals and measures for a customer perspective, including such factors as stakeholders, program and service quality, public image, teaching/learning excellence, curriculum excellence, fund raising, and human…

  17. Faculty Career Planning: Report from the Board of Deans, University of Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    In response to various budgetary and educational considerations the Board of Deans of the University of Washington made a detailed analysis of the mix of tenure and non-tenure faculty in each department, school and college; projecting for the next decade, on the basis of various assumptions with respect to resignation, termination, retirements,…

  18. Deans Admit Business Schools' Ills, but Cite Many Obstacles to Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooney, Carolyn J.

    1988-01-01

    Although most business school deans accept criticisms emerging in a new report, they predicted it would take a decade or more to develop programs that have the recommended qualities of being truly interdisciplinary, emphasizing the global economy, and providing students with effective interpersonal skills. (MSE)

  19. The Philosopher and the Lecturer: John Dewey, Everett Dean Martin, and Reflective Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Michael; Harbour, Clifford P.

    2013-01-01

    Adult education scholars have not yet examined the connections between the philosopher, John Dewey, and the lecturer on adult education, Everett Dean Martin. These scholars generally portray Dewey as indifferent to their field. However, Dewey's correspondence with a New York newspaper editor in 1928, recommending Martin's The Meaning of…

  20. Relationships between Drug Company Representatives and Medical Students: Medical School Policies and Attitudes of Student Affairs Deans and Third-Year Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierles, Frederick; Brodkey, Amy; Cleary, Lynn; McCurdy, Frederick A.; Mintz, Matthew; Frank, Julia; Lynn, Deborah Joanne; Chao, Jason; Morgenstern, Bruce; Shore, William; Woodard, John

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The authors sought to ascertain the details of medical school policies about relationships between drug companies and medical students as well as student affairs deans' attitudes about these interactions. Methods: In 2005, the authors surveyed deans and student affairs deans at all U.S. medical schools and asked whether their schools…

  1. Aerospace Workforce Development: The Nebraska Proposal; and Native Connections: A Multi-Consortium Workforce Development Proposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent; Vlasek, Karisa; Russell, Valerie; Teasdale, Jean; Downing, David R.; deSilva, Shan; Higginbotham, Jack; Duke, Edward; Westenkow, Dwayne; Johnson, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This report contains two sections, each of which describes a proposal for a program at the University of Nebraska. The sections are entitled: 1) Aerospace Workforce Development Augmentation Competition; 2) Native Connections: A Multi-Consortium Workforce Development Proposal.

  2. Defense Acquisition Workforce: Actions Needed to Guide Planning Efforts and Improve Workforce Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    DEFENSE ACQUISITION WORKFORCE Actions Needed to Guide Planning Efforts and Improve Workforce Capability Report... Planning Efforts and Improve Workforce Capability Why GAO Did This Study GAO and others have found that DOD needs to take steps to ensure DOD...develop an acquisition workforce plan every 2 years. DOD issued a plan in 2010, in which it called for the department to increase the size of the

  3. Exploring Scholarship and the Emergency Medicine Educator: A Workforce Study

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Jaime; Coates, Wendy C.; Clarke, Samuel; Runde, Daniel P.; Fowlkes, Emilie; Kurth, Jacqueline; Yarris, Lalena M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Recent literature calls for initiatives to improve the quality of education studies and support faculty in approaching educational problems in a scholarly manner. Understanding the emergency medicine (EM) educator workforce is a crucial precursor to developing policies to support educators and promote education scholarship in EM. This study aims to illuminate the current workforce model for the academic EM educator. Methods Program leadership at EM training programs completed an online survey consisting of multiple choice, completion, and free-response type items. We calculated and reported descriptive statistics. Results 112 programs participated. Mean number of core faculty/program: 16.02 ± 7.83 [14.53–17.5]. Mean number of faculty full-time equivalents (FTEs)/program dedicated to education is 6.92 ± 4.92 [5.87–7.98], including (mean FTE): Vice chair for education (0.25); director of medical education (0.13); education fellowship director (0.2); residency program director (0.83); associate residency director (0.94); assistant residency director (1.1); medical student clerkship director (0.8); assistant/associate clerkship director (0.28); simulation fellowship director (0.11); simulation director (0.42); director of faculty development (0.13). Mean number of FTEs/program for education administrative support is 2.34 ± 1.1 [2.13–2.61]. Determination of clinical hours varied; 38.75% of programs had personnel with education research expertise. Conclusion Education faculty represent about 43% of the core faculty workforce. Many programs do not have the full spectrum of education leadership roles and educational faculty divide their time among multiple important academic roles. Clinical requirements vary. Many departments lack personnel with expertise in education research. This information may inform interventions to promote education scholarship. PMID:28116031

  4. Multi-Institution Academic Programs: Dealmakers and Dealbreakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dawn; Moxley, Virginia; Maes, Sue; Reinert, Dana

    2008-01-01

    Higher education institutions are confronted with increasing demand for electronic access to educational opportunities, improved academic quality and accountability, and new academic programs that address societal workforce and economic development needs. Collaboration allows institutions to combine resources to respond efficiently and effectively…

  5. The Nation's Physician Workforce and Future Challenges.

    PubMed

    Grover, Atul; Orlowski, Janis M; Erikson, Clese E

    2016-01-01

    There is much debate about the adequacy of the U.S. physician workforce and projections of its future size, distribution and composition. Beginning with 3 observations about the workforce we believe are largely not subject to dispute, we address the debate by providing an overview of the current state of the workforce and Graduate Medical Education in the United States; a brief history of both calls for graduate medical education reform since 1910 and the recent, intense debate about the reliability of workforce projections; and a discussion of the challenges to understanding the physician workforce. We draw 3 concluding observations: (1) Precisely because projections can be unpredictable in their impact on both physician workforce behavior and public policy development, policy makers need to devote more attention to workforce projections, not less. (2) More research devoted specifically to the workforce implications of delivery and payment reforms is strongly needed. (3) Such research must be pursued with a sense of urgency, given the rapid aging of the Baby Boom generation, which will put a disproportionate demand on the nation's physician workforce.

  6. Collaborative Academic Training of Psychiatrists and Psychologists in VA and Medical School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaturo, Douglas J.; Huszonek, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors review the background and contemporary strengths of Dean's Committee Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in the collaborative academic training of psychiatrists and psychologists. Methods: The authors discuss the problems and prospects of the current health care environment as it impacts the behavioral health treatment of…

  7. Glass Ceiling in Academic Administration in Turkey: 1990s versus 2000s

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunluk-Senesen, Gulay

    2009-01-01

    This paper assesses the glass ceiling for academics in the Turkish universities with reference to top administration positions: rectors and deans. Glass ceiling indicators show that the glass ceiling thickened from the 1990s to late 2000s. The findings are discussed against the background of the transformation in the Turkish universities in the…

  8. Expectations and Integration of Early Career Academics into the Teaching Career: Empirical Evidence from Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabi, Goski; Abdulai, Munkaila

    2016-01-01

    The preparation and induction of Early Career Academics (ECAs) in Ghana has been investigated using a qualitative study that employed an enumerative-ethnographic approach. The study combined reviews of policy documents, interviews of 50 Deans and Heads of Departments and surveys of ECAs in five purposively selected universities in Ghana to capture…

  9. Survey of Current Academic Practices for Full-Time Postlicensure Nursing Faculty Who Teach Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanford, Karen J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine current academic practices of compensation, workload, rewards, and tenure and promotion for nursing faculty who teach graduate and postlicensure programs that are delivered 50% to 100% online. Deans and directors who are members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) were the…

  10. The Future of Academic Libraries: Conversations with Today's Leaders about Tomorrow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, John J.

    2016-01-01

    To determine how academic library leaders make decisions about their organization's future and how they effect changes, the author interviewed 44 university librarians and deans from institutions belonging to the Association of American Universities (AAU). The author analyzed the interviews using content analysis to identify the most frequent…

  11. Towards Healthy Organizations: The Use of Organization Development in Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsch, Janet H.; Baughman, M. Sue

    2010-01-01

    Two surveys assess use of organization development (OD) in Association of Research Libraries. Analysis presents organizational, deans', and staff professionals' perspectives on OD use. The study is the first broad analysis of academic library OD use and supports the concept of the "healthy organization." (Contains 12 tables.)

  12. Global Workforce Development - Addressing the Changing Geography of Investment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElvy, G. W.; Loudin, M. G.

    2005-12-01

    The Geography of professional workforce hiring is changing significantly and rapidly in the petroleum industry, mostly in response to shifting investment patterns. These geographical changes pose daunting challenges as well as new opportunities for philanthropic institutions such as the ExxonMobil Foundation, and especially for academia. Our Angolan affiliate illustrates the challenges brought about by investment in new areas. Although we will continue to require access to numerous Angolan Geoscience graduates who can fully participate in our global Geoscience community, there is only one Angolan institution that grants a relatively small number of Geoscience degrees. Our access to other locally-educated Angolan professional graduates is similarly limited. The Petroleum sector's response to this situation has been to seek indigenous students who are already enrolled, often in North American or European academic institutions, or to sponsor Angolan students there. If one multiplies our Angolan Geoscience example by the number of competing employers in Angola, and then by the number of countries around the world that are experiencing strong economic growth, the magnitude of the unfilled demand for international educational development seems daunting. However, several academic institutions have already taken the initiative and have provided educational, linguistic, and cultural pathways that encourage Angolans and others to obtain a world-class educational preparation on their respective campuses. This strategy has indeed begun to address the need for capacity-building for many indigenous students, and has aided various industries in their efforts to build indigenous workforces. Nevertheless, growing the capacity of indigenous academic infrastructure is also essential for the long term, and only a few academic institutions have begun to explore this educational frontier. Increased engagement and collaboration in international educational activities would clearly confer

  13. North Dakota Energy Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Drake

    2014-12-29

    Bismarck State College, along with its partners (Williston State College, Minot State University and Dickinson State University), received funding to help address the labor and social impacts of rapid oilfield development in the Williston Basin of western North Dakota. Funding was used to develop and support both credit and non-credit workforce training as well as four major symposia designed to inform and educate the public; enhance communication and sense of partnership among citizens, local community leaders and industry; and identify and plan to ameliorate negative impacts of oil field development.

  14. Recently Identified Changes to the Demographics of the Current and Future Geoscience Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. E.; Keane, C. M.; Houlton, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    The American Geosciences Institute's (AGI) Geoscience Workforce Program collects and analyzes data pertaining to the changes in the supply, demand, and training of the geoscience workforce. Much of these trends are displayed in detail in AGI's Status of the Geoscience Workforce reports. In May, AGI released the Status of the Geoscience Workforce 2014, which updates these trends since the 2011 edition of this report. These updates highlight areas of change in the education of future geoscientists from K-12 through graduate school, the transition of geoscience graduates into early-career geoscientists, the dynamics of the current geoscience workforce, and the future predictions of the changes in the availability of geoscience jobs. Some examples of these changes include the increase in the number of states that will allow a high school course of earth sciences as a credit for graduation and the increasing importance of two-year college students as a talent pool for the geosciences, with over 25% of geoscience bachelor's graduates attending a two-year college for at least a semester. The continued increase in field camp hinted that these programs are at or reaching capacity. The overall number of faculty and research staff at four-year institutions increased slightly, but the percentages of academics in tenure-track positions continued to slowly decrease since 2009. However, the percentage of female faculty rose in 2013 for all tenure-track positions. Major geoscience industries, such as petroleum and mining, have seen an influx of early-career geoscientists. Demographic trends in the various industries in the geoscience workforce forecasted a shortage of approximately 135,000 geoscientists in the next decade—a decrease from the previously predicted shortage of 150,000 geoscientists. These changes and other changes identified in the Status of the Geoscience Workforce will be addressed in this talk.

  15. Workforce Development Institute: 1995 Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ansleigh, Ed.

    This report provides a summary of the American Association of Community Colleges' (AACC's) second Workforce Development Institute (WDI), held January 18 to 21, 1995 to provide community college workforce service providers with resources and training. Introductory materials describe the WDI, its regional forums, the AACC's related National…

  16. Workforce strategies to improve children's oral health.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Kristine

    2014-12-01

    (1) Tooth decay is the most common chronic disease for children. (2) As millions receive dental coverage under the Affordable Care Act, the demand for dental services is expected to strain the current workforce's ability to meet their needs. (3) States have adopted various workforce approaches to improve access to dental care for underserved populations.

  17. Occupational Clusters of the Engineering Technical Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayton, Geoff

    A study was undertaken to provide information on the overall structure of the engineering workforce in Australia and the job functions of each occupational cluster. In the study, the term "engineering technical workforce" was defined as all staff primarily performing engineering functions between the levels of tradesperson and…

  18. Workforce Competitiveness Collection. "LINCS" Resource Collection News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Literacy Information and Communication System, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This edition of "'LINCS' Resource Collection News" features the Workforce Competitiveness Collection, covering the topics of workforce education, English language acquisition, and technology. Each month Collections News features one of the three "LINCS" (Literacy Information and Communication System) Resource Collections--Basic…

  19. Workforce Training: The Pellissippi State Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogaty, Lisa; And Others

    A discussion is provided of the role of community colleges as the primary delivery sources for workforce retraining, using the Pellissippi State Workforce Innovation Program as a case study. The first sections of the paper document the need for worker retraining in the United States, reporting the Department of Labor Secretary's Commission on…

  20. Workforce Education: Issues for the New Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pautler, Albert J., Jr., Ed.

    This book contains 22 papers on workforce education issues for the new century: "Introduction" (Alfred J. Pautler, Jr.); "Vocational Education: Past, Present, and Future" (Cheryl L. Hogg); "A Philosophic View for Seeing the Past of Vocational Education and Envisioning the Future of Workforce Education: Pragmatism…

  1. Experiential Training for Empowerment of the Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, John A.

    As downsizing of government and business organizations has become widespread, many managers are seeking to increase productivity by empowering the workforce. When effectively and appropriately implemented, empowered workforce structures can cut costs and improve quality and safety. Yet resistance to such changes arises from a patriarchal…

  2. CTE's Role in Workforce Readiness Credentialing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyslop, Alisha

    2008-01-01

    The career and technical education (CTE) programs play critical roles in the growth of workforce readiness credentials. This article presents an ACTE issue brief that highlighting the need for workforce readiness credentials, and the role CTE plays in helping students acquire them. CTE is at the forefront of preparing students at all levels for…

  3. Policy and Workforce Reform in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunter, Helen M.

    2008-01-01

    Current workforce reform, known as Remodelling the School Workforce, is part of an enduring policy process where there have been tensions between public and private sector structures and cultures. I show that the New Right and New Labour governments who have built and configured site based performance management over the past quarter of a century…

  4. Contributions of the Akamai Workforce Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John, Mark; Castori, Pam

    2014-01-01

    This brief presents a third party, external perspective on the Akamai Workforce Initiative (AWI), highlighting some of the contributions of the initiative over the last ten years. AWI is a program that seeks to develop a skilled local STEM workforce to meet the needs of Hawai'i's growing high-tech industry. It began as an internship program…

  5. Research Workforce. Go8 Backgrounder 19

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The demand for workers (employers, self-employed people and employees) having research training extends beyond the researcher workforce itself and is increasing. The research workforce is not uniform but segmented according to disciplines and the economic and sectoral contexts in which researchers work. The growth of cross-disciplinary and…

  6. Employee Engagement: Motivating and Retaining Tomorrow's Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuck, Michael Bradley; Wollard, Karen Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Tomorrow's workforce is seeking more than a paycheck; they want their work to meet their needs for affiliation, meaning, and self-development. Companies willing to meet these demands will capture the enormous profit potential of a workforce of fully engaged workers. This piece explores what engagement is, why it matters, and how human resource…

  7. Aerospace Workforce Development: The Nebraska Proposal; and Native View Connections: A Multi-Consortium Workforce Development Proposal. UNO Aviation Monograph Series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent D.; Russell, Valerie; Vlasek, Karisa; Avery, Shelly; Calamaio, Larry; Carstenson, Larry; Farritor, Shane; deSilva, Shan; Dugan, James; Farr, Lynne

    2003-01-01

    . This Native American Initiative of the NSGC addresses Nebraska workforce development and serves as a model to others. Following a structured evaluation process, NSGC proposes to sustain delivery of the training funded by NASA in 2002 to tribal entities through partnerships linking academic programs and industry leaders.

  8. Care and Feeding of the Chief Academic Officer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holyer, Robert

    2010-01-01

    There is an adage common among deans and provosts: The board is concerned with the care and feeding of the president; the faculty is concerned with the care and feeding of the faculty. The implication--and why it brings a knowing smile to any chief academic officer's face--is that no one seems concerned with the care and feeding of the CAO. Small…

  9. An Integral Part of the Frederick Community—Michael Dean | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    For more than 30 years, Michael Dean, Ph.D., has been an integral part of the NCI at Frederick community. In addition to studying several different aspects of genomics and cancer research, he has worked with the Werner H. Kirsten Student Intern Program and also volunteered his time with Mission of Mercy, a community-based organization providing free healthcare and free prescription medications to the uninsured and under-insured.

  10. Dean vortex membrane microfiltration and diafiltration of rBDNF E. coli inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Schutyser, Maarten; Rupp, Randall; Wideman, Janusz; Belfort, Georges

    2002-01-01

    Cross-flow microfiltration (CMF) and diafiltration were used to concentrate and purify recombinant Brain-Derived Neutrophic Factor (rBDNF) inclusion bodies from an E. coli cell suspension and a homogenized E. coli cell suspension (homogenate/lysate). Although these processes have been tested industrially in pilot scale with conventional linear membrane microfiltration modules, their performances were severely limited due to membrane fouling. The purpose of this work was to determine whether Dean vortex microfiltration with controlled centrifugal instabilities (Dean vortices produced in helical flow) could be used to improve filtration performance over that observed with conventional linear cross-flow microfiltration (CMF). For the microfiltration experiments with the feeds containing cell and homogenate suspensions, improvements in flux of about 50 and 70%, respectively, were obtained with the helical module as compared with that obtained with the linear module. For diafiltration with the homogenate suspension as feed, solute transport (as measured by mass) was from 100 to 40% higher after 40 and 100 min, respectively, with the helical module as compared with that obtained with the linear module. In the presence of the neutral surfactant, Tween 20, solute transport for diafiltration was at least 25 times higher during the first 10 min of operation and 100% higher after 300 min with the helical module as compared with that obtained with the linear module. Clearly, improved filtration performance, a purer and more concentrated product, and substantial savings can be expected with the new Dean vortex filters.

  11. Hot corrosion testing of Ni-based alloys and coatings in a modified Dean rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steward, Jason Reid

    Gas turbine blades are designed to withstand a variety of harsh operating conditions. Although material and coating improvements are constantly administered to increase the mean time before turbine refurbishment or replacement, hot corrosion is still considered as the major life-limiting factor in many industrial and marine gas turbines. A modified Dean rig was designed and manufactured at Tennessee Technological University to simulate the accelerated hot corrosion conditions and to conduct screening tests on the new coatings on Ni-based superalloys. Uncoated Ni-based superalloys, Rene 142 and Rene 80, were tested in the modified Dean rig to establish a testing procedure for Type I hot corrosion. The influence of surface treatments on the hot corrosion resistance was then investigated. It was found that grit-blasted specimens showed inferior hot corrosion resistance than that of the polished counterpart. The Dean rig was also used to test model MCrAlY alloys, pack cementation NiAl coatings, and electro-codeposited MCrAlY coatings. Furthermore, the hot corrosion attack on the coated-specimens were also assessed using a statistical analysis approach.

  12. The Role of the CEO, Executive Team, and Workforce Metrics of a Small University in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Pei-Chih; Lau, Yuet Hung Camilla; Hung, Huang-Chia; Wei, Fang-Chun

    2012-01-01

    The Role of the CEO, Executive Team, and Workforce Metrics of a small University in the U.S. is not just a question of academic standards. The 21st century requirements of education involve a wider set of attributes, equipping the young with social and organizational skills to cope with adult life inside and outside the workplace (Barber, 2001).…

  13. Academic Leadership Development: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Berman, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    A dean at a private school of nursing implemented a leadership development program for early- to mid-career nursing faculty consisting of one 4-hour evening session per academic quarter for 7 quarters. Eight faculty members who had expressed interest in assuming a leadership role or been recommended by their supervisors as having strong leadership potential were invited to join. Program topics included leadership pathways, legal issues, budgeting and governance, diversity, the political arena, human resources, and student issues. Interviews with participants revealed 6 themes: the support a peer cohort provided, a desire for real-life application, a lack of previous exposure to related content or experiences, new perceptions of themselves as academic nurse leaders, the value of the program as preparation for academic nursing leadership roles, and broad program applicability.

  14. Inequality of Paediatric Workforce Distribution in China

    PubMed Central

    Song, Peige; Ren, Zhenghong; Chang, Xinlei; Liu, Xuebei; An, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Child health has been addressed as a priority at both global and national levels for many decades. In China, difficulty of accessing paediatricians has been of debate for a long time, however, there is limited evidence to assess the population- and geography-related inequality of paediatric workforce distribution. This study aimed to analyse the inequality of the distributions of the paediatric workforce (including paediatricians and paediatric nurses) in China by using Lorenz curve, Gini coefficient, and Theil L index, data were obtained from the national maternal and child health human resource sampling survey conducted in 2010. In this study, we found that the paediatric workforce was the most inequitable regarding the distribution of children <7 years, the geographic distribution of the paediatric workforce highlighted very severe inequality across the nation, except the Central region. For different professional types, we found that, except the Central region, the level of inequality of paediatric nurses was higher than that of the paediatricians regarding both the demographic and geographic distributions. The inner-regional inequalities were the main sources of the paediatric workforce distribution inequality. To conclude, this study revealed the inadequate distribution of the paediatric workforce in China for the first time, substantial inequality of paediatric workforce distribution still existed across the nation in 2010, more research is still needed to explore the in-depth sources of inequality, especially the urban-rural variance and the inner- and inter-provincial differences, and to guide national and local health policy-making and resource allocation. PMID:27420083

  15. The public health workforce, 2006: new challenges.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, Kristine M; Turnock, Bernard J

    2006-01-01

    Efforts to develop the public health workforce since 2001 have benefited from increased funding resulting from concerns over terrorism and other public health threats. This largesse has been accompanied by the need for greater accountability for results. The size, composition, and distribution of the public health workforce have long been policy concerns. Production and retention of public health workers remain important issues, although new dimensions of readiness are also taking center stage. We offer here policy recommendations in the areas of assessing the public health workforce and its needs, organizing development efforts around essential competencies for public health practice, credentialing workers, and accrediting agencies.

  16. Faculty Composition in Four-Year Institutions: The Role of Pressures, Values, and Organizational Processes in Academic Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kezar, Adrianna; Gehrke, Sean

    2016-01-01

    This study broadens our understanding of conditions that shape faculty composition in higher education. We surveyed academic deans to evaluate their views on the professoriate, values, pressures, and practices pertaining to the use of non-tenure-track faculty (NTTF). We utilized [ordinary-least-squares] OLS regression to test a model for…

  17. The Role of Leadership Practices on Job Stress among Malay Academic Staff: A Structural Equation Modeling Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safaria, Triantoro; bin Othman, Ahmad; Wahab, Muhammad Nubli Abdul

    2011-01-01

    Globalization brings change in all aspect of human life, including in how job and organizations operate. These changes create strain and stress not only among employee at business organization, but also among academic staff. The dean of faculty or department at university has important role in prevent the effects of job stress among the academic…

  18. The Work of the Teacher-Educator in Australia: Reconstructing the "Superhero" Performer/Academic in an Audit Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuinamuana, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    What is it that teacher-educators "do"? This paper draws on interview data with Deans/Heads of Schools of Education in the Australian context to explore this question by asking: How is the teacher-educator produced as a category of academic worker? Using critical approaches to discourse analysis, the paper presents two interlocked…

  19. What is a microbiologist? A survey exploring the microbiology workforce.

    PubMed

    Redfern, James; Verran, Joanna

    2015-12-01

    Microbiology has a long tradition of making inspirational, world-changing discovery. Microbiology now plays essential roles in many disciplines, leading to some microbiologists raising concern over the apparent loss of identity. An electronic survey was undertaken to capture the scientific identity (based on scientific discipline) of people for whom microbiology forms a part of their profession, in addition to information regarding their first degree (title, country and year in which the degree was completed) and the sector in which they currently work. A total of 447 responses were collected, representing 52 countries from which they gained their first degree. Biology was the most common first degree title (of 32 titles provided), while microbiologist was the most common scientific identity (of 26 identities provided). The data collected in this study gives a snapshot of the multidisciplinarity, specialism and evolving nature of the microbiology academic workforce. While the most common scientific identity chosen in this study was that of a microbiologist, it appears that the microbiological workforce is contributed to by a range of different disciplines, highlighting the cross-cutting, multidisciplined and essential role microbiology has within scientific endeavour. Perhaps, we should be less concerned with labels, and celebrate the success with which our discipline has delivered.

  20. Gender and generational influences on the pediatric workforce and practice.

    PubMed

    Spector, Nancy D; Cull, William; Daniels, Stephen R; Gilhooly, Joseph; Hall, Judith; Horn, Ivor; Marshall, Susan G; Schumacher, Daniel J; Sectish, Theodore C; Stanton, Bonita F

    2014-06-01

    In response to demographic and other trends that may affect the future of the field of pediatrics, the Federation of Pediatric Organizations formed 4 working groups to participate in a year's worth of research and discussion preliminary to a Visioning Summit focusing on pediatric practice, research, and training over the next 2 decades. This article, prepared by members of the Gender and Generations Working Group, summarizes findings relevant to the 2 broad categories of demographic trends represented in the name of the group and explores the interface of these trends with advances in technology and social media and the impact this is likely to have on the field of pediatrics. Available data suggest that the trends in the proportions of men and women entering pediatrics are similar to those over the past few decades and that changes in the overall ratio of men and women will not substantially affect pediatric practice. However, although women may be as likely to succeed in academic medicine and research, fewer women than men enter research, thereby potentially decreasing the number of pediatric researchers as the proportion of women increases. Complex generational differences affect both the workforce and interactions in the workplace. Differences between the 4 generational groups comprising the pediatric workforce are likely to result in an evolution of the role of the pediatrician, particularly as it relates to aspects of work-life balance and the use of technology and social media.

  1. Neonatal nurse practitioner workforce survey executive summary.

    PubMed

    Timoney, Paula; Sansoucie, Debra

    2012-06-01

    The Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey, led by Paula Timoney, DNP, ARNP, NNP-BC, and Debra Sansoucie, EdD, RN, NNP-BC, with the National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NANNP), provides data collected from more than 600 neonatal nurse practitioners to examine workforce characteristics and needs. NANNP commissioned the survey because no comprehensive data existed for the neonatal nurse practitioner workforce. The executive summary given in this article highlights some of the survey's key findings in the areas of demographics, practice environment, scope of responsibilities, and job satisfaction. Readers are encouraged to review the complete text of the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey for more in-depth data and recommendations regarding NNP education, scope of practice, and scope of responsibility in the ever-changing health care environment. The report will be available for purchase at http://www.nannstore.org in summer 2012.

  2. Improvement, trust, and the healthcare workforce

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, D

    2003-01-01

    Although major defects in the performance of healthcare systems are well documented, progress toward remedy remains slow. Accelerating improvement will require large shifts in attitudes toward and strategies for developing the healthcare workforce. At present, prevailing strategies rely largely on outmoded theories of control and standardisation of work. More modern, and much more effective, theories of production seek to harness the imagination and participation of the workforce in reinventing the system. This requires a workforce capable of setting bold aims, measuring progress, finding alternative designs for the work itself, and testing changes rapidly and informatively. It also requires a high degree of trust in many forms, a bias toward teamwork, and a predilection toward shouldering the burden of improvement, rather than blaming external factors. A new healthcare workforce strategy, founded on these principles, will yield much faster improvement than at present. PMID:14645740

  3. Federal Workforce Reduction Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Lummis, Cynthia M. [R-WY-At Large

    2011-02-11

    02/18/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Federal Workforce, U.S. Postal Service, and Labor Policy . (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Training for Tomorrow: Developing a Native Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Asfour, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Although demographics are shifting, American Indians continue to suffer from a grossly disproportionate unemployment rate. By partnering with business and government, tribal colleges can alter such trends through workforce development.

  5. Federal Workforce Reduction Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Lummis, Cynthia M. [R-WY-At Large

    2010-05-20

    07/20/2010 Referred to the Subcommittee on Federal Workforce, Post Office, and the District of Columbia. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  6. The CERT Approach to Cybersecurity Workforce Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    CMU/SEI-2010-TR-045 | i Table of Contents Executive Summary iii Abstract v 1 Shortcomings with the Traditional Classroom Training Model 1 2 A New...workforce development. CMU/SEI-2010-TR-045 | vi CMU/SEI-2010-TR-045 | 1 1 Shortcomings with the Traditional Classroom Training Model The...most common workforce development training solution is the traditional classroom training model. While this training model is easy to implement and is

  7. Energy and mining industry workforce trends examined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-06-01

    The present and future are bright for energy and mining jobs in the United States, with the demand for workers expected to remain strong into the foreseeable future, according to a new report from the U.S. National Research Council. However, Emerging Workforce Trends in the U.S. Energy and Mining Industries: A Call to Action (2013) cautions that several key factors could adversely affect the workforce.

  8. Stability of magnetohydrodynamic Dean Flow as applied to centrifugally confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hassam, A.B.

    1999-10-01

    Dean Flow is the azimuthal flow of fluid between static concentric cylinders. In a magnetized plasma, there may also be radial stratification of the pressure. The ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability of such a flow in the presence of a strong axial magnetic field and an added radial gravitational force is examined. It is shown that both the Kelvin{endash}Helmholtz instability and pressure-gradient-driven interchanges can be stabilized if the flow is driven by a unidirectional external force and if the plasma annulus is sufficiently thin (large aspect ratio). These results find application in schemes using centrifugal confinement of plasma for fusion. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Transition from time-dependent to stationary flow patterns in the Taylor-Dean system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutabazi, Innocent; Andereck, C. David

    1991-11-01

    The flow between two horizontal coaxial cylinders with a partially filled gap, the Taylor-Dean system, is investigated for the case in which the outer cylinder rotates while the inner cylinder remains at rest. The initial instability is to a mixed state of both traveling inclined rolls and laminar base flow. At a larger rotation rate, the entire flow becomes time dependent. At a still larger rotation rate, the flow undergoes a subcritical transition to a stationary roll pattern, a process previously observed only in binary fluid mixtures.

  10. Workforce Training Results: An Evaluation of Washington State's Workforce Development System, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

    The third biennial outcome evaluation of the state of Washington's workforce development system analyzed the results of nine of the state's largest workforce development programs plus employer-provided training for participants who left programs from July 1, 1997 to June 30, 1998. For reporting results, the nine programs were grouped into three…

  11. The role of private foundations in addressing health care workforce needs.

    PubMed

    Thibault, George E

    2013-12-01

    There is an increased awareness among policy makers, providers, and educators that the size, composition, geographic distribution, and skill mix of the health care workforce is of great importance in determining the likelihood of success in achieving our societal goals for health care reform. As academic and governmental institutions work to address these pressing questions, private foundations can and should play an important role in supporting the design, execution, and evaluation of innovative educational programs that will address these needs. Foundations also can and should play a role in generating information that will better inform health care workforce policies and in convening thought leaders to make recommendations that will advance the field of workforce studies.The author details current efforts by the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation and other private foundations to address health care workforce needs. Foundations can play important roles as catalysts for change in our educational processes, and they can serve as important links between education and health care delivery systems. Partnerships among foundations and between private foundations and federal agencies can be powerful forces in helping to better align the skills of future health professionals with changing patient demographics and a changing health care system.

  12. Academic Blogging: Academic Practice and Academic Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkup, Gill

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a small-scale study which investigates the role of blogging in professional academic practice in higher education. It draws on interviews with a sample of academics (scholars, researchers and teachers) who have blogs and on the author's own reflections on blogging to investigate the function of blogging in academic practice…

  13. The organization and administration of community college non-credit workforce education and training cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozachyn, Karen P.

    Community colleges are struggling financially due to underfunding. Recent state budget cuts coupled with the elimination of federal stimulus money has exacerbated the issue as these funding streams had contributed to operating costs (Moltz, 2011). In response to these budget cuts, community colleges are challenged to improve, increase, and develop revenue producing programs. These factors heighten the need for community colleges to examine their non-credit workforce organizations. The community college units charged with delivering non-credit workforce education and training programs are historically ancillary to the academic divisions that deliver certificate, technical degree, and transfer degree programs. The perceptions of these units are that they are the community college's 'step child' (Grubb, Bradway, and Bell, 2002). This case study examined the organization and administration of community college non-credit workforce education and training units, utilizing observation, interviews, and document analysis. Observational data focused on the physical campus and the unit. Interviews were conducted onsite with decision-making personnel of the division units that deliver non-credit workforce education and training within each community college. Document analysis included college catalogues, program guides, marketing material, and website information. The study was grounded in the review of literature associated with the evolution of the community college, as well as the development of workforce education and training including funding, organizational structure and models, management philosophies, and effectiveness. The findings of the study report that all five units were self-contained and were organized and operated uniquely within the organization. Effectiveness was measured differently by each institution. However, two common benchmarks were revenue and student evaluations. Another outcome of this study is the perceived lack of college-wide alignment between

  14. High speed Deans switch for low duty cycle comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Abhijit; Bates, Carly T; Seeley, Stacy K; Seeley, John V

    2013-05-24

    A new high-speed valve-based modulator has been designed and tested for use in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC). The modulator is a Deans switch constructed from two micro-volume fittings and a solenoid valve. Modulator performance was characterized over a wide range of device settings including the magnitude of the switching flow, the gap between the tips of the primary and secondary column, the primary column flow rate, and the carrier gas identity. Under optimized conditions, the modulator was found to be capable of generating narrow pulses (<50ms) of primary effluent with a 2mL/min secondary column flow. This capability will ultimately allow the modulator to be used with GC×GC separations employing a wide range of detectors and secondary column geometries. The main disadvantage of this modulator is that it employs a low sampling duty cycle, and thus it produces separations with sensitivities that are lower than those produced with thermal modulators or differential flow modulators. The efficacy of the new high-speed Deans switch modulator was demonstrated through the GC×GC separation of a hydrocarbon standard and gasoline. Precise quantitation of individual components was possible provided the modulation ratio was kept greater than 2.0.

  15. Sedimentology and genetic stratigraphy of Dean and Spraberry Formations (Permian), Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Handford, C.R.

    1981-09-01

    The Spraberry trend of west Texas, once known as the world's largest uneconomic oil field, will undoubtedly become an increasingly important objective for the development of enhanced oil recovery techniques in fine-grained, low-permeability, low-pressure reservoirs. As the trend expands, facies and stratigraphic data should be integrated into exploration strategies. The Spraberry and Dean Formations may be divided into three genetic sequences, each consisting of several hundred feet of interbedded shale and carbonate overlain by a roughly equal amount of sandstone and siltstone. These sequences record episodes of shelf-margin progradation, deep-water resedimentation of shelf-derived carbonate debris, followed by influxes of terrigenous clastics into the basin by way of feeder channels or submarine canyons, and suspension settling of fine-grained sediment from the water column. Four lithofacies comprise the terrigenous clastics of the Spraberry and Dean Fomations: (1) cross-laminated, massive, and parallel-laminated sandstone, (2) laminated siltstone, (3) bioturbated siltstone, and (4) black, organic-rich shale. Carbonate lithofacies occur mostly in the form of thin-bedded turbidites, slump, and debris-flow deposits. Terrigenous clastic rocks display facies sequences, isopach patterns, and sedimentary structures suggestive of deposition from turbidity currents, and long-lived saline density underflow and interflow currents. Clastic isopach patterns reflect an overall southward thinning of clastics in the Midland basin. Channelized flow and suspension settling were responsible for the formation of elongate fan-shaped accumulations of clastic sediments.

  16. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  17. Workforce training and education gaps in gerontology and geriatrics: what we found in New York State.

    PubMed

    Maiden, Robert J; Horowitz, Beverly P; Howe, Judith L

    2010-01-01

    This article summarizes data from the 2008 Symposium Charting the Future for New York State Workforce Training and Education in Aging: The Stakeholder Perspective and the 2009 report Workforce Training and Education: The Challenge for Academic Institutions. This research is the outcome of a collaborative State Society on Aging of New York and New York State Office for the Aging study on New York State's workforce training and education needs. Eight Listening Sessions were held across New York State to obtain input on topics including training, gerontology education, and credentialing and certification. Individual sessions highlighted the needs of urban, rural, and suburban communities. Key themes identified through content analysis included the need for education about aging in agencies serving older adults, education on human development, positive aspects of aging, disabilities, developmental disabilities, and greater opportunities for training and education for service providers. Lack of incentives was identified as a barrier to credentialing or certification. Education about growing older beginning in grade school was recommended. Lack of funding was identified as a barrier that limited support for employee education/training. Disconnects were identified between employers and academic institutions and state government and providers regarding gerontology/geriatric training and education. Consideration to how these themes may be addressed by the Association of Gerontology in Higher Education is offered.

  18. The new radiology workforce: changing expectations.

    PubMed

    Cronan, John J

    2004-05-01

    The zeitgeist of the new radiology workforce can best be described by a Bob Dylan song title: "The Times They Are A-Changin'." The new generation of physicians, although embracing the same foundations of medical practice as previous generations, places greater emphasis on personal satisfaction than its predecessors. Gone are the days when physicians operated as sole practitioners; today's workforce member is content to function in the role of "employee" in a trade-off for more lifestyle flexibility. This change has occurred not because of one specific factor but because of a change in the profession of medicine coupled with a combination of factors; familial responsibilities, avocational activities, and personal satisfaction have surfaced as motivating factors in choosing a profession. Today's workforce has a personal perception of success that may not be fulfilled solely by the contemporary practice of medicine. With the radiologist shortages that are now occurring and anticipated increased demand for staff radiologists, today's radiology workforce has helped shape the specialty into one that is altering its structure to attract and retain its workforce.

  19. 75 FR 3217 - J&T Hydro Company; H. Dean Brooks and W. Bruce Cox; Notice of Application for Transfer of License...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission J&T Hydro Company; H. Dean Brooks and W. Bruce Cox; Notice of Application... 30, 2009, J&T Hydro Company (transferor) and W. Dean Brooks, and H. Bruce Cox (transferees) filed...

  20. Supporting the Academic Majority: Policies and Practices Related to Part-Time Faculty's Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eagan, M. Kevin, Jr.; Jaeger, Audrey J.; Grantham, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    The academic workforce in higher education has shifted in the last several decades from consisting of mostly full-time, tenure-track faculty to one comprised predominantly of contingent, non-tenure-track faculty. This substantial shift toward part-time academic labor has not corresponded with institutions implementing more supportive policies and…

  1. ROLE OF INSTITUTIONAL CLIMATE IN FOSTERING DIVERSITY IN BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH WORKFORCE: A CASE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Butts, Gary C.; Hurd, Yasmin; Palermo, Ann-Gel S.; Delbrune, Denise; Saran, Suman; Zony, Chati; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the barriers to diversity in biomedical research, describes the evolution and efforts to address climate issues to enhance the ability to attract, retain and develop underrepresented minorities (URM) - underrepresented minorities whose underrepresentation is found both in science and medicine, in the graduate school biomedical research doctoral programs (PhD and MD/PhD) at Mount Sinai School of Medicine (MSSM). We also describe the potential beneficial impact of having a climate that supports diversity and inclusion in the biomedical research workforce. MSSM diversity climate efforts are discussed as part of a comprehensive plan to increase diversity in all institutional programs PhD, MD/PhD, MD, and at the residency, post doctoral fellow, and faculty levels. Lessons learned from four decades of targeted programs and activities at MSSM may be of value to other institutions interested in improving diversity in the biomedical science and academic medicine workforce. PMID:22786740

  2. Development of an evaluation framework suitable for assessing humanitarian workforce competencies during crisis simulation exercises.

    PubMed

    Cranmer, Hilarie; Chan, Jennifer L; Kayden, Stephanie; Musani, Altaf; Gasquet, Philippe E; Walker, Peter; Burkle, Frederick M; Johnson, Kirsten

    2014-02-01

    The need to provide a professionalization process for the humanitarian workforce is well established. Current competency-based curricula provided by existing academically affiliated training centers in North America, the United Kingdom, and the European Union provide a route toward certification. Simulation exercises followed by timely evaluation is one way to mimic the field deployment process, test knowledge of core competences, and ensure that a competent workforce can manage the inevitable emergencies and crises they will face. Through a 2011 field-based exercise that simulated a humanitarian crisis, delivered under the auspices of the World Health Organization (WHO), a competency-based framework and evaluation tool is demonstrated as a model for future training and evaluation of humanitarian providers.

  3. Geographic Analysis of the Radiation Oncology Workforce

    SciTech Connect

    Aneja, Sanjay; Smith, Benjamin D.; Gross, Cary P.; Wilson, Lynn D.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Roberts, Kenneth; Yu, James B.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate trends in the geographic distribution of the radiation oncology (RO) workforce. Methods and Materials: We used the 1995 and 2007 versions of the Area Resource File to map the ratio of RO to the population aged 65 years or older (ROR) within different health service areas (HSA) within the United States. We used regression analysis to find associations between population variables and 2007 ROR. We calculated Gini coefficients for ROR to assess the evenness of RO distribution and compared that with primary care physicians and total physicians. Results: There was a 24% increase in the RO workforce from 1995 to 2007. The overall growth in the RO workforce was less than that of primary care or the overall physician workforce. The mean ROR among HSAs increased by more than one radiation oncologist per 100,000 people aged 65 years or older, from 5.08 per 100,000 to 6.16 per 100,000. However, there remained consistent geographic variability concerning RO distribution, specifically affecting the non-metropolitan HSAs. Regression analysis found higher ROR in HSAs that possessed higher education (p = 0.001), higher income (p < 0.001), lower unemployment rates (p < 0.001), and higher minority population (p = 0.022). Gini coefficients showed RO distribution less even than for both primary care physicians and total physicians (0.326 compared with 0.196 and 0.292, respectively). Conclusions: Despite a modest growth in the RO workforce, there exists persistent geographic maldistribution of radiation oncologists allocated along socioeconomic and racial lines. To solve problems surrounding the RO workforce, issues concerning both gross numbers and geographic distribution must be addressed.

  4. Becoming Scholars: Examining the Link between Moral Problem-Solving and Academic Authorship Practices in Future Educational Leaders in One Southern State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    The public expects its educational leaders--from instructional leaders and principals to college administrators and deans--to be moral exemplars. Nowhere is moral behavior more central to the central mission of teaching and learning than in the realm of academic integrity, where decisions are made daily about grading, testing, promotion,…

  5. Geoscience and the 21st Century Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, C. A.; Bralower, T. J.; Blockstein, D.; Keane, C. M.; Kirk, K. B.; Schejbal, D.; Wilson, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    Geoscience knowledge and skills play new roles in the workforce as our society addresses the challenges of living safely and sustainably on Earth. As a result, we expect a wider range of future career opportunities for students with education in the geosciences and related fields. A workshop offered by the InTeGrate STEP Center on 'Geoscience and the 21st Century Workforce' brought together representatives from 24 programs with a substantial geoscience component, representatives from different employment sectors, and workforce scholars to explore the intersections between geoscience education and employment. As has been reported elsewhere, employment in energy, environmental and extractive sectors for geoscientists with core geology, quantitative and communication skills is expected to be robust over the next decade as demand for resources grow and a significant part of the current workforce retires. Relatively little is known about employment opportunities in emerging areas such as green energy or sustainability consulting. Employers at the workshop from all sectors are seeking the combination of strong technical, quantitative, communication, time management, and critical thinking skills. The specific technical skills are highly specific to the employer and employment needs. Thus there is not a single answer to the question 'What skills make a student employable?'. Employers at this workshop emphasized the value of data analysis, quantitative, and problem solving skills over broad awareness of policy issues. Employers value the ability to articulate an appropriate, effective, creative solution to problems. Employers are also very interested in enthusiasm and drive. Participants felt that the learning outcomes that their programs have in place were in line with the needs expressed by employers. Preparing students for the workforce requires attention to professional skills, as well as to the skills needed to identify career pathways and land a job. This critical

  6. Examination of Academic Self-Regulation Variances in Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutt, Michelle A.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple workforce demands in healthcare have placed a tremendous amount of pressure on academic nurse educators to increase the number of professional nursing graduates to provide nursing care both in both acute and non-acute healthcare settings. Increased enrollment in nursing programs throughout the United States is occurring; however, due to…

  7. The Graying of Academic Librarians: Crisis or Revolution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, John; Green, Ravonne

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the aging of academic librarians and the potential shortage of librarians to replace those who are retiring. Recent statistics indicate that the exodus of retiring librarians may not be as severe as predicted several years ago. Recent articles show potential benefits as new librarians enter the workforce in large numbers to…

  8. 77 FR 36549 - Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit-“Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Nursing Workforce Diversity Invitational Summit--``Nursing in 3D: Workforce Diversity, Health Disparities, and Social Determinants of...

  9. Chicago Workforce Development Programs: System Map and Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Within the City of Chicago, a wide variety of public and private programs are geared towards preparing adults and youth for the workforce. This report of workforce development programs provides an overview of federal, state, and city workforce development programs within the City of Chicago through a detailed inventory table of the programs…

  10. Creating and Sustaining an Interdisciplinary Infant Mental Health Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Anne E.; Dillon, Colleen O.; Fernandes, Sherira; Spieker, Susan; ZeanahTulane, Paula D.

    2012-01-01

    Developing a sustainable, competent workforce is an urgent and challenging task for the Infant Mental Health (IMH) field. In this article, the authors share their experiences and perspectives on the importance of and challenges in the development of the IMH workforce. The broad view of both workforce members and professional development…

  11. 5 CFR 9.2 - Reporting workforce information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reporting workforce information. 9.2 Section 9.2 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE RULES WORKFORCE INFORMATION (RULE IX) § 9.2 Reporting workforce information. The Director of the Office of...

  12. Interactions of Tollmien-Schlichting waves and Dean vortices. Comparison of direct numerical simulation and a weakly nonlinear theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Bart A.; Zang, Thomas A.

    1989-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to evaluate a weakly nonlinear theory describing the interaction of Tollmien-Schlichting waves with Dean vortices in curved channel flow. The theory and the simulation agree for certain combinations of parameters, but the two approaches give conflicting results for other combinations. Some possibilities for these discrepancies are discussed.

  13. A Qualitative Study of the Job Challenges of Instructional Deans in the Technical College System of Georgia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Perrin J.

    2014-01-01

    The Technical College System of Georgia serves the people and the state by creating a system of technical education whose purpose is to use the latest technology and easy access for all adult Georgians and corporate citizens. Within each technical college is a hierarchy of faculty, staff, and administrators. The instructional deans serve a vital…

  14. Harlem Connections: Teaching Walter Dean Myers'"Scorpions" with Paul Laurence Dunbar's "The Sport of the Gods."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Mark I.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the author, in a course titled "Literature for Adolescents" paired Walter Dean Myers' 1988 young adult novel, "Scorpions," with Paul Laurence Dunbar's 1902 novel for adults, "The Sport of the Gods." Describes student readers' responses to the pair of books, which focus on the difficulties of growing up…

  15. Factor Invariance Assessment of the Dean-Woodcock Sensory-Motor Battery for Patients with ADHD versus Nonclinical Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, Holmes; Davis, Andrew; Dean, Raymond S.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined the measurement invariance of the Dean-Woodcock Sensory-Motor Battery (DWSMB) for children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and an age- and gender-matched nonclinical sample. The DWSMB is a promising new instrument for assessing a wide range of cortical and subcortical sensory and motor…

  16. The Superintendents' and Deans' Summit on Transformation and Collaboration for Student Success (April 22-23, 1997). Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mid-Atlantic Lab. for Student Success, Philadelphia, PA.

    This publication provides an overview of the proceedings of the Superintendents' and Deans' Summit on Transformation and Collaboration for Student Success. The overarching goal of the Summit was to develop a formal mechanism for forging the professional expertise of field-based practitioners and college level professional education programs.…

  17. Buffalo Tiger, Bobo Dean, and the "Young Turks": A Miccosukee Prelude to the 1975 Indian Self-Determination Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kersey, Harry A., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    An account of the Miccosukees' struggle to wrest control over their own economic destiny from conservative elements within the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and Department of the Interior is provided. The tenacity of Buffalo Tiger and his tribe with the support of Bobo Dean, Commissioner Bruce and the "Young Turks", helped pave the way for…

  18. The Honors Thesis: A Handbook for Honors Directors, Deans, and Faculty Advisors. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mark; Lyons, Karen; Weiner, Norman

    2014-01-01

    This handbook is intended to help all those who design, administer, and implement honors thesis programs--honors directors, deans, staff, faculty, and advisors--evaluate their thesis programs, solve pressing problems, select more effective requirements or procedures, or introduce an entirely new thesis program. The authors' goal is to provide…

  19. The BHEF National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative: A Model for Pathways to Baccalaureate Attainment and High-Skill Careers in Emerging Fields. BHEF Case Study Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Brian K.; Barkanic, Steve; Cardenas-Navia, Isabel; Elzey, Karen; Hughes, Debbie; Kashiri, Erica; Troyan, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Partnerships between higher education and business have long been an important part of the academic landscape, but often they are based on shorter-term transactional objectives rather than on longer-term strategic goals. BHEF's National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative brings together business and academia at the institutional,…

  20. When the Stakes Are High, Can We Rely on Value-Added? Exploring the Use of Value-Added Models to Inform Teacher Workforce Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhaber, Dan

    2010-01-01

    The formula is simple: Highly effective teachers equal student academic success. Yet, the physics of American education is anything but. Thus, the question facing education reformers is how can teacher effectiveness be accurately measured in order to improve the teacher workforce? Given the demand for objective, quantitative measures of teacher…

  1. Effective organizational control: implications for academic medicine.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Michael S; Srinivasan, Malathi; Flamholtz, Eric

    2005-11-01

    This article provides a framework for understanding the nature, role, functioning, design, and effects of organizational oversight systems. Using a case study with elements recognizable to an academic audience, the authors explore how a dean of a fictitious School of Medicine might use organizational control structures to develop effective solutions to global disarray within the academic medical center. Organizational control systems are intended to help influence the behavior of people as members of a formal organization. They are necessary to motivate people toward organizational goals, to coordinate diverse efforts, and to provide feedback about problems. The authors present a model of control to make this process more visible within organizations. They explore the overlap among academic medical centers and large businesses-for instance, each is a billion-dollar enterprise with complex internal and external demands and multiple audiences. The authors identify and describe how to use the key components of an organization's control system: environment, culture, structure, and core control system. Elements of the core control system are identified, described, and explored. These closely articulating elements include planning, operations, measurement, evaluation, and feedback systems. Use of control portfolios is explored to achieve goal-outcome congruence. Additionally, the authors describe how the components of the control system can be used synergistically by academic leadership to create organizational change, congruent with larger organizational goals. The enterprise of medicine is quickly learning from the enterprise of business. Achieving goal-action congruence will better position academic medicine to meet its multiple missions.

  2. Dental fluorosis prevalence and severity using Dean's index based on six teeth and on 28 teeth.

    PubMed

    Medina-Solis, Carlo Eduardo; Pontigo-Loyola, América Patricia; Maupome, Gerardo; Lamadrid-Figueroa, Hector; Loyola-Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Romano, Jesús; Villalobos-Rodelo, Juan José; de Lourdes Marquez-Corona, Ma

    2008-09-01

    To contrast the sensitivity, specificity, and positive-negative predictive values between dental fluorosis prevalence scored on 28 (DF28) and on six permanent teeth (DF6), we undertook a cross-sectional study on 1,538 adolescents (12 and 15 years old) residing in Hidalgo State, Mexico, a naturally fluoridated (>0.7 ppm) area at an elevated altitude (>2,500 m above sea level). Dental fluorosis was scored using Deans modified index. Using the scores obtained for all teeth present (DF28) as a gold standard, we calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive-negative predictive values, and receiver operating characteristic and concordance index pertaining to the scores based on six teeth (upper incisors and canines). DF28 fluorosis prevalence was 81.7%; based on DF6, it was 58.7% (23% difference). Among 12 year olds, the difference between DF28 and DF6 was 20.1% (84.5 vs. 64.4%); among 15 year olds, it was 25.4% (79.4 vs. 54%). Among girls, it was 23.2% (81.1 vs. 57.9%) and among boys, 22.8% (82.2 vs. 59.4%). The fluorosis community indices were 1.75 (DF28) and 1.11 (DF6). All positive predictive values reached 100% while negative predictive values were below 45%. Concordance between DF28 and DF6 was 53.9%, and kappa coefficient was 0.40. Partial scoring of fluorosis based on esthetically important permanent teeth underestimated prevalence, compared to full-mouth scoring. The decision to use an abridged Dean's index protocol must take into account the number of teeth examined, and which specific teeth are examined, to appraise the benefit of reduced data collection effort against possible information loss.

  3. Skills Governance and the Workforce Development Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hordern, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In the United Kingdom higher education environment, government may make efforts to encourage institutions to engage in governance structures to secure policy objectives through a steering approach. In this article connections between skills governance structures and the recent Higher Education Funding Council for England workforce development…

  4. Strengthening the Workforce in Better Buildings Neighborhoods

    SciTech Connect

    Sperling, Gil; Adams, Cynthia; Fiori, Laura; Penzkover, Dave; Wood, Danny; Farris, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is supporting an expanding energy efficiency workforce upgrading buildings in communities around the country. Contractors are being trained and have access to additional job opportunities, spurring local economic growth while helping Americans use less energy, save money, and be more comfortable in their homes and other buildings.

  5. Ex-Offenders Reentering the Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shivy, Victoria A.; Wu, J. Juana; Moon, Anya E.; Mann, Shay C.; Holland, Jo G.; Eacho, Christine

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 650,000 individuals will be released from incarceration in state and federal prisons this year. However, little is known about the challenges ex-offenders face when they endeavor to reenter the workforce. The authors used consensual qualitative research methods to analyze data from 2 focus groups: one for male (n=6) and another for…

  6. Georgia's Workforce Development Pipeline: One District's Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Melissa H.; Hufstetler, Tammy L.

    2011-01-01

    Launched in 2006, the Georgia Work Ready initiative seeks to improve the job training and marketability of Georgia's workforce and drive the state's economic growth. Georgia Work Ready is a partnership between the state and the Georgia Chamber of Commerce. Comprised of three components, Georgia's initiative focuses on job profiling, skills…

  7. Evaluating Number Sense in Workforce Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinke, Dorothea A.

    2015-01-01

    Earlier institution-sponsored research revealed that about 20% of students in community college basic math and pre-algebra programs lacked a sense of part-whole relationships with whole numbers. Using the same tool with a group of 86 workforce students, about 75% placed five whole numbers on an empty number line in a way that indicated lack of…

  8. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iden, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to…

  9. Strengthening the Workforce in Better Buildings Neighborhoods

    ScienceCinema

    Sperling, Gil; Adams, Cynthia; Fiori, Laura; Penzkover, Dave; Wood, Danny; Farris, Joshua

    2016-07-12

    The Better Buildings Neighborhood Program is supporting an expanding energy efficiency workforce upgrading buildings in communities around the country. Contractors are being trained and have access to additional job opportunities, spurring local economic growth while helping Americans use less energy, save money, and be more comfortable in their homes and other buildings.

  10. Economic and Workforce Development Program Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2014

    2014-01-01

    California's community colleges continue to play a crucial role in the state's economy by providing students with the skills and knowledge to succeed and by advancing the economic growth and global competitiveness of California and its regional economies through the Economic and Workforce Development Program (EWD). The EWD program invests in the…

  11. Workforce Development and Wind for Schools (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, C.; Baring-Gould, I.

    2012-06-01

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is faced with the need to quickly develop a skilled workforce and to address public acceptance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these challenges. This poster, produced for the American Wind Energy Association's annual WINDPOWER conference, provides an overview of the project, including objectives, methods, and results.

  12. Reducing the Teacher Workforce: A Management Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Philip; Nelson, Dorothy Q.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses substantive and procedural restraints, including legal pitfalls, due process, and no-layoff clauses, within which public employers must decide questions of reduction in workforce (RIF). Describes elements of a sound RIF policy and considers ways of using the collective bargaining process to facilitate the RIF process. (JBM)

  13. Validating an Instrument for Assessing Workforce Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Amy; Shelley, Kyna

    2008-01-01

    The community college has always played an integral role in job training but never more so than following the 1998 Workforce Investment Act (WIA) that significantly increased the community colleges' opportunity to join with others in the provision of job training services. With this, however, came demand for high levels of collaboration between…

  14. The Workforce Education and Development in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lung-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Workforce education and development (WED) can be broadly defined as those formal, informal and nonformal activities that prepare people for work. In Taiwan, it includes technological and vocational education (TVE), human resource development (HRD), public vocational training and adult education. In order to promote information exchanges and…

  15. Wind Energy Technology: Training a Sustainable Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krull, Kimberly W.; Graham, Bruce; Underbakke, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Through innovative teaching and technology, industry and educational institution partnerships, Cloud County Community College is preparing a qualified workforce for the emerging wind industry estimated to create 80,000 jobs by 2020. The curriculum blends on-campus, on-line and distance learning, land-lab, and field training opportunities for…

  16. Lifelong Learning: Workforce Development and Economic Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    Lifelong learning through a strong, policy-supported information technology (IT) infrastructure is critical to the success of Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) member economies. There is a great need to upgrade the quality of skills within the workforce, and there have been unprecedented investments in infrastructure and advanced…

  17. Developing an Effective Workforce through Instructor Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Richard A.

    2006-01-01

    Career and technical educators have long recognized the fact that a highly skilled craftsperson is not necessarily a highly skilled instructor of that craft. In the belief that the key to a productive, efficient workforce lies in high quality training for journeymen and apprentices, the Carpenter's International Training Fund (CITF) partnered with…

  18. Growing Our Workforce through Business and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauley, Douglas R.; Davidchik, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In 2004, Central Community College (CCC) established the Mechatronics Education Center (MEC), a regional center of excellence, to help the state address the shortage of skilled technicians in the area of industrial automation. The MEC addresses the needs of the current and future workforce through the implementation of its three main components:…

  19. Notification: Workforce Restructuring Under VERA–VSIP

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OPE-FY14-0049, October 8, 2014. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plans to begin preliminary research on efforts to restructure the EPA workforce in fiscal year 2014.

  20. Utilizing Local Partnerships to Enhance Workforce Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whikehart, John

    2009-01-01

    The Indiana Center for the Life Sciences, an award-winning partnership between education, government, and the private sector, houses state-of-the-art science labs, classrooms, and industry training space for community college students and local employers. This innovative partnership prepares both the current and future workforce for careers in the…

  1. The Outlook for Noncredit Workforce Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Noy, Michelle; Jacobs, James

    2009-01-01

    This article draws on information from a study conducted in 2007 and 2008 by the Community College Research Center at Columbia University in conjunction with the National Council on Workforce Education and the National Council on Continuing Education and Training (Van Noy and others, 2008). The study used two key sources of data. First, state…

  2. Workforce Development, Higher Education and Productive Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hordern, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Workforce development partnerships between higher education institutions and employers involve distinctive social and technical dynamics that differ from dominant higher education practices in the UK. The New Labour government encouraged such partnerships in England, including through the use of funding that aimed to stimulate reform to…

  3. The Changing Workforce: Human Resources Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodson, James M.

    1993-01-01

    The most effective colleges and universities in the next few decades will be those able to adapt to a changing workforce and shifting demands of business, political, and other environments. Effective institutions will build effective management teams, create new change strategies, focus on quality, and demonstrate learning from history. (MSE)

  4. Academic writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.

    2003-10-01

    The series of workshops on academic writing have been developed by academic writing instructors from Language Teaching Centre, Central European University and presented at the Samara Academic Writing Workshops in November 2001. This paper presents only the part dealing with strucutre of an argumentative essay.

  5. Academic nurse leaders' role in fostering a culture of civility in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Clark, Cynthia M; Springer, Pamela J

    2010-06-01

    Academic incivility is disruptive behavior that substantially or repeatedly interferes with teaching and learning. Incivility on college campuses jeopardizes the welfare of all members of the academy. Academic nurse leaders play a critical role in preventing and addressing academic incivility because these behaviors can negatively affect learning and harm faculty-student relationships. Although studies on student and faculty incivility have been conducted in nursing education, there are no known studies regarding the perceptions of academic nurse leaders about this problem. This is the first known study to investigate the perceptions of 126 academic nurse leaders (deans, directors, and chairpersons) from 128 associate degree in nursing and bachelor of science nursing programs in a large western state. Academic nurse leaders responded to five open-ended questions regarding their perceptions of stressors that affect nursing faculty and students, the uncivil behaviors exhibited by both groups, and the role of leadership in preventing and addressing incivility in nursing education.

  6. Workforce planning for DOE/EM: Assessing workforce demand and supply

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, R.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.

    1993-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to bringing its facilities into regulatory compliance and restoring the environment of sites under its control by the year 2019. Responsibility for accomplishing this goal is vested with the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM). Concerns regarding the availability of workers with the necessary technical skills and the prospect of retraining workers from other programs within DOE or other industries are addressed in this report in several ways. First, various workforce projections relevant to EM occupations are compared to determine common findings and resolve inconsistencies. Second, case studies, interviews, and published data are used to examine the potential availability of workers for these occupations via occupational mobility, training/retraining options, and salary adjustments. Third, demand and supply factors are integrated in a framework useful for structuring workforce analyses. The analyses demonstrate that workforce skills are not anticipated to change due to the change in mission; science, engineering, and technician occupations tend to be mobile within and across occupational categories; experience and on-the-job training are more crucial to issues of worker supply than education; and, the clarity of an organization`s mission, budget allocation process, work implementation and task assignment systems are critical determinants of both workforce need and supply. DOE is encouraged to create a more stable platform for workforce planning by resolving organizational and institutional hindrances to accomplishing work and capitalizing on workforce characteristics besides labor {open_quotes}supply{close_quotes} and demographics.

  7. Workforce Development and Mental Health Transformation: A State Perspective.

    PubMed

    Hoge, Michael A; Wolf, Jessica; Migdole, Scott; Cannata, Elisabeth; Gregory, Francis X

    2016-04-01

    The existence of a workforce crisis in behavioral health has been recognized for decades. However, workforce problems often have been viewed as too large, too complex, and too daunting for individual states to tackle. This article reviews the progress of one state in systematically strengthening its workforce as part of a federally supported effort to transform mental health services. The workforce priorities in Connecticut are identified and the specific workforce transformation projects and their impact are described. The success in sustaining these initiatives after cessation of federal support is reviewed. The authors conclude by offering five recommendations to guide comprehensive state workforce development. This work has particular salience for the many states across the nation that have identified behavioral health service and workforce needs as obstacles to comprehensive health care reform.

  8. Geoscience Workforce Development at UNAVCO: Building a Continuous Support Structure for Student Success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A. R.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    Developing confident, capable geoscientists from a diverse array of backgrounds requires, among many variables, the development of confident, capable mentors to help guide and support students along the path to professional positions. The geosciences are lagging behind other STEM fields in increasing the diversity of participants, and shifting the perspectives of those both inside and outside of the field requires intentional attention to ensuring undergraduate success. UNAVCO, Inc. is well-situated to both prepare undergraduate students for placement in geoscience technical positions and advanced graduate study and to provide mentoring resources for faculty engaged in supporting undergraduates from diverse backgrounds. UNAVCO is a university-governed consortium facilitating research and education in the geosciences. For the past 10 years, UNAVCO has managed Research Experiences in the Solid Earth Sciences for Students (RESESS), an NSF-funded multiyear geoscience research internship, community support, and professional development program. The primary goal of the RESESS program is to increase the number of historically underrepresented students entering the geosciences, whether continuing academic studies or moving into the workforce. Beginning in 2014, UNAVCO will add a second internship program to its portfolio. Leading Undergraduates in Challenges to Power Academic Development in the Geosciences (LAUNCHPAD) is aimed at involving two-year college students and lower-division undergraduates in projects that prepare them for independent research opportunities at UNAVCO and with other REU programs. LAUNCHPAD will assist early-academic career students in understanding and developing the skills necessary to transition to undergraduate research programs or to prepare for positions in the geoscience technical workforce. In order to ensure a continued student support structure, UNAVCO will host and run a two-day institute, the Faculty Institute for RESESS Mentoring

  9. How Academic Is Academic Development?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Kym; Ling, Peter

    2014-01-01

    University provision for academic development is well established in the USA, UK and many other countries. However, arrangements for its provision and staffing vary. In Australia, there has been a trend towards professional rather than academic staff appointments. Is this appropriate? In this paper, the domains of academic development work are…

  10. Comprehensive theory of the Deans' switch as a variable flow splitter: fluid mechanics, mass balance, and system behavior.

    PubMed

    Boeker, Peter; Leppert, Jan; Mysliwietz, Bodo; Lammers, Peter Schulze

    2013-10-01

    The Deans' switch is an effluent switching device based on controlling flows of carrier gas instead of mechanical valves in the analytical flow path. This technique offers high inertness and a wear-free operation. Recently new monolithic microfluidic devices have become available. In these devices the whole flow system is integrated into a small metal device with low thermal mass and leak-tight connections. In contrast to a mechanical valve-based system, a flow-controlled system is more difficult to calculate. Usually the Deans' switch is used to switch one inlet to one of two outlets, by means of two auxiliary flows. However, the Deans' switch can also be used to deliver the GC effluent with a specific split ratio to both outlets. The calculation of the split ratio of the inlet flow to the two outlets is challenging because of the asymmetries of the flow resistances. This is especially the case, if one of the outlets is a vacuum device, such as a mass spectrometer, and the other an atmospheric detector, e.g. a flame ionization detector (FID) or an olfactory (sniffing) port. The capillary flows in gas chromatography are calculated with the Hagen-Poiseuille equation of the laminar, isothermal and compressible flow in circular tubes. The flow resistances in the new microfluidic devices have to be calculated with the corresponding equation for rectangular cross-section microchannels. The Hagen-Poiseuille equation underestimates the flow to a vacuum outlet. A corrected equation originating from the theory of rarefied flows is presented. The calculation of pressures and flows of a Deans' switch based chromatographic system is done by the solution of mass balances. A specific challenge is the consideration of the antidiffusion resistor between the two auxiliary gas lines of the Deans' switch. A full solution for the calculation of the Deans' switch including this restrictor is presented. Results from validation measurements are in good accordance with the developed

  11. Development and evolution of convective bursts in WRF simulations of hurricanes Dean (2007) and Bill (2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazelton, Andrew Todd

    Understanding and predicting the inner-core structure and intensity change of tropical cyclones (TCs) remains one of the biggest challenges in tropical meteorology. This study addresses this challenge by investigating the formation, structure, and intensity changes resulting from localized strong updrafts in TCs known as convective bursts (CBs). The evolution of CBs are analyzed in high-resolution simulations of two hurricanes (Dean 2007 and Bill 2009) using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The simulations are able to capture the observed track and peak intensity of the TCs. With Dean, there is a slight lag between the simulated intensification and actual intensification, and the extreme rate of RI is not fully captured. However, the cycle of intensification, weakening, and re-intensification observed in both TCs is captured in the simulations, and appears to be due to a combination of internal dynamics and the surrounding environmental conditions. CBs are identified based on the 99th percentile of eyewall vertical velocity (over the layer from z = 6-12 km) in each simulation (8.4 m s-1 for Dean, 5.4 m s-1 for Bill). The highest density of CBs is found in the downshear-left quadrant, consistent with prior studies. The structure of the CBs is analyzed by comparing r-z composites of azimuths with CBs and azimuths without CBs, using composite figures and statistical comparisons. The CB composites show stronger radial inflow in the lowest 0-2 km, and stronger radial outflow from the eye to the eyewall in the 2-4 km layer. The CB composites also have stronger low-level vorticity than the non-CBs, potentially due to eyewall mesovortices. The analysis of individual CBs also confirms the importance of the eye-eyewall exchange in CB development, potentially by providing buoyancy, as parcel trajectories show that many parcels are flung outward from the eye and rapidly ascend in the CBs, with as much as 500 J/kg of CAPE along the parcel path. In addition, the

  12. The Changing Role of Deans in Higher Education--From Leader to Manager

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arntzen, Eystein

    2016-01-01

    During the latter decades new perspectives on academic leadership have emerged along with new ways of organizing the decision making structure. The image of academic leader as manager has slowly but steadily been diffused internationally. In addition to the structural changes in the system of higher education the idea of new public management has…

  13. The US pediatric nephrology workforce: a report commissioned by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Primack, William A; Meyers, Kevin E; Kirkwood, Suzanne J; Ruch-Ross, Holly S; Radabaugh, Carrie L; Greenbaum, Larry A

    2015-07-01

    The US pediatric nephrology workforce is poorly characterized. This report describes clinical and nonclinical activities, motivations and disincentives to a career in pediatric nephrology, future workforce needs, trainee recruitment, and possible explanations for personnel shortages. An e-mail survey was sent in 2013 to all identified US-trained or -practicing pediatric nephrologists. Of 504 respondents, 51% are men, 66% are US graduates, and 73% work in an academic setting. About 20% of trained pediatric nephrologists no longer practice pediatric nephrology. Among the 384 respondents practicing pediatric nephrology full or part-time in the United States, the mean work week was 56.1±14.3 hours, with time divided between patient care (59%), administration (13%), teaching (10%), clinical research (9%), basic research (6%), and other medical activities (3%). Most (>85%) care for dialysis and transplantation patients. The median number of weeks annually on call is 16, and 29% work with one or no partner. One-third of US pediatric nephrologists (n=126) plan to reduce or stop clinical nephrology practice in the next 5 years, and 53% plan to fully or partially retire. Almost half the division chiefs (47%) report inadequate physician staffing. Ongoing efforts to monitor and address pediatric nephrology workforce issues are needed.

  14. Rescuing the physician-scientist workforce: the time for action is now

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, Dianna M.; Lorenz, Robin G.; Dermody, Terence S.; Brass, Lawrence F.

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 NIH Physician-Scientist Workforce (PSW) Working Group report identified distressing trends among the small proportion of physicians who consider research to be their primary occupation. If unchecked, these trends will lead to a steep decline in the size of the workforce. They include high rates of attrition among young investigators, failure to maintain a robust and diverse pipeline, and a marked increase in the average age of physician-scientists, as older investigators have chosen to continue working and too few younger investigators have entered the workforce to replace them when they eventually retire. While the policy debates continue, here we propose four actions that can be implemented now. These include applying lessons from the MD-PhD training experience to postgraduate training, shortening the time to independence by at least 5 years, achieving greater diversity and numbers in training programs, and establishing Physician-Scientist Career Development offices at medical centers and universities. Rather than waiting for the federal government to solve our problems, we urge the academic community to address these goals by partnering with the NIH and national clinical specialty and medical organizations. PMID:26426074

  15. Rescuing the physician-scientist workforce: the time for action is now.

    PubMed

    Milewicz, Dianna M; Lorenz, Robin G; Dermody, Terence S; Brass, Lawrence F

    2015-10-01

    The 2014 NIH Physician-Scientist Workforce (PSW) Working Group report identified distressing trends among the small proportion of physicians who consider research to be their primary occupation. If unchecked, these trends will lead to a steep decline in the size of the workforce. They include high rates of attrition among young investigators, failure to maintain a robust and diverse pipeline, and a marked increase in the average age of physician-scientists, as older investigators have chosen to continue working and too few younger investigators have entered the workforce to replace them when they eventually retire. While the policy debates continue, here we propose four actions that can be implemented now. These include applying lessons from the MD-PhD training experience to postgraduate training, shortening the time to independence by at least 5 years, achieving greater diversity and numbers in training programs, and establishing Physician-Scientist Career Development offices at medical centers and universities. Rather than waiting for the federal government to solve our problems, we urge the academic community to address these goals by partnering with the NIH and national clinical specialty and medical organizations.

  16. Community health workers leading the charge on workforce development: lessons from New Orleans.

    PubMed

    Wennerstrom, Ashley; Johnson, Liljana; Gibson, Kristina; Batta, Sarah E; Springgate, Benjamin F

    2014-12-01

    Academic institutions and community organizations engaged community health workers (CHWs) in creating a community-appropriate CHW workforce capacity-building program in an area without a previously established CHW professional group. From 2009 to 2010, we solicited New Orleans-based CHWs' opinions about CHW professional development through a survey, a community conference, and workgroup meetings. Throughout 2011 and 2012, we created and implemented a responsive 80-h workforce development program that used popular education techniques. We interviewed CHWs 6 months post-training to assess impressions of the course and application of skills and knowledge to practice. CHWs requested training to develop nationally-recognized core competencies including community advocacy, addresses issues unique to New Orleans, and mitigate common professional challenges. Thirty-five people completed the course. Among 25 interviewees, common themes included positive impressions of the course, application of skills and community-specific information to practice, understanding of CHWs' historical roles as community advocates, and ongoing professional challenges. Engaging CHW participation in workforce development programs is possible in areas lacking organized CHW groups. CHW insight supports development of training that addresses unique local concerns. Trained CHWs require ongoing professional support.

  17. Safeguards Workforce Repatriation, Retention and Utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Gallucci, Nicholas; Poe, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory was tasked by NA-241 to assess the transition of former IAEA employees back to the United States, investigating the rate of retention and overall smoothness of the repatriation process among returning safeguards professionals. Upon conducting several phone interviews, study authors found that the repatriation process went smoothly for the vast majority and that workforce retention was high. However, several respondents expressed irritation over the minimal extent to which their safeguards expertise had been leveraged in their current positions. This sentiment was pervasive enough to prompt a follow-on study focusing on questions relating to the utilization rather than the retention of safeguards professionals. A second, web-based survey was conducted, soliciting responses from a larger sample pool. Results suggest that the safeguards workforce may be oversaturated, and that young professionals returning to the United States from Agency positions may soon encounter difficulties finding jobs in the field.

  18. Workforce mobility: Contributing towards smart city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nor, N. M.; Wahap, N. A.

    2014-02-01

    Smart cities gained importance as a means of making ICT enabled services and applications available to the citizens, companies and authorities that form part of a city's system. It aims at increasing citizen's quality of life, and improving the efficiency and quality of the services provided by governing entities and businesses. This perspective requires an integrated vision of a city and of its infrastructures in all components. One of the characteristics of a smart city is mobility. The concept of mobility, especially for the workforce, is studied through a research carried out on a daily work undertaken as a prototype in the administrative town of Putrajaya, Malaysia. Utilizing the location track from GNSS integrated with mobile devices platform, information on movement and mobility was analysed for quality and efficiency of services rendered. This paper will highlight the research and outcomes that were successfully carried out and will suggest that workforce mobility management can benefit the authorities towards implementing a smart city concept.

  19. Health workforce governance: Processes, tools and actors towards a competent workforce for integrated health services delivery.

    PubMed

    Barbazza, Erica; Langins, Margrieta; Kluge, Hans; Tello, Juan

    2015-12-01

    A competent health workforce is a vital resource for health services delivery, dictating the extent to which services are capable of responding to health needs. In the context of the changing health landscape, an integrated approach to service provision has taken precedence. For this, strengthening health workforce competencies is an imperative, and doing so in practice hinges on the oversight and steering function of governance. To aid health system stewards in their governing role, this review seeks to provide an overview of processes, tools and actors for strengthening health workforce competencies. It draws from a purposive and multidisciplinary review of literature, expert opinion and country initiatives across the WHO European Region's 53 Member States. Through our analysis, we observe distinct yet complementary roles can be differentiated between health services delivery and the health system. This understanding is a necessary prerequisite to gain deeper insight into the specificities for strengthening health workforce competencies in order for governance to rightly create the institutional environment called for to foster alignment. Differentiating between the contribution of health services and the health system in the strengthening of health workforce competencies is an important distinction for achieving and sustaining health improvement goals.

  20. Recommendations from the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Taskforce on women in academic emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Gloria J; Abbuhl, Stephanie B; Clem, Kathleen J

    2008-08-01

    The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) convened a taskforce to study issues pertaining to women in academic emergency medicine (EM). The charge to the Taskforce was to "Create a document for the SAEM Board of Directors that defines and describes the unique recruitment, retention, and advancement needs for women in academic emergency medicine." To this end, the Taskforce and authors reviewed the literature to highlight key data points in understanding this issue and made recommendations for individuals at four levels of leadership and accountability: leadership of national EM organizations, medical school deans, department chairs, and individual women faculty members. The broad range of individuals targeted for recommendations reflects the interdependent and shared responsibility required to address changes in the culture of academic EM. The following method was used to determine the recommendations: 1) Taskforce members discussed career barriers and potential solutions that could improve the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women in academic EM; 2) the authors reviewed recommendations in the literature by national consensus groups and experts in the field to validate the recommendations of Taskforce members and the authors; and 3) final recommendations were sent to all Taskforce members to obtain and incorporate additional comments and ensure a consensus. This article contains those recommendations and cites the relevant literature addressing this topic.

  1. Identification of Key Barriers in Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the identification of key barriers in the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed under a Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration grant. Many barriers exist that prevent the development of an adequate number of propertly trained national security personnel. Some barriers can be eliminated in a short-term manner, whereas others will involve a long-term strategy that takes into account public policy.

  2. Army Contracting Command Workforce Model Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-04

    College), and he has taught visiting seminars at American University in Cairo, and Instituto de Empresas in Madrid. Dr. Reed retired after 21 years...Advisory Panel, 2007, p. 7) not only points toward a strained workforce that lacks the requisite market expertise, but also to other factors that...mlpqdo^ar^qb=p`elli= Spyropoulos, D. (2005, March). Analysis of career progression and job performance in internal labor markets : The case of

  3. Kidney disease physician workforce: where is the emerging pipeline?

    PubMed

    Pogue, Velvie A; Norris, Keith C; Dillard, Martin G

    2002-08-01

    A predicted increase in the number of patients with end-stage renal disease in coming years, coupled with significant numbers of qualified nephrologists reaching retirement age, will place great demands on the renal physician workforce. Action is required on several fronts to combat the predicted shortfall in full-time nephrologists. Of particular importance is the need to recruit and train greater numbers of physicians from ethnic minority groups. Changes in the demographics of kidney disease make it increasingly a disease of ethnic minorities and the poor. These demographic changes, together with the existing racial disparities in the diagnosis and treatment of kidney disease, highlight the specific need for nephrologists who are cognizant of the issues and barriers that prevent optimal care of high-risk minority populations. The current lack of academic role models and the drive by medical schools and residency programs to encourage minority group physicians to become primary care providers, rather than specialists, are issues that must be urgently addressed. Equally, changes in the training of renal fellows are required to merge the critical need for cutting edge research activity in renal science and with the insights and sensitivity to equip clinicians with the necessary skills for the team-based approach to patient care that increasingly characterizes the management and care of the patient with chronic kidney disease.

  4. Diversity in the biomedical research workforce: developing talent.

    PubMed

    McGee, Richard; Saran, Suman; Krulwich, Terry A

    2012-01-01

    Much has been written about the need for and barriers to achievement of greater diversity in the biomedical workforce from the perspectives of gender, race, and ethnicity; this is not a new topic. These discussions often center around a "pipeline" metaphor that imagines students flowing through a series of experiences to eventually arrive at a science career. Here we argue that diversity will only be achieved if the primary focus is on (1) what is happening within the pipeline, not just counting individuals entering and leaving it; (2) de-emphasizing the achievement of academic milestones by typical ages; and (3) adopting approaches that most effectively develop talent. Students may develop skills at different rates based on factors such as earlier access to educational resources, exposure to science (especially research experiences), and competing demands for time and attention during high school and college. Therefore, there is wide variety among students at any point along the pipeline. Taking this view requires letting go of imagining the pipeline as a sequence of age-dependent steps in favor of milestones of skill and talent development decoupled from age or educational stage. Emphasizing talent development opens up many new approaches for science training outside of traditional degree programs. This article provides examples of such approaches, including interventions at the postbaccalaureate and PhD levels, as well as a novel coaching model that incorporates well-established social science theories and complements traditional mentoring. These approaches could significantly impact diversity by developing scientific talent, especially among currently underrepresented minorities.

  5. Astronomy in the United States: Workforce Development and Public Engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impey, Chris

    2012-08-01

    Astronomy workforce development and public engagement in the United States are described. The number of professional astronomers has grown by about a third in the past 25 years, to about 4000. Only one in four are faculty in an academic setting; the rest work in a wide range of public and private research institutes. PhD production has remained steady at about 200 per year. Women account for roughly half of BSc degrees and a third of PhD degrees, but their participation declines to about 10% at the level of full professor. Minorities are underrepresented by a substantial factor at all levels of the profession. In terms of public engagement, astronomy has unique advantages associated with its visual appeal and the large and active amateur astronomy community. The are 1400 public planetaria in the US, with another 110 in schools and universities. Astronomers have made good use of new media such as blogs and podcasts and social networks, but the biggest impact has been in the area of citizen science, where people with no technical background contribute directly to a research project by, for example, classifying galaxies. The International Year of Astronomy and the remarkable success of the Galileoscope have inspired large numbers of people to appreciate astronomy, contributing indirectly to the professional vitality of the field.

  6. Characterization of thermal desorption with the Deans-switch technique in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Huang, Ying-Xue; Huang, Ting-Jyun; Chen, Yong-Shen; Wang, Chieh-Heng; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2016-09-02

    This study presents a novel application based on the Deans-switch cutting technique to characterize the thermal-desorption (TD) properties for gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Flash-heating of the sorbent bed at high temperatures to desorb trapped VOCs to GC may easily produce severe asymmetric or tailing GC peaks affecting resolution and sensitivity if care is not taken to optimize the TD conditions. The TD peak without GC separation was first examined for the quality of the TD peak by analyzing a standard gas mixture from C2 to C12 at ppb level. The Deans switch was later applied in two different stages. First, it was used to cut the trailing tail of the TD peak, which, although significantly improved the GC peak symmetry, led to more loss of the higher boiling compounds than the low boiling ones, thus suggesting compound discrimination. Subsequently, the Deans switch was used to dissect the TD peak into six 30s slices in series, and an uneven distribution in composition between the slices were found. A progressive decrease in low boiling compounds and increase in higher boiling ones across the slices indicated severe inhomogeneity in the TD profile. This finding provided a clear evidence to answer the discrimination problem found with the tail cutting approach to improve peak symmetry. Through the use of the innovated slicing method based on the Deans-switch cutting technique, optimization of TD injection for highly resolved, symmetric and non-discriminated GC peaks can now be more quantitatively assessed and guided.

  7. Switchable 3D optofluidic Y-branch waveguides tuned by Dean flows

    PubMed Central

    Li, L.; Zhu, X.Q.; Liang, L.; Zuo, Y. F.; Xu, Y. S.; Yang, Y.; Yuan, Y. J.; Huang, Q. Q.

    2016-01-01

    Optical branch waveguides are one of the most important optical elements and have been widely exploited for optical communication systems. However, prevailing devices are typically solid and have limit in tunability. Liquid optical devices have attracted more interest for the advantage of tunability of liquid media, but their signals suffer serious leakage if the refractive index (RI) of liquid is smaller than that of solid channels. This paper demonstrates the tunable three-dimensional (3D) optofluidic Y-branch waveguides in plannar microchannels by simply introducing Dean flow. This device can reconfigure 3D Y-branch profiles and separate the intensity of light as tunable ratio from 0 to 1 by adjusting the flow rates with low loss. Different from the prevailing 2D liquid counterparts, the 3D configuration offer much more freedom in the selection of liquid media as liquid’s RI can be totally independent to the solid channel structure. The transmission loss through the device is estimated to 0.97 db when the splitting angle is 10°, which shows the light is confined better in the 3D liquid structures than traditional 2D liquid counterparts. The Y-branch waveguides show potential in applications of integrated optofluidic devices. PMID:27910958

  8. Switchable 3D optofluidic Y-branch waveguides tuned by Dean flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Zhu, X. Q.; Liang, L.; Zuo, Y. F.; Xu, Y. S.; Yang, Y.; Yuan, Y. J.; Huang, Q. Q.

    2016-12-01

    Optical branch waveguides are one of the most important optical elements and have been widely exploited for optical communication systems. However, prevailing devices are typically solid and have limit in tunability. Liquid optical devices have attracted more interest for the advantage of tunability of liquid media, but their signals suffer serious leakage if the refractive index (RI) of liquid is smaller than that of solid channels. This paper demonstrates the tunable three-dimensional (3D) optofluidic Y-branch waveguides in plannar microchannels by simply introducing Dean flow. This device can reconfigure 3D Y-branch profiles and separate the intensity of light as tunable ratio from 0 to 1 by adjusting the flow rates with low loss. Different from the prevailing 2D liquid counterparts, the 3D configuration offer much more freedom in the selection of liquid media as liquid’s RI can be totally independent to the solid channel structure. The transmission loss through the device is estimated to 0.97 db when the splitting angle is 10°, which shows the light is confined better in the 3D liquid structures than traditional 2D liquid counterparts. The Y-branch waveguides show potential in applications of integrated optofluidic devices.

  9. Dogs and Monsters: Moral Status Claims in the Fiction of Dean Koontz.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephen W

    2016-03-01

    This article explores conceptions of moral status in the work of American thriller author Dean Koontz. It begins by examining some of the general theories of moral status used by philosophers to determine whether particular entities have moral status. This includes both uni-criterial theories and multi-criterial theories of moral status. After this examination, the article argues for exploring bioethics conceptions in popular fiction. Popular fiction is considered a rich source for analysis because it provides not only a good approximation of the beliefs of ordinary members of the moral community, but also explores important issues in a context where ordinary individuals are likely to encounter them. Following on from this, the article then explores theories of moral status in the context of Koontz's novels. In particular, the article focuses on the novel Watchers and Koontz's Frankenstein series. Through these works, Koontz indicates that entities have moral status for a variety of reasons and thus presumably, he is a proponent of multi-criterial theories of moral status. The article concludes with an examination of what this might mean for our understanding of moral status claims generally.

  10. Workforce development and the organization of work: the science we need.

    PubMed

    Schoenwald, Sonja K; Hoagwood, Kimberly Eaton; Atkins, Marc S; Evans, Mary E; Ringeisen, Heather

    2010-03-01

    The industrialization of health care, underway for several decades, offers instructive guidance and models for speeding access of children and families to clinically and cost effective preventive, treatment, and palliative interventions. This industrialization--i.e., the systematized production of goods or services in large-scale enterprises--has the potential to increase the value and effects of care for consumers, providers, and payers (Hayes and Gregg in Integrated behavioral healthcare: Positioning mental health practice with medical/surgical practice. Academic Press, San Diego, 2001), and to generate efficiencies in care delivery, in part because workforce responsibilities become more functional and differentiated such that individuals with diverse educational and professional backgrounds can effectively execute substantive clinical roles (Rees in Clin Exp Dermatol, 33, 39-393, 2008). To date, however, the models suggested by this industrialization have not been applied to children's mental health services. A combination of policy, regulatory, fiscal, systemic, and organizational changes will be needed to fully penetrate the mental health and substance abuse service sectors. In addition, problems with the availability, preparation, functioning, and status of the mental health workforce decried for over a decade will need to be addressed if consumers and payers are to gain access to effective interventions irrespective of geographic location, ethnic background, or financial status. This paper suggests that critical knowledge gaps exist regarding (a) the knowledge, skills, and competencies of a workforce prepared to deliver effective interventions; (b) the efficient and effective organization of work; and (c) the development and replication of effective workforce training and support strategies to sustain effective services. Three sets of questions are identified for which evidence-based answers are needed. Suggestions are provided to inform the development of a

  11. First Annual LGBT Health Workforce Conference: Empowering Our Health Workforce to Better Serve LGBT Communities.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Nelson F; Sánchez, John Paul; Lunn, Mitchell R; Yehia, Baligh R; Callahan, Edward J

    2014-03-01

    The Institute of Medicine has identified significant health disparities and barriers to health care experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations. By lowering financial barriers to care, recent legislation and judicial decisions have created a remarkable opportunity for reducing disparities by making health care available to those who previously lacked access. However, the current health-care workforce lacks sufficient training on LGBT-specific health-care issues and delivery of culturally competent care to sexual orientation and gender identity minorities. The LGBT Healthcare Workforce Conference was developed to provide a yearly forum to address these deficiencies through the sharing of best practices in LGBT health-care delivery, creating LGBT-inclusive institutional environments, supporting LGBT personal and professional development, and peer-to-peer mentoring, with an emphasis on students and early career professionals in the health-care fields. This report summarizes the findings of the first annual LGBT Health Workforce Conference.

  12. Development and validation of a child health workforce competence framework.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lynda; Hawkins, Jean; McCrum, Anita

    2011-05-01

    Providing high quality, effective services is fundamental to the delivery of key health outcomes for children and young people. This requires a competent workforce. This paper reports on the development of a validated competence framework tool for the children and young people's health workforce. The framework brings together policy, strategic agendas and existing workforce competences. The framework will contribute to the improvement of children's physical and mental wellbeing by identifying competences required to provide proactive services that respond to children and young people with acute, continuing and complex needs. It details five core competences for the workforce, the functions that underpin them and levels of competence required to deliver a particular service. The framework will be of value to commissioners to inform contracting, to providers to ensure services are delivered by a workforce with relevant competences to meet identified needs, and to the workforce to assess existing capabilities and identify gaps in competence.

  13. Blueprint for development of the advanced practice psychiatric nurse workforce.

    PubMed

    Hanrahan, Nancy P; Delaney, Kathleen R; Stuart, Gail W

    2012-01-01

    The mental health system is inefficient and ineffective in providing behavioral health care services to the 1 in 4 Americans who have a mental illness or a substance abuse problem. Current health care reform initiatives present a significant opportunity for advanced practice psychiatric nurses-psychiatric mental health (APRN-PMH) to develop action-oriented recommendations for developing their workforce and thereby increasing access to high-quality and full-spectrum behavioral health care services. If endorsed by the professional nursing associations and the APRN-PMH workforce, the strategies presented in this paper provide a blueprint for developing the APRN-PMH workforce. Achieving these goals will significantly reform the APRN-PMH workforce, thereby contributing to the overall goal of supporting an integrated model of behavioral health care. No change has as much potential to influence the APRN-PMH workforce as the uniting of all APRN-PMHs in a "Blueprint for APRN-PMH Workforce Development."

  14. Academic Bullies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Piper

    2008-01-01

    Many professors have been traumatized by academic bullies. Unlike bullies at school, the academic bully plays a more subtle game. Bullies may spread rumors to undermine a colleague's credibility or shut their target out of social conversations. The more aggressive of the species cuss out co-workers, even threatening to get physical. There is…

  15. Translating cancer prevention and control research into the community setting: workforce implications.

    PubMed

    Harrop, J Phil; Nelson, David E; Kuratani, Darrah Goo; Mullen, Patricia Dolan; Paskett, Electra D

    2012-05-01

    A gap exists between cancer prevention research and its translation into community practice. Two strategies to reduce this gap are community-based participatory research (CBPR) and dissemination research. CBPR offers an avenue to engage academic and community partners, thereby providing mechanisms for joint learning and application of knowledge. Dissemination research examines the movement of evidence-based public health and clinical innovations to practice settings. While applying these approaches may reduce the gap between research and practice, the cancer prevention workforce may be inadequate in size, insufficiently trained, lack resources and incentives, or face structural barriers to effectively participate in CBPR and disseminate evidence-based research findings into practice. Information on translating cancer prevention information to communities and workforce implications was obtained from a panel of experts and through a review of the literature on CBPR and dissemination research. The expert panel and literature review identified major barriers to successfully conducting CBPR and dissemination research in community settings. Barriers included inadequate policies; insufficient networking and communication infrastructures; unsupportive research cultures, climates, and mindsets; inadequate researcher and practitioner education; and limited CBPR and dissemination research with adequate study designs. No specific estimates of the cancer prevention workforce were found; however, indirect evidence for a shortfall were identified. We recommend expanding CBPR training for academic and community partners; increasing funding for dissemination research and practice; supporting proven partnerships; and providing strategic coordination for government agencies, research institutions, nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector to foster better dissemination of information and integration of community-based cancer prevention and control programs and practices

  16. Enumeration of the public health workforce: developing a system.

    PubMed

    Gebbie, K M; Merrill, J

    2001-07-01

    Although it has been of interest to public health leaders, advocates, and policy planners for many years, decades have passed since the last organized count of public health workers. This article reports on methods used by the Columbia University School of Nursing, Center for Health Policy, to enumerate the public health workforce in 57 states and territories based on existing reports, summaries, and surveys. The complexity of public health workforce data is described and the scheme utilized to characterize the workforce using public agency categories is illustrated. The resulting "best current estimate" provokes many questions regarding future policy about a public health workforce database.

  17. FY17 Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training (EWDJT) Grants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This notice announces the availability of funds and solicits proposals from eligible entities, including nonprofit organizations, to deliver Environmental Workforce Development and Job Training programs.

  18. Psychiatric rehabilitation: an emerging academic discipline.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kenneth J; Barrett, Nora M

    2009-01-01

    Psychiatric rehabilitation is an emerging profession and academic discipline. This paper provides an overview of the need for psychiatric rehabilitation education, the workforce challenges this field faces and an introduction to the various efforts that institutions of higher education are making to meet this need. This paper also introduces some empirical findings in this area, reviewing three previously published evaluations of academic programs, and providing preliminary results of an unpublished evaluation from an American university with a career ladder in this field. The results of these evaluations suggest positive impact on the careers of the students, who appear to be knowledgeable and competent in psychiatric rehabilitation. More detailed evaluations of this education on the service outcomes of persons with serious mental illness are warranted as are studies of the methods of instruction used to develop the needed skills and attitudes. Replication of these existing academic programs should be considered.

  19. "In situ" extraction of essential oils by use of Dean-Stark glassware and a Vigreux column inside a microwave oven: a procedure for teaching green analytical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chemat, Farid; Perino-Issartier, Sandrine; Petitcolas, Emmanuel; Fernandez, Xavier

    2012-08-01

    One of the principal objectives of sustainable and green processing development remains the dissemination and teaching of green chemistry in colleges, high schools, and academic laboratories. This paper describes simple glassware that illustrates the phenomenon of extraction in a conventional microwave oven as energy source and a process for green analytical chemistry. Simple glassware comprising a Dean-Stark apparatus (for extraction of aromatic plant material and recovery of essential oils and distilled water) and a Vigreux column (as an air-cooled condenser inside the microwave oven) was designed as an in-situ extraction vessel inside a microwave oven. The efficiency of this experiment was validated for extraction of essential oils from 30 g fresh orange peel, a by-product in the production of orange juice. Every laboratory throughout the world can use this equipment. The microwave power is 100 W and the irradiation time 15 min. The method is performed at atmospheric pressure without added solvent or water and furnishes essential oils similar to those obtained by conventional hydro or steam distillation. By use of GC-MS, 22 compounds in orange peel were separated and identified; the main compounds were limonene (72.1%), β-pinene (8.4%), and γ-terpinene (6.9%). This procedure is appropriate for the teaching laboratory, does not require any special microwave equipment, and enables the students to learn the skills of extraction, and chromatographic and spectroscopic analysis. They are also exposed to a dramatic visual example of rapid, sustainable, and green extraction of an essential oil, and are introduced to successful sustainable and green analytical chemistry.

  20. Estimating the Size and Components of the U.S. Child Care Workforce and Caregiving Population. Key Findings from the Child Care Workforce Estimate. Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Alice; Whitebook, Marcy; Young, Marci; Bellm, Dan; Wayne, Claudia; Brandon, Richard N.; Maher, Erin

    In response to rising demand for information on the child care workforce, the Center for the Child Care Workforce (CCW) and the Human Services Policy Center (HSPC) have initiated a 2-year project to develop a framework and methodology for quantifying the size and characteristics of the U.S. child care workforce, focusing on the workforce serving…

  1. 77 FR 77112 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Workforce...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ...; Workforce Investment Act Management Information and Reporting System ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department... Collection: Workforce Investment Act Management Information and Reporting System. OMB Control Number: 1205... collection request (ICR) revision titled, ``Workforce Investment Act Management Information and...

  2. Academic Freedom and Academic Tenure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De George, Richard T.

    2001-01-01

    Asserts that Martin Michaelson's proposal in "Should Untenured as Well as Tenured Faculty Be Guaranteed Academic Freedom? A Few Observations," despite its good intentions, is seriously flawed and if adopted in preference to existing standards will weaken rather than strengthen academic freedom. (EV)

  3. Health Professional Workforce Education in the Asia Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Jessica; Webb, Gillian; Coulston, Frances; Smart, Aidan; Remedios, Louisa

    2016-01-01

    Objective To design and implement an international and interprofessional Global Learning Partnership Model, which involves shared learning between academics and students from Universitas 21 network with other universities with United Nations Millennium Development Goal needs. Design Two literature reviews were conducted to inform ethical aspects and curriculum design of the GLP model. Feedback from conference presentations and consultation with experts in education and public health has been incorporated to inform the current iteration of the GLP model. Intervention The pilot group of 25 students from U21 universities and Kathmandu University, representing six health disciplines will meet in Nepal in April 2016 for a shared learning experience, including a one week university based workshop and three week community based experience. Outcome measures A multi-phase, mixed method design was selected for the evaluation of the GLP model, utilising a combination of focus groups and questionnaires to evaluate the efficacy of the placement through student experience and learning outcomes in cultural competency, UN SDG knowledge, community engagement and health promotion skills. Results The literature review demonstrated that cultural awareness and cultural knowledge were improved through participation in cultural immersion programs that incorporated preparatory workshops and clinical experiences. Data will be gathered in April 2006 and the results of the evaluation will be published in the future. Conclusions The GLP model proposes a project around the fundamental concept of engagement and sharing between students and academics across universities and cultural contexts to build capacity through education, while capitalising on strengths of existing global health placements. Further the inclusion of host-country students and academics in this learning exchange will promote the establishment of an international and interprofessional network for ongoing health promotion

  4. The Primary Care Physician Workforce in Massachusetts: Implications for the Workforce in Rural, Small Town America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenger, Joseph; Cashman, Suzanne B.; Savageau, Judith A.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Small towns across the United States struggle to maintain an adequate primary care workforce. Purpose: To examine factors contributing to physician satisfaction and retention in largely rural areas in Massachusetts, a state with rural pockets and small towns. Methods: A survey mailed in 2004-2005 to primary care physicians, practicing in…

  5. Preparing our Workforce (POW) Initiative: Utilizing Moodle to Prepare Students for the Geoscience Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlton, H. R.; Keane, C. M.; Wilson, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    Bridging the workforce supply gap is an increasing concern among the geoscience community as our current geoscience professionals approach retirement age. To ensure the sustainability of our future workforce, the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) developed a program called the Preparing our Workforce (POW) Initiative to discuss the diverse career opportunities with geoscience students. These discussion-based, student-led talks bring together geoscience students and working professionals that emphasize the importance of integrating transferrable skills and outside interests to bolster one's career. Through the Geoscience Online Learning Initiative, (GOLI) sponsored by AGI and the American Institute of Professional Geologists (AIPG), nation-wide implementation is currently underway by employing Moodle to train geoscience professionals to host POW discussions with students in their area. The POW course currently utilizes many of Moodle's features including video streaming, discussion forums, assessments, databases and restricted access to materials. This talk will address the innovative structure, goals and implementation of the POW Initiative. Additionally, it will discuss future courses in Moodle that will address workforce needs and how to become more formally involved in the POW Initiative.

  6. The National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative: Strategy in Action: Building the Cybersecurity Workforce in Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Business-Higher Education Forum, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Business-Higher Education Forum (BHEF) has achieved particular success in operationalizing the National Higher Education and Workforce Initiative (HEWI) in Maryland around cybersecurity. Leveraging its membership of corporate CEOs, university presidents, and government agency leaders, BHEF partnered with the University System of Maryland to…

  7. Caring Attitudes in Medical Education: Perceptions of Deans and Curriculum Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Calvin L.; Clark, William D.; Haidet, Paul; White, Maysel Kemp; Krupat, Edward; Pelletier, Stephen; Weissmann, Peter; Anderson, M. Brownell

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND Systems of undergraduate medical education and patient care can create barriers to fostering caring attitudes. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to survey associate deans and curriculum leaders about teaching and assessment of caring attitudes in their medical schools. PARTICIPANTS The participants of this study include 134 leaders of medical education in the USA and Canada. METHODS We developed a survey with 26 quantitative questions and 1 open-ended question. In September to October 2005, the Association of American Medical Colleges distributed it electronically to curricular leaders. We used descriptive statistics to analyze quantitative data, and the constant comparison technique for qualitative analysis. RESULTS We received 73 responses from 134 medical schools. Most respondents believed that their schools strongly emphasized caring attitudes. At the same time, 35% thought caring attitudes were emphasized less than scientific knowledge. Frequently used methods to teach caring attitudes included small-group discussion and didactics in the preclinical years, role modeling and mentoring in the clinical years, and skills training with feedback throughout all years. Barriers to fostering caring attitudes included time and productivity pressures and lack of faculty development. Respondents with supportive learning environments were more likely to screen applicants’ caring attitudes, encourage collaborative learning, give humanism awards to faculty, and provide faculty development that emphasized teaching of caring attitudes. CONCLUSIONS The majority of educational leaders value caring attitudes, but overall, educational systems inconsistently foster them. Schools may facilitate caring learning environments by providing faculty development and support, by assessing students and applicants for caring attitudes, and by encouraging collaboration. PMID:17786522

  8. Survey on workforce retention and attrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-03-01

    The Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) is conducting a survey to gather information on why technical professionals change jobs or quit working. The survey, prompted by concern about the retention of skilled workers, aims to provide information to employers that can assist them in addressing practices that can lead to significant workforce attrition. To participate in the survey, which is open to everyone (including those who are not SPE members), go to http://research.spe.org/se.ashx?s=705E3F1335720258 through 15 May 2013. For more information, contact speresearch@spe.org.

  9. Workforce Challenges and Retention Success Stories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, John T.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph document discusses the current and future challenges in building and retaining the required workforce of scientist and engineers for NASA. Specifically, the talk reviews the current situation at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. Several programs at NASA for high school and college students to assist in inspiring the next generation of scientist and engineers are reviewed. The issue of retention of the best of the young scientists and engineers is also reviewed, with a brief review of several young engineers and their success with and for NASA.

  10. The New Academic Environment and Faculty Misconduct.

    PubMed

    Binder, Renée; Friedli, Amy; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena

    2016-02-01

    Faculty members are expected to abide by codes of conduct that are delineated in institutional policies and to behave ethically when engaging in scientific pursuits. As federal funds for research decrease, faculty members face increasing pressure to sustain their research activities, and many have developed new collaborations and pursued new entrepreneurial opportunities. As research collaborations increase, however, there may be competition to get credit as the first person to develop ideas, make new discoveries, and/or publish new findings. This increasingly competitive academic environment may contribute to intentional or unintentional faculty misconduct. The authors, who work in the Dean's Office at a large U.S. medical school (University of California, San Francisco), investigate one to two cases of alleged misconduct each month. These investigations, which are stressful and unpleasant, may culminate in serious disciplinary action for the faculty member. Further, these allegations sometimes result in lengthy and acrimonious civil litigation. This Perspective provides three examples of academic misconduct: violations of institutional conflict-of-interest policies, disputes about intellectual property, and authorship conflicts.The authors also describe prevention and mitigation strategies that their medical school employs, which may be helpful to other institutions. Prevention strategies include training campus leaders, using attestations to reduce violations of institutional policies, encouraging open discussion and written agreements about individuals' roles and responsibilities, and defining expectations regarding authorship and intellectual property at the outset. Mitigation strategies include using mediation by third parties who do not have a vested academic, personal, or financial interest in the outcome.

  11. Educating the undergraduate nanomanufacturing workforce in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbadawi, Isam A.

    will help create a workforce capable of handling the rapidly growing needs of the US market that are related to the booming of the nano-related industry. They also believed that determining the learning content competencies is crucial to prepare a full curriculum for such a program. There seems to be a high level of agreement among the panelists over issues related to the learning content. More than 95% of the panelists agreed on employing the current learning content competencies from five pioneering US institutions. 72 competencies emerged from the study and were included in a prioritized learning content list according to their scholastic level, academic requirement status, and teaching methodology. The competencies were organized in a curriculum format to construct a learning content for a BS in NM that provides students with the knowledge, skills and techniques essential to understand manufacturing at the nano-scale.

  12. Blurring the Lines: Integrating Academic and Occupational Instruction at the Community College. A White Paper by the Illinois Task Force on Academic/Occupational Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    This report concerns integrating academic and occupational instruction at the community college level. Such integration would be conducive to preparing a competitive workforce, providing a broader educational foundation, shifting from teaching to learning, and building bridges between disciplines in the community college. There are several…

  13. Academic Village.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    Presents design features of the Renner Middle School (Plano, Texas) where the sprawling suburbs have been kept at bay while creating the atmosphere of an academic village. Photos and a floor plan are provided. (GR)

  14. Academic Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Building data is given for the following academic libraries: (1) Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois; (2) Abilene Christian College, Abilene, Texas; (3) University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. (MF)

  15. Pharmacy Faculty Workplace Issues: Findings From the 2009-2010 COD-COF Joint Task Force on Faculty Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Peirce, Gretchen L.; Crabtree, Brian L.; Acosta, Daniel; Early, Johnnie L.; Kishi, Donald T.; Nobles-Knight, Dolores; Webster, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    Many factors contribute to the vitality of an individual faculty member, a department, and an entire academic organization. Some of the relationships among these factors are well understood, but many questions remain unanswered. The Joint Task Force on Faculty Workforce examined the literature on faculty workforce issues, including the work of previous task forces charged by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP). We identified and focused on 4 unique but interrelated concepts: organizational culture/climate, role of the department chair, faculty recruitment and retention, and mentoring. Among all 4 resides the need to consider issues of intergenerational, intercultural, and gender dynamics. This paper reports the findings of the task force and proffers specific recommendations to AACP and to colleges and schools of pharmacy. PMID:21769139

  16. The State of the Psychology Health Service Provider Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalski, Daniel S.; Kohout, Jessica L.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous efforts to describe the health service provider or clinical workforce in psychology have been conducted during the past 30 years. The American Psychological Association (APA) has studied trends in the doctoral education pathway and the resultant effects on the broader psychology workforce. During this period, the creation and growth of…

  17. Linking Training to Performance: A Guide for Workforce Development Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothwell, William J., Ed.; Gerity, Patrick E., Ed.; Gaertner, Elaine S., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This book is written for workforce developers in community colleges and branch campus settings. College administrators, public officials, and employers may also find it helpful because it will give them a frame of reference for directing--or judging the quality of--community college workforce developers, the functions they oversee, the results…

  18. Implementing the Workforce Investment Act of 1998. A White Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    The Workforce Investment Act represents a total customer-driven overhaul of the U.S. job training system that will help employers obtain needed workers and empower job seekers to obtain the training needed for the jobs they want. The Department of Labor will implement the Workforce Investment Act in cooperation with the Department of Education.…

  19. Creating Opportunities for Training California's Public Health Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demers, Anne L.; Mamary, Edward; Ebin, Vicki J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Today there are significant challenges to public health, and effective responses to them will require complex approaches and strategies implemented by a qualified workforce. An adequately prepared workforce requires long-term development; however, local health departments have limited financial and staff resources. Schools and…

  20. 77 FR 25523 - Semi-Annual Workforce Management Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-30

    ... Office of the Secretary Semi-Annual Workforce Management Conference AGENCY: U.S. Department of... of Transportation, Office of the Secretary, announces the second Semi-Annual Workforce Management... for addressing labor/management issues, and safety. Registration Space is limited. Registration...

  1. The Pedagogy of Leadership and Educating a Global Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dannielle Joy

    2014-01-01

    No Child Left Behind illustrates policy that stifles pedagogy and the effective training of a global workforce. In an effort to enhance the educational outcomes of students, critical pedagogy and Gardner's Five Minds for the Future are presented as tools for the cultivation of a more innovative workforce. The pedagogical strategies and…

  2. Skilling a Seasonal Workforce: A Way Forward for Rural Regions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Bound, Helen

    2005-01-01

    Seasonal work is crucial for the many rural regions reliant on seasonal industries such as agriculture, forestry, aquaculture and tourism. This report examines the diverse nature of the seasonal workforce in two locations and the approaches used in their training. The report finds that the seasonal workforce is diverse and has varied training…

  3. Workforce 2020: Work and Workers in the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judy, Richard W.; D'Amico, Carol

    The sequel to "Workforce 2000," this book lays out the general contours of the employment landscape depicting the many roads to "Workforce 2020" and offers the best ideas about what lies ahead and what workers should do to prepare for the journey. Chapter 1 examines the forces shaping the U.S. economy: rapid technological change; further global…

  4. Challenges of Broadening Participation in the Geospatial Technology Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBiase, D.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation I'll describe the geospatial technology industry and its workforce needs, in relation to the geosciences. The talk will consider the special challenge of recruiting and retaining women and under-represented minorities in high tech firms like Esri. Finally, I'll discuss what my company is doing to help realize the benefits of a diverse workforce.

  5. Definitions and Design Options: Workforce Initiatives Discussion Paper #1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Academy for Educational Development, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Workforce initiatives are about giving people the skills to do their jobs well, about strengthening the institutional infrastructure that provides job services, about positioning labor markets to lead growth and increased investment, and about creating sustainable employment and improved working conditions. Workforce initiatives aim to fill a…

  6. The Expanding Federal Role in Teacher Workforce Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Superfine, Benjamin M.; Gottlieb, Jessica J.; Smylie, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the recent expansion of the federal role into teacher workforce policy, primarily as embodied by the Race to the Top Fund of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Such recent federal teacher workforce policy reflects an important expansion of the federal role into a policy domain that deserves more attention. The…

  7. Finding Resources to Support Workforce Development Services for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Relave, Nanette

    2006-01-01

    Funding for youth employment and training has been scaled back during the past few decades. In addition, funding for workforce development services is spread among multiple programs and agencies, resulting in a fragmented funding environment. To address this issue, the youth provisions of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) aimed to move this…

  8. Locally Grown: Key Strategies for Expanding Workforce Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Sheila

    2006-01-01

    This report profiles three workforce organizations across the country--in Colorado, Georgia and New York--and explores the strategies they used to grow their programs locally. The report examines the dilemmas workforce organizations frequently face in meeting not only the needs of their dual customers--job seekers and employers--but also the needs…

  9. Office of the 21st Century Workforce. XXI, Fall 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    XXI, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This document presents information on the U.S. Department of Labor's activities in the following topics areas: developing a skilled workforce; keeping workers safe; building workforce security; and connecting workers with jobs. The following items are included: (1) a discussion by the president and chief executive officer of Cisco Systems, Inc.,…

  10. A Workforce Design Model: Providing Energy to Organizations in Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halm, Barry J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the change in performance realized by a professional services organization, which resulted in the Life Giving Workforce Design (LGWD) model through a grounded theory research design. This study produced a workforce design model characterized as an organizational blueprint that provides virtuous…

  11. Measurement of Workforce Readiness Competencies: Design of Prototype Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Harold F., Jr.; And Others

    A general methodology approach is suggested for measurement of workforce readiness competencies in the context of overall work by the National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing on the domain-independent measurement of workforce readiness skills. The methodology consists of 14 steps, from the initial selection of a…

  12. Investigation of Malaysian Higher Education Quality Culture and Workforce Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Hairuddin Mohd; Musah, Mohammed Borhandden

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the quality culture and workforce performance in the Malaysian higher education sector. The study also aims to test and validate the psychometric properties of the quality culture and workforce performance instruments used in the study. Design/methodology/approach: A total…

  13. The American Community College: Nexus for Workforce Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Robert H., Ed.

    Emphasizing the central role of community colleges in workforce development, this two-part monograph reviews the status of workforce development initiatives at the national, state, and local levels and provides descriptions of 10 exemplary programs at community colleges across North America. The first part focuses on the status of and operating…

  14. Using Workforce Information for Degree Program Planning in Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Charles A.; Butterfield, Lindsay; Lavery, Diana; Miller, Trey; Daugherty, Lindsay; Beleche, Trinidad; Han, Bing

    2015-01-01

    In May 2013, the Texas Legislature passed House Bill 1296, requiring a report on Texas's future workforce needs that would help inform decisions to develop or expand postsecondary education programs. Educators and policymakers in Texas and elsewhere have a wide variety of quantitative and qualitative workforce information available for planning…

  15. 75 FR 68781 - Workforce Guidelines for Home Energy Upgrades

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ...The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) announces the availability of a set of Standard Work Specifications (SWSs), Job Task Analyses (JTAs) and essential Knowledge, Skills and Abilities (KSAs) applicable to energy efficiency retrofits of single family homes which together constitute the Workforce Guidelines for Home Energy Upgrades (``Workforce......

  16. Breaking New Ground: Building a National Workforce Skills Credentialing System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    In 2010 ACT sponsored a strategic workforce development summit with several prominent community college presidents from across the country. The presidents provided diverse perspectives about how to effectively prepare and validate a prepared workforce. This paper represents, in part, key elements of that discussion as well as what they think is a…

  17. The DoD Civilian Workforce: An Undervalued Resource

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-08

    functions at the strategic level. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Professional Development, Drawdown, Downsizing , Expeditionary Workforce 16. SECURITY...38 KEY TERMS: Professional Development, Drawdown, Downsizing , Expeditionary Workforce CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified The DoD civilian...Learned from Previous Drawdowns DoD must learn from the past as it contemplates another large scale downsizing . Great care must be taken not to

  18. Universal Preschool in California: An Overview of Workforce Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellm, Dan; Whitebook, Marcy

    This report analyzes emerging workforce issues as California develops a universal preschool system, focusing on service delivery mechanisms, workforce standards for staff qualifications and compensation, and professional development and higher education system capacity. The review covers current conditions, emerging questions, research findings,…

  19. Teacher Workforce Data and Planning Processes in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Susanne; Kos, Julie; McKenzie, Phillip

    2008-01-01

    Workforce planning is essential to ensure sufficient numbers of well-qualified teachers and leaders to meet the emerging needs of schools in the 21st century. Given the current ageing workforce profile in Australia, there are concerns about teacher shortage, especially in some specialist subject areas, in rural and remote locations and in…

  20. Academic dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rushton, Vivian E; Horner, Keith

    2008-07-01

    Since 1988, thirteen dental schools have provided dental undergraduate programmes within the United Kingdom (UK). In 2006, two new dental schools were created supporting dental education in the community. A further new dental school in Scotland will be accepting students in autumn 2008. In the past 25 years, extensive reorganisation of the NHS has resulted in long-term implications for the training of medical and dental academic staff. The number of academic clinicians is below the minimum viable level and external constraints, combined with a lack of suitable applicants, have led to a moratorium on academic recruitment within some Dental Schools. A detailed review of the historical and associated factors which have led to the problems presently besetting academic dentistry are discussed along with the initiatives introduced in the last 10 years to revitalise the speciality. Also, the present and future outlook for academic dentistry in other countries are discussed. Opinion is divided as to the appropriate setting for the training of undergraduate students between those who support community-based dental education and those who believe dental education should remain within research led dental establishments. External factors are moulding an unsatisfactory situation that is proving increasingly unattractive to the potential dental academic and the case for reform is obvious.

  1. Integrated Workforce Planning Model: A Proof of Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruvadoo, Eranna K.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, the Workforce and Diversity Management Office at KSC have launched a major initiative to develop and implement a competency/skill approach to Human Resource management. As the competency/skill dictionary is being elaborated, the need for a competency-based workforce-planning model is recognized. A proof of concept for such a model is presented using a multidimensional data model that can provide the data infrastructure necessary to drive intelligent decision support systems for workforce planing. The components of competency-driven workforce planning model are explained. The data model is presented and several schemes that would support the workforce-planning model are presented. Some directions and recommendations for future work are given.

  2. The Supply and Demand of the Cardiovascular Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Akhil; Sinha, Shashank S.; Rajagopalan, Bharath; Ijioma, Nkechinyere N.; Jayaram, Natalie; Kithcart, Aaron P.; Tanguturi, Varsha K.; Cullen, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    As the burden of cardiovascular disease in the United States continues to increase, uncertainty remains on how well-equipped the cardiovascular workforce is to meet the challenges that lie ahead. In a time when health care is rapidly shifting, numerous factors affect the supply and demand of the cardiovascular workforce. This Council Commentary critically examines several factors that influence the cardiovascular workforce. These include current workforce demographics and projections, evolving health care and practice environments, and the increasing burden of cardiovascular disease. Finally, we propose 3 strategies to optimize the workforce. These focus on cardiovascular disease prevention, the effective utilization of the cardiovascular care team, and alterations to the training pathway for cardiologists. PMID:27712782

  3. Does State Legislation Improve Nursing Workforce Diversity?

    PubMed

    Travers, Jasmine; Smaldone, Arlene; Cohn, Elizabeth Gross

    2015-08-01

    A health-care workforce representative of our nation's diversity is a health and research priority. Although racial and ethnic minorities represent 37% of Americans, they comprise only 16% of the nursing workforce. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of state legislation on minority recruitment to nursing. Using data from the National Conference of State Legislatures, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, and U.S. census, we compared minority enrollment in baccalaureate nursing programs of states (Texas, Virginia, Michigan, California, Florida, Connecticut, and Arkansas) before and 3 years after enacting legislation with geographically adjacent states without legislation. Data were analyzed using descriptive and chi-square statistics. Following legislation, Arkansas (13.8%-24.5%), California (3.3%-5.4%), and Michigan (8.0%-10.0%) significantly increased enrollment of Blacks, and Florida (11.8%-15.4%) and Texas (11.2%-13.9%) significantly increased enrollment of Hispanic baccalaureate nursing students. States that tied legislation to funding, encouragement, and reimbursement had larger enrollment gains and greater minority representation.

  4. Strategies for Managing a Multigenerational Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iden, Ronald

    The multigenerational workforce presents a critical challenge for business managers, and each generation has different expectations. A human resource management study of organizations with more than 500 employees reported 58% of the managers experiencing conflict between younger and older workers. The purpose of this single case study was to explore the multigenerational strategies used by 3 managers from a Franklin County, Ohio manufacturing facility with a population size of 6 participants. The conceptual framework for this study was built upon generational theory and cohort group theory. The data were collected through face-to-face semistructured interviews, company documents, and a reflexive journal. Member checking was completed to strengthen the credibility and trustworthiness of the interpretation of participants' responses. A modified van Kaam method enabled separation of themes following the coding of data. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) required multigenerational managerial skills, (b) generational cohort differences, (c) most effective multigenerational management strategies, and (d) least effective multigenerational management strategies. Findings from this study may contribute to social change through better understanding, acceptance, and appreciation of the primary generations in the workforce, and, in turn, improve community relationships.

  5. Regional Economic and Workforce Strategies: A Focus on the Mature Workforce--New Opportunities for Meeting Skill Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Regions around the country are grappling with current and anticipated skills shortages and, in some cases, labor shortages. Economic prosperity depends heavily on the quality of the workforce, and yet far too few regions have recognized their best underutilized asset: the mature workforce. Because mature workers are nearing traditional retirement…

  6. The A and m coefficients in the Bruun/Dean equilibrium profile equation seen from the Arctic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Are, F.; Reimnitz, E.

    2008-01-01

    The Bruun/Dean relation between water depth and distance from the shore with a constant profile shape factor is widely used to describe shoreface profiles in temperate environments. However, it has been shown that the sediment scale parameter (A) and the profile shape factor (m) are interrelated variables. An analysis of 63 Arctic erosional shoreface profiles shows that both coefficients are highly variable. Relative frequency of the average m value is only 16% by the class width 0.1. No other m value frequency exceeds 21%. Therefore, there is insufficient reason to use average m to characterize Arctic shoreface profile shape. The shape of each profile has a definite combination of A and m values. Coefficients A and m show a distinct inverse relationship, as in temperate climate. A dependence of m values on coastal sediment grain size is seen, and m decreases with increasing grain size. With constant m = 0.67, parameter A obtains a dimension unit m1/3. But A equals the water depth in meters 1 m from the water edge. This fact and the variability of parameter m testify that the Bruun/Dean equation is essentially an empirical formula. There is no need to give any measurement unit to parameter A. But the International System of Units (SI) has to be used in applying the Bruun/Dean equation for shoreface profiles. A comparison of the shape of Arctic shoreface profiles with those of temperate environments shows surprising similarity. Therefore, the conclusions reached in this Arctic paper seem to apply also to temperate environments.

  7. U.S. Dental School Deans' Views on the Value of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Dentistry.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Evan B; Donoff, R Bruce; Riedy, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    There has historically been limited development and utilization of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) in clinical dentistry. However, in recent years PROMs have been recognized by other health care fields as valuable in the comprehensive assessment of patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to survey deans of U.S. dental schools to better understand their vision for the role of PROMs in the field of dentistry. A 13-question online survey was emailed to the deans of the 64 accredited U.S. dental schools at the time to gather their opinions about the value of patient-reported outcomes in dentistry. The survey consisted of questions in 12 domains such as treatment planning, perceived success/complications of surgery, identification/management of dental pain, psychological and oral function, and insurance payment/reimbursement. Of the 64 deans, 33 responses were received (51.5% response rate), but three surveys were excluded due to incomplete answers, resulting in a final response rate of 46.8%. All respondents reported there was value in utilization of PROMs for understanding a patient's satisfaction of a procedure, a patient's perceived success of dental surgery, identifying dental pain, and managing dental pain. However, there was disagreement among the respondents about utilization of PROMs for the purpose of determining insurance payment and/or reimbursement. Additional steps should be taken to develop clinically appropriate PROMs for dentistry and to determine the appropriate situations in which to use dental PROMs. This study suggests that PROMs should be incorporated into dental school curricula as they will likely play a role in future comprehensive treatment assessment.

  8. Who's Dean Today? Acting and Interim Management as Paradoxes of the Contemporary University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McWilliam, Erica; Bridgstock, Ruth; Lawson, Alan; Evans, Terry; Taylor, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Interim, discontinuous or "acting" management is an increasingly ubiquitous feature of universities. This paper asks: What are the implications of this for good academic governance? Should we understand this managerial dance as a symptom of the collapse of good managerial order or, by contrast, as a symptom of the robustness and…

  9. What Is Violence Against Women? Defining and Measuring the Problem: A Response to Dean Kilpatrick

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjaden, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses (a) the relationship between the reemergence of the women's movement in the 1970s and the current field of violence against women; (b) the role voluntary associations and social activism play in shaping social institutions, including the institution of academic scholarship; (c) the need to broaden our definition of violence…

  10. Sustaining supply of senior academic leadership skills in a shortage environment: a short review of a decade of dental experience.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Estie; Heitz-Mayfield, Lisa; Tennant, Marc

    2014-06-01

    For the past decade, and expected for the next decade, Australia faces a significant health workforce shortage and an acute maldistribution of health workforce. Against this background the governments at both national and state level have been increasing the training places for all health practitioners and trying to redress the imbalance through a strong regional focus on these developments. Dentistry has been an active participant in these workforce initiatives. This study examines the increasing demand for academics and discusses the existing pathways for increase, and also examines in detail the advantages of a sustainable, shared-model approach, using dentistry as a model for other disciplines. Three non-exclusive pathways for reform are considered: importation of academics, delayed retirement and the shared resource approach. Of the various solutions outlined in this review a detailed explanation of a cost-effective shared model of senior academic leadership is highlighted as a viable, sustainable model for ameliorating the shortage.

  11. Residency Surgical Training at an Independent Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeremiah; Sidwell, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    Independent academic medical centers have been training surgeons for more than a century; this environment is distinct from university or military programs. There are several advantages to training at a community program, including a supportive learning environment with camaraderie between residents and faculty, early and broad operative experience, and improved graduate confidence. Community programs also face challenges, such as resident recruitment and faculty engagement. With the workforce needs for general surgeons, independent training programs will continue to play an integral role.

  12. DIVERSITY IN THE BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH WORKFORCE: DEVELOPING TALENT

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Richard; Saran, Suman; Krulwich, Terry A.

    2012-01-01

    Much has been written about the need for and barriers to achievement of greater diversity in the biomedical workforce from the perspectives of gender, race and ethnicity; this is not a new topic. These discussions often center around a ‘pipeline metaphor’ which imagines students flowing through a series of experiences to eventually arrive at a science career. Here we argue that diversity will only be achieved if the primary focus is on: what is happening within the pipeline, not just counting individuals entering and leaving it; de-emphasizing achieving academic milestones by ‘typical’ ages; and adopting approaches that most effectively develop talent. Students may develop skills at different rates based on factors such as earlier access to educational resources, exposure to science (especially research experiences), and competing demands for time and attention during high school and college. Therefore, there is wide variety among students at any point along the pipeline. Taking this view requires letting go of imagining the pipeline as a sequence of age-dependent steps in favor of milestones of skill and talent development decoupled from age or educational stage. Emphasizing talent development opens up many new approaches for science training outside of traditional degree programs. This article provides examples of such approaches, including interventions at the post-baccalaureate and PhD levels, as well as a novel coaching model that incorporates well-established social science theories and complements traditional mentoring. These approaches could significantly impact diversity by developing scientific talent, especially among currently underrepresented minorities. PMID:22678863

  13. A scoping review of the nurse practitioner workforce in oncology.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Lorinda A; Hunt, Lauren; Cataldo, Janine

    2016-08-01

    The quality of cancer care may be compromised in the near future because of work force issues. Several factors will impact the oncology health provider work force: an aging population, an increase in the number of cancer survivors, and expansion of health care coverage for the previously uninsured. Between October 2014 and March 2015, an electronic literature search of English language articles was conducted using PubMed(®) , the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Sciences (CINAHL(®) ), Web of Science, Journal Storage (JSTOR(®) ), Google Scholar, and SCOPUS(®) . Using the scoping review criteria, the research question was identified "How much care in oncology is provided by nurse practitioners (NPs)?" Key search terms were kept broad and included: "NP" AND "oncology" AND "workforce". The literature was searched between 2005 and 2015, using the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 29 studies were identified, further review resulted in 10 relevant studies that met all criteria. Results demonstrated that NPs are utilized in both inpatient and outpatient settings, across all malignancy types and in a variety of roles. Academic institutions were strongly represented in all relevant studies, a finding that may reflect the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty work hour limitations. There was no pattern associated with state scope of practice and NP representation in this scoping review. Many of the studies reviewed relied on subjective information, or represented a very small number of NPs. There is an obvious need for an objective analysis of the amount of care provided by oncology NPs.

  14. Improving skills and care standards in the support workforce for older people: a realist synthesis of workforce development interventions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, L; Rycroft-Malone, J; Burton, C R; Edwards, S; Fisher, D; Hall, B; McCormack, B; Nutley, S M; Seddon, D; Williams, R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This evidence review was conducted to understand how and why workforce development interventions can improve the skills and care standards of support workers in older people's services. Design Following recognised realist synthesis principles, the review was completed by (1) development of an initial programme theory; (2) retrieval, review and synthesis of evidence relating to interventions designed to develop the support workforce; (3) ‘testing out’ the synthesis findings to refine the programme theories, and establish their practical relevance/potential for implementation through stakeholder interviews; and (4) forming actionable recommendations. Participants Stakeholders who represented services, commissioners and older people were involved in workshops in an advisory capacity, and 10 participants were interviewed during the theory refinement process. Results Eight context–mechanism–outcome (CMO) configurations were identified which cumulatively comprise a new programme theory about ‘what works’ to support workforce development in older people's services. The CMOs indicate that the design and delivery of workforce development includes how to make it real to the work of those delivering support to older people; the individual support worker's personal starting points and expectations of the role; how to tap into support workers' motivations; the use of incentivisation; joining things up around workforce development; getting the right mix of people engaged in the design and delivery of workforce development programmes/interventions; taking a planned approach to workforce development, and the ways in which components of interventions reinforce one another, increasing the potential for impacts to embed and spread across organisations. Conclusions It is important to take a tailored approach to the design and delivery of workforce development that is mindful of the needs of older people, support workers, health and social care services and the

  15. Public health workforce enumeration: beware the "quick fix".

    PubMed

    Gebbie, Kristine; Merrill, Jacqueline; Sanders, Lorraine; Gebbie, Eric N; Chen, D W

    2007-01-01

    The most common source of information on workforce in the United States is the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), a branch of the Department of Labor. In 1998, 14 public health workforce titles were added to the BLS Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system. While this was a constructive step, it is not a "quick fix," because these additional titles do not solve the longstanding problems inherent in capturing accurate PH workforce data. As is true for all currently available sources, BLS statistics capture a limited segment of public health's broadly defined and multidisciplinary workforce. A standard system of data collection is needed to guide planning to sustain the present and future workforce. Revision of the 1998 SOC in preparation for the 2010 Census is now underway. This presents an opportunity for the public health community to act on prior recommendations regarding workforce data and advocate for more inclusive enumeration of public health occupations that can inform policies and planning for the current and future workforce.

  16. Cultural Diversity in the Curriculum: Perceptions and Attitudes of Irish Hospitality and Tourism Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Frances; Hearns, Niamh; Baum, Tom; Murray, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Academics are facing significant challenges in preparing indigenous students for employment in the multicultural working environment of hospitality and tourism organisations. In dealing with the impact of the new skills and flexibilities demanded by increasing globalisation, the indigenous workforce needs to possess a multicultural perspective and…

  17. "Wasting Talent"? Gender and the Problematics of Academic Disenchantment and Disengagement with Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackmore, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Confronted with the processes of massification, commercialisation, internationalisation and reduced funding, universities also face an ageing academic workforce, with implications of a shrinking pool from which to recruit managerial and research leaders. A feminist analysis suggests that the policy problematic has been wrongly conceptualised as…

  18. Social and Emotional Learning as a Catalyst for Academic Excellence. White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchesi, Antonio G.; Cook, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    ICF International's white paper explores how implementation of social and emotional learning (SEL) has the potential to prepare students for workforce success and positively influence student engagement and academic performance while reducing dropout rates. Self-improvement and leadership development sections of bookstores are replete with texts…

  19. Supply Issues for Science Academics in Australia: Now and in the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Daniel; Smith, T. Fred

    2010-01-01

    Australia, like the rest of the developed world, is in the midst of dealing with notable issues related to the age structure of its academic workforce. These issues are widespread and have been articulated in the Australian context most comprehensively by Hugo (2008). This paper investigates issues with demographic change and other key factors…

  20. Integrated Services: Key to Academic Success. coNCepts. Issue 1, Winter 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, April D., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    In order to be competitive in today's world, it is necessary for North Carolina to have a well-educated workforce. Quality schools, including effective leadership, excellent teachers, and improved academic standards and rigor, are a significant factor in these endeavors. However, good schooling starts well before a student ever steps foot into a…

  1. Professional Development and the University Casual Academic: Integration and Support Strategies for Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Katrina; Harreveld, R. E.

    2013-01-01

    Professional development is imperative for the currency and relevancy of a proficient teaching workforce in distance education, and in turn, the quality of programs being delivered. As participation in distance education within Australian universities is growing, with increasing numbers of academics being required to teach, casual employment of…

  2. Australian academic primary health-care careers: a scoping survey.

    PubMed

    Barton, Christopher; Reeve, Joanne; Adams, Ann; McIntyre, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This study was undertaken to provide a snapshot of the academic primary health-care workforce in Australia and to provide some insight into research capacity in academic primary health care following changes to funding for this sector. A convenience sample of individuals self-identifying as working within academic primary health care (n=405) completed an anonymous online survey. Respondents were identified from several academic primary health-care mailing lists. The survey explored workforce demographics, clarity of career pathways, career trajectories and enablers/barriers to 'getting in' and 'getting on'. A mix of early career (41%), mid-career (25%) and senior academics (35%) responded. Early career academics tended to be female and younger than mid-career and senior academics, who tended to be male and working in 'balanced' (teaching and research) roles and listing medicine as their disciplinary background. Almost three-quarters (74%) indicated career pathways were either 'completely' or 'somewhat unclear', irrespective of gender and disciplinary backgrounds. Just over half (51%) had a permanent position. Males were more likely to have permanent positions, as were those with a medical background. Less than half (43%) reported having a mentor, and of the 57% without a mentor, more than two-thirds (69%) would like one. These results suggest a lack of clarity in career paths, uncertainty in employment and a large number of temporary (contract) or casual positions represent barriers to sustainable careers in academic primary health care, especially for women who are from non-medicine backgrounds. Professional development or a mentoring program for primary health-care academics was desired and may address some of the issues identified by survey respondents.

  3. Training the next generation's nephrology workforce.

    PubMed

    Berns, Jeffrey S; Ellison, David H; Linas, Stuart L; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2014-09-05

    The subspecialty of nephrology faces several critical challenges, including declining interest among medical students and internal medicine residents and worrisome declines in the number of applicants for nephrology fellowships. There is an urgent need to more clearly define the subspecialty and its scope of practice, reinvigorate meaningful research training and activities among trainees, and ensure that fellows who complete training and enter the practice of nephrology are experts in the broad scope of nephrology. This need requires a critical look at fellowship training programs and training requirements. A new workforce analysis is also needed that is not focused on primarily meeting estimated future clinical needs but rather, ensuring that there is alignment of supply and demand for nephrology trainees, which will ensure that those entering nephrology fellowships are highly qualified and capable of becoming outstanding nephrologists and that there are desirable employment opportunities for them when they complete their training.

  4. Striving to Diversify the Geosciences Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Aaron A.; Jaurrieta de Velasco, Edith

    2010-08-01

    The geosciences continue to lag far behind other sciences in recruiting and retaining diverse populations [Czujko and Henley, 2003; Huntoon and Lane, 2007]. As a result, the U.S. capacity for preparedness in natural geohazards mitigation, natural resource management and development, national security, and geosciences education is being undermined and is losing its competitive edge in the global market. Two key populations must be considered as the United States looks to build the future geosciences workforce and optimize worker productivity: the nation's youth and its growing underrepresented minority (URM) community. By focusing on both of these demographics, the United States can address the identified shortage of high-quality candidates for knowledge-intensive jobs in the geosciences, helping to develop the innovative enterprises that lead to discovery and new technology [see National Research Council (NRCd), 2007].

  5. Clean Technology Evaluation & Workforce Development Program

    SciTech Connect

    Patricia Glaza

    2012-12-01

    The overall objective of the Clean Technology Evaluation portion of the award was to design a process to speed up the identification of new clean energy technologies and match organizations to testing and early adoption partners. The project was successful in identifying new technologies targeted to utilities and utility technology integrators, in developing a process to review and rank the new technologies, and in facilitating new partnerships for technology testing and adoption. The purpose of the Workforce Development portion of the award was to create an education outreach program for middle & high-school students focused on clean technology science and engineering. While originally targeting San Diego, California and Cambridge, Massachusetts, the scope of the program was expanded to include a major clean technology speaking series and expo as part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

  6. Faculty of Radiation Oncology 2014 workforce census

    PubMed Central

    Munro, Philip L.; James, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction This paper reports the key findings of the Faculty of Radiation Oncology 2014 workforce census and compares the results with earlier surveys. Methods The census was conducted in mid‐2014 with distribution to all radiation oncologists, educational affiliates and trainees listed on the college database. There were six email reminders and responses were anonymous. The overall response rate was 76.1%. Results The age range of fellows was 32–96 (mean = 49 years, median = 47 years). The majority of the radiation oncologists were male (n = 263, 63%). The minority of radiation oncologists were of Asian descent (n = 43, 13.4%). Radiation oncologists graduated from medical school on average 23 years ago (median = 22 years). A minority of fellows (n = 66, 20%) held another postgraduate qualification. Most radiation oncologists worked, on average, at two practices (median = 2, range 1–7). Practising radiation oncologists worked predominantly in the public sector (n = 131, 49%), but many worked in both the public and private sectors (n = 94, 37%), and a minority worked in the private sector only (n = 38, 14%). The largest proportion of the workforce was from New South Wales accounting for 29% of radiation oncologists. Radiation oncologists worked an average of 43 h/week (median = 43 h, range 6–80). Radiation oncologists who worked in the private sector worked less hours than their public sector or public/private sector colleagues. (38.3 vs. 42.9 vs. 44.3 h, P = 0.042). Victorians worked the fewest average hours per week at 38 h and West Australians the most at 46 h/week. Radiation oncologists averaged 48 min for each new case, 17 min per follow up and 11 min for a treatment review. Radiation oncologists averaged 246 new patients per year (median = 250, range = 20–600) with men (average = 268), Western Australians (average = 354) and those in private practice seeing

  7. 'Who does what' in the orthodontic workforce.

    PubMed

    Hodge, T; Parkin, N

    2015-02-16

    The contraction of the economy in the United Kingdom and constraints on the National Health Service (NHS) together with new opportunities for the delivery of orthodontic treatment has resulted in an increasing number of dental personnel across the different registrant groups. This article focuses on the changes that have taken place in the orthodontic workforce over the past decade. Although others help deliver orthodontic services such as material suppliers, treatment coordinators and those involved in marketing, this article will restrict itself to informing the reader specifically about which dental registrants are doing what at the clinical interface. How health professionals have developed their skills to undertake the role they play within the team and possible threats arising because of these changes are also discussed.

  8. Growing the Nuclear Workforce Through Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilburn, Micha

    2015-10-01

    Many students don't encounter physics in the classroom until college or the end of high school. Most college students never encounter nuclear physics in the classroom. In order to grow the nuclear science workforce, students need to be aware of the field much earlier in the education. However, teaching teens about nuclear science can be a daunting task at the outset. I will present and describe successful outreach curricula and programs that can be duplicated by any college, university or laboratory. These include workshops for boy scouts and girl scouts as well as teaching nuclear science with magnetic marbles. I will also present some results from assessments of JINA-CEE's more intensive programs aimed at recruiting youth to the field. JINA-CEE

  9. CAM practitioners in the Australian health workforce: an underutilized resource

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background CAM practitioners are a valuable but underutilizes resource in Australian health care. Despite increasing public support for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) little is known about the CAM workforce. Apart from the registered professions of chiropractic, osteopathy and Chinese medicine, accurate information about the number of CAM practitioners in the workforce has been difficult to obtain. It appears that many non-registered CAM practitioners, although highly qualified, are not working to their full capacity. Discussion Increasing public endorsement of CAM stands in contrast to the negative attitude toward the CAM workforce by some members of the medical and other health professions and by government policy makers. The marginalisation of the CAM workforce is evident in prejudicial attitudes held by some members of the medical and other health professions and its exclusion from government policy making. Inconsistent educational standards has meant that non-registered CAM practitioners, including highly qualified and competent ones, are frequently overlooked. Legitimising their contribution to the health workforce could alleviate workforce shortages and provide opportunities for redesigned job roles and new multidisciplinary teams. Priorities for better utilisation of the CAM workforce include establishing a guaranteed minimum education standard for more CAM occupation groups through national registration, providing interprofessional education that includes CAM practitioners, developing courses to upgrade CAM practitioners' professional skills in areas of indentified need, and increasing support for CAM research. Summary Marginalisation of the CAM workforce has disadvantaged those qualified and competent CAM practitioners who practise evidence-informed medicine on the basis of many years of university training. Legitimising and expanding the important contribution of CAM practitioners could alleviate projected health workforce shortages

  10. The "Working Lives" Project: A Window into Australian Education and Workforce Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehring, Heather; Herring, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Lifting the rate of workforce participation in Australia has been called "the challenge of the decade". In light of the ageing workforce, changing nature of work demands and workforce attitudes, the need for insight into current patterns of workforce participation has never been more urgent. The following paper offers an overview of an…

  11. Internships and UNAVCO: Training the Future Geoscience Workforce Through the NSF GAGE Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, A. R.; MacPherson-Krutsky, C. C.; Charlevoix, D. J.; Bartel, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Facilities are uniquely positioned to both serve a broad, national audience and provide unique workforce experience to students and recent graduates. Intentional efforts dedicated to broadening participation in the future geoscience workforce at the NSF GAGE (Geodesy Advancing Geosciences and EarthScope) Facility operated by UNAVCO, are designed to meet the needs of the next generation of students and professionals. As a university-governed consortium facilitating research and education in the geosciences, UNAVCO is well-situated to both prepare students for geoscience technical careers and advanced research positions. Since 1998, UNAVCO has offered over 165 student assistant or intern positions including engineering, data services, education and outreach, and business support. UNAVCO offers three formal programs: the UNAVCO Student Internship Program (USIP), Research Experiences in Solid Earth Science for Students (RESESS), and the Geo-Launchpad (GLP) internship program. Interns range from community college students up through graduate students and recent Masters graduates. USIP interns gain real-world work experience in a professional setting, collaborate with teams toward a common mission, and contribute their knowledge, skills, and abilities to the UNAVCO community. RESESS interns conduct authentic research with a scientist in the Front Range area as well as participate in a structured professional development series. GLP students are in their first 2 years of higher education and work alongside UNAVCO technical staff gaining valuable work experience and insight into the logistics of supporting scientific research. UNAVCO's efforts in preparing the next generation of scientists largely focuses on increasing diversity in the geosciences, whether continuing academic studies or moving into the workforce. To date, well over half of our interns and student assistants come from backgrounds historically underrepresented in the geosciences. Over 80% of former interns

  12. The personal assistance workforce: trends in supply and demand.

    PubMed

    Kaye, H Stephen; Chapman, Susan; Newcomer, Robert J; Harrington, Charlene

    2006-01-01

    The workforce providing noninstitutional personal assistance and home health services tripled between 1989 and 2004, according to U.S. survey data, growing at a much faster rate than the population needing such services. During the same period, Medicaid spending for such services increased dramatically, while both workforce size and spending for similar services in institutional settings remained relatively stable. Low wage levels for personal assistance workers, which have fallen behind those of comparable occupations; scarce health benefits; and high job turnover rates highlight the need for greater attention to ensuring a stable and well-trained workforce to meet growing demand.

  13. Status of Educational Efforts in National Security Workforce

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-31

    This report documents the status of educational efforts for the preparation of a national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project, being performed by the Arrowhead Center of New Mexico State University under a DOE/NNSA grant. The need to adequately train and educate a national security workforce is at a critical juncture. Even though there are an increasing number of college graduates in the appropriate fields, many of these graduates choose to work in the private sector because of more desirable salary and benefit packages. This report includes an assessment of the current educational situation for the national security workforce.

  14. Evidence-based appointment and promotion of academic faculty at the University of Chicago.

    PubMed

    Feder, Martin E; Madara, James L

    2008-01-01

    The authors report how one academic medical center (AMC) and associated nonclinical departments implemented evidence-based academic criteria and an evidence-based academic vetting process, which may be models for other institutions. In 2004-2005, The University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences and Pritzker School of Medicine reconceptualized its appointment, promotion, and tenure criteria to recognize all forms of scholarship as equally legitimate bases for academic tenure. The revised criteria also accommodate differences in academic effort consistent with varying clinical demands. Implementation of these criteria, however, necessitated revised practices in providing objective evidence and analysis of their satisfaction. Three complementary mechanisms now yield excellent evidence and analysis. The first, electronic forms (e-forms) comprise highly specific response items with embedded instructions, advice, and rationale. The e-forms encourage candidates and departments to provide the evidence that subsequent review needs to evaluate appointment or promotion proposals. Unexpectedly, the e-forms have been coopted as effective mechanisms for faculty development. Second, a faculty dean of academic affairs, a regular faculty member, was appointed to provide robust academic authority and perspective to the process. Third, the promotion and tenure advisory committee was restricted to evaluating academic criteria, and from considerations of institutional value. This change interposed a "firewall" between academic and institutional review. These changes have attenuated dissatisfaction with the appointments and promotions process both within and outside the AMC.

  15. Leading Academics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middlehurst, Robin

    This book aims to increase the level of interest and understanding of leadership within the academic context and to demonstrate the relevance of leadership for contemporary United Kingdom universities. The book considers the concept of leadership and its appropriateness and usefulness for nonprofit professional organizations such as universities,…

  16. Academic Aspirations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durant, Linda

    2013-01-01

    As colleges and universities become even more complex organizations, advancement professionals need to have the skills, experience, and academic credentials to succeed in this ever-changing environment. Advancement leaders need competencies that extend beyond fundraising, alumni relations, and communications and marketing. The author encourages…

  17. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  18. Tradition meets innovation: transforming academic medical culture at the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Pati, Susmita; Reum, Josef; Conant, Emily; Tuton, Lucy Wolf; Scott, Patricia; Abbuhl, Stephanie; Grisso, Jeane Ann

    2013-04-01

    Traditional performance expectations and career advancement paths for academic physicians persist despite dramatic transformations in the academic workflow, workload, and workforce over the past 20 years. Although the academic physician's triple role as clinician, researcher, and educator has been lauded as the ideal by academic health centers, current standards of excellence for promotion and tenure are based on outdated models. These models fail to reward collaboration and center around rigid career advancement plans that do little to accommodate the changing needs of individuals and organizations. The authors describe an innovative, comprehensive, multipronged initiative at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania to initiate change in the culture of academic medicine and improve academic productivity, job satisfaction, and overall quality of life for junior faculty. As a key part of this intervention, task forces from each of the 13 participating departments/divisions met five times between September 2010 and January 2011 to produce recommendations for institutional change. The authors discuss how this initiative, using principles adopted from business transformation, generated themes and techniques that can potentially guide workforce environment innovation in academic health centers across the United States. Recommendations include embracing a promotion/tenure/evaluation system that supports and rewards tailored individual academic career plans; ensuring leadership, decision-making roles, and recognition for junior faculty; deepening administrative and team supports for junior faculty; and solidifying and rewarding mentorship for junior faculty. By doing so, academic health centers can ensure the retention and commitment of faculty throughout all stages of their careers.

  19. Do They Enter the Workforce? Career Choices after an Undergrad Research Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, S.; Wissel, S.; Zwicker, A.; Ortiz, D.; Dominguez, A.

    2015-11-01

    Students in undergrad research internships go on to grad school at rates of 50-75% (Lopatto, 2007;Russell, 2005). NSF studied its undergrad program and found that 74% of physics interns (67% for engineering) go to grad school. PPPL undergrad interns were tracked for 10 years. Only 3% of physics PhD candidates are studying plasma physics, but 23% of our alumni that entered grad school did so in plasma. AIP reports that 60% of physics majors go to grad school (AIP, 2012), but 95% of PPPL interns have gone on to grad schools. Several programs track enrollment in grad school. AIP compiles statistics of undergrads who enter grad school and PhD students who work in the field. There has been no study of interns that follows the path from undergrad to grad school and then on to employment. Our tracking shows that most not only complete their advanced degrees but also stay in STEM fields following their academic careers. 88% of them become part of the STEM workforce, higher than the 82% of all physics PhDs employed in physics after obtaining their degree (AIP, 2014). PPPL puts more students in grad school in physics, and specifically plasma physics, and a higher percentage of those grad students stay in the STEM workforce.

  20. Graduate Education for the Future: New Models and Methods for the Clinical and Translational Workforce

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Melissa D.; Bennett, L. Michelle; Cicutto, Lisa; Gadlin, Howard; Moss, Marc; Tentler, John; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2015-01-01

    This paper is the third in a five-part series on the clinical and translation science educational pipeline, and it focuses on strategies for enhancing graduate research education to improve skills for interdisciplinary team science. Although some of the most cutting edge science takes place at the borders between disciplines, it is widely perceived that advancements in clinical and translational science are hindered by the “siloed” efforts of researchers who are comfortable working in their separate domains, and reluctant to stray from their own discipline when conducting research. Without appropriate preparation for career success as members and leaders of interdisciplinary teams, talented scientists may choose to remain siloed or to leave careers in clinical and translational science all together, weakening the pipeline and depleting the future biomedical research workforce. To address this threat, it is critical to begin at what is perhaps the most formative moment for academics: graduate training. This paper focuses on designs for graduate education, and contrasts the methods and outcomes from traditional educational approaches with those skills perceived as essential for the workforce of the future, including the capacity for research collaboration that crosses disciplinary boundaries. PMID:26643714

  1. Brownfields ENVIRONMENTAL WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT AND JOB TRAINING GRANTS

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This notice announces the availability of funds and solicits proposals from eligible entities, including nonprofit organizations, to deliver environmental workforce development and job training programs that recruit, train, and place local, unemployed and

  2. Using State Workforce Data to Examine Postgraduation Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troutman, David R.; Shedd, Jessica M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides institutional researchers a foundation to understand workforce data and how they can be accessed and used within an institutional research operating culture. Specific wage methodologies, earnings reporting, and future directions for using wage data are provided.

  3. DOE Advanced Scientific Advisory Committee (ASCAC): Workforce Subcommittee Letter

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Barbara; Calandra, Henri; Crivelli, Silvia; Dongarra, Jack; Hittinger, Jeffrey; Lathrop, Scott A.; Sarkar, Vivek; Stahlberg, Eric; Vetter, Jeffrey S.; Williams, Dean

    2014-07-23

    Simulation and computing are essential to much of the research conducted at the DOE national laboratories. Experts in the ASCR ¬relevant Computing Sciences, which encompass a range of disciplines including Computer Science, Applied Mathematics, Statistics and domain Computational Sciences, are an essential element of the workforce in nearly all of the DOE national laboratories. This report seeks to identify the gaps and challenges facing DOE with respect to this workforce. This letter is ASCAC’s response to the charge of February 19, 2014 to identify disciplines in which significantly greater emphasis in workforce training at the graduate or postdoctoral levels is necessary to address workforce gaps in current and future Office of Science mission needs.

  4. Stress within the academic workplace.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole A; Pressler, Jana L

    2014-01-01

    Many new nursing leaders assuming deanships, assistant deanships, or interim deanships have limited education, experience, or background to prepare them to deal with workplace stress. To assist new deans and those aspiring to be deans, the authors of this department offer survival tips based on their personal experiences and insights. They address common issues such as time management, handling workplace bullying, and negotiating deadlines and assignments. The authors welcome counterpoint discussions with readers.

  5. EPA, the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability in Atlanta, Atlanta Workforce Development Agency and Local Partners Announce the Proctor Creek Trash Free Waters Community Workforce Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA News Release: EPA, the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability in Atlanta, Atlanta Workforce Development Agency and Local Partners Announce the Proctor Creek Trash Free Waters Community Workforce Program

  6. The Opportunities of Crises and Emergency Risk Communication in Activities of Serbian Public Health Workforce in Emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Radović, V; Ćurčić, L

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was a recommendation and establishment the concept of the appropriate communication between public health, other competent services and population in emergency as the corner stone which guarantee that all goals which are important for community life will be achieved. Methods: We used methodology appropriate for social science: analyses of documents, historical approach and comparative analysis. Results: The finding shows the urgent need for accepting of crises and emergency risk communication principles, or some similar concepts, in Serbia, and implementing effective two way communication especially in multiethnic region. The pragmatic value of the paper lays in information about the recent improvement of health workforce and emergency services in emergencies using new concept of communication and as source of numerous useful documents published in USA and few recent Serbian examples. Conclusion: Health workforce has significant role in the process of protection of population in emergencies. Policy makers should work on finding a way to improve their coordination and communication, creating new academic programs, providing of adequate training, and financial means in order to give them different role in society and provide visibility. From other side health workforce should build back to the citizen trust in what they are doing for society welfare using all their skills and abilities. PMID:23308348

  7. A New Mountain to Climb: As the New Dean of UC-Berkeley's Law School, Christopher Edley Jr. Plans to Continue the Civil Rights and Social Justice Agenda Work for Which He Has Become Well Known

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    On July 1, Christopher Edley Jr. became the dean of the University of California-Berkeley Boalt Hall School of Law. The first African American to hold the deanship of California's premier public law school, Edley brings to the job an array of accomplishments and experiences few American law school deans can match. This article describes his…

  8. Constellation Program Design Challenges as Opportunities for Educational Outreach and Workforce Development for Senior Design Classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    The Texas Space Grant Consortium (TSGC) and the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) both have programs that present design challenges for university senior design classes that offer great opportunities for educational outreach and workforce development. These design challenges have been identified by NASA engineers and researchers as real design problems faced by the Constellation Program in its exploration missions and architecture. Student teams formed in their senior design class select and then work on a design challenge for one or two semesters. The senior design class follows the requirements set by their university, but it must also comply with the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) in order to meet the class academic requirements. Based on a one year fellowship at a TSGC university under the NASA Administrator's Fellowship Program (NAFP) and several years of experience, results and metrics are presented on the NASA Design Challenge Program.

  9. Barriers to and Facilitators of Female Deans' Career Advancement in Higher Education: An Exploratory Study in Vietnam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Thi Lan Huong

    2013-01-01

    Although the slow progress of female academics compared to their male colleagues and the challenges that female academic leaders have to face in taking leadership roles have been well-documented, very little is known about female academic leaders and managers' career advancement in developing countries like Vietnam. This paper reports on an…

  10. Domestic Wind Energy Workforce; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Tegen, Suzanne

    2015-07-30

    A robust workforce is essential to growing domestic wind manufacturing capabilities. NREL researchers conducted research to better understand today's domestic wind workforce, projected needs for the future, and how existing and new education and training programs can meet future needs. This presentation provides an overview of this research and the accompanying industry survey, as well as the Energy Department's Career Maps, Jobs & Economic Development Impacts models, and the Wind for Schools project.

  11. Investing in the workforce through mentoring

    EPA Science Inventory

    The term mentor is often used synonymously with a faculty adviser in academic settings, but a mentorship is also a career development relationship in which more experienced senior colleagues share their knowledge and experience with mentees. Having the advice and guidance of an e...

  12. A national action plan for workforce development in behavioral health.

    PubMed

    Hoge, Michael A; Morris, John A; Stuart, Gail W; Huey, Leighton Y; Bergeson, Sue; Flaherty, Michael T; Morgan, Oscar; Peterson, Janice; Daniels, Allen S; Paris, Manuel; Madenwald, Kappy

    2009-07-01

    Across all sectors of the behavioral health field there has been growing concern about a workforce crisis. Difficulties encompass the recruitment and retention of staff and the delivery of accessible and effective training in both initial, preservice training and continuing education settings. Concern about the crisis led to a multiphased, cross-sector collaboration known as the Annapolis Coalition on the Behavioral Health Workforce. With support from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, this public-private partnership crafted An Action Plan for Behavioral Health Workforce Development. Created with input from a dozen expert panels, the action plan outlines seven core strategic goals that are relevant to all sectors of the behavioral health field: expand the role of consumers and their families in the workforce, expand the role of communities in promoting behavioral health and wellness, use systematic recruitment and retention strategies, improve training and education, foster leadership development, enhance infrastructure to support workforce development, and implement a national research and evaluation agenda. Detailed implementation tables identify the action steps for diverse groups and organizations to take in order to achieve these goals. The action plan serves as a call to action and is being used to guide workforce initiatives across the nation.

  13. Diversity Based on Race, Ethnicity, and Sex, of the US Radiation Oncology Physician Workforce

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Christina H.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Deville, Curtiland

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the current diversity of the US radiation oncology (RO) physician workforce by race, ethnicity, and sex. Methods and Materials: Publicly available American Medical Association, American Association of Medical Colleges, and US census registries were used to assess differences by race, ethnicity, and sex for 2010 among RO practicing physicians, academic faculty, residents, and residency applicants. RO resident diversity was compared to medical school graduates and medical oncology (MO) fellows. Significant differences in diversity of RO residents by race, ethnicity, and sex were evaluated between 2003 and 2010 academic years. Results: Females and traditionally underrepresented minorities in medicine (URM), blacks, Hispanics, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islanders are underrepresented as RO residents (33.3% and 6.9%, respectively), faculty (23.8%, 8.1%), and practicing physicians (25.5%, 7.2%) levels compared with the US population (50.8%, 30.0%; P<.01). Although females and URMs remain underrepresented at the resident trainee level compared with their proportions as medical school graduates (48.3%, 15.6%) and MO fellows (45.0%, 10.8%; P<.01), females are significantly increased in proportion as RO residents compared with RO practicing physicians (P<.01), whereas representation of individual URM groups as RO residents is no different than current practicing physicians. There is no trend toward increased diversification for female or URM trainees over 8 years, suggesting underrepresentation is not diminishing. Conclusions: Females and URM are underrepresented in the RO physician workforce. Given existing cancer disparities, further research and efforts are needed to ensure that the field is equipped to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse society.

  14. Preparing Students from a 21st Century Demographic for the Geoscience Workforce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doser, D. I.; Velasco, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    Preparing students for the workforce at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) represents a unique challenge as over half our undergraduate majors are the first in their family to attend college, most have rarely ventured beyond the highly urbanized border region, over 75% are Hispanic, and few know any practicing geoscientists outside the university community. One of our most successful activities for preparing students for the workforce is our annual student research colloquium that will be held for the 25th consecutive year in spring 2011. The colloquium encourages our undergraduate and graduate students, as well as students from the local community college, to present their research to professional geoscientists. They also interact with these geoscientists in a number of other social activities that extend over a 2-3 day period. Formal feedback is provided to the Department by these professionals to help us improve the skills and knowledge base of our students for the workforce. We also invite geoscientists from our local community to talk to undergraduates in a variety of formal and informal settings. Another successful program includes an NSF funded program to give undergraduate students research experience during the academic year, called Pathways, that prepares them for professional life beyond UTEP. Furthermore, we require students who complete internships at the start of their junior or senior year to make presentations to lower division students. Based on suggestions from our alumni, we have begun to implement class projects that expose students to “real world” type problems, including writing work plans and estimating budgets for proposed field work. For example, our senior seminar in environmental science requires students to write and present environmental assessments of selected “fictitious” (but plausible) projects that focus on the border region. Local professionals assist the students with organizing and writing these assessments and

  15. Workforce development and effective evaluation of projects.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Claire; Green, Tess; Blass, Eddie

    The success of a project or programme is typically determined in relation to outputs. However, there is a commitment among UK public services to spending public funds efficiently and on activities that provide the greatest benefit to society. Skills for Health recognised the need for a tool to manage the complex process of evaluating project benefits. An integrated evaluation framework was developed to help practitioners identify, describe, measure and evaluate the benefits of workforce development projects. Practitioners tested the framework on projects within three NHS trusts and provided valuable feedback to support its development. The prospective approach taken to identify benefits and collect baseline data to support evaluation was positively received and the clarity and completeness of the framework, as well as the relevance of the questions, were commended. Users reported that the framework was difficult to complete; an online version could be developed, which might help to improve usability. Effective implementation of this approach will depend on the quality and usability of the framework, the willingness of organisations to implement it, and the presence or establishment of an effective change management culture.

  16. Wind Energy Workforce Development: Engineering, Science, & Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lesieutre, George A.; Stewart, Susan W.; Bridgen, Marc

    2013-03-29

    Broadly, this project involved the development and delivery of a new curriculum in wind energy engineering at the Pennsylvania State University; this includes enhancement of the Renewable Energy program at the Pennsylvania College of Technology. The new curricula at Penn State includes addition of wind energy-focused material in more than five existing courses in aerospace engineering, mechanical engineering, engineering science and mechanics and energy engineering, as well as three new online graduate courses. The online graduate courses represent a stand-alone Graduate Certificate in Wind Energy, and provide the core of a Wind Energy Option in an online intercollege professional Masters degree in Renewable Energy and Sustainability Systems. The Pennsylvania College of Technology erected a 10 kilowatt Xzeres wind turbine that is dedicated to educating the renewable energy workforce. The entire construction process was incorporated into the Renewable Energy A.A.S. degree program, the Building Science and Sustainable Design B.S. program, and other construction-related coursework throughout the School of Construction and Design Technologies. Follow-on outcomes include additional non-credit opportunities as well as secondary school career readiness events, community outreach activities, and public awareness postings.

  17. The New York State optometry workforce study.

    PubMed

    Soroka, Mort

    2012-04-01

    This study presents an analysis of the current optometry workforce, both as a unique profession and more broadly within the context of all eye care providers (optometry and ophthalmology) in New York State. The supply and distribution of eye care practitioners provides useful information for policy makers while providing insights as to the impact of the one optometry school within the state. Several databases were employed and a web based survey was developed for completion by all optometrists. The questionnaire included demographic data, whether they were actively practicing in New York State or any other state, were they full time or part time, their primary mode of practice, or if they provided care within institutional settings. Access to care was gauged by the respondents' availability for appointments during evenings or weekends. Access to eye care services in New York State has improved significantly during the past 30 years as the supply of optometrists increased. Before this study was conducted it was generally believed that there were more optometrists than ophthalmologists in every state of the nation except New York, Maryland and the District of Columbia. Findings of this study demonstrate there are 37% more optometrists in New York State than ophthalmologists and more evenly distributed as optometrists are located in almost every county of the state. Sixteen counties have no ophthalmologists. This is attributed to the presence of the College of Optometry established in 1971. More than 60% of all optometrists in the state are SUNY College of Optometry graduates.

  18. Health workforce development planning in the Sultanate of Oman: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Basu

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Oman's recent experience in health workforce development may be viewed against the backdrop of the situation just three or four decades ago, when it had just a few physicians and nurses (mostly expatriate). All workforce categories in Oman have grown substantially over the last two decades. Increased self-reliance was achieved despite substantial growth in workforce stocks. Stocks of physicians and nurses grew significantly during 1985–2007. This development was the outcome of well-considered national policies and plans. This case outlines how Oman is continuing to turn around its excessive dependence on expatriate workforce through strategic workforce development planning. Case description The Sultanate's early development initiatives focused on building a strong health care infrastructure by importing workforce. However, the policy-makers stressed national workforce development for a sustainable future. Beginning with the formulation of a strategic health workforce development plan in 1991, the stage was set for adopting workforce planning as an essential strategy for sustainable health development and workforce self-reliance. Oman continued to develop its educational infrastructure, and began to produce as much workforce as possible, in order to meet health care demands and achieve workforce self-reliance. Other policy initiatives with a beneficial impact on Oman's workforce development scenario were: regionalization of nursing institutes, active collaboration with universities and overseas specialty boards, qualitative improvement of the education system, development of a strong continuing professional development system, efforts to improve workforce management, planned change management and needs-based micro/macro-level studies. Strong political will and bold policy initiatives, dedicated workforce planning and educational endeavours have all contributed to help Oman to develop its health workforce stocks and gain self-reliance. Discussion and

  19. Attributing Success Factors of Senior-Level Nonacademic Deans or Title Equivalent at Selected Colleges and Universities in the Greater Los Angeles Area

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravagne, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine attributing success factors in the professional development of senior-level nonacademic deans or title equivalent at selected colleges and universities in the greater Los Angeles area. Methodology. An open-ended questionnaire was sent out to 17 senior-level student affairs officers (SSAOs) or title equivalent at selected…

  20. Interdependent Learning in an Open Classroom Setting: Dean Rusk Elementary School, 1972-73. Research and Development Report, Volume 7, Number 7, August 1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goettee, Margaret

    All special programs at Dean Rusk Elementary School, funded in part under Title I of the 1965 Elementary Secondary Education Act, combined to facilitate individualized instruction in the nongraded, open classroom setting of the school. To better meet the needs of the pupils during the 1972-73 school year, the Follow Through Program included, for…

  1. What is violence against women? Defining and measuring the problem: a response to Dean Kilpatrick.

    PubMed

    Tjaden, Patricia

    2004-11-01

    This article discusses (a) the relationship between the reemergence of the women's movement in the 1970s and the current field of violence against women; (b) the role voluntary associations and social activism play in shaping social institutions, including the institution of academic scholarship; (c) the need to broaden our definition of violence against women to include nonviolent acts, such as stalking and emotional abuse; (d) the need to study the interrelationships among various forms of violence and abuse, including violence and abuse experienced as a minor and violence and abuse experienced as an adult; (e) the importance of using precise language when reporting research findings; (f) the importance of using a multiple definition/measurement approach when conducting research on violence against women; and (g) the need for comprehensive research on violence against women that takes into account the various types of violent and abusive behaviors experienced by women over their lifetimes.

  2. Academic-Service Partnerships in Nursing: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Beal, Judy A.

    2012-01-01

    This integrative review summarizes currently available evidence on academic-service partnerships in the profession of nursing. More than 300 articles, published primarily in refereed journals, were accessed. Articles (110) were included in this review as they presented detailed and substantive information about any aspect of a nursing academic-service partnership. The majority were anecdotal in nature. Topics clustered around the following categories: pre-requisites for successful partnerships, benefits of partnerships, types of partnerships, and workforce development with its themes of academic-practice progression and educational re-design. Many examples of partnerships between academic and service settings were thoroughly described and best practices suggested, most often, however, without formal evaluation of outcomes. Nursing leaders in both settings have a long tradition of partnering with very little replicable evidence to support their efforts. It is critical that future initiatives evaluate the effectiveness of these partnerships, not only to ensure quality of patient outcomes but also to maximize efforts at building capacity for tomorrow's workforce. PMID:22548160

  3. Lessons from England's health care workforce redesign: no quick fixes.

    PubMed

    Bohmer, Richard M J; Imison, Candace

    2013-11-01

    In 2000 the English National Health Service (NHS) began a series of workforce redesign initiatives that increased the number of doctors and nurses serving patients, expanded existing staff roles and developed new ones, redistributed health care work, and invested in teamwork. The English workforce redesign experience offers important lessons for US policy makers. Redesigning the health care workforce is not a quick fix to control costs or improve the quality of care. A poorly planned redesign can even result in increased costs and decreased quality. Changes in skill mix and role definitions should be preceded by a detailed analysis and redesign of the work performed by health care professionals. New roles and responsibilities must be clearly defined in advance, and teamwork models that include factors common in successful redesigns such as leadership, shared objectives, and training should be promoted. The focus should be on retraining current staff instead of hiring new workers. Finally, any workforce redesign must overcome opposition from professional bodies, individual practitioners, and regulators. England's experience suggests that progress is possible if workforce redesigns are planned carefully and implemented with skill.

  4. The state of the psychology health service provider workforce.

    PubMed

    Michalski, Daniel S; Kohout, Jessica L

    2011-12-01

    Numerous efforts to describe the health service provider or clinical workforce in psychology have been conducted during the past 30 years. The American Psychological Association (APA) has studied trends in the doctoral education pathway and the resultant effects on the broader psychology workforce. During this period, the creation and growth of the PsyD degree and the formalization of the predoctoral internship placement system (the APPIC Match) have been well noted, but efforts to gain a complete understanding of professional practice are lacking. Specifically, piecemeal research on the provider workforce has led to the study of specific subpopulations using varying approaches and definitions of those providing direct clinical service. Consequently, estimates of the supply and need for health service providers are distinctly divergent and generate protracted debate in organized psychology. The APA membership directory and the APA Doctorate Employment Surveys have traditionally been relied on for workforce analyses. Yet, these data have become characterized by limited generalizability in recent years because of declining survey response rates and the fact that APA member data may not be as representative of the entire psychology health service provider population as they were previously. The 2008 APA Survey of Psychology Health Service Providers targeted these limitations by including nonmember psychologists in the sampling frame. Results revealed emerging themes in the demographics, work settings, and delivery of health services of the psychology health service provider workforce. Future areas of research for APA and organized psychology to undertake in addressing need and demand are suggested.

  5. How Social Relationships Influence Academic Health in the "Enterprise University": An Insight into Productivity of Knowledge Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditton, Mary J.

    2009-01-01

    The comparatively poor mental health status of academics at Australian universities compared with the general Australian workforce poses a public health challenge. Productivity of knowledge workers is a key issue for the new economy. Using the case of one university, I interviewed employees stratified by level of employment and showed that their…

  6. Examination of Factors That Predict Academic Adjustment and Success of Community College Transfer Students in STEM at 4-Year Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Carlos; Jones, Stephanie J.

    2017-01-01

    There are a limited number of individuals who possess the skills to fulfill the workforce demand in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) in the United States. Therefore, community colleges and 4-year institutions must be able to identify academic and social factors that impact students' participation in the areas of STEM. These…

  7. Educational Attainment of the Public Health Workforce and Its Implications for Workforce Development

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Harper, Elizabeth; Bharthapudi, Kiran; Castrucci, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Educational attainment is a critical issue in public health workforce development. However, relatively little is known about the actual attainment of staff in state health agencies (SHAs). Objective: Ascertain the levels of educational attainment among SHA employees, as well as the correlates of attainment. Design: Using a stratified sampling approaching, staff from SHAs were surveyed using the Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS) instrument in late 2014. A nationally representative sample was drawn across 5 geographic (paired adjacent HHS) regions. Descriptive and inferential statistics were analyzed using balanced repeated replication weights to account for complex sampling. A logistic regression was conducted with attainment of a bachelor's degree as the dependent variable and age, region, supervisory status, race/ethnicity, gender, and staff type as independent variables. Setting and Participants: Web-based survey of SHA central office employees. Main Outcome Measure: Educational attainment overall, as well as receipt of a degree with a major in public health. Results: A total of 10 246 permanently-employed SHA central office staff participated in the survey (response rate 46%). Seventy-five percent (95% confidence interval [CI], 74-77) had a bachelor's degree, 38% (95% CI, 37-40) had a master's degree, and 9% (95% CI, 8%-10%) had a doctoral degree. A logistic regression showed Asian staff had the highest odds of having a bachelor's degree (odds ratio [OR] = 2.8; 95% CI, 2.2-3.7) compared with non-Hispanic whites, and Hispanic/Latino staff had lower odds (OR = 0.6; 95% CI, 0.4-0.8). Women had lower odds of having a bachelor's degree than men (OR = 0.5; 95% CI, 0.4-0.6). About 17% of the workforce (95% CI, 16-18) had a degree in public health at any level. Conclusions: Educational attainment among SHA central office staff is high, but relatively few have formal training of any sort in public health. This makes efforts to increase

  8. Health workforce competencies needed for a digital world.

    PubMed

    Hovenga, Evelyn J S

    2013-01-01

    The health workforce constitutes a very significant health system building block. As such it needs to have the capacity to influence how health data are captured, processed and used at all levels of decision making. This requires a national strategy that ensures all new health professional graduates are adequately prepared and that the existing workforce is developed to make the best possible use of all available digital technologies. This chapter provides an argument for why and how the health workforce should be contributing to health information governance, followed by an historical overview of various initiatives undertaken, the results achieved and issues identified during these processes. It concludes with an exploration of strategies that may be adopted to bring about change and achieve improvements.

  9. The global nephrology workforce: emerging threats and potential solutions!

    PubMed

    Sharif, Muhammad U; Elsayed, Mohamed E; Stack, Austin G

    2016-02-01

    Amidst the rising tide of chronic kidney disease (CKD) burden, the global nephrology workforce has failed to expand in order to meet the growing healthcare needs of this vulnerable patient population. In truth, this shortage of nephrologists is seen in many parts of the world, including North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Asia and the African continent. Moreover, expert groups on workforce planning as well as national and international professional organizations predict further reductions in the nephrology workforce over the next decade, with potentially serious implications. Although the full impact of this has not been clearly articulated, what is clear is that the delivery of care to patients with CKD may be threatened in many parts of the world unless effective country-specific workforce strategies are put in place and implemented. Multiple factors are responsible for this apparent shortage in the nephrology workforce and the underpinning reasons may vary across health systems and countries. Potential contributors include the increasing burden of CKD, aging workforce, declining interest in nephrology among trainees, lack of exposure to nephrology among students and residents, rising cost of medical education and specialist training, increasing cultural and ethnic disparities between patients and care providers, increasing reliance on foreign medical graduates, inflexible work schedules, erosion of nephrology practice scope by other specialists, inadequate training, reduced focus on scholarship and research funds, increased demand to meet quality of care standards and the development of new care delivery models. It is apparent from this list that the solution is not simple and that a comprehensive evaluation is required. Consequently, there is an urgent need for all countries to develop a policy framework for the provision of kidney disease services within their health systems, a framework that is based on accurate projections of disease burden, a

  10. The global nephrology workforce: emerging threats and potential solutions!

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Muhammad U.; Elsayed, Mohamed E.; Stack, Austin G.

    2016-01-01

    Amidst the rising tide of chronic kidney disease (CKD) burden, the global nephrology workforce has failed to expand in order to meet the growing healthcare needs of this vulnerable patient population. In truth, this shortage of nephrologists is seen in many parts of the world, including North America, Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Asia and the African continent. Moreover, expert groups on workforce planning as well as national and international professional organizations predict further reductions in the nephrology workforce over the next decade, with potentially serious implications. Although the full impact of this has not been clearly articulated, what is clear is that the delivery of care to patients with CKD may be threatened in many parts of the world unless effective country-specific workforce strategies are put in place and implemented. Multiple factors are responsible for this apparent shortage in the nephrology workforce and the underpinning reasons may vary across health systems and countries. Potential contributors include the increasing burden of CKD, aging workforce, declining interest in nephrology among trainees, lack of exposure to nephrology among students and residents, rising cost of medical education and specialist training, increasing cultural and ethnic disparities between patients and care providers, increasing reliance on foreign medical graduates, inflexible work schedules, erosion of nephrology practice scope by other specialists, inadequate training, reduced focus on scholarship and research funds, increased demand to meet quality of care standards and the development of new care delivery models. It is apparent from this list that the solution is not simple and that a comprehensive evaluation is required. Consequently, there is an urgent need for all countries to develop a policy framework for the provision of kidney disease services within their health systems, a framework that is based on accurate projections of disease burden, a

  11. Building a health informatics workforce in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Hersh, William; Margolis, Alvaro; Quirós, Fernán; Otero, Paula

    2010-02-01

    Information and communication technology can be used to improve the quality and safety of health care and to lower costs. But in both developed and developing countries, there is an inadequate supply of skilled individuals who have the technical skills to use this technology to improve health care. Some studies project workforce needs of tens of thousands in English-speaking developed countries, but it is not known what size workforce will be required in the developing world. It is important to identify and develop the skills, training, and competencies-consistent with local cultures, languages, and health systems-that will be needed to realize the full benefits of these technologies. We present a framework for answering these questions and for developing estimates of the size and scope of the workforce that may be needed.

  12. 75 FR 69126 - Proposed Information Collection Request (ICR) for the Workforce Investment Act Random Assignment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... Information Collection Request (ICR) for the Workforce Investment Act Random Assignment Impact Evaluation of... a Skilled Workforce--to conduct this evaluation. The evaluation will address the following research...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In 1998, Congress significantly reformed the public...

  13. Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs—Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Lori Ross; Assante, Michael; Tobey, D. H.; Conway, T. J.; Vanderhorst, Jr, T. J.; Januszewski, III, J.; Leo, R.; Perman, K.

    2013-07-01

    This document is a summarization of the report, Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs, the final report for phase 2 of the SPSP (DOE workforce study) project.

  14. Level of and motivation for extracurricular activity are associated with academic performance in the veterinary curriculum.

    PubMed

    Jones, Meredyth L; Rush, Bonnie R; Elmore, Ronnie G; White, Brad J

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to determine the number of school-sanctioned extracurricular opportunities available to veterinary students and characterize the policies of school administrations toward extracurricular involvement and academic standing. Further, we sought to describe the level of extracurricular involvement of veterinary students, determine the association between extracurricular activity involvement and academic performance, and determine the motivation for extracurricular involvement of veterinary students. Survey data were obtained from 18 associate deans of colleges of veterinary medicine regarding the number of extracurricular student organizations within their school and administrative recommendations regarding student involvement. Another survey was administered and responded to by 665 veterinary students enrolled in curricular years 1-3 at Kansas State University and Texas A&M University regarding their extracurricular involvement. Associate deans of 11 schools responded that they make formal or informal recommendations to students about extracurricular activities, workload, and academic priority (61.1%). In a multivariate model, students who participated two times per week or more had a significantly higher overall grade point average (GPA) than students participating once per week (p<.0500). Students for whom the primary reason for participation was networking or social enhancement had a significantly lower overall GPA than students for whom the primary reason was gaining new knowledge and skills (p<.0500). These results indicate that student extracurricular involvement is a consideration for administrators when counseling students in academic difficulty. Moderate levels of extracurricular involvement can contribute to the academic success of students, but students should temper their level of involvement based upon their own motivations.

  15. Workforce issues and consumer satisfaction in Medicaid personal assistance services.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Wayne L; Wiener, Joshua M; Khatutsky, Galina

    2006-01-01

    This study used a survey of older people and younger persons with disabilities who were receiving Medicaid-financed home and community-based services (HCBS) to assess the effect of workforce issues on consumer satisfaction. We found that recruitment problems had very strong negative and significant effects on consumer satisfaction. An interruption in service was a more important and significant indicator of consumer dissatisfaction than not having the same worker over time. We also found that problems with worker training and respect and treatment of consumers strongly and significantly affected satisfaction with paid care. Efforts to improve workforce issues are needed to improve the quality of care of these services.

  16. Addressing indigenous health workforce inequities: A literature review exploring 'best' practice for recruitment into tertiary health programmes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Addressing the underrepresentation of indigenous health professionals is recognised internationally as being integral to overcoming indigenous health inequities. This literature review aims to identify 'best practice' for recruitment of indigenous secondary school students into tertiary health programmes with particular relevance to recruitment of Māori within a New Zealand context. Methodology/methods A Kaupapa Māori Research (KMR) methodological approach was utilised to review literature and categorise content via: country; population group; health profession ffocus; research methods; evidence of effectiveness; and discussion of barriers. Recruitment activities are described within five broad contexts associated with the recruitment pipeline: Early Exposure, Transitioning, Retention/Completion, Professional Workforce Development, and Across the total pipeline. Results A total of 70 articles were included. There is a lack of published literature specific to Māori recruitment and a limited, but growing, body of literature focused on other indigenous and underrepresented minority populations. The literature is primarily descriptive in nature with few articles providing evidence of effectiveness. However, the literature clearly frames recruitment activity as occurring across a pipeline that extends from secondary through to tertiary education contexts and in some instances vocational (post-graduate) training. Early exposure activities encourage students to achieve success in appropriate school subjects, address deficiencies in careers advice and offer tertiary enrichment opportunities. Support for students to transition into and within health professional programmes is required including bridging/foundation programmes, admission policies/quotas and institutional mission statements demonstrating a commitment to achieving equity. Retention/completion support includes academic and pastoral interventions and institutional changes to ensure safer

  17. Teaching implant dentistry in the predoctoral curriculum: a report from the ADEA Implant Workshop's survey of deans.

    PubMed

    Petropoulos, Vicki C; Arbree, Nancy S; Tarnow, Dennis; Rethman, Michael; Malmquist, Jay; Valachovic, Richard; Brunson, W David; Alfano, Michael C

    2006-05-01

    In 2004, a survey of the deans of U.S. and Canadian dental schools was conducted to determine the implant dentistry curriculum structure and the extent of incorporating implant dentistry clinical treatment into predoctoral programs. The questionnaire was mailed to the deans of the fifty-six dental schools in advance of the ADEA Implant Workshop conference held in Arizona in November 2004. Out of the fifty-six, thirty-nine responded, yielding a response rate of 70 percent. Thirty-eight schools (97 percent) reported that their students received didactic instruction in dental implants, while one school (3 percent) said that its students did not. Thirty schools (86 percent) reported that their students received clinical experience, while five schools (14 percent) reported that theirs did not. Four schools (10 percent) did not respond to this question. Fifty-one percent of the students actually receive the clinical experience in restoring implants, with the range of 5-100 percent. Of those schools that provide clinical experience in restoring implants, four schools (13 percent) reported that it is a requirement for them, while twenty-eight schools (88 percent) reported that it is not a requirement for them. Three schools (9 percent) did not respond. The fee for implants is 45 percent higher than a crown or a denture, with a range of 0-100 percent. Twenty-nine schools (85 percent) indicated that they did receive free components from implant companies, while five schools (15 percent) did not. The conclusions of this report are as follows: 1) most schools have advanced dental education programs; 2) single-tooth implant restorations are performed at the predoctoral level in most schools; 3) implant-retained overdenture prostheses are performed at the predoctoral level in most schools; 4) there is no predoctoral clinical competency requirement for surgical implant placement in all schools that responded to the survey; 5) there is no predoctoral clinical competency

  18. 20 CFR 661.300 - What is the Local Workforce Investment Board?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What is the Local Workforce Investment Board? 661.300 Section 661.300 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Local Governance Provisions § 661.300 What is the Local Workforce Investment...

  19. Health Workforce and International Migration: Can New Zealand Compete? OECD Health Working Papers No. 33

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurn, Pascal; Dumont, Jean-Christophe

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines health workforce and migration policies in New Zealand, with a special focus on the international recruitment of doctors and nurses. The health workforce in New Zealand, as in all OECD countries, plays a central role in the health system. Nonetheless, maybe more than for any other OECD country, the health workforce in New…

  20. 20 CFR 661.430 - Under what conditions may the Governor submit a Workforce Flexibility Plan?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... a Workforce Flexibility Plan? 661.430 Section 661.430 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... the Governor submit a Workforce Flexibility Plan? (a) A State may submit to the Secretary, and the Secretary may approve, a workforce flexibility (work-flex) plan under which the State is authorized to...