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Sample records for acadian flycatcher empidonax

  1. Sex determination of the Acadian Flycatcher using discriminant analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, R.R.

    1999-01-01

    I used five morphometric variables from 114 individuals captured in Arkansas to develop a discriminant model to predict the sex of Acadian Flycatchers (Empidonax virescens). Stepwise discriminant function analyses selected wing chord and tail length as the most parsimonious subset of variables for discriminating sex. This two-variable model correctly classified 80% of females and 97% of males used to develop the model. Validation of the model using 19 individuals from Louisiana and Virginia resulted in 100% correct classification of males and females. This model provides criteria for sexing monomorphic Acadian Flycatchers during the breeding season and possibly during the winter.

  2. Acadian flycatcher nest placement: Does placement influence reproductive success?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, R.R.; Cooper, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    We located 511 Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) nests in bottomland hardwood forest of eastern Arkansas. Microhabitat characteristics were measured and their relationship with nest success evaluated. Fifty-two percent of all nesting attempts resulted in predation. Attributes of nest placement were similar between successful and unsuccessful nests, although successful nests were placed higher. Similarly, nonparasitized nests were typically higher than parasitized nests. Nests initiated late in the breeding season were placed in larger trees with higher canopy bases resulting in increased vegetation around the nest. Fifteen different tree species were used for nesting. Acadian Flycatchers chose nest trees in a nonrandom fashion, selecting Nuttall oak (Quercus nuttallii) and possumhaw (Ilex decidua) in greater proportions than their availability. However, there was no relationship between tree species used for nesting and nest success. Nest height was positively correlated with concealment at the nest site, supporting the predator-avoidance theory. No other attribute of nest placement differentiated successful nest sites, suggesting that nest predation is likely a function of random events in space and time.

  3. Risky business: Site selection by Acadian Flycatchers under threat of nest predation and brood parasitism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    HazIer, K.R.; Cooper, R.J.; Twedt, D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Habitat quality is determined not only by habitat structure and the availability of resources, but also by competitors, cooperators, predators, and parasites. We hypothesized that, for passerines, minimizing risk from avian nest predators and brood parasites is an important factor in selecting a breeding site. Through the early part of two breeding seasons, we spot-mapped locations of Acadian Flycatchers (Empidonax virescens, territory selectors), Red-bellied Woodpeckers (Melanerpes carolinus, nest predators) and Brown-headed Cowbirds (Molothrus ater, brood parasites) in a 56-ha study area within an extensive bottomland hardwood forest. We were thereby able to determine the order of flycatcher territory settlement and nest initiation in relation to risk of predation and parasitism, while accounting for habitat structure. Male settlement was influenced by both habitat structure and risk avoidance. However, risk trom woodpeckers was relatively more important in the first season and risk from cowbirds in the second, evidently due to differences in the relative abundance of predator and brood-parasite in each year. For male flycatchers, settlement choices appear to be flexible in the face of changing 'risk landscapes.' For females, habitat structure was the most important predictor of nest site selection. Even so, there was evidence that females avoided cowbirds. Surprisingly, nest site selection was positively associated with woodpecker abundance in the first season when woodpeckers were present in greater numbers. Possible explanations for this contradictory result are discussed.

  4. Habitat and sex differences in physiological condition of breeding Southwestern Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii extimus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Owen, J.C.; Sogge, M.K.; Kern, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus; hereafter "flycatcher") is a federally listed endangered species that breeds in densely vegetated riparian habitats dominated by native and exotic plants, including introduced monotypic saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima). Some workers have theorized that saltcedar is unsuitable habitat for the flycatcher, primarily because it generally supports a smaller and less diverse invertebrate community (the flycatcher's food base) than native habitats (e.g. Salix spp.). However, differences in insect communities between native and saltcedar habitats are not proof that saltcedar habitats are inferior. The only way to evaluate whether the habitats differ in dietary or energetic quality is to document actual food limitation or its manifestations. Measurements of an individual's body condition and metabolic state can serve as indicators of environmental stressors, such as food limitation and environmental extremes. We captured 130 flycatchers breeding in native and saltcedar habitats in Arizona and New Mexico and measured 12 variables of physiological condition. These variables included body mass, fat level, body condition index, hematocrit, plasma triglycerides, plasma free fatty acids and glycerol, plasma glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate, plasma uric acid, total leukocyte count, and heterophil-to-lymphocyte ratio. We found substantial sex-based differences in the condition of male and female flycatchers. Ten of the 12 measures of physiological condition differed significantly between the sexes. In all cases where male and female condition differed (except mass), the differences suggest that males were in poorer condition than females. We found few habitat-based differences in flycatcher condition. Only 3 of the 12 physiological condition indices differed significantly between habitats. Our data show that, at least in some parts of the flycatcher's range, there is no evidence that flycatchers breeding in saltcedar

  5. A survey protocol for the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tibbitts, Timothy J.; Sogge, Mark K.; Sferra, Susan J.

    1994-01-01

    The southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) is a riparian obligate neotropical migrant, nesting in cottonwood-willow associations and structurally similar riparian vegetation associations. The southwestern willow flycatcher has declined through the twentieth century, primarily due to a number of factors, including loss and fragmentation of riparian habitat, brood parasitism by brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater), invasion of riparian habitat by the exotic tamarisk (Tamarix sp.), and predation (Hunter et al. 1987), Unitt 1987, Hunter et al. 1988, Whitfield 1990, Harris 1991, Rosenberg et al. 1991). In 1991 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) designated the southwestern willow flycatcher as a candidate category 1 species (USFWS 1991), indicating that the USFWS had sufficient information to support listing under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (Act), but that a proposal to list was precluded by other listing actions of higher priority. In July 1993, the USFWS proposed to list E. t. extimus as an endangered species and to designate critical habitat under the Act (USFWS 1993). The states of Arizona, New Mexico, and California comprise most of the southwestern willow flycatcher's historic and current range. Each of these states lists the species as endangered [Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD) 1988, New Mexico Department of Game and Fish (NMDGF) 1988, California Department of Game and Fish 1991]. Because of the precarious status of the southwestern willow flycatcher (Unitt 1987, USFWS 1993), there is a need to identify as many remaining breeding locations as possible. This survey protocol was developed to facilitate and standardize breeding surveys, and is based primarily on extensive 1992 and 1993 field surveys. It was developed at the request of the Arizona Partners in flight, and organization of Federal and State agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and individuals. This protocol is intended to be useful

  6. Ecology and behaviour of the Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum, Tyrannidae in winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1999-01-01

    The Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum (Tyrannidae) winters from Colombia and Venezuela, south to northern Argentina. We studied the species in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru. In this area the species occupies riparian zones along lowland meander rivers as well as adjacent transition zone forest in the floodplain. These habitats have a number of age-related longitudinal zones (parallel to the river margin) that are short term (I-2 year) transitory stages in the succession to floodplain forest. The fast growing plant species that make up these habitats are suitable for commercial harvest for paper pulp. We examined habitat use of the species in an attempt to identify the effects of such harvest and resulting habitat loss on these birds. The Alder Flycatcher favours two longitudinal zones where it establishes territories. The territories may be long-term or transitory, and are often occupied and defended by two individuals, generally of different age. One bird tends to be more active in territory defence than the other. Defence involves patrolling, vocal duels, and chases. Birds sally for insects but also eat large quantities of fruit.

  7. Ecology and behaviour of the Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum, Tyrannidae in winter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.; Adams, N.J.; Slotow, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    The Alder Flycatcher Empidonax alnorum (Tyrannidae) winters from Colombia and Venezuela, south to northern Argentina. We studied the species in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru. In this area the species occupies riparian zones along lowland meander rivers as well as adjacent transition zone forest in the floodplain. These habitats have a number of age-related longitudinal zones (parallel to the river margin) that are short term (I-2 year) transitory stages in the succession to floodplain forest. The fast growing plant species that make up these habitats are suitable for commercial harvest for paper pulp. We examined habitat use of the species in an attempt to identify the effects of such harvest and resulting habitat loss on these birds. The Alder Flycatcher favours two longitudinal zones where it establishes territories. The territories may be long-term or transitory, and are often occupied and defended by two individuals, generally of different age. One bird tends to be more active in territory defence than the other. Defence involves patrolling, vocal duels, and chases. Birds sally for insects but also eat large quantities of fruit.

  8. Winter behavior and ecology of the Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) in Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    The winter ecology and behavior of Alder Flycatchers (Empidonax alnorum) were studied along the Manu, a white-water meander river in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru during October and November, 1993 to 1997. The birds occupied territories in primary-succession habitats on growing point bars. They were most common in mixed stands of Tessaria integrifolia (Asteraceae) and Gynerium sagittatum (Gramineaceae) interspersed with bare sand areas. The uneven height of the Tessaria canopy, which resulted in openings in the vegetation large enough for the birds to flycatch, was an important habitat feature. Birds obtained insects, which formed about 96% of the diet, by aerial hawking (91%), perch gleaning (6%), and hover gleaning (3%). They also fed on fruit. Territory sizes ranged from 0.04 to 0.25 ha. Of nine territories that we observed closely, six were occupied by two birds each, two by one bird each, and one by three birds. Every territory had one dominant individual who was primarily responsible for territory defense; the other birds were associates. Vocalizations given included the fee-bee-o song, a two-syllable song, and the pit note, which are also given on the breeding grounds. A series of pits given increasingly rapidly signaled a territorial interaction. In aggressive encounters, the birds (1) interacted vocally, remaining on their territories and counter calling or exchanging agitated calls; (2) moved toward a common territorial boundary and engaged in a vocal duel; or (3) the dominant chased intruders out of the territory. Chases were most common when a wave of new birds entered the area. Dominant birds, which sang the full song, were probably adult males. Immature males do not sing a full song, and females are not known to sing in nature. Associate individuals were likely females or young males.

  9. Winter behavior and ecology of the Alder Flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) in Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    The winter ecology and behavior of Alder Flycatchers (Empidonax alnorum) were studied along the Manu, a white-water meander river in Manu National Park, Madre de Dios, Peru?? during October and November, 1993 to 1997. The birds occupied territories in primary-succession habitats on growing point bars. They were most common in mixed stands of Tessaria integrifolia (Asteraceae) and Gynerium sagittatum (Gramineaceae) interspersed with bare sand areas. The uneven height of the Tessaria canopy, which resulted in openings in the vegetation large enough for the birds to flycatch, was an important habitat feature. Birds obtained insects, which formed about 96% of the diet, by aerial hawking (91%), perch gleaning (6%), and hover gleaning (3%). They also fed on fruit. Territory sizes ranged from 0.04 to 0.25 ha. Of nine territories that we observed closely, six were occupied by two birds each, two by one bird each, and one by three birds. Every territory had one dominant individual who was primarily responsible for territory defense; the other birds were associates. Vocalizations given included the fee-bee-o song, a two-syllable song, nd the pit note, which are also given on the breeding grounds. A series of pits given increasingly rapidly signaled a territorial interaction. In aggressive encounters, the birds (1) interacted vocally, remaining on their territories and counter calling or exchanging agitated calls; (2) moved toward a common territorial boundary and engaged in a vocal duel; or (3) the dominant chased intruders out of the territory. Chases were most common when a wave of new birds entered the area. Dominant birds, which sang the full song, were probably adult males. Immature males do not sing a full song, and females are not known to sing in nature. Associate individuals were likely females or young males. ?? The Neotropical Ornithological Society.

  10. Geographic variation in the plumage coloration of willow flycatchers Empidonax traillii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben H.; Sogge, Mark K.; Koronkiewicz, Thomas J.; McLeod, Mary Anne; Theimer, Tad C.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to identify distinct taxonomic groups of birds (species, subspecies, geographic races) can advance ecological research efforts by determining connectivity between the non-breeding and breeding grounds for migrant species, identifying the origin of migrants, and helping to refine boundaries between subspecies or geographic races. Multiple methods are available to identify taxonomic groups (e.g., morphology, genetics), and one that has played an important role for avian taxonomists over the years is plumage coloration. With the advent of electronic devices that can quickly and accurately quantify plumage coloration, the potential of using coloration as an identifier for distinct taxonomic groups, even when differences are subtle, becomes possible. In this study, we evaluated the degree to which plumage coloration differs among the four subspecies of the willow flycatcher Empidonax traillii, evaluated sources of variation, and considered the utility of plumage coloration to assign subspecies membership for individuals of unknown origin. We used a colorimeter to measure plumage coloration of 374 adult willow flycatchers from 29 locations across their breeding range in 2004 and 2005. We found strong statistical differences among the mean plumage coloration values of the four subspecies; however, while individuals tended to group around their respective subspecies' mean color value, the dispersion of individuals around such means overlapped. Mean color values for each breeding site of the three western subspecies clustered together, but the eastern subspecies' color values were dispersed among the other subspecies, rather than distinctly clustered. Additionally, sites along boundaries showed evidence of intergradation and intermediate coloration patterns. We evaluated the predictive power of colorimeter measurements on flycatchers by constructing a canonical discriminant model to predict subspecies origin of migrants passing through the southwestern U

  11. Preliminary Risk Assessment of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, A.F.; Gonzales, G.J.; Bennett, K.D.; Mullen, M.A.; Foxx, T.S.

    1998-10-01

    The southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) is the fourth threatened or endangered species to undergo a preliminary assessment for estimating potential risk from environmental contaminants at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The assessments are being conducted as part of a three-year project to develop a habitat management plan for threatened and endangered species and species of concern at the Laboratory. For the preliminary assessment, estimated doses were compared against toxicity reference values to generate hazard indices (HIs). This assessment included a measure of cumulative effects from multiple contaminants (radionuclides, metals, and organic chemicals) to 100 simulated nest sites located within flycatcher potential habitat. Sources of contaminant values were 10,000-ft{sup 2} grid cells within an Ecological Exposure Unit (EEU). This EEU was estimated around the potential habitat and was based on the maximum home range for the fly catcher identified in the scientific literature. The tools used included a custom FORTRAN program, ECORSK5, and a geographic information system. Food consumption and soil ingestion contaminant pathways were addressed in the assessment. Using a four-category risk evaluation, HI results indicate no appreciable impact is expected to the southwestern willow flycatcher. Information on risk by specific geographical location was generated, which can be used to manage contaminated areas, flycatcher habitat, facility siting, and/or facility operations in order to maintain low levels of risk from contaminants.

  12. Winter distribution of willow flycatcher subspecies (Distribución Invernal de las Subespecies de Empidonax traillii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben H.; Unitt, Philip; Sogge, Mark K.; Whitfield, Mary; Keim, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Documenting how different regions across a species' breeding and nonbreeding range are linked via migratory movements is the first step in understanding how events in one region can influence events in others and is critical to identifying conservation threats throughout a migratory animal's annual cycle. We combined two studies that evaluated migratory connectivity in the Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii), one using mitochondrial DNA sequences from 172 flycatchers sampled throughout their winter range, and another which examined morphological characteristics of 68 museum specimens collected in the winter range. Our results indicate that the four subspecies occupy distinct but overlapping regions of the winter range. Connectivity between specific breeding and winter grounds appears to be moderate to strong, with distributions that suggest migration patterns of both the chain and leap-frog types connecting the breeding and nonbreeding grounds. The Pacific lowlands of Costa Rica appear to be a key winter location for the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (E. t. extimus), although other countries in Central America may also be important for the subspecies.

  13. Female-biased sex ratio, polygyny, and persistence in the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kus, Barbara E.; Howell, Scarlett; Wood, Dustin A.

    2017-01-01

    Demographic changes in populations, such as skewed sex ratios, are of concern to conservationists, especially in small populations in which stochastic and other events can produce declines leading to extirpation. We documented a decline in one of the few remaining populations of Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) in southern California, USA, which dropped from 40 to 5 adults between 2000 and 2015. Declines were unequal between sexes (94% for males, 82% for females). Adult sex ratios were female-biased in 10 of 16 yr. The proportion of paired males that were polygynous ranged from 0% to 100%, depending on the ratio of females to males in the adult population. Some males paired with up to 5 females simultaneously. We investigated the role of nestling sex ratio in the female-biased adult sex ratio by using genetic techniques to determine sex from blood samples collected from 162 nestlings in 72 nests from 2002 to 2009. Both population-level and within-brood nestling sex ratios were female-biased, and were not influenced by nest order (first or subsequent), parental mating type (monogamous or polygynous), or year. Disproportionately more females than males were recruited into the breeding population, mirroring nestling and fledgling sex ratios. It thus appears that a skewed nestling sex ratio has contributed to a female-biased adult population, which in turn has influenced mating behavior. We propose that the capacity for polygyny, which generally occurs at low levels in Southwestern Willow Flycatchers, has allowed this population to persist through a decline that might otherwise have resulted in extinction.

  14. A satellite model of Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) breeding habitat and a simulation of potential effects of tamarisk leaf beetles (Diorhabda spp.), southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatten, James R.

    2016-08-08

    The study described in this report represents the first time that a satellite model has been used to identify potential Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) (hereinafter referred to as “flycatcher”) breeding habitat rangewide for 2013–15. Fifty-seven Landsat scenes were required to map the entire range of the flycatcher, encompassing parts of six States and more than 1 billion 30-meter pixels. Predicted flycatcher habitat was summarized in a hierarchical fashion from largest to smallest: regionwide, State, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) management unit, 7.5-minute quadrangle, and critical-habitat reach. The term “predicted habitat” is used throughout this report to distinguish areas the satellite model predicts as suitable flycatcher habitat from what may actually exist on the ground. A rangewide accuracy assessment was done with 758 territories collected in 2014, and change detection was done with yearly habitat maps to identify how and where habitat changed over time. Additionally, effects of tamarisk leaf beetles (Diorhabda spp.) on flycatcher habitat were summarized for the lower Virgin River from 2010 to 2015, and simulations of how tamarisk leaf beetles may affect flycatcher habitat in the lower Colorado and upper Gila Rivers were done for 2015. Model results indicated that the largest areas of predicted flycatcher habitat at elevations below 1,524 meters were in New Mexico and Arizona, areas followed in descending order by California, Texas, Nevada, Utah, and Colorado. By FWS management unit, the largest area of flycatcher habitat during all 3 years were the Middle Rio Grande (New Mexico), followed by the Upper Gila (Arizona and New Mexico) and Middle Gila/San Pedro (Arizona) management units. The area of predicted flycatcher habitat varied considerably in 7.5-minute quadrangles, ranging from 0 to1,398 hectares (ha). Averaged across 3 years, the top three producing quadrangles were Paraje Well (New Mexico), San Marcial

  15. Parasitism, productivity, and population growth: response of Least Bell's Vireos (Vireo bellii pusillus) and Southwestern Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii extimus) to cowbird (Molothrus spp.) control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kus, Barbara E.; Whitfield, Mary J.

    2005-01-01

    Cowbird (Molothrus spp.) control is a major focus of recovery-oriented management of two endangered riparian bird species,the Least Bell's Vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus) and Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus). During the past 20 years, annual trapping of cowbirds at Least Bell's Vireo and Southwestern Willow Flycatcher breeding sites has eliminated or reduced parasitism in comparison with pretrapping rates and, thereby, significantly increased seasonal productivity of nesting pairs. Enhanced productivity, in turn, has resulted in an 8-fold increase in numbers of Least Bell's Vireos; Southwestern Willow Flycatcher abundance, however, has changed little, and at some sites has declined despite cowbird control. Although generally successful by these short-term measures of host population response, cowbird control poses potential negative consequences for long-term recovery of endangered species. As currently employed, cowbird control lacks predetermined biological criteria to trigger an end to the control, making these species' dependence on human intervention open-ended. Prolonged reliance on cowbird control to manage endangered species can shift attention from identifying and managing other factors that limit populations--in particular, habitat availability. On the basis of our analysis of these long-term programs, we suggest that cowbird control be reserved for short-term crisis management and be replaced, when appropriate, by practices emphasizing restoration and maintenance of natural processes on which species depend. /// El manejo orientado hacia la recuperación de dos especies de aves ribereñas Vireo belli pusillus y Empidonax trailli extimus se ha focalizado principalmente en el control de los Molothrus spp parásitos. Durante los pasados 20 años, la captura anual de los Molothrus en las áreas de nidificación de Vireo belli pusillus y Empidonax trailli extimus ha eliminado o reducido el parasitismo en comparación con las tasas

  16. The name of Lawrence's flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    If Lawrence's flycatcher of Grenada, Trinidad, and northern South America is placed in the genus Lathrotriccus with the species euleri, it should be L. flaviventris (Lawrence) or L. euleriflaviventris, depending on rank. If it remains in the genus Empidonax, the specific name should be bolivianus Allen.

  17. Acadian orogen Which Acadian orogen

    SciTech Connect

    Ludman, A. )

    1993-03-01

    The Acadian orogeny is widely viewed as the climactic event in much of the Northern Appalachians, resulting from the closing of one or more ocean basins and the accretion of the Avalonian continent to ancestral North America. Unconformities have traditionally dated the Acadian orogeny as Middle Devonian in the east and Late Middle to Late Devonian in the western part of the orogen. The recent recognition that several post-Acadian'' plutons are actually Late Silurian suggests that the tectonic models are too simplistic; that accretion previously attributed to a Devonian (Acadian) event may have been a two-stage process: Late Silurian (Salinic ) and Acadian sensu stricto; that orogenic activity may have been continuous from Taconian through Acadian'' times. Differences between the records of the Taconic (Ordovician) and Acadian orogenies suggest different plate interactions: near-orthogonal subduction for the former vs transcurrent faulting for the latter as the dominant mechanisms. Distribution of Salinic'' unconformities across the Northern Appalachian orogen in Maine suggests that accretion of Avalon may have been completed by that Silurian event, but faunal provincialities displayed by fossils as young as Early Devonian in terranes bordering the Fredericton Trough argue for later (Devonian) accretion. A further complication is the imprecise knowledge of the extent to which post-Devonian tectonism is responsible for the current terrane configuration in the Northern Appalachians. Alleghenian folding and thrusting is well-established in some areas where post-Acadian (Carboniferous) strata are present, and is now being documented in older rocks in eastern Maine as well: transcurrent faulting as young as post-Mesozoic( ) along the Norumbega Fault Zone; east-directed thrusting involving the Early Devonian Center Pond pluton.

  18. Primary song by a juvenile willow flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sogge, M.K.

    1997-01-01

    The timing of song development in suboscines, in which song appears not to be learned from other adults is poorly known. The Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) is a suboscine with a primary song typically referred to as fitz-bew. I report here an instance of very early singing by a 6-8-wk-old Willow Flycatcher, which sang in an aggressive context in response to a recording of adult flycatcher song. This is exceptionally early development of primary song, even among suboscines. Early song development may assist in the defense of winter territories.

  19. Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Breeding Site and Territory Summary - 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durst, Scott L.; Sogge, Mark K.; Stump, Shay D.; Williams, Sartor O.; Kus, Barbara E.; Sferra, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) is an endangered bird that breeds only in dense riparian habitats in six southwestern states (southern California, extreme southern Nevada, southern Utah, southwestern Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico). Since 1993, hundreds of Southwestern Willow Flycatcher surveys have been conducted each year, and many new flycatcher breeding sites located. This document synthesizes information on all known Southwestern Willow Flycatcher breeding sites. This rangewide data synthesis was designed to meet these objectives: * identify all known Southwestern Willow Flycatcher breeding sites, and * assemble data on population size, location, habitat, and other information for all breeding sites, for as many years as possible, from 1993 through 2006. This report provides data summaries in terms of the number of flycatcher sites and the number of territories.

  20. Winter distribution of willow flycatcher subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, E.H.; Unitt, P.; Sogge, M.K.; Whitfield, M.; Keim, P.

    2011-01-01

    Documenting how different regions across a species' breeding and nonbreeding range are linked via migratory movements is the first step in understanding how events in one region can influence events in others and is critical to identifying conservation threats throughout a migratory animal's annual cycle. We combined two studies that evaluated migratory connectivity in the Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii), one using mitochondrial DNA sequences from 172 flycatchers sampled throughout their winter range, and another which examined morphological characteristics of 68 museum specimens collected in the winter range. Our results indicate that the four subspecies occupy distinct but overlapping regions of the winter range. Connectivity between specific breeding and winter grounds appears to be moderate to strong, with distributions that suggest migration patterns of both the chain and leap-frog types connecting the breeding and nonbreeding grounds. The Pacific lowlands of Costa Rica appear to be a key winter location for the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (E. t. extimus), although other countries in Central America may also be important for the subspecies. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  1. Willow Flycatcher nonbreeding territory defense behavior in Costa Rica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sogge, M.K.; Koronkiewicz, T.J.; van Riper, Charles; Durst, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    We studied the intraspecific territorial defense behavior of wintering Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) in Costa Rica using a randomized playback experiment that exposed male and female birds to recordings of Willow Flycatcher songs and calls, Lesser Ground Cuckoo (Morococcyx erythropygius) vocalizations, and random noise. Flycatchers of both sexes responded most strongly to simulated conspecific territory intrusion, and the agonistic behaviors that we observed were similar to those seen during natural intraspecific encounters in winter. Both males and females engaged in song and aggressive behaviors in defense of territories, and there was no significant difference between the sexes in scored agonistic responses. The similarity between the sexes in intraspecific territorial defense behaviors and aggressiveness may account for both sexes of flycatchers using the same habitats at our study sites in Costa Rica, and wintering females defending territories against males. The Willow Flycatcher, a sexually monomorphic species, differs in this way from a number of sexually dimorphic passerines, in which behaviorally dominant males occur in more optimal winter habitats. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2007.

  2. Nestling sex ratios in the southwestern willow flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, E.H.; Sogge, M.K.; McCarthey, Tracy; Keim, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Using molecular-genetic techniques, we determined the gender of 202 Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) nestlings from 95 nests sampled over a five-year period. Overall nestling sex ratio did not vary significantly from 50:50 among years, by clutch order, or by mating strategy (monogamous vs. polygamous pairings). However, we did observe significant differences among the four sites sampled, with sex ratios biased either toward males or females at the different sites. Given the small population sizes and geographic isolation of many of the endangered subspecies' breeding populations, sex-ratio differences may have localized negative impacts.

  3. Nestling sex ratio in the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, E.H.; Sogge, M.K.; McCarthey, T.D.; Keim, P.

    2002-01-01

    Using molecular-genetic techniques, we determined the gender of 202 Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) nestlings from 95 nests sampled over a five-year period. Overall nestling sex ratio did not vary significantly from 50:50 among years, by clutch order, or by mating strategy (monogamous vs. polygamous pairings). However, we did observe significant differences among the four sites sampled, with sex ratios biased either toward males or females at the different sites. Given the small population sizes and geographic isolation of many of the endangered subspecies' breeding populations, sex-ratio differences may have localized negative impacts. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2002.

  4. Southwestern Willow Flycatcher Breeding Site and Territory Summary - 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durst, Scott L.; Sogge, Mark K.; Stump, Shay D.; Walker, Hira A.; Kus, Barbara E.; Sferra, Susan J.

    2008-01-01

    The Southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus; hereafter references to willow flycatcher and flycatcher refer to E.t. extimus, except where specifically noted) is an endangered bird that breeds only in dense riparian habitats in parts of six Southwestern states (Arizona, New Mexico, southern California, extreme southern Nevada, southern Utah, and southwestern Colorado). Since 1993, hundreds of Southwestern willow flycatcher surveys have been conducted each year, and many new flycatcher breeding sites located. This document synthesizes the most current information available on all known Southwestern willow flycatcher breeding sites. This rangewide data synthesis was designed to meet two objectives: (1) identify all known Southwestern willow flycatcher breeding sites and (2) assemble data to estimate population size, location, habitat, and other information for all breeding sites, for as many years as possible, from 1993 through 2007. This report provides data summaries in terms of the number of flycatcher sites and the number of territories. When interpreting and using this information, it must be kept in mind that a 'site' is a geographic location where one or more willow flycatchers establishes a territory. Sites with unpaired territorial males are considered breeding sites, even if no nesting attempts were documented. A site is often a discrete patch of riparian habitat but may also be a cluster of riparian patches; there is no standardized definition for site, and its use varies within and among states. For example, five occupied habitat patches along a 10-km stretch of river might be considered five different sites in one state but only a single site in another state. This lack of standardization makes comparisons based on site numbers problematic. Researchers for this report generally deferred to statewide summary documents or to local managers and researchers when delineating a site for inclusion in the database. However, to avoid inflating

  5. Available data support protection of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher under the Endangered Species Act

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theimer, Tad C.; Smith, Aaron D.; Mahoney, Sean M.; Ironside, Kirsten E.

    2016-01-01

    Zink (2015) argued there was no evidence for genetic, morphological, or ecological differentiation between the federally endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) and other Willow Flycatcher subspecies. Using the same data, we show there is a step-cline in both the frequency of a mtDNA haplotype and in plumage variation roughly concordant with the currently recognized boundary between E. t. extimus and E. t adastus, the subspecies with which it shares the longest common boundary. The geographical pattern of plumage variation is also concordant with previous song analyses differentiating those 2 subspecies and identified birds in one low-latitude, high-elevation site in Arizona as the northern subspecies. We also demonstrate that the ecological niche modeling approach used by Zink yields the same result whether applied to the 2 flycatcher subspecies or to 2 unrelated species, E. t. extimus and Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia). As a result, any interpretation of those results as evidence for lack of ecological niche differentiation among Willow Flycatcher subspecies would also indicate no differentiation among recognized species and would therefore be an inappropriate standard for delineating subspecies. We agree that many analytical techniques now available to examine genetic, morphological, and ecological differentiation would improve our understanding of the distinctness (or lack thereof) of Willow Flycatcher subspecies, but we argue that currently available evidence supports protection of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher under the Endangered Species Act.

  6. Reproductive ecology of Dusky Flycatchers in western Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.

    1993-01-01

    Breeding ecology of Dusky Flycatchers (Empidonax oberholseri) was studied in western Montana from May-August 1974. Dusky Flycatchers were monogamous and single-brooded although some pairs made renesting attempts after first nests failed. Length of the reproductive cycle for first nesting attempts, from arrival on the breeding grounds to fledging, was about 70 days. All nests were placed in shrubs, primarily ninebark (Physocarpus malvaceus) and Rocky Mountain maple (Acer glabrum), and were an average of 150 cm above the ground. Females incubated a clutch with an average of 4.0 eggs for 15-16 days, and the average nestling period was 17.5 days. Both sexes fed nestlings and fledglings, but only females brooded nestlings. Egg survival was 63.8%, hatching success was 95.4%, and nestling survival was 61.9% for an overall probability of 0.376 percent that an egg produced a fledgling. Predation was the major cause of nest failure. Dusky Flycatchers reared an average of 1.9 fledglings/pair.

  7. The ecology of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher in central Arizona - A 10-year synthesis report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben H.; Sogge, Mark K.; Durst, Scott L.; Theimer, Tad C.; Hatten, James R.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND From 1996 to 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a demographic study of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) in Arizona in collaboration with the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD). The study was begun the year following the listing of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher as an endangered species. At the time of the listing, very little was known about the biology and threats to the flycatcher, and one of the main objectives of the study was to gather detailed long-term information on the biology of the flycatcher. This report is organized into eight chapters. Following the introductory chapter, we deal with specific aspects of flycatcher ecology and habitat use in each of six separate chapters. We end with a concluding chapter that synthesizes information into broad topical themes that address key management issues. Each of the core chapters (chapters 2 through 7) conclude with a list of management considerations derived from the findings of the respective chapter.

  8. Elucidating spatially explicit behavioral landscapes in the Willow Flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakian, Amanda V.; Sullivan, Kimberly A.; Paxton, Eben H.

    2012-01-01

    Animal resource selection is a complex, hierarchical decision-making process, yet resource selection studies often focus on the presence and absence of an animal rather than the animal's behavior at resource use locations. In this study, we investigate foraging and vocalization resource selection in a population of Willow Flycatchers, Empidonax traillii adastus, using Bayesian spatial generalized linear models. These models produce “behavioral landscapes” in which space use and resource selection is linked through behavior. Radio telemetry locations were collected from 35 adult Willow Flycatchers (n = 14 males, n = 13 females, and n = 8 unknown sex) over the 2003 and 2004 breeding seasons at Fish Creek, Utah. Results from the 2-stage modeling approach showed that habitat type, perch position, and distance from the arithmetic mean of the home range (in males) or nest site (in females) were important factors influencing foraging and vocalization resource selection. Parameter estimates from the individual-level models indicated high intraspecific variation in the use of the various habitat types and perch heights for foraging and vocalization. On the population level, Willow Flycatchers selected riparian habitat over other habitat types for vocalizing but used multiple habitat types for foraging including mountain shrub, young riparian, and upland forest. Mapping of observed and predicted foraging and vocalization resource selection indicated that the behavior often occurred in disparate areas of the home range. This suggests that multiple core areas may exist in the home ranges of individual flycatchers, and demonstrates that the behavioral landscape modeling approach can be applied to identify spatially and behaviorally distinct core areas. The behavioral landscape approach is applicable to a wide range of animal taxa and can be used to improve our understanding of the spatial context of behavior and resource selection.

  9. Describing Willow Flycatcher habitats: scale perspectives and gender differences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    We compared habitat characteristics of nest sites (female-selected sites) and song perch sites (male-selected sites) with those of sites unused by Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) at three different scales of vegetation measurement: (1) microplot (central willow [Salix spp.] bush and four adjacent bushes); (2) mesoplot (0.07 ha); and, (3) macroplot (flycatcher territory size). Willow Flycatchers exhibited vegetation preferences at all three scales. Nest sites were distinguished by high willow density and low variability in willow patch size and bush height. Song perch sites were characterized by large central shrubs, low central shrub vigor, and high variability in shrub size. Unused sites were characterized by greater distances between willows and willow patches, less willow coverage, and a smaller riparian zone width than either nest or song perch sites. At all scales, nest sites were situated farther from unused sites in multivariate habitat space than were song perch sites, suggesting (1) a correspondence among scales in their ability to describe Willow Flycatcher habitat, and (2) females are more discriminating in habitat selection than males. Microhabitat differences between male-selected (song perch) and female-selected (nest) sites were evident at the two smaller scales; at the finest scale, the segregation in habitat space between male-selected and female-selected sites was greater than that between male-selected and unused sites. Differences between song perch and nest sites were not apparent at the scale of flycatcher territory size, possibly due to inclusion of (1) both nest and song perch sites, (2) defended, but unused habitat, and/or (3) habitat outside of the territory, in larger scale analyses. The differences between nest and song perch sites at the finer scales reflect their different functions (e.g., nest concealment and microclimatic requirements vs. advertising and territorial defense, respectively), and suggest that the exclusive use

  10. Injury due to leg bands in willow flycatchers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, J.A.; Klus, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    We report an apparently unusually high incidence of leg injury in Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) as a result of banding and color banding. Color bands and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) bands applied to Willow Flycatchers from 1988-1995 resulted in an overall leg injury rate of 9.6% to birds returning to our study areas in subsequent years. Most injuries occurred on legs with only color band(s) (58.3%) or on legs with both a USFWS band and a color band (35%); only 6.7% of injuries (4/60) were due to USFWS bands alone, yielding an overall USFWS band injury rate of only 0.6%. Injuries ranged from severe (swollen, bleeding legs; a missing foot) to relatively minor (irritations on the tarsus). Amputation of the foot occurred in 33.9% of the cases. Return rates of adult injured birds in the year(s) following injury were significantly lower than for the population at large.

  11. Vocal frequency change reflects different responses to anthropogenic noise in two suboscine tyrant flycatchers

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Clinton D.; Ortega, Catherine P.; Cruz, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise is prevalent across the globe and can exclude birds from otherwise suitable habitat and negatively influence fitness; however, the mechanisms responsible for species' responses to noise are not always clear. One effect of noise is a reduction in effective acoustic communication through acoustic masking, yet some urban songbirds may compensate for masking by noise through altering their songs. Whether this vocal flexibility accounts for species persistence in noisy areas is unknown. Here, we investigated the influence of noise on habitat use and vocal frequency in two suboscine flycatchers using a natural experiment that isolated effects of noise from confounding stimuli common to urban habitats. With increased noise exposure, grey flycatcher (Empidonax wrightii) occupancy declined, but vocal frequency did not change. By contrast, ash-throated flycatcher (Myiarchus cinerascens) occupancy was uninfluenced by noise, but individuals in areas with greater noise amplitudes vocalized at a higher frequency, although the increase (≈200 kHz) may only marginally improve communication and may represent a secondary effect from increased vocal amplitude. Even so, the different flycatcher behavioural responses suggest that signal change may help some species persist in noisy areas and prompt important questions regarding which species will cope with an increasingly noisy world. PMID:21123268

  12. A habitat overlap analysis derived from maxent for tamarisk and the south-western willow flycatcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, Patricia; Evangelista, Paul; Kumar, Sunil; Graham, James; Flather, Curtis; Stohlgren, Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Biologic control of the introduced and invasive, woody plant tamarisk ( Tamarix spp, saltcedar) in south-western states is controversial because it affects habitat of the federally endangered South-western Willow Flycatcher ( Empidonax traillii extimus). These songbirds sometimes nest in tamarisk where floodplain-level invasion replaces native habitats. Biologic control, with the saltcedar leaf beetle ( Diorhabda elongate), began along the Virgin River, Utah, in 2006, enhancing the need for comprehensive understanding of the tamarisk-flycatcher relationship. We used maximum entropy (Maxent) modeling to separately quantify the current extent of dense tamarisk habitat (>50% cover) and the potential extent of habitat available for E. traillii extimus within the studied watersheds. We used transformations of 2008 Landsat Thematic Mapper images and a digital elevation model as environmental input variables. Maxent models performed well for the flycatcher and tamarisk with Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) values of 0.960 and 0.982, respectively. Classification of thresholds and comparison of the two Maxent outputs indicated moderate spatial overlap between predicted suitable habitat for E. traillii extimus and predicted locations with dense tamarisk stands, where flycatcher habitat will potentially change flycatcher habitats. Dense tamarisk habitat comprised 500 km2 within the study area, of which 11.4% was also modeled as potential habitat for E. traillii extimus. Potential habitat modeled for the flycatcher constituted 190 km2, of which 30.7% also contained dense tamarisk habitat. Results showed that both native vegetation and dense tamarisk habitats exist in the study area and that most tamarisk infestations do not contain characteristics that satisfy the habitat requirements of E. traillii extimus. Based on this study, effective biologic control of Tamarix spp. may, in the short term, reduce suitable habitat available to E. traillii extimus, but also has the potential

  13. A Natural History Summary and Survey Protocol for the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sogge, Mark K.; ,; Ahlers, Darrell; ,; Sferra, Susan J.; ,

    2010-01-01

    The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) has been the subject of substantial research, monitoring, and management activity since it was listed as an endangered species in 1995. When proposed for listing in 1993, relatively little was known about the flycatcher's natural history, and there were only 30 known breeding sites supporting an estimated 111 territories rangewide (Sogge and others, 2003a). Since that time, thousands of presence/absences surveys have been conducted throughout the historical range of the flycatcher, and many studies of its natural history and ecology have been completed. As a result, the ecology of the flycatcher is much better understood than it was just over a decade ago. In addition, we have learned that the current status of the flycatcher is better than originally thought: as of 2007, the population was estimated at approximately 1,300 territories distributed among approximately 280 breeding sites (Durst and others, 2008a). Concern about the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher on a rangewide scale was brought to focus by Unitt (1987), who described declines in flycatcher abundance and distribution throughout the Southwest. E. t. extimus populations declined during the 20th century, primarily because of habitat loss and modification from activities, such as dam construction and operation, groundwater pumping, water diversions, and flood control. In 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) designated the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher as a candidate category 1 species (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1991). In July 1993, the USFWS proposed to list E. t. extimus as an endangered species and to designate critical habitat under the Act (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1993). A final rule listing E. t. extimus as endangered was published in February 1995 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1995); critical habitat was designated in 1997 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1997). The USFWS Service released a Recovery Plan for

  14. Comprehensive Base Realignment/Closure and Fort Belvoir Development: Environmental Impact Statement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    Projects. In addition to workshop plans and audits, papers on the printing industry, blast grit and the paper and pulp industry are being prepared...tract of land on which kennels, horses, poultry , or livestock are maintained regardless of the area of the tract. (b) "Applicant" means a person who... olive -sided flycatcher Conotopus borealisU eastern wood-peewee Conotopus virens yellow-bellied flycatcher Empidonax fla viventris acadian flycatcher

  15. Territoriality, site fidelity, and survivorship of willow flycatchers wintering in Costa Rica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koronkiewicz, T.J.; Sogge, M.K.; van Riper, Charles; Paxton, E.H.

    2006-01-01

    We studied wintering Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) in two seasonal freshwater wetland habitats in northwestern Costa Rica during five boreal winters, to determine habitat occupancy, overwinter and between-year site and territory fidelity, and the degree to which the sexes maintain and defend winter territories. Both males and females used agonistic displays, song, and other vocalizations to maintain and defend mutually exclusive winter territories. Males were generally more abundant than females, but this varied by site and year. There was no significant difference in male and female territory size, nor any indication of sexual habitat segregation. Similarity in morphology and aggressiveness between the sexes may account for the lack of habitat segregation and the ability of females to maintain territories at wintering sites. Each year, 80%-92% of banded flycatchers that were present in midwinter remained at the site until late winter; of these, 86%-100% of individuals maintained the same territories throughout the entire period. We also observed nonterritorial floaters that subsequently established and held winter territories. Between-year site fidelity averaged 68%, and almost all returning birds established territories with boundaries similar to the previous year. Between-year apparent survivorship estimates ranged annually from 54%-72%, with no difference between sites but weak support for higher survivorship of males compared to females. Values for winter site and territory fidelity were generally higher than those reported for other species and for Willow Flycatchers on the breeding grounds; between-year survivorship estimates were similar to those reported for breeding flycatchers. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2006.

  16. Acadian dextral transpression in western Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, S.G. ); Marvinney, R.G. )

    1993-03-01

    Two groups of faults characterize the Acadian tectonic regime of northwestern Maine. The first group is largely dextral and reverse in nature and is represented by the Deep Pond (DPF) and Thrasher Peaks (TPF) faults in the Jackman area. The second is reverse in nature, and is represented by three faults in the Caucomgomoc Lake area. Taken together this fault system represents an Acadian dextral transpressive regime. Part of this regime includes an 11 km wide by 17 km long horst of Cambrian( ), Ordovician( ) and Late Silurian rocks in the Caucomgomoc Lake area. This horst is a part of a restraining bend. Associated with this bend is a deflection and rotation of the regional fault, fold axis and cleavage pattern. Orientations of these structures generally change from NE-SW in the Jackman area to N-S in the Caucomgomoc area. In westernmost Maine, the DPF and TPF both strike NE-SW, but the strikes rotate to ENE-WSW farther to the east in the Jackman area. The NW-dipping DPF separates Silurian rocks of the Frontenac Fm on the north from Devonian rocks of the Seboomook Group on the south. Foliation associated with Acadian folding dips moderately (30--50 degrees) near the DPF and major folds are overturned and verge toward the SE along its entire length in Maine. This contrasts sharply with the dominant upright, NW-verging folds and sleep foliation which characterizes the Acadian throughout northwestern Maine. The NW-dipping TPF separates Devonian rocks of the Seboomook Group on the north from Precambrian and Ordovician rocks of the Chain Lakes massif and Attean pluton, respectively, on the south. Along the TPF and DPF are kinematic indicators which suggest reverse and dextral components to movement.

  17. Bibliographie Annotee de Linguistique Acadienne (Annotated Bibliography of Acadian Linguistics).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gesner, Edward

    A bibliography of 430 books, journal articles, papers, and other references on Acadian French written in English or French is divided into two principal sections: an annotated bibliography of works focusing on the Acadian French dialect spoken in the Canadian Maritime Provinces, and an unannotated bibliography pertaining to Louisiana Acadian…

  18. A Case for Acadian--The Politics of Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wrenn, Phyllis

    1993-01-01

    Finds in the "Lettres" (1895-98) of Marichette (a Franco-Acadian woman) graphic evidence of the effects of language contact with the socially and economically dominant English on her Franco-Acadian dialect. Explores her penchant for code-switching and relates this aspect of the writer's style to her political commentary. (SR)

  19. A multiscaled model of southwestern willow flycatcher breeding habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatten, J.R.; Paradzick, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The southwestern willow flycatcher (SWFL; Empidonax traillii extimus) is an endangered songbird whose habitat has declined dramatically over the last century. Understanding habitat selection patterns and the ability to identify potential breeding areas for the SWFL is crucial to the management and conservation of this species. We developed a multiscaled model of SWTL breeding habitat with a Geographic Information System (GIS), survey data, GIS variables, and multiple logistic regressions. We obtained presence and absence survey data from a riverine ecosystem and a reservoir delta in south-central Arizona, USA, in 1999. We extracted the GIS variables from satellite imagery and digital elevation models to characterize vegetation and floodplain within the project area. We used multiple logistic regressions within a cell-based (30 X 30 m) modeling environment to (1) determine associations between GIS variables and breeding-site occurrence at different spatial scales (0.09-72 ha), and (2) construct a predictive model. Our best model explained 54% of the variability in breeding-site occurrence with the following variables: vegetation density at the site (0.09 ha), proportion of dense vegetation and variability in vegetation density within a 4.5-ha neighborhood, and amount of floodplain or flat terrain within a 41-ha neighborhood. The density of breeding sites was highest in areas that the model predicted to be most suitable within the project area and at an external test site 200 km away. Conservation efforts must focus on protecting not only occupied patches, but also surrounding riparian forests and floodplain to ensure long-term viability of SWTL. We will use the multiscaled model to map SWTL breeding habitat in Arizona, prioritize future survey effort, and examine changes in habitat abundance and quality over time.

  20. 78 FR 28837 - Acadian Gas Pipeline System; Notice of Petition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... (``SOC'') applicable to its transportation services filed on September 26, 2011 in Docket No. PR11-129-000. Acadian states that the SOC addresses the concerns filed in the September 26, 2011 filing,...

  1. Timing of the Acadian Orogeny in Northern New Hampshire.

    PubMed

    Eusden Jr; Guzofski; Robinson; Tucker

    2000-03-01

    New U-Pb geochronology constrains the timing of the Acadian orogeny in the Central Maine Terrane of northern New Hampshire. Sixteen fractions of one to six grains each of zircon or monazite have been analyzed from six samples: (1) an early syntectonic diorite that records the onset of the Acadian; (2) a schist, a migmatite, and two granites that together record the peak of the Acadian; and (3) a postkinematic pluton that records the end of the Acadian. Zircon from the syntectonic Wamsutta Diorite gives a 207Pb/206Pb age of circa 408 Ma, the time at which the boundary between the deforming orogenic wedge and the foreland basin was in the vicinity of the Presidential Range. This age agrees well with the Emsian position of the northwest migrating Acadian orogenic front and records the beginning of the Acadian in this part of the Central Maine Terrane. We propose a possible Acadian tectonic model that incorporates the geochronologic, structural, and stratigraphic data. Monazite from the schist, migmatite, Bigelow Lawn Granite, and Slide Peak Granite gives 207Pb/206U ages, suggesting the peak of Acadian metamorphism and intrusion of two-mica granites occurred at circa 402-405 Ma, the main pulse of Acadian orogenesis. Previously reported monazite ages from schists that likely record the peak metamorphism in the Central Maine Terrane of New Hampshire and western Maine range from circa 406-384 Ma, with younger ages in southeastern New Hampshire and progressively older ages to the west, north, and northeast. Acadian orogenesis in the Presidential Range had ended by circa 355 Ma, the 207Pb/235U age of monazite from the Peabody River Granite. From 408 to perhaps at least 394 Ma, Acadian orogenesis in the Presidential Range was typical of the tectonic style, dominated by synkinematic metamorphism, seen in central and southern New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. From no earlier than 394 Ma to as late as 355 Ma, the orogenesis was typical of the style in parts of

  2. Timing of the Acadian Orogeny in northern New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eusden, J.D.; Guzofski, C.A.; Robinson, A.C.; Tucker, R.D.

    2000-01-01

    New U-Pb geochronology constrains the timing of the Acadian orogeny in the Central Maine Terrane of northern New Hampshire. Sixteen fractions of one to six grains each of zircon or monazite have been analyzed from six samples: (1) an early syntectonic diorite that records the onset of the Acadian, (2) a schist, a migmatite, and two granites that together record the peak of the Acadian; and (3) a postkinematic pluton that records the end of the Acadian. Zircon from the syntectonic Wamsutta Diorite gives a 207Pb/206Pb age of circa 408 Ma, the time at which the boundary between the deforming orogenic wedge and the foreland basin was in the vicinity of the Presidential Range. This age agrees well with the Emsian position of the northwest migrating Acadian orogenic front and records the beginning of the Acadian in this part of the Central Maine Terrane. We propose a possible Acadian tectonic model that incorporates the geochronologic, structural, and stratigraphic data. Monazite from the schist, migmatite, Bigelow Lawn Granite, and Slide Peak Granite gives 207Pb/206U ages, suggesting the peak of Acadian metamorphism and intrusion of two-mica granites occurred at circa 402-405 Ma, the main pulse of Acadian orogenesis. Previously reported monazite ages from schists that likely record the peak metamorphism in the Central Maine Terrane of New Hampshire and western Maine range from circa 406-384 Ma, with younger ages in southeastern New Hampshire and progressively older ages to the west, north, and northeast. Acadian orogenesis in the Presidential Range had ended by circa 355 Ma, the 207Pb/235U age of monazite from the Peabody River Granite. From 408 to perhaps at least 394 Ma, Acadian orogenesis in the Presidential Range was typical of the tectonic style, dominated by synkinematic metamorphism, seen in central and southern New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Connecticut. From no earlier than 394 Ma to as late as 355 Ma, the orogenesis was typical of the style in parts of

  3. 76 FR 10063 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... Southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) in conjunction with recovery activities throughout... renewed permit to take Southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) in conjunction...

  4. The eastern limit of Acadian high grade metamorphism in northern New England: Implications for the location of the Acadian Suture''

    SciTech Connect

    West, D.P. Jr. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Identifying the eastern limit of Acadian high grade metamorphism in New England is complicated by the presence of pre-Devonian high grade relics, locally intense Late Paleozoic thermal overprints, and post-metamorphic faults. New [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar mineral ages from along the eastern margin of high grade metamorphism in Maine and New Hampshire help delineate the eastern limit of Devonian amphibolite facies metamorphism thereby placing constraints on the location of the Acadian suture. In New Hampshire, Acadian high grade metamorphism extends southeast at least as far as the Campbell Hill fault and perhaps as far as the Flint Hill fault. New [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar hornblende ages and previously published U-Pb monazite ages from the Massabesic Gneiss Complex are Permian indicating high grade Alleghanian metamorphism. New [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar hornblende ages from the Rye Formation, although complicated by excess argon, are considerably older, indicating an earlier Pre-Silurian amphibolite facies metamorphism affected these rocks. North of Portland, [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar hornblende ages east of the Norumbega Fault Zone from high grade rocks of the Casco Bay Group have ages that range from Middle Devonian to Early Carboniferous, consistent with diachronous cooling following Acadian metamorphism. Further northeast, in upper amphibolite facies rocks of the Passagassawakeag Gneiss, new [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar hornblende ages range from 385--395 Ma suggesting that these rocks were also affected by high grade Acadian metamorphism.

  5. Natural and sexual selection against hybrid flycatchers.

    PubMed

    Svedin, Nina; Wiley, Chris; Veen, Thor; Gustafsson, Lars; Qvarnström, Anna

    2008-03-22

    While sexual selection is generally assumed to quickly cause or strengthen prezygotic barriers between sister species, its role in causing postzygotic isolation, through the unattractiveness of intermediate hybrids, is less often examined. Combining 24 years of pedigree data and recently developed species-specific molecular markers from collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (Ficedula hypoleuca) flycatchers and their hybrids, we were able to quantify all key components of fitness. To disentangle the relative role of natural and sexual selection acting on F1 hybrid flycatchers, we estimated various fitness components, which when combined represent the total lifetime reproductive success of F1 hybrids, and then compared the different fitness components of F1 hybrids to that of collared flycatchers. Female hybrid flycatchers are sterile, with natural selection being the selective force involved, but male hybrids mainly experienced a reduction in fitness through sexual selection (decreased pairing success and increased rate of being cuckolded). To disentangle the role of sexual selection against male hybrids from a possible effect of genetic incompatibility (on the rate of being cuckolded), we compared male hybrids with pure-bred males expressing intermediate plumage characters. Given that sexual selection against male hybrids is a result of their intermediate plumage, we expect these two groups of males to have a similar fitness reduction. Alternatively, hybrids have reduced fitness owing to genetic incompatibility, in which case their fitness should be lower than that of the intermediate pure-bred males. We conclude that sexual selection against male hybrids accounts for approximately 75% of the reduction in their fitness. We discuss how natural and sexual selection against hybrids may have different implications for speciation and conclude that reinforcement of reproductive barriers may be more likely when there is sexual selection against hybrids.

  6. Structural and petrologic characteristics of the Taconian-Acadian overprint zone in Massachusetts and Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, T.R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Hames, W.E. . Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Structural and petrologic relationships from two regions of the New England Taconide Zone provide distinction of Taconian and Acadian deformation fabrics and related metamorphisms. In SW Massachusetts, Taconian metamorphism increases eastward from chlorite- to kyanite-grade, with staurolite zone Zr hb plateau ages of [approx]445 Ma. Within the Acadian fibrolite zone, Ar cooling ages are related to a thermal maximum at 390--400Ma, coeval with crenulation cleavage that deforms Taconian fabrics. Taconian and Acadian metamorphic regimes are separated by a 4 km-wide zone in which polymetamorphic assemblages exist but yield consistent Acadian mineral-rim P-T data, and Acadian structures are pervasive. In southern Vermont, the overlap zone is broad ([approx]30 km); undisturbed Taconian Ar K-feldspar cooling ages occur on the west side of the Green Mountain massif. Farther east, Taconian fabric is almost completely obliterated by dynamic Acadian metamorphism, and is truncated and retrograded in areas adjacent to a major Acadian thrust zone. The upper plate rocks, including the Barnard Belt and the Silurian-Devonian sequences (the CVB), do not contain Taconian fabrics, the early Acadian deformations, or retrogression, and are associated with garnet-to-kyanite-grade Acadian metamorphism and a coeval, regionally dominant deformation, both of which are younger than 390Ma and older than 373Ma.

  7. Memoires d'une famille acadienne de Van Buren, Maine (Memoirs of an Acadian Family of Van Buren, Maine).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyr, Marguerite

    These memoirs of an Acadian family present aspects of the cultural history of the Acadians in the St. John River Valley in Maine. The six chapters deal with the following topics: (1) a brief history of the land and the people; (2) the chronicles of a large Acadian family from the time of the arrival of their ancestors from France until the…

  8. Using a remote sensing/GIS model to predict southwestern Willow Flycatcher breeding habitat along the Rio Grande, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatten, James R.; Sogge, Mark K.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus; hereafter SWFL) is a federally endangered bird (USFWS 1995) that breeds in riparian areas in portions of New Mexico, Arizona, southwestern Colorado, extreme southern Utah and Nevada, and southern California (USFWS 2002). Across this range, it uses a variety of plant species as nesting/breeding habitat, but in all cases prefers sites with dense vegetation, high canopy, and proximity to surface water or saturated soils (Sogge and Marshall 2000). As of 2005, the known rangewide breeding population of SWFLs was roughly 1,214 territories, with approximately 393 territories distributed among 36 sites in New Mexico (Durst et al. 2006), primarily along the Rio Grande. One of the key challenges facing the management and conservation of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher is that riparian areas are dynamic, with individual habitat patches subject to cycles of creation, growth, and loss due to drought, flooding, fire, and other disturbances. Former breeding patches can lose suitability, and new habitat can develop within a matter of only a few years, especially in reservoir drawdown zones. Therefore, measuring and predicting flycatcher habitat - either to discover areas that might support SWFLs, or to identify areas that may develop into appropriate habitat - requires knowledge of recent/current habitat conditions and an understanding of the factors that determine flycatcher use of riparian breeding sites. In the past, much of the determination of whether a riparian site is likely to support breeding flycatchers has been based on qualitative criteria (for example, 'dense vegetation' or 'large patches'). These determinations often require on-the-ground field evaluations by local or regional SWFL experts. While this has proven valuable in locating many of the currently known breeding sites, it is difficult or impossible to apply this approach effectively over large geographic areas (for example, the

  9. Geochronologic studies in central New England I: Evidence for pre-Acadian metamorphism in eastern Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Spear, F.S. ); Harrison, T.M. )

    1989-02-01

    {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar geochronology on hornblendes from central New England reveals a Grenvillian cooling age (1026 {plus minus} 12 Ma) along the eastern margin of the Green Mountain massif, Acadian ages in east-central Vermont (350-397 Ma) and along the Bronson Hill anticlinorium in New Hampshire and Massachusetts (407-280 Ma), and Late Ordovician to Silurian ages (440-451 Ma) along a belt in eastern Vermont and central Massachusetts. These ages indicate a minimal Acadian overprint in eastern Vermont, the highest degree of Acadian overprint being located along the axis of the domes in the Connecticut Valley synclinorium. These data suggest that the formation of the domes occurred in the Acadian. Moreover, the Late Ordovician to Silurian cooling ages in eastern Vermont suggest that much of the metamorphic mineralogy and fabric observed in the Connecticut Valley synclinorium may be pre-Silurian in age.

  10. Variation in habitat use by juvenile Acadian redfish, Sebastes fasciatus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auster, P.J.; Lindholm, J.; Valentine, P.C.

    2003-01-01

    A basic paradigm in behavioral ecology is that organisms expand their distribution as preferred sites become saturated with individuals that reduce the availability of resources (e.g., shelter, prey) on a per capita basis. Previous fish community studies at Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary have shown that juvenile Acadian redfish Sebastes fasciatus (20 cm TL) also occurred in dense cerianthid habitats. Two explanations for these distributions can be advanced. The simplest is that redfish use both boulder and cerianthid habitats on an encounter basis, regardless of habitat saturation or predation pressure. Alternatively, boulder reefs serve as recruitment habitats and cerianthid habitats serve as a conduit for redfish moving away from saturated boulder reef sites, essentially serving as elements of a 'redfish pump'.

  11. Migration of the Acadian Orogen and foreland basin across the Northern Appalachians of Maine and adjacent areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Dwight Culver; Tucker, Robert D.; Lux, Daniel R.; Harris, Anita G.; McGregor, D. Colin

    2000-01-01

    The timing of Acadian orogenesis in Maine is reassessed, on the basis of a new Silurian-Devonian time scale, new U/Pb and 40Ar/39Ar ages of Acadian plutons, new conodont and palynomorph ages of strata that constrain the age of deformation, and published information. This analysis shows that the Acadian deformation front migrated some 240 km (present distance) from southeast to northwest during a span of about 40 million years from Late Silurian to Middle Devonian time.

  12. DEVELOPING AND INDEX OF BENTHIC CONDITION FOR THE ACADIAN BIOGEOGRAPHIC PROVINCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Coastal Assessment has sampled benthic assemblages each summer since 2000 in coastal areas of the U.S. Acadian Biogeographic Province (tip of Cape Cod to Canadian border). We are developing a multimetric index to be used as an indicator of benthic condition. During...

  13. Song discrimination by nestling collared flycatchers during early development

    PubMed Central

    Söderberg, Axel; Wheatcroft, David; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Pre-zygotic isolation is often maintained by species-specific signals and preferences. However, in species where signals are learnt, as in songbirds, learning errors can lead to costly hybridization. Song discrimination expressed during early developmental stages may ensure selective learning later in life but can be difficult to demonstrate before behavioural responses are obvious. Here, we use a novel method, measuring changes in metabolic rate, to detect song perception and discrimination in collared flycatcher embryos and nestlings. We found that nestlings as early as 7 days old respond to song with increased metabolic rate, and, by 9 days old, have increased metabolic rate when listening to conspecific when compared with heterospecific song. This early discrimination between songs probably leads to fewer heterospecific matings, and thus higher fitness of collared flycatchers living in sympatry with closely related species. PMID:27405379

  14. Demographic Divergence History of Pied Flycatcher and Collared Flycatcher Inferred from Whole-Genome Re-sequencing Data

    PubMed Central

    Nadachowska-Brzyska, Krystyna; Burri, Reto; Olason, Pall I.; Kawakami, Takeshi; Smeds, Linnéa; Ellegren, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Profound knowledge of demographic history is a prerequisite for the understanding and inference of processes involved in the evolution of population differentiation and speciation. Together with new coalescent-based methods, the recent availability of genome-wide data enables investigation of differentiation and divergence processes at unprecedented depth. We combined two powerful approaches, full Approximate Bayesian Computation analysis (ABC) and pairwise sequentially Markovian coalescent modeling (PSMC), to reconstruct the demographic history of the split between two avian speciation model species, the pied flycatcher and collared flycatcher. Using whole-genome re-sequencing data from 20 individuals, we investigated 15 demographic models including different levels and patterns of gene flow, and changes in effective population size over time. ABC provided high support for recent (mode 0.3 my, range <0.7 my) species divergence, declines in effective population size of both species since their initial divergence, and unidirectional recent gene flow from pied flycatcher into collared flycatcher. The estimated divergence time and population size changes, supported by PSMC results, suggest that the ancestral species persisted through one of the glacial periods of middle Pleistocene and then split into two large populations that first increased in size before going through severe bottlenecks and expanding into their current ranges. Secondary contact appears to have been established after the last glacial maximum. The severity of the bottlenecks at the last glacial maximum is indicated by the discrepancy between current effective population sizes (20,000–80,000) and census sizes (5–50 million birds) of the two species. The recent divergence time challenges the supposition that avian speciation is a relatively slow process with extended times for intrinsic postzygotic reproductive barriers to evolve. Our study emphasizes the importance of using genome-wide data to

  15. What Do Owls, Salamanders, Flycatchers and Cuckoos Have In Common?

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrave, Maria A.

    2016-09-27

    This is an article from the Los Alamos Living magazine. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on a beautiful and unique landscape that provides important protected habitat to many species, including a few that are federally-listed as threatened or endangered. These species are the Jemez Mountains Salamander, the Mexican Spotted Owl, the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher, the Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse. Part of the job of the Laboratory's wildlife biologists is to survey for these species each year and determine what actions need to be taken if they are found.

  16. A New Species of Muscicapa Flycatcher from Sulawesi, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Ding Li; Prawiradilaga, Dewi M.; Putra, Dadang Dwi; Round, Philip D.; Rheindt, Frank E.

    2014-01-01

    The Indonesian island of Sulawesi, a globally important hotspot of avian endemism, has been relatively poorly studied ornithologically, to the extent that several new bird species from the region have been described to science only recently, and others have been observed and photographed, but never before collected or named to science. One of these is a new species of Muscicapa flycatcher that has been observed on several occasions since 1997. We collected two specimens in Central Sulawesi in 2012, and based on a combination of morphological, vocal and genetic characters, we describe the new species herein, more than 15 years after the first observations. The new species is superficially similar to the highly migratory, boreal-breeding Gray-streaked Flycatcher Muscicapa griseisticta, which winters in Sulawesi; however, the new species differs strongly from M. griseisticta in several morphological characters, song, and mtDNA. Based on mtDNA, the new species is only distantly related to M. griseisticta, instead being a member of the M. dauurica clade. The new species is evidently widely distributed in lowland and submontane forest throughout Sulawesi. This wide distribution coupled with the species' apparent tolerance of disturbed habitats suggests it is not currently threatened with extinction. PMID:25419968

  17. One-dimensional thermal modelling of Acadian metamorphism in southern Vermont, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, T.R.; Tracy, R.J.

    2000-01-01

    One-dimensional thermal (1DT) modelling of an Acadian (Devonian) tectonothermal regime in southern Vermont, USA, used measured metamorphic pressures and temperatures and estimated metamorphic cooling ages based on published thermobarometric and geochronological studies to constrain thermal and tectonic input parameters. The area modelled lies within the Vermont Sequence of the Acadian orogen and includes: (i) a western domain containing garnet-grade pre-Silurian metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks from the eastern flank of an Acadian composite dome structure (Rayponda-Sadawga Dome); and (ii) an eastern domain containing similar, but staurolite- or kyanite-grade, rocks from the western flank of a second dome structure (Athens Dome), approximately 10 km farther east. Using reasonable input parameters based on regional geological, petrological and geochronological constraints, the thermal modelling produced plausible P-T paths, and temperature-time (T-t) and pressure-time (P-t) curves. Information extracted from P-T-t modelling includes values of maximum temperature and pressure on the P-T paths, pressure at maximum temperature, predicted Ar closure ages for hornblende, muscovite and K-feldspar, and integrated exhumation and cooling rates for segments of the cooling history. The results from thermal modelling are consistent with independently obtained pressure, temperature and Ar cooling age data on regional metamorphism in southern Vermont. Modelling results provide some important bounding limits on the physical conditions during regional metamorphism, and indicate that the pressure contemporaneous with the attainment of peak temperature was probably as much as 2.5 kbar lower than the actual maximum pressure experienced by rocks along various particle paths. In addition, differences in peak metamorphic grade (garnet-grade versus staurolite-grade or kyanite-grade) and peak temperature for rocks initially loaded to similar crustal depths, differences in calculated

  18. Timing of middle Paleozoic (Acadian) metamorphism in the southern Appalachians: K-Ar studies in the Talladega belt, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Kish, S.A. )

    1990-07-01

    The Talladega belt of Alabama and Georgia is located at the southernmost exposed part of the southern Appalachian orogen and is one of the westernmost metamorphic terranes in this part of the orogen. The presence of the Lower Devonian Jemison Chert of the Talladega Group provides a maximum age for the timing of greenschist facies metamorphism and penetrative slaty cleavage formation in this terrane. Six slate collected form upper Precambrian( )-Lower Cambrian, and Silurian( )-Devonian rocks of the Talladega belt have an average K-Ar age of 399 {plus minus} 17 Ma. This age is interpreted to be the approximate time of regional greenschist facies metamorphism. The timing of metamorphism in the Talladega belt is similar to the age of the Acadian orogeny in the Maritime and northern Appalachians. Unlike the accreted nature of the Acadian terranes in the northern Appalachians, the Talladega belt appears to have been part of the early to middle Paleozoic cratonic margin of North America. The results of this study indicate that Acadian dynamothermal events extended into parts of the Laurentian margin in the southern Appalachians. Paleozoic igneous activity in the southern Appalachians was less extensive compared with the voluminous Acadian plutonism of the northern Appalachians; however, synkinematic to postkinematic Devonian plutons are present in the central and western parts of the orogen.

  19. Genealogy, natural history, and phenotype of Alström syndrome in a large Acadian kindred and three additional families.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J D; Ludman, M D; Shea, S E; Salisbury, S R; Willi, S M; LaRoche, R G; Nishina, P M

    1997-12-12

    We describe a large Acadian kindred including 8 Alstrom Syndrome (AS) patients, with an age range of 4 to 26 at the time of clinical assessment. The affected subjects come from 5 nuclear families within this kindred. The phenotype includes early childhood retinopathy, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, truncal obesity, and acanthosis nigricans. In addition, hyperinsulinemia and hypertriglyceridemia with normal cholesterol levels were observed in most affected individuals tested. Non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and growth retardation appear to be age-related manifestations that occur post-adolescence. Younger affected children are not overtly hyperglycemic and are normal or above average height for age. Although the AS patients in kindred 1 presumably carry the same mutation, many manifestations of the disease are variable. For example, of the 8 children in the Acadian kindred, 4 have scoliosis, 2 have had infantile cardiomyopathy, 2 are hypothyroid, 1 has had hepatic dysfunction and is hypertensive, and 4 have developed asthma. Seven subjects described in this kindred exhibit developmental delay. One additional manifestation not described widely in the literature, advanced bone age, was observed in all subjects tested. The clinical data from this large Acadian kindred, together with information obtained from 4 additional AS patients in 3 unrelated kindreds, confirm and extend clinical observations previously described. In addition, the Acadian kindred with multiple affected individuals, probably arising from a common founder, should allow for identification of the chromosomal localization of a gene causing AS.

  20. [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar evidence for delayed post-Acadian cooling in the southernmost Connecticut Valley Synclinorium

    SciTech Connect

    Moecher, D.P. . Dept. of Geological Science); Cosca, M.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Available Ar-40/Ar-39 data for the Connecticut Valley Synclinorium (CVS) of the New England segment of the Appalachian Orogen indicate rapid post-Acadian cooling. However, new data indicate this pattern does not extend the entire length of the CVS. Ar-40/Ar-39 ages obtained from hornblende and muscovite in The Straits Schist indicate delayed cooling and a more complex post-Acadian thermal history. Data for the Seymour area are consistent with the studies above for the vicinity of the Waterbury Dome. The data farther south indicate one or more of the following: (1) slow (2--3C/Ma) post-Acadian cooling and uplift through the Permian; (2) post-Acadian cooling through Hbl closure in the Mississippian with a subsequent Alleghanian metamorphism that did not exceed 500 C; or (3) post-Acadian cooling with subsequent metamorphism that approached 500 C or involved ductile recrystallization, partly resetting hornblende and totally resetting muscovite south of Derby. Petrologic evidence supporting (2) or (3) consists of widespread but not pervasive greenschist facies retrogression of Hbl + Pl + Sph assemblages in amphibolites to Act + Ep, and Grt + Ky + St assemblages in metapelites to Chl + Bt + Qz. The present data cannot resolve between (2) or (3). However, both are consistent with results of a study in the Bridgeport Synform that yield (1) a U-Pb monazite age of 296 [+-] 2 Ma from the Ansonia Leucogranite, implying the occurrence of an Alleghanian thermal event that promoted monazite growth; and, (2) a U-Pb cooling age of 360 Ma from sphene in the Pumpkin Ground Granodiorite, indicating that Alleghanian events did not exceed ca. 550 C.

  1. Using Molecular Genetic Markers to Resolve a Subspecies Boundary: The Northern Boundary of the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher in the Four-Corner States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben H.; Sogge, Mark K.; Theimer, Tad C.; Girard, Jessica; Keim, Paul

    2008-01-01

    *Executive Summary* The northern boundary of the endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) is currently approximated as running through southern Colorado and Utah, but the exact placement is uncertain because this subspecies shares a border with the more northern and non-endangered E. t. adastus. To help resolve this issue, we evaluated the geographic distribution of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA by sampling breeding sites across the four-corner states (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, and Utah). We found that breeding sites clustered into two major groups generally consistent with the currently designated boundary, with the exception of three sites situated along the current boundary. However, delineating a precise boundary that would separate the two subspecies is made difficult because (1) we found evidence for a region of intergradation along the boundary area, suggesting the boundary is not discreet, and (2) the boundary region is sparsely populated, with too few extant breeding populations to precisely locate a boundary. The boundary region encompasses an area where elevation changes markedly over relatively short distances, with low elevation deserts to the south and more mesic, higher elevation habitats to the north. We hypothesized that latitudinal and elevational differences and their concomitant ecological effects could form an ecological barrier that inhibited gene flow between the subspecies, forming the basis for the subspecies boundary. We modeled changes in geographic patterns of genetic markers as a function of latitude and elevation finding significant support for this relationship. The model was brought into a GIS environment to create multiple subspecies boundaries, with the strength of each predicted boundary evaluated on the basis of how much genetic variation it explained. The candidate boundary that accounted for the most genetic variation was situated generally near the currently recognized subspecies boundary

  2. Molecular phylogeny of the Indian Ocean Terpsiphone paradise flycatchers: undetected evolutionary diversity revealed amongst island populations.

    PubMed

    Bristol, Rachel M; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Irestedt, Martin; Jønsson, Knud A; Shah, Nirmal J; Tatayah, Vikash; Warren, Ben H; Groombridge, Jim J

    2013-05-01

    We construct a molecular phylogeny of Terpsiphone flycatchers of the Indian Ocean and use this to investigate their evolutionary relationships. A total of 4.4 kb of mitochondrial (cyt-b, ND3, ND2, control region) and nuclear (G3PDH, MC1R) sequence data were obtained from all species, sub-species and island populations of the region. Colonisation of the western Indian Ocean has been within the last two million years and greatly postdates the formation of the older islands of the region. A minimum of two independent continent-island colonisation events must have taken place in order to explain the current distribution and phylogenetic placement of Terpsiphone in this region. While five well-diverged Indian Ocean clades are detected, the relationship between them is unclear. Short intermodal branches are indicative of rapid range expansion across the region, masking exact routes and chronology of colonisation. The Indian Ocean Terpsiphone taxa fall into five well supported clades, two of which (the Seychelles paradise flycatcher and the Mascarene paradise flycatcher) correspond with currently recognised species, whilst a further three (within the Madagascar paradise flycatcher) are not entirely predicted by taxonomy, and are neither consistent with distance-based nor island age-based models of colonisation. We identify the four non-Mascarene clades as Evolutionarily Significant Units (ESUs), while the Mascarene paradise flycatcher contains two ESUs corresponding to the Mauritius and Réunion subspecies. All six ESUs are sufficiently diverged to be worthy of management as if they were separate species. This phylogenetic reconstruction highlights the importance of sub-specific molecular phylogenetic reconstructions in complex island archipelago settings in clarifying phylogenetic history and ESUs that may otherwise be overlooked and inadvertently lost. Our phylogenetic reconstruction has identified hidden pockets of evolutionary distinctiveness, which provide a valuable

  3. Water Quality in the Acadian-Pontchartrain Drainages; Louisiana and Mississippi, 1999-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demcheck, Dennis K.; Tollett, Roland W.; Mize, Scott V.; Skrobialowski, Stanley C.; Fendick, Robert B.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Porter, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This report contains the major findings of a 1999?2001 assessment of water quality in the Acadian-Pontchartrain Drainages Study Unit. It is one of a series of reports by the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program that present major findings in 51 major river basins and aquifer systems across the Nation. In these reports, water quality is discussed in terms of local, State, and regional issues. Conditions in a particular basin or aquifer system are compared to conditions found elsewhere and to selected national benchmarks, such as those for drinking-water quality and the protection of aquatic organisms. This report is intended for individuals working with water-resource issues in Federal, State, or local agencies, universities, public interest groups, or in the private sector. The information will be useful in addressing a number of current issues, such as the effects of agricultural and urban land use on water quality, human health, drinking water, source-water protection, hypoxia and excessive growth of algae and plants, pesticide registration, and monitoring and sampling strategies. This report also is for individuals who wish to know more about the quality of streams and ground water in areas near where they live, and how that water quality compares to other areas across the Nation. The water-quality conditions in the Acadian-Pontchartrain Drainages Study Unit summarized in this report are discussed in detail in other reports that can be accessed from (http://la.water.usgs.gov/nawqa/default.htm). Detailed technical information, data and analyses, collection and analytical methodology, models, graphs, and maps that support the findings presented in this report in addition to other reports in this series from other basins can be accessed from the national NAWQA Web site (http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa).

  4. Preliminary vitrinite reflectance study of the post-Acadian Mapleton and Trout Valley Formation, northern Maine

    SciTech Connect

    Malinconico, M.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Vitrinite reflectance was measured on plant fossils from the Devonian Mapleton and Trout Valley Formations in northern Maine in order to assess the degree and possible history of thermal maturation of these post-Acadian intermontane basin deposits, generally considered to be unmetamorphosed. The Middle Devonian Mapleton Formation, west of Presque Isle, lies within the prehnite-pumpellyite terrane of northeastern Aroostook County in which the degree of metamorphism increases from west to east. Vitrinite reflectance from the quarry'' plant fossil locality has a reflectance of 1.4%, which is slightly higher than the death line'' of oil and indicates a maximum paleotemperature of ca. 120--150 C. If not due to burial alone, this very low grade metamorphism may be due to (1) intrusion of nearby teschenite dikes or (2) the Maritime Disturbance of the Pennsylvanian. Based on conodont alteration indices and vitrinite and graptolite reflectance, the degree of thermal maturation of pre-Acadian Ordovician to Lower Devonian formations decreases rapidly several kilometers west of the prehnite-analcime isograd; the lowest rank rocks, in a northeast-trending ban from Square Lake to Mud Lake have paleotemperatures in the range of 60--90 C, the birth line'' of oil. In the post- orogenic Lower Devonian Trout Valley Formation immediately north of Mt. Katahdin, two samples about seven kilometers apart have anthracite grade reflectances of 3.0% and 8.2% respectively. Both localities are near andesite sills. Importantly, the smooth nongranular non-coked texture of these samples suggests that all or part of the Trout Valley Formation had been heated by an unidentified thermal event to temperatures above the coking range of coal before being subjected to later very local contact metamorphism by dikes and sills.

  5. Friedreich ataxia in Acadian families from eastern Canada: clinical diversity with conserved haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Richter, A; Poirier, J; Mercier, J; Julien, D; Morgan, K; Roy, M; Gosselin, F; Bouchard, J P; Melançon, S B

    1996-09-06

    The gene for Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), an autosomal-recessive neurodegenerative disease, remains elusive. The current candidate region of about 150 kb lies between loci FR2 and F8101 near the D9S15/D9S5 linkage group at 9q13-21.1. Linkage homogeneity between classical FRDA and a milder, slowly progressive Acadian variant (FRDA-Acad) has been demonstrated. An extended D9S15-D9S5 haplotype (C6) predominates in FRDA-Acad chromosomes from Louisiana. We studied 10 Acadian families from New Brunswick, Canada. In eight families, affected individuals conformed to the clinical description of FRDA-Acad; in one, 2 sibs presented with spastic ataxia (SPA-Acad). In the last family, 2 sibs had FRDA-Acad, and one had SPA-Acad. We found that SPA-Acad is linked to the FRDA gene region. The C6 haplotype and a second major haplotype (B7) were identified. The same ataxia-linked haplotypes segregated with both FRDA-Acad and SPA-Acad in two unrelated families. The parental origins of these haplotypes were different. Our observation of different phenotypes associated with the same combination of haplotypes may point to the influence of the parent of origin on gene expression, indicate the effect of modifier genes, or reflect the presence of different mutations on the same haplotypes. Our findings underline the need to investigate families with autosomal-recessive ataxias for linkage to the FRDA region, despite lack of key diagnostic manifestations such as cardiomyopathy or absent deep-tendon reflexes.

  6. Friedreich ataxia in Acadian families from eastern Canada: Clinical diversity with conserved haplotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, A.; Poirier, J.; Mercier, J.

    1996-09-06

    The gene for Friedreich ataxia (FRDA), an autosomal-recessive neurodegenerative disease, remains elusive. The current candidate region of about 150 kb lies between loci FR2 and F8101 near the D9S15/D9S5 linkage group at 9q13-21.1. Linkage homogeneity between classical FRDA and a milder, slowly progressive Acadian variant (FRDA-Acad) has been demonstrated. An extended D9S15-D9S5 haplotype (C6) predominates in FRDA-Acad chromosomes from Louisiana. We studied 10 Acadian families from New Brunswick, Canada. In eight families, affected individuals conformed to the clinical description of FRDA-Acad; in one, 2 sibs presented with spastic ataxia (SPA-Acad). In the last family, 2 sibs had FRDA-Acad, and one had SPA-Acad. We found that SPA-Acad is linked to the FRDA gene region. The C6 haplotype and a second major haplotype (137) were identified. The same ataxia-linked haplotypes segregated with both FRDA-Acad and SPA-Acad in two unrelated families. The parental origins of these haplotypes were different. Our observation of different phenotypes associated with the same combination of haplotypes may point to the influence of the parent of origin on gene expression, indicate the effect of modifier genes, or reflect the presence of different mutations on the same haplotype. Our findings underline the need to investigate families with autosomal-recessive ataxias for linkage to the FRDA region, despite lack of key diagnostic manifestations such as cardiomyopathy or absent deep-tendon reflexes. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Nest box use and productivity of great crested flycatchers in prescribed-burned longleaf pine forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Seginak, J.T.

    2000-01-01

    Managing for the endangered Red-cockaded Woodpecker (Picoides borealis) on federal lands requires burning large tracts of mature pine forests every 3-5 yr. Many cavity trees that serve as potential nest sites for primary and secondary hole-nesting birds are destroyed by fire. We assessed the efficacy of a nest box program for the Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus) at Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge, an area intensively managed for Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. During 1996-1998, we installed and monitored 330 (30 in each of 11 sites) nest boxes in mature (>60 yr) longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) tracts that were burned either in April-June (warm season) or December-March (cool season). Prescribed-burned sites were nearly devoid of snags; we estimated only 0.8/ ha in cool-season burns and 1.7/ha in warm-season burns. Great Crested Flycatchers built nests in 20% of the boxes available to them. Clutch sizes were larger in warm-season burns than in cool-season burns, but fledging success (fledglings/nest hatching -1 egg) was lower. Twenty-two of 59 Great Crested Flycatcher nests were depredated and the proportions in each burn class were similar. We recommend the installation of nest boxes for Great Crested Flycatchers in prescribed-burned pine forests, but additional research is needed in these habitats on nest depredation rates and causes.

  8. Oxidative stress in pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) nestlings from metal contaminated environments in northern Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, A.M.M. Sturve, J.; Foerlin, L.; Nyholm, N.E.I.

    2007-11-15

    Metals have been shown to induce oxidative stress in animals. One of the most metal polluted terrestrial environments in Sweden is the surroundings of a sulfide ore smelter plant located in the northern part of the country. Pied flycatcher nestlings (Ficedula hypoleuca) that grew up close to the industry had accumulated amounts of arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead, iron and zinc in their liver tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate if pied flycatcher nestlings in the pollution gradient of the industry were affected by oxidative stress using antioxidant molecules and enzyme activities. The antioxidant assays were also evaluated in search for useful biomarkers in pied flycatchers. This study indicated that nestlings in metal contaminated areas showed signs of oxidative stress evidenced by up regulated hepatic antioxidant defense given as increased glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) activities and slightly but not significantly elevated lipid peroxidation and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities. Stepwise linear regression indicated that lipid peroxidation and CAT activities were influenced mostly by iron, but iron and lead influenced the CAT activity to a higher degree. Positive relationships were found between GST and lead as well as GR activities and cadmium. We conclude that GR, CAT, GST activities and lipid peroxidation levels may function as useful biomarkers for oxidative stress in free-living pied flycatcher nestlings exposed to metal contaminated environments.

  9. Leucogranites and the prolonged, episodic nature of Acadian orogenesis, southwestern Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    Sevigny, J.H.; Lanzirotti, A.; Hanson, G.N. . Dept of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    The Acadian of southwestern Connecticut exposes a middle crustal level orogenic zone comprised of multiply-deformed metapelitic and metaplutonic units that have been intruded by a number of generations of crustally-derived leucogranites. U-Pb ages from garnet + muscovite [+-] biotite leucogranites, pegmatites, and pelitic schists constrain the timing of crustal anatexis and amphibolite facies metamorphism. The Ansonia leucogranite (406 [+-] 13 Ma) is a stitching granite that shares the regional foliation with Silurian and Ordovician orthogneisses. A muscovite granite dike (390 [+-] 3 Ma) that cuts a Silurian orthogneiss has been transposed and is foliated. The Shelton muscovite granite (380 [+-] 3 Ma) is deformed by the regional foliation. Undeformed, garnet two-mica granite (376 [+-] 2 Ma) and muscovite pegmatite (375 [+-] 1 Ma) show that kinematic metamorphic recrystallization pre-dated ca. 375 Ma. Volumetrically minor biotite pegmatite is 354 [+-] 3 Ma. Morphologically distinct monazites in pelitic schists give ages ranging from ca. 395 to 376 Ma. Monazite ages in pelitic schists and crystallization ages in leucogranites and pegmatites probably record episodes of heating, fluid influx, and ductile shearing primarily between 420 and 375 Ma, but extending to 354 Ma in southwestern Connecticut.

  10. Vortex wake, downwash distribution, aerodynamic performance and wingbeat kinematics in slow-flying pied flycatchers

    PubMed Central

    Muijres, Florian T.; Bowlin, Melissa S.; Johansson, L. Christoffer; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Many small passerines regularly fly slowly when catching prey, flying in cluttered environments or landing on a perch or nest. While flying slowly, passerines generate most of the flight forces during the downstroke, and have a ‘feathered upstroke’ during which they make their wing inactive by retracting it close to the body and by spreading the primary wing feathers. How this flight mode relates aerodynamically to the cruising flight and so-called ‘normal hovering’ as used in hummingbirds is not yet known. Here, we present time-resolved fluid dynamics data in combination with wingbeat kinematics data for three pied flycatchers flying across a range of speeds from near hovering to their calculated minimum power speed. Flycatchers are adapted to low speed flight, which they habitually use when catching insects on the wing. From the wake dynamics data, we constructed average wingbeat wakes and determined the time-resolved flight forces, the time-resolved downwash distributions and the resulting lift-to-drag ratios, span efficiencies and flap efficiencies. During the downstroke, slow-flying flycatchers generate a single-vortex loop wake, which is much more similar to that generated by birds at cruising flight speeds than it is to the double loop vortex wake in hovering hummingbirds. This wake structure results in a relatively high downwash behind the body, which can be explained by the relatively active tail in flycatchers. As a result of this, slow-flying flycatchers have a span efficiency which is similar to that of the birds in cruising flight and which can be assumed to be higher than in hovering hummingbirds. During the upstroke, the wings of slowly flying flycatchers generated no significant forces, but the body–tail configuration added 23 per cent to weight support. This is strikingly similar to the 25 per cent weight support generated by the wing upstroke in hovering hummingbirds. Thus, for slow-flying passerines, the upstroke cannot be regarded as

  11. Vortex wake, downwash distribution, aerodynamic performance and wingbeat kinematics in slow-flying pied flycatchers.

    PubMed

    Muijres, Florian T; Bowlin, Melissa S; Johansson, L Christoffer; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-02-07

    Many small passerines regularly fly slowly when catching prey, flying in cluttered environments or landing on a perch or nest. While flying slowly, passerines generate most of the flight forces during the downstroke, and have a 'feathered upstroke' during which they make their wing inactive by retracting it close to the body and by spreading the primary wing feathers. How this flight mode relates aerodynamically to the cruising flight and so-called 'normal hovering' as used in hummingbirds is not yet known. Here, we present time-resolved fluid dynamics data in combination with wingbeat kinematics data for three pied flycatchers flying across a range of speeds from near hovering to their calculated minimum power speed. Flycatchers are adapted to low speed flight, which they habitually use when catching insects on the wing. From the wake dynamics data, we constructed average wingbeat wakes and determined the time-resolved flight forces, the time-resolved downwash distributions and the resulting lift-to-drag ratios, span efficiencies and flap efficiencies. During the downstroke, slow-flying flycatchers generate a single-vortex loop wake, which is much more similar to that generated by birds at cruising flight speeds than it is to the double loop vortex wake in hovering hummingbirds. This wake structure results in a relatively high downwash behind the body, which can be explained by the relatively active tail in flycatchers. As a result of this, slow-flying flycatchers have a span efficiency which is similar to that of the birds in cruising flight and which can be assumed to be higher than in hovering hummingbirds. During the upstroke, the wings of slowly flying flycatchers generated no significant forces, but the body-tail configuration added 23 per cent to weight support. This is strikingly similar to the 25 per cent weight support generated by the wing upstroke in hovering hummingbirds. Thus, for slow-flying passerines, the upstroke cannot be regarded as inactive

  12. Prevalence of blood parasites in Tyrannidae (flycatchers) in the Eastern plains of Colombia.

    PubMed

    Matta, Nubia E; Basto, Natalia; Gutierrez, Rafael; Rodríguez, Oscar A; Greiner, Ellis C

    2004-05-01

    Blood samples from 159 birds of the New-world family Tyrannidae (the flycatchers) from the eastern plains of Colombia, were examined for haematozoa parasites, in 1999-2000. Haematozoa were detected in six of 20 species. The overall prevalence was 10.1%. The most common parasites detected were microfilariae, followed by Trypanosoma and Plasmodium. The highest prevalence (9.6%) was found in the Ochre-bellied Flycatcher (Mionectes oleaginea). Mixed infections with more than one genus of blood parasite were rare and most infections encountered were of low intensity. The results of this study suggest an important role of ecologically diverse conditions determining composition, transmission, and prevalence of a blood parasite fauna, presumably through host interaction population density. Some new host parasite relationship records are presented.

  13. A model for northern Vermont's Acadian magmatism with insight from Italy's Tuscan magmatic province

    SciTech Connect

    Westerman, D.S. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    S-type Devonian acidic intrusives in northern Vermont occur scattered throughout the turbiditic flysch sequence and pervasive horizon of mafic Standing Pond Volcanics of the Connecticut Valley--Gaspe Trough (CVGT). These granitoids formed in a successor basin that opened over the stalled Taconic subduction zone located between the Bronson Hill--Boundary Mountain Volcanic arc (east) and the ophiolite-bearing accretionary complex of the Green Mountains (west). Contact aureoles surrounding the granitoids are superimposed over low-pressure facies series metamorphic isograds that have concentric pattern correlated with the centers of intrusion. Italy's Tuscan Magmatic Province, also dominated by S-type acidic intrusives, developed between 7 and 2 Ma in a successor basin over an extinct subduction zone. In that case, the basin and its plutons developed when the Corsica-Sardinia plate pulled back to form the Tyrrhenian Sea after having collided with Italy to form the Apennine range approximately 10 m.y. earlier. In this model for northern Vermont, a volcanic arc and accretionary complex developed during Ordovician subduction, perhaps with continuing trench--arc separation due to shallow subduction. When the leading edge of continental North America entered the subduction zone, the process stalled and the subducted Iapetus slab continued to lose heat and increase density, promoting its separation from the overlying plate. Upwelling under the former forearc region rifted the crust to form the CVGT. The mantle-derived mafic melts rose, transferring heat to metamorphose and partially melt the basin fill. The Standing Pond Volcanics represent this melt that reached the surface at one stage and flooded the basin. Northern Vermont's granitoids rose, penetrating the domed strata above their source region, as extensional tectonism was replaced by Acadian compression.

  14. Early reproductive success of western bluebirds and ash-throated flycatchers: a landscape-contaminant perspective.

    PubMed

    Fair, Jeanne M; Myers, Orrin B

    2002-01-01

    Eggshell quality, clutch size, sex ratio, and hatching success of western bluebirds (Sialia mexicana) and ash-throated flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens) were studied on a landscape-soil contaminant gradient at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico from 1997 to 1999. A variety of contaminants (heavy metals, chemicals, insecticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorines, and radioactive isotopes) range across different spatial scales and concentrations on LANL land. This study is an example of a monitoring program over a large area with varying degree of contamination that is used to highlight locations of concern for future research. There were two locations where the flycatcher had a lower hatching success. The bluebirds at Sandia wetland, a location of concern for PCBs. had a thinner eggshell thickness index (RATCLIFFE) and the eggs were smaller than at other locations. The flycatcher had thinner eggshells than bluebirds, which could add to sensitivity to exposure to contaminants. There was no variation in clutch size or sex ratio between locations or areas closer to contaminant release sites for both species. Percent females in the clutch ranged from 0 to 100% in the WEBL and from 33 to 67% for ATFL.

  15. Myiarchus flycatchers are the primary seed dispersers of Bursera longipes in a Mexican dry forest

    PubMed Central

    Almazán-Núñez, R. Carlos; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Arizmendi, María del Coro

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the seed dispersal of Bursera longipes by birds along a successional gradient of tropical dry forest (TDF) in southwestern Mexico. B. longipes is an endemic tree to the TDF in the Balsas basin. The relative abundance of frugivorous birds, their frequency of visits to B. longipes and the number of removed fruits were recorded at three study sites with different stages of forest succession (early, intermediate and mature) characterized by distinct floristic and structural elements. Flycatchers of the Myiarchus and Tyrannus genera removed the majority of fruits at each site. Overall, visits to B. longipes were less frequent at the early successional site. Birds that function as legitimate dispersers by consuming whole seeds and regurgitating or defecating intact seeds in the process also remove the pseudoaril from seeds, thereby facilitating the germination process. The highest germination percentages were recorded for seeds that passed through the digestive system of two migratory flycatchers: M. cinerascens and M. nutingii. Perch plants, mainly composed of legumes (e.g., Eysenhardtia polystachya, Acacia cochliacantha, Calliandra eryophylla, Mimosa polyantha), serve also as nurse plants since the number of young individuals recruited from B. longipes was higher under these than expected by chance. This study shows that Myiarchus flycatchers are the most efficient seed dispersers of B. longipes across all successional stages. This suggests a close mutualistic relationship derived from adaptive processes and local specializations throughout the distribution of both taxa, as supported by the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution. PMID:27326382

  16. African departure rather than migration speed determines variation in spring arrival in pied flycatchers.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Janne; Both, Christiaan

    2017-01-01

    Properly timed spring migration enhances reproduction and survival. Climate change requires organisms to respond to changes such as advanced spring phenology. Pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca have become a model species to study such phenological adaptations of long-distance migratory songbirds to climate change, but data on individuals' time schedules outside the breeding season are still lacking. Using light-level geolocators, we studied variation in migration schedules across the year in a pied flycatcher population in the Netherlands, which sheds light on the ability for individual adjustments in spring arrival timing to track environmental changes at their breeding grounds. We show that variation in arrival dates to breeding sites in 2014 was caused by variation in departure date from sub-Saharan Africa and not by environmental conditions encountered en route. Spring migration duration was short for all individuals, on average 2 weeks. Males migrated ahead of females in spring, while migration schedules in autumn were flexibly adjusted according to breeding duties. Individuals were therefore not consistently early or late throughout the year. In fast migrants like our Dutch pied flycatchers, advancement of arrival to climate change likely requires changes in spring departure dates. Adaptation for earlier arrival may be slowed down by harsh circumstances in winter, or years with high costs associated with early migration.

  17. Myiarchus flycatchers are the primary seed dispersers of Bursera longipes in a Mexican dry forest.

    PubMed

    Almazán-Núñez, R Carlos; Eguiarte, Luis E; Arizmendi, María Del Coro; Corcuera, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the seed dispersal of Bursera longipes by birds along a successional gradient of tropical dry forest (TDF) in southwestern Mexico. B. longipes is an endemic tree to the TDF in the Balsas basin. The relative abundance of frugivorous birds, their frequency of visits to B. longipes and the number of removed fruits were recorded at three study sites with different stages of forest succession (early, intermediate and mature) characterized by distinct floristic and structural elements. Flycatchers of the Myiarchus and Tyrannus genera removed the majority of fruits at each site. Overall, visits to B. longipes were less frequent at the early successional site. Birds that function as legitimate dispersers by consuming whole seeds and regurgitating or defecating intact seeds in the process also remove the pseudoaril from seeds, thereby facilitating the germination process. The highest germination percentages were recorded for seeds that passed through the digestive system of two migratory flycatchers: M. cinerascens and M. nutingii. Perch plants, mainly composed of legumes (e.g., Eysenhardtia polystachya, Acacia cochliacantha, Calliandra eryophylla, Mimosa polyantha), serve also as nurse plants since the number of young individuals recruited from B. longipes was higher under these than expected by chance. This study shows that Myiarchus flycatchers are the most efficient seed dispersers of B. longipes across all successional stages. This suggests a close mutualistic relationship derived from adaptive processes and local specializations throughout the distribution of both taxa, as supported by the geographic mosaic theory of coevolution.

  18. 75 FR 30425 - Endangered and Threatened Species Permit Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... willow flycatcher (Empidonax taillii extimus) within New Mexico. Permit TE-172278 Applicant: John Abbott... surveys for southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax taillii extimus) within Texas. Permit TE-11152A... permit for research and recovery purposes to conduct presence/absence surveys for southwestern...

  19. Microsatellite usefulness is independent of phylogenetic distance in Tyrant flycatchers (Aves: Tyrannidae): a test using two globally threatened species.

    PubMed

    Mahler, B; Schneider, A R R; Di Giacomo, A S; Di Giacomo, A G; Reboreda, J C; Tiedemann, R

    2013-08-12

    Tyrant flycatchers (Aves: Tyrannidae) are endemic to the New World, and many species of this group are threatened or near-threatened at the global level. The aim of this study was to test the 18 microsatellite markers that have been published for other Tyrant flycatchers in the Strange-tailed Tyrant (Alectrurus risora) and the Sharp-tailed Tyrant (Culicivora caudacuta), two endemic species of southern South American grasslands that are classified as vulnerable. We also analyzed the usefulness of loci in relation to phylogenetic distance to the source species. Amplification success was high in both species (77 to 83%) and did not differ between the more closely and more distantly related species to the source species. Polymorphism success was also similar for both species, with 9 and 8 loci being polymorphic, respectively. An increased phylogenetic distance thus does not gradually lead to allelic or locus dropouts, implying that in Tyrant flycatchers, the published loci are useful independent of species relatedness.

  20. The seventy-second Christmas bird count. 302. Southern Dorchester County, Md

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, R.R.; Cooper, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    We located 511 Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) nests in bottomland hardwood forest of eastern Arkansas. Microhabitat characteristics were measured and their relationship with nest success evaluated. Fifty-two percent of all nesting attempts resulted in predation. Attributes of nest placement were similar between successful and unsuccessful nests, although successful nests were placed higher. Similarly, nonparasitized nests were typically higher than parasitized nests. Nests initiated late in the breeding season were placed in larger trees with higher canopy bases resulting in increased vegetation around the nest. Fifteen different tree species were used for nesting. Acadian Flycatchers chose nest trees in a nonrandom fashion, selecting Nuttall oak (Quercus nuttallii) and possumhaw (Ilex decidua) in greater proportions than their availability. However, there was no relationship between tree species used for nesting and nest success. Nest height was positively correlated with concealment at the nest site, supporting the predator-avoidance theory. No other attribute of nest placement differentiated successful nest sites, suggesting that nest predation is likely a function of random events in space and time.

  1. Does nonrandom nest placement imply nonrandom nest predation? - A reply

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, R.J.; Wilson, R.R.; Zenitsky, G.D.; Mullin, S.J.; Dececco, J.D.; Marshall, M.R.; Wolf, D.J.; Pomara, L.Y.

    1999-01-01

    In response to the critique by Schmidt and Whelan (Condor 101(4):916-920, 1999), we find that the relationship between nest success and tree selectivity is dependent upon inclusion or exclusion of particular tree species, whether or not years are pooled, and the selectivity index used. We question their use of point estimates of nest success with extremely high variances, defend our index, question the application of the Chesson (1983) index to our data, and explain the need to analyze years separately. Bottomland hardwood forest systems are extremely variable; hydroperiods alter the suitability of nesting substrates, availability of alternative food, and behavior of predators and their prey. Given these features, actively searching for Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) nests is seldom an efficient predator foraging strategy. Therefore, these predation events are best described as random; nests are principally encountered opportunistically by generalist predators while searching for other prey.

  2. Malaria-Infected Female Collared Flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) Do Not Pay the Cost of Late Breeding

    PubMed Central

    Kulma, Katarzyna; Low, Matthew; Bensch, Staffan; Qvarnström, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Life-history theory predicts that the trade-off between parasite defense and other costly traits such as reproduction may be most evident when resources are scarce. The strength of selection that parasites inflict on their host may therefore vary across environmental conditions. Collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) breeding on the Swedish island Öland experience a seasonal decline in their preferred food resource, which opens the possibility to test the strength of life-history trade-offs across environmental conditions. We used nested-PCR and quantitative-PCR protocols to investigate the association of Haemosporidia infection with reproductive performance of collared flycatcher females in relation to a seasonal change in the external environment. We show that despite no difference in mean onset of breeding, infected females produced relatively more of their fledglings late in the season. This pattern was also upheld when considering only the most common malaria lineage (hPHSIB1), however there was no apparent link between the reproductive output and the intensity of infection. Infected females produced heavier-than-average fledglings with higher-than-expected recruitment success late in the season. This reversal of the typical seasonal trend in reproductive output compensated them for lower fledging and recruitment rates compared to uninfected birds earlier in the season. Thus, despite different seasonal patterns of reproductive performance the overall number of recruits was the same for infected versus uninfected birds. A possible explanation for our results is that infected females breed in a different microhabitat where food availability is higher late in the season but also is the risk of infection. Thus, our results suggest that another trade-off than the one we aimed to test is more important for explaining variation in reproductive performance in this natural population: female flycatchers appear to face a trade-off between the risk of infection and

  3. The geology of a part of Acadia and the nature of the Acadian orogeny across Central and Eastern Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tucker, R.D.; Osberg, P.H.; Berry, H.N.

    2001-01-01

    The zone of Acadian collision between the Medial New England and Composite Avalon terranes is well preserved in Maine. A transect from northwest (Rome) to southeast (Camden) crosses the eastern part of Medial New England comprising the Central Maine basin, Liberty-Orrington thrust sheet, and Fredericton trough, and the western part of Composite Avalon, including the Graham Lake, Clarry Hill, and Clam Cove thrust sheets. U-Pb geochronology of events before, during, and after the Acadian orogeny helps elucidate the nature and distribution of tectonostrati& graphic belts in this zone and the timing of some Acadian events in the Northern Appalachians. The Central Maine basin consists of sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Middle Ordovician (???470 to ???460 Ma) age overlain with probable conformity by latest Ordovician(?) through earliest Devonian marine rift and flysch sedimentary rocks; these are intruded by weakly to undeformed plutonic rocks of Early and Middle Devonian age (???399??378 Ma). The Fredericton trough consists of Early Silurian gray pelite and sandstone to earliest Late Silurian calcareous turbidite, deformed and variably metamorphosed prior to the emplacement of Late Silurian (???422 Ma) and Early to Late Devonian (???418 to ???368 Ma) plutons. The Liberty-Orrington thrust sheet consists of Cambrian(?)-Ordovician (>???474 to ???469 Ma and younger) clastic sedimentary and volcanic rocks intruded by highly deformed Late Silurian (???424 to ???422 Ma) and Devonian (???418 to ???389 Ma) plutons, possibly metamorphosed in Late Silurian time (prior to ???417 Ma), and metamorphosed to amphibolite facies in Early to Middle Devonian time (???400 to ???381 Ma). The Graham Lake thrust sheet contains possible Precambrian rocks, Cambrian sedimentary rocks with a volcanic unit dated at ???503 Ma, and Ordovician rocks with possible Caradocian Old World fossils, metamor& phosed and deformed in Silurian time and intruded by mildly to undeformed Late Silurian (???421 Ma

  4. Constraints on ages of Taconian and Acadian deformation from zircon evaporation ages of felsic plutons from western Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, B.F.; Karabinos, P. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    New dates on three felsic plutons constrain the age of Taconian and Acadian deformation in western Massachusetts. The tonalitic Hallockville Pond Gneiss intrudes the Moretown Formation of the Rowe-Hawley belt and shows deformation comparable in degree and orientation to that of the surrounding rocks. The Middlefield Granite, a quartz monzonite, intrudes the Rowe and Moretown Formations at their contact. The Williamsburg Granodiorite, of minimum-melt composition, intrudes Silurian and Devonian formations of the Connecticut Valley Synclinorium, east of the Row-Hawley belt, and contains no obvious deformation fabric. [sup 207]Pb/[sup 206]Pb single-grain zircon evaporation ages for these plutons are as follows: the Hallockville Pond Gneiss, 484 [plus minus] 7 Ma; the Middlefield Granite, 447 [plus minus] 3 Ma (weighted average of 4 grains); and the Williamsburg Granodiorite, 373 [plus minus] 5 Ma (weighted average of 3 grains). The Moretown Formation, presently correlated with the Middle Ordovician Beauceville Formation in Quebec, must be older than 484 Ma (Early Ordovician), the age of the intruding Hallockville Pond Gneiss, which might be related to rocks in the proposed Shelburne Falls arc of similar age (Karabinos and Tucker, 1992). Field relations and the age of the Middlefield Granite show that if the Rowe-Moretown contact is a fault, one interpretation suggested by Stanley and Hatch (1988) and advocated by Ratcliffe et al. (1992), then Taconian thrusting in this area ended by 447 Ma because the pluton is not offset by faults. The 373 Ma age of the unfoliated Williamsburg Granodiorite, together with a U-Pb zircon age on a strongly deformed sill in the Granville dome of 376 [plus minus] 4 Ma, tightly constrains the timing of the main phase of Acadian deformation in western Massachusetts.

  5. An USH2A founder mutation is the major cause of Usher syndrome type 2 in Canadians of French origin and confirms common roots of Quebecois and Acadians

    PubMed Central

    Ebermann, Inga; Koenekoop, Robert K; Lopez, Irma; Bou-Khzam, Lara; Pigeon, Renée; Bolz, Hanno J

    2009-01-01

    Congenital hearing loss affects approximately one child in 1000. About 10% of the deaf population have Usher syndrome (USH). In USH, hearing loss is complicated by retinal degeneration with onset in the first (USH1) or second (USH2) decade. In most populations, diagnostic testing is hampered by a multitude of mutations in nine genes. We have recently shown that in French Canadians from Quebec, USH1 largely results from a single USH1C founder mutation, c.216G>A (‘Acadian allele'). The genetic basis of USH2 in Canadians of French descent, however, has remained elusive. Here, we have investigated nine USH2 families from Quebec and New Brunswick (the former Acadia) by haplotype analyses of the USH2A locus and sequencing of the three known USH2 genes. Seven USH2A mutations were identified in eight patients. One of them, c.4338_4339delCT, accounts for 10 out of 18 disease alleles (55.6%). This mutation has previously been reported in an Acadian USH2 family, and it was found in homozygous state in the three Acadians of our sample. As in the case of c.216G>A (USH1C), a common haplotype is associated with c.4338_4339delCT. With a limited number of molecular tests, it will now be possible in these populations to estimate whether children with congenital hearing impairment of different degrees will develop retinal disease – with important clinical and therapeutic implications. USH2 is the second example that reveals a significant genetic overlap between Quebecois and Acadians: in contrast to current understanding, other genetic disorders present in both populations are likely based on common founder mutations as well. PMID:18665195

  6. Acadian variant of Fanconi syndrome is caused by mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I deficiency due to a non-coding mutation in complex I assembly factor NDUFAF6.

    PubMed

    Hartmannová, Hana; Piherová, Lenka; Tauchmannová, Kateřina; Kidd, Kendrah; Acott, Philip D; Crocker, John F S; Oussedik, Youcef; Mallet, Marcel; Hodaňová, Kateřina; Stránecký, Viktor; Přistoupilová, Anna; Barešová, Veronika; Jedličková, Ivana; Živná, Martina; Sovová, Jana; Hůlková, Helena; Robins, Vicki; Vrbacký, Marek; Pecina, Petr; Kaplanová, Vilma; Houštěk, Josef; Mráček, Tomáš; Thibeault, Yves; Bleyer, Anthony J; Kmoch, Stanislav

    2016-09-15

    The Acadian variant of Fanconi Syndrome refers to a specific condition characterized by generalized proximal tubular dysfunction from birth, slowly progressive chronic kidney disease and pulmonary interstitial fibrosis. This condition occurs only in Acadians, a founder population in Nova Scotia, Canada. The genetic and molecular basis of this disease is unknown. We carried out whole exome and genome sequencing and found that nine affected individuals were homozygous for the ultra-rare non-coding variant chr8:96046914 T > C; rs575462405, whereas 13 healthy siblings were either heterozygotes or lacked the mutant allele. This variant is located in intron 2 of NDUFAF6 (NM_152416.3; c.298-768 T > C), 37 base pairs upstream from an alternative splicing variant in NDUFAF6 chr8:96046951 A > G; rs74395342 (c.298-731 A > G). NDUFAF6 encodes NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase complex assembly factor 6, also known as C8ORF38. We found that rs575462405-either alone or in combination with rs74395342-affects splicing and synthesis of NDUFAF6 isoforms. Affected kidney and lung showed specific loss of the mitochondria-located NDUFAF6 isoform and ultrastructural characteristics of mitochondrial dysfunction. Accordingly, affected tissues had defects in mitochondrial respiration and complex I biogenesis that were corrected with NDUFAF6 cDNA transfection. Our results demonstrate that the Acadian variant of Fanconi Syndrome results from mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I deficiency. This information may be used in the diagnosis and prevention of this disease in individuals and families of Acadian descent and broadens the spectrum of the clinical presentation of mitochondrial diseases, respiratory chain defects and defects of complex I specifically.

  7. Alternate non-stop migration strategies of pied flycatchers to cross the Sahara desert

    PubMed Central

    Both, Christiaan

    2016-01-01

    Each year more than two billion songbirds cross the Sahara, but how they perform this formidable task is largely unknown. Using geolocation tracks from 27 pied flycatchers, a nocturnally migrating passerine, we show that most birds made diurnal flights in both autumn and spring. These diurnal flights were estimated to be part of non-stop flights of mostly 40–60 h. In spring, birds flew across the Sahara, while autumn migration probably circumpassed part of the desert, through a long oversea flight. Our data contradict claims that passerines cross the Sahara by intermittent flight and daytime resting. The frequent occurrence of long non-stop flights to cross the desert shows migrants' physiological abilities and poses the question why this would not be the general migration strategy to cross the Sahara. PMID:27072404

  8. Hybrid Dysfunction Expressed as Elevated Metabolic Rate in Male Ficedula Flycatchers.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Sirkiä, Päivi M; Ålund, Murielle; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Studies of ecological speciation are often biased towards extrinsic sources of selection against hybrids, resulting from intermediate hybrid morphology, but the knowledge of how genetic incompatibilities accumulate over time under natural conditions is limited. Here we focus on a physiological trait, metabolic rate, which is central to life history strategies and thermoregulation but is also likely to be sensitive to mismatched mitonuclear interactions. We measured the resting metabolic rate of male collared, and pied flycatchers as well as of naturally occurring F1 hybrid males, in a recent hybrid zone. We found that hybrid males had a higher rather than intermediate metabolic rate, which is indicative of hybrid physiological dysfunction. Fitness costs associated with elevated metabolic rate are typically environmentally dependent and exaggerated under harsh conditions. By focusing on male hybrid dysfunction in an eco-physiological trait, our results contribute to the general understanding of how combined extrinsic and intrinsic sources of hybrid dysfunction build up under natural conditions.

  9. Hybrid Dysfunction Expressed as Elevated Metabolic Rate in Male Ficedula Flycatchers

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S. Eryn; Sirkiä, Päivi M.; Ålund, Murielle; Qvarnström, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Studies of ecological speciation are often biased towards extrinsic sources of selection against hybrids, resulting from intermediate hybrid morphology, but the knowledge of how genetic incompatibilities accumulate over time under natural conditions is limited. Here we focus on a physiological trait, metabolic rate, which is central to life history strategies and thermoregulation but is also likely to be sensitive to mismatched mitonuclear interactions. We measured the resting metabolic rate of male collared, and pied flycatchers as well as of naturally occurring F1 hybrid males, in a recent hybrid zone. We found that hybrid males had a higher rather than intermediate metabolic rate, which is indicative of hybrid physiological dysfunction. Fitness costs associated with elevated metabolic rate are typically environmentally dependent and exaggerated under harsh conditions. By focusing on male hybrid dysfunction in an eco-physiological trait, our results contribute to the general understanding of how combined extrinsic and intrinsic sources of hybrid dysfunction build up under natural conditions. PMID:27583553

  10. Breeding Experience and the Heritability of Female Mate Choice in Collared Flycatchers

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, Gergely; Herényi, Márton; Wilson, Alastair J.; Garamszegi, László Zsolt; Rosivall, Balázs; Eens, Marcel; Török, János

    2010-01-01

    Background Heritability in mate preferences is assumed by models of sexual selection, and preference evolution may contribute to adaptation to changing environments. However, mate preference is difficult to measure in natural populations as detailed data on mate availability and mate sampling are usually missing. Often the only available information is the ornamentation of the actual mate. The single long-term quantitative genetic study of a wild population found low heritability in female mate ornamentation in Swedish collared flycatchers. One potentially important cause of low heritability in mate ornamentation at the population level is reduced mate preference expression among inexperienced individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings Applying animal model analyses to 21 years of data from a Hungarian collared flycatcher population, we found that additive genetic variance was 50 percent and significant for ornament expression in males, but less than 5 percent and non-significant for mate ornamentation treated as a female trait. Female breeding experience predicted breeding date and clutch size, but mate ornamentation and its variance components were unrelated to experience. Although we detected significant area and year effects on mate ornamentation, more than 85 percent of variance in this trait remained unexplained. Moreover, the effects of area and year on mate ornamentation were also highly positively correlated between inexperienced and experienced females, thereby acting to remove difference between the two groups. Conclusions/Significance The low heritability of mate ornamentation was apparently not explained by the presence of inexperienced individuals. Our results further indicate that the expression of mate ornamentation is dominated by temporal and spatial constraints and unmeasured background factors. Future studies should reduce unexplained variance or use alternative measures of mate preference. The heritability of mate preference in the wild

  11. 77 FR 41147 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Revised Critical Habitat for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ...; Designation of Revised Critical Habitat for the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife..., proposed designation of revised critical habitat for the southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii... Willow Flycatcher Recovery Plan (Recovery Plan) (Service 2002) and included in this proposed rule,...

  12. Southwest Mississippi Tributaries Study Area Environmental Inventory; Wildlife Resources.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) X Eastern phoebe (Sayornis phoebe) X X Vermillion flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) X Great crested flycatcher (Myiarchus...34 " ,". - . ..../ :_’± ,’. -’ Table 26 Endangered Vertebrates of Mississippi Fish Southern redbelly dace (Phoxinus erythrogaster) Bayou darter (Etheostoma rubrum)* Crystal... darter (Ammocrypta aspreZZa)* Frecklebelly madtom (Noturus munitus) Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrhynchus) Undescribed Tombigbee River sturgeon

  13. Friedreich ataxia in Louisiana Acadians: demonstration of a founder effect by analysis of microsatellite-generated extended haplotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Sirugo, G; Keats, B; Fujita, R; Duclos, F; Purohit, K; Koenig, M; Mandel, J L

    1992-01-01

    Eleven Acadian families with Friedreich ataxia (FA) who were from southwest Louisiana were studied with a series of polymorphic markers spanning 310 kb in the D9S5-D9S15 region previously shown to be tightly linked to the disease locus. In particular, three very informative microsatellites were tested. Evidence for a strong founder effect was found, since a specific extended haplotype spanning 230 kb from 26P (D9S5) to MCT112 (D9S15) was present on 70% of independent FA chromosomes and only once (6%) on the normal ones. There was no evident correlation between haplotypes and clinical expression. The typing of an additional microsatellite (GS4) located 80 kb from MCT112 created a divergence of the main FA-linked haplotype, generating four minor and one major haplotype. A similar split was observed with GS4 in a patient homozygous for a rare 26P-to-MCT112 haplotype. These results suggest that GS4 is flanking marker for the disease locus, although other interpretations are possible. Images Figure 2 PMID:1347194

  14. Annotated Bibliography of Water-Related Information and Studies, Acadian-Pontchartrain Study Unit, Louisiana, 1863-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grimsley, Kevin J.; D'Arconte, Patricia J.

    2003-01-01

    The mission of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program is to describe the status and trends in the quality of a large, representative part of the nation's surface- and ground-water resources and to improve understanding of the primary natural and human factors affecting the quality of these resources. This report is a collection of 1,364 bibliographic references to water-related information and studies that are pertinent to these goals in the Acadian-Ponchartrain Study Unit of the National Water- Quality Assessment Program This study unit includes all or parts of 39 parishes in southern Louisiana and 5 counties in southwestern Mississippi. These references encompass a large range of subjects, including aquatic biology, climate, geology, land use, liminology, salinity, sedimentation, subsidence, surface-and ground-water hydrology, urban runoff, water chemistry, and water use and management. Publication dates for references range from 1863 through 2000. Whenever possible, an abstract is included in addition to the bibliographic information.

  15. Slow improvements of metal exposure, health- and breeding conditions of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) after decreased industrial heavy metal emissions.

    PubMed

    Berglund, A M M; Nyholm, N E I

    2011-09-15

    The environment around metal industries, such as smelters, is often highly contaminated due to continuous deposition of metals. We studied nest box breeding populations of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) in a well-studied pollution gradient from a sulfide ore smelter in Northern Sweden, after reduced aerial metal emissions (by 93-99%) from the smelter. The deposition of arsenic, cadmium, copper and zinc (based on moss samples) reflected the reduced emissions fairly well. However, nestling pied flycatchers had similar concentrations of these elements and mercury in tissues (bone, liver and blood) and feces in the 2000s, as in the 1980s, when the emissions were substantially higher. The exposure to high metal concentrations in the close vicinity of the smelter resulted in inhibited ALAD activities, depressed hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and increased mortality of nestlings. Our results indicate that in the highly contaminated environment around the smelter, nestlings reflected the slowly cycling soil pool, rather than the atmospheric deposition, and the concentration in soils plays an important role for the response of pied flycatchers to reduced atmospheric deposition.

  16. Estimation of linkage disequilibrium and interspecific gene flow in Ficedula flycatchers by a newly developed 50k single-nucleotide polymorphism array

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takeshi; Backström, Niclas; Burri, Reto; Husby, Arild; Olason, Pall; Rice, Amber M; Ålund, Murielle; Qvarnström, Anna; Ellegren, Hans

    2014-01-01

    With the access to draft genome sequence assemblies and whole-genome resequencing data from population samples, molecular ecology studies will be able to take truly genome-wide approaches. This now applies to an avian model system in ecological and evolutionary research: Old World flycatchers of the genus Ficedula, for which we recently obtained a 1.1 Gb collared flycatcher genome assembly and identified 13 million single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)s in population resequencing of this species and its sister species, pied flycatcher. Here, we developed a custom 50K Illumina iSelect flycatcher SNP array with markers covering 30 autosomes and the Z chromosome. Using a number of selection criteria for inclusion in the array, both genotyping success rate and polymorphism information content (mean marker heterozygosity = 0.41) were high. We used the array to assess linkage disequilibrium (LD) and hybridization in flycatchers. Linkage disequilibrium declined quickly to the background level at an average distance of 17 kb, but the extent of LD varied markedly within the genome and was more than 10-fold higher in ‘genomic islands’ of differentiation than in the rest of the genome. Genetic ancestry analysis identified 33 F1 hybrids but no later-generation hybrids from sympatric populations of collared flycatchers and pied flycatchers, contradicting earlier reports of backcrosses identified from much fewer number of markers. With an estimated divergence time as recently as <1 Ma, this suggests strong selection against F1 hybrids and unusually rapid evolution of reproductive incompatibility in an avian system. PMID:24784959

  17. Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals the Character of Incomplete Dosage Compensation across Multiple Tissues in Flycatchers

    PubMed Central

    Uebbing, Severin; Künstner, Axel; Mäkinen, Hannu; Ellegren, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Sex chromosome divergence, which follows the cessation of recombination and degeneration of the sex-limited chromosome, can cause a reduction in expression level for sex-linked genes in the heterozygous sex, unless some mechanisms of dosage compensation develops to counter the reduction in gene dose. Because large-scale perturbations in expression levels arising from changes in gene dose might have strong deleterious effects, the evolutionary response should be strong. However, in birds and in at least some other female heterogametic organisms, wholesale sex chromosome dosage compensation does not seem to occur. Using RNA-seq of multiple tissues and individuals, we investigated male and female expression levels of Z-linked and autosomal genes in the collared flycatcher, a bird for which a draft genome sequence recently has been reported. We found that male expression of Z-linked genes was on average 50% higher than female expression, although there was considerable variation in the male-to-female ratio among genes. The ratio for individual genes was well correlated among tissues and there was also a correlation in the extent of compensation between flycatcher and chicken orthologs. The relative excess of male expression was positively correlated with expression breadth, expression level, and number of interacting proteins (protein connectivity), and negatively correlated with variance in expression. These observations lead to a model of compensation occurring on a gene-by-gene basis, supported by an absence of clustering of genes on the Z chromosome with respect to the extent of compensation. Equal mean expression level of autosomal and Z-linked genes in males, and 50% higher expression of autosomal than Z-linked genes in females, is compatible with that partial compensation is achieved by hypertranscription from females’ single Z chromosome. A comparison with male-to-female expression ratios in orthologous Z-linked genes of ostriches, where Z–W recombination

  18. Nutritional correlates and mate acquisition role of multiple sexual traits in male collared flycatchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegyi, Gergely; Szöllősi, Eszter; Jenni-Eiermann, Susanne; Török, János; Eens, Marcel; Garamszegi, László Zsolt

    2010-06-01

    The information content of a sexual signal may predict its importance in a multiple signal system. Many studies have correlated sexual signal expression with the absolute levels of nutrient reserves. In contrast, the changes of nutrient reserves associated with signal expression are largely unknown in the wild due to technical limitations although they are important determinants of signal information content. We compared two visual and eight acoustic sexual traits in male collared flycatchers to see whether the nutritional correlates of expression predict the role of the signal in sexual selection. We used single point assays of plasma lipid metabolites to estimate short-term changes in nutritional state in relation to sexual trait expression during courtship. As a measure of sexual selection, we estimated the relationship with pairing latency after arrival in a 4-year dataset. Males which found a mate rapidly were characterized by large wing and forehead patches, but small song strophe complexity and small figure repertoire size. Traits more strongly related to pairing latency were also more closely related to changes in nutrient reserves. This indicates a link between signal role and information content. Small wing patches and, surprisingly, complex songs seemed to indicate poor phenotypic quality and were apparently disfavoured at mate acquisition in our population. Future studies of the information content of sexual traits, especially dynamic traits such as song, may benefit from the use of plasma metabolite profiles as non-invasive indicators of short-term changes in body condition.

  19. A sexual conflict in collared flycatchers, Ficedula albicollis: early male moult reduces female fitness

    PubMed Central

    Hemborg, C.; Meril, J.

    1998-01-01

    A sexual conflict over levels of parental care occurs in most animals with biparental care, and studies of sexual differences in levels of parental care have usually focused on its intra-annual fitness consequences. We investigated inter-annual fitness consequences of a sexual difference in timing of feather replacement (moult) in collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis). In this study, males overlapped reproduction and moult more often than females, they also initiated their moult at an earlier stage of breeding than females. Females mated to males with a moult-breeding overlap had significantly lowered survival chances than females mated with males initiating moult after breeding. Furthermore, females mated with moulting males risked a lowered future fecundity in terms of a delayed start to breeding in the following season. However, early moulting males achieved a similar reproductive success as males initiating moult after breeding. Likewise, male survival probability to the following breeding season did not differ between early and late moulting individuals, nor was there any evidence that males gained or lost in future mating advantages by moulting early. These results show not only that a sexual conflict over timing of moult may operate, but also that it can impose severe fitness consequences, in terms of reduced future fecundity and survival probability, upon the 'losing' sex.

  20. [EEG in altricial pied flycatcher nestlings during the functional sates related with natural behavior cycle].

    PubMed

    Korneeva, E V; Aleksandrov, L I; Khramov, A E; Sitnikova, E Iu; Raevskiĭ, V V

    2014-01-01

    Electrical brain activity accompanying various forms of behavior was studied in 11-day-old pied flycatcher nestlings. Wavelet analysis of EEG, recorded from symmetrical areas of caudomedial nidopallium (higher avian auditory center) during rest, passive and active wakefulness and movements showed that the major rhythmical EEG component was confined to low-frequency range in all four states. The significant difference from other states was observed only during movements: spectral power in the range of 1-3 Hz decreased while that in the range of 5-20 Hz--increased. The range of 3-5 Hz revealed, in all functional states, the interhemispheric asymmetry of spectral power that could be due to asymmetrical embryonic development of avian visual projections. Active wakefulness and movements were characterized by high positive correlations between spectral power in right and left hemispheres. During rest this correlation was negative. The correlation values during passive wakefulness and rest were rather low that could indicate disintegration of neural connections.

  1. Experimentally activated immune defence in female pied flycatchers results in reduced breeding success.

    PubMed

    Ilmonen, P; Taarna, T; Hasselquist, D

    2000-04-07

    Traditional explanations for the negative fitness consequences of parasitism have focused on the direct pathogenic effects of infectious agents. However, because of the high selection pressure by the parasites, immune defences are likely to be costly and trade off with other fitness-related traits, such as reproductive effort. In a field experiment, we immunized breeding female flycatchers with non-pathogenic antigens (diphtheria-tetanus vaccine), which excluded the direct negative effects of parasites, in order to test the consequences of activated immune defence on hosts' investment in reproduction and self-maintenance. Immunized females decreased their feeding effort and investment in self-maintenance (rectrix regrowth) and had lower reproductive output (fledgling quality and number) than control females injected with saline. Our results reveal the phenotypic cost of immune defence by showing that an activated immune system per se can lower the host's breeding success. This may be caused by an energetic or nutritional trade-off between immune function and physical workload when feeding young or be an adaptive response to 'infection' to avoid physiological disorders such as oxidative stress and immunopathology.

  2. Understanding the colonization history of the Galápagos flycatcher (Myiarchus magnirostris).

    PubMed

    Sari, Eloisa H R; Parker, Patricia G

    2012-05-01

    The Galápagos archipelago has never been connected to any continental land masses, so it is of interest to know the colonization and diversification history of its endemic species. We analyzed the phylogenetic placement of the endemic Galápagos flycatcher, M. magnirostris, within Myiarchus by using the genes ND2 and cytb (1970 bp) to compare 16 of the 22 species that comprise this genus. We also analyzed variability in cytb sequences from 154 M. magnirostris individuals captured on seven Galápagos islands. Our phylogenetic analyses recovered the two main Myiarchus clades that had been described by previous genetic, morphological, and vocal analyses. M. magnirostris is monophyletic and its closest living relative is M. tyrannulus from Mexico and Central America. The average age for the split node between these two groups was approximately 850,000 years (95% C.I. 630,735-1,087,557). M. tyrannulus, M. nugator, M. nuttingi, M. sagrae, and M. stolidus are not monophyletic species. Within M. magnirostris itself, we found low nucleotide and haplotype diversities (π=0.0009 and h=0.4913, respectively) and a high genetic structure among populations. We also detected a star-shaped haplotype network and significantly negative values for Tajima's D and Fu's Fs for this species. Our results suggest that M. magnirostris originated from a single colonization event and had a recent population expansion in the Galápagos archipelago.

  3. Early Acadian exhumation history of garnet-kyanite schists from western Massachusetts determined by LASS analysis of metamorphic monazite (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, E. M.; Snoeyenbos, D. R.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the mechanics of exhumation (e.g. steady vs. episodic processes) requires constraints on the timing and rates of metamorphism and deformation, which can be accomplished by directly dating minerals that formed along the exhumation path. This research focuses on metamorphic monazites contained in restitic high-pressure garnet-kyanite schists from the Goshen Dome in western Massachusetts that record exhumation during the early Acadian. We employ the laser ablation split stream (LASS) technique to simultaneously collect geochronological and geochemical information from the same volume of material. By measuring in situ, LASS analysis allows coordination of petrology, geochemistry and geochronology to reconstruct the timing of metamorphic mineral growth concomitant with exhumation. The gar + ky × crd schists analyzed in this study contain monazite in a variety of petrographic contexts, some of which are interpreted to represent prograde metamorphism. Because we are concerned with exhumation, this contribution focuses on matrix monazite. Matrix monazites are generally aligned with their long axes parallel to foliation. All grains have at least one metamorphic overgrowth, and many grains have multiple generations of overgrowths, thus presenting a detailed record of events. The majority of the matrix monazite cores are 378 to 374 Ma with variable Y concentrations and REE trends. From 375 to 371 Ma, monazite depleted in Y with steep HREE profiles and higher LREE concentrations overgrew pre-existing cores or formed as neoblasts. Dates from most of these monazite domains cluster around 374 to 373 Ma. Neoblasts are typically elongated parallel to the foliation. From 370 to 369 Ma, overgrowths have intermediate Y concentrations with shallower HREE trends and intermediate LREE concentrations, indicating growth during garnet breakdown; these domains are commonly overgrowths with a consistent thickness (ca. 10-15 um), but some domains are more rounded. A pulse of

  4. The relationship between DRD4 polymorphisms and phenotypic correlations of behaviors in the collared flycatcher

    PubMed Central

    Garamszegi, László Z; Mueller, Jakob C; Markó, Gábor; Szász, Eszter; Zsebők, Sándor; Herczeg, Gábor; Eens, Marcel; Török, János

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the genetic architecture of exploration behavior includes the dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4). Such a link implies that the within-individual consistency in the same behavior has a genetic basis. Behavioral consistency is also prevalent in the form of between-individual correlation of functionally different behaviors; thus, the relationship between DRD4 polymorphism and exploration may also be manifested for other behaviors. Here, in a Hungarian population of the collared flycatcher, Ficedula albicollis, we investigate how males with distinct DRD4 genotypes differ in the consistent elements of their behavioral displays during the courtship period. In completely natural conditions, we assayed novelty avoidance, aggression and risk-taking, traits that were previously shown repeatable over time and correlate with each other, suggesting that they could have a common mechanistic basis. We identified two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP554 and SNP764) in the exon 3 of the DRD4 gene by sequencing a subsample, then we screened 202 individuals of both sexes for these SNPs. Focusing on the genotypic variation in courting males, we found that “AC” heterozygote individuals at the SNP764 take lower risk than the most common “AA” homozygotes (the “CC” homozygotes were not represented in our subsample of males). We also found a considerable effect size for the relationship between SNP554 polymorphism and novelty avoidance. Therefore, in addition to exploration, DRD4 polymorphisms may also be associated with the regulation of behaviors that may incur fear or stress. Moreover, polymorphisms at the two SNPs were not independent indicating a potential role for genetic constraints or another functional link, which may partially explain behavioral correlations. PMID:24834341

  5. The relationship between DRD4 polymorphisms and phenotypic correlations of behaviors in the collared flycatcher.

    PubMed

    Garamszegi, László Z; Mueller, Jakob C; Markó, Gábor; Szász, Eszter; Zsebők, Sándor; Herczeg, Gábor; Eens, Marcel; Török, János

    2014-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that the genetic architecture of exploration behavior includes the dopamine receptor D4 gene (DRD4). Such a link implies that the within-individual consistency in the same behavior has a genetic basis. Behavioral consistency is also prevalent in the form of between-individual correlation of functionally different behaviors; thus, the relationship between DRD4 polymorphism and exploration may also be manifested for other behaviors. Here, in a Hungarian population of the collared flycatcher, Ficedula albicollis, we investigate how males with distinct DRD4 genotypes differ in the consistent elements of their behavioral displays during the courtship period. In completely natural conditions, we assayed novelty avoidance, aggression and risk-taking, traits that were previously shown repeatable over time and correlate with each other, suggesting that they could have a common mechanistic basis. We identified two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP554 and SNP764) in the exon 3 of the DRD4 gene by sequencing a subsample, then we screened 202 individuals of both sexes for these SNPs. Focusing on the genotypic variation in courting males, we found that "AC" heterozygote individuals at the SNP764 take lower risk than the most common "AA" homozygotes (the "CC" homozygotes were not represented in our subsample of males). We also found a considerable effect size for the relationship between SNP554 polymorphism and novelty avoidance. Therefore, in addition to exploration, DRD4 polymorphisms may also be associated with the regulation of behaviors that may incur fear or stress. Moreover, polymorphisms at the two SNPs were not independent indicating a potential role for genetic constraints or another functional link, which may partially explain behavioral correlations.

  6. Habitat shifts in the evolutionary history of a Neotropical flycatcher lineage from forest and open landscapes

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Little is known about the role ecological shifts play in the evolution of Neotropical radiations that have colonized a variety of environments. We here examine habitat shifts in the evolutionary history of Elaenia flycatchers, a Neotropical bird lineage that lives in a range of forest and open habitats. We evaluate phylogenetic relationships within the genus based on mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data, and then employ parsimony-based and Bayesian methods to reconstruct preferences for a number of habitat types and migratory behaviour throughout the evolutionary history of the genus. Using a molecular clock approach, we date the most important habitat shifts. Results Our analyses resolve phylogenetic relationships among Elaenia species and confirm several species associations predicted by morphology while furnishing support for other taxon placements that are in conflict with traditional classification, such as the elevation of various Elaenia taxa to species level. While savannah specialism is restricted to one basal clade within the genus, montane forest was invaded from open habitat only on a limited number of occasions. Riparian growth may have been favoured early on in the evolution of the main Elaenia clade and subsequently been deserted on several occasions. Austral long-distance migratory behaviour evolved on several occasions. Conclusion Ancestral reconstructions of habitat preferences reveal pronounced differences not only in the timing of the emergence of certain habitat preferences, but also in the frequency of habitat shifts. The early origin of savannah specialism in Elaenia highlights the importance of this habitat in Neotropical Pliocene and late Miocene biogeography. While forest in old mountain ranges such as the Tepuis and the Brazilian Shield was colonized early on, the most important colonization event of montane forest was in conjunction with Pliocene Andean uplift. Riparian habitats may have played an important role in

  7. 75 FR 13275 - Environmental Impacts Statements; Notice of Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... Desert Tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and Southwestern Williow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus...) Development and Environment Study Project, From I-95 to West Channel Bridges of the MacArthur Causeway...

  8. Candidate genes for colour and vision exhibit signals of selection across the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) breeding range.

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, P K; Laaksonen, T; Artemyev, A V; Belskii, E; Berg, P R; Both, C; Buggiotti, L; Bureš, S; Burgess, M D; Bushuev, A V; Krams, I; Moreno, J; Mägi, M; Nord, A; Potti, J; Ravussin, P-A; Sirkiä, P M; Sætre, G-P; Winkel, W; Primmer, C R

    2012-04-01

    The role of natural selection in shaping adaptive trait differentiation in natural populations has long been recognized. Determining its molecular basis, however, remains a challenge. Here, we search for signals of selection in candidate genes for colour and its perception in a passerine bird. Pied flycatcher plumage varies geographically in both its structural and pigment-based properties. Both characteristics appear to be shaped by selection. A single-locus outlier test revealed 2 of 14 loci to show significantly elevated signals of divergence. The first of these, the follistatin gene, is expressed in the developing feather bud and is found in pathways with genes that determine the structure of feathers and may thus be important in generating variation in structural colouration. The second is a gene potentially underlying the ability to detect this variation: SWS1 opsin. These two loci were most differentiated in two Spanish pied flycatcher populations, which are also among the populations that have the highest UV reflectance. The follistatin and SWS1 opsin genes thus provide strong candidates for future investigations on the molecular basis of adaptively significant traits and their co-evolution.

  9. Differentiation in neutral genes and a candidate gene in the pied flycatcher: using biological archives to track global climate change.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Kerstin; Schwenk, Klaus; Both, Christiaan; Canal, David; Johansson, Ulf S; van der Mije, Steven; Töpfer, Till; Päckert, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Global climate change is one of the major driving forces for adaptive shifts in migration and breeding phenology and possibly impacts demographic changes if a species fails to adapt sufficiently. In Western Europe, pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) have insufficiently adapted their breeding phenology to the ongoing advance of food peaks within their breeding area and consequently suffered local population declines. We address the question whether this population decline led to a loss of genetic variation, using two neutral marker sets (mitochondrial control region and microsatellites), and one potentially selectively non-neutral marker (avian Clock gene). We report temporal changes in genetic diversity in extant populations and biological archives over more than a century, using samples from sites differing in the extent of climate change. Comparing genetic differentiation over this period revealed that only the recent Dutch population, which underwent population declines, showed slightly lower genetic variation than the historic Dutch population. As that loss of variation was only moderate and not observed in all markers, current gene flow across Western and Central European populations might have compensated local loss of variation over the last decades. A comparison of genetic differentiation in neutral loci versus the Clock gene locus provided evidence for stabilizing selection. Furthermore, in all genetic markers, we found a greater genetic differentiation in space than in time. This pattern suggests that local adaptation or historic processes might have a stronger effect on the population structure and genetic variation in the pied flycatcher than recent global climate changes.

  10. Genetic mapping in a natural population of collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis): conserved synteny but gene order rearrangements on the avian Z chromosome.

    PubMed

    Backström, Niclas; Brandström, Mikael; Gustafsson, Lars; Qvarnström, Anna; Cheng, Hans; Ellegren, Hans

    2006-09-01

    Data from completely sequenced genomes are likely to open the way for novel studies of the genetics of nonmodel organisms, in particular when it comes to the identification and analysis of genes responsible for traits that are under selection in natural populations. Here we use the draft sequence of the chicken genome as a starting point for linkage mapping in a wild bird species, the collared flycatcher - one of the most well-studied avian species in ecological and evolutionary research. A pedigree of 365 flycatchers was established and genotyped for single nucleotide polymorphisms in 23 genes selected from (and spread over most of) the chicken Z chromosome. All genes were also found to be located on the Z chromosome in the collared flycatcher, confirming conserved synteny at the level of gene content across distantly related avian lineages. This high degree of conservation mimics the situation seen for the mammalian X chromosome and may thus be a general feature in sex chromosome evolution, irrespective of whether there is male or female heterogamety. Alternatively, such unprecedented chromosomal conservation may be characteristic of most chromosomes in avian genome evolution. However, several internal rearrangements were observed, meaning that the transfer of map information from chicken to nonmodel bird species cannot always assume conserved gene orders. Interestingly, the rate of recombination on the Z chromosome of collared flycatchers was only approximately 50% that of chicken, challenging the widely held view that birds generally have high recombination rates.

  11. Low level of extra-pair paternity between nearest neighbors results from female preference for high-quality males in the yellow-rumped flycatcher (Ficedula zanthopygia)

    PubMed Central

    E, Mingju; Gong, Ye; Yu, Jiangping; Zhang, Siyu; Fan, Qianxi; Jiang, Yunlei

    2017-01-01

    Extra-pair copulation is considered to be a means by which females can modify their initial mate choice, and females might obtain indirect benefits to offspring fitness by engaging in this behavior. Here, we examined the patterns of extra-pair paternity and female preferences in the yellow-rumped flycatcher (Ficedula zanthopygia). We found that female yellow-rumped flycatchers are more likely to choose larger and relatively highly heterozygous males than their social mates as extra-pair mates, that the genetic similarity of pairs that produced mixed-paternity offspring did not differ from the similarity of pairs producing only within-pair offspring, and that extra-pair offspring were more heterozygous than their half-siblings. These findings support the good genes hypothesis but do not exclude the compatibility hypothesis. Most female yellow-rumped flycatchers attained extra-pair paternity with distant males rather than their nearest accessible neighboring males, and no differences in genetic and phenotypic characteristics were detected between cuckolded males and their nearest neighbors. There was no evidence that extra-pair mating by female flycatchers reduced inbreeding. Moreover, breeding density, breeding synchrony and their interaction did not affect the occurrence of extra-pair paternity in this species. Our results suggest that the variation in extra-pair paternity distribution between nearest neighbors in some passerine species might result from female preference for highly heterozygous males. PMID:28257431

  12. Interactions between the Avian Parasite, Philornis downsi (Diptera: Muscidae) and the Galapagos Flycatcher, Myiarchus magnirostris Gould (Passeriformes: Tyrannidae).

    PubMed

    Lincango, Piedad; Causton, Charlotte; Cedeño, Daniel; Castañeda, Johanna; Hillstrom, Alexandra; Freund, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    An incidental observation of the fly Philornis downsi parasitizing a Galapagos Flycatcher (Myiarchus magnirostris) nest has revealed new insights into the searching behavior and biology of this invasive fly parasite and its interactions with endemic landbirds in the Galapagos Islands. Observations suggest that P. downsi relies on olfactory cues, or olfactory cues combined with the activity of adult birds, to locate nests and that flies continue to visit nests when chicks are >3 d old. At least 200 eggs were laid by P. downsi in different parts of the nest and >40 early-instar larvae were found inside the head of one chick, with additional larvae found in the base of the nest. Parasitism was the likely cause of mortality of both chicks found in or near the nest. This description of P. downsi parasitizing chicks of M. magnirostris highlights the vulnerability of this endemic bird species to this invasive fly.

  13. A high-density linkage map enables a second-generation collared flycatcher genome assembly and reveals the patterns of avian recombination rate variation and chromosomal evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Takeshi; Smeds, Linnéa; Backström, Niclas; Husby, Arild; Qvarnström, Anna; Mugal, Carina F; Olason, Pall; Ellegren, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Detailed linkage and recombination rate maps are necessary to use the full potential of genome sequencing and population genomic analyses. We used a custom collared flycatcher 50 K SNP array to develop a high-density linkage map with 37 262 markers assigned to 34 linkage groups in 33 autosomes and the Z chromosome. The best-order map contained 4215 markers, with a total distance of 3132 cm and a mean genetic distance between markers of 0.12 cm. Facilitated by the array being designed to include markers from most scaffolds, we obtained a second-generation assembly of the flycatcher genome that approaches full chromosome sequences (N50 super-scaffold size 20.2 Mb and with 1.042 Gb (of 1.116 Gb) anchored to and mostly ordered and oriented along chromosomes). We found that flycatcher and zebra finch chromosomes are entirely syntenic but that inversions at mean rates of 1.5–2.0 event (6.6–7.5 Mb) per My have changed the organization within chromosomes, rates high enough for inversions to potentially have been involved with many speciation events during avian evolution. The mean recombination rate was 3.1 cm/Mb and correlated closely with chromosome size, from 2 cm/Mb for chromosomes >100 Mb to >10 cm/Mb for chromosomes <10 Mb. This size dependence seemed entirely due to an obligate recombination event per chromosome; if 50 cm was subtracted from the genetic lengths of chromosomes, the rate per physical unit DNA was constant across chromosomes. Flycatcher recombination rate showed similar variation along chromosomes as chicken but lacked the large interior recombination deserts characteristic of zebra finch chromosomes. PMID:24863701

  14. Identifying the African Wintering Grounds of Hybrid Flycatchers Using a Multi–Isotope (δ2H, δ13C, δ15N) Assignment Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Wilgenburg, Steven L.; Hobson, Keith A.; Folmer, Eelke; Font, Laura; Klaassen, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Migratory routes and wintering grounds can have important fitness consequences, which can lead to divergent selection on populations or taxa differing in their migratory itinerary. Collared (Ficedula albicollis) and pied (F. hypoleuca) flycatchers breeding in Europe and wintering in different sub-Saharan regions have distinct migratory routes on the eastern and western sides of the Sahara desert, respectively. In an earlier paper, we showed that hybrids of the two species did not incur reduced winter survival, which would be expected if their migration strategy had been a mix of the parent species' strategies potentially resulting in an intermediate route crossing the Sahara desert to different wintering grounds. Previously, we compared isotope ratios and found no significant difference in stable-nitrogen isotope ratios (δ15N) in winter-grown feathers between the parental species and hybrids, but stable-carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in hybrids significantly clustered only with those of pied flycatchers. We followed up on these findings and additionally analyzed the same feathers for stable-hydrogen isotope ratios (δ2H) and conducted spatially explicit multi-isotope assignment analyses. The assignment results overlapped with presumed wintering ranges of the two species, highlighting the efficacy of the method. In contrast to earlier findings, hybrids clustered with both parental species, though most strongly with pied flycatcher. PMID:24847717

  15. Foreland-forearc collisional granitoid and mafic magmatism caused by lower-plate lithospheric slab breakoff: The Acadian of Maine, and other orogens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoonmaker, A.; Kidd, W.S.F.; Bradley, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    During collisional convergence, failure in extension of the lithosphere of the lower plate due to slab pull will reduce the thickness or completely remove lower-plate lithosphere and cause decompression melting of the asthenospheric mantle; magmas from this source may subsequently provide enough heat for substantial partial melting of crustal rocks under or beyond the toe of the collisional accretionary system. In central Maine, United States, this type of magmatism is first apparent in the Early Devonian West Branch Volcanics and equivalent mafic volcanics, in the slightly younger voluminous mafic/silicic magmatic event of the Moxie Gabbro-Katahdin batholith and related ignimbrite volcanism, and in other Early Devonian granitic plutons. Similar lower-plate collisional sequences with mafic and related silicic magmatism probably caused by slab breakoff are seen in the Miocene-Holocene Papuan orogen, and the Hercynian-Alleghenian belt. Magmatism of this type is significant because it gives evidence in those examples of whole-lithosphere extension. We infer that normal fault systems in outer trench slopes of collisional orogens in general, and possibly those of oceanic subduction zones, may not be primarily due to flexural bending, but are also driven by whole-lithosphere extension due to slab pull. The Maine Acadian example suggests that slab failure and this type of magmatism may be promoted by pre-existing large margin-parallel faults in the lower plate. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  16. Effects of pollution on land snail abundance, size and diversity as resources for pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca.

    PubMed

    Eeva, Tapio; Rainio, Kalle; Suominen, Otso

    2010-09-01

    Passerine birds need extra calcium during their breeding for developing egg shells and proper growth of nestling skeleton. Land snails are an important calcium source for many passerines and human-induced changes in snail populations may pose a severe problem for breeding birds. We studied from the bird's viewpoint how air pollution affects the shell mass, abundance and diversity of land snail communities along a pollution gradient of a copper smelter. We sampled remnant snail shells from the nests of an insectivorous passerine, the pied flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca, to find out how the availability of land snails varies along the pollution gradient. The total snail shell mass increased towards the pollution source but declined abruptly in the vicinity of the smelter. This spatial variation in shell mass was evident also within a single snail species and could not be wholly explained by spatially varying snail numbers or species composition. Instead, the total shell mass was related to their shell size, individuals being largest at the moderately polluted areas. Smaller shell size suggests inferior growth of snails in the most heavily polluted area. Our study shows that pollution affects the diversity, abundance (available shell mass) and individual quality of land snails, posing reproductive problems for birds that rely on snails as calcium sources during breeding. There are probably both direct pollution-related (heavy metal and calcium levels) and indirect (habitat change) effects behind the observed changes in snail populations.

  17. Foveolar Müller Cells of the Pied Flycatcher: Morphology and Distribution of Intermediate Filaments Regarding Cell Transparency.

    PubMed

    Zueva, Lidia; Golubeva, Tatiana; Korneeva, Elena; Makarov, Vladimir; Khmelinskii, Igor; Inyushin, Mikhail

    2016-04-01

    Specialized intermediate filaments (IFs) have critical importance for the clearness and uncommon transparency of vertebrate lens fiber cells, although the physical mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Recently, an unusual low-scattering light transport was also described in retinal Müller cells. Exploring the function of IFs in Müller cells, we have studied the morphology and distribution pattern of IFs and other cytoskeletal filaments inside the Müller cell main processes in the foveolar part of the avian (pied flycatcher) retina. We found that some IFs surrounded by globular nanoparticles (that we suggest are crystallines) are present in almost every part of the Müller cells that span the retina, including the microvilli. Unlike IFs implicated in the mechanical architecture of the cell, these IFs are not connected to any specific cellular membranes. Instead, they are organized into bundles, passing inside the cell from the endfeet to the photoreceptor, following the geometry of the processes, and repeatedly circumventing numerous obstacles. We believe that the presently reported data effectively confirm that the model of nanooptical channels built of the IFs may provide a viable explanation of Müller cell transparency.

  18. Integrated plumage colour variation in relation to body condition, reproductive investment and laying date in the collared flycatcher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laczi, Miklós; Hegyi, Gergely; Herényi, Márton; Kiss, Dorottya; Markó, Gábor; Nagy, Gergely; Rosivall, Balázs; Szöllősi, Eszter; Török, János

    2013-10-01

    The possible integration of different sexual ornaments into a composite system, and especially the information content of such ornament complexes, is poorly investigated. Many bird species display complex plumage coloration, but whether this represents one integrated or several independent sexual traits can be unclear. Collared flycatchers ( Ficedula albicollis) display melanised and depigmented plumage areas, and the spectral features (brightness and UV chroma) of these are correlated with each other across the plumage. In a 5-year dataset of male and female plumage reflectance, we examined some of the potential information content of integrated, plumage-level colour attributes by estimating their relationships to previous and current year body condition, laying date and clutch size. Females were in better condition the year before they became darker pigmented, and males in better current year condition were also darker pigmented. Female pigment-based brightness was positively, while male structurally based brightness was negatively related to current laying date. Finally, the overall UV chroma of white plumage areas in males was positively associated with current clutch size. Our results show that higher degree of pigmentation is related to better condition, while the structural colour component is associated with some aspects of reproductive investment. These results highlight the possibility that correlated aspects of a multiple plumage ornamentation system may reflect together some aspects of individual quality, thereby functioning as a composite signal.

  19. Out of Amazonia again and again: episodic crossing of the Andes promotes diversification in a lowland forest flycatcher

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Matthew J; Bermingham, Eldredge; Klicka, John; Escalante, Patricia; do Amaral, Fabio S. Raposo; Weir, Jason T; Winker, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Most Neotropical lowland forest taxa occur exclusively on one side of the Andes despite the availability of appropriate habitat on both sides. Almost all molecular phylogenies and phylogenetic analyses of species assemblages (i.e. area cladograms) have supported the hypothesis that Andean uplift during the Late Pliocene created a vicariant barrier affecting lowland lineages in the region. However, a few widespread plant and animal species occurring in lowland forests on both sides of the Andes challenge the generality of this hypothesis. To understand the role of the Andes in the history of such organisms, we reconstructed the phylogeographic history of a widespread Neotropical flycatcher (Mionectes oleagineus) in the context of the other four species in the genus. A molecular phylogeny based on nuclear and mitochondrial sequences unambiguously showed an early basal split between montane and lowland Mionectes. The phylogeographic reconstruction of lowland taxa revealed a complex history, with multiple cases in which geographically proximate populations do not represent sister lineages. Specifically, three populations of M. oleagineus west of the Andes do not comprise a monophyletic clade; instead, each represents an independent lineage with origins east of the Andes. Divergence time estimates suggest that at least two cross-Andean dispersal events post-date Andean uplift. PMID:18285279

  20. Textural aspects of high T-low P polymetamorphism in the Rangeley area, western Maine: General implications for studies of Acadian metamorphic rocks in New England

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, C.V. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    High T-Low P polymetamorphism in W. Maine results from overlapping, regionally extensive thermal aureoles around sheet-like granitic plutons. At least five metamorphic events have been recognized. The Rangeley-Oquossoc (R-O) area was affected by two high T, static events (M[sub 2] and M[sub 3]). M[sub 2], (400 Ma) developed and + St + Bt regionally. M[sub 3] (370 Ma), due to heating by the sheet-like Mooselookmeguntic Pluton (MP), is superimposed on M[sub 2] such that near the MP, M[sub 2] rocks were prograded to upper sillimanite zone, migmatitic gneisses. To the E., M[sub 2] rocks have been downgraded to garnet zone. Mineral chemistry and assemblage data strongly suggest that M[sub 3] parageneses closely approximated a new equilibrium. These temporally separate superimposed events produced pseudomorphic replacement textures; in the E. by downgrade reactions; in the W. by prograde reactions. The nature of the downgrade or prograde pseudomorphs reflects where they occur in the M[sub 3] range of metamorphic grades. Some authors have interpreted these textures as due to continuous PTt paths or K-metasomatism. Even worse, in some studies the textures are simply ignored and mineral assemblages merely assumed to be the result of a single, equilibrium metamorphic event. The three Al-silicate rocks in the Littleton-Mooselauke area of New Hampshire probably fall in this latter category. It is suggested that in most cases such textures are best interpreted as the R-O area. Metamorphic textures probably are unique in some aspects related to the details of the metamorphism(s) of the given area. However, in New England the commonness in Acadian metamorphic rocks of textures similar to those found in the fortuitously well displayed example of temporally separated polymetamorphism in the R-O area suggests a basis to recognize similar histories elsewhere.

  1. 40Ar/39Ar whole-rock data constraints on Acadian diagenesis and Alleghanian cleavage in the Martinsburg Formation, eastern Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wintsch, R.P.; Kunk, M.J.; Epstein, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    A comparison of 40Ar/39Ar age spectra of whole-rock mudstone and slate samples from the Ordovician Martinsburg Formation at Lehigh Gap, Pennsylvania, and stratigraphic and thermal constraints support an Alleghanian age for regional slaty cleavage and a late Acadian age for diagenesis in these rocks. Age spectra from mudstones have a sigmoidal shape, with slopes that climb steeply from apparent Mesozoic ages to intermediate saddle regions with Devonian apparent ages, and then climb steeply again to Late Proterozoic apparent ages. The steps with these oldest apparent ages are interpreted to be dominated by Late Proterozoic detrital muscovite. The saddle region of the mudstone samples gives very Late Silurian to earliest Devonian ages, which are maximum ages of diagenetic micas and which eliminate a Taconic age for the cleavage. The ages of the saddle regions of the slate samples containing cleavage-forming muscovite is

  2. Genomic distribution and estimation of nucleotide diversity in natural populations: perspectives from the collared flycatcher (Ficedula albicollis) genome.

    PubMed

    Dutoit, Ludovic; Burri, Reto; Nater, Alexander; Mugal, Carina F; Ellegren, Hans

    2016-09-26

    Properly estimating genetic diversity in populations of nonmodel species requires a basic understanding of how diversity is distributed across the genome and among individuals. To this end, we analysed whole-genome resequencing data from 20 collared flycatchers (genome size ≈1.1 Gb; 10.13 million single nucleotide polymorphisms detected). Genomewide nucleotide diversity was almost identical among individuals (mean = 0.00394, range = 0.00384-0.00401), but diversity levels varied extensively across the genome (95% confidence interval for 200-kb windows = 0.0013-0.0053). Diversity was related to selective constraint such that in comparison with intergenic DNA, diversity at fourfold degenerate sites was reduced to 85%, 3' UTRs to 82%, 5' UTRs to 70% and nondegenerate sites to 12%. There was a strong positive correlation between diversity and chromosome size, probably driven by a higher density of targets for selection on smaller chromosomes increasing the diversity-reducing effect of linked selection. Simulations exploring the ability of sequence data from a small number of genetic markers to capture the observed diversity clearly demonstrated that diversity estimation from finite sampling of such data is bound to be associated with large confidence intervals. Nevertheless, we show that precision in diversity estimation in large outbred population benefits from increasing the number of loci rather than the number of individuals. Simulations mimicking RAD sequencing showed that this approach gives accurate estimates of genomewide diversity. Based on the patterns of observed diversity and the performed simulations, we provide broad recommendations for how genetic diversity should be estimated in natural populations.

  3. Introgression and phenotypic assimilation in Zimmerius flycatchers (Tyrannidae): population genetic and phylogenetic inferences from genome-wide SNPs.

    PubMed

    Rheindt, Frank E; Fujita, Matthew K; Wilton, Peter R; Edwards, Scott V

    2014-03-01

    Genetic introgression is pervasive in nature and may lead to large-scale phenotypic assimilation and/or admixture of populations, but there is limited knowledge on whether large phenotypic changes are typically accompanied by high levels of introgression throughout the genome. Using bioacoustic, biometric, and spectrophotometric data from a flycatcher (Tyrannidae) system in the Neotropical genus Zimmerius, we document a mosaic pattern of phenotypic admixture in which a population of Zimmerius viridiflavus in northern Peru (henceforth "mosaic") is vocally and biometrically similar to conspecifics to the south but shares plumage characteristics with a different species (Zimmerius chrysops) to the north. To clarify the origins of the mosaic population, we used the RAD-seq approach to generate a data set of 37,361 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A range of population-genetic diagnostics shows that the genome of the mosaic population is largely indistinguishable from southern Z. viridiflavus and distinct from northern Z. chrysops, and the application of parsimony and species tree methods to the genome-wide SNP data set confirms the close affinity of the mosaic population with southern Z. viridiflavus. Even so, using a subset of 2710 SNPs found across all sampled lineages in configurations appropriate for a recently proposed statistical ("ABBA/BABA") test that distinguishes gene flow from incomplete lineage sorting, we detected low levels of gene flow from northern Z. chrysops into the mosaic population. Mapping the candidate loci for introgression from Z. chrysops into the mosaic population to the zebra finch genome reveals close linkage with genes significantly enriched in functions involving cell projection and plasma membranes. Introgression of key alleles may have led to phenotypic assimilation in the plumage of mosaic birds, suggesting that selection may have been a key factor facilitating introgression.

  4. Building hierarchical models of avian distributions for the State of Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howell, J.E.; Peterson, J.T.; Conroy, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    To predict the distributions of breeding birds in the state of Georgia, USA, we built hierarchical models consisting of 4 levels of nested mapping units of decreasing area: 90,000 ha, 3,600 ha, 144 ha, and 5.76 ha. We used the Partners in Flight database of point counts to generate presence and absence data at locations across the state of Georgia for 9 avian species: Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens), brownheaded nuthatch (Sitta pusilla), Carolina wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus), indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea), northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), prairie warbler (Dendroica discolor), yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyxus americanus), white-eyed vireo (Vireo griseus), and wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina). At each location, we estimated hierarchical-level-specific habitat measurements using the Georgia GAP Analysis18 class land cover and other Geographic Information System sources. We created candidate, species-specific occupancy models based on previously reported relationships, and fit these using Markov chain Monte Carlo procedures implemented in OpenBugs. We then created a confidence model set for each species based on Akaike's Information Criterion. We found hierarchical habitat relationships for all species. Three-fold cross-validation estimates of model accuracy indicated an average overall correct classification rate of 60.5%. Comparisons with existing Georgia GAP Analysis models indicated that our models were more accurate overall. Our results provide guidance to wildlife scientists and managers seeking predict avian occurrence as a function of local and landscape-level habitat attributes.

  5. Temperature can interact with landscape factors to affect songbird productivity.

    PubMed

    Cox, W Andrew; Thompson, Frank R; Reidy, Jennifer L; Faaborg, John

    2013-04-01

    Increased temperatures and more extreme weather patterns associated with global climate change can interact with other factors that regulate animal populations, but many climate change studies do not incorporate other threats to wildlife in their analyses. We used 20 years of nest-monitoring data from study sites across a gradient of habitat fragmentation in Missouri, USA, to investigate the relative influence of weather variables (temperature and precipitation) and landscape factors (forest cover and edge density) on the number of young produced per nest attempt (i.e., productivity) for three species of songbirds. We detected a strong forest cover × temperature interaction for the Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) on productivity. Greater forest cover resulted in greater productivity because of reduced brood parasitism and increased nest survival, whereas greater temperatures reduced productivity in highly forested landscapes because of increased nest predation but had no effect in less forested landscapes. The Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) exhibited a similar pattern, albeit with a marginal forest cover × temperature interaction. By contrast, productivity of the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) was not influenced by landscape effects or temperature. Our results highlight a potential difficulty of managing wildlife in response to global change such as habitat fragmentation and climate warming, as the habitat associated with the greatest productivity for flycatchers was also that most negatively influenced by high temperatures. The influence of high temperatures on nest predation (and therefore, nest predators) underscores the need to acknowledge the potential complexity of species' responses to climate change by incorporating a more thorough consideration of community ecology in the development of models of climate impacts on wildlife.

  6. [Visual input affects the expression of the early genes c-Fos and ZENK in auditory telencephalic centers of pied flycatcher nestlings during the acoustically-guided freezing].

    PubMed

    Korneeva, E V; Tiunova, A A; Aleksandrov, L I; Golubeva, T B; Anokhin, K V

    2014-01-01

    The present study analyzed expression of transcriptional factors c-Fos and ZENK in 9-day-old pied flycatcher nestlings' (Ficedula hypoleuca) telencephalic auditory centers (field L, caudomedial nidopallium and caudomedial mesopallium) involved in the acoustically-guided defense behavior. Species-typical alarm call was presented to the young in three groups: 1--intact group (sighted control), 2--nestlings visually deprived just before the experiment for a short time (unsighted control) 3--nestlings visually deprived right after hatching (experimental deprivation). Induction of c-Fos as well as ZENK in nestlings from the experimental deprivation group was decreased in both hemispheres as compared with intact group. In the group of unsighted control, only the decrease of c-Fos induction was observed exclusively in the right hemisphere. These findings suggest that limitation of visual input changes the population of neurons involved into the acoustically-guided behavior, the effect being dependant from the duration of deprivation.

  7. [Estimation of heritability and repeatability of resting metabolic rate in birds, with free-living pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca (Aves: Passeriformes) as an example].

    PubMed

    Bushuev, A V; Kerimov, A B; Ivankina, E V

    2010-01-01

    Estimates of a trait heritability and repeatability can get at an idea of its usefulness for being an individual characteristic and its ability to change under selection pressure. Heritability and repeatability of energetic parameters still poorly studied in birds. The most important physiological characteristic of homoiotherms is resting metabolic rate (RMR), which, in the absence of productive processes, does not exceed basal metabolic rate (BMR). We estimated BMR repeatability in free-living pied flycatchers in Moscow Region (55 degrees 44' N, 36 degrees 51' E; 1992-2008) and Tomsk (56 degrees 20' N, 84 degrees 56' E; 2008-2009) populations over intervals from 40 days to 3 years. In Moscow Region population, BMR repeatability amounted to tau = 0.34 +/- 0.10 (n=80) if measured over 1 year interval, tau = 0.60 +/- 0.15 (n=19) if measured over 2 years interval, and tau = 0.85 +/- 0.13 (n=6) if measured over 3 years interval providing that consecutive BMR measurements were done in the same period of reproductive season. In Tomsk population, BMR repeatability, measured over 1 year interval, amounted to tau = 0.49 +/- 0.11 (n=50). Repeatability is a measure of a trait constancy and sets the upper limit of its heritability. To estimate RMR heritability, cross-fostering experiments have been conducted in 2003-2005 with flycatchers of Moscow Region population. RMR of chicks positively correlated with BMR of their biological fathers, whereas such correlation in metabolic rates between chicks and their foster fathers was absent. The RMR heritability estimate turned out to be h2 = 0.43 +/- 0.17 (n=210). The obtained estimates of heritability and repeatability of fundamental energetic traits are rather high for physiological features. This suggests the existence of a potential for direct selection on BMR and evolutionary stable diversity of avian populations with regard to basal metabolic rate.

  8. Phylogeography of the Vermilion Flycatcher species complex: Multiple speciation events, shifts in migratory behavior, and an apparent extinction of a Galápagos-endemic bird species.

    PubMed

    Carmi, Ore; Witt, Christopher C; Jaramillo, Alvaro; Dumbacher, John P

    2016-09-01

    The Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) is a widespread species found in North and South America and the Galápagos. Its 12 recognized subspecies vary in degree of geographic isolation, phenotypic distinctness, and migratory status. Some authors suggest that Galápagos subspecies nanus and dubius constitute one or more separate species. Observational reports of distinct differences in song also suggest separate species status for the austral migrant subspecies rubinus. To evaluate geographical patterns of diversification and taxonomic limits within this species complex, we carried out a molecular phylogenetic analysis encompassing 10 subspecies and three outgroup taxa using mitochondrial (ND2, Cyt b) and nuclear loci (ODC introns 6 through 7, FGB intron 5). We used samples of preserved tissues from museum collections as well as toe pad samples from museum skins. Galápagos and continental clades were recovered as sister groups, with initial divergence at ∼1mya. Within the continental clade, North and South American populations were sister groups. Three geographically distinct clades were recovered within South America. We detected no genetic differences between two broadly intergrading North American subspecies, mexicanus and flammeus, suggesting they should not be recognized as separate taxa. Four western South American subspecies were also indistinguishable on the basis of loci that we sampled, but occur in a region with patchy habitat, and may represent recently isolated populations. The austral migrant subspecies, rubinus, comprised a monophyletic mitochondrial clade and had many unique nuclear DNA alleles. In combination with its distinct song, exclusive song recognition behavior, different phenology, and an isolated breeding range, our data suggests that this taxon represents a separate species from other continental populations. Mitochondrial and nuclear genetic data, morphology, and behavior suggest that Galápagos forms should be elevated to two

  9. Laying date and polygyny as determinants of annual reproductive success in male collared flycatchers ( Ficedula albicollis): a long-term study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herényi, Márton; Garamszegi, László Zsolt; Hargitai, Rita; Hegyi, Gergely; Rosivall, Balázs; Szöllősi, Eszter; Török, János

    2014-04-01

    Annual reproductive success (ARS) is one of the main components of lifetime reproductive success, a reliable measure of individual fitness. Previous studies often dealt with ARS and variables potentially affecting it. Among them, long-term studies that consider multiple factors at the same time are particularly important in understanding the adaptive value of different phenotypes. Here, we used an 18-year dataset to quantify the ARS of male collared flycatchers ( Ficedula albicollis) on the basis of recruited offspring. We simultaneously assessed the effect of start of breeding, age, polygyny, body size and the expression of forehead patch (a sexually selected trait). The success of early breeding individuals was appreciably higher than late birds; however, breeding too early was also disadvantaged, and males that bred around the yearly median breeding date had the highest ARS. Polygynous males were more successful in years with good food supply, while in years with low food availability, they did not produce more recruits than monogamous males. The age of males, their forehead patch size and body size did not affect the number of recruits. Our findings support the importance of breeding date and suggest stabilizing selection on it in the long term. We also show that polygyny is not always advantageous for males, and its fitness pay-off may depend on environmental quality.

  10. Expeditionary Readiness Course Expansion Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment, Nevada Test and Training Range

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    Updated May 2, 2008) CLARK COUNTY Birds E Southwestern willow flycatcher Empidonax traillii extimus C Yellow-billed cuckoo (Western U.S...species_by_county.html 1 NYE COUNTY Birds C Yellow-billed cuckoo (Western U.S. Distinct Population Segment) Coccyzus americanus E Southwestern

  11. Retrospective multicenter evaluation of the "fly-catching syndrome" in 24 dogs: EEG, BAER, MRI, CSF findings and response to antiepileptic and antidepressant treatment.

    PubMed

    Wrzosek, Marcin; Płonek, Marta; Nicpoń, Józef; Cizinauskas, Sigitas; Pakozdy, Akos

    2015-12-01

    The fly-catching syndrome (FCS) is a rare canine condition of sudden, occasional, or constant episodes of biting the air. It may be accompanied by jumping, licking, and swallowing. The etiology of FCS is unknown and controversial. Various explanations for its occurrence have included epileptoid disorders such as visual cortex epileptiform disturbances and simple and complex partial seizures as well as compulsive disorders, hallucinatory behavior, and stereotypy. A retrospective multicenter analysis of 24 dogs with clinical symptoms of FCS is presented. Clinical signs at the time of presentation, the mean age at onset of the disease, the response to treatment, and the clinical outcome were recorded and analyzed in all patients. All dogs underwent clinical, neurological, and otoscopic examinations. Complete blood cell counts (CBCs) and serum chemistry panels were obtained from each dog. Diagnostic testing included MRI and EEG examinations in 21 cases, BAER in 19 cases, and CSF analysis in 20 cases. The EEG revealed spike activity in 8 (38%) of the 21 cases, 7 of which had activity in the occipital lobes. The brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) revealed three cases of bilateral deafness. The MRI revealed six cases of Chiari malformation (CM), one case of syringohydromyelia (SM), and one case of a falx cerebri meningioma. The dogs were divided into groups according to their treatment protocol. Group A included dogs treated with phenobarbital (PB), and group B consisted of dogs treated with fluoxetine (FLX). Thirty-six percent of the dogs in group A responded to PB, while 100% of the dogs in group B responded to FLX. The results suggest that FCS is more responsive to FLX than PB. However, the etiology of this behavior remains unclear in most cases.

  12. Breeding birds in managed forests on public conservation lands in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, Daniel J.; Wilson, R. Randy

    2017-01-01

    Managers of public conservation lands in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley have implemented forest management strategies to improve bottomland hardwood habitat for target wildlife species. Through implementation of various silvicultural practices, forest managers have sought to attain forest structural conditions (e.g., canopy cover, basal area, etc.) within values postulated to benefit wildlife. We evaluated data from point count surveys of breeding birds on 180 silviculturally treated stands (1049 counts) that ranged from 1 to 20 years post-treatment and 134 control stands (676 counts) that had not been harvested for >20 years. Birds detected during 10-min counts were recorded within four distance classes and three time intervals. Avian diversity was greater on treated stands than on unharvested stands. Of 42 commonly detected species, six species including Prothonotary Warbler (Prothonotaria citrea) and Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) were indicative of control stands. Similarly, six species including Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) and Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens) were indicative of treated stands. Using a removal model to assess probability of detection, we evaluated occupancy of bottomland forests at two spatial scales (stands and points within occupied stands). Wildlife-forestry treatment improved predictive models of species occupancy for 18 species. We found years post treatment (range = 1–20), total basal area, and overstory canopy were important species-specific predictors of occupancy, whereas variability in basal area was not. In addition, we used a removal model to estimate species-specific probability of availability for detection, and a distance model to estimate effective detection radius. We used these two estimated parameters to derive species densities and 95% confidence intervals for treated and unharvested stands. Avian densities differed between treated and control stands for 16 species, but only Common Yellowthroat

  13. Declining Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) populations are associated with landscape-specific reductions in brood parasitism and increases in songbird productivity.

    PubMed

    Cox, W Andrew; Thompson, Frank R; Root, Brian; Faaborg, John

    2012-01-01

    Many songbird species have experienced significant population declines, partly because of brood parasitism by the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater), which is positively associated with increasing landscape forest cover in the midwestern United States. However, cowbirds are also experiencing long-term population declines, which should reduce parasitism pressure and thus increase productivity of host species. We used 20 years of nest monitoring data from five sites in Missouri across a gradient of landscape forest cover to assess temporal trends in the rate and intensity of brood parasitism for Acadian Flycatchers (Empidonax virescens), Indigo Buntings (Passerina cyanea), and Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis). We evaluated whether there were concomitant changes in fledging brood size, nest survival, a combination of the two metrics (i.e., host young produced per nest attempt), and whether such changes were more substantial with decreasing landscape forest cover. Parasitism rates and intensities declined substantially during 1991-2010. Fledging brood size and nest survival rates were positively associated with landscape forest cover, confirming the fragmentation hypothesis for Midwest forest birds. Declining parasitism rates were associated with increased fledging brood sizes, with more pronounced increases as landscape forest cover decreased. Nest survival increased insubstantially across time during laying and incubation, but not during the nestling stage. The best predictor of nest survival was parasitism status, with parasitized nests surviving at lower rates than unparasitized nests. Overall, productivity increased during 1991-2010, with more pronounced increases associated with lower levels of landscape forest cover. The negative effects of cowbirds on nest survival in addition to fledging brood size in less forested landscapes suggest that cowbirds may be a primary cause of forest fragmentation effects on songbird productivity in the Midwest. Our

  14. A method for detecting undervalued resources with application to breeding birds.

    PubMed

    Shustack, Daniel P; Rodewald, Amanda D

    2010-10-01

    Anthropogenic changes to ecosystems can decouple habitat selection and quality, a phenomenon well illustrated by ecological traps in which individuals mistakenly prefer low-quality habitats. Less recognized is the possibility that individuals might fail to select high-quality habitat because of the absence of some appropriate cue. This incorrect assessment of resource quality can lead to relatively high-quality resources being undervalued, whereby they support fewer individuals than optimal. We developed a habitat selection model to predict the expected patterns in patch-level density, fitness, and individual quality derived from either accurate assessment of habitat quality or from undervaluing of habitat patches (i.e., quality is not correctly assessed). Unlike previous habitat selection models, we explicitly and simultaneously incorporated variation in both individual and habitat quality into our estimates of realized fitness. Although multiple mechanisms can reduce patch-average density, fitness, and individual quality in less preferred patches, only undervaluation results in the occupation of higher-quality territories by similar-quality individuals in less preferred vs. preferred patches. We then looked for evidence of undervaluation in our seven-year data set of Acadian Flycatchers (Empidonax virescens) occupying forests in urbanizing landscapes in Ohio, USA. We suspected that forests within more urban landscapes may be undervalued in our study system because (1) urban forests typically support lower densities of Neotropical migratory birds than rural forests and (2) anthropogenic disturbance and habitat alterations are likely to result in mismatches between cues typically used in habitat selection and actual habitat quality. In contrast to our predictions, field data suggest that urban forests are not undervalued. Our work not only expands upon previous habitat selection models by considering undervaluation, but also demonstrates how predictions derived

  15. A removal model for estimating detection probabilities from point-count surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farnsworth, G.L.; Pollock, K.H.; Nichols, J.D.; Simons, T.R.; Hines, J.E.; Sauer, J.R.

    2002-01-01

    Use of point-count surveys is a popular method for collecting data on abundance and distribution of birds. However, analyses of such data often ignore potential differences in detection probability. We adapted a removal model to directly estimate detection probability during point-count surveys. The model assumes that singing frequency is a major factor influencing probability of detection when birds are surveyed using point counts. This may be appropriate for surveys in which most detections are by sound. The model requires counts to be divided into several time intervals. Point counts are often conducted for 10 min, where the number of birds recorded is divided into those first observed in the first 3 min, the subsequent 2 min, and the last 5 min. We developed a maximum-likelihood estimator for the detectability of birds recorded during counts divided into those intervals. This technique can easily be adapted to point counts divided into intervals of any length. We applied this method to unlimited-radius counts conducted in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. We used model selection criteria to identify whether detection probabilities varied among species, throughout the morning, throughout the season, and among different observers. We found differences in detection probability among species. Species that sing frequently such as Winter Wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) and Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) had high detection probabilities (~90%) and species that call infrequently such as Pileated Woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) had low detection probability (36%). We also found detection probabilities varied with the time of day for some species (e.g. thrushes) and between observers for other species. We used the same approach to estimate detection probability and density for a subset of the observations with limited-radius point counts.

  16. Factors affecting songbird nest survival in riparian forests in a Midwestern agricultural landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peak, R.G.; Thompson, F. R.; Shaffer, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting nest success of songbirds in riparian forest and buffers in northeastern Missouri. We used an information-theoretic approach to determine support for hypotheses concerning effects of nest-site, habitat-patch, edge, and temporal factors on nest success of songbirds in three narrow (55DS95 m) and three wide (400DS530 m) riparian forests with adjacent grasslandDSshrub buffer strips and in three narrow and three wide riparian forests without adjacent grasslandDSshrub buffer strips. We predicted that temporal effects would have the most support and that habitat-patch and edge effects would have little support, because nest predation would be great across all sites in the highly fragmented, predominantly agricultural landscape. Interval nest success was 0.404, 0.227, 0.070, and 0.186, respectively, for Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea), and forest interior species pooled (Acadian Flycatcher [Empidonax virescens], Wood Thrush [Hylocichla mustelina], Ovenbird [Seiurus aurocapillus], and Kentucky Warbler [Oporornis formosus]). The effect of nest stage on nest success had the most support; daily nest success for Gray Catbird and Indigo Bunting were lowest in the laying stage. We found strong support for greater nest success of Gray Catbird in riparian forests with adjacent buffer strips than in riparian forests without adjacent buffer strips. Patch width also occurred in the most supported model for Gray Catbird, but with very limited support. The null model received the most support for Northern Cardinal. Riparian forests provided breeding habitat for areas sensitive forest species and grassland-shrub nesting species. Buffer strips provided additional breeding habitat for grassland-shrub nesting species. Interval nest success for Indigo Bunting and area-sensitive forest species pooled, however, fell well below the level that is likely necessary to balance

  17. Factors affecting songbird nest survival in riparian forests in a midwestern agricultural landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peak, R.G.; Thompson, F. R.; Shaffer, T.L.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated factors affecting nest success of songbirds in riparian forest and buffers in northeastern Missouri. We used an information-theoretic approach to determine support for hypotheses concerning effects of nest-site, habitat-patch, edge, and temporal factors on nest success of songbirds in three narrow (55-95 m) and three wide (400-530 m) riparian forests with adjacent grassland-shrub buffer strips and in three narrow and three wide riparian forests without adjacent grassland-shrub buffer strips. We predicted that temporal effects would have the most support and that habitat-patch and edge effects would have little support, because nest predation would be great across all sites in the highly fragmented, predominantly agricultural landscape. Interval nest success was 0.404, 0.227, 0.070, and 0.186, respectively, for Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis), Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea), and forest interior species pooled (Acadian Flycatcher [Empidonax virescens], Wood Thrush [Hylocichla mustelina], Ovenbird [Seiurus aurocapillus], and Kentucky Warbler [Oporornis formosus]). The effect of nest stage on nest success had the most support; daily nest success for Gray Catbird and Indigo Bunting were lowest in the laying stage. We found strong support for greater nest success of Gray Catbird in riparian forests with adjacent buffer strips than in riparian forests without adjacent buffer strips. Patch width also occurred in the most-supported model for Gray Catbird, but with very limited support. The null model received the most support for Northern Cardinal. Riparian forests provided breeding habitat for area-sensitive forest species and grassland-shrub nesting species. Buffer strips provided additional breeding habitat for grassland-shrub nesting species. Interval nest success for Indigo Bunting and area-sensitive forest species pooled, however, fell well below the level that is likely necessary to balance juvenile

  18. Landscape structure in a managed forest mosaic of the Southern Appalachian Mountains and its influence on songbirds and small mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimgruber, Peter

    Forests in the Appalachian Mountains have been severely affected by logging in the past and little old-growth is left. The remaining forests form a heterogeneous mosaic of different forest successions. A concern for conservation is how additional logging will alter the mosaic and its fauna. I studied the effects of logging on the landscape mosaic and how changes in the landscape structure influence small mammals and birds in the George Washington National Forest, Virginia. My dissertation also included research on how to improve techniques for landscape ecological studies, such as roadside monitoring of birds and mapping of forest resources using remote sensing and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Because of the scale dependency of landscape-ecological relationships, I investigated how landscape structure in the forest mosaic changes with increasing scales. I determined threshold scales at which structure changed markedly. After establishing a baseline, I examined how logging affected the intensity and location of such thresholds. I found thresholds in landscape structure exist at 400-, 500-, and 800-m intervals from the outer edge of the cut. While logging did not change threshold location and intensity for global landscape indices, such as dominance and contagion, thresholds for focal indices, such as mean patch size and percent cover for early-successional forest, changed markedly. Using GIS, I determined how logging affected small mammals and birds at the landscape scale. I divided the landscape into three zones (zone 1, inside logged areas; zone 2, 20--400 m from logged areas; zone 3, 1000--1500 m from logged areas). Logging changed species presence and richness more drastically in close proximity of cuts than on the landscape and influenced birds more strongly than mammals. In the cuts, edge-adapted birds, such as the indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea), replaced forest interior species, such as the Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens). Most

  19. Social information and community dynamics: nontarget effects from simulating social cues for management.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Robert J

    2008-10-01

    Artificially creating social stimuli may be an effective tool for facilitating settlement by rare and/or declining species into suitable habitat. However, the potential consequences for other community members have not been explored and should be considered when evaluating the overall utility of using such management strategies. I report on nontarget, community-wide effects that occurred when manipulating social cues of two competitors that are species of concern in the western United States, the dominant Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus) and the subordinate American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla). The experiment consisted of surveying birds during a pretreatment year, which allows for the control of baseline communities, and a treatment year, in which treatments were applied just prior to settlement by migratory birds. Treatments included broadcasting songs of flycatchers and redstarts and were compared to controls. While the addition of redstart cues did not significantly influence community structure, the addition of flycatcher cues reduced species richness of migratory birds by approximately 30%. This pattern was driven by an absence of local colonizations of small-bodied migrants to sites with added flycatcher cues, rather than by local extinctions occurring from manipulations. The artificial flycatcher stimuli were more responsible for declines in species richness than were changes in actual flycatcher densities. I conclude by identifying some fundamental issues that managers and conservation practitioners should weigh when considering simulating social cues for species conservation prior to implementation.

  20. Whallwachsia illuminata n. gen., n. sp. (Trematoda: Digenea: Plagiorchiformes: Prosthogonimidae) in the steely-vented hummingbird Amazilia saucerrottei (Aves: Apodiformes: Trochilidae) and the yellow-olive flycatcher Tolmomyias sulphurescens (Aves: Passeriformes: Tyraninidae) from the Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Guanacaste, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Zamparo, David; Brooks, Daniel R; Causey, Douglas

    2003-08-01

    A new species of digenean found in the intestines of the steely-vented hummingbird Amazilia saucerrottei and the yellow-olive flycatcher Tolmomyias sulphurescens from the Area de Conservación Guanacaste, Guanacaste, Costa Rica, resembles members of the Prosthogonimidae in having a highly lobate ovary; an elongate cirrus sac containing the cirrus, pars prostatica, and internal seminal vesicle; no external seminal vesicle; 2 fields of extracecal vitelline follicles restricted to the area between the intestinal bifurcation and testes; and uterine loops occupying all available space in the hind body. The new species differs from all other members of the family in having genital pores opening laterally to the cecum, immediately anterior to the acetabular level, and markedly oblique rather than symmetrical testes. Consequently, we propose the new genus Whallwachsia for the species. Preliminary phylogenetic assessment suggests that the species is the sister group of all other prosthogonimids.

  1. A technique to produce aluminum color bands for avian research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koronkiewicz, T.J.; Paxton, E.H.; Sogge, M.K.

    2005-01-01

    We developed a technique to produce metal (aluminum) color bands, in response to concerns about leg injuries caused by celluloid-plastic color bands applied to Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii). The technique involves color-anodized aluminum bands (unnumbered blanks and federal numbered bands), with auto pin-striping tape and flexible epoxy sealant, to create a variety of solid, half- and triple-split colors. This allows for hundreds of unique, high-contrast color combinations. During six consecutive years of application, these colored metal bands have resisted color fade compared to conventional celluloid-plastic bands, and have reduced leg injuries in the flycatcher. Although not necessarily warranted for all color-banding studies, these metal bands may provide a lower-impact option for studies of species known to be impacted by plastic color bands.

  2. Nest survival of forest birds in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, D.J.; Wilson, R.R.; Henne-Kerr, J.L.; Hamilton, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    vimns, 7%), eastern towhee (14%), indigo bunting (14%), and northern cardinal (17%) did not differ from nest success in cottonwood plantations that were coppiced from root sprouts following pulpwood harvest. Within bottomland hardwood forests, uneven-aged group-selection timber harvest reduced the combined daily nest survival of all species from 0.958 to 0.938, which reduced nest success by about 14%. Specifically, timber harvest reduced nest success of species that nest in the forest midstory and canopy, such as Acadian flycatcher (Empidonax virescens)--from 32% before harvest to 14% after harvest. Conversely, those species that nest primarily in the shrubby understory--such as northern cardinal--were not affected by timber harvest and maintained an overall nest success of about 33%. Thus, birds nesting in the understory of bottomland hardwood forests are not adversely impacted by selective timber harvest, but there is a short-term reduction in nest success for birds that nest in the canopy and midstory.

  3. Species interactions and population density mediate the use of social cues for habitat selection.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Robert J

    2007-05-01

    1. The perspective that populations and communities are structured by antagonistic interactions among individuals has dominated much of ecology. Yet how animals use social information to guide decisions, such as habitat selection, may be influenced by both positive and negative interactions among individuals. Recent theory also suggests that the way animals use social information may be substantially influenced by population density, which alters the potential costs and benefits of such behaviours. 2. I manipulated cues of two competitors, the dominant least flycatcher Empidonax minimus (Baird & Baird) and the subordinate American redstart Setophaga ruticilla (Linnaeus), to assess the use of conspecific and heterospecific cues during habitat selection, and if population density influences these strategies. The experiment consisted of surveying birds during a pre-treatment year, which allows for the control and testing the effect of baseline densities, and a treatment year, in which treatments were applied just prior to settlement. Treatments included broadcasting songs of flycatchers and redstarts, and were compared with controls. 3. When controlling for pre-treatment densities, bird densities, and to a lesser extent arrival dates, during the treatment year suggested that flycatchers were attracted to both conspecific and heterospecific cues during settlement. Furthermore, attraction was strongest for flycatchers in plots with moderate pre-treatment densities. American redstarts were rare in the study area but showed apparent attraction to conspecifics and avoidance of heterospecifics. 4. These results provide experimental evidence for the use of multiple social cues in habitat selection and suggest that heterospecific attraction may operate under broader contexts than originally envisioned. In such instances, nontarget effects can potentially occur when manipulating social cues to elicit settlement in conservation strategies. The impact of population density on

  4. Political Partisanship, Bureaucratic Pragmatism and Acadian Nationalism: New Brunswick, Canada's 1920 History Textbook Controversy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helyar, Frances

    2014-01-01

    During a time of post-war sensitivity to Canadian nationalism and patriotism, public feeling was aroused in 1920 New Brunswick regarding a world history textbook with a new chapter about the First World War. The American author made no reference to Canada's war efforts. The subsequent public discussion focused on issues of patriotism, citizenship,…

  5. Site Level Climate Downscaling for Forecasting Water Balance Stress and Reslience of Acadian Boreal Trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, B. G.; Serbin, S.

    2014-12-01

    A downscaling framework is presented and applied to physiological and climatic data for projecting future climate resilience of one key boreal tree species, black spruce, in Cape Breton Highlands, Nova Scotia. The technique is based on a combination of probabilistic downscaling methods and control system theory, which together are used to transform large-scale future climate input (air temperature, humidity) to local scale climate parameters important to plant biophysical processes (vapor pressure deficit). Large-scale forecast data from the Community Earth System Model were downscaled spatially then temporally based on the cumulative distributions and sub-daily patterns from corresponding observational data at North Mountain (Cape Breton). Validation over historical decades shows that this technique provides hourly temperature and vapor pressure deficit data accurate to within 0.7%. Further we applied these environmental factors to a species specific empirical model of stomatal conductance for black spruce to compare differences in predicted water regulation response when large-scale (ESM) data are used as drivers versus localized data transformed using this new site-level downscaling technique. We observe through this synthetic study that over historical to contemporary periods (1850-2006) differences between large-scale and localized forecasts of stomatal conductance were small but that future climate extremes (2006-2100) have a strong effect on derived water balance in black spruce. These results also suggest that black spruce in the Cape Breton Highlands may have biophysical responses to climate change that are not predicted by spatially coarse (1°) data, which does not include site level extremes that in this study are shown to strongly curb future growth rates in black spruce as present day climate extremes become common place.

  6. Problems in separating species with similar habits and vocalizations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.; Stallcup, R.W.; Ralph, C. John; Scott, J. Michael

    1981-01-01

    The possibilities for species misidentification based on vocalization or habitat association are high. However, the magnitude of the errors actually perpetrated is generally within an acceptable range in most types of bird survey work. Examples of problems discussed are: congeners that are similar in appearance or in song (such as Chimney and Vaux's Swifts, Chaetura pelagica, C. vauxi; Hammond's, Dusky and Gray Flycatchers, Empidonax hammondii, E. oberholseri, E. wrightii; Willow and Alder Flycatchers, E. traillii, E. alnorum; Common and Fish Crows, Corvus brachyrhynchos, C. ossifragus); birds that are misidentified because they are not expected by the observer (House Finches, Carpodacus mexicanus, invading new areas of eastern U.S.); birds that imitate other species (especially Starling, Sturnus vulgaris, and Mockingbird, Mimus polyglottos); birds in mixed flocks; birds with geographic differences in vocalizations (Solitary Vireo, Vireo solitarius); woodpeckers that are only heard drumming; and nests or eggs that are misidentified. Equally serious problems are the errors resulting from undetected species and from careless recording or failure to check manuscripts against original data. The quality of published count work can be improved considerably by (1) recognizing the problems that exist, (2) standardizing techniques for dealing with situations where not all birds can be identified, and (3) routinely applying all appropriate safeguards such as verification by mist netting and measuring, photography, tape recording or playback, additional observations, and careful verification of all entries in the final manuscript.

  7. Vitality and Ethnolinguistic Attitudes of Acadians, Franco-Ontarians and Francophone Quebecers: Two or Three Solitudes in Canada's Bilingual Belt?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sioufi, Rana; Bourhis, Richard Y.; Allard, Réal

    2016-01-01

    Do French-Canadian (FC) minorities in New Brunswick and Ontario remain as committed as majority Francophone Quebecers in developing their vitality within Canada's bilingual belt? FCs constitute host communities for interprovincial migrants of FC and English-Canadian (EC) background who can bolster or weaken the vitality of FCs. How FCs and ECs…

  8. The Northeast Kingdom batholith, Vermont: magmatic evolution and geochemical constraints on the origin of Acadian granitic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, R.A.; Arth, Joseph G.

    1992-01-01

    Five Devonian plutons (West Charleston, Echo Pond, Nulhegan, Derby, and Willoughby) that constitute the Northeast Kingdom batholith in Vermont show wide ranges in elemental abundances and ratios consistent with major crustal contributions during their evolution. The batholith consists of metaluminous quartz gabbro, diorite and quartz monzodiorite, peraluminous granodiorite and granite, and strongly peraluminous leucogranite. Contents of major elements vary systematically with increasingSiO40) and have small negative Eu anomalies. The strongly peraluminous Willoughby leucogranite has unique trace-element abundances and ratios relative to the rest of the batholith, including low contents of Hf, Zr, Sr, and Ba, low values of K/Rb (80-164), Th/Ta (<9), Rb/Cs (7-40), K/Cs (0.1-0.5), Ce/Pb (0.5-4), high values of Rb/Sr (1-18) low to moderate REE contents and light-REE enriched patterns (with small negative Eu anomalies). Flat REE patterns (with large negative Eu anomalies) are found in a small, hydrothermally-altered area characterized by high abundances of Sn (up to 26 ppm), Rb (up to 670 ppm), Li (up to 310 ppm), Ta (up to 13.1 ppm), and U (up to 10 ppm). There is no single mixing trend, fractional crystallization assemblage, or assimilationscheme that accounts for all trace elementvariations from quartz gabbro to granite in the Northeast Kingdom batholith. The plutons originated by mixing mantle-derived components and crustal melts generated at different levels in the heterogeneous lithosphere in a continental collisional environment. Hybrid rocks in the batholith evolved by fractional crystallization and assimilation of country rocks (<50% by mass), and some of the leucogranitic rocks were subsequently disturbed by a mild hydrothermal event that resulted in the deposition of small amounts of sulfide minerals. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Recommendations for cowbird management in recovery efforts for the southwestern willow flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rothstein, S.I.; Kus, B.E.; Whitfield, M.J.; Sferra, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Three generations of mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) were fed either a control diet or a diet containing 0.5 ppm mercury in the form of methylmercury. The levels of mercury in adult tissues and eggs remained about the same over 3 generations. The methylmercury diet had no effect on adult weights or weight changes during the reproductive season. Females fed a diet containing 0.5 ppm mercury laid a greater percentage of their eggs outside their nestboxes than did controls, and also laid fewer eggs and produced fewer ducklings. Methylmercury in the diet appeared to result in a small amount of eggshell thinning. Ducklings from parents fed methylmercury were less responsive than, controls to tape-recorded maternal calls, but were hyper-responsive to a frightening stimulus in avoidance tests; there were no significant differences in locomotor activity in an open-field test.

  10. Effects of reintroduced beaver (Castor canadensis) on riparian bird community structure along the upper San Pedro River, southeastern Arizona and northern Sonora, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Glenn E.; van Riper, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Chapter 1.—We measured bird abundance and richness along the upper San Pedro River in 2005 and 2006, in order to document how beavers (Castor canadensis) may act as ecosystem engineers after their reintroduction to a desert riparian area in the Southwestern United States. In areas where beavers colonized, we found higher bird abundance and richness of bird groups, such as all breeding birds, insectivorous birds, and riparian specialists, and higher relative abundance of many individual species—including several avian species of conservation concern. Chapter 2.—We conducted bird surveys in riparian areas along the upper San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona (United States) and northern Sonora (Mexico) in order to describe factors influencing bird community dynamics and the distribution and abundance of species, particularly those of conservation concern. These surveys were also used to document the effects of the ecosystem-altering activities of a recently reintroduced beavers (Castor canadensis). Chapter 3.—We reviewed Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) nest records and investigated the potential for future breeding along the upper San Pedro River in southeastern Arizona, where in July 2005 we encountered the southernmost verifiable nest attempt for the species. Continued conservation and management of the area’s riparian vegetation and surface water has potential to contribute additional breeding sites for this endangered Willow Flycatcher subspecies. Given the nest record along the upper San Pedro River and the presence of high-density breeding sites to the north, the native cottonwood-willow forests of the upper San Pedro River could become increasingly important to E. t. extimus recovery, especially considering the anticipated effect of the tamarisk leaf beetle (Diorhabda carinulata) on riparian habitat north of the region.

  11. Tamarisk biocontrol using tamarisk beetles: Potential consequences for riparian birds in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, E.H.; Theimer, T.C.; Sogge, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    The tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda spp.), a non-native biocontrol agent, has been introduced to eradicate tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), a genus of non-native tree that has become a dominant component of riparian woodlands in the southwestern United States. Tamarisk beetles have the potential to spread widely and defoliate large expanses of tamarisk habitat, but the effects of such a widespread loss of riparian vegetation on birds remains unknown. We reviewed literature on the effects of other defoliating insects on birds to investigate the potential for tamarisk beetles to affect birds positively or negatively by changing food abundance and vegetation structure. We then combined data on the temporal patterns of tamarisk defoliation by beetles with nest productivity of a wellstudied riparian obligate, the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus), to simulate the potential demographic consequences of beetle defoliation on breeding riparian birds in both the short and long term. Our results highlight that the effects of tamarisk biocontrol on birds will likely vary by species and population, depending upon its sensitivity to seasonal defoliation by beetles and net loss of riparian habitat due to tamarisk mortality. Species with restricted distributions that include areas dominated by tamarisk may be negatively affected both in the short and long term. The rate of regeneration and/or restoration of native cottonwoods (Populus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.) relative to the rate of tamarisk loss will be critical in determining the long-term effect of this large-scale ecological experiment. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2011.

  12. Tamarisk biocontrol using tamarisk beetles: Potential consequences for riparian birds in the southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paxton, Eben H.; Theimer, Tad C.; Sogge, Mark K.

    2011-01-01

    The tamarisk beetle (Diorhabda spp.), a non-native biocontrol agent, has been introduced to eradicate tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), a genus of non-native tree that has become a dominant component of riparian woodlands in the southwestern United States. Tamarisk beetles have the potential to spread widely and defoliate large expanses of tamarisk habitat, but the effects of such a widespread loss of riparian vegetation on birds remains unknown. We reviewed literature on the effects of other defoliating insects on birds to investigate the potential for tamarisk beetles to affect birds positively or negatively by changing food abundance and vegetation structure. We then combined data on the temporal patterns of tamarisk defoliation by beetles with nest productivity of a well-studied riparian obligate, the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus), to simulate the potential demographic consequences of beetle defoliation on breeding riparian birds in both the short and long term. Our results highlight that the effects of tamarisk biocontrol on birds will likely vary by species and population, depending upon its sensitivity to seasonal defoliation by beetles and net loss of riparian habitat due to tamarisk mortality. Species with restricted distributions that include areas dominated by tamarisk may be negatively affected both in the short and long term. The rate of regeneration and/or restoration of native cottonwoods (Populus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.) relative to the rate of tamarisk loss will be critical in determining the long-term effect of this large-scale ecological experiment.

  13. Nesting success of grassland and savanna birds on reclaimed surface coal mines of the midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Galligan, E.W.; DeVault, T.L.; Lima, S.L.

    2006-12-15

    Reclaimed surface coal mines in southwestern Indiana support many grassland and shrub/savanna bird species of conservation concern. We examined the nesting success of birds on these reclaimed mines to assess whether such 'unnatural' places represent productive breeding habitats for such species. We established eight study sites on two large, grassland-dominated mines in southwestern Indiana and classified them into three categories (open grassland, shrub/savanna, and a mixture of grassland and shrub/savanna) based on broad vegetation and landscape characteristics. During the 1999 and 2000 breeding seasons, we found and monitored 911 nests of 31 species. Daily nest survival for the most commonly monitored grassland species ranged from 0.903 (Dickcissel, Spiza americana) to 0.961 (Grasshopper Sparrow, Ammodramus savannarum). Daily survival estimates for the dominant shrub/savanna nesting species ranged from 0.932 (Brown Thrasher, Toxostoma rufum) to 0.982 (Willow Flycatcher, Empidonax traillii). Vegetation and landscape effects on nesting success were minimal, and only Eastern Meadowlarks (Sturnella magna) showed a clear time-of-season effect, with greater nesting success in the first half of the breeding season. Rates of Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) parasitism were only 2.1% for grassland species and 12.0% for shrub/savanna species. The nesting success of birds on reclaimed mine sites was comparable to that in other habitats, indicating that reclaimed habitats on surface mines do not necessarily represent reproductive traps for birds.

  14. Birds of a high-altitude cloud forest in Alta Verapaz, Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Eisermann, Knut; Schulz, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    The Northern Central American Highlands have been recognized as endemic bird area, but little is known about bird communities in Guatemalan cloud forests. From 1997 to 2001 a total of 142 bird species were recorded between 2000 and 2400 masl in cloud forest and agricultural clearings on Montaña Caquipec (Alta Verapaz, Guatemala). The bird community is described based on line transect counts within the forest. Pooling census data from undisturbed and disturbed forest, the Gray-breasted Wood-Wren (Henicorhina leucophrys) was found to be the most abundant species, followed in descending order by the Common Bush-Tanager (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus), the Paltry Tyrannulet (Zimmerius vilissimus), the Yellowish Flycatcher (Empidonax flavescens), the Ruddy-capped Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus frantzi), and the Amethyst-throated Hummingbird (Lampornis amethystinus). Bird communities in undisturbed and disturbed forest were found to be similar (Serensen similarity index 0.85), indicating low human impact. Of all recorded species, approximately 27% were Nearctic-Neotropical migratory birds. The most abundant one was the Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla). The Montaña Caquipec is an important area for bird conservation, which is indicated by the presence of four species listed in the IUCN Red List (Highland Guan Penelopina nigra, Resplendent Quetzal Pharomachrus mocinno, Pink-headed Warbler Ergaticus versicolor, Golden-cheeked Warbler Dendroica chrysoparia), and 42 Mesoamerican endemics, of which 14 species are endemic to the Central American Highlands. The results presented here will be useful as baseline data for a long-term monitoring.

  15. Tamarix and Diorhabda leaf beetle interactions: implications for Tamarix water use and riparian habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagler, Pamela; Glenn, Edward P.

    2013-01-01

    Tamarix leaf beetles (Diorhabda carinulata) have been widely released on western United States rivers to control introduced shrubs in the genus Tamarix, with the goals of saving water through removal of an assumed high water-use plant, and of improving habitat value by removing a competitor of native riparian trees. We review recent studies addressing three questions: (1) to what extent are Tamarix weakened or killed by recurrent cycles of defoliation; (2) can significant water salvage be expected from defoliation; and (3) what are the effects of defoliation on riparian ecology, particularly on avian habit? Defoliation has been patchy at many sites, and shrubs at some sites recover each year even after multiple years of defoliation. Tamarix evapotranspiration (ET) is much lower than originally assumed in estimates of potential water savings, and are the same or lower than possible replacement plants. There is concern that the endangered southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax trailli extimus) will be negatively affected by defoliation because the birds build nests early in the season when Tamarix is still green, but are still on their nests during the period of summer defoliation. Affected river systems will require continued monitoring and development of adaptive management practices to maintain or enhance riparian habitat values. Multiplatform remote sensing methods are playing an essential role in monitoring defoliation and rates of ET on affected river systems.

  16. Avian habitat relationships in pinyon-juniper woodland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedgwick, James A.

    1987-01-01

    Habitat relationships of breeding birds were examined in northwestern Colorado in pinyon-juniper (Pinus edulis-Juniperus osteosperma) woodland and in openings where most overstory trees had been knocked down by anchor chaining. Vegetation characteristics and physical habitat features were measured in 233 0.04-ha circular plots around singing males of 13 species of birds from 15 May to 15 July 1980. Thirteen-group discriminant function analysis ordinated bird species along three habitat dimensions described by (1) canopy height; (2) slope, shrub size, and shrub species diversity; and (3) percentage canopy cover, large tree density, distance from a habitat edge, litter cover, and green cover. Woodland, open-area, and intermediate edge species were clearly segregated along the first discriminant axis, and species' associations with shrubs, inclination, ground cover, and edges were revealed by the ordinations along the second and third discriminant axes. Two-group discriminant analyses comparing occupied and available plots identified additional and more specific habitat associations. For example, Hermit Thrushes (Catharus guttatus) were associated with mature forested habitats and forest interiors, Virginia's Warblers (Vermivora virginiae) favored steep, oak-covered draws, Rock Wrens (Salpinctes obsoletus) selected areas where percentage log cover and small tree density were high, and Dusky Flycatchers (Empidonax oberholseri) preferred shrubby slopes with scattered large trees near woodland edges.

  17. Management by assertion: beavers and songbirds at Lake Skinner (Riverside County, California).

    PubMed

    Longcore, Travis; Rich, Catherine; Müller-Schwarze, Dietland

    2007-04-01

    Management of ecological reserve lands should rely on the best available science to achieve the goal of biodiversity conservation. "Adaptive Resource Management" is the current template to ensure that management decisions are reasoned and that decisions increase understanding of the system being managed. In systems with little human disturbance, certain management decisions are clear; steps to protect native species usually include the removal of invasive species. In highly modified systems, however, appropriate management steps to conserve biodiversity are not as readily evident. Managers must, more than ever, rely upon the development and testing of hypotheses to make rational management decisions. We present a case study of modern reserve management wherein beavers (Castor canadensis) were suspected of destroying habitat for endangered songbirds (least Bell's vireo, Vireo bellii pusillus, and southwestern willow flycatcher, Empidonax traillii extimus) and for promoting the invasion of an exotic plant (tamarisk, Tamarix spp.) at an artificial reservoir in southern California. This case study documents the consequences of failing to follow the process of Adaptive Resource Management. Managers made decisions that were unsupported by the scientific literature, and actions taken were likely counterproductive. The opportunity to increase knowledge of the ecosystem was lost. Uninformed management decisions, essentially "management by assertion," undermine the long-term prospects for biodiversity conservation.

  18. Breeding Phenology of Birds: Mechanisms Underlying Seasonal Declines in the Risk of Nest Predation

    PubMed Central

    Borgmann, Kathi L.; Conway, Courtney J.; Morrison, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal declines in avian clutch size are well documented, but seasonal variation in other reproductive parameters has received less attention. For example, the probability of complete brood mortality typically explains much of the variation in reproductive success and often varies seasonally, but we know little about the underlying cause of that variation. This oversight is surprising given that nest predation influences many other life-history traits and varies throughout the breeding season in many songbirds. To determine the underlying causes of observed seasonal decreases in risk of nest predation, we modeled nest predation of Dusky Flycatchers (Empidonax oberholseri) in northern California as a function of foliage phenology, energetic demand, developmental stage, conspecific nest density, food availability for nest predators, and nest predator abundance. Seasonal variation in the risk of nest predation was not associated with seasonal changes in energetic demand, conspecific nest density, or predator abundance. Instead, seasonal variation in the risk of nest predation was associated with foliage density (early, but not late, in the breeding season) and seasonal changes in food available to nest predators. Supplemental food provided to nest predators resulted in a numerical response by nest predators, increasing the risk of nest predation at nests that were near supplemental feeders. Our results suggest that seasonal changes in foliage density and factors associated with changes in food availability for nest predators are important drivers of temporal patterns in risk of avian nest predation. PMID:23776566

  19. Waiting for trees to grow: nest survival, brood parasitism, and the impact of reforestation efforts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hazler, K.R.; Twedt, D.J.; Cooper, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Of the forested wetlands that once covered the Mississippi Alluvial Valley, only -25% remain due to large-scale conversion to agriculture. Reforestation efforts are currently underway, but tracts planted with slow-growing oaks maintain the structure of a grassland for 5 yr or longer, and will require at least 40 yr to resemble a mature forest. Nonetheless, it is hoped that reforestation, even in early stages, can effectively increase core area in extant tracts of mature forest by reducing higher rates of nest failure and brood parasitism often associated with forest-agriculture interfaces. To test this, we monitored nests of a mature-forest specialist, the Acadian Flycatcher, in extensive bottomland forests adjacent to agricultural fields and reforested tracts (<20 yr-old). We used an information-theoretic approach to evaluate alternative hypotheses regarding the relative impacts of agriculture and reforestation in the landscape. Controlling for year, season, and stand basal area, there was little evidence that landscape context significantly affected nest survival, although survival tended to increase with decreasing amounts of agriculture. The probability of brood parasitism increased with greater proportions of open habitats in the landscape. There was much stronger support for the hypothesis that parasitism rates depended on the sum of agricultural and reforested tracts, rather than on the amount of agriculture alone. Thus, reforested tracts are not expected to have the desired effect of reducing parasitism rates in the adjacent mature forest until several decades have passed.

  20. A removal model for estimating detection probabilities from point-count surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farnsworth, G.L.; Pollock, K.H.; Nichols, J.D.; Simons, T.R.; Hines, J.E.; Sauer, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    We adapted a removal model to estimate detection probability during point count surveys. The model assumes one factor influencing detection during point counts is the singing frequency of birds. This may be true for surveys recording forest songbirds when most detections are by sound. The model requires counts to be divided into several time intervals. We used time intervals of 2, 5, and 10 min to develop a maximum-likelihood estimator for the detectability of birds during such surveys. We applied this technique to data from bird surveys conducted in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. We used model selection criteria to identify whether detection probabilities varied among species, throughout the morning, throughout the season, and among different observers. The overall detection probability for all birds was 75%. We found differences in detection probability among species. Species that sing frequently such as Winter Wren and Acadian Flycatcher had high detection probabilities (about 90%) and species that call infrequently such as Pileated Woodpecker had low detection probability (36%). We also found detection probabilities varied with the time of day for some species (e.g. thrushes) and between observers for other species. This method of estimating detectability during point count surveys offers a promising new approach to using count data to address questions of the bird abundance, density, and population trends.

  1. Uncertain nest fates in songbird studies and variation in Mayfield estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manolis, J.C.; Andersen, D.E.; Cuthbert, F.J.

    2000-01-01

    Determining whether nesting attempts are successful can be difficult. Yet, current protocols for estimating nesting success do not address how uncertain nest fates should be handled. We examined the problem of nest-fate uncertainty as it relates to Mayfield estimation of nesting success and in analyses of factors that influence success. We used data from Minnesota to illustrate the potential effect of uncertain fate; 40% of Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapillus; n = 127) nests and 30% of Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus; n = 144) nests had uncertain fates. How this uncertainty is incorporated into Mayfield estimates of success varied widely among researchers. In a survey of researchers who use the Mayfield method, 9 of 22 respondents (of 40 contacted) excluded nests with uncertain fate. Excluding uncertain fates is counter to how Mayfield first described his estimator and can result in severe downward bias. The remaining respondents (59%) included nests with uncertain fate but varied in how they terminated the exposure period. We developed a simulation model that calculated Mayfield estimates using different approaches and compared them with a known rate of nesting success. Magnitude of bias in Mayfield estimates varied considerably in our simulations. The approach with the least bias terminated exposure with the last observed active date for nests with uncertain fate, and with the midpoint between last observed active and first observed inactive dates for nests with known fate. In addition, information necessary to interpret and compare Mayfield estimates often is not reported. These values, including variance estimates and the period lengths used to estimate survival rates, should be reported with Mayfield estimates. Finally, nest fate is commonly used as a categorical variable in studies of factors affecting nesting success. In this approach, however, nests with uncertain fate must be excluded. An alternative approach is Cox regression, which incorporates nests with

  2. Implications of Climate Change for Bird Conservation in the Southwestern U.S. under Three Alternative Futures.

    PubMed

    Friggens, Megan M; Finch, Deborah M

    2015-01-01

    Future expected changes in climate and human activity threaten many riparian habitats, particularly in the southwestern U.S. Using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt3.3.3) modeling, we characterized habitat relationships and generated spatial predictions of habitat suitability for the Lucy's warbler (Oreothlypis luciae), the Southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) and the Western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus). Our goal was to provide site- and species-specific information that can be used by managers to identify areas for habitat conservation and/or restoration along the Rio Grande in New Mexico. We created models of suitable habitat for each species based on collection and survey samples and climate, biophysical, and vegetation data. We projected habitat suitability under future climates by applying these models to conditions generated from three climate models for 2030, 2060 and 2090. By comparing current and future distributions, we identified how habitats are likely to change as a result of changing climate and the consequences of those changes for these bird species. We also examined whether land ownership of high value sites shifts under changing climate conditions. Habitat suitability models performed well. Biophysical characteristics were more important that climate conditions for predicting habitat suitability with distance to water being the single most important predictor. Climate, though less important, was still influential and led to declines of suitable habitat of more than 60% by 2090. For all species, suitable habitat tended to shrink over time within the study area leaving a few core areas of high importance. Overall, climate changes will increase habitat fragmentation and reduce breeding habitat patch size. The best strategy for conserving bird species within the Rio Grande will include measures to maintain and restore critical habitat refugia. This study provides an example of a presence-only habitat model that can be used

  3. Avian use of forest habitats in the Pembina Hills of northeastern North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faanes, Craig A.; Andrew, Jonathan M.

    1983-01-01

    North Dakota has the least extensive total area of forested habitats of any of the 50 United States. Although occurring in limited area, forest communities add considerably to the total ecological diversity of the State. The forests of the Pembina Hills region in northeastern North Dakota are one of only three areas large enough to be considered of commercial value. During 1981 we studied the avifauna of the upper valley of the Pembina River in the Pembina Hills. Field work extended from 20 April to 23 July; breeding bird censuses were conducted 7 June to 2 July. Of the 120 bird species recorded during the study period, 79 species were recorded during the breeding season. The total breeding population was estimated at nearly 76,000 breeding pairs. The wood warblers (Parulidae) were the most numerous family, accounting for about 28,000 breeding pairs. The yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia) was the most abundant breeding species, making up 19.4% of the population. American redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) was second in abundance, accounting for 10.5% of the breeding population. Largest breeding densities occurred in the willow (Salix sp.) shrub community. Although supporting the lowest mean breeding density, quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) forests supported the highest species diversity. First State breeding records were recorded for alder flycatcher (Empidonax alnorum) and golden-winged warbler (Vermivora chrysoptera). Records were obtained for 12 species considered rare or unusual in North Dakota during the breeding season. The status of all species known to have occurred in the study area is described in an annotated species list.

  4. Implications of Climate Change for Bird Conservation in the Southwestern U.S. under Three Alternative Futures

    PubMed Central

    Friggens, Megan M.; Finch, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    Future expected changes in climate and human activity threaten many riparian habitats, particularly in the southwestern U.S. Using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt3.3.3) modeling, we characterized habitat relationships and generated spatial predictions of habitat suitability for the Lucy’s warbler (Oreothlypis luciae), the Southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) and the Western yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus). Our goal was to provide site- and species-specific information that can be used by managers to identify areas for habitat conservation and/or restoration along the Rio Grande in New Mexico. We created models of suitable habitat for each species based on collection and survey samples and climate, biophysical, and vegetation data. We projected habitat suitability under future climates by applying these models to conditions generated from three climate models for 2030, 2060 and 2090. By comparing current and future distributions, we identified how habitats are likely to change as a result of changing climate and the consequences of those changes for these bird species. We also examined whether land ownership of high value sites shifts under changing climate conditions. Habitat suitability models performed well. Biophysical characteristics were more important that climate conditions for predicting habitat suitability with distance to water being the single most important predictor. Climate, though less important, was still influential and led to declines of suitable habitat of more than 60% by 2090. For all species, suitable habitat tended to shrink over time within the study area leaving a few core areas of high importance. Overall, climate changes will increase habitat fragmentation and reduce breeding habitat patch size. The best strategy for conserving bird species within the Rio Grande will include measures to maintain and restore critical habitat refugia. This study provides an example of a presence-only habitat model that can be

  5. Monitoring avian productivity and survivorship (MAPS) 5-year summary, Naval Outlying Landing Field, Imperial Beach, southwestern San Diego County, California, 2009-13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lynn, Suellen; Madden, Melanie C.; Houston, Alexandra; Kus, Barbara E.

    2015-01-01

    During 2009–13, a Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) banding station was operated at the Naval Outlying Landing Field (NOLF), Imperial Beach, in southwestern San Diego County, California. The station was established as part of a long-term monitoring program of Neotropical migratory bird populations on NOLF and helps Naval Base Coronado (NOLF is a component) meet the goals and objectives of Department of Defense Partners in Flight program and the Birds and Migratory Birds Management Strategies of the Naval Base Coronado Integrated Natural Resources Management Plan. During 2009–13, captures averaged 644 ±155 per year. Fifty-seven species were captured, of which 44 are Neotropical migratory species and 33 breed at the MAPS station. Twenty-two sensitive species were detected, including Least Bell’s Vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus), Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii), Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens) and Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia). Local population trends varied among species and years, as did annual productivity (number of young per adult). We found no significant relationship between productivity and the observed population size in the subsequent year for any species, nor did we find an association between productivity and precipitation for the current bio-year. Similarly, survivorship varied across species and years, and there was no obvious relationship between adult survivorship and observed population size for any species except Wrentit (Chamaea fasciata), for which the relationship was positive. Adult survivorship was unrelated to precipitation at the MAPS station. Additional years of data will be required to generate sample sizes adequate for more rigorous analyses of survivorship and productivity as predictors of population growth.

  6. Songbird response to increased willow (Salix spp.) growth in Yellowstone's northern range.

    PubMed

    Baril, Lisa M; Hansen, Andrew J; Renkin, Roy; Lawrence, Rick

    2011-09-01

    After nearly a century of height suppression, willows (Salix spp.) in the northern range of Yellowstone National Park, U.S.A., are increasing in height growth as a possible consequence of wolf (Canis lupus) restoration, climate change, or other factors. Regardless of the drivers, the recent release of this rare but important habitat type could have significant implications for associated songbirds that are exhibiting declines in the region. Our objective was to evaluate bird response to releasing willows by comparing willow structure and bird community composition across three willow growth conditions: height suppressed, recently released, and previously tall (i.e., tall prior to the height increase of released willows). Released and previously tall willows exhibited high and similar vertical structure, but released willows were significantly lower in horizontal structure. Suppressed willows were significantly shorter and lower in horizontal cover than released or previously tall willows. Bird richness increased along a gradient from lowest in suppressed to highest in previously tall willows, but abundance and diversity were similar between released and previously tall willows, despite lower horizontal cover in the released condition. Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) and Lincoln's Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) were found in all three growth conditions; however, Yellow Warbler (Dendroica petechia), Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus), Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii), and Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodii) were present in released and previously tall willows only. Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) was found in previously tall willows only, appearing to specialize on tall, dense willows. The results of our a priori habitat models indicated that foliage height diversity was the primary driver of bird richness, abundance, and diversity. These results indicate that vertical structure was a more important driver of bird community variables than horizontal

  7. Planned flooding and Colorado River riparian trade-offs downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stevens, Lawrence E.; Ayers, T.J.; Bennett, J.B.; Christensen, K.; Kearsley, M.J.C.; Meretsky, V.J.; Phillips, A. M.; Parnell, R.A.; Spence, J.; Sogge, M.K.; Springer, A.E.; Wegner, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Regulated river restoration through planned flooding involves trade-offs between aquatic and terrestrial components, between relict pre-dam and novel post-dam resources and processes, and between management of individual resources and ecosystem characteristics. We review the terrestrial (wetland and riparian) impacts of a 1274 m3/s test flood conducted by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation in March/April 1996, which was designed to improve understanding of sediment transport and management downstream from Glen Canyon Dam in the Colorado River ecosystem. The test flood successfully restored sandbars throughout the river corridor and was timed to prevent direct impacts to species of concern. A total of 1275 endangered Kanab ambersnail (Oxyloma haydeni kanabensis) were translocated above the flood zone at Vaseys Paradise spring, and an estimated 10.7% of the total snail habitat and 7.7% of the total snail population were lost to the flood. The test flood scoured channel margin wetlands, including potential foraging habitats of endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus). It also buried ground-covering riparian vegetation under >1 m of fine sand but only slightly altered woody sandbar vegetation and some return-current channel marshes. Pre-flood control efforts and appropriate flood timing limited recruitment of four common nonnative perennial plant species. Slight impacts on ethnobotanical resources were detected >430 km downstream, but those plant assemblages recovered rapidly. Careful design of planned flood hydrograph shape and seasonal timing is required to mitigate terrestrial impacts during efforts to restore essential fluvial geomorphic and aquatic habitats in regulated river ecosystems.

  8. Effects of sea-level rise and anthropogenic development on priority bird species habitats in coastal Georgia, USA.

    PubMed

    Brittain, Ross A; Craft, Christopher B

    2012-02-01

    We modeled changes in area of five habitats, tidal-freshwater forest, salt marsh, maritime shrub-scrub (shrub), maritime broadleaf forest (oak) and maritime narrowleaf (pine) forest, in coastal Georgia, USA, to evaluate how simultaneous habitat loss due to predicted changes in sea level rise (SLR) and urban development will affect priority bird species of the south Atlantic coastal plain by 2100. Development rates, based on regional growth plans, were modeled at 1% and 2.5% annual urban growth, while SLR rates, based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's A1B mean and maximum scenarios, were modeled at 52 cm and 82 cm, respectively. SLR most greatly affected the shrub habitat with predicted losses of 35-43%. Salt marsh and tidal forest also were predicted to lose considerable area to SLR (20-45 and 23-35%, respectively), whereas oak and pine forests had lesser impact from SLR, 18-22% and 11-15%, respectively. Urban development resulted in losses of considerable pine (48-49%) and oak (53-55%) habitat with lesser loss of shrub habitat (21-24%). Under maximum SLR and urban growth, shrub habitat may lose up to 59-64% compared to as much as 62-65% pine forest and 74-75% oak forest. Conservation efforts should focus on protection of shrub habitat because of its small area relative to other terrestrial habitats and use by Painted Buntings (Passerina ciris), a Partners In Flight (PIF) extremely high priority species. Tidal forests also deserve protection because they are a likely refuge for forest species, such as Northern Parula and Acadian Flycatcher, with the decline of oak and pine forests due to urban development.

  9. Effects of Sea-Level Rise and Anthropogenic Development on Priority Bird Species Habitats in Coastal Georgia, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brittain, Ross A.; Craft, Christopher B.

    2012-02-01

    We modeled changes in area of five habitats, tidal-freshwater forest, salt marsh, maritime shrub-scrub (shrub), maritime broadleaf forest (oak) and maritime narrowleaf (pine) forest, in coastal Georgia, USA, to evaluate how simultaneous habitat loss due to predicted changes in sea level rise (SLR) and urban development will affect priority bird species of the south Atlantic coastal plain by 2100. Development rates, based on regional growth plans, were modeled at 1% and 2.5% annual urban growth, while SLR rates, based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's A1B mean and maximum scenarios, were modeled at 52 cm and 82 cm, respectively. SLR most greatly affected the shrub habitat with predicted losses of 35-43%. Salt marsh and tidal forest also were predicted to lose considerable area to SLR (20-45 and 23-35%, respectively), whereas oak and pine forests had lesser impact from SLR, 18-22% and 11-15%, respectively. Urban development resulted in losses of considerable pine (48-49%) and oak (53-55%) habitat with lesser loss of shrub habitat (21-24%). Under maximum SLR and urban growth, shrub habitat may lose up to 59-64% compared to as much as 62-65% pine forest and 74-75% oak forest. Conservation efforts should focus on protection of shrub habitat because of its small area relative to other terrestrial habitats and use by Painted Buntings ( Passerina ciris), a Partners In Flight (PIF) extremely high priority species. Tidal forests also deserve protection because they are a likely refuge for forest species, such as Northern Parula and Acadian Flycatcher, with the decline of oak and pine forests due to urban development.

  10. 78 FR 65843 - General Provisions; Revised List of Migratory Birds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-01

    ... matters of taxonomy, nomenclature, and the sequence of species and other higher taxonomic categories..., 1997, 1998); Taiga Flycatcher, Ficedula albicilla (AOU 1982, 1983, 1998, 2006); Dark-sided Flycatcher... albicilla (1). Dark-sided Flycatcher, Muscicapa sibirica (1). Asian Brown Flyctcher, Muscicapa dauurica...

  11. K-Ar dating and delta O-18-delta D characterization of nanometric illite from Ordovician K-bentonites of the Appalachians: illitization and the Acadian-Alleghenian tectonic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clauer, Norbert; Fallick, Anthony E.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Honty, Miroslav; Huff, Warren D.; Auberti, Amelie

    2013-01-01

    Nanometric (2 diagram that illitization occurred in all fractions by simultaneous nucleation and crystal growth, except for one sample. In that sample, a period of growth without nucleation was detected on top of the nucleation and growth episode. The K-Ar ages organize into two isochrons, the first at 319.9 ± 2.0 Ma with an initial 40Ar/36Ar ratio of 271 ± 66 Ma, and the second at 284.9 ± 1.2 Ma with an initial 40Ar/36Ar ratio of 310 ± 44. One data point above the older isochron and three between the two isochrons suggest a detrital contamination for the former separate and a possible further generation of nanoparticles for the three others. The samples with the older crystallization age consist of illite and illite-rich mixed-layers, and those with the younger age contain smectite-rich mixed-layers without illite, or illite-enriched illite-smectite mixed-layers. The K-Ar ages fit the age trends published previously for similar K-bentonites with regional age patterns between 240 and 270 Ma in the southwestern region, between 270 and 300 Ma in the central zone and the southern Appalachians, and between 315 and 370 Ma in the northernmost. Each of the two generations of illite crystals yields very consistent δ18O (V-SMOW) values at 17 ± 1‰ for the older and at 21 ± 1‰ for the younger. If crystallization temperatures of the nanometric illite were between 100 and 200 °C, as suggested by microthermometric determinations, the hydrothermal fluids had δ18O values of 4 ± 1‰ in the Dalton district and of 8 ± 1‰ in the Lafayette, Trenton, and Dirtseller districts at 100 °C, and of 11 ± 1 and 15 ± 1‰ in the same locations at 200 °C, probably because the water-rock isotope exchanges at elevated temperature occurred in rock-dominated systems. The δ18O of the fluids remained unchanged during local crystal growth, but varied depending on the geographic location of the samples and timing of illitization. The δD (V-SMOW) values of the different size fractions do not provide consistent information; they range from −70 to −45‰ for most nanometric and micrometric fractions (V-SMOW), but with no apparent coherent pattern. Nanometric illite-rich crystals from K-bentonite that underwent tectono-thermal alteration yield constant ages, constant clay mineralogy, constant crystallite size distributions for all of the nucleating and growing illite-type crystals of each sample, as well as constant δ18O values implying constant fluid chemistry, all pointing to geologically sudden crystallization.

  12. Comparison of statistical and theoretical habitat models for conservation planning: the benefit of ensemble prediction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones-Farrand, D. Todd; Fearer, Todd M.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Thompson, Frank R.; Nelson, Mark D.; Tirpak, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Selection of a modeling approach is an important step in the conservation planning process, but little guidance is available. We compared two statistical and three theoretical habitat modeling approaches representing those currently being used for avian conservation planning at landscape and regional scales: hierarchical spatial count (HSC), classification and regression tree (CRT), habitat suitability index (HSI), forest structure database (FS), and habitat association database (HA). We focused our comparison on models for five priority forest-breeding species in the Central Hardwoods Bird Conservation Region: Acadian Flycatcher, Cerulean Warbler, Prairie Warbler, Red-headed Woodpecker, and Worm-eating Warbler. Lacking complete knowledge on the distribution and abundance of each species with which we could illuminate differences between approaches and provide strong grounds for recommending one approach over another, we used two approaches to compare models: rank correlations among model outputs and comparison of spatial correspondence. In general, rank correlations were significantly positive among models for each species, indicating general agreement among the models. Worm-eating Warblers had the highest pairwise correlations, all of which were significant (P , 0.05). Red-headed Woodpeckers had the lowest agreement among models, suggesting greater uncertainty in the relative conservation value of areas within the region. We assessed model uncertainty by mapping the spatial congruence in priorities (i.e., top ranks) resulting from each model for each species and calculating the coefficient of variation across model ranks for each location. This allowed identification of areas more likely to be good targets of conservation effort for a species, those areas that were least likely, and those in between where uncertainty is higher and thus conservation action incorporates more risk. Based on our results, models developed independently for the same purpose

  13. Comparison of statistical and theoretical habitat models for conservation planning: the benefit of ensemble prediction.

    PubMed

    Jones-Farrand, D Todd; Fearer, Todd M; Thogmartin, Wayne E; Thompson, Frank R; Nelson, Mark D; Tirpak, John M

    2011-09-01

    Selection of a modeling approach is an important step in the conservation planning process, but little guidance is available. We compared two statistical and three theoretical habitat modeling approaches representing those currently being used for avian conservation planning at landscape and regional scales: hierarchical spatial count (HSC), classification and regression tree (CRT), habitat suitability index (HSI), forest structure database (FS), and habitat association database (HA). We focused our comparison on models for five priority forest-breeding species in the Central Hardwoods Bird Conservation Region: Acadian Flycatcher, Cerulean Warbler, Prairie Warbler, Red-headed Woodpecker, and Worm-eating Warbler. Lacking complete knowledge on the distribution and abundance of each species with which we could illuminate differences between approaches and provide strong grounds for recommending one approach over another, we used two approaches to compare models: rank correlations among model outputs and comparison of spatial correspondence. In general, rank correlations were significantly positive among models for each species, indicating general agreement among the models. Worm-eating Warblers had the highest pairwise correlations, all of which were significant (P < 0.05). Red-headed Woodpeckers had the lowest agreement among models, suggesting greater uncertainty in the relative conservation value of areas within the region. We assessed model uncertainty by mapping the spatial congruence in priorities (i.e., top ranks) resulting from each model for each species and calculating the coefficient of variation across model ranks for each location. This allowed identification of areas more likely to be good targets of conservation effort for a species, those areas that were least likely, and those in between where uncertainty is higher and thus conservation action incorporates more risk. Based on our results, models developed independently for the same purpose

  14. Linguistic Minorities and the Multilingual Turn: Constructing Language Ownership through Affect in Cultural Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Mireille

    2016-01-01

    The "multilingual turn" brings questions of language ownership to the forefront of debates about linguistic minority governance. Acadian minority cultural producers construct language ownership using multiple languages and targeting multilingual publics, but use ideologies of monolingualism to situate Acadian authenticity in place and…

  15. "Bonjour History": Materials and Ideas for Teaching Louisiana's Cajun History = "Bonjour l'Histoire": Quelques Idees, Deux ou Trois Activites, et Plusieurs Materiaux pour l'Enseignement de l'Histoire des Cadiens en Louisiane.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mounier, Brenda

    The goals of this teacher's guidebook and videotape are designed to incorporate Acadian (Cajun) history into the 4th grade social studies curriculum and the 4th and 5th grade Louisiana 30-minute daily French programs and French immersion programs. Another goal is to create an awareness, appreciation, and understanding of Acadian history in…

  16. Proceedings: Conference on Applications of the Guild Concept to Environmental Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    fly out to get something. The American redstart does some gleaning and a lot of flycatching. If one goes through a long line of birds, a continuum of a...American redstart (Setophaga ruticiila) 117. Say’s phoebe (Sayornis saya) 174. House sparrow (Passer domesticus) 118. Willow flycatcher (Empidonaz

  17. 75 FR 13297 - Southeastern Lincoln County Habitat Conservation Plan, Lincoln County, NV

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... take of the threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) and the endangered southwestern willow... applicants are seeking permits for the incidental take of desert tortoise and southwestern willow flycatcher... southwestern willow flycatcher habitat during the term of the permit. The covered area includes the...

  18. Streamflow and Endangered Species Habitat in the Lower Isleta Reach of the Middle Rio Grande

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bovee, Ken D.; Waddle, Terry J.; Spears, J. Mark

    2008-01-01

    San Acacia Dam is located in a reach of the Rio Grande that has been designated as critical habitat for two endangered species, the Rio Grande silvery minnow (Hybognathus amarus) and the southwestern willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus). Under present operations, the Rio Grande upstream from the dam is used to convey irrigation water to the Socorro main canal at San Acacia Dam. In order to increase operational flexibility and improve irrigation delivery efficiency, the 'Bernardo Siphon' has been proposed to intercept up to 150 cubic feet per second from the Lower San Juan Riverside Drain on the east side of the Rio Grande and transport it under the river into a drainage canal on the west side. Irrigation deliveries to the Socorro main canal would be conveyed by way of the drainage canal rather than the Rio Grande. The objective of this study was to provide the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) and other stakeholders with a tool to evaluate the effects of different operational modes of the Bernardo siphon on habitat for H. amarus and E. t. extimus in this section of river. We used a two-dimensional hydraulic simulation model to simulate hydraulic conditions for a range of discharges at three study sites in the Rio Grande between the proposed siphon location and San Acacia Dam. Suitable habitat characteristics were defined for H. amarus by consensus of a panel of experts and for E. t. extimus on the basis of a study conducted in 2003 by BOR. Habitat suitability maps for each targeted life stage and simulated discharge were constructed using a Geographic Information System (ArcGIS) and the results compiled into tables relating discharge to areas of suitable habitat. A separate analysis was conducted to calculate an index of connectivity among habitat patches at low flows. A hydrologic model was constructed to synthesize flows, by reach, without the siphon, which was used as a baseline for comparison with similarly-synthesized discharges with the siphon under

  19. Spatial Patterns of Subtidal Benthic Invertebrates and Environmental Factors in the Nearshore Gulf of Maine

    EPA Science Inventory

    The spatial patterns of subtidal benthic invertebrates and physical-chemical variables in the nearshore Gulf of Maine (Acadian Biogeographic Province) were studied to provide information needed to calibrate benthic indices of environmental condition, determine physical-chemical f...

  20. U.S. Air Force Environmental Assessment: Repair by Replacement JP-8 Fuel Transfer Line Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    macroura), barn swallow (Hirundo rustica), red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), meadowlark (Sturnella spp.), scissor- tailed flycatcher (Tyrannus...considered optimal wildlife habitat; typical grassland species such as cottontail, fox squirrel, raccoon, red-winged blackbird , mourning dove, and

  1. Environmental Assessment: Transforming the 49th Fighter Wing’s Combat Capability, Holloman Air Force Base, New Mexico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    surinarn(!nsis Coiumbina passerina Coccyzus americanvs StriX ~eolalis l~ci<la Athena cuoia;laria Cypseloides niger Cynanthus latirostr’is...Hykxhari$ leucoti$ Trogon elegaos Empidonax traillii e:xtimus lanlu$ !udovicianus Vireo bellit Viteo vieinior Ammodromus bairdii Passerina versicolor

  2. Habitat selection as an antipredator behaviour in a multi-predator landscape: all enemies are not equal.

    PubMed

    Morosinotto, Chiara; Thomson, Robert L; Korpimäki, Erkki

    2010-03-01

    1. Breeding territory choice constitutes a crucial antipredator behaviour for animals that determines reproductive success and survival during the breeding season. On arrival to breeding grounds migrant prey face a multitude of 'waiting' predators already settled within the landscape. 2. We studied territory selection and reproductive investment of migrant pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) relative to breeding pygmy owls (POs) (Glaucidium passerinum) and Tengmalm's owls (TOs) (Aegolius funereus). Diurnal POs present a greater predation threat to adult flycatchers (up to 80% songbirds in diet) compared with nocturnal TOs (up to 36%). 3. During territory selection, pied flycatchers strongly avoided POs (occupation: 42% in presence vs. 92% in absence of owl nest) but not TOs (80% vs. 75%). This suggests that flycatchers are able to distinguish between two potential predators, avoiding dangerous POs but not obviously responding to the less risky TOs. 4. Flycatchers responded to presence of PO nests with c. 4-day delay in the start of egg-laying. A significantly prolonged nest building period contributed to this potentially costly breeding delay. Flycatchers further significantly reduced initial reproductive investment in presence of POs by laying 8.2% smaller clutch sizes, even if laying date was controlled. No breeding delay and clutch size reduction was found relative to TO presence. 5. Our results highlight flexibility in breeding territory selection and reproductive strategies as antipredator responses to perceived risk in a multi-predator environment. This supports the idea that for prey, not all predators are equal.

  3. Actes des Journees de linguistique (Proceedings of the Linguistics Conference) (7th, March 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drouin, Patrick, Ed.; And Others

    Papers from a 1993 conference on linguistics, all in French, include essays on the following: Yoruba morphophonology; literary Arabic morphophonology; grammatical cohesion in Burushaski; phonological and lexical variation in French Canadian dialects, including Acadian; insults in Madrid Spanish; discourse analysis; maintenance of meaning in…

  4. North America and the Francophone: Local and Transnational Movements for the Survival of French-Speaking North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St-Hilaire, Aonghas

    1997-01-01

    Notes that North American French survives as a first language of home and community in three historic Francophone strongholds: Quebec, New Brunswick, and Louisiana. It is suggested that the dynamics of cooperation between the Quebecois, Acadians, Cajuns, and the global Francophone tell of a common cultural struggle toward a community of…

  5. 77 FR 72297 - Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 648 RIN 0648-XC164 Magnuson-Stevens Act Provisions; Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Proposed Rule To Implement a Targeted Acadian Redfish Fishery...

  6. The Socio-Economic Vitality of Official-Language Communities. New Canadian Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudin, Maurice; Boudreau, Rene; De Benedetti, George

    Socioeconomic profiles of two Canadian communities are presented in which the language spoken, an official language, is also a minority language: the French-speaking Acadian minority in an area of Prince Edward Island, and an anglophone minority in the Gaspe Peninsula. The profiles are designed to establish a comparative base from which to assess…

  7. 75 FR 19363 - Endangered Species; File No. 14754

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... 25,000 fertilized shortnose sturgeon eggs of Saint John River ancestry from Acadian Sturgeon and Caviar Inc., Saint John, NB, Canada. The initial proposed research will take place during two sampling.... Dated: April 7, 2010. Jolie Harrison, Acting Chief, Permits, Conservation and Education Division,...

  8. (Re)-Introduction to French: Four Education Models to Revitalise an Endangered Group in Eastern Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cormier, Marianne; Bourque, Jimmy; Jolicoeur, Manon

    2014-01-01

    This study explores early francization models for a linguistic minority currently struggling to preserve its language. The French Acadians of New Brunswick, Canada, represent 30% of the province's total population, yet their numbers and their linguistic vitality are decreasing. New Brunswick has two public school systems: the English language…

  9. The Social Context of Franco-American Schooling in New England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Phyllis L.

    1984-01-01

    The historical background and cultural identity of Franco-Americans in New England, both French Canadians and Acadians, are outlined. Their educational experiences in American public schools, in which they have been left largely to assimilate by themselves, are discussed, and the current struggle for Franco-American cultural and linguistic…

  10. Emsian synorogenic paleogeography of the Maine Applachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, D.; Tucker, R.

    2002-01-01

    The Acadian deformation front in the northern Appalachians of Maine and New Hampshire can now be closely located during the early Emsian (Early Devonian; 408-406 Ma). Tight correlations between paleontologically and isotopically dated rocks are possible only because of a new 408-Ma time scale tie point for the early Emsian. The deformation front lay between a belt of Lower Devonian flysch and molasse that were deposited in an Acadian foreland basin and had not yet been folded and a belt of early Emsian plutons that intruded folded Lower Devonian rocks. This plutonic belt includes the newly dated Ore Mountain gabbro (U/Pb; 406 Ma), which hosts magmatic-sulfide mineralization. Along the deformation front, a 407-Ma pluton that locally truncates Acadian folds (Katahdin) was the feeder to volcanic rocks (Traveler Rhyolite; 406-407 Ma) that are part of the foreland-basin succession involved in these same folds. The Emsian igneous rocks thus define a syncollisional magmatic province that straddled the deformation front. These findings bear on three alternative subduction geometries for the Acadian collision.

  11. 77 FR 37387 - New England Fishery Management Council; Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Notice of Intent to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ... endangered distinct population segments of Atlantic sturgeon. This notice is to alert the interested public... sturgeon that interact with the NE multispecies fisheries. These potential measures are described in...); American plaice; witch flounder; Acadian redfish; white hake; windowpane flounder (GOM/GB and SNE/MA...

  12. Nasal mites from birds of a Guatemalan cloud forest (Acarina: rhinonyssidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Spicer, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the nasal mites from Guatemalan cloud forest birds is reported. Seventy-eight birds, representing 10 families and 18 species, were examined. Prevalence of infection was 24%. Two new species are described: Sternostoma darlingi from Mitrephanes phaeocercus (Tyrannidae) and S. pencei from Empidonax flavescens (Tyrannidae). New host records are reported for S. priangae from Chlorospingus opthalmicus (Thraupidae), S. hutsoni from Catharus dryas (Turdidae), Ptilonyssus sairae from Chlorospingus opthalmicus (Thraupidae), and Myioborus miniatus (Parulidae), P. euroturdi from Catharus dryas (Turdidae), P. tyrannus from Empidonax flavescens and Mitrephanes phaeocercus (both Tyannidae), and Tinaminyssus ixoreus from Catharus dryas (Turdidae). The subspecies Ptilonyssus euroturdi mimicola Fain and Hyland is synonymized with the nominate subspecies. Data are presented to suggest that the Rhinonyssidae may be a polyphyletic assemblage. 35 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  13. Temporal differences in food abundance promote coexistence between two congeneric passerines.

    PubMed

    Veen, Thor; Sheldon, Ben C; Weissing, Franz J; Visser, Marcel E; Qvarnström, Anna; Saetre, Glenn-Peter

    2010-04-01

    Many related species share the same environment and utilize similar resources. This is surprising because based on the principle of competitive exclusion one would predict that the superior competitor would drive the other species to extinction; coexistence is only predicted if interspecific competition is weaker than intraspecific competition. Interspecific competition is frequently reduced by differential resource use, resulting in habitat segregation. In this paper, we use the closely related collared and pied flycatcher to assess the potential of habitat differences to affect interspecific competition through a different mechanism, namely by generating temporal differences in availability of similar food resources between the two species. We found that the tree species composition of the breeding territories of the two species differed, mainly by a higher abundance of coniferous species around nest-boxes occupied by pied flycatchers. The temporal availability of caterpillars was measured using frass traps under four deciduous and two coniferous tree species. Deciduous tree species showed an early and narrow peak in abundance, which contrasted with the steady increase in caterpillar abundance in the coniferous tree species through the season. We subsequently calculated the predicted total caterpillar biomass available in each flycatcher territory. This differed between the species, with biomass decreasing more slowly in pied flycatcher territories. Caterpillar biomass is strongly correlated with the reproductive success of collared flycatchers, but much less so with pied flycatchers. However, caterpillar availability can only partly explain the differences in seasonal decline of reproductive success between the two species; we discuss additional factors that may contribute to this species difference. Overall, our results are consistent with the suggestion that minor habitat differences between these two species may contribute to promoting their coexistence.

  14. Effects of calcium supplementation on growth and biochemistry in two passerine species breeding in a Ca-poor and metal-polluted area.

    PubMed

    Espín, Silvia; Ruiz, Sandra; Sánchez-Virosta, Pablo; Eeva, Tapio

    2016-05-01

    Several studies provide evidence of calcium (Ca)-limited reproduction in birds. A Ca-supplementation experiment was carried out in 2014 in a Ca-poor area associated with metal pollution in SW Finland. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between Ca availability and heavy metal exposure in free-living passerines, and to compare Ca levels in plasma and feces and the effects of Ca supplementation and metals on breeding, nestling growth, and plasma biochemistry in great tits and pied flycatchers. Although the Ca supplement was used by parents, in general the treatment had limited effects on growth and biochemistry, suggesting that parents are capable of finding sufficient Ca-rich foods to allow nestlings to grow properly. Snail shells were an abundant Ca source in the moderately polluted zone for pied flycatcher, and great tits likely combines the intake of snail shells and other anthropogenic Ca-rich items. Great tits had higher Ca concentrations in feces and plasma than pied flycatcher nestlings, suggesting that they need and sustain higher Ca levels and seem to be more opportunistic in search for Ca than pied flycatcher, since they consumed more of the supplemented Ca. Negative effects of pollution in nestling size and fledgling number were found in great tit. This species may suffer especially from the lower food quality and quantity in the polluted area. The pied flycatcher seems to be adapted to low Ca availability and they can successfully breed when metal concentrations are not too high. Our results show that great tits and pied flycatchers may employ different strategies in response to low Ca availability.

  15. Molecular cytogenetics of the california condor: evolutionary and conservation implications.

    PubMed

    Modi, W S; Romanov, M; Green, E D; Ryder, O

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary cytogenetic comparisons involved 5 species of birds (California condor, chicken, zebra finch, collared flycatcher and black stork) belonging to divergent taxonomic orders. Seventy-four clones from a condor BAC library containing 80 genes were mapped to condor chromosomes using FISH, and 15 clones containing 16 genes were mapped to the stork Z chromosome. Maps for chicken and finch were derived from genome sequence databases, and that for flycatcher from the published literature. Gene content and gene order were highly conserved when individual condor, chicken, and zebra finch autosomes were compared, confirming that these species largely retain karyotypes close to the ancestral condition for neognathous birds. However, several differences were noted: zebra finch chromosomes 1 and 1A are homologous to condor and chicken chromosomes 1, the CHUNK1 gene appears to have transposed on condor chromosome 1, condor chromosomes 4 and 9 and zebra finch chromosomes 4 and 4A are homologous to chicken chromosome arms 4q and 4p, and novel inversions on chromosomes 4, 12 and 13 were found. Condor and stork Z chromosome gene orders are collinear and differentiated by a series of inversions/transpositions when compared to chicken, zebra finch, or flycatcher; phylogenetic analyses suggest independent rearrangement along the chicken, finch, and flycatcher lineages.

  16. The Role of MC1R in Speciation & Phylogeny

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    2013-01-01

    A point mutation in the MC1R gene, a G-protein-coupled receptor, has been found that could have led to the formation of two subspecies of Solomon Island flycatcher from a single ancestral population. I discuss the many roles that G-protein-coupled receptors play in vertebrate physiology and how one particular point mutation can have enormous…

  17. Legacy Bird Species at Risk Monitoring in and Around Camp Navajo and the Naval Observatory Flagstaff Station, AZ

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-16

    Sallabanks. 2000. Olive-sided Flycatcher. In A. Poole and F. Gill, (eds.) The Birds of North America, No. 502. The Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia...in M.D. Cadman, P.J.F. Eagles, and F.M. Helleiner, editors. Atlas of the breeding birds of Ontario. Federation of Ontario Naturalists, University of

  18. Vigilance against predators induced by eavesdropping on heterospecific alarm calls in a non-vocal lizard Oplurus cuvieri cuvieri (Reptilia: Iguania)

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Ryo; Mori, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Prey animals can reduce their risk of predation by detecting potential predators before encounters occur. Some animals gain information about nearby predators by eavesdropping on heterospecific alarm calls. Despite having well-developed ears, most lizards do not use vocal information for intraspecific communication, and few studies have shown practical use of the ears in wild lizards. Here, we show that the Madagascan spiny-tailed iguana (Oplurus cuvieri cuvieri) obtains auditory signals for predator detection. The Madagascan spiny-tailed iguana and the Madagascar paradise flycatcher (Terpsiphone mutata) are syntopic inhabitants of the Ampijoroa dry deciduous forest of Madagascar. The iguana and the flycatcher have neither a predator–prey relationship nor resource competition, but they have shared predators such as raptors and snakes. Using playback experiments, we demonstrated that the iguana discriminates mobbing alarm calls of the flycatcher from its songs and then enhances its vigilance behaviour. Our results demonstrate the occurrence of an asymmetrical ecological relationship between the Madagascan spiny-tailed iguana and the paradise flycatcher through eavesdropping on information about the presence of predators. This implies that indirect interspecific interactions through information recognition may be more common than generally thought in an animal community. PMID:20031993

  19. Environmental Assessment for the Auxiliary Airfield

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-18

    White-faced Ibis Plegadis chihi Sandhill crane Grus canadensis Road Runner Geococcyx californianus Mockingbird Mimus polyglottos Vermilion flycatcher...HORNED, TEXAS (Phrynosomacornutum) ***SNAKE, INDIGO, TEXAS (Drymarchon corais erebennus) **BLUE SUCKER (Cycleptus elongatus) *RIO GRANDE DARTER ...LIZARD, COLLARED, RETICULATE (Crotaphytus.reticulatus) ***RIO GRANDE DARTER (Etheostoma grahami) **BLUE SUCKER (Cycleptus elongatus) *PROSERPINE SHINER

  20. 78 FR 343 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Southwestern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-03

    ... middle Rio Grande and upper Gila River in New Mexico, and Roosevelt Lake and the San Pedro and Gila River...) segment of the San Francisco River at Luna Lake, Arizona, which we proposed for designation, does not... have the ability to develop into flycatcher nesting habitat. The habitat surrounding Luna Lake...

  1. Vitamin profiles in two free-living passerine birds under a metal pollution gradient - A calcium supplementation experiment.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Sandra R; Espín, Silvia; Sánchez-Virosta, Pablo; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Lilley, Thomas M; Eeva, Tapio

    2017-04-01

    Vitamin and carotenoid deficiency may impair development in free-living vertebrates, because of the importance of these micronutrients to growth, antioxidant defense and calcium regulation. Micronutrient and calcium insufficiency can be intensified by metal pollution which can interfere with nutrient homeostasis or indirectly reduce food availability. Furthermore, absorption of dietary heavy metals is dependent on food calcium and vitamin levels. We investigated the effect of calcium on plasma vitamin and carotenoid profiles and how these affected growth and survival in two passerine birds with different calcium turnover living along a metal pollution gradient. Vitamins (A, D3 and E) and carotenoids were quantified from blood plasma of great tit (Parus major) and pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) nestlings. Metal concentrations in soil and in feces from the same nestlings were used to assess the exposure to air pollution. Additionally, we examined the vitamin level variation between developmental stages (eggs and nestlings within the same brood). Our results showed that generally higher concentrations of vitamins and carotenoids circulate in blood of great tits than in pied flycatchers. In general, birds inhabiting the polluted zone presented lower concentrations of the studied micronutrients. Calcium supplementation and metal pollution decreased vitamin A concentration in pied flycatcher, but not in great tit, while vitamin A affected growth and survival in great tit and pied flycatcher respectively. Our results suggest that populations under exposure to metal pollution may experience increased vitamin A deficiency, and that the two passerine species, while obtaining similar micronutrients in food, respond differently to environmental disturbance of nutrients.

  2. Offshore medicine.

    PubMed

    Baker, D

    2001-03-01

    Offshore life can be refreshing for medics who are looking for a little change of pace; however, it is not for everyone. Working offshore can be the easiest or most boring job you'll ever have. It takes a specific type of medic to fit this mold. So, if you are considering a career in the offshore field, take all of the above into consideration. You are not just making a change in jobs, but a change in lifestyle. Once you become accustomed to this lifestyle, it will be hard to go back to the everyday hustle and bustle of the streets. For more information about working offshore, contact Acadian Contract Services at 800/259-333, or visit www.acadian.com.

  3. Paleozoic orogens in New England, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, P.; Tucker, R.D.; Bradley, D.; Berry, H.N.; Osberg, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Stratigraphy and isotope geochronology in the crystalline core of the Appalachians suggest revised interpretations of the extent, nature and timing of Paleozoic orogens in New England. Five major episodes of magmatism, deformation, and high-grade regional metamorphism are recognized: Taconian (455-442 Ma), Acadian (423-385 Ma), Neo-Acadian (366-350 Ma), Late Pennsylvanian (300-290 Ma) and Alleghanian (280-260 Ma). In the Taconian, the passive margin of Laurentia was subducted below a complex magmatic arc lasting from 480 to 442 Ma, founded in part on continental crust of a Medial New England terrane with possible affinities with Amazonia. Questions about Medial New England involve its coherence as a single plate, and the nature of its underlying crust. The Acadian began in Late Silurian as a collision between the amalgamated Laurentia-Medial New England and outer belts of Composite Avalon along a cryptic suture in coastal Maine, and progressed northwestward to the Connecticut Valley basin by mid-Devonian. Tonalitic-granitic magmatism and up to granulite-facies metamorphism culminated in Early Devonian, possibly tied to lithospheric detachment below the subducting northwestern plate and consequent asthenosphere upwelling. Newly discovered Neo-Acadian Late Devonian to Early Mississippian tonalitic-granitic magmatism, up to granulite-facies metamorphism, and severe deformation in central Massachusetts took place in a plate context poorly understood. Late Pennsylvanian effects include magmatism, metamorphism, and deformation near south New England gneiss domes and the Sebago batholith, and development of the right-lateral Norumbega fault system. Permian Alleghanian effects include penetrative deformation, granitic intrusions and up to sillimanite-grade metamorphism of Pennsylvanian beds in southeastern New England. These last two episodes relate to the arrival of Africa.

  4. Appalachian Basin Low-Permeability Sandstone Reservoir Characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Boswell; Susan Pool; Skip Pratt; David Matchen

    1993-04-30

    A preliminary assessment of Appalachian basin natural gas reservoirs designated as 'tight sands' by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) suggests that greater than 90% of the 'tight sand' resource occurs within two groups of genetically-related units; (1) the Lower Silurian Medina interval, and (2) the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Acadian clastic wedge. These intervals were targeted for detailed study with the goal of producing geologic reservoir characterization data sets compatible with the Tight Gas Analysis System (TGAS: ICF Resources, Inc.) reservoir simulator. The first phase of the study, completed in September, 1991, addressed the Medina reservoirs. The second phase, concerned with the Acadian clastic wedge, was completed in October, 1992. This report is a combined and updated version of the reports submitted in association with those efforts. The Medina interval consists of numerous interfingering fluvial/deltaic sandstones that produce oil and natural gas along an arcuate belt that stretches from eastern Kentucky to western New York. Geophysical well logs from 433 wells were examined in order to determine the geologic characteristics of six separate reservoir-bearing intervals. The Acadian clastic wedge is a thick, highly-lenticular package of interfingering fluvial-deltaic sandstones, siltstones, and shales. Geologic analyses of more than 800 wells resulted in a geologic/engineering characterization of seven separate stratigraphic intervals. For both study areas, well log and other data were analyzed to determine regional reservoir distribution, reservoir thickness, lithology, porosity, water saturation, pressure and temperature. These data were mapped, evaluated, and compiled into various TGAS data sets that reflect estimates of original gas-in-place, remaining reserves, and 'tight' reserves. The maps and data produced represent the first basin-wide geologic characterization for either interval. This report outlines the methods and

  5. Genetic heterogeneity in regional populations of Quebec--parental lineages in the Gaspe Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Claudia; Vézina, Hélène; Yotova, Vania; Hamon, Robert; de Knijff, Peter; Sinnett, Daniel; Labuda, Damian

    2009-08-01

    Stable colonization of the Gaspe Peninsula by Europeans started in the middle of the 18th century at the time of the British conquest of New France. The earliest settlers were Acadians, escaping British deportation policies, followed by Loyalists from the US, who preferred to remain under British rule after the Declaration of Independence. In the 19th century, the developing fishing industry attracted French Canadians from the St. Lawrence Valley and newcomers from Europe including Channel Islanders from Jersey and Guernsey. We analyzed parental lineages of the self-declared descendants of these four groups of settlers by mtDNA D-loop sequencing and Y-chromosome genotyping and compared them with French, British, and Irish samples. Their representation in terms of haplotype frequency classes reveals different signatures of founder effects, such as a loss of rare haplotypes, modification of intermediate frequency haplotypes, reduction in genetic diversity (seen in Acadians), but also enrichment by admixture. Parental lineages correlate with group identity. Descendants of early settlers, Acadians and Loyalists, preserved their identity more than those of French Canadian and Channel Islander "latecomers." Although overall genetic diversity among Gaspesians is comparable with their European source populations, F(ST) analysis indicated their greater differentiation. Distinct settlement history, a limited number of founders and relative genetic isolation contributed to the regionalization of the Quebec gene pool that appears less homogenous than usually anticipated.

  6. Meiotic stability and polymorphism of CAG repeat in normal chromosome at SCA1 locus

    SciTech Connect

    Limprasert, P.; Nouri, N.; Keats, B.J.B.

    1994-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder associated with an unstable and expanded CAG repeat. We analyzed the CAG repeat in normal chromosomes from various sources including SCA1 and nonSCA1 families, and Caucasian, African American, Eskimo, South American Indian and Acadian populations. The range of CAG repeats is 10-37 in normal alleles while the disease allele contains 45-65 repeats in our studies. To determine unbiased normal allelic frequencies, we analyzed data from unrelated individuals in each group. The significance of differences in allelic frequencies among the groups was determined by a chi-square test. Caucasian and Acadian frequencies were similar (p = 0.23), but highly significant differences were found among the Caucasians, African Americans, Eskimos, and South American Indians (p < 0.0005), and the range of allele sizes was much narrower in Eskimos and South American Indians. To determine if the normal chromosome is susceptible to meiotic instability, we examined members of 19 Caucasian and 24 Acadian families. Normal sized CAG repeats were faithfully transmitted from parents to offspring without any alteration in CAG number in 236 meioses. Transmission of CAG repeats in normal alleles were also stable in our SCA1 family. However, the disease allele was associated with a significant degree of instability. Some patients showed 2 expanded bands in DNA prepared from untransformed blood cells. This finding suggest mitotic instability of the disease allele.

  7. The tectono-thermal evolution of the Waterbury dome, western Connecticut, based on U-Pb and 40Ar/39Ar ages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dietsch, Craig; Kunk, Michael J.; Aleinikoff, John; Sutter, John F.

    2010-01-01

    Level 3 nappes were emplaced over the Waterbury dome along an Acadian décollement synchronous with the formation of a D3 thrust duplex in the dome. The décollement truncates the Ky + Kfs-in (migmatite) isograd in the dome core and a St-in isograd in level 3 nappes, indicating that peak metamorphic conditions in the dome core and nappe cover rocks formed in different places at different times. Metamorphic overgrowths on zircon from the felsic orthogneiss in the Waterbury dome have an age of 387 ± 5 Ma. Rocks of all levels and the décollement are folded by D4 folds that have a strongly developed, regional crenulation cleavage and D5 folds. The Waterbury dome was formed by thrust duplexing followed by fold interference during the Acadian orogeny. The 40Ar/39Ar ages of amphibole, muscovite, biotite, and K-feldspar from above and below the décollement are ca. 378 Ma, 355 Ma, 360 Ma (above) and 340 (below), and 288 Ma, respectively. Any kilometer-scale vertical movements between dome and nappe rocks were over by ca. 378 Ma. Core and cover rocks of the Waterbury dome record synchronous, post-Acadian cooling.

  8. Acoustic Monitoring of Threatened and Endangered Species in Inaccessible Areas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Research and Development Program STFL Scissor-tailed flycatcher TES Threaten and endangered species UNKN Unknown YBCU Yellow-billed cuckoo ...Common Yellowthroat? 14 1 Carolina Chickadee 20 9 Great Blue Heron? 14 2 Eastern Meadowlark 20 7 Northern Cardinal 13 10 Yellow-billed Cuckoo : YBCU...the Yellow-billed Cuckoo (a rarely detected bird with a low-pitched call). Estimates are included for the number of birds responsible for these

  9. A Feasibility Study on Bird Classification with Neural Network.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    signal which is generated by the Flycatcher tracking radar has a relationship with the wing stroke pattern of a bird. An automatic system to classify...birds using the AGC signal could be used in a bird collision warning system. Such a system does not yet exist. A prototype of a bird classification...expensive to be done in the framework of a feasibility study. According to the test results it is recommended to acquire real AGC data.

  10. Are nest sites actively chosen? Testing a common assumption for three non-resource limited birds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, A. E.; Elliot, S. L.; Hart, A. G.

    2009-09-01

    Many widely-accepted ecological concepts are simplified assumptions about complex situations that remain largely untested. One example is the assumption that nest-building species choose nest sites actively when they are not resource limited. This assumption has seen little direct empirical testing: most studies on nest-site selection simply assume that sites are chosen actively (and seek explanations for such behaviour) without considering that sites may be selected randomly. We used 15 years of data from a nestbox scheme in the UK to test the assumption of active nest-site choice in three cavity-nesting bird species that differ in breeding and migratory strategy: blue tit ( Cyanistes caeruleus), great tit ( Parus major) and pied flycatcher ( Ficedula hypoleuca). Nest-site selection was non-random (implying active nest-site choice) for blue and great tits, but not for pied flycatchers. We also considered the relative importance of year-specific and site-specific factors in determining occupation of nest sites. Site-specific factors were more important than year-specific factors for the tit species, while the reverse was true for pied flycatchers. Our results show that nest-site selection, in birds at least, is not always the result of active choice, such that choice should not be assumed automatically in studies of nesting behaviour. We use this example to highlight the need to test key ecological assumptions empirically, and the importance of doing so across taxa rather than for single "model" species.

  11. A new model for the provenance of the Upper Devonian Old Red Sandstone (UORS) of southern Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennis, Meg; Meere, Pat; Timmerman, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The geology of Southern Ireland is dominated by the influence of both the Caledonian and Variscan orogenies which have shaped the landscape of today. The Old Red Sandstone (ORS) sequences of the Middle - Upper Devonian Munster Basin have traditionally been viewed as a post-orogenic molasse deposit sourced from the Caledonides (Friend et al. 2000 & references therein), which were subsequently deformed by the Late Carboniferous Variscan Orogeny. This model does not take into account the potential impact of the Acadian Orogeny, an Early to Mid Devonian transpressional tectonic event which culminated in Mid Emsian times and resulted in the deformation and inversion of Lower ORS (LORS) basins across Britain and Ireland (Soper & Woodcock 2003; Meere & Mulchrone 2006). Evidence of Acadian deformation in Southern Ireland is recorded in the LORS sequence of the Lower-Middle Devonian basin, the Dingle Basin. Meere & Mulchrone (2006) show that penetrative deformation visible in the LORS of the Dingle Basin has an Acadian signature and is not associated with Late Carboniferous Variscan compression (Parkin 1976; Todd 2000). The role of the Acadian Orogeny in the tectono-sedimentary evolution of Southern Ireland has been analyzed in this study using a multidisciplinary approach. Petrographic analysis of both the LORS and Upper ORS (UORS) of southern Ireland suggests an alternative provenance model in which there is a direct genetic link between the two Devonian deposits. There is a fining-up relationship between the two basins and the volcanic lithic fragments - while extremely limited in occurrence in the Munster Basin - are strikingly similar in both units. The absence of conglomeratic units at the base of the Munster Basin provide further evidence that the UORS does not represent a classic molasse deposit. This is supported by EMPA data from both basins which indicates identical mica chemistries in both the LORS and UORS. A comparison with the white mica chemistries from a

  12. Tectono-metamorphic history of southern New Hampshire and southeastern Vermont

    SciTech Connect

    Chamberlain, C.P.; Lyons, J.B.; Thompson, J.B. Jr.; Rosenfeld, J.L.; Downie, E.

    1985-01-01

    A major boundary between two Acadian metamorphic terranes is marked by a band of low-grade rocks in the Connecticut River valley coinciding with the Monroe Line (ML) and separating higher-grade rocks in two distinct lithostratigraphic terranes. To the west, Cambro-Devonian rocks in the Vermont sequence overlie Grenvillian basement, whereas to the east a different Cambro-Dev. sequence rests upon Hadrynian basement. These terranes were assembled no later than the early Devonian. The eastern terrane, consisting of the Bronson Hill Anticlinorium(BHA) and Merrimack Synclinorium (MS), is bounded on the east by the older Massabesic Gneiss (650-480 my) and Ord (.) Merrimack Group. This southeastern terrane was in contact with the MS by the early Devonian because there is no break in metamorphism across the terrane boundary. Metamorphism in the western terrane (Vermont) is synkinematic and peaks in the Staur-Ky zone. The earliest metamorphism is believed to be Taconian and represents the thermal decay of relict blueschist metamorphism observed to the northwest and the accretion of an island-arc. The earliest metamorphism in the eastern terrane (BHA-MS) is Acadian and is associated with nappe formation and synkinematic plutons. Continued Acadian crustal shortening in the MS resulted in a pressure increase (from 3.8 to 7 kb), with rocks reaching peak metamorphism in the Sil-Mus up to Kspar-Cord zones. The authors suggest that this high-grade metamorphism was the result of a high transient heat flux initiated by crustal stretching in the MS during the Silurian and early Devonian when 8 km of clastics were deposited in a rapidly subsiding trough.

  13. Quantitative estimates of metamorphic equilibria: Tallassee synform, Dadeville belt, Alabama's Inner Piedmont

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, M.S.; Neilson, M.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Tallassee synform is the major structural feature in the western part of the Dadeville belt. This megascopic F2 structure folds amphibolite (Ropes Creek Amphibolite) and metasedimentary units (Agricola Schist, AS), as well as tonalitic (Camp Hill Gneiss, CHG), granitic (Chattasofka Creek Gneiss, CCG), and mafic-ultramafic plutons (Doss Mt. and Slaughters suites). Acadian-age prograde regional metamorphism preceded the F2 folding event, producing the pervasive S1 foliation and metamorphic recrystallization. Prograde mineralogy in the metapelites and metagraywackes of the AS includes garnet, biotite, muscovite, plagioclase, kyanite, sillimanite, and epidote. The intrusive rocks, both felsic and mafic-ultramafic, are occasionally garnetiferous and provide suitable mineral assemblages for P-T evaluation. The AS yields a range of T-P from 512--635C and 5.1--5.5 kb. Muscovite from the AS exhibits an increase in Ti content from 0.07 to 0.15 Ti/22 O formula unit with progressively increasing T's from 512 to 635C. This observation is consistent with other studies that show increasing Ti content with increasing grade. A CHG sample records an average metamorphic T-P of 604C and 5.79 kb. Hornblende-garnet pairs from a Doss Mt. amphibolite sample provides an average metamorphic T of 607C. These data are consistent with regional Barrovian-type middle to upper amphibolite facies metamorphism for the Tallassee synform. Peak metamorphism is represented by kyanite-sillimanite zone conditions and localized migmatization of the AS. The lithotectonic belts bounding the Dadeville belt to the NW and SE are the eastern Blue Ridge and Opelika belts. Studies have shown that these belts have also experienced Acadian-age amphibolite facies metamorphism with comparable P-T estimates to those presented here. These data suggest that the eastern Blue Ridge and Inner Piedmont of AL experienced the same pervasive dynamothermal Barrovian-type metamorphic episode during Acadian orogenesis.

  14. Late-Middle to Late Devonian (Givetian-Famennian) tectonic and stratigraphic history of central Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Ettensohn, F.R. . Dept. of Geological Sciences); Barnett, S.F. ); Norby, R.D. )

    1994-04-01

    Earliest Givetian deposition in central Kentucky is represented in upper parts of the Boyle and Sellersburg formations and reflects marginal-marine to shallow-marine carbonate deposition at the end of the second tectophase of the Acadian orogeny. Inception of the third tectophase of the Acadian orogeny in the area is reflected by a disconformity or angular unconformity between the Boyle and New Albany formations, by reactivation of faults on the Kentucky river and related fault zones, and by concurrent graben formation. Succeeding late Givetian deposition is represented by the equivalent Portwood and Blocher members of the New Albany. The Portwood represents localized deposition of dolomitic breccias and black shales in grabens and half grabens, paleogeographically manifest as a series of restricted coastal lagoons and estuaries in central and east-central Kentucky. In contrast, dolomitic, Blocher black shales in west-central kentucky, beyond the effects of faulting, reflect more open, platform-lagoonal conditions. Both units are carbonate rick, contain a sparse benthic fauna, and had local sources of sediment. By latest Givetian or earliest Frasnian, local basins were largely filed, and when local sediment sources were inundated by transgression, sediment starvation, represented by a major lag zone or bone bed, ensued throughout central Kentucky, while black- and gray-shale deposition continued in deeper parts of the Illinois and Appalachian basins. During the Frasnian and early Famennian, as subsidence and transgression continued, deeper water gray- and black-shale units from the Appalachian and Illinois basins slowly onlapped the Cincinnati Arch area of central Kentucky; black shales in these units are fissile and lack both carbonates and benthic fauna. At the Devonian-Mississippian transition, however, a locally developed unconformity and structurally related erosion probably reflect inception of the fourth and final tectophase of the Acadian orogeny.

  15. Mississippian fossils from southern appalachian metamorphic rocks and their implications for late paleozoic tectonic evolution.

    PubMed

    Gastaldo, R A; Guthrie, G M; Steltenpohl, M G; Gastaldo, R A; Steltenpohl, M G

    1993-10-29

    Fossils of Periastron reticulatum Unger emended. Beck recovered from the Erin Slate of the Talladega slate belt of Alabama establish that these rocks have a Mississippian (Kinderhookian-Tournaisian) age. The Talladega slate belt, the southwestern extension of the western Blue Ridge belt, was interpreted to have been affected by regional dynamothermal metamorphism and coeval deformation as a result of the Acadian orogeny. This fossil find indicates that metamorphism and deformation of the Talladega belt occurred after the Early Carboniferous (Alleghanian), requiring a reevaluation of tectonic interpretations of the southernmost Appalachians.

  16. Ion-microprobe dating of zircon from quartz-graphite veins at the Bristol, New Hampshire, metamorphic hot spot

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitler, P.K. ); Barreiro, B.; Chamberlain, C.P. ); Rumble, D. III )

    1990-07-01

    Detrital zircons entrained in hydrothermal quartz-graphite-rutile veins found near the Bristol, New Hampshire, metamorphic hot spot are overgrown by thin rims. Ion-microprobe analyses of these rims date their growth at 408 {plus minus} 6 Ma. These measurements quantitatively confirm textural evidence that the graphite veins were emplaced during peak metamorphism associated with the Acadian orogeny, and they provide a direct positive test of the hypothesis, based on petrological and stable-isotope evidence, that the hydrothermal systems responsible for the quartz-graphite veins were also responsible for the hot-spot metamorphism.

  17. Geometry of an outcrop-scale duplex in Devonian flysch, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, D.C.; Bradley, L.M.

    1994-01-01

    We describe an outcrop-scale duplex consisting of 211 exposed repetitions of a single bed. The duplex marks an early Acadian (Middle Devonian) oblique thrust zone in the Lower Devonian flysch of northern Maine. Detailed mapping at a scale of 1:8 has enabled us to measure accurately parameters such as horse length and thickness, ramp angles and displacements; we compare these and derivative values with those of published descriptions of duplexes, and with theoretical models. Shortening estimates based on line balancing are consistently smaller than two methods of area balancing, suggesting that layer-parallel shortening preceded thrusting. ?? 1994.

  18. Late cretaceous extensional tectonics and associated igneous activity on the northern margin of the Gulf of Mexico Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, R. L.; Sundeen, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Major, dominantly compressional, orogenic episodes (Taconic, Acadian, Alleghenian) affected eastern North America during the Paleozoic. During the Mesozoic, in contrast, this same region was principally affected by epeirogenic and extensional tectonism; one episode of comparatively more intense tectonic activity involving extensive faulting, uplift, sedimentation, intrusion and effusion produced the Newark Series of eposits and fault block phenomena. This event, termed the Palisades Disturbance, took place during the Late Triassic - Earliest Jurassic. The authors document a comparable extensional tectonic-igneous event occurring during the Late Cretaceous (Early Gulfian; Cenomanian-Santonian) along the southern margin of the cratonic platform from Arkansas to Georgia.

  19. Heat-producing elements and the thermal and baric patterns of metamorphic belts.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, C P; Sonder, L J

    1990-11-09

    The character of sedimentary basins, before they are deformed and metamorphosed, may strongly influence the thermal and baric patterns of metamorphic belts. Crustal thickening of anoxic sedimentary basins and subsequent thermal reequilibration may produce large areas of high-grade metamorphic rocks and granites because the concentrations of the heat-producing elements are high in such basins. In New England there is a spatial association among granites and high-grade metasedimentary rocks rich in U and Th that now form the Central Maine terrane. The high content of heat-producing elements in these rocks is attributed to fixing of U and Th in highly reduced sediments that were deposited in an anoxic basin that formed in the Silurian. When the basin was thickened during the Devonian Acadian orogeny, the thermal energy generated by the U- and Th-rich sediments produced the observed broad zone of high-grade rocks and anatectic granites. This hypothesis was tested with thermal calculations that reproduce most of the first-order thermal and baric patterns of the Acadian Appalachians, if pretectonic lateral variations in heat production are assumed.

  20. Bedrock geologic and joint trend map of the Pinardville quadrangle, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, William C.; Armstrong, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    The bedrock geology of the Pinardville quadrangle includes the Massabesic Gneiss Complex, exposed in the core of a regional northeast-trending anticlinorium, and highly deformed metasedimentary rocks of the Rangeley Formation, exposed along the northwest limb of the anticlinorium. Both formations were subjected to high-grade metamorphism and partial melting: the Rangeley during the middle Paleozoic Acadian orogeny, and the Massabesic Gneiss Complex during both the Acadian and the late Paleozoic Alleghanian orogeny. Granitoids produced during these orogenies range in age from Devonian (Spaulding Tonalite) to Permian (granite at Damon Pond), each with associated pegmatite. In the latest Paleozoic the Massabesic Gneiss Complex was uplifted with respect to the Rangeley Formation along the ductile Powder Hill fault, which also had a left-lateral component. Uplift continued into the early Mesozoic, producing the 2-kilometer-wide Campbell Hill fault zone, which is marked by northwest-dipping normal faults and dilational map-scale quartz bodies. Rare, undeformed Jurassic diabase dikes cut all older lithologies and structures. A second map is a compilation of joint orientations measured at all outcrops in the quadrangle. There is a great diversity of strike trends, with northeast perhaps being the most predominant.

  1. Structure of the Appalachian deformation front in western Newfoundland: Implications of multichannel seismic reflection data

    SciTech Connect

    Stockmal, G.S. ); Waldron, J.W.F. )

    1990-08-01

    Petroleum-industry multichannel marine seismic data in the public domain do not support the traditional interpretation of the Acadian deformation front in the Appalachians of western Newfoundland. They show that the Late Ordovician to latest Silurian Long Point-Clam Bank succession is folded in a northwest-facing monocline, whereas the underlying Cambrian-Ordovician platform succession dips southeast. We interpret the intervening region as a structural triangle zone similar to those at the foreland edges of other thrust belts. The contact between the Long Point Groups and the underlying Humber Arm allochthon, previously interpreted as unconformable on Port au Port Peninsula, is the southeast-vergent upper detachment surface of the triangle zone. The platform succession on the peninsula is probably within the triangle zone and is therefore allochthonous; at least 30 km of Acadian (Silurian-Devonian) northwest transport is implied. The triangle zone continues to the northeast, offshore the Bay of Islands, suggesting that Grenvillian basement of the Long Range massif is also allochthonous.

  2. Tightly linked flanking microsatellite markers for the Usher syndrome type I locus on the short arm of chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Keats, B.J.B.; Nouri, N.; Pelias, M.Z.; Deininger, P.L. ); Litt, M. )

    1994-04-01

    Usher syndrome type I is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by profound congenital hearing impairment and vestibular dysfunction followed by the onset of progressive pigmentary retinopathy in childhood or early adolescence. A locus (USH1C) for one form of this disease was previously assigned to the short arm of chromosome 11 through linkage studies in the Acadian population of southwestern Louisiana. Linkage analyses of a set of microsatellite markers in 27 Acadian families provide evidence that USH1C lies between D11S861 and D11S928. Three markers (D11S419, D11S921, and D11S899) that lie between the flanking markers show no recombination with USH1C, and all 54 chromosomes with the abnormal allele at the disease locus have identical alleles for D11S419 and D11S921. This haplotype was found on only 10 of 50 chromosomes with the normal allele at the disease locus, suggesting a strong founder effect. Of the 54 chromosomes with the abnormal allele, 12 had a divergent allele at D11S899. These results suggest that USH1C is in the 2-3-cM interval between D11S861 and D11S899. 16 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Tightly linked flanking microsatellite markers for the Usher syndrome type I locus on the short arm of chromosome 11.

    PubMed Central

    Keats, B. J.; Nouri, N.; Pelias, M. Z.; Deininger, P. L.; Litt, M.

    1994-01-01

    Usher syndrome type I is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by profound congenital hearing impairment and vestibular dysfunction followed by the onset of progressive pigmentary retinopathy in childhood or early adolescence. A locus (USH1C) for one form of this disease was previously assigned to the short arm of chromosome 11 through linkage studies in the Acadian population of southwestern Louisiana. Linkage analyses of a set of microsatellite markers in 27 Acadian families provide evidence that USH1C lies between D11S861 and D11S928. Three markers (D11S419, D11S921, and D11S899) that lie between the flanking markers show no recombination with USH1C, and all 54 chromosomes with the abnormal allele at the disease locus have identical alleles for D11S419 and D11S921. This haplotype was found on only 10 of 50 chromosomes with the normal allele at the disease locus, suggesting a strong founder effect. Of the 54 chromosomes with the abnormal allele, 12 had a divergent allele at D11S899. These results suggest that USH1C is in the 2-3-cM interval between D11S861 and D11S899. PMID:8128966

  4. Localization of two genes for Usher syndrome type I to chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.J.H.; Daiger, S.P. ); Jay, M.; Bird, A. ); Reardon, W. ); Guest, M. ); Kimberling, W.J.; Pelias, M.Z.; Keats, B.J.B.

    1992-12-01

    The Usher syndromes (USH) are autosomal recessive diseases characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing loss and progressive pigmentary retinopathy. While relatively rare in the general population, collectively they account for approximately 6% of the congenitally deaf population. Usher syndrome type II (USH2) has been mapped to chromosome 1q, and one form of Usher syndrome type I (USH1) has been mapped to chromosome 14q. These loci have been excluded as regions of USH genes in this data set, which is composed of 8 French-Acadian USH1 families and 11 British USH1 families. Both of these sets of families show linkage to loci on chromosome 11. Linkage analysis demonstrates locus heterogeneity between these sets of families, with the French-Acadian families showing linkage to D11S419 (Z = 4.20, [theta] = 0) and the British families showing linkage to D11S527 (Z = 6.03, [theta] = 0). Genetic heterogeneity of the data set was confirmed using HOMOG and the M test (log likelihood ratio > 10[sup 5]). These results confirm the presence of two distinct USH1 loci on chromosome 11. 41 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Heavy metal bioaccumulation in two passerines with differing migration strategies.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Zoë; Bringolf, Robert; Cooper, Robert; Loftis, Kathy; Bryan, Albert L; Martin, James A

    2017-03-11

    Various anthropogenic activities have resulted in concentration of heavy metals and contamination of surrounding environments. Historically, heavy metal contamination at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina has resulted from accidental releases of stored waste generated from nuclear weapon production in the early 1950s. Songbirds inhabiting and using resources from these areas have the potential to bioaccumulate metals but there is limited information on metal concentration levels in areas suspected of contamination as well as uncontaminated sites. Nonlethal tissues samples from avian blood and feathers provide a reliable approach for determining the bioavailability of these pollutants (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn). The objectives of this study were to survey terrestrial heavy metal contamination at the SRS on potentially bioavailable contaminated (PBC) sites through blood and feather samples from resident Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) and migratory Great Crested Flycatchers (Myiarchus crinitus) and quantify sex-specific concentrations within species. Samples were collected in April to June of 2016. Cardinals had lower blood concentrations of Hg (β=-0.17, 85% CL=-0.26, -0.09) and Se (β=-0.33, 85% CL=-0.50, -0.16) than flycatchers. Cr feather concentrations were less in cardinals (β=-1.46, 85% CL=-2.44, -0.49) and all feathers of both species from reference locations had significantly less Zn (β=-67.92, 85% CL=-128.71, -7.14). Results indicate flycatchers were exposed to differing heavy metal levels during feather formation on their wintering grounds as compared to their recent exposure (through bloods samples) on their breeding grounds. Sex of individuals did not have a significant impact on bioaccumulation in either species. Overall, metal concentration levels in both species indicate minimal risk for acute toxicity; however, there is limited research on wild passerine populations with similar concentration levels. Therefore

  6. Costs Associated with Endangered Species Act Compliance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    Least Tern $5,400,831 Least Tern 54,003,827 Piping Plover $5,265,091 Southwestern Willow Flycatcher $3,346,170 Sockeye Salmon $5,209,675...Turtle $815,744 Coho Salmon S1,137,958 West Indian West Indian Manatee $743,377 Manatee $683,336 Southwestern Bull Trout $730,573 Willow Fl...Longhorn Beetle $2,676,927 Southwestern Willow ~’catcher $2,064,255 Bald Eagle1 S1,585,62l Loggerhead Sea Turtle S1,307,802 Cape Sable Seaside

  7. A neotropical migrant bird's dilemma: where to stop for a good meal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontaine, Joseph J.; van Riper, Charles

    2009-01-01

    To learn how migrating birds determine where to stop and find food, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, Northern Arizona University, and The University of Arizona studied the behavior of 28 species of neotropical migrant songbirds - warblers, flycatchers, tanagers, and vireos - along the lower Colorado River from 2001 to 2004. They found that, like interstate travelers greeted by restaurant billboards, songbirds flying over Cibola National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona, relied on the flowering of honey mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) to detect the availability of insects that they prey on. Understanding where and why migrant birds stop will help land managers better protect key habitats used by these tiny travelers.

  8. Guild structure of a riparian avifauna relative to seasonal cattle grazing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knopf, F.L.; Sedgwick, J.A.; Cannon, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Knopf et al. found that summer cattle grazing has an adverse effect on the presence of certain willow-dependent songbirds. Pastures that have historical summer grazing no longer have the Willow flycatcher, Lincoln's sparrow and the White-crowned sparrow present. Yet in these same areas, birds like the American Robin, Brown-headed cowbird and the Red-winged blackbird have increased in density. One possible answer for the decrease in some songbirds is the fact that the main focus of the Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge is on waterfowl habitat, which requires large amounts of open space (opposite of desirable songbird habitat).

  9. Investigating Records of Prograde Metamorphism in Quartz with TitaniQ Thermobarometry: Initial Results from the Northfield Mountains, Vermont

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyess, P.; Webb, L. E.; Spear, F. S.; Thomas, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    We present results of microstructural, petrological, and chemical analyses on pelitic schists of the Green Mountain Cover Sequence in the Northfield Mountains of central Vermont. Sampling was conducted along a structural transect from Royalton to Rochester, Vermont, crossing the Richardson Memorial Contact and encompassing the transition from strictly Acadian to combined Taconic and Acadian deformation and metamorphism. The transect covers a region exhibiting a series of interbedded phyllites, quartzites, and calcic schists that form the eastern limb of the Green Mountain Anticlinorium. Petrology and microstructures record two major prograde events resulting from nappe emplacement events. An increase in peak metamorphism from chlorite grade in the west to garnet grade in the east provides a well-defined thermal and barometric transect along which to investigate the application of the Ti-in-quartz (TitaniQ) thermobarometer to constrain P-T-t-D histories. Cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging of quartz provides a qualitative depiction of [Ti] and intensity based upon the positive relationship at λ = 415 nm. Based on our results to date, two major trends in CL patterns have been recognized: a distinct difference between matrix and inclusion quartz in garnet-bearing samples, and a progressive transition in zoning patterns across the entire transect. In chlorite grade rocks to the west, matrix quartz is more uniform under CL. In higher grade rocks to the east, matrix quartz typically has dark cores with bright rims, while inclusions within garnet typically have either patchy dark cores with bright rims or uniformly bright cores with brighter rims. Furthermore, quartz grains from the lower grade samples frequently exhibit banding in CL, potentially related to planar defects that have been removed at higher P-T conditions. Zones of banding are restricted to the Q domains of the dominant (S2) schistosity. Banding appears to be frequently aligned with the sweeping direction of

  10. Long-term effects of precommercial thinning on small mammals in northern Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Homyack, J.A.; Harrison, D.J.; Krohn, W.B.

    2005-01-01

    Precommercial thinning (PCT) is being practiced increasingly throughout the Acadian forest of eastern North America to meet silvicultural objectives; however, effects of this practice on wildlife, both immediately and several years post-treatment are not well understood. Forest dependent small mammals have ecological roles as prey for numerous avian and mammalian predators, dispersers of seeds, fruit, and spores, and contribute to nutrient cycling. Researchers in the northwestern USA have suggested that thinning of young, regenerating clearcuts may increase the abundance and diversity of some forest-dependent small mammals by increasing rates of forest development and enhancing the ecological representation of mid-successional stands across managed landscapes. We examined the effects of PCT within conifer-dominated forest stands 1-, 6-, 11-, and 16-years post-treatment, on abundances of mice, voles, and shrews, and on within-stand structure in the commercially managed, Acadian forests of northern Maine. We live-trapped small mammals on 24 herbicide-treated clearcuts treated with PCT and on 13 similar, unthinned stands during summers of 2000 and 2001. Thinning of mid-successional conifer stands resulted in increased abundances, (red-backed voles, Clethrionomys gapperi, P = 0.008; masked shrews, Sorex cinereus, P < 0.001) or had no detectable effect on (deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus, P = 0.544; short-tailed shrews, Blarina brevicauda, P = 0.517) the 4 most common species of Muridae and Soricidae in northern Maine. In general, abundance of deer mice responded more positively to increasing development class and to the number of years since thinning than other species of small mammals. Several within-stand habitat characteristics associated with stand maturity, such as larger stem diameters and a partially open canopy, occurred in thinned stands. Thus, PCT may accelerate the development of habitat attributes typical of mid-successional conifer stands in intensively

  11. Effects of nocturnal illumination on life-history decisions and fitness in two wild songbird species

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Maaike; Ouyang, Jenny Q.; Da Silva, Arnaud; van Grunsven, Roy H. A.; Kempenaers, Bart; Visser, Marcel E.; Spoelstra, Kamiel

    2015-01-01

    The effects of artificial night lighting on animal behaviour and fitness are largely unknown. Most studies report short-term consequences in locations that are also exposed to other anthropogenic disturbance. We know little about how the effects of nocturnal illumination vary with different light colour compositions. This is increasingly relevant as the use of LED lights becomes more common, and LED light colour composition can be easily adjusted. We experimentally illuminated previously dark natural habitat with white, green and red light, and measured the effects on life-history decisions and fitness in two free-living songbird species, the great tit (Parus major) and pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) in two consecutive years. In 2013, but not in 2014, we found an effect of light treatment on lay date, and of the interaction of treatment and distance to the nearest lamp post on chick mass in great tits but not in pied flycatchers. We did not find an effect in either species of light treatment on breeding densities, clutch size, probability of brood failure, number of fledglings and adult survival. The finding that light colour may have differential effects opens up the possibility to mitigate negative ecological effects of nocturnal illumination by using different light spectra. PMID:25780240

  12. Covariation in levels of nucleotide diversity in homologous regions of the avian genome long after completion of lineage sorting.

    PubMed

    Dutoit, Ludovic; Vijay, Nagarjun; Mugal, Carina F; Bossu, Christen M; Burri, Reto; Wolf, Jochen; Ellegren, Hans

    2017-02-22

    Closely related species may show similar levels of genetic diversity in homologous regions of the genome owing to shared ancestral variation still segregating in the extant species. However, after completion of lineage sorting, such covariation is not necessarily expected. On the other hand, if the processes that govern genetic diversity are conserved, diversity may potentially covary even among distantly related species. We mapped regions of conserved synteny between the genomes of two divergent bird species-collared flycatcher and hooded crow-and identified more than 600 Mb of homologous regions (66% of the genome). From analyses of whole-genome resequencing data in large population samples of both species we found nucleotide diversity in 200 kb windows to be well correlated (Spearman's ρ = 0.407). The correlation remained highly similar after excluding coding sequences. To explain this covariation, we suggest that a stable avian karyotype and a conserved landscape of recombination rate variation render the diversity-reducing effects of linked selection similar in divergent bird lineages. Principal component regression analysis of several potential explanatory variables driving heterogeneity in flycatcher diversity levels revealed the strongest effects from recombination rate variation and density of coding sequence targets for selection, consistent with linked selection. It is also possible that a stable karyotype is associated with a conserved genomic mutation environment contributing to covariation in diversity levels between lineages. Our observations imply that genetic diversity is to some extent predictable.

  13. Natural selection for earlier male arrival to breeding grounds through direct and indirect effects in a migratory songbird

    PubMed Central

    Velmala, William; Helle, Samuli; Ahola, Markus P; Klaassen, Marcel; Lehikoinen, Esa; Rainio, Kalle; Sirkiä, Päivi M; Laaksonen, Toni

    2015-01-01

    For migratory birds, the earlier arrival of males to breeding grounds is often expected to have fitness benefits. However, the selection differential on male arrival time has rarely been decomposed into the direct effect of male arrival and potential indirect effects through female traits. We measured the directional selection differential on male arrival time in the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) using data from 6 years and annual number of fledglings as the fitness proxy. Using structural equation modeling, we were able to take into account the temporal structure of the breeding cycle and the hierarchy between the examined traits. We found directional selection differentials for earlier male arrival date and earlier female laying date, as well as strong selection differential for larger clutch size. These selection differentials were due to direct selection only as indirect selection for these traits was nonsignificant. When decomposing the direct selection for earlier male arrival into direct and indirect effects, we discovered that it was almost exclusively due to the direct effect of male arrival date on fitness and not due to its indirect effects via female traits. In other words, we showed for the first time that there is a direct effect of male arrival date on fitness while accounting for those effects that are mediated by effects of the social partner. Our study thus indicates that natural selection directly favored earlier male arrival in this flycatcher population. PMID:25859326

  14. Leading edge vortex in a slow-flying passerine

    PubMed Central

    Muijres, Florian T.; Johansson, L. Christoffer; Hedenström, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Most hovering animals, such as insects and hummingbirds, enhance lift by producing leading edge vortices (LEVs) and by using both the downstroke and upstroke for lift production. By contrast, most hovering passerine birds primarily use the downstroke to generate lift. To compensate for the nearly inactive upstroke, weight support during the downstroke needs to be relatively higher in passerines when compared with, e.g. hummingbirds. Here we show, by capturing the airflow around the wing of a freely flying pied flycatcher, that passerines may use LEVs during the downstroke to increase lift. The LEV contributes up to 49 per cent to weight support, which is three times higher than in hummingbirds, suggesting that avian hoverers compensate for the nearly inactive upstroke by generating stronger LEVs. Contrary to other animals, the LEV strength in the flycatcher is lowest near the wing tip, instead of highest. This is correlated with a spanwise reduction of the wing's angle-of-attack, partly owing to upward bending of primary feathers. We suggest that this helps to delay bursting and shedding of the particularly strong LEV in passerines. PMID:22417792

  15. Sex chromosome linked genetic variance and the evolution of sexual dimorphism of quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Husby, Arild; Schielzeth, Holger; Forstmeier, Wolfgang; Gustafsson, Lars; Qvarnström, Anna

    2013-03-01

    Theory predicts that sex chromsome linkage should reduce intersexual genetic correlations thereby allowing the evolution of sexual dimorphism. Empirical evidence for sex linkage has come largely from crosses and few studies have examined how sexual dimorphism and sex linkage are related within outbred populations. Here, we use data on an array of different traits measured on over 10,000 individuals from two pedigreed populations of birds (collared flycatcher and zebra finch) to estimate the amount of sex-linked genetic variance (h(2)z ). Of 17 traits examined, eight showed a nonzero h(2)Z estimate but only four were significantly different from zero (wing patch size and tarsus length in collared flycatchers, wing length and beak color in zebra finches). We further tested how sexual dimorphism and the mode of selection operating on the trait relate to the proportion of sex-linked genetic variance. Sexually selected traits did not show higher h(2)Z than morphological traits and there was only a weak positive relationship between h(2)Z and sexual dimorphism. However, given the relative scarcity of empirical studies, it is premature to make conclusions about the role of sex chromosome linkage in the evolution of sexual dimorphism.

  16. Covariation in levels of nucleotide diversity in homologous regions of the avian genome long after completion of lineage sorting

    PubMed Central

    Dutoit, Ludovic; Vijay, Nagarjun; Mugal, Carina F.; Bossu, Christen M.; Burri, Reto; Wolf, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    Closely related species may show similar levels of genetic diversity in homologous regions of the genome owing to shared ancestral variation still segregating in the extant species. However, after completion of lineage sorting, such covariation is not necessarily expected. On the other hand, if the processes that govern genetic diversity are conserved, diversity may potentially covary even among distantly related species. We mapped regions of conserved synteny between the genomes of two divergent bird species—collared flycatcher and hooded crow—and identified more than 600 Mb of homologous regions (66% of the genome). From analyses of whole-genome resequencing data in large population samples of both species we found nucleotide diversity in 200 kb windows to be well correlated (Spearman's ρ = 0.407). The correlation remained highly similar after excluding coding sequences. To explain this covariation, we suggest that a stable avian karyotype and a conserved landscape of recombination rate variation render the diversity-reducing effects of linked selection similar in divergent bird lineages. Principal component regression analysis of several potential explanatory variables driving heterogeneity in flycatcher diversity levels revealed the strongest effects from recombination rate variation and density of coding sequence targets for selection, consistent with linked selection. It is also possible that a stable karyotype is associated with a conserved genomic mutation environment contributing to covariation in diversity levels between lineages. Our observations imply that genetic diversity is to some extent predictable. PMID:28202815

  17. Longitudinal studies of West Nile virus infection in avians, Yucatán State, México.

    PubMed

    Farfán-Ale, José A; Blitvich, Bradley J; Loroño-Pino, María A; Marlenee, Nicole L; Rosado-Paredes, Elsy P; García-Rejón, Julián E; Flores-Flores, Luis F; Chulim-Perera, Luis; López-Uribe, Mildred; Pérez-Mendoza, Gerardo; Sánchez-Herrera, Ingrid; Santamaría, Waldemar; Moo-Huchim, Jose; Gubler, Duane J; Cropp, Bruce C; Calisher, Charles H; Beaty, Barry J

    2004-01-01

    Following the introduction of West Nile virus (WNV) into North America in 1999, surveillance for evidence of infection with this virus in migratory and resident birds was established in Yucatán State, México in March 2000. Overall, 8611 birds representing 182 species and 14 orders were captured and assayed for antibodies to WNV. Of these, 5066 (59%) birds were residents and 3545 (41%) birds were migrants. Twenty-one (0.24%) birds exhibited evidence of flavivirus infection. Of these, 8 birds had antibodies to WNV by epitope-blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Five (0.06%) birds (gray catbird, brown-crested flycatcher, rose-breasted grosbeak, blue bunting and indigo bunting) were confirmed to have WNV infections by plaque reduction neutralization test. The WNV-infected birds were sampled in December 2002 and January 2003. The brown-crested flycatcher and blue bunting presumably were resident birds; the other WNV seropositive birds were migrants. These data provide evidence of WNV transmission among birds in the Yucatán Peninsula.

  18. Effects of experimental calcium availability and anthropogenic metal pollution on eggshell characteristics and yolk carotenoid and vitamin levels in two passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Espín, Silvia; Ruiz, Sandra; Sánchez-Virosta, Pablo; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Eeva, Tapio

    2016-05-01

    The maternal investment into egg quality depends on the condition of the female, the quality of the mate, and the quality of the environment. In that sense, availability of nutrients and exposure to pollutants are essential parameters to consider. The main aim of this study is to assess the effects of calcium (Ca) availability and anthropogenic metal pollution on early-stage reproduction in two passerine species, great tits (Parus major) and pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), inhabiting a Ca-poor and metal-polluted area in SW Finland. Both species were able to obtain sufficient Ca for eggshell formation, and metal pollution was below the level of having negative effects in the egg size and eggshell characteristics. However, metal polluted environment negatively affected yolk lutein and vitamin D3 levels in both species, probably because of a lower access to carotenoid-rich diet and higher metal interference with vitamin D3 metabolism. The higher levels of vitamin D3 in yolks in the unpolluted zone could also be due to upregulated D3 levels as a response to the lower natural Ca availability. Yolk carotenoids and vitamin D3 were positively associated with nestling growth and size, supporting their importance for the appropriate chick development. The interspecific differences in yolk nutrient concentrations possibly reflect the different growth rate of these species. Pied flycatchers are likely adapted to low Ca availability through an efficient vitamin D3 metabolism, but their Ca intake could be close to a deficient level.

  19. Effects of nocturnal illumination on life-history decisions and fitness in two wild songbird species.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Maaike; Ouyang, Jenny Q; Da Silva, Arnaud; van Grunsven, Roy H A; Kempenaers, Bart; Visser, Marcel E; Spoelstra, Kamiel

    2015-05-05

    The effects of artificial night lighting on animal behaviour and fitness are largely unknown. Most studies report short-term consequences in locations that are also exposed to other anthropogenic disturbance. We know little about how the effects of nocturnal illumination vary with different light colour compositions. This is increasingly relevant as the use of LED lights becomes more common, and LED light colour composition can be easily adjusted. We experimentally illuminated previously dark natural habitat with white, green and red light, and measured the effects on life-history decisions and fitness in two free-living songbird species, the great tit (Parus major) and pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) in two consecutive years. In 2013, but not in 2014, we found an effect of light treatment on lay date, and of the interaction of treatment and distance to the nearest lamp post on chick mass in great tits but not in pied flycatchers. We did not find an effect in either species of light treatment on breeding densities, clutch size, probability of brood failure, number of fledglings and adult survival. The finding that light colour may have differential effects opens up the possibility to mitigate negative ecological effects of nocturnal illumination by using different light spectra.

  20. Fitness consequences of northward dispersal as possible adaptation to climate change, using experimental translocation of a migratory passerine.

    PubMed

    Burger, Claudia; Nord, Andreas; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Gilot-Fromont, Emmanuelle; Both, Christiaan

    2013-01-01

    Climate change leads to rapid, differential changes in phenology across trophic levels, often resulting in temporal mismatches between predators and their prey. If a species cannot easily adjust its timing, it can adapt by choosing a new breeding location with a later phenology of its prey. In this study, we experimentally investigated whether long-distance dispersal to northern breeding grounds with a later phenology could be a feasible process to restore the match between timing of breeding and peak food abundance and thus improve reproductive success. Here, we report the successful translocation of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) to natural breeding sites 560 km to the Northeast. We expected translocated birds to have a fitness advantage with respect to environmental phenology, but to potentially pay costs through the lack of other locally adapted traits. Translocated individuals started egg laying 11 days earlier than northern control birds, which were translocated only within the northern site. The number of fledglings produced was somewhat lower in translocated birds, compared to northern controls, and fledglings were in lower body condition. Translocated individuals were performing not significantly different to control birds that remained at the original southern site. The lack of advantage of the translocated individuals most likely resulted from the exceptionally cold spring in which the experiment was carried out. Our results, however, suggest that pied flycatchers can successfully introduce their early breeding phenotype after dispersing to more northern areas, and thus that adaptation through dispersal is a viable option for populations that get locally maladapted through climate change.

  1. Bacteria-killing ability of fresh blood plasma compared to frozen blood plasma.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Anne C; Fair, Jeanne M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the bacteria-killing assay (BKA) has become a popular technique among ecoimmunologists. New variations of that assay allow researchers to use smaller volumes of blood, an important consideration for those working on small-bodied animals. However, this version of the assay requires access to a lab with a nanodrop spectrophotometer, something that may not be available in the field. One possible solution is to freeze plasma for transport; however, this assumes that frozen plasma samples will give comparable results to fresh ones. We tested this assumption using plasma samples from three species of birds: chickens (Gallus gallus), ash-throated flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens), and western bluebirds (Sialia mexicana). Chicken plasma samples lost most or all of their bacterial killing ability after freezing. This did not happen in flycatchers and bluebirds; however, frozen plasma did not produce results comparable to those obtained using fresh plasma. We caution researchers using the BKA to use fresh samples whenever possible, and to validate the use of frozen samples on a species-by-species basis.

  2. Bimodal Silurian and Lower Devonian volcanic rock assemblages in the Machias-Eastport area, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gates, Olcott; Moench, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Exposed in the Machias-Eastport area of southeastern Maine is the thickest (at least 8,000 m), best exposed, best dated, and most nearly complete succession of Silurian and Lower Devonian volcanic strata in the coastal volcanic belt, remnants of which crop out along the coasts of southern New Brunswick, Canada, and southeastern New England in the United States. The volcanics were erupted through the 600-700-million-year-old Avalonian sialic basement. To test the possibility that this volcanic belt was a magmatic arc above a subduction zone prior to presumed Acadian continental collision, samples representing the entire section in the Machias-Eastport area of Maine were chemically analyzed. Three strongly bimodal assemblages of volcanic rocks and associated intrusives are recognized, herein called the Silurian, older Devonian, and younger Devonian assemblages. The Silurian assemblage contains typically nonporphyritic high-alumina tholeiitic basalts, basaltic andesites, and diabase of continental characterand calc-alkalic rhyolites, silicic dacites, and one known dike of andesite. These rocks are associated with fossiliferous, predominantly marine strata of the Quoddy, Dennys, and Edmunds Formations, and the Leighton Formation of the Pembroke Group (the stratigraphic rank of both is revised herein for the Machias-Eastport area), all of Silurian age. The shallow marine Hersey Formation (stratigraphic rank also revised herein) of the Pembroke Group, of latest Silurian age (and possibly earliest Devonian, as suggested by an ostracode fauna), contains no known volcanics; and it evidently was deposited during a volcanic hiatus that immediately preceded emergence of the coastal volcanic belt and the eruption of the older Devonian assemblage. The older Devonian assemblage, in the lagoonal to subaerial Lower Devonian Eastport Formation, contains tholeiitic basalts and basaltic andesites, typically with abundant plagioclase phenocrysts and typically richer in iron and

  3. Comparative studies of the CAG repeats in the spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) gene.

    PubMed

    Limprasert, P; Nouri, N; Nopparatana, C; Deininger, P L; Keats, B J

    1997-09-19

    The CAG repeat tract at the autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) locus was analyzed in SCA1 families and French-Acadian, African-American, Caucasian, Greenland Inuit, and Thai populations. The normal alleles had 9-37 repeats, whereas disease alleles contained 44-64 repeats. The CAG repeat tract contained one or two CAT interruptions in 44 of 47 normal human chromosomes and in all five chimpanzees examined. In contrast, no CAT interruptions were found in Old World monkeys or expanded human alleles. The number and positions of CAT interruptions may be important in stabilizing CAG repeat tracts in normal chromosomes. At least five codons occupy the region corresponding to the polyglutamine tract at the SCA1 locus in mice, rats, and other rodents. They comprise three or four CCN (coding for proline) in addition to one or two CAG repeats.

  4. Quality of Water from Shallow Wells in Urban Residential and Light Commercial Areas in Lafayette Parish, Louisiana, 2001 through 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fendick, Robert B.; Tollett, Roland W.

    2004-01-01

    In 2001-02, the U.S. Geological Survey installed and sampled 28 shallow wells in urban residential and light commercial areas in Lafayette Parish, Louisiana, for a land-use study in the Acadian-Pontchartrain Study Unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The wells were installed in the Chicot aquifer system, the primary source of water for irrigation and public-water supplies in southwestern Louisiana. The purpose of this report is to describe the quality of water from the 28 shallow wells and to relate that water quality to natural factors and to human activities. Ground-water samples were analyzed for general ground-water properties and about 240 water-quality contituents, including dissolved solids, major inorganic ions, trace elements, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), radon, chlorofluorocarbons, selected stable isotopes, pesticides, pesticide degradation products, and volatile organic compounds (VOC's).

  5. A field trip guidebook to the type localities of Marland Billings' 1935 Paleozoic bedrock stratigraphy near Littleton, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, Douglas W.; Rankin, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    Marland Billings' classic paper published in 1937 in the Geological Society of America Bulletin established a succession of six stratigraphic units in rocks of low metamorphic grade near Littleton, New Hampshire. The two youngest units are fossiliferous in the area, with ages established at the time as “middle” Silurian and Early Devonian. Billings and students mapped the same stratigraphic section in adjacent areas of progressively higher regional metamorphic grade. This work laid the foundation upon which a major part of subsequent work in New England has been directly or indirectly built. This guidebook was written for a field trip held in March 2013 to visit roadcuts that are as close as possible in March to the type localities or areas of Billings’ six-fold stratigraphic succession. Ten stops are in rocks of chlorite grade of Acadian(?) metamorphism; the final stop visits amphibolite of the Ammonoosuc Volcanics. Fieldwork by the authors over the past 20 years confirms Billings’ broad conclusions.

  6. Dating slate belts using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and zircon ages from crosscutting plutons: A case study from east-central Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanem, Hind; Kunk, Michael; Ludman, Allan; Bish, David; Wintsch, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Determining the tectonic significance of slate belts is a persistent problem in many orogenic belts because of the lack of time constraints on the age of deposition and the age(s) of cleavages. We have solved this problem in east-central Maine where the ages of the regional Acadian cleavage (S1) and local ductile fault zone cleavage (S2) were both constrained using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and the ages of crosscutting plutons. Applying 40Ar/39Ar geochronology to rocks with multiple generations of muscovite was possible because each cleavage-forming muscovite records a crystallization age rather than a cooling age due to the low grade of regional metamorphism. Evidence for metamorphic crystallization in rocks dominated by regional Acadian cleavage (S1) comes from the truncations of detrital and authigenic muscovite and chlorite grains by new muscovite and chlorite grains that define the S1 foliation. In rocks that display two foliations, the evidence comes from the truncations of chlorite and muscovite grains defining all earlier fabrics by new muscovite grains in the younger folia (S2). Step-heating experiments using the 40Ar/39Ar technique on twelve samples all yielded sigmoidal age spectra. The low-temperature steps produced a hump in the age spectra, indicating 39Ar recoil into adjacent interlayered chlorite grains, the latter interlayering confirmed by back-scattered electron imaging. Continuing steps climbed steadily from those with minimum apparent ages as young as ~381 Ma to steps with maximum ages as old as 466 Ma. The samples with the lowest minimum apparent age steps are those in which the S2 cleavage-forming mica population dominates. In contrast, the oldest apparent age steps are from samples that have the highest modal abundance of detrital micas. The Middle Ordovician age of the maximum age steps is interpreted to be the minimum cooling age of the detrital micas. The minimum 40Ar/39Ar age steps of muscovite in the samples that display only S1 cleavage

  7. The character and reactivation history of the southern extension of the seismically active Clarendon Linden Fault System, western New York State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobi, Robert D.; Fountain, John

    2002-08-01

    Integration of 11 types of data sets enabled us to determine the location, character and fault history of the southern extension of the Clarendon-Linden Fault System (CLF) in southwestern New York State. The data sets utilized include detailed stratigraphic and fracture measurements at more than 1000 sites, soil gas anomalies, seismic reflection profiles, well logs and lineaments on air photos, topographic maps, Landsat and SLAR images. The seismically active CLF consists of as many as 10 parallel, segmented faults across the fault system. The fault segments are truncated by NW-striking cross-strike discontinuities (CSDs). The faults of the CLF and intersecting CSDs form fault blocks that have semi-independent subsidence and uplift histories. East-dipping reflectors in the Precambrian basement indicate the southward continuation of thrusts of the intra-Grenvillian Elzevir-Frontenac Boundary Zone. These thrusts were reactivated during Iapetan rifting as normal (listric) growth faults. In Ordovician Black River to Trenton time, the southern CLF segments experienced a second phase of growth fault activity, with faults displaying a cumulative stratigraphic throw of as much as ˜170 m. Thrusting on the same east-dipping Precambrian reflectors typified the CLF in Taconic (post-Trenton) times. Detailed comparisons among the fault segments show that the fault activity in Silurian and Devonian times generally alternated between the western and central main faults. In Late Devonian time, the fault motion reversed from down-on-the-east to down-on-the-west about the time the Appalachian Basin axis passed across the CLF in its westward migration. The deep Precambrian faults of the CLF were thus reactivated as the Appalachian Basin developed in Acadian times. Finally, the CLF thrust fault imaged on seismic line CLF-1 offsets all bedrock (Devonian) units; thus, significant motion occurred along this fault during Late Acadian, or more likely, Alleghanian time.

  8. Igneous petrogenesis and tectonic setting of granitic rocks from the eastern Blue Ridge, Alabama Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, M.S. . Geology Dept.); Allison, D.T. . Geology Dept.); Tull, J.F. . Geology Dept.); Bieler, D.B. . Geology Dept.)

    1994-03-01

    A span of 150 my of orogenic activity is recorded within the granitic rocks of the eastern Blue Ridge of Alabama (EBR). Four discrete episodes of plutonism can be differentiated, each event exhibiting distinct field relations and geochemical signatures. (1) Penobscotian stage: this initial stage of plutonic activity is represented by the Elkahatchee Quartz Diorite (EQD), a premetamorphic (495 Ma) batholith and the largest intrusive complex (880 km[sup 2]) exposed in the Blue Ridge. Calc-alkaline I-type tonalite-granodiorite are the principal lithologies, with subordinate cumulate hbl-bt diorite, metadacite, granite and trondhjemite. The parental tonalitic magmas are interpreted to have been derived from a subducted MORB source under eclogite to get amphibolite conditions. (2) Taconic stage: the Kowaliga augen gneiss (KAG) and the Zana granite gneiss (ZG) are 460 Ma granitic bodies that reside in the SE extremity and structurally highest portion of the EBR. Both of these bodies are pre-metamorphic with strongly elongate sill- and pod-like shapes concordant with S[sub 1] foliation. Granite and granodiorite comprise the bulk of the KAG. (3) Acadian stage: Rockford Granite (RG), Bluff springs Granite (BSG, 366 Ma), and Almond Trondhjemite represent a suite of pre- to syn-metamorphic granitic intrusions. (4) late-Acadian stage: The Blakes Ferry pluton (BFP) is a post-kinematic pluton displaying spectacular by schlieren igneous flow structures, but no metamorphic fabric. The pluton's age can be bracketed between a 366 Ma age on the BSG and a 324 Ma K-Ar muscovite age on the BFP. BFP's petrogenesis has involved partial melting a MORB source followed by assimilation of metasedimentary host rock.

  9. The tectono-stratigraphic framework and evolution of southwestern Maine and southeastern New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hussey, Arthur M.; Bothner, Wallace A.; Alienikoff, John N.; Tollo, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    Five belts of metamorphosed sedimentary and volcanic rocks underlie southwestern Maine and southeastern New Hampshire: Middle Ordovician Falmouth-Brunswick sequence; Middle and Late Ordovician Casco Bay Group, and Late Ordovician to Early Silurian rocks of the Merribuckfred Basin; Late Ordovician to Early Silurian rocks of the East Harpswell Group; Silurian to Early Devonian rocks of the Central Maine Basin; and highly tectonized enigmatic rocks of the Rye complex of uncertain age. Stratigraphic reassessment and new U/Pb zircon ages support a model of east-directed Middle Ordovician subduction beneath Miramichi, a peri-Gondwanan block, and formation of the Falmouth-Brunswick–Casco Bay volcanic arc complex that is roughly correlative with arc activity on strike in New Brunswick. Passive Late Ordovician sedimentation in a reducing restricted backarc basin followed. Late Ordovician to Early Silurian volcanic rocks and volcanogenic sediments (East Harpswell Group) support west-directed subduction under the Miramichi block. Late Ordovician to Early Silurian turbidites accumulated in the Merribuckfred Basin between the Falmouth-Brunswick–Casco Bay arc and Ganderia to the east. The collision of Ganderia with the Falmouth Brunswick arc in Late Silurian time represents an early phase of the Acadian orogeny, during which the Merribuckfred rocks were deformed, metamorphosed, intruded, and uplifted. Simultaneously and inboard, the Central Maine Basin received sediment eroded mostly from Laurentia. Later, during the Late Silurian and Early Devonian, uplifted Merribuckfred basin rocks became the major source of sediments for the Central Maine Basin. A later phase of the Acadian orogeny resulted in Middle Devonian deformation, metamorphism, and intrusion of rocks of all six belts.

  10. Biogeography of dinoflagellate cysts in northwest Atlantic estuaries.

    PubMed

    Price, Andrea M; Pospelova, Vera; Coffin, Michael R S; Latimer, James S; Chmura, Gail L

    2016-08-01

    Few biogeographic studies of dinoflagellate cysts include the near-shore estuarine environment. We determine the effect of estuary type, biogeography, and water quality on the spatial distribution of organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts from the Northeast USA (Maine to Delaware) and Canada (Prince Edward Island). A total of 69 surface sediment samples were collected from 27 estuaries, from sites with surface salinities >20. Dinoflagellate cysts were examined microscopically and compared to environmental parameters using multivariate ordination techniques. The spatial distribution of cyst taxa reflects biogeographic provinces established by other marine organisms, with Cape Cod separating the northern Acadian Province from the southern Virginian Province. Species such as Lingulodinium machaerophorum and Polysphaeridinium zoharyi were found almost exclusively in the Virginian Province, while others such as Dubridinium spp. and Islandinium? cezare were more abundant in the Acadian Province. Tidal range, sea surface temperature (SST), and sea surface salinity (SSS) are statistically significant parameters influencing cyst assemblages. Samples from the same type of estuary cluster together in canonical correspondence analysis when the estuaries are within the same biogeographic province. The large geographic extent of this study, encompassing four main estuary types (riverine, lagoon, coastal embayment, and fjord), allowed us to determine that the type of estuary has an important influence on cyst assemblages. Due to greater seasonal variations in SSTs and SSSs in estuaries compared to the open ocean, cyst assemblages show distinct latitudinal trends. The estuarine context is important for understanding present-day species distribution, the factors controlling them, and to better predict how they may change in the future.

  11. Orogenesis and Basin Development: U-Pb Detrital Zircon Age Constraints on Evolution of the Late Paleozoic St. Marys Basin, Central Mainland Nova Scotia.

    PubMed

    Murphy; Hamilton

    2000-01-01

    The St. Marys Basin, along the southern flank of the composite Late Paleozoic Magdalen Basin in the Canadian Appalachians and along the Avalon-Meguma terrane boundary, contains Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous continental clastic rocks of the Horton Group that were deposited in fluvial and lacustrine environments after the peak of the Acadian orogeny. SHRIMP II (Geological Survey of Canada) data on approximately 100 detrital zircons from three samples of Horton Group rocks from the St. Marys Basin show that most of the zircons have been involved in a multistage history, recycled from clastic rocks in the adjacent Meguma and Avalonian terranes. Although there is a minor contribution from Early Silurian (411 Ma) and Late Devonian suites (ca. 380-370 Ma), Neoproterozoic (ca. 700-550 Ma) and Paleoproterozoic (ca. 2.0-2.2 Ga) zircon populations predominate, with a minor contribution from ca. 1.0-, 1.2-, and 1.8-Ga zircons. Published U-Pb single-zircon analyses on clastic sedimentary rocks indicate that the Meguma and Avalon terranes have different populations of detrital zircons, sourced from discrete portions (Amazonian and West African cratons) of the ancient Gondwanan margin. Both terranes contain Neoproterozoic and Late Archean populations. The SHRIMP data, in conjunction with published sedimentological and geochemical data, indicate that the Horton Group basin-fill sediments are largely the result of rapid uplift and erosion of Meguma terrane metasedimentary and granitoid rocks immediately to the south of the St. Marys Basin during the waning stages of the Acadian orogeny. Regional syntheses indicate that this uplift occurred before and during deposition and was a consequence of dextral ramping of the Meguma terrane over the Avalon terrane along the southern flank of the Magdalen Basin.

  12. Contrasting tectonothermal domains and faulting in the Potomac terrane, Virginia-Maryland - Discrimination by 40Ar/39Ar and fission-track thermochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunk, M.J.; Wintsch, R.P.; Naeser, C.W.; Naeser, N.D.; Southworth, C.S.; Drake, A.A.; Becker, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar data reveal ages and thermal discontinuities that identify mapped and unmapped fault boundaries in the Potomac terrane in northern Virginia, thus confirming previous interpretations that it is a composite terrane. The rocks of the Potomac terrane were examined along the Potomac River, where it has been previously subdivided into three units: the Mather Gorge, Sykesville, and Laurel Formations. In the Mather Gorge Formation, at least two metamorphic thermal domains were identified, the Blockhouse Point and Bear Island domains, separated by a fault active in the late Devonian. Early Ordovician (ca. 475 Ma) cooling ages of amphibole in the Bear Island domain reflect cooling from Taconic metamorphism, whereas the Blockhouse Point domain was first metamorphosed in the Devonian. The 40Ar/39Ar data from muscovites in a third (eastern) domain within the Mather Gorge Formation, the Stubblefield Falls domain, record thrusting of the Sykesville Formation over the Mather Gorge Formation on the Plummers Island fault in the Devonian. The existence of two distinctly different thermal domains separated by a tectonic boundary within the Mather Gorge argues against its status as a formation. Hornblende cooling ages in the Sykesville Formation are Early Devonian (ca. 400 Ma), reflecting cooling from Taconic and Acadian metamorphism. The ages of retrograde and overprinting muscovite in phyllonites from domain-bounding faults are late Devonian (Acadian) and late Pennsylvanian (Alleghanian), marking the time of assembly of these domains and subsequent movement on the Plummers Island fault. Our data indicate that net vertical motion between the Bear Island domain of the Mather Gorge complex and the Sykesville Formation across the Plummers Island fault is east-side-up. Zircon fission-track cooling ages demonstrate thermal equillbrium across the Potomac terrane in the early Permian, and apatite fission-track cooling ages record tilting of the Potomac terrane in the Cretaceous

  13. Autogenic gas (self sourced) from shales - an example from the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Milici, R.C. )

    1993-01-01

    Black gas shales of Devonian and Mississippian age occur over much of the Appalachian basin, extending from eastern Tennessee north- and northeastward into Ohio and New York. In general, these shales were deposited along the distal margin of the Acadian Catskill delta in response to episodes of tectonic subsidence and regional transgression during the Acadian orogeny. A major trend of high organic carbon content in the black shales extends along the western side of the Catskill delta, from southwestern Virginia to the southern shores of Lake Erie. The high content of organic detritus in these Devonian and Mississippian black-shale source beds is probably related to high organic productivity in combination with moderate sedimentation rates along the distal margins of the Catskill delta. In general, organic matter in the black shales is more marine and oil prone on the western side of the basin, away from the major sources of siliciclastic input, than it is to the east. Thermal maturity trends follow depositional strike and isopachs of the Catskill delta and, thus, are related to depth of burial. Fracture porosity within the black shale sequence appears to have been affected mostly by regional decollement within discrete stratigraphic units that were, perhaps, overpressured during deformation. Shale gas is produced from relatively large fields in southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, southwestern West Virginia, and southernmost Ohio. To the north, the strata rich in organic matter are thermally immature, and fields along the southern shores of lake Erie in Ohio and Pennsylvania are only marginally productive. To the east in northwestern West Virginia, the organic content of the shales is diluted by increased amounts of siliciclastics; organic matter is not sufficient to sustain long-term gas production, and shale-gas wells are short lived. 79 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Dating slate belts using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and zircon ages from crosscutting plutons: A case study from east-central Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanem, Hind; Kunk, Michael J.; Ludman, Allan; Bish, David L.; Wintsch, Robert P.

    2016-12-01

    We report the ages of cleavage development in a normally intractable lower greenschist facies slate belt, the Central Maine-Aroostook-Matapedia belt in east-central Maine. We have attacked this problem by identifying the minimum ages of muscovite in a regional Acadian cleavage (S1) and in a local ductile fault zone cleavage (S2) using 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and the ages of crosscutting plutons. Our success stems from the regional low-grade metamorphism of the rocks in which each crystallization event preserves a40Ar/39Ar crystallization age and not a cooling age. Evidence for recrystallization via a pressure solution mechanism comes from truncations of detrital, authigenic, and in some rocks S1 muscovite and chlorite grains by new cleavage-forming muscovite and chlorite grains. Low-blank furnace age spectra from meta-arkosic and slaty rocks climb from moderate temperature Devonian age-steps dominated by cleavage-forming muscovite to Ordovician age-steps dominated by a detrital muscovite component. S1- and S2-cleaved rocks were hornfelsed by granitoids of ∼407 and 377 Ma, respectively. The combination of these minimum ages with the maximum metamorphic crystallization ages establishes narrow constraints on the timing of these two cleavage-forming events, ∼410 Ma (S1) and ∼380 Ma (S2). These two events coincide in time with a change in the plate convergence kinematics from the arrival of the Avalon terrane (Acadian orogeny), to a right-lateral transpression arrival of the Meguma terrane in the Neoacadian orogeny.

  15. P-T-t paths and differential Alleghanian loading and uplift of the Bronson Hill terrane south central New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wintsch, R.P.; Kunk, M.J.; Boyd, J.L.; Aleinikoff, J.N.

    2003-01-01

    Late Paleozoic U-Pb ages of sphene and 40Ar/39Ar cooling ages of amphibole and muscovite from rocks of the Bronson Hill terrane in Connecticut and central Massachusetts reflect a late Paleozoic (Alleghanian) overprint on Acadian metamorphic rocks. Prograde Alleghanian sphenes crystallized during the Late Pennsylvanian, and eliminate the possibility that amphibole ages reflect delayed Permian cooling from Devonian Acadian metamorphism. Fourteen new amphibole ages from Connecticut form a north-to-south trend of decreasing age from 294 to 245 Ma, while in Massachusetts four new amphibole ages together with three others from the literature produce a random Carboniferous pattern. Seven new muscovite ages support existing data indicating uniform cooling throughout the Bronson Hill terrane through ???350??C in the Early Triassic. The rate of Permian cooling defined by amphibole-muscovite pairs increases from ???4??C/my in northern Connecticut to ???50??C/my near Long Island Sound. Hinged loading and hinged but delayed exhumation in the southern part of the Bronson Hill terrane (with the hinge in central Connecticut) explain these ages and cooling rates as well as a southerly increasing metamorphic field gradient. One-dimensional thermal modeling indicates that loading of Bronson Hill rocks must have begun by the Late Mississippian. The time of peak Alleghanian metamorphic temperature decreases southward from Early Permian in northern Connecticut to Late Permian to the south. These results demonstrate that the metamorphic effects of the Alleghanian orogeny are not restricted to the Avalon terrane of southeastern New England. On the contrary, the Alleghanian orogeny reset 40Ar/39Ar mineral ages, recrystallized minerals, partially melted felsic rocks, and transposed fabrics at least as far west as the Bronson Hill terrane in south-central New England.

  16. A Late Silurian U-Pb zircon age for Linville metadiabase, Grandfather Mountain window, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Fetter, A.H.; Goldberg, S.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Linville metadiabase intrudes both Precambrian basement within the Grandfather Mountain window and nonconformably overlying Grandfather Mountain Formation. It occurs as sill-like and dike-like bodies, and is apparently not recognized outside of the window. Major element data classify the composition of the rock as tholeiitic basalt. Zircon was separated from a metadiabase body intruding metasiltstone of the Grandfather Mountain Formation west of Cranberry Knob. Zircon are clear, euhedral, with a l/w ratio of 3:1. Two abraded fractions (75-150 and < 75 [mu]m, both NM-2[degree]) yield concordant ages, which the authors report as 415 [plus minus] 3 Ma (2[sigma]), a weighted mean of the two [sup 207]Pb/[sup 206]Pb ages. This Late Silurian (Ludlow) age is interpreted as the time of crystallization. Previously, similarities in mode of occurrence and major element composition have been used to correlate Linville metadiabase with late Precambrian mafic rocks within and outside of the window, as field relations do not constrain its age. Linville metadiabase thus is an unlikely candidate for feeders to the Montezuma metabasalt, which occurs as a flow immediately above metarhyolite dated as 742 [plus minus] 2 Ma (2[sigma]). Linville metadiabase may be one component of a magmatic pulse spanning 10-20 m.y. associated with the Acadian orogeny. The new zircon age places constraints on the timing of metamorphism and deformation, as Linville metadiabase is foliated, containing metamorphic assemblages from the biotite zone of the greenschist facies. The age and fabric relations are permissive evidence of post-Taconic, Acadian or Alleghanian orogeny.

  17. Interspecific variation in the relationship between clutch size, laying date and intensity of urbanization in four species of hole-nesting birds.

    PubMed

    Vaugoyeau, Marie; Adriaensen, Frank; Artemyev, Alexandr; Bańbura, Jerzy; Barba, Emilio; Biard, Clotilde; Blondel, Jacques; Bouslama, Zihad; Bouvier, Jean-Charles; Camprodon, Jordi; Cecere, Francesco; Charmantier, Anne; Charter, Motti; Cichoń, Mariusz; Cusimano, Camillo; Czeszczewik, Dorota; Demeyrier, Virginie; Doligez, Blandine; Doutrelant, Claire; Dubiec, Anna; Eens, Marcel; Eeva, Tapio; Faivre, Bruno; Ferns, Peter N; Forsman, Jukka T; García-Del-Rey, Eduardo; Goldshtein, Aya; Goodenough, Anne E; Gosler, Andrew G; Grégoire, Arnaud; Gustafsson, Lars; Harnist, Iga; Hartley, Ian R; Heeb, Philipp; Hinsley, Shelley A; Isenmann, Paul; Jacob, Staffan; Juškaitis, Rimvydas; Korpimäki, Erkki; Krams, Indrikis; Laaksonen, Toni; Lambrechts, Marcel M; Leclercq, Bernard; Lehikoinen, Esa; Loukola, Olli; Lundberg, Arne; Mainwaring, Mark C; Mänd, Raivo; Massa, Bruno; Mazgajski, Tomasz D; Merino, Santiago; Mitrus, Cezary; Mönkkönen, Mikko; Morin, Xavier; Nager, Ruedi G; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Nilsson, Sven G; Norte, Ana C; Orell, Markku; Perret, Philippe; Perrins, Christopher M; Pimentel, Carla S; Pinxten, Rianne; Richner, Heinz; Robles, Hugo; Rytkönen, Seppo; Senar, Juan Carlos; Seppänen, Janne T; Pascoal da Silva, Luis; Slagsvold, Tore; Solonen, Tapio; Sorace, Alberto; Stenning, Martyn J; Tryjanowski, Piotr; von Numers, Mikael; Walankiewicz, Wieslaw; Møller, Anders Pape

    2016-08-01

    The increase in size of human populations in urban and agricultural areas has resulted in considerable habitat conversion globally. Such anthropogenic areas have specific environmental characteristics, which influence the physiology, life history, and population dynamics of plants and animals. For example, the date of bud burst is advanced in urban compared to nearby natural areas. In some birds, breeding success is determined by synchrony between timing of breeding and peak food abundance. Pertinently, caterpillars are an important food source for the nestlings of many bird species, and their abundance is influenced by environmental factors such as temperature and date of bud burst. Higher temperatures and advanced date of bud burst in urban areas could advance peak caterpillar abundance and thus affect breeding phenology of birds. In order to test whether laying date advance and clutch sizes decrease with the intensity of urbanization, we analyzed the timing of breeding and clutch size in relation to intensity of urbanization as a measure of human impact in 199 nest box plots across Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East (i.e., the Western Palearctic) for four species of hole-nesters: blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus), great tits (Parus major), collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis), and pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca). Meanwhile, we estimated the intensity of urbanization as the density of buildings surrounding study plots measured on orthophotographs. For the four study species, the intensity of urbanization was not correlated with laying date. Clutch size in blue and great tits does not seem affected by the intensity of urbanization, while in collared and pied flycatchers it decreased with increasing intensity of urbanization. This is the first large-scale study showing a species-specific major correlation between intensity of urbanization and the ecology of breeding. The underlying mechanisms for the relationships between life history and

  18. Side-specific effect of yolk testosterone elevation on second-to-fourth digit ratio in a wild passerine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Gergely; Blázi, György; Hegyi, Gergely; Török, János

    2016-02-01

    Second-to-fourth digit ratio is a widely investigated sexually dimorphic morphological trait in human studies and could reliably indicate the prenatal steroid environment. Conducting manipulative experiments to test this hypothesis comes up against ethical limits in humans. However, oviparous tetrapods may be excellent models to experimentally investigate the effects of prenatal steroids on offspring second-to-fourth digit ratio. In this field study, we injected collared flycatcher ( Ficedula albicollis) eggs with physiological doses of testosterone. Fledglings from eggs with elevated yolk testosterone, regardless of their sex, had longer second digits on their left feet than controls, while the fourth digit did not differ between groups. Therefore, second-to-fourth digit ratio was higher in the testosterone-injected group, but only on the left foot. This is the first study which shows experimentally that early testosterone exposure can affect second-to-fourth digit ratio in a wild population of a passerine bird.

  19. Side-specific effect of yolk testosterone elevation on second-to-fourth digit ratio in a wild passerine.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gergely; Blázi, György; Hegyi, Gergely; Török, János

    2016-02-01

    Second-to-fourth digit ratio is a widely investigated sexually dimorphic morphological trait in human studies and could reliably indicate the prenatal steroid environment. Conducting manipulative experiments to test this hypothesis comes up against ethical limits in humans. However, oviparous tetrapods may be excellent models to experimentally investigate the effects of prenatal steroids on offspring second-to-fourth digit ratio. In this field study, we injected collared flycatcher (Ficedula albicollis) eggs with physiological doses of testosterone. Fledglings from eggs with elevated yolk testosterone, regardless of their sex, had longer second digits on their left feet than controls, while the fourth digit did not differ between groups. Therefore, second-to-fourth digit ratio was higher in the testosterone-injected group, but only on the left foot. This is the first study which shows experimentally that early testosterone exposure can affect second-to-fourth digit ratio in a wild population of a passerine bird.

  20. Paternal genetic contribution to offspring condition predicted by size of male secondary sexual character

    PubMed Central

    Sheldon, B. C.; Merila, J.; Qvarnström, A.; Gustafsson, L.; Ellegren, H.

    1997-01-01

    Whether females can obtain genetic benefits from mate choice is contentious, and the main problem faced by previous studies of natural populations is that many factors other than paternal genes contribute to offspring fitness. Here, we use comparisons between sets of naturally occurring maternal half-sibling collared flycatchers, Ficedula albicollis, to control for this problem. We show, first, that there are paternal genetic effects on nestling fledging condition, a character related to fitness in this species. Further, the magnitude of the paternal genetic contribution to this character is related to the size of a condition-dependent male secondary sexual character. Our results demonstrate that genetic benefits from mate choice can be predicted by the size of a secondary sexual character, and therefore provide direct support for indicator models of sexual selection.

  1. Monitoring and assessment of juvenile steelhead on Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge. Quick Response Project for 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jezorek, Ian G.; Petersen, James H.

    2002-01-01

    Toppenish National Wildlife Refuge (TNWR) in south central Washington was established in 1964 to provide an important link in the chain of feeding and resting areas for waterfowl and other migratory birds using the Pacific Flyway. Wetlands on TNWR include both natural floodplain wetlands along Toppenish Creek and man-made impoundments designed to mimic natural floodplain processes. Wetland improvement projects were completed between 1995-1998 to restore wetland habitat conditions and eliminate monotypic stands of invasive reed canary grass. Habitat improvements boosted fall/winter use from 2,000 to 50,000 waterfowl, and increased overall use by many species of water birds, shorebirds, and other migratory birds. Increased use by bald eagles, peregrine falcons, and willow flycatchers has also been recorded.

  2. Environment-dependent selection on mate choice in a natural population of birds.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Matthew R; van Doorn, G Sander; Gustafsson, Lars; Qvarnström, Anna

    2012-06-01

    Female mate choice acts as an important evolutionary force, yet the influence of the environment on both its expression and the selective pressures acting upon it remains unknown. We found consistent heritable differences between females in their choice of mate based on ornament size during a 25-year study of a population of collared flycatchers. However, the fitness consequences of mate choice were dependent on environmental conditions experienced whilst breeding. Females breeding with highly ornamented males experienced high relative fitness during dry summer conditions, but low relative fitness during wetter years. Our results imply that sexual selection within a population can be highly variable and dependent upon the prevailing weather conditions experienced by individuals.

  3. The risk of predation favors cooperation among breeding prey.

    PubMed

    Krams, Indrikis; Krama, Tatjana; Berzins, Arnis; Rantala, Markus J

    2010-05-01

    Empirical studies have shown that animals often focus on short-term benefits under conditions of predation risk, which reduces the likelihood that they will cooperate with others. However, some theoretical studies predict that animals in adverse conditions should not avoid cooperation with their neighbors since it may decrease individual risks and increase long-term benefits of reciprocal help. We experimentally tested these two alternatives to find out whether increased predation risk enhances or diminishes the occurrence of cooperation in mobbing, a common anti-predator behavior, among breeding pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca. Our results show that birds attended mobs initiated by their neighbors more often, approached the stuffed predator significantly more closely, and mobbed it at a higher intensity in areas where the perceived risk of predation was experimentally increased. This study demonstrates a positive impact of predation risk on cooperation in breeding songbirds, which might help to explain the emergence and evolution of cooperation.

  4. Exploring Heterozygosity-Survival Correlations in a Wild Songbird Population: Contrasting Effects between Juvenile and Adult Stages

    PubMed Central

    Canal, David; Serrano, David; Potti, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between genetic diversity and fitness, a major issue in evolutionary and conservation biology, is expected to be stronger in traits affected by many loci and those directly influencing fitness. Here we explore the influence of heterozygosity measured at 15 neutral markers on individual survival, one of the most important parameters determining individual fitness. We followed individual survival up to recruitment and during subsequent adult life of 863 fledgling pied flycatchers born in two consecutive breeding seasons. Mark-recapture analyses showed that individual heterozygosity did not influence juvenile or adult survival. In contrast, the genetic relatedness of parents was negatively associated with the offspring’s survival during the adult life, but this effect was not apparent in the juvenile (from fledgling to recruitment) stage. Stochastic factors experienced during the first year of life in this long-distance migratory species may have swamped a relationship between heterozygosity and survival up to recruitment. PMID:25122217

  5. Isotopic analysis of island House Martins Delichon urbica indicates marine provenance of nutrients

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Adam D P; Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas; Österblom, Henrik; McGill, Rona A R; Furness, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    The presence of one of the largest colonies of House Martins in Europe on the small island of Stora Karlsö, Sweden, led us to investigate the source of their food by analysis of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen. Carbon isotopic values of House Martin nestlings were the same as those of Common Guillemot Uria aalge nestlings fed on marine fish, but differed from local Collared Flycatcher Ficedula albicollis nestlings fed on woodland insects. We infer that these House Martins fed their chicks almost exclusively on insects that had used nutrients derived from seabirds, indicating a dependence on the presence of a large seabird colony. We suggest by extension that some populations of island passerines of high conservation importance may also be dependent on nutrient subsidies from seabird colonies. PMID:25866414

  6. Forest fragmentation and its effects on birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.; Johnson, James E.

    1988-01-01

    Fragmentation of forest land, whether by suburban development, highways, transmission lines, or poorly planned cutting regimes, seriously affects reproduction by the large numbers of obligate forest interior birds. Many of our warblers, vireos, thrushes, tanagers, and flycatchers are highly migratory insectivorous birds that spend more than half the year in the neotropics, but migrate north to the United States and Canada to rear their young. These tropical visitors are especially vulnerable to predation and cowbird parasitism and are unable to maintain their populations within 100-200 m of forest edge. Habitats for these declining species can be provided by managing forest lands in large blocks so as to maintain at all times extensive contiguous areas of successional stages as well as of mature forest. Avoiding scattered small cuts will also help by reducing edge, road construction, and other disturbance.

  7. Birds as objects in bioindication of radioactive pollution.

    PubMed

    Krivolutski, D A; Lebedeva, N V; Shuktomova, I I

    1999-01-01

    This article is a review the recent results of research in the accumulation of natural and artificial radionuclides in birds from Russia (Adigea, Krasnodar, Rostov, Astrahan and Moscow regions, Novaya Zemlya isles), Ukraine, Vietnam, Poland, Ethiophia and Mongolia after global precipitation and local pollution, such as in the East-Urals radioactive region and radioactive zones after the Chernobyl accident. Resident birds reflect local level of radionuclide contamination. The 90Sr concentration in the food of the Pied Flycatcher had a tendency to increase in dependent of age. The Common Jay and the Mallard were the most contaminated with 137Cs in the Bryansk region. The total content of various radio-isotopes of plutonium in bird bones from Southwest Russia were hundred and thousand times more, than in Mongolia. Activity levels in specimens from Ethiopia bear record to Ethiopia can notbe a "pure" control site in radioecological research and radioactive background since it does not significantly differ from Turkmenia and Mongolia.

  8. Isotopic analysis of island House Martins Delichon urbica indicates marine provenance of nutrients.

    PubMed

    Cross, Adam D P; Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas; Österblom, Henrik; McGill, Rona A R; Furness, Robert W

    2014-07-01

    The presence of one of the largest colonies of House Martins in Europe on the small island of Stora Karlsö, Sweden, led us to investigate the source of their food by analysis of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen. Carbon isotopic values of House Martin nestlings were the same as those of Common Guillemot Uria aalge nestlings fed on marine fish, but differed from local Collared Flycatcher Ficedula albicollis nestlings fed on woodland insects. We infer that these House Martins fed their chicks almost exclusively on insects that had used nutrients derived from seabirds, indicating a dependence on the presence of a large seabird colony. We suggest by extension that some populations of island passerines of high conservation importance may also be dependent on nutrient subsidies from seabird colonies.

  9. Relationships of the avifauna of San Esteban Island, Sonora

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, R.C.

    1969-01-01

    Seven species of geographically variable birds have been reported as part of the resident avifauna of San Esteban Island in the Gulf of California, Sonora. Two of these, the Curvebilled Thrasher and the Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, may not actually have breeding populations there, at least at the present time. Of the seven, only two, the Verdin and the doubtfully resident thrasher, can be used in a determination of the relationships of the avifauna, and both show affinities to that of Sonora. The Ash-throated Flycatcher and the House Finch are represented by the same form on San Esteban and in both Sonora and Baja California at the latitude of the island. Neither the Ladder-backed Woodpecker nor the endemic Black-throated Sparrow shows greater similarity to the Baja California or Sonoran avifauna. The slight balance of evidence indicates that the avifauna of San Esteban Island is best considered with that of Sonora.

  10. Sapayoa aenigma: a New World representative of 'Old World suboscines'.

    PubMed Central

    Fjeldså, Jon; Zuccon, Dario; Irestedt, Martin; Johansson, Ulf S; Ericson, Per G P

    2003-01-01

    Passerine birds are very plastic in their adaptations, which has made it difficult to define phylogenetic lineages and correctly allocate all species to these. Sapayoa aenigma, a member of the large group of New World flycatchers, has been difficult to place, and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments have indicated that it may have been misplaced. This is confirmed here, as base sequencing of two nuclear genes places it as a deep branch in the group of broadbills and pittas of the Old World tropics. The peculiar distribution of this lineage may be best explained in terms of a Gondwanic and Late Cretaceous origin of the passerine birds, as this particular lineage dispersed from the Antarctic landmass, reaching the Old World tropics via the drifting Indian plate, and South America via the West Antarctic Peninsula. PMID:14667393

  11. Fitness Consequences of Northward Dispersal as Possible Adaptation to Climate Change, Using Experimental Translocation of a Migratory Passerine

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Claudia; Nord, Andreas; Nilsson, Jan-Åke; Gilot-Fromont, Emmanuelle; Both, Christiaan

    2013-01-01

    Climate change leads to rapid, differential changes in phenology across trophic levels, often resulting in temporal mismatches between predators and their prey. If a species cannot easily adjust its timing, it can adapt by choosing a new breeding location with a later phenology of its prey. In this study, we experimentally investigated whether long-distance dispersal to northern breeding grounds with a later phenology could be a feasible process to restore the match between timing of breeding and peak food abundance and thus improve reproductive success. Here, we report the successful translocation of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) to natural breeding sites 560 km to the Northeast. We expected translocated birds to have a fitness advantage with respect to environmental phenology, but to potentially pay costs through the lack of other locally adapted traits. Translocated individuals started egg laying 11 days earlier than northern control birds, which were translocated only within the northern site. The number of fledglings produced was somewhat lower in translocated birds, compared to northern controls, and fledglings were in lower body condition. Translocated individuals were performing not significantly different to control birds that remained at the original southern site. The lack of advantage of the translocated individuals most likely resulted from the exceptionally cold spring in which the experiment was carried out. Our results, however, suggest that pied flycatchers can successfully introduce their early breeding phenotype after dispersing to more northern areas, and thus that adaptation through dispersal is a viable option for populations that get locally maladapted through climate change. PMID:24349454

  12. Androgens regulate gene expression in avian skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Barske, Julia; Du, Sienmi; Day, Lainy B; Schlinger, Barney A

    2012-01-01

    Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR) are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus), zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata), and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus). Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird's body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR) to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T) up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca(2+) cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction.

  13. Science-Driven Management of Protected Areas: A Philippine Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallari, Neil Aldrin D.; Collar, Nigel J.; McGowan, Philip J. K.; Marsden, Stuart J.

    2013-06-01

    The lack of scientific baseline information hinders appropriate design and management of protected areas. To illustrate the value of science to management, we consider five scenarios for the 202.0 km² Puerto Princesa Subterranean River National Park, Philippines: (1) closure to human activities, (2) and (3) two levels of increase in unplanned human activities, (4) creation of a forest corridor and (5) additional allocation of land for permanent or shifting agriculture. We then use habitat-specific bird density estimates to simulate the net effect of each scenario on 18 focal bird populations. Closure has significant benefits—populations of five species are predicted to increase by >50 % and nine by >25 %, but two secondary forest flycatchers, including the endemic and `Vulnerable' Palawan flycatcher, decline dramatically, while the creation of a 4.0 km² forest corridor yields average increases across species of 2 ± 4 % (SD). In contrast, heavier unplanned park usage produces declines in all but a few species, while the negative effects of an extra 2.0 km² of shifting cultivation are 3-5 times higher than for a similar area of permanent agriculture and affect species whose densities are highest in primary habitats. Relatively small changes within the park, especially those associated with agricultural expansion, has serious predicted implications for local bird populations. Our models do not take into account the full complexities of bird ecology at a site, but they do provide park managers with an evidence base from which to make better decisions relating to biodiversity conservation obligations which their parks are intended to meet.

  14. An Ecohydrological Approach to Riparian Restoration Planning in the American Southwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leverich, G. T.; Orr, B.; Diggory, Z.; Dudley, T.; Hatten, J.; Hultine, K. R.; Johnson, M. P.; Orr, D.

    2014-12-01

    Riparian systems across the American southwest region are under threat from a growing and intertwined cast of natural and anthropogenic stressors, including flooding, drought, invasion by non-native plants, wildfire, urban encroachment, and land- and water-use practices. In relatively remote and unregulated systems like the upper Gila River in Arizona, riparian habitat value has persisted reasonably well despite much of it being densely infested with non-native tamarisk (salt cedar). A new concern in the watershed, however, is the eventual arrival of the tamarisk leaf beetle that is expected to soon colonize the tamarisk-infested riparian corridor as the beetle continues to spread across the southwest region. While there are numerous potential benefits to tamarisk suppression (e.g., groundwater conservation, riparian habitat recovery, fire-risk reduction), short-term negative consequences are also possible, such as altered channel hydraulics and canopy defoliation during bird nesting season (e.g., the endangered southwestern willow flycatcher). In preparation for anticipated impacts following beetle colonization, we developed a holistic restoration framework to promote recovery of native riparian habitat and subsequent local increases in avian population. Pivotal to this process was an ecohydrological assessment that identified sustainable restoration sites based on consideration of natural and anthropogenic factors that, together, influence restoration opportunities—flood-scour dynamics, vegetation community structure and resilience, surface- and groundwater availability, soil texture and salinity, wildfire potential, and land-use activities. Data collected included high-resolution remote-sensing products, GIS-based delineation of geomorphic activity, and vegetation field mapping. These data along with other information generated, including pre-biocontrol vegetation monitoring and flycatcher-habitat modeling, were synthesized to produce a comprehensive

  15. Change Points in the Population Trends of Aerial-Insectivorous Birds in North America: Synchronized in Time across Species and Regions

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adam C.; Hudson, Marie-Anne R.; Downes, Constance M.; Francis, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    North American populations of aerial insectivorous birds are in steep decline. Aerial insectivores (AI) are a group of bird species that feed almost exclusively on insects in flight, and include swallows, swifts, nightjars, and flycatchers. The causes of the declines are not well understood. Indeed, it is not clear when the declines began, or whether the declines are shared across all species in the group (e.g., caused by changes in flying insect populations) or specific to each species (e.g., caused by changes in species’ breeding habitat). A recent study suggested that population trends of aerial insectivores changed for the worse in the 1980s. If there was such a change point in trends of the group, understanding its timing and geographic pattern could help identify potential causes of the decline. We used a hierarchical Bayesian, penalized regression spline, change point model to estimate group-level change points in the trends of 22 species of AI, across 153 geographic strata of North America. We found evidence for group-level change points in 85% of the strata. Change points for flycatchers (FC) were distinct from those for swallows, swifts and nightjars (SSN) across North America, except in the Northeast, where all AI shared the same group-level change points. During the 1980s, there was a negative change point across most of North America, in the trends of SSN. For FC, the group-level change points were more geographically variable, and in many regions there were two: a positive change point followed by a negative change point. This group-level synchrony in AI population trends is likely evidence of a response to a common environmental factor(s) with similar effects on many species across broad spatial extents. The timing and geographic patterns of the change points that we identify here should provide a spring-board for research into the causes behind aerial insectivore declines. PMID:26147572

  16. Androgens Regulate Gene Expression in Avian Skeletal Muscles

    PubMed Central

    Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Barske, Julia; Du, Sienmi; Day, Lainy B.; Schlinger, Barney A.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR) are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus), zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata), and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus). Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird’s body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR) to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T) up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca2+ cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction. PMID:23284699

  17. Change Points in the Population Trends of Aerial-Insectivorous Birds in North America: Synchronized in Time across Species and Regions.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam C; Hudson, Marie-Anne R; Downes, Constance M; Francis, Charles M

    2015-01-01

    North American populations of aerial insectivorous birds are in steep decline. Aerial insectivores (AI) are a group of bird species that feed almost exclusively on insects in flight, and include swallows, swifts, nightjars, and flycatchers. The causes of the declines are not well understood. Indeed, it is not clear when the declines began, or whether the declines are shared across all species in the group (e.g., caused by changes in flying insect populations) or specific to each species (e.g., caused by changes in species' breeding habitat). A recent study suggested that population trends of aerial insectivores changed for the worse in the 1980s. If there was such a change point in trends of the group, understanding its timing and geographic pattern could help identify potential causes of the decline. We used a hierarchical Bayesian, penalized regression spline, change point model to estimate group-level change points in the trends of 22 species of AI, across 153 geographic strata of North America. We found evidence for group-level change points in 85% of the strata. Change points for flycatchers (FC) were distinct from those for swallows, swifts and nightjars (SSN) across North America, except in the Northeast, where all AI shared the same group-level change points. During the 1980s, there was a negative change point across most of North America, in the trends of SSN. For FC, the group-level change points were more geographically variable, and in many regions there were two: a positive change point followed by a negative change point. This group-level synchrony in AI population trends is likely evidence of a response to a common environmental factor(s) with similar effects on many species across broad spatial extents. The timing and geographic patterns of the change points that we identify here should provide a spring-board for research into the causes behind aerial insectivore declines.

  18. Comparison of historical bottleneck effects and genetic consequences of re-introduction in a critically endangered island passerine.

    PubMed

    Bristol, Rachel M; Tucker, Rachel; Dawson, Deborah A; Horsburgh, Gavin; Prys-Jones, Robert P; Frantz, Alain C; Krupa, Andy; Shah, Nirmal J; Burke, Terry; Groombridge, Jim J

    2013-09-01

    Re-introduction is an important tool for recovering endangered species; however, the magnitude of genetic consequences for re-introduced populations remains largely unknown, in particular the relative impacts of historical population bottlenecks compared to those induced by conservation management. We characterize 14 microsatellite loci developed for the Seychelles paradise flycatcher and use them to quantify temporal and spatial measures of genetic variation across a 134-year time frame encompassing a historical bottleneck that reduced the species to ~28 individuals in the 1960s, through the initial stages of recovery and across a second contemporary conservation-introduction-induced bottleneck. We then evaluate the relative impacts of the two bottlenecks, and finally apply our findings to inform broader re-introduction strategy. We find a temporal trend of significant decrease in standard measures of genetic diversity across the historical bottleneck, but only a nonsignificant downward trend in number of alleles across the contemporary bottleneck. However, accounting for the different timescales of the two bottlenecks (~40 historical generations versus <1 contemporary generation), the loss of genetic diversity per generation is greater across the contemporary bottleneck. Historically, the flycatcher population was genetically structured; however, extinction on four of five islands has resulted in a homogeneous contemporary population. We conclude that severe historical bottlenecks can leave a large footprint in terms of sheer quantity of genetic diversity lost. However, severely depleted genetic diversity does not render a species immune to further genetic erosion upon re-introduction. In some cases, the loss of genetic diversity per generation can, initially at least, be greater across re-introduction-induced bottlenecks.

  19. Carry-over effects of conditions at the wintering grounds on breeding plumage signals in a migratory bird: roles of phenotypic plasticity and selection.

    PubMed

    Järvistö, P E; Calhim, S; Schuett, W; Sirkiä, P M; Velmala, W; Laaksonen, T

    2016-08-01

    To understand the consequences of ever-changing environment on the dynamics of phenotypic traits, distinguishing between selection processes and individual plasticity is crucial. We examined individual consistency/plasticity in several male secondary sexual traits expressed during the breeding season (white wing and forehead patch size, UV reflectance of white wing patch and dorsal melanin coloration) in a migratory pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) population over an 11-year period. Furthermore, we studied carry-over effects of three environmental variables (NAO, a climatic index; NDVI, a vegetation index; and rainfall) at the wintering grounds (during prebreeding moult) on the expression of these breeding plumage traits of pied flycatcher males at individual and population levels. Whereas NAO correlates negatively with moisture in West Africa, NDVI correlates positively with primary production. Forehead patch size and melanin coloration were highly consistent within individuals among years, whereas the consistency of the other two traits was moderate. Wing patch size decreased with higher NAO and increased with higher rainfall and NDVI at the individual level. Interestingly, small-patched males suffered lower survival during high NAO winters than large-patched males, and vice versa during low NAO winters. These counteracting processes meant that the individual-level change was masked at the population level where no relationship was found. Our results provide a good example of how variation in the phenotypic composition of a natural population can be a result of both environment-dependent individual plasticity and short-term microevolution. Moreover, when plasticity and viability selection operate simultaneously, their impacts on population composition may not be evident.

  20. Molecular systematics of New World suboscine birds.

    PubMed

    Chesser, R Terry

    2004-07-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among New World suboscine birds were studied using nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences. New World suboscines were shown to constitute two distinct lineages, one apparently consisting of the single species Sapayoa aenigma, the other made up of the remaining 1000+ species of New World suboscines. With the exception of Sapayoa, monophyly of New World suboscines was strongly corroborated, and monophyly within New World suboscines of a tyrannoid clade and a furnarioid clade was likewise strongly supported. Relationships among families and subfamilies within these clades, however, differed in several respects from current classifications of suboscines. Noteworthy results included: (1) monophyly of the tyrant-flycatchers (traditional family Tyrannidae), but only if the tityrines (see below) are excluded; (2) monophyly of the pipromorphine flycatchers (Pipromorphinae of ) as one of two primary divisions of a monophyletic restricted Tyrannidae; (3) monophyly of the tityrines, consisting of the genus Tityra plus all sampled species of the Schiffornis group (), as sister group to the manakins (traditional family Pipridae); (4) paraphyly of the ovenbirds (traditional family Furnariidae), if woodcreepers (traditional family Dendrocolaptidae) are excluded; and (5) polyphyly of the antbirds (traditional family Formicariidae) and paraphyly of the ground antbirds (Formicariidae sensu stricto). Genus Melanopareia (the crescent-chests), although clearly furnarioid, was found to be distant from other furnarioids and of uncertain affinities within the Furnarii. Likewise, the species Oxyruncus cristatus (the Sharpbill), although clearly tyrannoid, was distantly related to other tyrannoids and of uncertain affinities within the Tyranni. Results of this study provide support for some of the more novel features of the suboscine phylogeny of, but also reveal key differences, especially regarding relationships among suboscine families and subfamilies. The

  1. Bedrock geology of the Mount Carmel and Southington quadrangles, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fritts, Crawford Ellswroth

    1962-01-01

    thinly layered sediments that contained rather high percentages of fine-grained volcanic debris. Metadiabase and metabasalt extrusives above Derby Hill Schist south of the map area represent more intense volcanic activity before or during the early stages of the Taconic disturbance in Late Ordovician time. Impure argillaceous, siliceous, and minor calcareous sediments of the Wepawaug Schist, which is Silurian and Devonian in age, were deposited unconformably on older rocks during renewed subsidence of a geosyncline. The Wepawaug now occupies the trough of a tight syncline, which formed before and during progressive regional metamorphism at the time of the Acadian orogeny in middle to Late Devonian time. Felsic igneous rocks were intruded into the metasedimentary formations of Paleozoic age before the climax of the latest progressive regional metamorphism. Intrusives that gave rise to the Prospect and Ansonia Gneisses were emplaced mainly in the Southington Mountain Schist, and the igneous rocks as well as the host rocks were metamorphosed in the staurolite zone. Although it is possible that these two intrusives were emplaced during the Taconic disturbance, the writer believes it more likely that the igneous rocks from which the Prospect and Ansonia Gneisses formed were emplaced during the Acadian orogeny. Woodbridge Granite, which intruded the Wepawaug Schist, is Devonian in age and undoubtedly was emplaced during the Acadian orogeny. In this area the granite is essentially unmetamorphosed, because it is in the chlorite, garnet, and biotite zones. Southwest of the map area, however, metamorphic equivalents of the Woodbridge are found in Wepawaug Schist in the staurolite zone. The Ansonia Gneiss, therefore, may be a metamorphic equivalent of the Woodbridge Granite. Rocks of Late Triassic age formerly covered the entire map area, but were eroded from the western part after tilting and faulting in Late Triassic time. The New Haven Arkose of the Newark

  2. Paleomagnetic Progress in Peri-Gondwanan Terranes of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunow, A. M.; Thompson, M. D.; Barr, S. M.; White, C. E.

    2009-05-01

    Paleopoles from primary Ediacaran magnetization directions established the Gondwanan origin of northern Appalachian Avalonian terranes, but magnetic overprints in the same rocks also provide useful tectonic information. Thus, in the Southeastern New England Avalon Zone, virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) calculated from magnetic B and C components in both 595 Ma Lynn-Mattapan volcanic rocks and 490-488 Ma Nahant Gabbro track mid- and late Paleozoic segments of the North American apparent polar wander path (APWP), suggesting the influence of Acadian and Neo-Acadian accretionary events. We report here on multi- vectorial magnetizations in pilot samples from Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia where the Bras d'Or and Mira terranes represent both Ganderian and Avalonian elements transferred from Gondwana. Overprint relationships in these terranes may constrain their amalgamation with each other as well their docking with Laurentia. As in southeastern New England, secondary remanences can be identified in Cape Breton Island as consistent magnetization directions in rocks of differing ages. The S- to SSE-trending and gently downward pointing direction reported in 1985 by Johnson and Van der Voo in Middle Cambrian sedimentary rocks of the Bourinot Group (Bras d'Or terrane), for example, is also present in the 563 Ma Main à Dieu Formation and in 620 Ma Chisholm Brook Granite and East Bay Hill rhyolite (Mira terrane). This magnetization represents the C component already found around Boston, MA. The resulting VGPs in both areas occupy positions on the North American APWP consistent with a Neo-Acadian overprint, possibly related to the docking of the Meguma terrane against previously accreted Avalonia. Other overprint directions encountered in this investigation give rise to VGPs that do not coincide with the North American APWP, hence appear to reflect tectonic events independent of Laurentia. One such cluster comprising both Mira and Bras d'Or VGPs includes the paleopole also

  3. Silurian extension in the Upper Connecticut Valley, United States and the origin of middle Paleozoic basins in the Québec embayment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rankin, D.W.; Coish, R.A.; Tucker, R.D.; Peng, Z.X.; Wilson, S.A.; Rouff, A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Pre-Silurian strata of the Bronson Hill arch (BHA) in the Upper Connecticut Valley, NH-VT are host to the latest Ludlow Comerford Intrusive Suite consisting, east to west, of a mafic dike swarm with sheeted dikes, and an intrusive complex. The rocks are mostly mafic but with compositions ranging from gabbro to leucocratic tonalite. The suite is truncated on the west by the Monroe fault, a late Acadian thrust that carries rocks of the BHA westward over Silurian-Devonian strata of the Connecticut Valley-Gaspe?? trough (CVGT). Dikes intrude folded strata with a pre-intrusion metamorphic fabric (Taconian?) but they experienced Acadian deformation. Twenty fractions of zircon and baddeleyite from three sample sites of gabbrodiorite spanning nearly 40 km yield a weighted 207Pb/206Pb age of 419 ?? 1 Ma. Greenschist-facies dikes, sampled over a strike distance of 35 km, were tholeiitic basalts formed by partial melting of asthenospheric mantle, with little or no influence from mantle or crustal lithosphere. The dike chemistry is similar to mid-ocean ridge, within-plate, and back-arc basin basalts. Parent magmas originated in the asthenosphere and were erupted through severely thinned lithosphere adjacent to the CVGT. Extensive middle Paleozoic basins in the internides of the Appalachian orogen are restricted to the Que??bec embayment of the Laurentian rifted margin, and include the CVGT and the Central Maine trough (CMT), separated from the BHA by a Silurian tectonic hinge. The NE-trending Comerford intrusions parallel the CVGT, CMT, and the tectonic hinge, and indicate NW-SE extension. During post-Taconian convergence, the irregular margins of composite Laurentia and Avalon permitted continued collision in Newfoundland (St. Lawrence promontory) and coeval extension in the Que??bec embayment. Extension may be related to hinge retreat of the northwest directed Brunswick subduction complex and rise of the asthenosphere following slab break-off. An alternative hypothesis is

  4. Mutant allele frequencies among domestic cats in some eastern areas of Canada: regional homogeneity of factors in Canadian Atlantic Provinces and the French colony of Saint Pierre.

    PubMed

    Todd, N B; Todd, L M

    1976-01-01

    Surveys to determine mutant allele frequencies in domestic cats of the Canadian Atlantic Provinces (Halifax, Nova Scotia; Fredericton, New Brunswick; Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island; St. John's Newfoundland) and the French colony of Saint Pierre, Saint Pierre et Miquelon, reveal a general regional homogeneity for most factors. Despite diverse historical patterns of settlement, a strong common component of origin is indicated. This is tentatively identified as late 18th and early 19th century British. One mutant, polydactyly, which is of New England origin appears to have been distributed largely by loyalist refugees from New England at the time of the American Rebellion. No elements of a specific Acadian (French) character have yet been identified. Siamese cats have been "introduced" to the region in recent years and are now so abundant that they will undoubtedly cause a significant change in some mutant allele frequencies over the next few decades. Interregional exchanges of cats no doubt are contributing to homogenizing the populations of the area, but the practice of sterilization of pets offsets this to some degree.

  5. New paleomagnetic data from carboniferous volcanics and red beds from central New Brunswick

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, Maurice K.; Singh, A.; Fyffe, L.

    1985-02-01

    It has long been argued, on the basis of paleomagnetic data derived from Devonian, Carboniferous and Permian lithological units from eastern North America that a sinistral megashear of Carboniferous age parallels and lies within the faults delimiting the Appalachian-Caledonian chains. Recent paleomagnetic studies in the northern Appalachians have cast doubt on the models of a Carboniferous offset. The geologic evidence suggests that only a small amount of dextral (and not sinistral) strike slip has occurred on faults which are parallel with pre-Acadian paleogeographic realms. The purpose of this paleomagnetic study is to test the validity of the proposed left-lateral motion at one of the sites of its presumed passage in central New Brunswick. Six sites (80 oriented specimens) in Carboniferous red beds and volcanics were collected on both sides of the Fredericton Fault and other parallel faults. After AF and thermal cleaning, the mean direction of magnetization is 158° + 38° the fold test is indecisive. The corresponding paleopole is 135°E, 21°N and the paleolatitude 20°S. The paleopole positions and paleolatitudes are not significantly different on either side of the Fredericton fault and no left-lateral motion was detected by paleomagnetic means. As no such motion was detected in south-central New Brunswick and Newfoundland, it is possible but unlikely that it took place in northern New Brunswick and in the western Gaspé Peninsula. This contribution is useful in discussing possible motions of Acadia.

  6. Metamorphic and structural evolution of the Straits Schist, W. Connecticut: U-PB monazite constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzirotti, A.; Hanson, G.N. . Dept. of Earth and Space Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    U-Pb dating of monazites from two outcrops of The Straits Schist south of Waterbury Dome precisely constrains the timing of Acadian metamorphism and deformation. Synkinematic pegmatites which parallel schistosity are common in The Straits Schist south of Waterbury. A pegmatite at the type-section of The Straits Schist east of Straitsville yields U-Pb monazite ages of 385 [+-] 2.5 Ma. At both outcrops the axial planar schistosity is defined by muscovites and biotites which wrap around axes of folds but are not themselves deformed, suggesting they represent a recrystallized fabric. Monazites in the schists at both outcrops display petrographic evidence of grain boundary pinning against mica surfaces and growth across muscovite-biotite grain boundaries, consistent with growth during or after biotite and muscovite crystallization. Monazites from the schist at Straitsville and Naugatuck yield U-Pb ages of 383 [+-] 3 Ma. The U-Pb data, coupled with field and petrographic observations, suggest that pegmatite intrusion, deformation, and metamorphic recrystallization occurred within 3 Ma of about 383 Ma.

  7. A direct comparison of the ages of detrital monazite versus detrital zircon in Appalachian foreland basin sandstones: Searching for the record of Phanerozoic orogenic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hietpas, Jack; Samson, Scott; Moecher, David

    2011-10-01

    The provenance potential of detrital monazite was investigated by in situ measurement of 232Th- 208Pb dates of grains isolated from six Middle Carboniferous-Permian sandstones from the Appalachian foreland basin. Provenance assessment of these units was previously investigated by measuring U-Pb crystallization ages of detrital zircon (Thomas et al., 2004; Becker et al., 2005, 2006). Approximately 90% of the detrital zircon ages record Mesoproterozoic or older ages, with only 10% recording the three major pulses of tectonism (Taconian, Acadian and Alleghanian) that are the hallmark of the Appalachian Orogen. 232Th- 208Pb ages of detrital monazite, however, strongly record the complex phases of Paleozoic orogenesis. Nearly 65% of the ages record Paleozoic events, while 35% record Neoproterozoic or older ages. In several of the analyzed sandstones, detrital monazite ages record Paleozoic orogenic events that are completely missed by detrital zircon ages, demonstrating that monazite ages more accurately reflect the character of the sediment source rocks. The inferred maximum age of sediment deposition, as determined by the youngest monazite grains, is ~ 550 Ma younger for two of the analyzed sandstones compared to depositional constraints based on the youngest detrital zircon. The different physical properties and petrogenesis of zircon and monazite are interpreted to be factors for the dramatic differences in sediment provenance information provided by each mineral. The results from this study have important implications for determining sediment provenance, constraining maximum age of sediment deposition, and developing robust regional tectonic models.

  8. 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar data bearing on the metamorphic and tectonic history of western New England.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutter, J.F.; Ratcliffe, N.M.; Mukasa, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar ages of coexisting biotite and hornblende from Proterozoic Y gneisses of the Berkshire and Green Mt massifs, as well as 40Ar/39Ar and K/Ar mineral and whole-rock ages from Palaeozoic metamorphic rocks, suggest that the thermal peaks for the dominant metamorphic recrystallization in western New England occurred 465 + or - 5 m.y. (Taconian). 40Ar/39Ar age data from a poorly-defined terrain along the eastern strip of the area suggests that the area has been retrograded during a metamorphism that peaked at least 376 + or - 5 m.y. (Acadian). Available age and petrological data from western New England indicate the presence of at least three separate metamorphic-structure domains of Taconic age: 1) a small area of relict high-P and low-T metamorphism, 2) a broad area of normal Barrovian metamorphism from chlorite to garnet grade characterized by a gentle metamorphic gradient and, 3) a rather narrow belt of steep-gradient, Barrovian series metamorphic rocks. Areas of maximum metamorphic intensity within the last domain coincide with areas of maximum crustal thickening in the later stage of Taconic orogeny. -L.di H

  9. Nova Scotia: ``Feu Follet" At Cheticamp, and Also the Phenomena At L'Sitkuk of the Mi'Kmaw, May Be Electromagnetic In Nature.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, Michael Ann; McLeod, Roger D.

    2001-11-01

    There is a strong tradition that ``feu follet" exists at the cemetery associated with the Acadian French at Cheticamp. It is described as a blue light, and may actually be the equivalent of an ascending, positively charged stream of ions in the atmosphere, just like the blue-light column that is often a precursor of a storm's lightning-strike. Similar phenomena are at America's Stonehenge, at a stone serpent effigy site in Ohio, and just north of the Lakes Memphremagog and Magog of Vermont and Canada. At the Bear River L'sitkuk Reservation area, which seems to us to have been a most unsuitable site, was deliberately chosen by the Mi'kmaw for their living area. Was this because certain properties of the electromagnetic field (EMF) are evident to them there, which also seem to be reflected in their legends? We hope to establish that these disparate cultures and their separate worldviews can be confirmed by the presence of particular EMF signatures. *This paper does not represent the views of the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

  10. Pre-lithification tectonic foliation development in a clastic sedimentary sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meere, Patrick; Mulchrone, Kieran; McCarthy, David; Timmermann, Martin; Dewey, John

    2016-04-01

    The current view regarding the timing of regionally developed penetrative tectonic fabrics in sedimentary rocks is that their development postdates lithification of those rocks. In this case fabric development is achieved by a number of deformation mechanisms including grain rigid body rotation, crystal-plastic deformation and pressure solution (wet diffusion). The latter is believed to be the primary mechanism responsible for shortening and the domainal structure of cleavage development commonly observed in low grade metamorphic rocks. In this study we combine field observations with strain analysis and modelling to fully characterise considerable (>50%) mid-Devonian Acadian crustal shortening in a Devonian clastic sedimentary sequence from south west Ireland. Despite these high levels of shortening and associated penetrative tectonic fabric there is a marked absence of the expected domainal cleavage structure and intra-clast deformation, which are expected with this level of deformation. In contrast to the expected deformation processes associated with conventional cleavage development, fabrics in these rocks are a product of translation, rigid body rotation and repacking of extra-formational clasts during deformation of an un-lithified clastic sedimentary sequence.

  11. Evolution of the Murphy synclinorium, southern Appalachian Blue Ridge, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tull, James F.; Baggazi, Haitham; Groszos, Mark S.

    2012-11-01

    The western Blue Ridge allochthon of the southern Appalachians is dominated by the >180 km-long Murphy synclinorium, paired with anticlinoria to the northwest. These are first generation, northwest overturned, doubly plunging, large amplitude and wavelength (>10 km) isoclinal folds contemporaneous with peak Neo-Acadian orogeny (Visian, ˜335-345 Ma) regional metamorphism. The synclinorium folds a regional unconformity separating Neoproterozoic rift and lower Paleozoic drift sequences from a younger successor-basin sequence. Strain analysis of metaconglomerates from lithologic groups above and below the unconformity indicates coaxial, low to moderate, oblate to nearly plane strain in both groups. The synclinorium evolved via NNW-SSE-crustal shortening (˜32%), combined with orthogonal NNE-SSW-sub-horizontal flow (stretching) (˜35-45%) sub-parallel to the developing fold axes. Differences in metamorphic grade and paleodepth (˜10-17 km) of the exposed synclinorium had essentially no effect on strain magnitudes. Retrodeformation of the embedded regional unconformity reveals a very broad synclinal warping of the rift and drift-facies units predating superposition of the Murphy synclinorium, suggesting tectonic inheritance in the latter structure's origin. The earlier mild deformation is post-Early Cambrian and may represent the only vestige of the dynamic effects of the Middle Ordovician Taconic orogeny to be found in this region.

  12. Gaspé Belt subsurface geometry in the northern Québec Appalachians as revealed by an integrated geophysical and geological study: 2 — Seismic interpretation and potential field modelling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Geological information, seismic reflection profiles and potential field data are used to study the geometry of the Middle Paleozoic Gaspé Belt (eastern Canada) that has been interpreted in various ways in the past. On the western edge of the Gaspé Belt, in the Matapédia area, growth strata are imaged on seismic profiles and testify of normal (or transtensional) motion during the period spanning the Silurian (and possibly Late Ordovician) to earliest Devonian along several faults, including the Shickshock-Sud Fault. In this area, Acadian deformation during the Middle to Late Devonian is associated with relatively modest shortening (less than 20%) accommodated by broad open folds, steeply-dipping neo-formed faults and inversion of previously formed faults. Neo-formed faults cut the entire Middle Paleozoic succession and offset the Ordovician Taconian unconformity suggesting that no sedimentary interval acted as an efficient décollement level. Toward the SE, the Sainte-Florence Fault divides rock assemblages with different paleogeographic settings and structural styles. Increase in tectonic complexity and amount of shortening to the south of the fault is interpreted as resulting of a vise effect between two basement blocks.

  13. The Riviere des Plante ophiolitic Melange; tectonic setting and melange formation in the Quebec Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Cousineau, P.A. )

    1991-01-01

    The Riviere des Plante ophiolitic Melange (RPOM) is the largest and best exposed of the three known ophiolitic melanges that contain blocks of Chain Lakes Massif (CLM). All three lie along the Baie Verte-Brompton line, which marks the suture between the continental rocks of the Humber zone and the oceanic rocks of the Dunnage zone. The ophiolitic melange is composed of: serpentinized ultramafic rocks, some of which are sheared and/or carbonatized; blocks of amphibolitized gabbro; basalt; volcanogenic breccia; and conglomerates. It also contains continental K-rich granitoid rocks and high-grade metamorphic (upper amphibolite facies) rocks. The RPOM is part of the Saint-Daniel Melange, an accretionary prism onto which the RPOM has been tectonically emplaced. The CLM was part of a terrane accreted to the Laurentian margin during the Taconian orogeny. Blocks of the CLM along the Baie Verte-Brompton line are interpreted as fragments of this terrane caught within the suture zone. It is proposed that the CLM could be the equivalent of Grenville-derived greywacke originally laid down during the phase of continental rifting that led to the formation of the Iapetus Ocean and was later tectonized and metamorphosed during the Taconian and Acadian orogenies. The RPOM would represent the relic of a serpentinite diapir that rose within a deep oceanic fault. The presence of continental rocks like the CLM suggest that a continental magmatic arc was put in contact with an oceanic crust along this fault.

  14. Alternative Speech Communication System for Persons with Severe Speech Disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selouani, Sid-Ahmed; Sidi Yakoub, Mohammed; O'Shaughnessy, Douglas

    2009-12-01

    Assistive speech-enabled systems are proposed to help both French and English speaking persons with various speech disorders. The proposed assistive systems use automatic speech recognition (ASR) and speech synthesis in order to enhance the quality of communication. These systems aim at improving the intelligibility of pathologic speech making it as natural as possible and close to the original voice of the speaker. The resynthesized utterances use new basic units, a new concatenating algorithm and a grafting technique to correct the poorly pronounced phonemes. The ASR responses are uttered by the new speech synthesis system in order to convey an intelligible message to listeners. Experiments involving four American speakers with severe dysarthria and two Acadian French speakers with sound substitution disorders (SSDs) are carried out to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed methods. An improvement of the Perceptual Evaluation of the Speech Quality (PESQ) value of 5% and more than 20% is achieved by the speech synthesis systems that deal with SSD and dysarthria, respectively.

  15. Louisiana coastal ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Louisiana's coast and its degradation and restoration are major environmental issues being studied at the National Wetlands Research Center. Coastal ecosystems are vulnerable because of the tremendous amount of human activity that takes place along the coast. Information on ecological processes is essential to guide the development along the coast as well as to protect and restore wildlife habitat.Louisiana has about 40% of coastal wetlands in the lower 48 states; they support fish, waterfowl, and fur-bearing animals as well as unique cultures like that of the Acadians. The fish and wildlife resources of Louisiana's coast produce over $1 billion each year in revenues.But Louisiana has the highest coastal loss rate because of natural and human causes. Over the past three decades, Louisiana has lost as much as 35-40 mi2 (90-104 km2) of coastal wetlands a year.The National Wetlands Research Center is qualified to assess and monitor this ecosystem because of its proximity to the study area, a staff chosen for their expertise in the system, and a number of established partnerships with others who study the areas. The Center is often the lead group in partnerships with universities, other federal agencies, and private entities who study this ecosystem.Most of the Center's research and technology development performed for coastal wetlands are done at the Lafayette headquarters; some work is performed at the National Wetlands Research Center's project office in Baton Rouge, LA.

  16. Alleghanian development of the Goat Rock fault zone, southernmost Appalachians: Temporal compatibility with the master decollement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steltenpohl, Mark G.; Goldberg, Steven A.; Hanley, Thomas B.; Kunk, Michael J.

    1992-09-01

    The Goat Rock and associated Bartletts Ferry fault zones, which mark the eastern margin of the Pine Mountain Grenville basement massif, are controversial due to the suggestion that they are rare exposed segments of the late Paleozoic southern Appalachian master decollement. The controversy in part stems from reported middle Paleozoic (Acadian) radiometric dates postulated as the time of movement along these fault zones. Ultramylonite samples from the type area at Goat Rock Dam yield a 287 ±15 Ma Rb-Sr isochron interpreted as the time of Sr isotopic rehomogenization during mylonitization. This date is corroborated by Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian 40Ar/39Ar mineral ages on hornblende (297-288 Ma) and muscovite (285-278 Ma) from neomineralized and dynamically recrystallized rocks within and straddling the fault zone. These Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian dates indicate the time of right-slip movement (Alleghanian) along the Goat Rock fault zone, which is compatible with the timing suggested by COCORP for thrusting along the southern Appalachian master decollement.

  17. Alleghanian development of the Goat Rock fault zone, southernmost Appalachians: Temporal compatibility with the master decollement

    SciTech Connect

    Steltenpohl, M.G. ); Goldberg, S.A. ); Hanley, T.B. ); Kunk, M.J. )

    1992-09-01

    The Goat Rock and associated Bartletts Ferry fault zones, which mark the eastern margin of the Pine Mountain Grenville basement massif, are controversial due to the suggestion that they are rare exposed segments of the late Paleozoic southern Appalachian master decollement. The controversy in part stems from reported middle Paleozoic (Acadian) radiometric dates postulated as the time of movement along these fault zones. Ultramylonite samples from the type area at Goat Rock Dam yield a 287 [plus minus] 15 Ma Rb-Sr isochron interpreted as the time of Sr isotopic rehomgenization during mylonitization. This date is corroborated by Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar mineral ages on hornblende (297-288 Ma) and muscovite (285-278 Ma) from neomineralized and dynamically recrystallized rocks within and straddling the fault zone. These Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian dates indicate the time of right-slip movement (Alleghenian) along the Goat Rock fault zone, which is compatible with the timing suggested by COCORP for thrusting along the southern Appalachian master decollement.

  18. Textural and Rb-Sr isotopic evidence for late Paleozoic mylonitization within the Honey Hill fault zone southeastern Connecticut

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hara, K.D.; Gromet, L.P.

    1983-09-01

    A petrographic and Rb-Sr isotopic study of rocks within and near the Honey Hill fault zone places important constraints on its history of movement. Rb-Sr apparent ages for micas and plagioclase from these rocks have been reset and range from Permian to Triassic, considerably younger than the minimum stratigraphic age (Ordovician) of the rocks studied or of Acadian (Devonian) regional metamorphism. Permian Rb-Sr ages of dynamically recrystallized muscovite date the development of mylonite fabric. An older age is precluded by the excellent preservation of unrecovered quartz, which indicates that these rocks did not experience temperatures high enough to anneal quartz or thermally reset Rb-Sr isotopic systems in muscovite since the time of mylonitization. Metamorphic mineral assemblages and mineral apparent ages in rocks north of the fault zone indicate recrystallization under similar upper greenschist-lower amphibolite grade conditions during Permian to Triassic time. Collectively these results indicate that the Honey Hill fault zone was active during the Late Paleozoic and that ductile deformation and metamorphism associated with the Alleghanian orogeny extend well into southern Connecticut. An Alleghanian age for mylonitization within the Honey Hill fault zone suggests it should be considered as a possible site for the major Late Paleozoic strike-slip displacements inferred from paleomagnetic studies for parts of coastal New England and maritime Canada.

  19. Structural controls on groundwater flow in a fractured bedrock aquifer underlying an agricultural region of northwestern New Brunswick, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DesRoches, Aaron; Danielescu, Serban; Butler, Karl

    2014-08-01

    A hydrogeological study was conducted in northwestern New Brunswick, Canada, to improve the predictability of fracture-dominated groundwater flow within folded bedrock composed of fine-grained turbidites. Borehole televiewer logging and outcrop mapping, integrated with hydraulic packer tests revealed enhanced hydraulic conductivity associated with northeasterly striking bedding-plane fractures formed during folding and flexural slip. These fractures impart azimuthal anisotropy to the aquifer because of moderately dipping fold limbs. High-angle fractures form a well-developed non-stratabound network, comprising two open fracture sets striking NNE parallel to the current direction of principal stress, and WNW parallel to the direction of principal stress that dominated during the Acadian orogeny. The subset of fractures showing significant oxidation, deemed most important to the groundwater flow system, is dominated by bedding-plane and high-angle fractures striking near-parallel to the maximum principal stress direction, resulting in extensional opening and enhanced hydraulic conductivities. An equivalent porous media model, incorporating anisotropy and varying hydraulic conductivity with depth, indicates that horizontal flow dominates the aquifer with relatively minor exchange between different model layers. These findings have implications for understanding flow directions in the Black Brook Watershed and elsewhere in the Matapédia Basin where fractures formed under similar stress conditions.

  20. Ethnic food: the use of Cajun cuisine as a model.

    PubMed

    Broussard-Marin, L; Hynak-Hankinson, M T

    1989-08-01

    Studies have shown that dietitians perceive a need for further education about ethnic food habits. Knowledge about the dietary habits of immigrants and ethnic groups is important for dietitians because those habits are frequently assimilated into the culinary traditions of America. The authors used Cajun cuisine as a model for studying a rapidly expanding form of ethnic food. The foods in Cajun cuisine are currently best-selling menu items, they challenge adaptation for modified diets, and they have been influenced by agricultural and social customs. Historically, Cajun food evolved from an area in south Louisiana called Acadiana. The Acadians were impoverished exiles from Nova Scotia who settled along the bayous of Louisiana and learned to use available foods in the area. Cajun cuisine was also influenced by the Creoles from the area of New Orleans located approximately 100 miles from the Cajun settlers. As part of the education process about ethnic food habits, one needs to consider the history, indigenous foods, symbolism and meaning of foods, food preparation methods, and adaptations that can be made for modified diets. When Cajun cuisine is used as a framework, nutrition education, counseling, and food preparation for ethnic groups may be more effective.

  1. Factors regulating the bioavailability of methylmercury to breeding rusty blackbirds in northeastern wetlands.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Samuel Trower; O'Driscoll, Nelson J; Hillier, N Kirk; Atwood, Jonathan L; Evers, David C

    2012-12-01

    Rusty blackbirds are undergoing rapid population decline and have elevated Hg concentrations while breeding in the Acadian ecoregion of North America. Factors regulating the bioavailability of methyl-Hg (MeHg) within this population's habitat were determined using water, invertebrates, and blood from adult rusty blackbirds collected for Hg-speciation, along with additional water column parameters: MeHg and THg, dissolved organic carbon, pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, redox potential, and temperature. Both DO(2) and pH were negatively related to biota MeHg, while water MeHg concentrations were positively related. Both invertebrate MeHg concentration and %MeHg increased with trophic level. Invertebrate MeHg concentrations were among the greatest reported when compared with those reported elsewhere for wetlands and waterbodies-often several times greater for similar taxa-while percent MeHg of THg were similar. An environment with high bioavailability of MeHg in combination with a high trophic position best explains elevated Hg concentrations for this species regional population.

  2. Tectonic and flexural significance of Middle Devonian graben-fill sequence in new Albany shale, central Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, S.F.; Ettensohn, F.R.; Mellon, C. )

    1989-08-01

    The third tectonic phase of the Acadian orogeny began in the late Middle Devonian, and the sedimentary record of that event is largely restricted to the deeper, more proximal portions of the Appalachian foreland and Illinois intercratonic basins. Much of the intervening area, on and near the Cincinnati arch, was uplifted and subjected to erosion by movement on the peripheral bulge accompanying the initiation of the third tectonic phase. However, bulge movement also reactivated basement fault systems in Kentucky and created a series of grabens that were filled with eroded sediments and debris flows from adjacent horsts. Although rarely preserved, a buried Devonian graben along Carpenter Fork in Boyle County, central Kentucky, reveals such a sequence. The graben is bounded by upthrown blocks of Middle Devonian Boyle Dolomite, which also floors the graben. Within the graben a black-shale unit, apparently absent elsewhere, conformably overlies the Boyle and grades upward into debris-flow deposits represented by the Duffin breccia facies of the New Albany Shale. The Duffin contains clasts of the shale, as well as of chert, silicified fossils, and fine to boulder-size dolostone clasts eroded from the Boyle high on the flanks of the graben. The underlying shale also exhibits evidence of penecontemporaneous soft-sediment deformation related to the debris-flow emplacement of Boyle residue in the graben and due to later loading by the Duffin.

  3. Depositional response to foreland deformation in the Carboniferous of eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Tankard, A.J.

    1986-06-01

    The Appalachian basin is a typical foreland basin that has subsided episodically under the loads of successive thrust sheets. The dynamics of basin subsidence and upwarping of basin-margin arch systems reflects the flex-ural properties of the lithosphere. Quantitative models of the lithosphere depend on assumed rheological properties. This study attempts to test these geodynamic models in a part of the Appalachian basin. Mississippian deposition is correlated with waning Acadian tectonism. Orogenic quiescence coincided with basin overdeepening and uplift of the Cincinnati arch or fore-bulge. Although the foreland basin was mudstone dominated, shoaling along the crest of the basin-margin arch system resulted in reworking and wedges of unconformities. In contrast, the onset of Alleghenian orogenesis during the Pennsylvanian is reflected in a thick wedge of terrigenous clastic sediments. The Pennsylvanian basin fluctuated between underfilled (restricted marine) and overfilled (nonmarine) conditions. Rapid response of the basin to thrust-sheet loading is inferred. These characteristics of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian deposition support a viscoelastic model of the lithosphere.

  4. Geological factors controlling the utility of refractory dolomite: The Cambrian Ledger Formation dolomite, a case study

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, F.C.; Gregg, J.M.; Ablin, V.C.; Moore, R.E. )

    1993-03-01

    The Middle Cambrian Ledger Formation in eastern Pennsylvania is a high purity, single-stage-sintering dolomite. It yields high quality, direct bonded, environmentally clean, doloma bricks for steel, cement and lime industries use. Geological properties are controlled by the depositional environment, diagenesis, metamorphism, deformation, and rifting. The Middle Cambrian was a time of high sea level stand, high evaporation, low volcanism, and absence of land plants. This produced carbonates low in SiO[sub 2], Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], and Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] (< 1%). Uniform oolite shoals developed on fault blocks. Early diagenesis dolomitized the [approx]1 mm oolites. The Taconic-Acadian Orogeny greenschist-metamorphism annealed the dolomite by heating it to 300--400 C, at [approx]2 kbar, for [approx]200 million years. This produced a homogeneous coarse crystalline, nonporous, nonplanar dolomite with uniform grain chemistry. Alleghenian overthrusting strained the dolomite, producing deformed oolite ghosts, and minor strain twins. Time, temperature, pressure, and strain increases sinterability and thus suitability of the dolomite for refractory purposes. Near Triassic faults the quality of the brickstone grade dolomite has been degraded to fettling and agricultural grade dolomite. Faulting produced dolomite twinning, polymictic brecciation, and fracture porosity. Karstification generated quartz, feldspar and hematite that filled the porosity. Triassic intrusions partial recrystallized the dolomite incorporating the impurities and thereby degrading it.

  5. Thirty-seventh supplement to the American Ornithologists' Union checklist of North American birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monroe, Burt L.; Banks, Richard C.; Fitzpatrick, John W.; Howell, Thomas R.; Johnson, Ned K.; Ouellet, Henri; Remsen, J.V.; Storer, Robert W.

    1989-01-01

    This third supplement subsequent to the 6th edition (1983) of the A.O.U. "Check-list of North American Birds" consists of changes adopted by the Committee on Classification and Nomenclature as of 1 March 1989. The changes fall into nine categories: (1) six species are added to the main list (Pterodroma longirostris, Larus crassirostris, Streptopelia decaocto, Cocccyzus julieni, Chrysolampis mosquitus, Emberiza aureola) because of new distributional information; (2) five species (Ara cubensis, Chlorostilbon bracei, Empidonax occidentalis, Polioptila californica, Pipilo crissalis) are added to the main list because of the splitting of species already on the list; (3) one name (Anthus rubescens) is changed because of the splitting of a species from outside the Checklist area; (4) two names (Morus bassanus, Nyctanassa violacea) is removed from the main list to Appendix B because of re-evaluation of Northern Hemisphere records; (6) three species (Pterodrama rostrata, P. alba, P. solandri) are moved from Appendix A to Appendix B, and one (P. defilippiana) is added to Appendix B because of questionable sight records; (7)A.O.U. numbers are added to three species (Ciccaba virgata, Myiopagis viridicata, Molothrus bonariensis) on the basis on new distributional records or supporting data; (8) several corrections in spelling or citations are made; and (9) English names are changed for twelve species to accommodate worldwide usage of these names. No new distributional information is included except as indicated above (i.e. minor changes of distribution are not noted). These actions bring the number of species recognized as occurring in North America (main list) to 1,945.

  6. Artificial cavities enhance breeding bird densities in managed cottonwood forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, D.J.; Henne-Kerr, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The paucity of natural cavities within short-rotation hardwood agroforests restricts occupancy by cavity-nesting birds. However, providing 1.6 artificial nesting cavities (nest boxes)/ha within 3- to 10-year-old managed cottonwood forests in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley increased territory density of cavity-nesting birds. Differences in territory densities between forests with and without nest boxes increased as stands aged. Seven bird species initiated 38 nests in 173 boxes during 1997 and 39 nests in 172 boxes during 1998. Prothonotary warblers (Protonotaria citrea) and eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) accounted for 67% of nests; nearly all warbler nests were in 1.8-L, plastic-coated cardboard (paper) boxes, whereas bluebird nests were divided between paper boxes and 3.5-L wooden boxes. Larger-volume (16.5-L) wooden nest boxes were used by eastern screech owls (Otus asio) and great crested flycatchers (Myiarchus crinitus), but this box type often was usurped by honey bees (Apis mellifera). To enhance territory densities of cavity-nesting birds in cottonwood agroforests, we recommend placement of plastic-coated paper nest boxes, at a density of 0.5/ha, after trees are >4 years old but at least 2 years before anticipated timber harvest.

  7. Ultra-Rapid Vision in Birds.

    PubMed

    Boström, Jannika E; Dimitrova, Marina; Canton, Cindy; Håstad, Olle; Qvarnström, Anna; Ödeen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Flying animals need to accurately detect, identify and track fast-moving objects and these behavioral requirements are likely to strongly select for abilities to resolve visual detail in time. However, evidence of highly elevated temporal acuity relative to non-flying animals has so far been confined to insects while it has been missing in birds. With behavioral experiments on three wild passerine species, blue tits, collared and pied flycatchers, we demonstrate temporal acuities of vision far exceeding predictions based on the sizes and metabolic rates of these birds. This implies a history of strong natural selection on temporal resolution. These birds can resolve alternating light-dark cycles at up to 145 Hz (average: 129, 127 and 137, respectively), which is ca. 50 Hz over the highest frequency shown in any other vertebrate. We argue that rapid vision should confer a selective advantage in many bird species that are ecologically similar to the three species examined in our study. Thus, rapid vision may be a more typical avian trait than the famously sharp vision found in birds of prey.

  8. Complete development of three species of Haemoproteus (Haemosporida, Haemoproteidae) in the biting midge Culicoides impunctatus (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Liutkevicius, Gediminas; Iezhova, Tatjana A

    2002-10-01

    Development of Haemoproteus balmorali, H. dolniki, and H. tartakovskyi was followed in experimentally infected biting midges Culicoides impunctatus on the Curonian Spit in the Baltic Sea. Wild-caught flies were allowed to take blood meals on naturally infected spotted flycatchers Muscicapa striata, chaffinches Fringilla coelebs, or crossbills Loxia curvirostra harboring mature gametocytes of these parasites. The engorged biting midges were collected, held at 14-18 C, and dissected daily. Mature ookinetes of H. balmorali, H. dolniki, and H. tartakovskyi were numerous in the midgut content 36 hr postinfection (PI). Oocysts were first seen in the midgut wall 3 days PI. They were numerous in the midgut on the fourth day PI. Sporozoites were seen in salivary glands 5 days PI. The percentage of experimentally infected biting midges with sporozoites of H. balmorali was 36.1%: 8.8% with H. dolniki and 31.2% with H. tartakovskyi. Culicoides impunctatus is likely to be an important vector of Haemoproteus spp. in Europe. All investigated species of parasites can be distinguished on the basis of morphology or size (or both) of their vector stages. Morphological features of the ookinetes, oocysts, and sporozoites should be given more prominence in the description of new species of hemoproteids.

  9. Search behavior of arboreal insectivorous migrants at gulf coast stopover sites in spring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Chao-Chieh; Barrow, W.C.; Ouchley, K.; Hamilton, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Search behavior of arboreal insectivorous migrants was studied at three stopover sites along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico during spring migrations, 1993–1995. We examined if search behavior was affected by phylogeny, or by environmental factors. A sequence of search movements (hop, flutter, or flight) in a foraging bout was recorded for each migrant encountered. Search rate, frequency, and distance of movements were calculated for each species. Search rate was positively correlated with proportion of hop, but negatively correlated to flight distance. Hop distance was positively correlated to tarsus length, as was flight distance to wing length for the 31 species of migrants. Cluster analysis indicated closely related species generally have similar foraging modes, which range from “sit-and-wait” of flycatchers to “widely foraging” of warblers. Migrants tended to use more hops in dense vegetation, but more flights in areas with sparse vegetation. Migrants also used more flights when foraging in mixed-species flocks and during periods of high migrant density. Logistic models indicated warblers were more influenced by environmental factors than vireos, possibly because warblers are near-perch searchers and more affected by these factors.

  10. Acrobatic courtship display coevolves with brain size in manakins (Pipridae).

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Willow R; Houck, Justin T; Giuliano, Claire E; Day, Lainy B

    2015-01-01

    Acrobatic display behaviour is sexually selected in manakins (Pipridae) and can place high demands on many neural systems. Manakin displays vary across species in terms of behavioural complexity, differing in number of unique motor elements, production of mechanical sounds, cooperation between displaying males, and construction of the display site. Historically, research emphasis has been placed on neurological specializations for vocal aspects of courtship, and less is known about the control of physical, non-vocal displays. By examining brain evolution in relation to extreme acrobatic feats such as manakin displays, we can vastly expand our knowledge of how sexual selection acts on motor behaviour. We tested the hypothesis that sexual selection for complex motor displays has selected for larger brains across the Pipridae. We found that display complexity positively predicts relative brain weight (adjusted for body size) after controlling for phylogeny in 12 manakin species and a closely related flycatcher. This evidence suggests that brain size has evolved in response to sexual selection to facilitate aspects of display such as motor, sensorimotor, perceptual, and cognitive abilities. We show, for the first time, that sexual selection for acrobatic motor behaviour can drive brain size evolution in avian species and, in particular, a family of suboscine birds.

  11. Seasonal patterns in δ(2) H values of multiple tissues from Andean birds provide insights into elevational migration.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Mariana; Newsome, Seth D; Blake, John G

    2016-12-01

    Elevational migration is a widespread phenomenon in tropical avifauna but it is difficult to identify using traditional approaches. Hydrogen isotope (δ(2) H) values of precipitation decrease with elevation so δ(2) H analysis of multiple bird tissues with different isotopic incorporation rates may be a reliable method for characterizing seasonal elevational migration. Here we compare δ(2) H values in metabolically inert (feathers and claws) and metabolically active (whole blood) tissues to examine whether an upslope migration occurs prior to the breeding season in the Yungas Manakin (Chiroxiphia boliviana). We compare results from C. boliviana with data from a known elevational migrant, the Streak-necked Flycatcher (Mionectes striaticollis). Opposite to our expectations, tissue δ(2) H values increased over time, largely reflecting seasonal patterns in precipitation δ(2) H rather than elevational effects; linear mixed-effects models with strongest support included ordinal date, tissue type, and elevation. This seasonal increase in precipitation δ(2) H is a general phenomenon in both tropical and temperate mountain ranges. We use these data to propose a hypothetical framework that predicts different patterns in tissue δ(2) H values collected in different seasons from residents and elevational migrants. This framework can serve as a reference for future studies that assess elevational migration in birds and other animals.

  12. Mimicry Cycles, Traps, and Chains: The Coevolution of Toucan and Kiskadee Mimicry.

    PubMed

    Prum, Richard O; Samuelson, Larry

    2016-06-01

    Interspecific social dominance mimicry (ISDM) is a form of social parasitism in which a subordinate species evolves to mimic and deceive a dominant interference competitor in order to avoid attack by the dominant species. ISDM has been proposed to result in (1) antagonistic coevolutionary arms races in appearance between the model and the mimic (e.g., Ramphastos toucans) and (2) the evolution of complexes of multiple species converging on a common visual appearance (e.g., kiskadee flycatchers). We present evolutionary games of antagonistic coevolution in appearance between pairs and triplets of sympatric species under interference competition. We identify conditions for the existence and stability of (1) coevolutionary mimicry cycles in appearance between evader and pursuer strategies of models and mimics, (2) mimicry chains in which three or more species are coevolutionarily entrained to evolve a single common appearance despite differences in their costs and benefits, and (3) mimicry traps in which a subdominant species is evolutionarily constrained from evading mimicry by a third, subordinate mimic species. Mimicry cycles will result in the evolutionary divergence of models and mimics from their ancestral phenotypes. The hierarchical evolutionary dynamics of ISDM traps and chains resemble Müllerian mimicry with variable costs to toxicity.

  13. Migrating songbirds tested in computer-controlled Emlen funnels use stellar cues for a time-independent compass.

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, H; Larsen, O N

    2001-11-01

    This paper investigates how young pied flycatchers, Ficedula hypoleuca, and blackcaps, Sylvia atricapilla, interpret and use celestial cues. In order to record these data, we developed a computer-controlled version of the Emlen funnel, which enabled us to make detailed temporal analyses. First, we showed that the birds use a star compass. Then, we tested the birds under a stationary planetarium sky, which simulated the star pattern of the local sky at 02:35 h for 11 consecutive hours of the night, and compared the birds' directional choices as a function of time with the predictions from five alternative stellar orientation hypotheses. The results supported the hypothesis suggesting that birds use a time-independent star compass based on learned geometrical star configurations to pinpoint the rotational point of the starry sky (north). In contrast, neither hypotheses suggesting that birds use the stars for establishing their global position and then perform true star navigation nor those suggesting the use of a time-compensated star compass were supported.

  14. What prevents phenological adjustment to climate change in migrant bird species? Evidence against the "arrival constraint" hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Anne E; Hart, Adam G; Elliot, Simon L

    2011-01-01

    Phenological studies have demonstrated changes in the timing of seasonal events across multiple taxonomic groups as the climate warms. Some northern European migrant bird populations, however, show little or no significant change in breeding phenology, resulting in synchrony with key food sources becoming mismatched. This phenological inertia has often been ascribed to migration constraints (i.e. arrival date at breeding grounds preventing earlier laying). This has been based primarily on research in The Netherlands and Germany where time between arrival and breeding is short (often as few as 9 days). Here, we test the arrival constraint hypothesis over a 15-year period for a U.K. pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) population where laying date is not constrained by arrival as the period between arrival and breeding is substantial and consistent (average 27 ± 4.57 days SD). Despite increasing spring temperatures and quantifiably stronger selection for early laying on the basis of number of offspring to fledge, we found no significant change in breeding phenology, in contrast with co-occurring resident blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). We discuss possible non-migratory constraints on phenological adjustment, including limitations on plasticity, genetic constraints and competition, as well as the possibility of counter-selection pressures relating to adult survival, longevity or future reproductive success. We propose that such factors need to be considered in conjunction with the arrival constraint hypothesis.

  15. Evolutionary analysis of the female-specific avian W chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Smeds, Linnéa; Warmuth, Vera; Bolivar, Paulina; Uebbing, Severin; Burri, Reto; Suh, Alexander; Nater, Alexander; Bureš, Stanislav; Garamszegi, Laszlo Z.; Hogner, Silje; Moreno, Juan; Qvarnström, Anna; Ružić, Milan; Sæther, Stein-Are; Sætre, Glenn-Peter; Török, Janos; Ellegren, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The typically repetitive nature of the sex-limited chromosome means that it is often excluded from or poorly covered in genome assemblies, hindering studies of evolutionary and population genomic processes in non-recombining chromosomes. Here, we present a draft assembly of the non-recombining region of the collared flycatcher W chromosome, containing 46 genes without evidence of female-specific functional differentiation. Survival of genes during W chromosome degeneration has been highly non-random and expression data suggest that this can be attributed to selection for maintaining gene dose and ancestral expression levels of essential genes. Re-sequencing of large population samples revealed dramatically reduced levels of within-species diversity and elevated rates of between-species differentiation (lineage sorting), consistent with low effective population size. Concordance between W chromosome and mitochondrial DNA phylogenetic trees demonstrates evolutionary stable matrilineal inheritance of this nuclear–cytonuclear pair of chromosomes. Our results show both commonalities and differences between W chromosome and Y chromosome evolution. PMID:26040272

  16. Postexercise ketosis in night-migrating passerine birds.

    PubMed

    Jenni-Eiermann, S; Jenni, L

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the postexercise metabolism of six species of free-living, night-migrating passerine birds (European robin, pied flycatcher, wheatear, redstart, blackcap, and garden warbler). The birds were caught during autumn migration out of their nocturnal flight, and their metabolism changed from a fasting, highly active state to a fasting, resting state. Concentrations of six plasma metabolites of the fat, carbohydrate, and protein metabolism were measured during up to 10 h of recovery time. The metabolic changes indicated a biphasic pattern: (a) a quick first response to the reduced energy demands during the first 20 min of recovery, suggested by an increase and subsequent decrease of free fatty acid levels, and (b) subsequently, a postexercise ketosis and a reduction of lipolysis and proteolysis, suggested by high beta-hydroxy-butyrate and low free fatty acid, glycerol, triglyceride, and uric acid levels. This metabolic pattern differs from that of humans and rats, in which ketosis starts immediately postexercise or is absent in trained subjects. Since migrating birds are naturally adapted to endurance exercise, it is hypothesized that the high and long-lasting postexercise ketosis does not evoke physiological problems (such as hypoglycemia) but, by contrast, increases the ability of birds to rely on lipids, to a very high extent, during and after flight and decreases the dependence on glucose and glucogenic amino acids. Differences between species in fat stores and metabolic pattern support this hypothesis.

  17. Comparative study of understorey birds diversity inhabiting lowland rainforest virgin jungle reserve and regenerated forest.

    PubMed

    Nor Hashim, Ezyan; Ramli, Rosli

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of understorey birds inhabiting different habitats, that is, virgin jungle reserve (VJR) and regenerated forest (RF), was conducted in Ulu Gombak Forest Reserve and Selangor and Triang Forest Reserve, Negeri Sembilan, Peninsular Malaysia. The objective of this study was to assess the diversity of understorey birds in both habitats and the effects of forest regeneration on the understorey bird community. The mist-netting method was used to capture understorey birds inhabiting both habitats in both locations. Species composition and feeding guild indicated that understorey bird populations were similar in the two habitats. However, the number of secondary forest species such as Little spiderhunter (Arachnothera longirostra) in VJR is increasing due to its proximity to RF. This study discovered that RFs in both study areas are not yet fully recovered. However, based on the range of species discovered, the RFs have conservation value and should be maintained because they harbour important forest species such as babblers and flycatchers. The assessment of the community structure of understorey birds in VJR and RF is important for forest management and conservation, especially where both habitats are intact.

  18. You mob my owl, I'll mob yours: birds play tit-for-tat game

    PubMed Central

    Krama, Tatjana; Vrublevska, Jolanta; Freeberg, Todd M.; Kullberg, Cecilia; Rantala, Markus J.; Krams, Indrikis

    2012-01-01

    Reciprocity is fundamental to cooperative behaviour and has been verified in theoretical models. However, there is still limited experimental evidence for reciprocity in non-primate species. Our results more decisively clarify that reciprocity with a tit-for-tat enforcement strategy can occur among breeding pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca separate from considerations of byproduct mutualism. Breeding pairs living in close proximity (20–24 m) did exhibit byproduct mutualism and always assisted in mobbing regardless of their neighbours' prior actions. However, breeding pairs with distant neighbours (69–84 m) either assisted or refused to assist in mobbing a predatory owl based on whether or not the distant pair had previously helped them in their own nest defense against the predator. Clearly, these birds are aware of their specific spatial security context, remember their neighbours' prior behaviour, and choose a situation-specific strategic course of action, which could promote their longer-term security, a capacity previously thought unique to primates. PMID:23150772

  19. Effects of protective fencing on birds, lizards, and black-tailed hares in the Western Mojave Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.

    1999-01-01

    Effects of protective fencing on birds, lizards, black-tailed hares (Lepus californicus), perennial plant cover, and structural diversity of perennial plants were evaluated from spring 1994 through winter 1995 at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA), in the Mojave Desert, California. Abundance and species richness of birds were higher inside than outside the DTNA, and effects were larger during breeding than wintering seasons and during a high than a low rainfall year. Ash-throated flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens), cactus wrens (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus), LeConte's thrashers (Toxostoma lecontei), loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus), sage sparrows (Amphispiza belli), and verdins (Auriparus flaviceps) were more abundant inside than outside the DTNA. Nesting activity was also more frequent inside. Total abundance and species richness of lizards and individual abundances of western whiptail lizards (Cnemidophorous tigris) and desert spiny lizards (Sceloporus magister) were higher inside than outside. In contrast, abundance of black-tailed hares was lower inside. Structural diversity of the perennial plant community did not differ due to protection, but cover was 50% higher in protected areas. Black-tailed hares generally prefer areas of low perennial plant cover, which may explain why they were more abundant outside than inside the DTNA. Habitat structure may not affect bird and lizard communities as much as availability of food at this desert site, and the greater abundance and species richness of vertebrates inside than outside the DTNA may correlate with abundances of seeds and invertebrate prey.

  20. The importance of floodplain forests in the conservation and management of neotropical migratory birds in the Midwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knutson, M.G.; Hoover, J.P.; Klaas, E.E.; Thompson, Frank R.

    1996-01-01

    Bottomland forests of the Central Forest Region of the Upper Midwest are found primarily on the floodplains of large rivers and include at least six types of forest communities. Birds breeding in bottomland forests are affected by extensive variation in latitude, climate, hydrology, forest succession, and change caused by anthropogenic disturbances. The floodplain forest bird community differs in species composition and in relative abundance from adjacent upland habitats. High abundances of some species are found in the floodplain and some species, such as the prothonotary warbler, brown creeper, yellow-billed cuckoo, yellow-bellied sapsucker, and great crested flycatcher, show a clear preference for floodplain forests. Studies of nesting success indicate that, for some species, nest success may be higher in the floodplain than in the uplands. Floodplain birds face threats due to large-scale loss of floodplain forest habitat. Conservation efforts should focus on restoring degraded floodplains by maintaining high tree species diversity and wide corridors. To accomplish this, the underlying hydrodynamics which support a diverse floodplain forest habitat may need to be restored. Large, contiguous tracts of floodplain and upland forests should be maintained where they exist and restored in other locations. This will provide some high quality habitat for area-sensitive neotropical migratory birds (NTMBs) in agricultural landscapes where small, scattered forest fragments are the rule. Future research efforts should examine the importance of floodplain forests in maintaining populations of neotropical migrants, especially birds experiencing population declines in adjacent uplands.

  1. Seasonal differences in riparian consumer diet and insect communities in an Oregon Coast Range watershed food web.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robillard, A.; Li, J.

    2005-05-01

    In riparian areas, terrestrial and aquatic habitats overlap creating zones where they interact as an aquatic-terrestrial interface. This coupling allows energy to move between systems and generates intertwining food webs. Thus, vertebrate riparian consumers, such as fish or birds, potentially have alternative prey from sources external to their habitats. The purpose of our study was to explore this reciprocal exchange in an alder dominated riparian forest of the Oregon Coast Range. Diet samples were collected from birds and fish in summer and fall 2003 with a suite of insect samples at Honeygrove Creek and two of its small tributaries. In a comparison of emerging aquatic insects and flying terrestrial insects during June and again in September, we detected seasonal differences in terrestrial and aquatic insects available to riparian consumers. Despite this availability of externally derived prey, fish depended more on resources derived from within their respective habitats during summer. Cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) and Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kitsutch) ate more juvenile aquatic than adult aquatic or terrestrial insects. During fall, the same pattern was exhibited by Coho but Cutthroat trout appeared to consume a slightly greater number of terrestrial insects. The preliminary analysis of bird diet samples from commonly encountered species such as, Swainson's thrush, Song Sparrow, and Pacific-slope Flycatcher, showed more terrestrial derived prey in their diets than aquatic during the summer sampling season.

  2. Nest-dwelling ectoparasites reduce antioxidant defences in females and nestlings of a passerine: a field experiment.

    PubMed

    López-Arrabé, Jimena; Cantarero, Alejandro; Pérez-Rodríguez, Lorenzo; Palma, Antonio; Alonso-Alvarez, Carlos; González-Braojos, Sonia; Moreno, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Ectoparasites may imply a cost in terms of oxidative stress provoked by inflammatory responses in hosts. Ectoparasites may also result in costs for nestlings and brooding females because of the direct loss of nutrients and reduced metabolic capacity resulting from parasite feeding activities. These responses may involve the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that may induce oxidative damage in host tissues. Our goal was to examine the effect of ectoparasites in terms of oxidative stress for nestlings and adult females in a population of pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca. We manipulated the entire nest ectoparasite community by reducing ectoparasite loads in some nests through a heating treatment and compared them with a control group of nests with natural loads. A marker of total antioxidant capacity (TAS) in plasma and total levels of glutathione (tGSH) in red blood cells as well as a marker of oxidative damage in plasma lipids (malondialdehyde; MDA) were assessed simultaneously. Levels of tGSH were higher in heat-treated nests than in controls for both females and nestlings. Higher TAS values were observed in females from heat-treated nests. In nestlings there was a negative correlation between TAS and MDA. Our study supports the hypothesis that ectoparasites expose cavity-nesting birds to an oxidative challenge. This could be paid for in the long term, ultimately compromising individual fitness.

  3. Nest-climatic factors affect the abundance of biting flies and their effects on nestling condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Merino, Santiago; Lobato, Elisa; Aguilar, Juan Rivero-de; del Cerro, Sara; Ruiz-de-Castañeda, Rafael; Moreno, Juan

    2010-11-01

    The first step in the establishment of a host-biting fly relationship is host location. While a number of studies highlight the role of host emitted products as important cues affecting host location by biting flies, the role of host temperature is far from clear. We investigated the role of different nest microclimatic variables affecting the interaction between pied flycatchers and two biting flies: black flies and biting midges. Biting midge abundances increased with temperature inside the nest, supporting the potential importance of nest temperature as a cue used by insects to localize their hosts. The possibility that biting fly infestations were associated to ecological conditions in the vicinity of the nests is also discussed. Furthermore, we found a negative association between nestling weight (including tarsus length as a covariate in the analyses) and the interaction between the abundance of biting midges and the presence/absence of black flies in nests. The potential negative effect of these ectoparasites on nestling weight (condition index) and potential differences in the bird phenotypic/genetic quality associated with nest site choice and parasite infestations are considered.

  4. What prevents phenological adjustment to climate change in migrant bird species? Evidence against the ``arrival constraint'' hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodenough, Anne E.; Hart, Adam G.; Elliot, Simon L.

    2011-01-01

    Phenological studies have demonstrated changes in the timing of seasonal events across multiple taxonomic groups as the climate warms. Some northern European migrant bird populations, however, show little or no significant change in breeding phenology, resulting in synchrony with key food sources becoming mismatched. This phenological inertia has often been ascribed to migration constraints (i.e. arrival date at breeding grounds preventing earlier laying). This has been based primarily on research in The Netherlands and Germany where time between arrival and breeding is short (often as few as 9 days). Here, we test the arrival constraint hypothesis over a 15-year period for a U.K. pied flycatcher ( Ficedula hypoleuca) population where laying date is not constrained by arrival as the period between arrival and breeding is substantial and consistent (average 27 ± 4.57 days SD). Despite increasing spring temperatures and quantifiably stronger selection for early laying on the basis of number of offspring to fledge, we found no significant change in breeding phenology, in contrast with co-occurring resident blue tits ( Cyanistes caeruleus). We discuss possible non-migratory constraints on phenological adjustment, including limitations on plasticity, genetic constraints and competition, as well as the possibility of counter-selection pressures relating to adult survival, longevity or future reproductive success. We propose that such factors need to be considered in conjunction with the arrival constraint hypothesis.

  5. Gathering public information for habitat selection: prospecting birds cue on parental activity.

    PubMed Central

    Pärt, Tomas; Doligez, Blandine

    2003-01-01

    Because habitat quality strongly affects individual fitness, understanding individual habitat selection strategies is fundamental for most aspects of the evolution and conservation of species. Several studies suggest that individuals gather public information, i.e. information derived from the reproductive performance of conspecifics, to assess and select habitats. However, the behavioural mechanisms of information gathering, i.e. prospecting, are largely unknown, despite the fact that they directly constrain individual selection strategies. To test whether prospectors gather public information or other cues of habitat quality, we manipulated brood size of collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) and investigated subsequent attraction of prospectors. Experimentally adding two nestlings increased the probability of attracting prospectors to the nest as a result of increased parental feeding rates. Prospectors were attracted to the most successful sites because feeding rate predicted subsequent fledgling production. In the year following prospecting, individuals selected a breeding site very close to the prospected site. These results provide the first experimental evidence, to our knowledge, of the links between information gathering behaviour and breeding habitat selection strategies based on public information. PMID:12964983

  6. The excuse principle can maintain cooperation through forgivable defection in the Prisoner's Dilemma game.

    PubMed

    Krams, Indrikis; Kokko, Hanna; Vrublevska, Jolanta; Abolins-Abols, Mikus; Krama, Tatjana; Rantala, Markus J

    2013-09-07

    Reciprocal altruism describes a situation in which an organism acts in a manner that temporarily reduces its fitness while increasing another organism's fitness, but there is an ultimate fitness benefit based on an expectation that the other organism will act in a similar manner at a later time. It creates the obvious dilemma in which there is always a short-term benefit to cheating, therefore cooperating individuals must avoid being exploited by non-cooperating cheaters. This is achieved by following various decision rules, usually variants of the tit-for-tat (TFT) strategy. The strength of TFT, however, is also its weakness-mistakes in implementation or interpretation of moves, or the inability to cooperate, lead to a permanent breakdown in cooperation. We show that pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) use a TFT with an embedded 'excuse principle' to forgive the neighbours that were perceived as unable to cooperate during mobbing of predators. The excuse principle dramatically increases the stability of TFT-like behavioural strategies within the Prisoner's Dilemma game.

  7. Genome-wide association mapping in a wild avian population identifies a link between genetic and phenotypic variation in a life-history trait.

    PubMed

    Husby, Arild; Kawakami, Takeshi; Rönnegård, Lars; Smeds, Linnéa; Ellegren, Hans; Qvarnström, Anna

    2015-05-07

    Understanding the genetic basis of traits involved in adaptation is a major challenge in evolutionary biology but remains poorly understood. Here, we use genome-wide association mapping using a custom 50 k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in a natural population of collared flycatchers to examine the genetic basis of clutch size, an important life-history trait in many animal species. We found evidence for an association on chromosome 18 where one SNP significant at the genome-wide level explained 3.9% of the phenotypic variance. We also detected two suggestive quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on chromosomes 9 and 26. Fitness differences among genotypes were generally weak and not significant, although there was some indication of a sex-by-genotype interaction for lifetime reproductive success at the suggestive QTL on chromosome 26. This implies that sexual antagonism may play a role in maintaining genetic variation at this QTL. Our findings provide candidate regions for a classic avian life-history trait that will be useful for future studies examining the molecular and cellular function of, as well as evolutionary mechanisms operating at, these loci.

  8. Aggressive behavior of the male parent predicts brood sex ratio in a songbird

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szász, Eszter; Garamszegi, László Zsolt; Hegyi, Gergely; Szöllősi, Eszter; Markó, Gábor; Török, János; Rosivall, Balázs

    2014-08-01

    Brood sex ratio is often affected by parental or environmental quality, presumably in an adaptive manner that is the sex that confers higher fitness benefits to the mother is overproduced. So far, studies on the role of parental quality have focused on parental morphology and attractiveness. However, another aspect, the partner's behavioral characteristics, may also be expected to play a role in brood sex ratio adjustment. To test this hypothesis, we investigated whether the proportion of sons in the brood is predicted by the level of territorial aggression displayed by the father, in the collared flycatcher ( Ficedula albicollis). The proportion of sons in the brood was higher in early broods and increased with paternal tarsus length. When controlling for breeding date and body size, we found a higher proportion of sons in the brood of less aggressive fathers. Male nestlings are more sensitive to the rearing environment, and the behavior of courting males may often be used by females to assess their future parental activity. Therefore, adjusting brood sex ratio to the level of male aggression could be adaptive. Our results indicate that the behavior of the partner could indeed be a significant determinant in brood sex ratio adjustment, which should not be overlooked in future studies.

  9. Bird Diversity and Distribution in relation to Urban Landscape Types in Northern Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Gatesire, T.; Nsabimana, D.; Nyiramana, A.; Seburanga, J. L.; Mirville, M. O.

    2014-01-01

    Using the point count method, linear mixed models, Shannon's diversity index, and Bray-Curtis cluster analysis, we conducted a study of the effect of urban fabric layout on bird diversity and distribution in northern Rwanda. The results showed a significant effect of city landscapes on bird richness and relative abundance; residential neighborhoods, institutional grounds, and informal settlements had the highest species diversity in comparison to other microlandscape types. Riversides were characterized by specialized bird species, commonly known to be restricted to wetland environments. Built-up areas and open field landscapes had comparable results. One Albertine Rift endemic bird species, the Ruwenzori Double-collared Sunbird (Cinnyris stuhlmanni), was recorded. Three migratory birds were found in Musanze city for the first time: the Common Sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos), the Spotted Flycatcher (Muscicapa striata), and the Willow Warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus). Two bird species have not been previously reported in Rwanda: the Garden Warbler (Sylvia borin) and the Lesser Spotted Eagle (Aquila pomarina). The implications of this study are particularly relevant to urban decision makers who should consider the existence of a great diversity of avian fauna when developing and implementing master plans, especially when villages and cities are in proximity of protected areas or natural reserves. PMID:25133203

  10. Bird diversity and distribution in relation to urban landscape types in northern Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Gatesire, T; Nsabimana, D; Nyiramana, A; Seburanga, J L; Mirville, M O

    2014-01-01

    Using the point count method, linear mixed models, Shannon's diversity index, and Bray-Curtis cluster analysis, we conducted a study of the effect of urban fabric layout on bird diversity and distribution in northern Rwanda. The results showed a significant effect of city landscapes on bird richness and relative abundance; residential neighborhoods, institutional grounds, and informal settlements had the highest species diversity in comparison to other microlandscape types. Riversides were characterized by specialized bird species, commonly known to be restricted to wetland environments. Built-up areas and open field landscapes had comparable results. One Albertine Rift endemic bird species, the Ruwenzori Double-collared Sunbird (Cinnyris stuhlmanni), was recorded. Three migratory birds were found in Musanze city for the first time: the Common Sandpiper (Actitis hypoleucos), the Spotted Flycatcher (Muscicapa striata), and the Willow Warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus). Two bird species have not been previously reported in Rwanda: the Garden Warbler (Sylvia borin) and the Lesser Spotted Eagle (Aquila pomarina). The implications of this study are particularly relevant to urban decision makers who should consider the existence of a great diversity of avian fauna when developing and implementing master plans, especially when villages and cities are in proximity of protected areas or natural reserves.

  11. Preliminary study on avian fauna of the Krishna River basin Sangli District, Western Maharashtra, India.

    PubMed

    Kumbar, Suresh M; Ghadage, Abhijit B

    2014-11-01

    The present study on avifaunal diversity carried out for three years at the Krishna River Basin, Sangli District revealed a total of 126 species of birds belonging to 30 families, of which 91 species were resident, 16 migratory, 12 resident and local migratory and 7 species were resident and migratory. Among the migrant birds, Rosy Starling Sturnus roseus was dominant in the study area. Commonly recorded resident bird species were, Red vented bulbul, Jungle crow, House sparrow, Common myna, Brahminy myna, Rock pigeon, Spotted dove, Rose ringed parakeet, Indian robin, White-browed fantail-flycatcher and Small sunbird. Most of the families had one or two species, whereas Muscicapidae family alone had 16 species. Forty one species of waterfowls were recorded in this small landscape. Out of 126 bird species, 38 were insectivorous, 28 piscivorous, 25 omnivorous, 19 carnivorous, 9 granivorous, 5 frugivorous and 2 species were nectar sucker and insectivorous. These results suggest that richness of avifauna in the Krishna River Basin, Western Maharashtra might be due to large aquatic ground, varied vegetations and favourable environmental conditions.

  12. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA phylogenies reveal a complex evolutionary history in the Australasian robins (Passeriformes: Petroicidae).

    PubMed

    Christidis, Les; Irestedt, Martin; Rowe, Dianne; Boles, Walter E; Norman, Janette A

    2011-12-01

    The Australasian robins (Petroicidae) comprise a relatively homogeneous group of small to medium-sized insectivorous birds. Their center of diversity is Australia and New Guinea (40 species) but seven species have managed to colonize geographically distant islands such as Tanimbar, New Britain, New Zealand, New Caledonia, Norfolk Island, Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Fiji and Samoa. To resolve the evolutionary relationships within the Petroicidae, we here present the results of a phylogenetic analysis of sequence data from two mitochondrial genes (ND2, CO1) and one nuclear intron (β-Fibrinogen intron 5) for all 14 genera and 40 of the 46 currently recognized species. All phylogenetic analyses identified six primary lineages, treated here as subfamilies, within the Petroicidae: (1) Eopsaltriinae comprising Eopsaltria (excluding E. flaviventris), Tregellasia, Peneothello, Melanodryas, Poecilodryas and Heteromyias; (2) Drymodinae comprising Drymodes; (3) Microecinae comprising Microeca, Monachella and Eopsaltria flaviventris; (4) Petroicinae comprising Petroica and Eugerygone; (5) Pachycephalopsinae comprising Pachycephalopsis; and (6) Amalocichlinae comprising Amalocichla. The genera Eopsaltria, Microeca, Peneothello and Poecilodryas were found to be paraphyletic. Based on assessments of phylogenetic branching patterns and/or DNA divergence it also was apparent that Eopsaltriaaustralis, Tregellasialeucops, Melanodryascucullata, Heteromyiasalbispecularis, Drymodessupercilious and Microecaflavigaster may each comprise more than one species. The Petroicidae display a complex biogeographical history involving repeated radiations both within, and across Australia and New Guinea. It appears that dispersal into smaller islands such as New Britain, Tanimbar and the South Pacific has only been undertaken by species with a "flycatcher" body form.

  13. Summer inventory of landbirds in Kenai Fjords National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2006-01-01

    As part of the National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring Program, we conducted a summer inventory of landbirds within Kenai Fjords National Park. Using a stratified random sampling design of areas accessible by boat or on foot, we selected sites that encompassed the breadth of habitat types within the Park. We detected 101 species across 52 transects, including 62 species of landbirds, which confirmed presence of 87% of landbird species expected to occur in the Park during the summer breeding season. We found evidence of breeding for three Partners in Flight Watch List species, Rufous Hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus), Olive-sided Flycatcher (Contopus cooperi), and Rusty Blackbird (Euphagus carolinus), which are of particular conservation concern due to recent population declines. Kenai Fjords National Park supports extremely high densities of Hermit Thrush, Orange-crowned Warbler, and Wilson’s Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) compared with other regions of Alaska. Other commonly observed species included Fox Sparrow (Passerella iliaca), Varied Thrush (Ixoreus naevius), Rubycrowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula), and Yellow Warbler (Dendroica petechia). More than half of the landbird species we observed occurred in needleleaf forests, and several of these species were strongly associated with the coastforest interface. Tall shrub habitats, which occurred across all elevations and in recently deglaciated areas, supported high densities and a diverse array of passerines. Two major riparian corridors, with their broadleaf forests, wetlands, and connectivity to interior Alaska, provided unique and important landbird habitats within the region.

  14. Single-generation estimates of individual fitness as proxies for long-term genetic contribution.

    PubMed

    Brommer, Jon E; Gustafsson, Lars; Pietiäinen, Hannu; Merilä, Juha

    2004-04-01

    Individual fitness is a central evolutionary concept, but the question of how it should be defined in empirical studies of natural selection remains contentious. Using founding cohorts from long-term population studies of two species of individually marked birds (collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis and Ural owl Strix uralensis), we compared a rate-sensitive (lambdaind) and a rate-insensitive (lifetime reproductive success [LRS]) estimate of individual fitness with an estimate of long-term genetic fitness. The latter was calculated as the number of gene copies present in the population after more than two generations, as estimated by tracing genetic lineages and accounting for the fact that populations were not completely closed. When counting fledglings, rate-insensitive estimates of individual fitness correlated better than rate-sensitive estimates with estimated long-term genetic contribution. When counting recruits, both classes of estimates performed equally well. The results support the contention that simple, rate-insensitive measures of fitness, such as LRS, provide a valid and good estimate of fitness in evolutionary studies of natural populations.

  15. Selective disappearance of individuals with high levels of glycated haemoglobin in a free-living bird.

    PubMed

    Récapet, Charlotte; Sibeaux, Adélaïde; Cauchard, Laure; Doligez, Blandine; Bize, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Although disruption of glucose homeostasis is a hallmark of ageing in humans and laboratory model organisms, we have little information on the importance of this process in free-living animals. Poor control of blood glucose levels leads to irreversible protein glycation. Hence, levels of protein glycation are hypothesized to increase with age and to be associated with a decline in survival. We tested these predictions by measuring blood glycated haemoglobin in 274 adult collared flycatchers of known age and estimating individual probability of recapture in the following 2 years. Results show a strong decrease in glycated haemoglobin from age 1 to 5 years and an increase thereafter. Individuals with high levels of glycated haemoglobin had a lower probability of recapture, even after controlling for effects of age and dispersal. Altogether, our findings suggest that poor control of glucose homoeostasis is associated with lower survival in this free-living bird population, and that the selective disappearance of individuals with the highest glycation levels could account for the counterintuitive age-related decline in glycated haemoglobin in the early age categories.

  16. Nonrandom dispersal drives phenotypic divergence within a bird population

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Carlos; Canal, David; Potti, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Gene flow through dispersal has traditionally been thought to function as a force opposing evolutionary differentiation. However, directional gene flow may actually reinforce divergence of populations in close proximity. This study documents the phenotypic differentiation over more than two decades in body size (tarsus length) at a very short spatial scale (1.1 km) within a population of pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca inhabiting deciduous and coniferous habitats. Unlike females, males breeding in the deciduous forest were consistently larger than those from the managed coniferous forest. This assortment by size is likely explained by preset habitat preferences leading to dominance of the largest males and exclusion of the smallest ones toward the nonpreferred coniferous forest coupled with directional dispersal. Movements of males between forests were nonrandom with respect to body size and flow rate, which might function to maintain the phenotypic variation in this heritable trait at such a small spatial scale. However, a deeply rooted preference for the deciduous habitat might not be in line with its quality due to the increased levels of breeding density of hole-nesting competitors therein. These results illustrate how eco-evolutionary scenarios can develop under directional gene flow over surprisingly small spatial scales. Our findings come on top of recent studies concerning new ways in which dispersal and gene flow can influence microevolution. PMID:24363908

  17. Understory avifauna exhibits altered mobbing behavior in tropical forest degraded by selective logging.

    PubMed

    Hua, Fangyuan; Sieving, Kathryn E

    2016-11-01

    In understanding the impacts of selective logging on biodiversity, relatively little is known about the critical behavioral link between altered forest conditions and population persistence. Predator-mobbing is a widespread anti-predator behavior in birds that expresses a well-known trade-off influencing prey survival under predation risk. Here, we ask whether the predator-mobbing behavior of understory forest birds is altered by selective logging and associated forest structural changes in the highly endangered lowland rainforest of Sumatra. At four study sites spanning a gradient of logging-induced forest degradation, we used standardized mobbing and owl call playbacks with predator model presentation to elicit the predator-mobbing behavior of understory prey birds, compared birds' mobbing intensity across sites, and related variation in this intensity to forest vegetation structure. We found that selective logging altered birds' predator-mobbing intensity (measured by behavioral conspicuousness and propensity to approach the predator) as well as forest structure, and that vegetative changes to canopy and understory were correlated with contrasting responses by the two major bird foraging guilds, gleaning versus flycatching birds. We additionally discuss the implications of our findings for further hypothesis testing pertaining to the impacts of selective logging on the ecological processes underlying prey mobbing behavior, particularly with regards to predator-prey interactions and prey accruement of energy reserves.

  18. Predator encounters have spatially extensive impacts on parental behaviour in a breeding bird community

    PubMed Central

    Moks, Kadri; Thomson, Robert L.; Calhim, Sara; Järvistö, Pauliina E.; Schuett, Wiebke; Velmala, William; Laaksonen, Toni

    2016-01-01

    Predation risk has negative indirect effects on prey fitness, partly mediated through changes in behaviour. Evidence that individuals gather social information from other members of the population suggests that events in a community may impact the behaviour of distant individuals. However, spatially wide-ranging impacts on individual behaviour caused by a predator encounter elsewhere in a community have not been documented before. We investigated the effect of a predator encounter (hawk model presented at a focal nest) on the parental behaviour of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), both at the focal nest and at nearby nests different distances from the predator encounter. We show that nest visitation of both focal pairs and nearby pairs were affected, up to 3 h and 1 h, respectively. Parents also appeared to compensate initial disrupted feeding by later increasing nest visitation rates. This is the first evidence showing that the behaviour of nearby pairs was affected away from an immediate source of risk. Our results indicate that the impacts of short-term predator encounters may immediately extend spatially to the broader community, affecting the behaviour of distant individuals. Information about predators is probably quickly spread by cues such as intra- and heterospecific alarm calls, in communities of different taxa. PMID:27030411

  19. Variation in prevalence and intensity of two avian ectoparasites in a polluted area.

    PubMed

    Eeva, Tapio; Klemola, Tero

    2013-09-01

    We counted the numbers of pupae of two ectoparasitic flies (Protocalliphora sp. and Ornithomyia sp.) in the nests of a passerine bird, the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) to find out if their prevalence or intensity are affected by long-term environmental pollution by a copper smelter and whether such an interaction would have impacts on birds' breeding success. Fecal metal concentrations of F. hypoleuca nestlings were used to explore direct association between metal levels and parasite prevalence, but we also included other explanatory factors in our analysis, such as timing of breeding, brood size, ambient temperature, habitat quality and host population density. We found that environmental pollution decreased the prevalence of Protocalliphora via changed habitat quality but did not affect the prevalence of Ornithomyia. The prevalence of neither ectoparasite was, however, directly related to ambient metal levels. Both ectoparasites showed higher prevalence when ambient temperature during the nestling period was high, emphasizing the potential of climate change to modify host–parasite relationships. The prevalence of Ornithomyia was further highest in dense F. hypoleuca populations and late broods. Nestling survival decreased with increasing infestation intensity of Ornithomyia while no association was found for Protocalliphora. Despite relatively low numbers and overall weak effect of parasites on survival, the possible delayed and/or sublethal effects of these ectoparasites call for further studies. Our results suggest that pollution-related effects on avian ectoparasite numbers are species-specific and reflect habitat changes rather than direct toxic effect of heavy metals.

  20. Sound settlement: noise surpasses land cover in explaining breeding habitat selection of secondary cavity-nesting birds.

    PubMed

    Kleist, Nathan J; Guralnick, Robert P; Cruz, Alexander; Francis, Clinton D

    2017-01-01

    Birds breeding in heterogeneous landscapes select nest sites by cueing in on a variety of factors from landscape features and social information to the presence of natural enemies. We focus on determining the relative impact of anthropogenic noise on nest site occupancy, compared to amount of forest cover, which is known to strongly influence the selection process. We examine chronic, industrial noise from natural gas wells directly measured at the nest box as well as site-averaged noise, using a well-established field experimental system in northwestern New Mexico. We hypothesized that high levels of noise, both at the nest site and in the environment, would decrease nest box occupancy. We set up nest boxes using a geospatially paired control and experimental site design and analyzed four years of occupancy data from four secondary cavity-nesting birds common to the Colorado Plateau. We found different effects of noise and landscape features depending on species, with strong effects of noise observed in breeding habitat selection of Myiarchus cinerascens, the Ash-throated Flycatcher, and Sialia currucoides, the Mountain Bluebird. In contrast, the amount of forest cover less frequently explained habitat selection for those species or had a smaller standardized effect than the acoustic environment. Although forest cover characterization and management is commonly employed by natural resource managers, our results show that characterizing and managing the acoustic environment should be an important tool in protected area management.

  1. Müller cell alignment in bird fovea: possible role in vision

    PubMed Central

    Zueva, Lidia; Makarov, Vladimir; Zayas-Santiago, Astrid; Golubeva, Tatiana; Korneeva, Elena; Savvinov, Alexey; Eaton, Misty

    2015-01-01

    Birds which possess high visual acuity, such as eagles and falcons, are known to have retinas with a deep conically curved central foveal pit. There have been different attempts to explain the importance of this particular shape of the fovea in visual resolution. Recently, the function of Müller cells as “light fibers” was discovered, showing how the endfeet of Müller cells trap the light and then transfer it to a single cone photoreceptor. Here we describe how the endfeet of Müller cells line the walls of the foveal pit in the Pied Flycatcher, and how the Müller cell body extends its processes towards individual cones, forming machinery that could allow for light transfer from the pit wall to the photoreceptor layer alongside the pit. We describe how this construction may send an image from the fovea to the cones, and also, how the angular positioning of Müller cells, being optical extensions of the cones, has the advantage of being much denser than on a flat or slightly curved fovea. We, therefore, suggest that this type of optic fiber alignment can be used as a novel type of “amplifying array” that simply increases the amount of megapixels at the photoreceptor cell layer. PMID:25866702

  2. Studies on the dynamics of transmission of onchocerciasis in a Sudan-savanna area of North Cameroon V. What is a tolerable level of Annual Transmission Potential?

    PubMed

    Renz, A; Wenk, P; Anderson, J; Fuglsang, H

    1987-06-01

    The prevalence and intensity of infection with Onchocerca volvulus were assessed in population surveys in nine villages, situated at different distances from Simulium damnosum s.l. breeding sites. The prevalence varied from 48 to 89%, the arithmetic mean densities of microfilariae per skin snip were between 16 and 109, and severe ocular lesions were found in from 1 to 22% of patients. Annual Transmission Potentials (ATP) were measured for up to three years in the near vicinity of nine villages at several fly-catching sites. Weighted means of the ATP over the three years, and of the sojourn times of the human population, were calculated at three of the villages, where the prevalence of onchocerciasis was 51, 61 and 89%. An average ATP of 100 larvae or less in the head, thorax and abdomen of the flies was associated with an onchocerciasis prevalence of 50 to 60%, a mean microfilarial density below 40 microfilariae per skin-snip, less than 5% of ocular lesions, and no onchocercal blindness. This value might therefore be considered to be an indication of the level to which the transmission must be reduced in the savanna in order to prevent the occurrence of severe ocular lesions or blindness. It is lower than the present level accepted by the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in the Volta River Basin.

  3. Ultra-Rapid Vision in Birds

    PubMed Central

    Boström, Jannika E.; Dimitrova, Marina; Canton, Cindy; Håstad, Olle; Qvarnström, Anna; Ödeen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Flying animals need to accurately detect, identify and track fast-moving objects and these behavioral requirements are likely to strongly select for abilities to resolve visual detail in time. However, evidence of highly elevated temporal acuity relative to non-flying animals has so far been confined to insects while it has been missing in birds. With behavioral experiments on three wild passerine species, blue tits, collared and pied flycatchers, we demonstrate temporal acuities of vision far exceeding predictions based on the sizes and metabolic rates of these birds. This implies a history of strong natural selection on temporal resolution. These birds can resolve alternating light-dark cycles at up to 145 Hz (average: 129, 127 and 137, respectively), which is ca. 50 Hz over the highest frequency shown in any other vertebrate. We argue that rapid vision should confer a selective advantage in many bird species that are ecologically similar to the three species examined in our study. Thus, rapid vision may be a more typical avian trait than the famously sharp vision found in birds of prey. PMID:26990087

  4. Climate variation and regional gradients in population dynamics of two hole-nesting passerines.

    PubMed Central

    Saether, Bernt-Erik; Engen, Steinar; Møller, Anders Pape; Matthysen, Erik; Adriaensen, Frank; Fiedler, Wolfgang; Leivits, Agu; Lambrechts, Marcel M; Visser, Marcel E; Anker-Nilssen, Tycho; Both, Christiaan; Dhondt, André A; McCleery, Robin H; McMeeking, John; Potti, Jamie; Røstad, Ole Wiggo; Thomson, David

    2003-01-01

    Latitudinal gradients in population dynamics can arise through regional variation in the deterministic components of the population dynamics and the stochastic factors. Here, we demonstrate an increase with latitude in the contribution of a large-scale climate pattern, the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), to the fluctuations in size of populations of two European hole-nesting passerine species. However, this influence of climate induced different latitudinal gradients in the population dynamics of the two species. In the great tit the proportion of the variability in the population fluctuations explained by the NAO increased with latitude, showing a larger impact of climate on the population fluctuations of this species at higher latitudes. In contrast, no latitudinal gradient was found in the relative contribution of climate to the variability of the pied flycatcher populations because the total environmental stochasticity increased with latitude. This shows that the population ecological consequences of an expected climate change will depend on how climate affects the environmental stochasticity in the population process. In both species, the effects will be larger in those parts of Europe where large changes in climate are expected. PMID:14667357

  5. Shiny cowbird parasitism in two avian communities in Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The shiny cowbird (M. bonariensis), a brood parasite, has recently expanded its range from South America to Puerto Rico via the Lesser Antilles. This species is a host generalist and, on reaching Puerto Rico, encounteed avian species with no history of social parasitism. In mangrove habitat study areas, 42% of the resident non-raptorial land bird species were parasitized. Some species were heavily parasitized; e.g., yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), 76% of nests parasitized black-whiskered vireo (Vireo altiloquus), 82%, Puerto Rican flycatcher (Myiarchus antillarum), 85%, yellow-shouldered blackbird (Agelaius xanthomus), 95%, troupial (Icterus icterus), 100%, black-cowled oriole (I. dominicensis), 100%. Others suffered low rates of parasitism (2-17% of nests examined); e.g., gray kingbird (Tyrannus dominicensis), red-legged thrush (Turdus plumbeus), bronze mannikin (Lonchura cucullata), northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos), greater antillean grackle (Quiscalus niger). Cowbird parasitism affected hosts by depressing nest success an average of 41% below non-parasitized nests and reducing host productivity. Parasitized host nests hatched 12% fewer eggs an fledged 67% fewer of their own chicks than non-parasitized pairs.

  6. Host selection by the shiny cowbird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiley, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Factors important in Shiny Cowbird (Molothrus bonariensis) host selection were examined within the mangrove community in Puerto Rico. Cowbirds did not parasitize birds in proportion to their abundance. The cowbird breeding season coincided with those of its major hosts, which were 'high-quality' foster species (i.e., species that fledge .gtoreq. 55% of cowbirds hatched: Yellow Warbler, Dendroica petechia; Yellow-shouldered Blackbird, Agelaius xanthomus; Black-whiskered Vireo, Vireo altiloquus; Black-cowled Oriole, Icterus dominicensis; Peurto Rican Flycatcher, Myiarchus antillarum; Troupial, Icterus icterus), and did not extend into other periods even though nests of 'low-quality: species (i.e., species that fledge < 55% of cowbird chicks that hatched: Bronze Mannikin, Lonchura cucullata; Greater Antillean Grackle, Quiscalus niger; Gray Kingbird, Tyrannus dominicensis; Northern Mockingbird, Mimus polyglottos; Red-legged Thrush, Turdus plumbeus) were available. Shiny Cowbird food habits and egg size were similar to those of their hosts, suggesting that cowbirds choose hosts partly on the basis of this combination. Cowbirds located host nests primarily by cryptically watching activities of birds in likely habitats. Other nest locating strategies were active searching of suitable habitat and 'flushing' of hosts by the cowbird's noisy approach. Cowbirds closely monitored nest status with frequent visits that peaked on the host's first day of egg laying. Hosts using covered nests (e.g., cavities, domed nests) were as vulnerable to cowbird parasitism as those building open nests.

  7. Healing with animals in the Levant from the 10th to the 18th century

    PubMed Central

    Lev, Efraim

    2006-01-01

    Animals and products derived from different organs of their bodies have constituted part of the inventory of medicinal substances used in various cultures since ancient times. The article reviews the history of healing with animals in the Levant (The Land of Israel and parts of present-day Syria, Lebanon, and Jordan, defined by the Muslims in the Middle Ages as Bilad al-Sham) in the medieval and early Ottoman periods. Intensive research into the phenomenon of zootherapy in the medieval and early Ottoman Levant has yielded forty-eight substances of animal origin that were used medicinally. The vast majority of these substances were local and relatively easy to obtain. Most of the substances were domestic (honey, wax, silkworm, etc.), others were part of the local wildlife (adder, cuttle fish, flycatcher, firefly, frog, triton, scorpion, etc.), part of the usual medieval household (milk, egg, cheese, lamb, etc.), or parasites (louse, mouse, stinkbug, etc.). Fewer substances were not local but exotic, and therefore rare and expensive (beaver testicles, musk oil, coral, ambergris, etc.). The range of symptoms that the substances of animal origin were used to treat was extensive and included most of the known diseases and maladies of that era: mainly hemorrhoids, burns, impotence, wounds, and skin, eye, and stomach diseases. Changes in the moral outlook of modern societies caused the use of several substances of animal origin to cease in the course of history. These include mummy, silkworm, stinkbug, scarabees, snail, scorpion, and triton. PMID:16504024

  8. Convergent evolution of Hawaiian and Australo-Pacific honeyeaters from distant songbird ancestors.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Robert C; James, Helen F; Olson, Storrs L

    2008-12-23

    The Hawaiian "honeyeaters," five endemic species of recently extinct, nectar-feeding songbirds in the genera Moho and Chaetoptila, looked and acted like Australasian honeyeaters (Meliphagidae), and no taxonomist since their discovery on James Cook's third voyage has classified them as anything else. We obtained DNA sequences from museum specimens of Moho and Chaetoptila collected in Hawaii 115-158 years ago. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences supports monophyly of the two Hawaiian genera but, surprisingly, reveals that neither taxon is a meliphagid honeyeater, nor even in the same part of the songbird radiation as meliphagids. Instead, the Hawaiian species are divergent members of a passeridan group that includes deceptively dissimilar families of songbirds (Holarctic waxwings, neotropical silky flycatchers, and palm chats). Here we designate them as a new family, the Mohoidae. A nuclear-DNA rate calibration suggests that mohoids diverged from their closest living ancestor 14-17 mya, coincident with the estimated earliest arrival in Hawaii of a bird-pollinated plant lineage. Convergent evolution, the evolution of similar traits in distantly related taxa because of common selective pressures, is illustrated well by nectar-feeding birds, but the morphological, behavioral, and ecological similarity of the mohoids to the Australasian honeyeaters makes them a particularly striking example of the phenomenon.

  9. The eye of the field geologist and the mind of the tectonician: one view of dynamic crustal rheology in convergent orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.

    2004-05-01

    -depleted rocks, implying that they were quasi-continuously drained. Studies of migmatitic granulites demonstrate that melt migrates from grain boundaries to mesoscale networks of structures (mm to m) to steeply-inclined conduits recorded by rod or tabular granite intrusions (m to dm). Melt loss from lower crust yields residual rocks composed of strong minerals (feldspar, pyroxene and garnet) with only minor melt on grain boundaries. Thus, weakening of lower crust due to melting is followed by its strengthening. Around the brittle-to-viscous transition zone granite accumulates in subhorizontal tabular plutons, which implies transient presence of significantly weaker layers in shallow orogenic crust; these are potential detachment horizons. Field studies of exhumed orogens suggest deformation commonly is laterally, transversely and vertically diachronous, reflecting the spatial and temporal variation in the weakening-to-strengthening cycle. There may be important sub-horizontal movement horizons, which allow (partial) decoupling of crustal layers. At upper-to-middle crustal levels rocks are metamorphosed in greenschist-amphibolite facies, with local enhancement by pluton-advected heat to amphibolite-granulite facies and thrust-style brittle-ductile deformation (e.g., Acadian, NH). Rocks from middle crustal levels are in amphibolite facies and have penetrative steep fabrics (e.g., Acadian, western ME) or exhibit a complex network of shallowly- and steeply-dipping fabrics (e.g., St. Malo, France). Rocks from lower crustal levels are in amphibolite-granulite facies and have shallow fabrics due to crustal flow, although these may be steepened by later deformation including core-complex formation (e.g., S. Brittany, France).

  10. Glastonbury Gneiss and mantling rocks (a modified Oliverian dome) in south-central Massachusetts and north-central Connecticut; geochemistry, petrogenesis, and isotopic age

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leo, G.W.; Zartman, R.E.; Brookins, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    The Glastonbury dome is a long, narrow structure trending approximately 70 km north-northeast through Connecticut and Massachusetts along the west side of the Bronson Hill anticlinorium. Structurally and stratigraphically the dome is analogous to the Oliverian domes of New Hampshire. It is cored by Glastonbury Gneiss and is mantled by Ammonoosuc Volcanics and Partridge Formation (or their equivalents) of Ordovician age. The Glastonbury Gneiss intrudes the Ammonoosuc and, thereby, establishes the relative age of the two units. Monson Gneiss, which unconformably underlies the Ammonoosuc Volcanics in the Monson anticline to the east, is not in contact with Glastonbury Gneiss except near Stafford Springs, Conn., where the contact may be gradational. In some places, Monson Gneiss shows evidence of plastic flow and potential anatexis. The northern part of the Glastonbury Gneiss typically is leucocratic, granoblastic, relatively potassium-poor gneiss that appears homogeneous in outcrop, but proves to be chemically and modally inhomogeneous over short distances, as shown by variation diagrams and REE plots. The gneiss straddles the compositional fields of trondhjemite, tonalite, and granodiorite, and partly overlaps that of Monson Gneiss. The southern part of the Glastonbury Gneiss is consistently more potassic than the northern, having compositions ranging from granite to granodiorite. All of the Glastonbury Gneiss show pervasive, strong foliation, deformation, and local shearing related to the Acadian orogeny. Field relations, textures, and chemistry of the northern part of the Glastonbury suggest an origin by anatexis of the premetamorphic Monson sequence at temperatures of about 690 DC to 750 DC and pressures of <3kbars. The southern part of the Glastonbury appears to have been generated contemporaneously but not comagmatically from calcalkaline crust. U-Pb zircon ages for both the northern and southern bodies are slightly discordant with 207PbfosPb ages of 445 to 467

  11. TitaniQ Records of P-T-D Paths from Metapelites during Burial Metamorphism and Orogenesis: Evidence for the Role of Pressure Solution Creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, L. E.; Dyess, P.; Ashley, K. T.; Spear, F. S.; Thomas, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    TitaniQ (Ti-in-quartz) thermobarometry of metapelites recording crenulation cleavage development during prograde metamorphism reveals that quartz grains in different fabric domains may record distinct stages of P-T-D paths and further testifies to the importance of pressure solution creep in the rheology of the upper and middle continental crust. This study integrates microstructural analyses, petrologic modeling, cathodoluminscence (CL) imaging, and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) of samples with known tectonic histories. Samples were collected along E-W transects across the Rowe-Hawley Belt (RHB) and the Connecticut Valley-Gaspe Trough (CVG) of central Vermont. Rocks of the RHB record both the Taconic and Acadian orogenies; CVG rocks record the Acadian orogeny only. CL and SIMS analyses were conducted on quartz in different microstructural contexts such as fold hinges, microlithons and cleavage domains, inclusion suites defining internal foliations in garnet, and pressure shadows. In each generation of foliation, metapelites of the RHB and CVG display pressure solution seams, flattened quartz grains neighboring micas in cleavage domains, and more equant quartz grains with foam textures in quartz-rich microlithons and hinges of microfolds. Quartz grains in prograde fabric domains lack lattice preferred orientations. CL (415 nm) zoning patterns of quartz are typically complex and associated with sharp boundaries. Patterns include: rounded-to-anhedral dark cores with bright rims (indicating an increase in [Ti] from core to rim); bright cores with dark rims; dark cores with bright mantles, and dark rims; patchy zoning; and striated grains. RHB chlorite-garnet grade metapelites yielded [Ti] from 0.4-157 ppm; a small fraction of analyses yielded [Ti] greater than that predicted for peak metamorphic conditions and are interpreted as detrital signatures. Garnet-staurolite grade CVG metapelites yielded [Ti] of 2.2-9.8 ppm. The degree of geochemical recycling of

  12. Modelling metamorphism in the Hoosac Schist, Western Massachusetts: new approaches to a New England problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidgood, Anna; Waters, Dave; Gardiner, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Along the western margin of the metamorphic Appalachians in New England, Taconic (Ordovician) tectonism and metamorphism are overprinted towards the east by Acadian (Devonian) structures and metamorphism. The Hoosac Schist, a probable correlate of the well-known Gassetts Schist of Vermont, lies in the region of overprinting. It forms a narrow N-S-trending tectonically-bound zone crossing several Barrovian mineral-assemblage zones from garnet to kyanite grade. Highly aluminous units containing cm-sized garnets (Cheney & Brady, 1992) are noted for the occurrence of textural unconformities within the garnets, separating inclusion-rich cores from inclusion-poor rims. Matrix domains contain both paragonite and muscovite. Muscovite is present in at least two compositionally distinct generations, with broad later laths cutting across a microfolded earlier fabric. Rutile is restricted to inclusions in garnet, whereas the matrix Ti- phase is ilmenite. These features suggest a polymetamorphic history, potentially recording the superimposition of Acadian metamorphism on Taconic, but it has not yet proved possible to demonstrate the presence of two metamorphic cycles. This study aims to test and employ the new and revised activity models recently developed for metapelites in the full system MnNCKFMASHTO (White et al, 2014), for use with the Holland & Powell data-set 6. Features that can now be more explicitly modelled include garnet zonation in relation to its inclusion suites and microstructural features, the occurrence, texture and distribution of Ti-bearing accessory minerals, and the assemblages and compositional trends in white micas. Preliminary modelling, correlated with microstructural observation, indicates (1) some confirmation of the concern expressed by White et al (2014) that the stability of margarite-bearing assemblages may be somewhat overestimated, (2) that apart from this, the early growth history of garnet is consistent with its suite of trapped inclusions

  13. The carpenter fork bed, a new - and older - Black-shale unit at the base of the New Albany shale in central Kentucky: Characterization and significance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, S.F.; Ettensohn, F.R.; Norby, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    Black shales previously interpreted to be Late Devonian cave-fill or slide deposits are shown to be much older Middle Devonian black shales only preserved locally in Middle Devonian grabens and structural lows in central Kentucky. This newly recognized - and older -black-shale unit occurs at the base of the New Albany Shale and is named the Carpenter Fork Bed of the Portwood Member of the New Albany Shale after its only known exposure on Carpenter Fork in Boyle County, central Kentucky; two other occurrences are known from core holes in east-central Kentucky. Based on stratigraphic position and conodont biostratigraphy, the unit is Middle Devonian (Givetian: probably Middle to Upper P. varcus Zone) in age and occurs at a position represented by an unconformity atop the Middle Devonian Boyle Dolostone and its equivalents elsewhere on the outcrop belt. Based on its presence as isolated clasts in the overlying Duffin Bed of the Portwood Member, the former distribution of the unit was probably much more widespread - perhaps occurring throughout western parts of the Rome trough. Carpenter Fork black shales apparently represent an episode of subsidence or sea-level rise coincident with inception of the third tectophase of the Acadian orogeny. Deposition, however, was soon interrupted by reactivation of several fault zones in central Kentucky, perhaps in response to bulge migration accompanying start of the tectophase. As a result, much of central Kentucky was uplifted and tilted, and the Carpenter Fork Bed was largely eroded from the top of the Boyle, except in a few structural lows like the Carpenter Fork graben where a nearly complete record of Middle to early Late Devonian deposition is preserved.

  14. 3D Seismic, Mechanical Stratigraphy, and Petrophysical Analysis of the Marcellus Shale in Taylor County, West Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weicht, Derek

    The Marcellus Shale is a Devonian age black shale formed during the Acadian Orogeny along the eastern margin of North America. The Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale is an unconventional shale-gas reservoir that has been a major target of seismic exploration and gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. This study focuses on analyses of seismic response, mechanical, and petrophysical properties of the Marcellus Shale and surrounding strata in Taylor County, West Virginia. Spectral blueing was performed on the post stack migration seismic volume to enhance the resolution. The resolution of the volume was increased from 61 feet to 47 feet, which improved the detail observed in the seismic response and provided additional insights in the interpretation of the Marcellus and bounding intervals. The isochore map created from the modified Marcellus picks shows greater variability in the thickness of the Marcellus, with an overall trend of thickening to the east. Within the thicker part of the Marcellus, a second negative reflection event appeared that was not obvious in the post stack migration. This event was interpreted to be part of the Lower Marcellus Shale. Lambda-rho and Mu-rho parameters were calculated using compressional and shear wave vibrations and density obtained from the well logs. When combined with the Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio, these cross-plots are indicative of favorable brittle and total organic carbon (TOC) rich zones that highlight potential drilling targets in the Marcellus. TOC was estimated using the Schmoker and Passey methods, and provide very similar estimates within the Marcellus Shale. Specifically note that the Middle and Lower Marcellus are generally the more TOC rich and productive Marcellus zones.

  15. Devonian-Carboniferous tectonics and basin deformation in the Cabot Strait Area, eastern Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, G.S.; Hall, J.

    1994-11-01

    The Magdalen Basin, in the Cabot Strait-Bay St. George area, was a major depocenter for Devonian-Carboniferous sediments in eastern Canada. Structure within the basin is complex and is characterized by northeast- and east-trending, mainly dextral strike-slip faults associated with the bend in the Appalachian orogenic belt known as the St. Lawrence Promontory. Under the Cabot Strait two linear grabens parallel the major fault trends and preserve up to 6 km of Devonian-Carboniferous sedimentary rocks, comprising mainly coarse-grained terrigenous clastics with a Lower Carboniferous transgressive episode recorded by marine carbonates, evaporites, and fine-grained clastics. Several unconformities within the sedimentary succession record deformation associated with movement along the regional strike-slip faults. Minor local unconformities are interpreted within the upper Horton (early Visean), upper Barachois (late Westphalian), and post-Pennsylvanian successions. A major unconformity cuts out most of the Namurian and Westphalian section in the study area and can be correlated on a regional scale. Kinematic strain partitioning along the master Cabot fault led to the development of doubly vergent compressional structures within a wrench borderland. This was complicated by transpressive deformation at a restraining bend in the master fault, and by deformation associated with over-stepped ends of splays of the regional fault system. The Magdalen Basin probably formed in an early phase of post-Acadian extension, and was later reactivated by regional strike-slip faults. The presence of thick source and reservoir rocks, as well as diverse trapping possibilities and a favorable burial and maturation history, indicate that the Cabot Strait area has good potential for accumulating and preserving petroleum.

  16. Strike-slip faulting at Thebes Gap, Missouri and Illinois: Implications for New Madrid tectonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Richard W.; Schultz, Art

    1994-04-01

    Numerous NNE and NE striking strike-slip faults and associated normal faults, folds, and transtensional grabens occur in the Thebes Gap area of Missouri and Illinois. These structures developed along the northwestern margin of the buried Reelfoot rift of Precambrian-Cambrian age at the northern edge of the Mississippi embayment. They have had a long-lived and complex structural history. This is an area of recent moderate seismicity, approximately 45 km north of the New Madrid seismic zone. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that these faults were active during the Middle Ordovician. They were subsequently reactivated between the Early Devonian and Late Cretaceous, probably in response to both the Acadian and Ouachita orogenies. Deformation during this period was characterized by strongly faulted and folded Ordovician through Devonian rocks. In places, these deformed rocks are overlain with angular unconformity by undeformed Cretaceous strata. Fault motion is interpreted as dominantly strike slip. A still younger period of reactivation involved Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic formations as young as the Miocene or Pliocene Mounds Gravel. These formations have experienced both minor high-angle normal faulting and subsequent major, right-lateral strike-slip faulting. En echelon north-south folds, ENE striking normal faults, regional fracture patterns, and drag folds indicate the right-lateral motion for this major episode of faulting which predates deposition of Quaternary loess. Several nondefinitive lines of evidence suggest Quaternary faulting. Similar fault orientations and kinematics, as well as recent seismicity and proximity, clearly suggest a structural relationship between deformation at Thebes Gap and tectonism associated with the New Madrid area.

  17. Formation of monazite via prograde metamorphic reactions among common silicates: implications for age determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Matthew J.; Malloy, Margaret A.

    2004-01-01

    Three lines of evidence from schists of the Great Smoky Mountains, NC, indicate that isogradic monazite growth occurred at the staurolite-in isograd at ˜600°C: (1) Monazite is virtually absent below the staurolite-in isograd, but is ubiquitous (several hundred grains per thin section) in staurolite- and kyanite-grade rocks. (2) Many monazite grains are spatially associated with biotite coronas around garnets, formed via the reaction Garnet + Chlorite + Muscovite = Biotite + Plagioclase + Staurolite + H 2O. (3) Garnets contain high-Y annuli that result from prograde dissolution of garnet via the staurolite-in reaction, followed by regrowth, and rare monazite inclusions occur immediately outside the annulus and in the matrix, but not in the garnet core. Larger monazite grains also exhibit quasi-continuous Th zoning with high Th cores and low Th rims, consistent with monazite growth via a single reaction and fractional crystallization during prograde growth. Common silicates may host sufficient P and LREEs that reactions among them can produce observable LREE phosphate. Specifically phosphorus contents of garnet and plagioclase are hundreds of parts per million, and dissolution of garnet and recrystallization of plagioclase could form thousands of phosphate grains several micrometers in diameter per thin section. LREEs may be more limiting, but sheet silicates and plagioclase can contain tens to ˜100 (?) ppm LREE, so recrystallization of these silicates to lower LREE contents could produce hundreds of grains of monazite per thin section. Monazite ages, determined via electron and ion microprobes, are ˜400 Ma, directly linking prograde Barrovian metamorphism of the Western Blue Ridge with the "Acadian" orogeny, in contrast to previous interpretations that metamorphism was "Taconian" (˜450 Ma). Interpretation of ages from metamorphic monazite grains will require prior chemical characterization and identification of relevant monazite-forming reactions, including

  18. A Reconsideration of Pan African Orogenic Cycle in the Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hefferan, K. P.; Soulaimani, A.; Samson, S. D.; Admou, H.; Inglis, J.; Saquaque, A.; Heywood, N. C.

    2013-12-01

    The term 'Pan African' orogeny was first proposed in 1964 for a tectonothermal event in Africa ~ 500+/- 50 Ma. Over the past 50 years, the Pan African orogeny has been extended to as much as ~1050-450 Ma and recognized in other Gondwanan continents where regional names such as Brasiliano (South America), Adelaidean (Australian) and Bearmore (Antarctica) have been applied. The Pan African time span of ~500 million years is much longer than any Phanerozoic orogeny. However, it does correlate with time ranges of well defined Phanerozoic orogenic cycles such as the Appalachian cycle, extending from ~1,100 to 250 Ma, and the Cordilleran cycle of ~350 Ma to the present. A significant difference of course is that the Appalachian orogenic cycle has long been recognized as consisting of separate Grenville, Taconic, Acadian and Alleghenian orogenies. Similarly, the Mesozoic-Cenozoic Cordilleran orogenic cycle consists of distinct Antler, Sonoma, Nevadan, Sevier, Laramide and ongoing Cascadian-Andean orogenies. Until recently, the absence of precise geochronology in West Africa has prevented a more refined analysis of individual orogenic events within the Pan-African orogenic cycle. Since 2000, precision geochronologic dating by various researchers in the Anti-Atlas Mountains, Morocco, has provided critical data by which it is now appropriate to designate a Pan African orogenic cycle consisting of three separate orogenic events. We herein propose the following distinct orogenic events in the Anti-Atlas Mountains of Morocco: Iriri-Tichibanine orogeny (750-700 Ma), Bou Azzer orogeny (660-640 Ma) and the WACadomian orogeny (620-580 Ma). Generalized tectonic map of the Anti-Atlas Mountain inliers (Adapted from Ennih and Liégeois, 2008). Geodynamic model of the Pan African orogenic cycle in the Anti-Atlas Mountains. Modified from Walsh et al. (2012) and incorporating ideas from Thomas et al. (2002) and El Hadi et al. (2012).

  19. Exploring the Wichita Mountain front - With new parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R.E. )

    1991-08-01

    Understanding the short south flank of the Anadarko basin has been limited by a lack of well control and extremely poor seismic data in this complex trend. This flank lies immediately south of the synclinal axis of the Anadarko basin and has been uplifted nearly 40,000 ft in a space of 5 to 10 mi. Variously called the Wichita Mountain front or the buried Wichita-Amarillo mountains, this trend separates-the deep Anadarko basin from the Hardeman or Palo Duro basin to the south. With tensional forces during the Acadian and Wichitan orogenies, then compressional movement in the Late Pennsylvanian (the Arbuckle orogeny), this 250-mi trend traverses more than half of southwestern Oklahoma. It extends from the Arbuckle Mountains westward into the Texas Panhandle and is noted for its early shallow oil and gas fields in its uppermost blocks. For the past 25 years deeper drilling, especially in Beckham County, Oklahoma, and Wheeler County, Texas, has found huge quantities of gas in the lower Paleozoic carbonates. These limestones and dolomites in the Hunton and Arbuckle are becoming attractive targets because of the recent activity at Cottonwood Creek, Susie Pi-Hoodle (Alden area), and the new Park Avenue well south of Cordell. In February 1991 an extensive 460-mi survey of 28 seismic lines was completed - shooting with the intent to image the intermediate fault blocks that bring those carbonates up from 40,000 ft of burial to the surface along the Wichita Mountain front. For the first time, detailed high-resolution data has been obtained in previously poor-to-questionable record areas. Including a series of dip lines from West Mayfield to Lawton that show the structural style and types of hydrocarbon traps that are attracting large exploration dollars, this talk till also discuss the new parameters needed to obtain high-quality data.

  20. The bedrock and structural geology of Tuckerman Ravine and Boott Spur in the Presidential Range, N. H

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.H.; Maconochie, J.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Detailed mapping has been done of the polydeformed, lower sillimanite grade, Silurian and Devonian metasedimentary rocks in the southeast part of the Presidential Range, N.H. These rocks are part of the cover sequence in the Central Maine Terrane of the northern Appalachians. Folding and associated metamorphism is thought to be related to the Acadian and Alleghanian( ) orogenics. The Silurian Rangeley Formation, the oldest unit, is a schist and quartzite which has been subdivided into two members based on the presence or absence of calc-silicate pods. In places it is highly migmitized due to the intrusion of the Glen Boulder granite in the southern section of the field area. The Silurian Smalls Falls Formation, a rusty schist, highly susceptible to weathering, overlies the Rangeley Formation. Overlying this is the Silurian Madrid Formation, a well layered calc-silicate granofels. On top of the sequence lies a thick section of schists and quartzites of varying thicknesses and relative abundances. This section has been sub-divided into ten members that collectively form the lower Devonian Littleton Formation. The area has undergone three phases of deformation. Field data and structural analysis indicate that an early macroscopic fold, F1, dominates the area and has an average trend of 325[degree] and plunge of 25[degree]. The axial surface, S1, strikes north and dips moderately west. This fold exposes inverted beds in the northwest limb and up-right beds in the southeast limb. Asymmetric, east vergent, F2 folds are abundant. These folds have an average trend of 112[degree] and plunge of 53[degree], with associated axial planar cleavage, S2, striking north and dipping moderately to the west. Pegmatite veins are folded by F2 indicating that they and similar igneous bodies likely predate F2 folding. Evidence for later stage F3 folding also exists.

  1. Sediment and weathering control on the distribution of Paleozoic magmatic tin-tungsten mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romer, Rolf L.; Kroner, Uwe

    2015-03-01

    The formation of major granite-hosted Sn and/or W deposits and lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT) type pegmatites in the Acadian, Variscan, and Alleghanian orogenic belts of Europe and Atlantic Northern America involves weathering-related Sn and W enrichment in the sedimentary debris of the Cadomian magmatic arc and melting of these sedimentary source rocks during later tectonic events, followed by magmatic Sn and W enrichment. We suggest that within this, more than 3,000-km long late Paleozoic belt, large Sn and/or W deposits are only found in regions where later redeposition of the Sn-W-enriched weathered sediments, followed by tectonic accumulation, created large volumes of Sn-W-enriched sedimentary rocks. Melting of these packages occurred both during the formation of Pangea, when continental collision subjected these source rocks to high-grade metamorphism and anatexis, and during post-orogenic crustal extension and mantle upwelling. The uncoupling of source enrichment and source melting explains (i) the diachronous occurrence of tin granites and LCT pegmatites in this late Paleozoic orogenic belt, (ii) the occurrence of Sn and/or W mineralizations and LCT pegmatites on both sides of the Rheic suture, and (iii) the contrasting tectonic setting of Sn and/or W mineralizations within this belt. Source enrichment, sedimentary and tectonic accumulation of the source rocks, and heat input to mobilize metals from the source rocks are three unrelated requirements for the formation of Sn and/or W granites. They are the controlling features on the large scale. Whether a particular granite eventually generates a Sn and/or W deposit depends on local conditions related to source melting, melt extraction, and fractionation processes.

  2. Identification of a Novel Gene on 10q22.1 Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa (adRP)

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lori S.; Bowne, Sara J.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Blanton, Susan H.; Wheaton, Dianna K.; Avery, Cheryl E.; Cadena, Elizabeth D.; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Fulton, Robert S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Weinstock, George M.; Lewis, Richard A.; Birch, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome linkage mapping identified a region on chromosome 10q21.3–q22.1 with a maximum LOD score of 3.0 at 0 % recombination in a six-generation family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). All known adRP genes and X-linked RP genes were excluded in the family by a combination of methods. Whole-exome next-generation sequencing revealed a missense mutation in hexokinase 1, HK1 c.2539G > A, p.Glu847Lys, tracking with disease in all affected family members. One severely-affected male is homozygous for this region by linkage analysis and has two copies of the mutation. No other potential mutations were detected in the linkage region nor were any candidates identified elsewhere in the genome. Subsequent testing detected the same mutation in four additional, unrelated adRP families, for a total of five mutations in 404 probands tested (1.2 %). Of the five families, three are from the Acadian population in Louisiana, one is French Canadian and one is Sicilian. Haplotype analysis of the affected chromosome in each family and the homozygous individual revealed a rare, shared haplotype of 450 kb, suggesting an ancient founder mutation. HK1 is a widely-expressed gene, with multiple, abundant retinal transcripts, coding for hexokinase 1. Hexokinase catalyzes phosphorylation of glucose to glusose-6-phospate, the first step in glycolysis. The Glu847Lys mutation is in a highly-conserved site, outside of the active site or known functional sites. PMID:26427411

  3. Bulge Migration and Pinnacle Reef Development, Devonian Appalachian Foreland Basin.

    PubMed

    Ver Straeten CA; Brett

    2000-05-01

    Detailed stratigraphic analyses of Late Emsian and Early Eifelian (Lower to Middle Devonian) carbonate-dominated strata in the northern Appalachian Basin indicate anomalous, locally varying relative sea level changes and inversions of topography. The distribution of a major basal-bounding unconformity, basinal pinnacle reefs, local absence of parasequences, and eastward migration of shallow marine carbonate lithofacies and related biofacies in the Onondaga Limestone and underlying strata mark the retrograde migration of an elongate, northeast-southwest-trending area of positive relief, bordered on its cratonward side by a similarly migrating basin of intermediate depth. These features are thought to represent the forebulge and back-bulge basin of the Appalachian foreland basin system as it developed during a time of relative quiescence within the Acadian Orogeny. However, the relatively small size of the bulgelike feature (ca. 80-100-km-wide, 20-50-m positive relief), its great distance from the probable deformation front (>400 km), and the lack of a well-developed foredeep immediately adjacent to the bulgelike feature may indicate that it represents a smaller-scale flexural high ("flexural welt") superposed over the cratonward edge of the larger-scale classical forebulge of the basin. Development of shallow-water reefs on the crest of the bulge during sea level lowstand, followed by migration of the bulge and widespread transgression, permitted growth of economically significant pinnacle reefs in the deep basin center. Further subsurface reef exploration should concentrate along the projected position of the bulge during the basal Onondaga lowstand.

  4. Supra-subduction zone extensional magmatism in Vermont and adjacent Quebec: Implications for early Paleozoic Appalachian tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, J.; Coish, R.; Evans, M.; Dick, G.

    2003-01-01

    Metadiabasic intrusions of the Mount Norris Intrusive Suite occur in fault-bounded lithotectonic packages containing Stowe, Moretown, and Cram Hill Formation lithologies in the northern Vermont Rowe-Hawley belt, a proposed Ordovician arc-trench gap above an east-dipping subduction zone. Rocks of the Mount Norris Intrusive Suite are characteristically massive and weakly foliated, have chilled margins, contain xenoliths, and have sharp contacts that both crosscut and are parallel to early structural fabrics in the host metasedimentary rocks. Although the mineral assemblage of the Mount Norris Intrusive Suite is albite + actinolite + epidote + chlorite + calcite + quartz, intergrowths of albite + actinolite are probably pseudomorphs after plagioclase + clinopyroxene. The metadiabases are subalkaline, tholeiitic, hypabyssal basalts with preserved ophitic texture. A backarc-basin tectonic setting for the intrusive suite is suggested by its LREE (light rare earth element) enrichment, negative Nb-Ta anomalies, and Ta/Yb vs. Th/Yb trends. Although no direct isotopic age data are available, the intrusions are broadly Ordovician because their contacts are clearly folded by the earliest Acadian (Silurian-Devonian) folds. Field evidence and geochemical data suggest compelling along-strike correlations with the Coburn Hill Volcanics of northern Vermont and the Bolton Igneous Group of southern Quebec. Isotopic and stratigraphic age constraints for the Bolton Igneous Group bracket these backarc magmas to the 477-458 Ma interval. A tectonic model that begins with east-dipping subduction and progresses to outboard west-dipping subduction after a syncollisional polarity reversal best explains the intrusion of deformed metamorphosed metasedimentary rocks by backarc magmas.

  5. Reevaluation of the Bedford--Berea sequence on Ohio and adjacent states: New perspectives on sedimentation and tectonics in foreland basins

    SciTech Connect

    Pashin, J.C. ); Ettensohn, F.R. )

    1992-01-01

    The Late Devonian Bedford-Berea (BB) sequence provided an early basis for models of epeiric sedimentation, but controversy regarding its origin has arisen in recent years. This study was designed to resolve this controversy and to identify factors that control depositional architecture in foreland basins on the basis of outcrop and subsurface data. The BB is a siliciclastic succession that was deposited in the Appalachian foreland basin during a relaxational phase of the Acadian orogeny. Among the salient features of the BB are an eastern platform and a western basin. The platform was characterized largely by erosion of Catskill sediment and subsequent deposition of aggradational valley-fill sequences, whereas the basin was characterized mainly by progradational delta and shelf deposits that overlie conformably the distalmost part of the Catskill clastic wedge. BB depositional history and paleogeography is divided into two episodes: (1) basin filling and (2) delta destruction. Basin filling was characterized by regressive fluvial-deltaic systems that eroded the Catskill wedge and supplied prograding deltaic and shelf sediment to the western basin. Delta destruction began after the basin was full with sediment and was dominated by flexural relaxation, which gave rise to unusual facies patterns. Delta-front deposits in the western basin were uplifted and reworked, and a shelf silt blanket prograded back toward the incised valleys on the rapidly subsiding eastern platform where estuaries were forming. Reevaluation of the BB sequence demonstrates that the depositional architecture and paleogeographic history of foreland basins is much more elaborate than is commonly recognized. Tectonism, relict topography, differential compaction, and relative sea-level variation functioned collectively to determine the complex depositional history and paleogeography of the BB sequence.

  6. Variations in deformation styles within the central Maine terrane: An example from the Presidential Range, NH

    SciTech Connect

    Eusden, J.D. Jr.; Garesche, J.; Johnson, A.; Maconochie, J.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Silurian and Devonian cover rocks of the Central Maine Terrane in the northern Appalachians are a complex, highly metamorphosed, stratigraphy that has been equally, if not more complexly, deformed. Correlations of regional deformation sequences (be they Acadian and/or Alleghanian) have been difficult, controversial, and elusive. This stems from the common observation that across-strike and strike-parallel variations in deformation sequences appear to be the norm rather than the exception in this belt. Enormous variations in structural style have been routinely observed in a detailed, five-year study of the well-exposed outcrops above treeline in the Presidential Range. Domains of different structural styles have been mapped in the northern, central and southern portions of the range. The northern domain, including Mts. Madison, Adams, and Jefferson, is composed of various members of the Devonian Littleton Formation. The map pattern is dominated by three macroscopic F1 synclines that face and are interpreted to verge northeasterly. The central domain, which includes Mt. Clay and much of Great Gulf, is interpreted to be a klippe of presumably Silurian gneisses probably correlative to the Rangeley, Smalls Falls, and Madrid Formations. A stratigraphic discontinuity, interpreted as the Greenough Spring thrust fault, separates this domain from the others and truncates the early fold structures of all domains. Within the Klippe there is evidence for an early phase of deformation but no folds related to it have been mapped. The map pattern is dominated by second phase folds that deform the early schistosity. The Greenough Spring thrust fault, and the second phase folds within it are refolded by a late phase of deformation which is characterized by a macroscopic, overturned synform.

  7. The Mars Hill Terrane: An enigmatic southern Appalachian terrane

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, L.A.; Johnson, P.A. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-03-01

    The Mars Hill Terrane (MHT) in the Appalachian Blue Ride Belt is bordered by complex, locally reactivated thrust and strike-slip faults. On the east, the MHT is bounded by the allochthonous, ensimatic Toe Terrane (TT) across the diachronous, ductile Holland Mountain-Soque River Fault System. The MHT is separated on the northwest from ensialic Laurentian basement (LB), by the Fries-Hayesville Fault System. On the south, the MHT is truncated by the Shope Fork Fault. The MHT is characterized by migmatitic biotite-pyroxene-hornblende gneiss, but contains 1--1.8 b.y. old quartz-feldspar gneisses, plus ultramafic rocks, calc-silicate rocks, mica schists and gneisses, and Neoproterozoic Bakersville gabbros. This rock assemblage contrasts with that of the adjoining terranes. The only correlative units between the MHT and adjoining terranes are Neoproterozoic gabbro, Ordovician-Devonian granitoid plutons, and ultramafic rocks. Gabbro links the MHT with LB rocks. Apparently similar calc-silicate rocks differ petrographically among terranes. During Taconic or Acadian events, both the TT and MHT reached amphibolite to granulite metamorphic grade, but the LB did not exceed greenschist grade. The data conflict. The O-D plutons, ultramafic rocks, and metamorphic histories suggest that the TT had docked with the MHT by Ordovician time. The premetamorphic character of the Holland Mtn.-Soque River Fault System supports that chronology. Neoproterozoic gabbros suggest a MHT-LB link by Cambrian time, but the LB experienced neither O-D plutonism nor Paleozoic amphibolite-granulite facies metamorphism.

  8. The Structural Control and Tectonic Evolution of the Campbellton Region, northern New Brunswick, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craggs, Simon D.

    The Campbellton region is transected by a network of ENE-trending dextral transcurrent faults and NNE-trending high-angle reverse faults. A fieldwork-based study was conducted to determine the region's kinematic response to Middle Paleozoic deformation in order to assess the potential for the occurrence of a structural hydrocarbon trap. Detailed study of five major faults (the Black Lake, Squaw Cap, Sugar Loaf, Sellarsville and Sellarsville East faults) and their associated damage zones indicate that during the Middle Paleozoic the region was part of a larger dextral transpressive system that extended north into the Gaspe Peninsula. The timing and style of fault development suggest that boundary conditions present during deformation restricted lateral extension of the region, which indicates that the Middle Silurian Salinic Orogeny had only a minor effect on rocks of the study area. The Sellarsville and Sellarsville East faults are thought to have moved first, during the Acadian Orogeny, as back thrusts within a NW-propagating foreland thrust belt. This was followed by dextral transcurrent movement along the ENE-trending faults and counter-clockwise rotation of the Sellarsville block. Damage-zone assessment suggests that, in general, all the faults acted as a partial barrier to flow during deformation. Many of the essential elements for hydrocarbon-trap development are in place within the study area. While sporadic distribution of reservoir rocks of the Upper Silurian West Point Formation limits our ability to locate hydrocarbon target sites, two areas have been identified where major lineaments interact with anticlinal hinges, and potential reservoir rocks are overlain by volcanic rocks of the Lower Devonian Val d'Amour Formation.

  9. Strike-slip faulting at Thebes Gap, Missouri and Illinois; implications for New Madrid tectonism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Richard W.; Schultz, Art

    1994-01-01

    Numerous NNE and NE striking strike-slip faults and associated normal faults, folds, and transtensional grabens occur in the Thebes Gap area of Missouri and Illinois. These structures developed along the northwestern margin of the buried Reelfoot rift of Precambrian-Cambrian age at the northern edge of the Mississippi embayment. They have had a long-lived and complex structural history. This is an area of recent moderate seismicity, approximately 45 km north of the New Madrid seismic zone. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that these faults were active during the Middle Ordovician. They were subsequently reactivated between the Early Devonian and Late Cretaceous, probably in response to both the Acadian and Ouachita orogenies. Deformation during this period was characterized by strongly faulted and folded Ordovician through Devonian rocks. In places, these deformed rocks are overlain with angular unconformity by undeformed Cretaceous strata. Fault motion is interpreted as dominantly strike slip. A still younger period of reactivation involved Late Cretaceous and Cenozoic formations as young as the Miocene or Pliocene Mounds Gravel. These formations have experienced both minor high-angle normal faulting and subsequent major, right-lateral strike-slip faulting. En echelon north-south folds, ENE striking normal faults, regional fracture patterns, and drag folds indicate the right-lateral motion for this major episode of faulting which predates deposition of Quaternary loess. Several nondefinitive lines of evidence suggest Quaternary faulting. Similar fault orientations and kinematics, as well as recent seismicity and proximity, clearly suggest a structural relationship between deformation at Thebes Gap and tectonism associated with the New Madrid area.

  10. Structural and Hydrologic Implications of Joint Orientations in the Warner Creek and Stony Clove Drainage Basins, Catskill Mountains, Eastern New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haskins, M. N.; Vollmer, F. W.; Rayburn, J. A.; Gurdak, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    To investigate joint control on hydrology as well as tectonic implications, we conducted a study of joint orientations near the Stony Clove and Warner Creek drainages of the Catskill Mountains, Eastern New York. Specific goals of this research were to determine joint control on stream orientations and groundwater flow, to compare results with previous studies in the area, and to investigate their tectonic significance. Trails, streams, and road cuts were traversed to locate bedrock outcrops whose positions were determined using topographic maps and a handheld GPS unit. Additional outcrops were located using aerial photographs and GIS data. Joint orientations were measured using a standard Brunton pocket transit. The data was analyzed using Orient (Vollmer, 2010), an orientation analysis program, to plot joint and stream orientations on rose diagrams. ArcGIS was used to produce topographic, hill-shade, and stream drainage maps. Over 500 joint orientations at over 100 outcrop stations were collected. The data were plotted on a rose diagrams, and two major joint sets were found, one with a mean strike of 021° and one with a mean strike of 096°. Stream orientations were also plotted on a rose diagram showing an axial mean of 022°, and indicate that the joint set with mean strike of 021 may have a significant control on stream orientations. The hill-shade maps also demonstrate clearly the strong control of jointing on the topography. The data collected in this research expands on previous joint orientation studies of Engelder and Geiser (1980) in the southwestern and central Catskills, and is similar to joint orientations found by Isachsen et al. (1977) in their study of the Panther Mountain circular structure, a possible impact-related feature. The origin of this jointing is thought to be related to Alleghanian (Permian) and possibly Acadian (Devonian) orogenic events.

  11. Influence of deformation on Ar retention in white mica: Devonian reactivation of the Silurian Dover fault, Newfoundland Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellett, D.; Warren, C. J.; Larson, K.; Rogers, N.; Van Staal, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Radiogenic 40Ar stored in white mica may be disturbed or reset by a variety of processes including deformation, recrystallization and diffusion. Ductile shear zone mylonites are ideal for examining the effects of deformation and dynamic re-/neo-crystallization on white mica at temperatures for which thermal diffusion of Ar is inefficient. Here we investigate Ar behaviour in white mica from Late Silurian syn-tectonic granitoids emplaced into the trailing edge of the Ganderian microcontinent, Newfoundland Appalachians. Subsequent regional metamorphism and development of the broad Wing Pond shear zone are interpreted to record Acadian orogenesis, resulting from the docking of Avalonia to Ganderia (composite Laurentian margin) by sinistral-oblique transpressional collision. The suture was later reactivated as a lower temperature, narrow dextral-sense shear zone. The window for sinistral and dextral slip is constrained by emplacement of the syn-tectonic granitoids and a post-tectonic pluton that stitches the Dover fault at 377±4 Ma. In this study we combine in situ 40Ar/39Ar analyses with deformation temperatures from quartz c-axis fabrics to investigate the influence of deformation on Ar retention in white mica for differing structural positions. Zircon U-Pb ages indicate granitoid emplacement ca. 430-425 Ma. Monazite U-Pb ages that span ca. 429 - 403 Ma are interpreted to record recrystallization during high temperature metamorphism and deformation. High spatial-resolution in situ 40Ar/39Ar laser analyses of white mica range from ca. 403 Ma to 390-375 Ma (depending on sample) such that ages reflect the structural field relationships. Relatively low deformation temperatures, single-grain age transects inconsistent with Dodsonian diffusion, and localization of older and younger age domains at thin section scale argue for deformation-induced loss of 40Ar. These data demonstrate the potential of spatially-controlled 40Ar/39Ar age data in elucidating thermal and

  12. Age and zircon inheritance of eastern Blue Ridge plutons, southwestern North Carolina and northeastern Georgia, with implications for magma history and evolution of the southern Appalachian origin

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, C.F.; Hatcher, R.D. Jr.; Ayers, J.C.; Coath, C.D.; Harrison, T.M.

    2000-02-01

    High-resolution ion microprobe analysis of zircon has provided ages for previously undated plutons of the high-grade eastern Blue Ridge of northeastern Georgia and southwestern North Carolina. These data, together with backscattered electron imaging, reveal the presence of nearly ubiquitous inherited cores of highly variable age and magmatic rims that have experienced variable Pb loss, thus making interpretation of conventional U-Pb analyses very difficult. Ion probe rim analyses indicate that the plutons were emplaced during both the mod-Ordovician and mid-Devonian. Zircons from all intrusions have predominantly 1.0 to 1.25 Ga cores (Grenvillian). In addition, both Devonian and Ordovician plutons have smaller populations of Late Proterozoic-early Paleozoic (0.5--0.75 Ga), Middle Proterozoic (1.4 Ga), and Late Archean (2.6--2.9 Ga) cores. The ubiquitous, round cores and thick magmatic rims suggest significant resorption and then protracted growth within the melts. Zircon saturation temperatures based on whole-rock ({approximately}melt) Zr concentrations are lower than expected for magma generation (710--760 C). Zirconium concentrations may not reflect saturation at maximum temperature, if melting was very rapid (<{approximately}10{sup 5} yrs), or if zircon cores represent grains that were shielded from melt inside host grains for much of the magmatic history. Ages of magmatic and inherited zones of zircon from the plutons demonstrate that similar crust underlay the eastern Blue Ridge during both Taconian and Acadian orogenies, that there was no single episode of voluminous magmatism, and that metamorphism and deformation began before 470 Ma and continued after 370 Ma. These plutons do not constitute a significant convergence-related arc, though it is possible that they represent a displaced part of an arc that lies primarily to the east (in the Inner Piedmont?).

  13. Paleostress and deformation patterns in a collisional orogeny: Examples from the West Carpathians and the Appalachians

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischmann, K.H.; Keith, J.F. Jr. ); Nemcok, M. )

    1991-03-01

    Results from field analyses of two convergent orogens show the importance of stress analysis techniques in identifying the subtleties of convergent deformation not recorded by the larger scale aspects of regional geology. The northeastern part of the Slovakian West Carpathians is composed of Tertiary and Mesozoic sediments and Tertiary volcanics. Field analysis of brittle faults indicates that initial thrusting and subsequent back-thrusting were orogen-perpendicular through early Badenian time. Subsequent thrusting was accompanied by second-order strike-slip faults, indicating local exchanges of {sigma}{sub 3} and {sigma}{sub 2}. Strike-slip faulting clearly was dominant in the outer flysch until late Sarmatian time, with {sigma}{sub 1} and {sigma}{sub 3} oriented NE and NW, respectively. In the northern portion of the Champlain Valley, N80W-directed Taconic thrusting produced calcite-mineralized bedding-plane slip surfaces in the sedimentary rocks. Older mineralized faults were reactivated in basement rocks, first as calcite-mineralized high-angle reverse faults and subsequently as oblique slip faults. Stress analysis of fault-slip data suggested that the Taconic stress field was dominated by an N80W horizontal {sigma}{sub 1}, with the vertical stress changing from {sigma}{sub 3} (Taconian) to {sigma}{sub 2} (Taconian-Acadian ). For both the West Carpathians and the Appalachians, these analyses showed the change from a classic thrust-dominated stress regime to a strike-slip-dominated stress regime. In neither case is this change recorded by other elements of the regional geology.

  14. High-Resolution Mapping of Crossover and Non-crossover Recombination Events by Whole-Genome Re-sequencing of an Avian Pedigree.

    PubMed

    Smeds, Linnéa; Mugal, Carina F; Qvarnström, Anna; Ellegren, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Recombination is an engine of genetic diversity and therefore constitutes a key process in evolutionary biology and genetics. While the outcome of crossover recombination can readily be detected as shuffled alleles by following the inheritance of markers in pedigreed families, the more precise location of both crossover and non-crossover recombination events has been difficult to pinpoint. As a consequence, we lack a detailed portrait of the recombination landscape for most organisms and knowledge on how this landscape impacts on sequence evolution at a local scale. To localize recombination events with high resolution in an avian system, we performed whole-genome re-sequencing at high coverage of a complete three-generation collared flycatcher pedigree. We identified 325 crossovers at a median resolution of 1.4 kb, with 86% of the events localized to <10 kb intervals. Observed crossover rates were in excellent agreement with data from linkage mapping, were 52% higher in male (3.56 cM/Mb) than in female meiosis (2.28 cM/Mb), and increased towards chromosome ends in male but not female meiosis. Crossover events were non-randomly distributed in the genome with several distinct hot-spots and a concentration to genic regions, with the highest density in promoters and CpG islands. We further identified 267 non-crossovers, whose location was significantly associated with crossover locations. We detected a significant transmission bias (0.18) in favour of 'strong' (G, C) over 'weak' (A, T) alleles at non-crossover events, providing direct evidence for the process of GC-biased gene conversion in an avian system. The approach taken in this study should be applicable to any species and would thereby help to provide a more comprehensive portray of the recombination landscape across organism groups.

  15. Heritability and genetic correlation between the sexes in a songbird sexual ornament

    PubMed Central

    Potti, J; Canal, D

    2011-01-01

    The genetic correlation between the sexes in the expression of secondary sex traits in wild vertebrate populations has attracted very few previous empirical efforts of field researchers. In southern European populations of pied flycatchers, a sexually selected male ornament is also expressed by a proportion of females. Additive genetic variances in ornament size and expression, transmission mechanisms (autosomal vs Z-linkage) and maternal effects are examined by looking at patterns of familial resemblance across three generations. Size of the secondary sex trait has a genetic basis common to both sexes, with estimated heritability being 0.5 under an autosomal model of inheritance. Significant additive genetic variance in males was also confirmed through a cross-fostering experiment. Heritability analyses were only partially consistent with previous molecular genetics evidence, as only two out of the three predictions supported Z-linkage and lack of significant mother–daughter resemblance could be due to small sample sizes caused by limited female trait expression. Therefore, the evidence was mixed as to the contribution of the Z chromosome and autosomal genes to trait size. The threshold heritability of trait expression in females was lower, around 0.3, supporting autosomal-based trait expression in females. Environmental (birth date) and parental effects on ornament size mediated by the mother's condition after accounting for maternal and paternal genetic influences are also highlighted. The genetic correlation between the sexes did not differ from one, indicating that selection on the character on either sex entails a correlated response in the opposite sex. PMID:21081966

  16. Negative impacts of a vertebrate predator on insect pollinator visitation and seed output in Chuquiraga oppositifolia, a high Andean shrub.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Alejandro A; Arroyo, Mary T K

    2004-01-01

    Studies on plant-pollinator interactions have largely neglected the potential negative effects of the predators of pollinators on seed output, even though anti-predatory behaviour of pollinators may affect visitation patterns, pollen transfer, and therefore potentially, plant reproductive output. We tested the hypothesis that the presence of lizards and insectivorous birds, by reducing pollinator visitation, can have significant negative effects on seed output in the insect-pollinated, genetically self-incompatible lower alpine Andean shrub, Chuquiraga oppositifolia (Asteraceae). The lower alpine belt supports a high density of territorial Liolaemus (Tropiduridae) lizards and low shrubs interspersed among rocks of varying sizes, the latter inhabited by lizards and commonly used by flycatchers Muscisaxicola (Tyrannidae) as perching sites. In a 2x2 factorial predator-exclusion experiment, visitation rates of the most frequent pollinators of C. oppositifolia (the satyrid butterfly Cosmosatyrus chilensis and the syrphid fly Scaeva melanostoma), the duration of pollinator visits, and seed output, were 2-4 times greater when lizards were excluded, while birds had no effect. In a natural experiment, visits by S. melanostoma were 9 times shorter, and pollinator visitation rates of C. chilensis and S. melanostoma, and C. oppositifolia seed output were 2-3 times lower on shrubs growing adjacent to lizard-occupied rocks compared to those growing distant from rocks. Our results, verified for additional Andean sites, suggest that lizard predators can alter the behaviour of pollinators and elicit strong top-down indirect negative effects on seed output. Such effects may be especially important in high alpine plant communities, where pollinator activity can be low and erratic, and pollen limitation has been reported.

  17. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita Uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to the Dry Flats disposal site, 6 road miles (mi) [ 1 0 kilometers (km)] to the southeast. At the disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal site would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action activities would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial action would result in the loss of approximately 164 ac (66 ha) of soils, but 132 ac (53 ha) of these soils are contaminated and cannot be used for other purposes. Another 154 ac (62 ha) of soils would be temporarily disturbed. Approximately 57 ac (23 ha) of open range land would be permanently removed from livestock grazing and wildlife use. The removal of the contaminated materials would affect the 1 00-year floodplain of the San Miguel River and would result in the loss of riparian habitat along the river. The southwestern willow flycatcher, a Federal candidate species, may be affected by the remedial action, and the use of water from the San Miguel River ``may affect`` the Colorado squawfish, humpback chub, bonytail chub, and razorback sucker. Traffic levels on State Highways 90 and 141 would be increased during the remedial action, as would the noise levels along these transportation routes. Measures for mitigating the adverse environmental impacts of the proposed remedial action are discussed in Section 6.0 of this environmental assessment (EA).

  18. Tamarix as habitat for birds: Implications for riparian restoration in the Southwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sogge, M.K.; Sferra, S.J.; Paxton, E.H.

    2008-01-01

    Exotic vegetation has become a major habitat component in many ecosystems around the world, sometimes dramatically changing the vegetation community structure and composition. In the southwestern United States, riparian ecosystems are undergoing major changes in part due to the establishment and spread of the exotic Tamarix (saltcedar, tamarisk). There are concerns about the suitability of Tamarix as habitat for birds. Although Tamarix habitats tend to support fewer species and individuals than native habitats, Arizona Breeding Bird Atlas data and Birds of North America accounts show that 49 species use Tamarix as breeding habitat. Importantly, the relative use of Tamarix and its quality as habitat vary substantially by geographic location and bird species. Few studies have examined how breeding in Tamarix actually affects bird survivorship and productivity; recent research on Southwestern Willow Flycatchers has found no negative effects from breeding in Tamarix habitats. Therefore, the ecological benefits and costs of Tamarix control are difficult to predict and are likely to be species specific and site specific. Given the likelihood that high-quality native riparian vegetation will not develop at all Tamarix control sites, restoration projects that remove Tamarix but do not assure replacement by high-quality native habitat have the potential to reduce the net riparian habitat value for some local or regional bird populations. Therefore, an assessment of potential negative impacts is important in deciding if exotic control should be conducted. In addition, measurable project objectives, appropriate control and restoration techniques, and robust monitoring are all critical to effective restoration planning and execution. ?? 2008 Society for Ecological Restoration International.

  19. Effects of spring temperatures on the strength of selection on timing of reproduction in a long-distance migratory bird.

    PubMed

    Visser, Marcel E; Gienapp, Phillip; Husby, Arild; Morrisey, Michael; de la Hera, Iván; Pulido, Francisco; Both, Christiaan

    2015-04-01

    Climate change has differentially affected the timing of seasonal events for interacting trophic levels, and this has often led to increased selection on seasonal timing. Yet, the environmental variables driving this selection have rarely been identified, limiting our ability to predict future ecological impacts of climate change. Using a dataset spanning 31 years from a natural population of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), we show that directional selection on timing of reproduction intensified in the first two decades (1980-2000) but weakened during the last decade (2001-2010). Against expectation, this pattern could not be explained by the temporal variation in the phenological mismatch with food abundance. We therefore explored an alternative hypothesis that selection on timing was affected by conditions individuals experience when arriving in spring at the breeding grounds: arriving early in cold conditions may reduce survival. First, we show that in female recruits, spring arrival date in the first breeding year correlates positively with hatch date; hence, early-hatched individuals experience colder conditions at arrival than late-hatched individuals. Second, we show that when temperatures at arrival in the recruitment year were high, early-hatched young had a higher recruitment probability than when temperatures were low. We interpret this as a potential cost of arriving early in colder years, and climate warming may have reduced this cost. We thus show that higher temperatures in the arrival year of recruits were associated with stronger selection for early reproduction in the years these birds were born. As arrival temperatures in the beginning of the study increased, but recently declined again, directional selection on timing of reproduction showed a nonlinear change. We demonstrate that environmental conditions with a lag of up to two years can alter selection on phenological traits in natural populations, something that has important

  20. Limb muscles are androgen targets in an acrobatic tropical bird.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ni Y; Katz, Amnon; Day, Lainy B; Barske, Julia; Schlinger, Barney A

    2010-03-01

    Spectacular athleticism is a conspicuous feature of many animal courtship displays yet surprisingly little is known about androgen dependence of skeletal muscles underlying these displays. Testosterone (T) acts through androgen receptors (ARs) to stimulate muscular male Golden-collared manakins of Panama to perform a remarkably athletic courtship display that includes loud wingsnaps generated by the rapid and forceful lifting of the wings. We tested the hypothesis that androgen sensitivity, reflected in the expression levels of AR mRNA, is a muscular adaptation supporting these courtship displays. Quantitative PCR showed substantially greater AR mRNA expression in all limb muscles of wild male and female manakins compared with two other avian species that do not perform athletic displays, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers. AR expression levels in the massive skeletal muscles were comparable with the minute oscine syringeal muscle but greater than levels in nonmuscular androgen targets that did not differ across species. Compared with zebra finches, male manakins also had greater activity of the T-activating enzyme 5 alpha-reductase in a wing-lifting muscle. In addition, low levels of estrogen receptor alpha (ER) mRNA were detected in all muscles of control, T-treated, and estradiol-treated manakins. Treatment of manakins with T, but not estradiol, significantly increased skeletal muscle ER expression, suggesting that ER expression is AR-dependent. These results confirm manakin limb muscles as important androgen targets where T may act to promote the speed, force, and/or endurance required for the manakin display. Androgen-sensitive muscular phenotypes may adapt males of many species to perform impressive athletic displays.

  1. Documentation of the Ecological Risk Assessment Computer Model ECORSK.5

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony F. Gallegos; Gilbert J. Gonzales

    1999-06-01

    The FORTRAN77 ecological risk computer model--ECORSK.5--has been used to estimate the potential toxicity of surficial deposits of radioactive and non-radioactive contaminants to several threatened and endangered (T and E) species at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These analyses to date include preliminary toxicity estimates for the Mexican spotted owl, the American peregrine falcon, the bald eagle, and the southwestern willow flycatcher. This work has been performed as required for the Record of Decision for the construction of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility at LANL as part of the Environmental Impact Statement. The model is dependent on the use of the geographic information system and associated software--ARC/INFO--and has been used in conjunction with LANL's Facility for Information Management and Display (FIMAD) contaminant database. The integration of FIMAD data and ARC/INFO using ECORSK.5 allows the generation of spatial information from a gridded area of potential exposure called an Ecological Exposure Unit. ECORSK.5 was used to simulate exposures using a modified Environmental Protection Agency Quotient Method. The model can handle a large number of contaminants within the home range of T and E species. This integration results in the production of hazard indices which, when compared to risk evaluation criteria, estimate the potential for impact from consumption of contaminants in food and ingestion of soil. The assessment is considered a Tier-2 type of analysis. This report summarizes and documents the ECORSK.5 code, the mathematical models used in the development of ECORSK.5, and the input and other requirements for its operation. Other auxiliary FORTRAN 77 codes used for processing and graphing output from ECORSK.5 are also discussed. The reader may refer to reports cited in the introduction to obtain greater detail on past applications of ECORSK.5 and assumptions used in deriving model parameters.

  2. Context dependence of maternal effects: testing assumptions of optimal egg size, differential, and sex allocation models.

    PubMed

    Krist, Miloš; Munclinger, Pavel

    2015-10-01

    If offspring develop in adverse conditions, the maternal component of their phenotypic variation might increase due to the stronger dependence of offspring traits on parental investment. This should result in increased parental investment to individual offspring, as assumed by the model of optimal egg size. The opposite pattern, i.e., stronger dependence of offspring fitness on parental investment and consequently larger parental investment under good conditions is assumed by both the theory of differential allocation if attractive males provide material benefits, and reproductive compensation if they invest less into paternal care. Another influential idea is the Trivers-Willard model, which assumes sex-specific dependence of offspring fitness on parental investment. Here we tested these ideas by examining the effects of egg size on offspring fitness across many postnatal contexts in the Collared Flycatcher Ficedula albicollis. We employed a cross-fostering design that generated variation in egg size within nests and used brood means of fledgling mass as a functional measure of the quality of rearing conditions. Effects of egg size on three offspring traits, including lifetime reproductive success of recruits, were more pronounced in low-quality broods. These results support the assumption of the model of optimal egg size. Based on female preference for males providing material benefits, this pattern could support differential allocation, if attractive males invest less in paternal care, or reproductive compensation, if they invest more. By comparison, we did not find any evidence for sex specificity of fitness returns that might explain sex monomorphism of egg size in this species. The challenge for future studies will be the integration of components of parental investment and offspring fitness into their global measures and testing how the former affects the latter across gradients of postnatal conditions.

  3. Effects of Protective Fencing on Birds, Lizards, and Black-Tailed Hares in the Western Mojave Desert.

    PubMed

    BROOKS

    1999-04-01

    / Effects of protective fencing on birds, lizards, black-tailed hares (Lepus californicus), perennial plant cover, and structural diversity of perennial plants were evaluated from spring 1994 through winter 1995 at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area (DTNA), in the Mojave Desert, California. Abundance and species richness of birds were higher inside than outside the DTNA, and effects were larger during breeding than wintering seasons and during a high than a low rainfall year. Ash-throated flycatchers (Myiarchus cinerascens), cactus wrens (Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus), LeConte's thrashers (Toxostoma lecontei), loggerhead shrikes (Lanius ludovicianus), sage sparrows (Amphispiza belli), and verdins (Auriparus flaviceps) were more abundant inside than outside the DTNA. Nesting activity was also more frequent inside. Total abundance and species richness of lizards and individual abundances of western whiptail lizards (Cnemidophorous tigris) and desert spiny lizards (Sceloporus magister) were higher inside than outside. In contrast, abundance of black-tailed hares was lower inside. Structural diversity of the perennial plant community did not differ due to protection, but cover was 50% higher in protected areas. Black-tailed hares generally prefer areas of low perennial plant cover, which may explain why they were more abundant outside than inside the DTNA. Habitat structure may not affect bird and lizard communities as much as availability of food at this desert site, and the greater abundance and species richness of vertebrates inside than outside the DTNA may correlate with abundances of seeds and invertebrate prey. KEY WORDS: Birds; Fenced protection; Lepus californicus, Lizards; Mojave Desert; Off-highway vehicles; Protected area management; Sheep grazing

  4. A Water Budget for Riparian Vegetation on the Lower Colorado River: the Myth of Water Salvage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, P. L.; Glenn, E. P.; Webb, R. H.; Howard, K. A.

    2007-05-01

    For many years, river managers have envisaged large saving of water by clearing the exotic plant, saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima) from western U.S. rivers. Early estimates of evapotranspiration (ET) by saltcedar ranged as high as 3-4 m/yr, and it was estimated that saltcedar on the Lower Colorado River used more water than Los Angeles. Furthermore, saltcedar was considered to have low habitat value, so clearing projects might enhance habitat value by allowing the return of more valuable native species. We have examined these assumptions based on recent evidence. Moisture flux towers set in dense saltcedar stands show that ET is moderate, ranging from 0.8-1.4 m/yr with a mean value of 1 m/yr over five studies on three rivers, similar to wide-area estimates from remote sensing studies. Projected over the 18,200 ha of dense saltcedar monocultures estimated for the Lower Colorado River riparian corridor in the U.S., the potential water saving would only be about 1 percent of the annual flow (assuming no replacement vegetation). A similar acreage of saltcedar monoculture exists in the Colorado River delta in Mexico, but these stands are supported by outflow of brackish water from the irrigation district rather than river water. The assumption of low habitat value is not supported by recent studies. For example, Hinojosa- Huerta (2006) found that saltcedar monocultures away from the river channel supported 65 percent as many bird numbers and 74 percent as many bird species as the best habitat type, mixed saltcedar and native trees in proximity to water, in the delta of the Colorado River in Mexico, and saltcedar provided equal habitat value as native trees for endangered willow flycatchers on Arizona and New Mexico rivers (Owen et al., 2005). Hence, the prospects for saving water without destroying habitat by clearing saltcedar are doubtful for this river system.

  5. Distinguishing the effects of selection from demographic history in the genetic variation of two sister passerines based on mitochondrial–nuclear comparison

    PubMed Central

    Hung, C-M; Zink, R M

    2014-01-01

    Determining the mechanisms responsible for the distribution of genetic diversity in natural populations has occupied a central role in molecular evolution. Our study was motivated by the unprecedented observation that a widespread Eurasian flycatcher, Ficedula albicilla, exhibited no variation at the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) ND2 gene in 75 individuals sampled over a 5000-km distance. In contrast, its sister species, F. parva, had low but considerably higher levels of mtDNA variation. We assessed whether natural selection or demographic factors could explain the absence of mtDNA variation in F. albicilla. Eighteen nuclear genes were sequenced to estimate the two species' phylogeographic histories, and for comparison to the mtDNA data. Multilocus coalescence analyses suggested that F. albicilla experienced a population expansion perhaps following a population bottleneck. Simulations based on this demographic history, however, did not replicate the extremely low level of mtDNA variation. Historical range changes based on ecological niche models also failed to explain the observed mtDNA patterns. Neutrality tests (DHEW and ML-HKA) suggested a non-neutral pattern in the mtDNA of F. albicilla. We found a transmembrane-skewed distribution of nonsynonymous substitutions between the two species, three of which caused functional change; the results implied that positive selection could have targeted mtDNA. Several lines of evidence support selection rather than demographic history as the main force influencing the patterns of mtDNA variation. Despite the influence of natural selection, many of the phylogeographic inferences derived from mtDNA were robust, including species limits and a high level of gene flow among populations within species. PMID:24619180

  6. Longevity records and survival estimate of birds in a Guatemala rain forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, C.S.; Dowell, B.; Hines, J.

    2002-01-01

    Birds were mist-netted for ten consecutive 'winter' seasons at two sites on Cerro San Gil and for three to nine seasons at eight other sites on the mountain. Sixteen nets were used at each site for three days; net locations were the same each year. From 1,255 subsequent-year recaptures we computed annual survival using the program MARK. A low annual survival of 0.26+0.03 for Long-tailed Hermit probably reflects extensive wandering in search of food. The only other residents with low survival rates were Ochre-bellied Flycatcher (0.32) and Olive-backed Euphonia (0.38). Other residents tested ranged from 0.49 for Red-capped Manakin to 0.67 for Stub-tailed Spadebill and are within ranges reported from other tropical sites. Rates for migrants were lower, ranging from 0.33 (Worm-eating Warbler) to 0.45 (Kentucky Warbler). Limiting the analysis to known territorial adults (birds that had already returned from a previous year), raised survival rates for residents an average of 0.05, whereas rates for wintering migratory species remained unchanged. The oldest birds recaptured were all residents: Scalythroated Leaftosser (9 years 9 months), Tawny-winged and Wedge-billed Woodcreepers, Northern Bentbill, Tawny-crowned Greenlet, and White-breasted Woodwren (8 years 9 months each). Ages over three years nine months were recorded for 46 species; for the majority of these, new maximum age records were established. A positive relationship was found between survival rate and maximum age and between sample size and maximum age

  7. Inventory of montane-nesting birds in Katmai and Lake Clark national parks and preserves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruthrauff, Daniel R.; Tibbitts, Lee; Gill, Robert E.; Handel, Colleen M.

    2007-01-01

    As part of the National Park Service’s Inventory and Monitoring Program, biologists from the U. S. Geological Survey’s Alaska Science Center conducted an inventory of birds in montane regions of Katmai and Lake Clark National Parks and Preserves during 2004–2006. We used a stratified random survey design to allocate samples by ecological subsection. To survey for birds, we conducted counts at 468 points across 29, 10-km x 10-km (6.2-mi x 6.2-mi) sample plots in Katmai and 417 points across 25, 10-km x 10-km sample plots in Lake Clark. We detected 92 and 104 species in Katmai and Lake Clark, respectively, including 40 species of conservation concern. We detected three species not previously recorded in Katmai (Ring-necked Duck [Aythya collaris], Lesser Scaup [Aythya affinis], and White-tailed Ptarmigan [Lagopus leucurus]) and two species not previously recorded in Lake Clark (Northern Flicker [Colaptes auratus ] and Olive-sided Flycatcher [Contopus cooperi]). The most commonly detected species in both parks was Golden-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia atricapilla); Fox Sparrow (Passerella iliaca) and American Pipit (Anthus rubescens) were abundant and widely-distributed as well. We defined sites as low (100–350 m), middle (351–600 m), or high (601–1,620 m) elevation based on the distribution of vegetation cover, and similarly categorized the 34 most-commonly detected species based on the mean elevation of sample points at which they were detected. High elevation (i.e., alpine) sites were characterized by high percent cover of dwarf shrub and bare ground habitat and supported species like Rock Ptarmigan (L. mutus), American Golden-Plover (Pluvialis dominica), Wandering Tattler (Tringa incana), Surfbird (Aphriza virgata), and Snow Bunting (Plectrophenax nivalis), all species of conservation concern. This inventory represents the first systematic survey of birds nesting in montane regions of both parks. Results from this inventory can form the foundation of

  8. Heterospecific attraction and food resources in migrants' breeding patch selection in northern boreal forest.

    PubMed

    Forsman, Jukka T; Mönkkönen, Mikko; Helle, Pekka; Inkeröinen, Jouko

    1998-06-01

    We studied experimentally how heterospecific attraction may affect habitat selection of migrant passerine birds in Finnish Lapland. We manipulated the densities of resident tit species (Parus spp.). In four study plots residents were removed before the arrival of the migrants in the first study year, and in four other plots their densities were increased by releasing caught individuals. In the second year the treatments of the areas were reversed, allowing paired comparisons within each plot. We also investigated the relative abundance of arthropods in the study plots by the sweep-net method. This allowed us to estimate the effect of food resources on the abundance of birds. The heterospecific attraction hypothesis predicts that densities of migrant species (especially habitat generalists) would be higher during increased resident density. Results supported this prediction. Densities and number of the most abundant migrant species were significantly higher when resident density was increased than when they were removed. On the species level the redwing (Turdus iliacus) showed the strongest positive response to the increased abundance of tits. Migrant bird abundances seemed not to vary in parallel with relative arthropod abundance, with the exception of the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) which showed a strongly positive correlation with many arthropod groups. The results of the experiment indicate that migrants can use resident tit species as a cue to a profitable breeding patch. The relationship between the abundance of the birds and arthropods suggests that annual changes in food resources during the breeding season probably do not have a very important effect on bird populations in these areas. The results stress the importance of positive interspecific interactions in structuring northern breeding bird communities.

  9. Effects of Spring Temperatures on the Strength of Selection on Timing of Reproduction in a Long-Distance Migratory Bird

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Marcel E.; Gienapp, Phillip; Husby, Arild; Morrisey, Michael; de la Hera, Iván; Pulido, Francisco; Both, Christiaan

    2015-01-01

    Climate change has differentially affected the timing of seasonal events for interacting trophic levels, and this has often led to increased selection on seasonal timing. Yet, the environmental variables driving this selection have rarely been identified, limiting our ability to predict future ecological impacts of climate change. Using a dataset spanning 31 years from a natural population of pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca), we show that directional selection on timing of reproduction intensified in the first two decades (1980–2000) but weakened during the last decade (2001–2010). Against expectation, this pattern could not be explained by the temporal variation in the phenological mismatch with food abundance. We therefore explored an alternative hypothesis that selection on timing was affected by conditions individuals experience when arriving in spring at the breeding grounds: arriving early in cold conditions may reduce survival. First, we show that in female recruits, spring arrival date in the first breeding year correlates positively with hatch date; hence, early-hatched individuals experience colder conditions at arrival than late-hatched individuals. Second, we show that when temperatures at arrival in the recruitment year were high, early-hatched young had a higher recruitment probability than when temperatures were low. We interpret this as a potential cost of arriving early in colder years, and climate warming may have reduced this cost. We thus show that higher temperatures in the arrival year of recruits were associated with stronger selection for early reproduction in the years these birds were born. As arrival temperatures in the beginning of the study increased, but recently declined again, directional selection on timing of reproduction showed a nonlinear change. We demonstrate that environmental conditions with a lag of up to two years can alter selection on phenological traits in natural populations, something that has important

  10. High-Resolution Mapping of Crossover and Non-crossover Recombination Events by Whole-Genome Re-sequencing of an Avian Pedigree

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnström, Anna; Ellegren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Recombination is an engine of genetic diversity and therefore constitutes a key process in evolutionary biology and genetics. While the outcome of crossover recombination can readily be detected as shuffled alleles by following the inheritance of markers in pedigreed families, the more precise location of both crossover and non-crossover recombination events has been difficult to pinpoint. As a consequence, we lack a detailed portrait of the recombination landscape for most organisms and knowledge on how this landscape impacts on sequence evolution at a local scale. To localize recombination events with high resolution in an avian system, we performed whole-genome re-sequencing at high coverage of a complete three-generation collared flycatcher pedigree. We identified 325 crossovers at a median resolution of 1.4 kb, with 86% of the events localized to <10 kb intervals. Observed crossover rates were in excellent agreement with data from linkage mapping, were 52% higher in male (3.56 cM/Mb) than in female meiosis (2.28 cM/Mb), and increased towards chromosome ends in male but not female meiosis. Crossover events were non-randomly distributed in the genome with several distinct hot-spots and a concentration to genic regions, with the highest density in promoters and CpG islands. We further identified 267 non-crossovers, whose location was significantly associated with crossover locations. We detected a significant transmission bias (0.18) in favour of ‘strong’ (G, C) over ‘weak’ (A, T) alleles at non-crossover events, providing direct evidence for the process of GC-biased gene conversion in an avian system. The approach taken in this study should be applicable to any species and would thereby help to provide a more comprehensive portray of the recombination landscape across organism groups. PMID:27219623

  11. Identification of a feather β-keratin gene exclusively expressed in pennaceous barbule cells of contour feathers in chicken.

    PubMed

    Kowata, Kinue; Nakaoka, Minori; Nishio, Kaori; Fukao, Ayaka; Satoh, Akira; Ogoshi, Maho; Takahashi, Sumio; Tsudzuki, Masaoki; Takeuchi, Sakae

    2014-05-25

    Feathers are elaborate skin appendages shared by birds and theropod dinosaurs that have hierarchical branching of the rachis, barbs, and barbules. Feather filaments consist of β-keratins encoded by multiple genes, most of which are located in tandem arrays on chromosomes 2, 25, and 27 in chicken. The expansion of the genes is thought to have contributed to feather evolution; however, it is unclear how the individual genes are involved in feather formation. The aim of the present study was to identify feather keratin genes involved in the formation of barbules. Using a combination of microarray analysis, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, and in situ hybridization, we found an uncharacterized keratin gene on chromosome 7 that was expressed specifically in barbule cells in regenerating chicken feathers. We have named the gene barbule specific keratin 1 (BlSK1). The BlSK1 gene structure was similar to the gene structure of previously characterized feather keratin genes, and consisted of a non-coding leader exon, an intron, and an exon with an open reading frame (ORF). The ORF was predicted to encode a 98 aa long protein, which shared 59% identity with feather keratin B. Orthologs of BlSK1 were found in the genomes of other avian species, including turkey, duck, zebra finch, and flycatcher, in regions that shared synteny with chromosome 7 of chicken. Interestingly, BlSK1 was expressed in feather follicles that generated pennaceous barbules but not in follicles that generated plumulaceous barbules. These results suggested that the composition of feather keratins probably varies depending on the structure of the feather filaments and, that individual feather keratin genes may be involved in building different portions and/or types of feathers in chicken.

  12. Competitor phenology as a social cue in breeding site selection.

    PubMed

    Samplonius, Jelmer M; Both, Christiaan

    2017-05-01

    Predicting habitat quality is a major challenge for animals selecting a breeding patch, because it affects reproductive success. Breeding site selection may be based on previous experience, or on social information from the density and success of competitors with an earlier phenology. Variation in animal breeding phenology is often correlated with variation in habitat quality. Generally, animals breed earlier in high-quality habitats that allow them to reach a nutritional threshold required for breeding earlier or avoid nest predation. In addition, habitat quality may affect phenological overlap between species and thereby interspecific competition. Therefore, we hypothesized that competitor breeding phenology can be used as social cue by settling migrants to locate high-quality breeding sites. To test this hypothesis, we experimentally advanced and delayed hatching phenology of two resident tit species on the level of study plots and studied male and female settlement patterns of migratory pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca. The manipulations were assigned at random in two consecutive years, and treatments were swapped between years in sites that were used in both years. In both years, males settled in equal numbers across treatments, but later arriving females avoided pairing with males in delayed phenology plots. Moreover, male pairing probability declined strongly with arrival date on the breeding grounds. Our results demonstrate that competitor phenology may be used to assess habitat quality by settling migrants, but we cannot pinpoint the exact mechanism (e.g. resource quality, predation pressure or competition) that has given rise to this pattern. In addition, we show that opposing selection pressures for arrival timing may give rise to different social information availabilities between sexes. We discuss our findings in the context of climate warming, social information use and the evolution of protandry in migratory animals.

  13. A sampling plan for riparian birds of the Lower Colorado River-Final Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bart, Jonathan; Dunn, Leah; Leist, Amy

    2010-01-01

    A sampling plan was designed for the Bureau of Reclamation for selected riparian birds occurring along the Colorado River from Lake Mead to the southerly International Boundary with Mexico. The goals of the sampling plan were to estimate long-term trends in abundance and investigate habitat relationships especially in new habitat being created by the Bureau of Reclamation. The initial objective was to design a plan for the Gila Woodpecker (Melanerpes uropygialis), Arizona Bell's Vireo (Vireo bellii arizonae), Sonoran Yellow Warbler (Dendroica petechia sonorana), Summer Tanager (Piranga rubra), Gilded Flicker (Colaptes chrysoides), and Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus); however, too little data were obtained for the last two species. Recommendations were therefore based on results for the first four species. The study area was partitioned into plots of 7 to 23 hectares. Plot borders were drawn to place the best habitat for the focal species in the smallest number of plots so that survey efforts could be concentrated on these habitats. Double sampling was used in the survey. In this design, a large sample of plots is surveyed a single time, yielding estimates of unknown accuracy, and a subsample is surveyed intensively to obtain accurate estimates. The subsample is used to estimate detection ratios, which are then applied to the results from the extensive survey to obtain unbiased estimates of density and population size. These estimates are then used to estimate long-term trends in abundance. Four sampling plans for selecting plots were evaluated based on a simulation using data from the Breeding Bird Survey. The design with the highest power involved selecting new plots every year. Power with 80 plots surveyed per year was more than 80 percent for three of the four species. Results from the surveys were used to provide recommendations to the Bureau of Reclamation for their surveys of new habitat being created in the study area.

  14. Characterizing Wildlife Habitat With LiDAR Data: Distribution Mapping Of Snags And Understory Shrubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinuzzi, S.; Vierling, L.; Gould, W.; Falkowski, M.; Evans, J.; Hudak, A.; Vierling, K.

    2008-12-01

    Spatial data about the distribution of snags and understory shrubs is a major need for managing wildlife habitat in forests. We are evaluating the use of discrete return LiDAR data for predicting the distribution (presence/absence) of understory shrubs and different classes (i.e. diameters) of snags, in a managed, mixed-conifer forest in Northern Idaho, US. We are using a variety of ground and vegetation metrics derived from LiDAR data and the Random Forest algorithm to build our distribution models, and have obtained overall accuracies >80%. These preliminary results indicate that LiDAR data are valuable for predicting the distribution of understory shrubs and common snag diameter classes in the study area. In particular, LiDAR-derived metrics allow us to 1) quantify a variety of ecological factors (e.g. canopy structure, topography) that are known to influence the distribution and abundance of understory vegetation and snags in temperate, mountainous forests, and 2) quantify structural characteristics that are known to directly or indirectly indicate the presence of our classes of interest, such as the percent of vegetation returns in the lower strata of the canopy (for the shrubs), and the structural heterogeneity of the forest canopy (for the snags). Finally, and in order to further evaluate the use of LiDAR data for characterizing wildlife habitat, we integrate our maps of snags and shrubs distribution into models of habitat suitability, using four avian species (i.e. three woodpeckers and a flycatcher) as a case study.

  15. First Report of Carboniferous Alkalic Magmatism in the Maine Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, D. P.; Bradley, D. C.; McCauley, A.

    2013-12-01

    The Litchfield pluton is a composite alkalic plutonic complex that occupies an area of approximately 7 km2 in south-central Maine. The rocks intrude deformed Silurian meta-sedimentary rocks of the Central Maine Sequence and include sodium amphibole and pyroxene bearing leucosyenites, and coarse-grained nepheline × cancrinite × sodalite syenites (a.k.a. 'Litchfieldite'). While these rocks have attracted the interest of mineral collectors for over a century, poor exposure has discouraged detailed study and the age and petrogenesis of these unusual rocks have remained elusive. Whole rock geochemical analysis of representative samples reveals intermediate compositions in terms of SiO2 content (58-65 wt.%), a strong enrichment in alkali elements (K2O + Na2O = 12-14 wt.%), and negligible amounts of MgO and TiO2. Chondrite-normalized rare earth element (REE) patterns show varying degrees of light REE enrichment (10-100 times chondritic abundances) that tend to flatten at the heavy REE end. Nearly all of the REE patterns show positive Eu anomalies and various trace element plots reveal a notable enrichment in most high field strength elements (e.g., Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta). Prismatic, elongate, and clear zircons were separated from a sample of coarse-grained nepheline syenite and U-Pb isotopic analysis was carried out using the USGS-Stanford SHRIMP-RG. A weighted mean of 206Pb/238U ages from 13 zircons provides what we interpret to be an igneous crystallization age of 321 × 2 Ma. A single 40Ar/39Ar biotite total gas age of 239 × 1 Ma obtained from the same sample is consistent with previously published mica ages from surrounding country rocks and reflects regional exhumation and slow cooling following the Devonian Acadian Orogeny. Mid-Carboniferous alkaline magmatism is rare in the northern Appalachians and thus the tectonic significance of this particular intrusion is difficult to place into a more regional context. While rocks of this age are lacking in Maine, the intrusion

  16. Deformation conditions, kinematics, and displacement history of shallow crustal ductile shearing in the Norumbega fault system in the Northern Appalachians, eastern Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chunzeng; Ludman, Allan

    2004-06-01

    The Norumbega fault system in the Northern Appalachians in eastern Maine experienced complex post-Acadian ductile and brittle deformation from middle through late Paleozoic times. Well-preserved epizonal ductile shear zones in Fredericton belt metasedimentary rocks and granitic batholiths that intrude them provide valuable information on the nature, geometry, and evolution of orogen-parallel strike-slip Norumbega faulting. Metasedimentary rocks were ductilely sheared into phyllonite schistose mylonite, whereas granite into mylonite within the ductile shear zones. Ductile shearing took place at conditions of the lower greenschist facies with peak temperatures on the order of 300-350° based on comparison of plastic quartz and brittle feldspar microstructures, confirming a shallow crustal environment during faulting. Ductile shear strain was partitioned into two major shear zones in easternmost Maine—the Waite and Kellyland zones—but these zones converge toward the southwest. Megascopic, mesoscopic, and microscopic kinematic indicators confirm that fault motion in both zones was dominantly dextral strike-slip. Detailed mapping, especially in the plutonic rocks, reveals a complex ductile deformation history in the area where the Waite and Kellyland zones converge. Shear strain is broadly distributed in the rocks between Kellyland and Waite zones, and increases toward their junction. Multiple dextral high-strain zones oblique to both zones resemble megascopic synthetic c' shear bands. Together with the Kellyland and Waite master shear zones, these define a megascopic S-C' structure system produced in a regional-scale dextral strike-slip shear duplex that developed in the transition zone between the deeper (south-central Maine) and shallower (eastern Maine) segments of the Norumbega fault system. Granite plutons caught within the strike-slip shear duplex were intensely sheared and progressively smeared into long and narrow slivers identified by this study. The

  17. Origin of the Lyme Dome and implications for the timing of multiple Alleghanian deformational and intrusive events in southern Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, G.J.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Wintsch, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    unloading and exhumation. Monazite and metamorphic zircon rim ages record this event at ca. 259 Ma. The evolution of the Lyme dome involved D1 mylonitization, intrusion, and migmatization during north-directed contraction, limited late D1 diapirism, D2 migmatization during WNW contraction with associated flexural flow and fold interference, D3 NNW horizontal extension and decompression melting, and final D4 vertical extension and rapid exhumation. Late regional uplift, extension, and normal faulting at higher crustal levels may have been caused by diapiric rise of the lower crust, below the structural level of the Lyme dome. The rocks record no evidence of Acadian metamorphism or deformation, suggesting that the Gander zone here was not tectonically juxtaposed with Avalon until the Alleghanian orogeny.

  18. Crustal development and deformation of Laurentia during the Trans-Hudson and Alleghenian orogenies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Growdon, Martha Lynne

    The Kisseynew domain in Manitoba and the Orange-Milford complex in Connecticut are exhumed orogenic terranes that record the development of Laurentia along rigid basement margins during continent-continent collision and terrane accretion. The Kisseynew domain lies within the Paleoproterozoic Trans-Hudson Orogen and the Orange-Milford complex is a tectonic domain within the Paleozoic New England Appalachians. The response of continental crust to continent collisions ˜1.8 Ga contrasts with that during terrane accretions ˜300 Ma because the metamorphic evolution of each terrane is strongly controlled by the configuration of the converging tectonic blocks. The Paleoproterozoic Kisseynew domain is situated between three Archean cratons: the Hearne-Rae, Superior and Sask. The development of folds with axes oriented primarily NE-SW shows evidence for east-west compression of the rocks between the Superior and Hearne cratons. However, arching along a roughly east-west axis suggests a contribution of late north-south shortening between the Sask and Hearne cratons. Metamorphic temperatures exceeded 850°C and rocks now exposed at the surface were buried to at least 40 km due to the convergence of these three continental blocks. In contrast to these very high-grade rocks, the Orange-Milford complex is situated on the edge of the New York Promontory, a crustal buttress that localized strain from oblique terrane accretion into transpression, and contains an Acadian Barrovian-style metamorphic gradient. New 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology indicates a late phase of muscovite+chlorite growth occurred ˜300Ma during retrograde Alleghenian greenschist-facies deformation. The associated chlorite-muscovite fabrics are pervasive and cross-cut all older fabrics. These structures, that develop in association with the New York Promontory, are elongated parallel to the margin and contain evidence of significant along-strike stretching and thinning. In this setting rocks escape along the

  19. Gondwanan/peri-Gondwanan origin for the Uchee terrane, Alabama and georgia: Carolina zone or Suwannee terrane(?) and its suture with Grenvillian basement of the Pine Mountain window

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steltenpohl, M.G.; Mueller, P.M.; Heatherington, A.L.; Hanley, T.B.; Wooden, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    The poorly known, suspect, Uchee terrane occupies a critical tectonic position with regard to how and when peri-Gondwanan (Carolina) and Gondwanan (Suwannee) terranes were sutured to Laurentia. It lies sandwiched between Laurentian(?) continental basement exposed in the Pine Mountain window and adjacent buried Gondwanan crust of the Suwannee terrane. The Uchee terrane has been proposed as both a septum of Piedmont rocks that once was continuous across the erosionally breached Pine Mountain window or part of the Carolina zone. To help resolve this issue, we conducted U-Pb (SHRIMP-RG) (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe-reverse geometry) zircon studies and whole-rock isotopic analyses of principal metasedimentary and metaplutonic units. U-Pb ages for zircons from the Phenix City Gneiss suggest igneous crystallization at ca. 620 Ma, inheritance ca. 1000 to ca. 1700 Ma, and a ca. 300 Ma (Alleghanian) overprint recorded by zircon rims. Zircons from the metasedimentary/metavolcaniclastic Moffits Mill Schist yield bimodal dates at ca. 620 and 640 Ma. The 620 to 640 Ma dates make these rocks age-equivalent to the oldest parts of the Carolina slate belt (Virgilina and Savannah River) and strongly suggest a Gondwanan (Pan-African and/or Trans-Brasiliano) origin for the Uchee terrane. Alternatively, the Uchee terrane may be correlative with metamorphic basement of the Suwannee terrane. The ca. 300 Ma overgrowths on zircons are compatible with previously reported 295 to 288 Ma 40Ar/39Ar hornblende dates on Uchee terrane rocks, which were interpreted to indicate deep tectonic burial of the Uchee terrane contemporaneous with the Alleghanian orogeny recorded in the foreland. Temperature-time paths for the Uchee terrane are similar to that of the Pine Mountain terrane, indicating a minimum age of ca. 295 Ma for docking. In terms of tectono-metamorphic history of the Uchee terrane, it is important to note that no evidence for intermediate "Appalachian" dates (e.g, Acadian or

  20. Evidence of Laurussian affinity for parts of the Mauritanides and Souttoufides (Moroccan Sahara)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärtner, Andreas; Villeneuve, Michel; Linnemann, Ulf; El Archi, Abdelkrim; Bellon, Hervé

    2013-04-01

    The Soutouffide belt is located in the southern part of the Moroccan Sahara. Representing the northern section of the Carboniferous Mauritanide belt, it extends from Morocco to Senegal. The Dhlou and Adrar Souttouf Massifs, both of which belong to the Souttoufide belt, are located on the western margin of the Archean Reguibat Shield. Previously, the Adrar Souttouf Massif has been suggested to be part of the Variscan Mauritanian-Appalachian system. To date the Moroccan Sahara has been one of the least studied regions in West Africa. This study presents new zircon ages from two units of the Adrar Souttouf Massif which have nevertheless allowed us to hypothesise a complex polyphased history. The Massif can be subdivided into four NNE-SSW trending units (listed here from east to west). The Sebkha Matallah unit represents the eastern margin of the Adrar Souttouf Massif and is thrust over the Ordovician to Devonian sedimentary Dhloat Ensour Group to the east. A central (Dayet Lawda) unit consisting of mafic and ultramafic rocks is interpreted as a possible remnant of Neoproterozoic oceanic crust or mafic terranes. The western Sebkha Gezmayet and Oued Togba units are mainly composed of granitoids and orthogneisses. Zircon ages of the Tonian-Stenian (1.4-1.0 Ga) were recorded in the Oued Togba and Sebkha Gezmayet units and suggest an Avalonian-Meguman-like relationship. Three other age groups were obtained in these two units: 610 to 570 Ma (Pan-African), 530 to 490 Ma (Cambrian), and 440 to 270 Ma. The latter population cannot result from Variscan orogeny alone, and is possibly linked to the Salinic and Acadian orogenies of Laurentia. Zircon age populations at ~3.0 Ga and ~2.65 Ga determined for two granite samples from the Archean foreland are in accordance to data already published. Ages of between 226 Ma (Upper Triassic) and 158 Ma (Upper Jurassic) result from lower intercepts of discordia lines and are interpreted as a Mesozoic thermal overprint of the area attributed

  1. From plot to province; scaling field mensuration to stand-level lidar to public GIS data in a hierarchical approach to map regional forest biomass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkinson, C.; Colville, D.; Bourdeau, D.; Monette, S.; Fox, A.; Maher, R.

    2010-12-01

    As public energy utilities rise to the dual challenge of meeting growing energy demands while attempting to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, there is a clear and urgent need to inventory any ‘green’ energies that are potentially available for energy generation. In heavily forest-covered landscapes such as in the Province of Nova Scotia, forest bio-fuels potentially offer a viable source of carbon-neutral alternative energy that can be exploited with relatively minor modification of existing power generation infrastructure. However, while government GIS databases do contain extensive stand-level forest resource inventory (FRI) data covering the entire Province, the conversion of these data into meaningful estimates of available and sustainable biofuel requires calibration. At the opposite end of the scale, permanent sample plot (PSP) data collected in the field allows accurate calculation of biomass over very small areas but scaling between PSPs and FRI stands is challenged by the large within-stand heterogeneity displayed by Acadian mixed wood forests. Airborne Lidar rapidly samples the 3D structure of forest canopies over large areas at high resolutions and thus offers the perfect opportunity to scale between PSP and FRI data. In this study, approximately 100 PSPs visited within two years of a geographically coincident lidar survey between the years 2005 and 2010, were selected to train a lidar-based model of biomass, which was then used to train an FRI-based model which could be applied to the entire Province. PSP data (species, height, diameter at breast height and stem density) were used to directly quantify green, dry, woody and foliage biomass. Lidar data collected over approximately 30 different survey missions using the same airborne laser terrain mapper (ALTM) 3100 sensor were extracted for each of the PSPS. Summary statistics describing the within-plot vertical lidar frequency distributions were combined with physical lidar intensity and echo

  2. Seismotectonics of northeastern United States and adjacent Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jih-Ping; Aggarwal, Yash Pal

    1981-06-01

    appears to predominate. The western margin of this province, however, appears to be relatively aseismic. We attribute this relative lack of activity to one or more of the following: the presence of igneous activity postdating rifting of Africa from North America, the occurrence of intense metamorphism during the Acadian orogeny which may have annealed preexisting faults, and the predominance of ductile as opposed to brittle deformation in the geologic past. The inferred axis of maximum horizontal compression along the eastern margin of the Appalachians is rather uniform and trends W-WNW, almost perpendicular to the magnetic lineations offshore. We suggest that this W-WNW compression reflects the gravitational force arising from horizontal density variations in the oceanic lithosphere as it cools and moves away from spreading centers.

  3. Late Silurian plutons in Yucatan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, M. B.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1996-08-01

    U-Pb measurements of zircons from two composite plutons in the Maya Mountains of the Yucatan Block (Belize) give Late Silurian ages. Zircons from one of the five compositional phases of the Mountain Pine Ridge pluton yield an age of 418±3.6 Ma. A second compositional phase gives a minimum age of 404 Ma, and zircons from a third phase, although plagued with high common Pb, yield ages consistent with the other two. Zircons from one compositional phase of the Hummingbird-Mullins River pluton indicate an age of about 410-420 Ma. These data demonstrate that two of the three Maya Mountains plutons residing among the strata of the Late Pennsylvanian through Permian Santa Rosa Group are older than that sedimentation. Although the third pluton was not dated, both the similarity of sedimentary facies patterns adjacent to it to those adjacent to one of the plutons dated as Late Silurian and a published single Rb-Sr age of 428 ± 41 Ma suggest this third pluton also was emergent during Santa Rosa deposition. Thus the new U/Pb dates and other data suggest that all three Maya Mountains plutons pre-date Late Carboniferous sedimentation and that none intrude the Santa Rosa Group. Although very uniform ages of about 230 Ma amongst all plutons, derived from abundant earlier dating by the K-Ar system, led to the conclusion that intrusion mostly had occurred in the Late Triassic, the U-Pb ages (obtained from the same sites as the K-Ar dates) demonstrate that the K-Ar ages do not derive from a Late Triassic intrusive episode. The K-Ar dates probably are a signature of the rifting associated with Pangean breakup and formation of the Gulf of Mexico. In a reconstructed Pangea, the position of the Maya Mountains Late Silurian plutons suggests that the Late Silurian Acadian-Caledonian orogen of eastern North America extended through the region of the future Gulf of Mexico. Finally, the U-Pb ages of the Maya Mountains plutons are the same as those of a group of shocked zircons found in the

  4. U-Pb zircon and monazite dating of a mafic-ultramafic complex and its country rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebauer, D.; Bernard-Griffiths, J.; Grünenfelder, M.

    1981-05-01

    U-Pb data on zircons from the largest mafic-ultramafic body (6×2 km) of the French Central Massif (Sauviat-sur-Vige) yield the following age results: Primary magmatic crystallization of the gabbroic and peridotitic protoliths took place in the Cambro-Ordovician (496±25/17 m.y.). Variable transformation under eclogite facies conditions was Hercynian (320±29/36 m.y.). The same age pattern, derived by U-Pb monazite analyses, was found also for the immediate country rocks, i.e. kyanite bearing, coarse-grained metagranites occurring to the W and N of the Sauviat massif. Due to the fact that there is no regional Hercynian high-grade metamorphism in this part of the French Central Massif (e.g. Duthou 1977; Bernard-Griffiths 1975), both mafic-ultramafic complex as well as immediate felsic country rocks must have been emplaced tectonically into pre-Hercynian (Acadian±Caledonian) crustal rocks. The cause for such a Hercynian tectonism is thought to be due to continent-continent collision of the Spanish with the Armorican plate. Preliminary U-Pb zircon results on one eclogite sample taken about 50 km S of the Sauviat complex indicate also an Early Palaeozoic age for the magmatic protolith and a Hercynian transformation into eclogite, combined with and/or followed by tectonic emplacement. However, opposite to the continental Sauviat massif, we are probably dealing here with oceanic material, possibly deposited in an Early Palaeozoic marginal sea basin. Thus, subduction and tectonic emplacement of oceanic crust into continental crust terminated in this area also in the Hercynian. Concerning U-Pb systematics of zircon and monazite the following conclusions can be drawn: 1) U-Pb systems of primary magmatic zircons of mafic and ultramafic rocks are only weakly disturbed during static eclogite facies metamorphism ( T>820° C; P> 15 kbar); 2) New- and overgrowth of zircon during eclogite facies metamorphism seems to be the major cause for the degree of discordance; 3

  5. A 30 Myr record of retrograde metamorphism and multiple generations of monazite and garnet in western MA revealed by coordinated LASS and EPMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, E. M.; Burton, Z. F. M.; Rubel, J. N.; Snoeyenbos, D. R.; Kylander-Clark, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    Garnet-kyanite-cordierite pelitic schists with relict phosphatic garnets thought to record ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism (e.g., Snoeyenbos and Koziol, 2008) crop out along the western margin of the Goshen Dome in western Massachusetts. These schists contain monazite inclusions within Grt, Ky, Crd, Bt, Pl, Qz, and Chl. Compositional maps via EPMA-WDS show overgrowths on each monazite grain, indicating that each grain records multiple metamorphic events. We analyzed monazite in situ using laser-ablation split-stream (LASS) ICPMS to correlate the geochemical and age domains and to reconstruct the polyphase metamorphic history. We used WDS compositional maps of Y and Th, and ICPMS Gd/Yb ratios and U/Pb ages to define the timing of major garnet growth and breakdown processes, and melting and/or fluid-rich metamorphism. For example, decreasing Gd/Yb and high Y concentrations are consistent with garnet breakdown; highly variable Gd/Yb indicate melting and/or fluid-rich metamorphism (e.g., Stearns et al., 2013). The following cumulative histories are interpreted from two samples (B and G). In both samples, decreasing Gd/Yb in monazite suggest garnet breakdown from c. 398 to 387 Ma. Data from sample B (n = 644 analyses) indicate two additional phases of garnet growth: 382 to 377 Ma and 375 to 369 Ma (see figure). Data from sample G (n = 231 analyses) also indicate two additional phases of garnet growth: 387 to 381 Ma and 379 to 369 Ma. The final garnet growth event affecting both samples is marked by the most variable Gd/Yb ratios in monazite from all petrographic contexts and is consistent with melting or a fluid-rich metamorphic event. These data are most consistent with metamorphism during emplacement to crustal levels in the early Acadian, and a substantial overprint during the regional thermal maximum. This complex record can only be unraveled by collecting geochronologic and geochemical data in situ to preserve the petrographic context of each grain, thus

  6. Pre-Obduction, Syn-Magmatic Extensional Deformation and Unroofing of a Fore-Arc Ophiolite, the Thetford-Mines Complex of Southern Quebec.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroetter, J.; Page, P.; Bedard, J. H.; Tremblay, A.

    2003-12-01

    The Ordovician Thetford Mines Ophiolite Complex (TMOC) is a peri-continental supra-subduction zone fore-arc terrane obducted onto the Laurentian margin during the Taconic Orogeny. Stratigraphic correlations suggest that the Mont-Orford and Asbestos Ophiolites are correlative, which implies obduction of a 100 km long oceanic slab. The TMOC is affected by syn-obduction (syn-emplacement) deformation, and two post-obduction events: (i) Silurian backthrusting and normal faulting, and (ii) Acadian folding and reverse faulting. The post-obduction deformation tilted the southern part of the TMOC to the vertical, exposing from base to top: cumulate Dunitic, Pyroxenitic and Gabbroic Zones, a hypabyssal unit (either sheeted dykes or a subvolcanic breccia), and an ophiolitic extrusive/sedimentary sequence, upon which were deposited (unconformably) a forearc basin. Our mapping has revealed the presence of numerous pre-obduction faults, spaced c.1 km apart on average. In the plutonic part of the crust, the faults are manifested as sheared or mylonitic dunites and syn-magmatic breccias, and may correspond to along-strike breaks in lithology. Fault breccias are cut by undeformed, 10-m scale, websteritic to lherzolitic intrusions, demonstrating the pre- to syn-magmatic nature of the faulting, and suggesting a role in transfer of melt to the surface. Assuming that rhythmic cumulate layering was originally paleo-horizontal, then kinematic analysis implies that these were originally normal faults separating a series of tilted (30-90 degrees) blocks. Swarms of dykes are oriented parallel to the major faults and locally constitute a sheeted complex, locally removed by syn-volcanic unroofing and erosion. In the upper part of the crust, the faults correspond to marked lateral changes in the thickness and facies assemblages seen in supracrustal rocks, are locally marked by prominent subvolcanic breccias, and have upwardly decreasing throws, which together suggest that they are growth

  7. Ediacaran-Devonian opening and closing of the complex Iapetus Ocean and the formation of an accretionary orogen in the northern Appalachians and British Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Staal, Cees; Zagorevski, Alexandre

    2013-04-01

    Prior to the formation of Pangea, the Northern Appalachians-British Caledonides accretionary orogen formed over ca. 150 my by piecemeal accretion of outboard terranes to a progressively growing composite Laurentian margin. The accreted material originated either in seaways and marginal basins in the peri-Gondwanan or peri-Laurentian realms and comprises micro-continental ribbons with arc supra-structure and, to a lesser extent, supra-subduction zone oceanic slivers. The preponderance of micro-continental ribbons in Iapetus necessitates detailed knowledge of the opening history in order to understand the closure. The final opening of Iapetus took place between 550 and 540 Ma following a ca. 70 my period of rifting and formation of extensive hyper-extended, non volcanic segments with adjacent seaways partially underlain by exhumed lithospheric mantle along the Laurentian margin. The conjugate margin to Laurentia likely was represented by Arequipa-Antofalla, which was left behind when Amazonia departed earlier during the Ediacaran. Subduction in Iapetus initiated at ca. 515 Ma at opposite margins, probably as a result of a major plate reorganization following the terminal amalgamation of Gondwana. Shortly thereafter Ganderia and Avalonia diachronously rifted-off Gondwana and drifted towards Laurentia, opening the Rheic Ocean in their wake. Meguma could have travelled with Avalonia or as a separate microcontinent. Closure of the main tract of the Iapetus Ocean took place during the Late Ordovician following arc-arc collision. Iapetus' main closure did not lead to widespread orogenesis; most collisional damage took place as a result of arrival of continental ribbons at the composite Laurentian margin following closure of narrow oceanic, Iapetus-related seaways or marginal basins The resultant deformation is grouped into Cambro-Ordovician Taconic-Grampian, Silurian Salinic-Scandian and Devonian Acadian orogenies; however, these orogenies are all composite and involve

  8. A Tectonic Model for the Midcontinent U.S. Lithosphere Based on Structural Analyses of Mesoproterozoic Through Cenozoic Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, R.; Schultz, A.

    2008-12-01

    Insights into the tectonic fabric of the midcontinent U.S. lithosphere are provided by structural investigations of exposed basement and its supra-crustal sedimentary cover sequences. Mesoproterozoic basement rocks of the St. Francois terrane possess an orthogonal pattern of vertical NW- and NE-trending strike-slip fault zones. The NW trend dominates Mesoproterozoic deformation and is inherent from an older fabric that controlled the location of Mesoproterozoic igneous activity. Two of these NW-trending zones appear to have from 60 to 75 km and 30 to 75 km of accumulative left slip. Pre-Late Cambrian vertical, right-lateral, strike-slip faulting on NW-trending structures in the St. Francois terrane, emplacement of dominantly NE-trending, 1.33 Ga mafic dikes, and uplift and erosion of ~2 to 4 km of rocks represents the assembly and breakup of Rodinia in the rock record of the midcontinent basement. Re-activation of NE-trending structures in the Late Cambrian resulted in formation of the Reelfoot rift and was accompanied by re-activation of vertical NW- trending structures with left-lateral displacement. Faulting in the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic cover sequences document re-activation of both vertical trends as far-field strike-slip faults during the Acadian, Taconic, Ouachita, Alleghany, and Laramide orogenies. Step overs from one strike-slip fault strand to another during these orogenies produced local uplift along restraining bends and subsidence in pull-apart grabens and basins. The New Madrid seismic zone and other sites of Quaternary deformation in the midcontinent also are attributed to re-activation of inherited vertical fabric. In summary, a tectonic model of the midcontinent lithosphere is best portrayed as consisting of an orthogonal mosaic of vertical zones of shear that presumably penetrate the crust and upper mantle, and are therefore long lived and prone to reactivation under lithospheric stresses. Much worldwide intraplate seismicity is

  9. Effects of logging and recovery process on avian richness and diversity in hill dipterocarp tropical rainforest-Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Husin, Mohamed Zakaria; Rajpar, Muhammad Nawaz

    2015-01-01

    The effects of logging and recovery process on avian richness and diversity was compared in recently logged and thirty year post-harvested hill dipterocarp tropical rainforest, using mist-netting method. Atotal of 803 bird individuals representing 86 bird species and 29 families (i.e., 37.90% from recently logged forest and 62.10% from thirty year post-harvested forest) were captured from October 2010 to September, 2012. Twenty one bird species were commonly captured from both types of forests, 37 bird species were caught only in thirty year post-harvested forest and 28 bird species were caught only from recently logged forest. Arachnothera longirostra--Little Spiderhunter, Malacopteron magnum--Rufous-crowned Babbler, Alophoixus phaeocephalus -Yellow-bellied Bulbul and Meiglyptes tukki--Buff-necked Woodpecker were the most abundant four bird species in the thirty year post-harvested forest. On the contrary, seven bird species, i.e., Trichastoma rostratum - White-chested Babbler, Lacedo pulchella - Banded Kingfisher, Picus miniaceus--Banded Woodpecker, Enicurus ruficapillus - Chestnut-naped Forktail, Anthreptes simplex--Plain Sunbird, Muscicapella hodgsoni--Pygmy Blue Flycatcher and Otus rufescens--Reddish Scope Owl were considered as the rarest (i.e., each represented only 0.12%). Likewise, A. longirostra, Pycnonotus eythropthalmos - Spectacled Bulbul, P. simplex--Cream-vented Bulbul and Merops viridis--Blue-throated Bee-eater were the most dominant and Copsychus malabaricus--White-rumped Shama Eurylaimus javanicus--Banded Broadbill /xos malaccensis - Streaked Bulbul and Harpactes diardii--Diard's Trogon (each 0.12%) were the rarest bird species in recently logged forest. CAP analysis indicated that avian species in thirty year post-harvested forest were more diverse and evenly distributed than recently logged forest. However, recently logged forest was rich in bird species than thirty year post- harvested forest. The results revealed that logging and retrieval

  10. Migratory timing, rate, routes and wintering areas of White-crested Elaenia (Elaenia albiceps chilensis), a key seed disperser for Patagonian forest regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Susana Patricia; Cueto, Victor Rodolfo; Gorosito, Cristian Andrés

    2017-01-01

    Migratory animals often play key ecological roles within the communities they visit throughout their annual journeys. As a consequence of the links between biomes mediated by migrants, changes in one biome could affect remote areas in unpredictable ways. Migratory routes and timing of most Neotropical austral migrants, which breed at south temperate latitudes of South America and overwinter closer to or within tropical latitudes of South America, have yet to be described in detail. As a result, our understanding about how these birds provide links between South American biomes is almost non-existent. White-crested Elaenia (Elaenia albiceps chilensis) is a long-distance austral migrant that breeds in the Patagonian Forest biome and overwinters in tropical South America. Because this small flycatcher plays a key role in the regeneration of this ecosystem, our objective was to describe the annual cycle of White-crested elaenias to evaluate the degree of migratory connectivity between breeding and wintering areas and therefore to determine if there are specific biomes of northern South America linked by elaenias to Patagonian forests. Fifteen individuals were successfully tracked throughout a complete migration cycle using miniature light-level geolocators. All individuals resided and moved through the same general regions. During fall (March-April-May), elaenias were located in the Caatinga and the Atlantic Forest biomes, from Rio de Janeiro to the region near Salvador da Bahia, Brazil. During winter (June-July-Aug.), birds were located further inland, within the Cerrado biome. Birds used three different routes during fall migration. Our results indicate that some individuals use a direct route, flying between 500–600 km/day, crossing desert and grasslands, while others took a detour, flying 100–200 km/day through forested areas with refueling opportunities. All birds used the Yunga forest during spring migration, with ten out of 15 individuals showing a clear

  11. Breeding biology of the golden-faced Tyrannulet (Zimmerius chrysops) in venezuela

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goulding, W.; Martin, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first detailed information on the breeding biology of the Golden-faced Tyrannulet (Zimmerius chrysops). Information was gathered from 96 nests in Yacamb National Park, Venezuela during the 2002 to 2008 breeding seasons. The enclosed nest was similar to descriptions of nests of other species in the genus. Eggs were laid on alternate days with mean (?? SE) clutch size of 1.98 ?? 0.02 (n 45) and fresh weight of 1.616 ?? 0.020 g (n 48). Only the female incubated and the incubation period averaged 16.9 ?? 0.3 days (n 10). Nest attentiveness ( time on the nest) averaged 66.0 ?? 1.6 (n 40) and increased from early to mid- and late-incubation. Incubation behavior yielded an average 24-hr egg temperature of 34.88 ?? 0.45?? C (n 7 nests, 43 days). The nestling growth rate constant for body mass (k 0.285 ?? 0.011) was slow even for tropical tyrannids. The nestling period for nests where exact hatch and fledging days were observed ranged from 17 to 19 days with an average of 18.0 ?? 0. 2 days (n 9). Both females and males fed nestlings at a rate that increased over the nestling period with a mean of 4.41 ?? 0.65 trips/hr (n 10) during days 1 and 2 after hatching, and 14.93 ?? 2.36 trips/hr (n 6) at pin-break (days 1011). Daily predation rates were similar in egg-laying (0.052 ?? 0.025; n 76.5 exposure days) and incubation periods (0.068 ?? 0.010; n 575.5 exposure days), but were lower during the nestling period (0.039 ?? 0.010; n 377.0 exposure days). The total daily predation rate (0.057 ?? 0.007; n 989.0 exposure days) indicated only 12 of nests were successful. These breeding biology parameters for Z. chrysops differ substantially from other tyrant-flycatchers and temperate species, further highlighting the diversity within the Tyrannidae. ?? 2010 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  12. Evaluating carbon storage, timber harvest, and habitat possibilities for a Western Cascades (USA) forest landscape.

    PubMed

    Kline, Jeffrey D; Harmon, Mark E; Spies, Thomas A; Morzillo, Anita T; Pabst, Robert J; McComb, Brenda C; Schnekenburger, Frank; Olsen, Keith A; Csuti, Blair; Vogeler, Jody C

    2016-10-01

    Forest policymakers and managers have long sought ways to evaluate the capability of forest landscapes to jointly produce timber, habitat, and other ecosystem services in response to forest management. Currently, carbon is of particular interest as policies for increasing carbon storage on federal lands are being proposed. However, a challenge in joint production analysis of forest management is adequately representing ecological conditions and processes that influence joint production relationships. We used simulation models of vegetation structure, forest sector carbon, and potential wildlife habitat to characterize landscape-level joint production possibilities for carbon storage, timber harvest, and habitat for seven wildlife species across a range of forest management regimes. We sought to (1) characterize the general relationships of production possibilities for combinations of carbon storage, timber, and habitat, and (2) identify management variables that most influence joint production relationships. Our 160 000-ha study landscape featured environmental conditions typical of forests in the Western Cascade Mountains of Oregon (USA). Our results indicate that managing forests for carbon storage involves trade-offs among timber harvest and habitat for focal wildlife species, depending on the disturbance interval and utilization intensity followed. Joint production possibilities for wildlife species varied in shape, ranging from competitive to complementary to compound, reflecting niche breadth and habitat component needs of species examined. Managing Pacific Northwest forests to store forest sector carbon can be roughly complementary with habitat for Northern Spotted Owl, Olive-sided Flycatcher, and red tree vole. However, managing forests to increase carbon storage potentially can be competitive with timber production and habitat for Pacific marten, Pileated Woodpecker, and Western Bluebird, depending on the disturbance interval and harvest intensity chosen

  13. A transect through the base of the Bronson Hill Terrane in western New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Gregory J.; Valley, Peter M.; Sicard, Karri R.; Thompson, Thelma Barton; Thompson, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    regards to the stratigraphy of the BHA and CVT, and the distribution, or even existence, of faults ranging in age from Devonian to Mesozoic (e.g., Spear and others, 2008; McWilliams and others, 2010; Walsh and others, 2010). Questions to ponder on this trip include, but are not limited to: 1) Is the Bronson Hill anticlinorium allochthonous? 2) What is the crust beneath the Bronson Hill anticlinorium? 3) Is there a “Big Staurolite nappe” as proposed by Spear and others (2002, 2003, 2008)? 4) What is the role of Taconic, Acadian, and Alleghanian orogenesis in the tectonic development of the region? Modern 1:24,000-scale mapping is the first step towards answering these questions. Mapping will be supplemented by modern geochronology and geochemistry as this project develops. We plan to share some of our provisional results during this field trip.

  14. Stratigraphy, geochronology, and accretionary terrane settings of two Bronson Hill arc sequences, northern New England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Robert H.; Aleinikoff, John N.

    2002-01-01

    southern Laurentian margin, but northwest of the principal Iapetan suture, or Red Indian line (RIL). The Boil Mountain-Jim Pond-Hurricane Mountain sequence was ramped northwestward over the Chain Lakes massif at ∼475 Ma, on the basal Boil Mountain surface. This obduction probably occurred slightly before obduction on the Baie Verte-Brompton surface (BBL), farther NW, over the Laurentian margin, and was followed by Dead River flysch sedimentation, which ended with the abrupt onset of Ammonoosuc-sequence arc magmatism at ∼470 Ma. Ammonoosuc eruptions probably ended at ∼460 Ma, when Iapetus closed along the Red Indian line. During a following magmatic hiatus of ∼3-5 m.y., now represented by portions of the Partridge Formation that overlie the Ammonoosuc Volcanics, subduction polarity reversed, and subduction resumed below the northwest-dipping Brunswick subduction complex (BSC) of New Brunswick, Canada. Quimby-sequence magmatism (∼456-435 Ma) on the the newly accreted Laurentian margin occurred above the BSC, whose footwall is now buried to the southeast by mainly Silurian clastic sediments of the Merrimack-Fredericton trough, deposited in the “Fredericton Sea”. In Silurian to Early Devonian time, the NW-dipping BSC footwall was paired with a SE-dipping subduction zone that produced arc magmas of the Coastal Volcanic belt, built on the composite Avalon and adjacent peri-Avalonian terranes. Orogen-normal extension produced by rapid rollback of both subduction zones narrowed the Fredericton Sea, produced the Central Maine and Connecticut Valley-Gaspé basins, and culminated in the Acadian orogeny when the sea completely closed in Early Devonian time.

  15. Stratigraphy, geochronology, and accretionary terrane settings of two Bronson Hill arc sequences, northern New England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Robert H.; Aleinikoff, John N.

    the southern Laurentian margin, but northwest of the principal Iapetan suture, or Red Indian line. The Boil Mountain-Jim Pond-Hurricane Mountain sequence was ramped northwestward over the Chain Lakes massif at ∼475 Ma, on the basal Boil Mountain surface. This obduction probably occurred slightly before obduction on the Baie Vert-Brompton surface (BBL), farther NW, over the Laurentian margin, and was followed by Dead River flysch sedimentation, which ended with the abrupt onset of Ammonoosuc-sequence arc magmatism at ∼470 Ma. Ammonoosuc eruptions probably ended at ∼460 Ma, when Iapetus closed along the Red Indian line. During a following magmatic hiatus of ∼3-5 m.y., now represented by portions of the Partridge Formation that overlie the Ammonoosuc Volcanics, subduction polarity reversed, and subduction resumed below the northwest-dipping Brunswick subduction complex (BSC) of New Brunswick, Canada. Quimby-sequence magmatism (∼456-435 Ma) on the newly accreted Laurentian margin occurred above the BSC, whose footwall is now buried to the southeast by mainly Silurian clastic sediments of the Merrimack-Fredericton trough, deposited in the “Fredericton Sea”. In Silurian to Early Devonian time, the NW-dipping BSC footwall was paired with a SE-dipping subduction zone that produced arc magmas of the Coastal Volcanic belt, built on the composite Avalon and adjacent peri-Avalonian terranes. Orogen-normal extension produced by rapid rollback of both subduction zones narrowed the Fredericton Sea, produced the Central Maine and Connecticut Valley-Gaspé basins, and culminated in the Acadian orogeny when the sea completely closed in Early Devonian time.

  16. Geology of the Andover Granite and surrounding rocks, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castle, Robert O.

    1964-01-01

    Field and petrographic studies of the Andover Granite and surrounding rocks have afforded an opportunity for an explanation of its emplacement and crystallization. The investigation has contributed secondarily to an understanding of the geologic history of southeastern New England, particularly as it is revealed in the Lawrence, Wilmington, South Groveland, and Reading quadrangles of Massachusetts. The Andover Granite and Sharpners Pond Tonalite together comprise up to 90 percent of the Acadian(?) subalkaline intrusive series cropping out within the area of study. The subalkaline series locally invades a sequence of early to middle Paleozoic and possibly Precambrian metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks. Much of the subalkaline series and most of the Andover Granite is confined between two prominent east-northeast trending faults or fault systems. The northern fault separates the mildly metamorphosed Middle Silurian(?) Merrimack Group on the north from a highly metamorphosed and thoroughly intruded Ordovician(?) sequence on the south. The southern 'boundary '' fault is a major structural discontinuity characterized by penetrative, diffuse shearing over a zone one-half mile or more in width. The magmatic nature of the Andover Granite is demonstrated by: (1) sharply crosscutting relationships with surrounding rocks; (2) the occurrence of tabular-shaped xenoliths whose long directions parallel the foliation within the granite and whose internal foliation trends at a high angle to that of the granite; (3) continuity with the clearly intrusive Sharpners Pond Tonalite; (4) the compositional uniformity of the granite as contrasted with the compositional diversity of the rocks it invades; (5) its modal and normative correspondence with (a) calculated norms of salic extrusives and (b) that of the ternary (granite) minimum for the system NaAlSi3O8-KAlSi3O8-SiO2. Orogenic granites, as represented by the Andover, contrast with post-orogenic granites, represented locally by

  17. Stratigraphy, geochronology, and accretionary terrane settings of two Bronson Hill arc sequences, northern New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, R.H.; Aleinikoff, J.N.

    2003-01-01

    the southern Laurentian margin, but northwest of the principal Iapetan suture, or Red Indian line. The Boil Mountain-Jim Pond-Hurricane Mountain sequence was ramped northwestward over the Chain Lakes massif at ???475 Ma, on the basal Boil Mountain surface. This obduction probably occurred slightly before obduction on the Baie Vert-Brompton surface (BBL), farther NW, over the Laurentian margin, and was followed by Dead River flysch sedimentation, which ended with the abrupt onset of Ammonoosuc-sequence arc magmatism at ???470 Ma. Ammonoosuc eruptions probably ended at ???460 Ma, when Iapetus closed along the Red Indian line. During a following magmatic hiatus of ???3-5 m.y., now represented by portions of the Partridge Formation that overlie the Ammonoosuc Volcanics, subduction polarity reversed, and subduction resumed below the northwest-dipping Brunswick subduction complex (BSC) of New Brunswick, Canada. Quimby-sequence magmatism (???456-435 Ma) on the newly accreted Laurentian margin occurred above the BSC, whose footwall is now buried to the southeast by mainly Silurian clastic sediments of the Merrimack-Fredericton trough, deposited in the "Fredericton Sea". In Silurian to Early Devonian time, the NW-dipping BSC footwall was paired with a SE-dipping subduction zone that produced arc magmas of the Coastal Volcanic belt, built on the composite Avalon and adjacent peri-Avalonian terranes. Orogen-normal extension produced by rapid rollback of both subduction zones narrowed the Fredericton Sea, produced the Central Maine and Connecticut Valley-Gaspe?? basins, and culminated in the Acadian orogeny when the sea completely closed in Early Devonian time. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  18. Stratigraphy, geochronology, and accretionary terrane settings of two Bronson Hill arc sequences, northern New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, R.H.; Aleinikoff, J.N.

    2002-01-01

    off the southern Laurentian margin, but northwest of the principal Iapetan suture, or Red Indian line (RIL). The Boil Mountain-Jim Pond-Hurricane Mountain sequence was ramped northwestward over the Chain Lakes massif at ???475 Ma, on the basal Boil Mountain surface. This obduction probably occurred slightly before obduction on the Baie Verte-Brompton surface (BBL), farther NW, over the Laurentian margin, and was followed by Dead River flysch sedimentation, which ended with the abrupt onset of Ammonoosuc-sequence arc magmatism at ???470 Ma. Ammonoosuc eruptions probably ended at ???460 Ma, when Iapetus closed along the Red Indian line. During a following magmatic hiatus of ???3-5 m.y., now represented by portions of the Partridge Formation that overlie the Ammonoosuc Volcanics, subduction polarity reversed, and subduction resumed below the northwest-dipping Brunswick subduction complex (BSC) of New Brunswick, Canada. Quimby-sequence magmatism (???456-435 Ma) on the the newly accreted Laurentian margin occurred above the BSC, whose footwall is now buried to the southeast by mainly Silurian clastic sediments of the Merrimack-Fredericton trough, deposited in the "Fredericton Sea". In Silurian to Early Devonian time, the NW-dipping BSC footwall was paired with a SE-dipping subduction zone that produced arc magmas of the Coastal Volcanic belt, built on the composite Avalon and adjacent peri-Avalonian terranes. Orogen-normal extension produced by rapid rollback of both subduction zones narrowed the Fredericton Sea, produced the Central Maine and Connecticut Valley-Gaspe?? basins, and culminated in the Acadian orogeny when the sea completely closed in Early Devonian time. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd.

  19. Quality of water in domestic wells in the Chicot and Chicot equivalent aquifer systems, southern Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi, 2000-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tollett, Roland W.; Fendick, Robert B.; Simmons, Lane B.

    2003-01-01

    In 2000-2001, water-quality data were collected from 60 randomly selected domestic wells in the Acadian-Pontchartrain Study Unit, as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The data were collected from wells screened in shallow sands (less than 350 feet below land surface) in two major aquifer systems--the Chicot aquifer system in southwestern Louisiana and the Chicot equivalent aquifer system in southeastern Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi. The Chicot equivalent aquifer system is part of the Southern Hills regional aquifer system, and both the Chicot aquifer system and the Southern Hills regional aquifer systems are designated as sole-source aquifers by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The well depths ranged from 40 to 340 feet below land surface with a median depth of 120 feet. The ground-water-quality data included 5 physiochemical properties, dissolved solids, 9 major inorganic ions, 24 trace elements, 6 nutrients, dissolved organic carbon, 109 pesticides and degradation products, and 85 volatile organic compounds (VOC's); and a subset of the wells were sampled for radon, chlorofluorocarbons, and stable isotopes. Water from 35 of the 60 domestic wells sampled had pH values less than the USEPA Seconday Maximum Contaminant Level (SMCL) range of 6.5 to 8.5 standard units. Specific conductance ranged from 17 to 1,420 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius. Dissolved-solids concentrations in water from two wells exceeded the SMCL of 500 mg/L (milligrams per liter); the maximum concentration was 858 mg/L. Sodium and calcium were the dominant cations, and bicarbonate and chloride were the dominant anions. One chloride concentration (264 mg/L) exceeded the SMCL of 250 mg/L. One arsenic concentration (55.3 micrograms per liter) exceeded the USEPA Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) of 10 micrograms per liter. Iron concentrations in water from 22 wells exceeded the SMCL of 300 micrograms per liter; the maximum concentration

  20. Sub-pluvial Saqqara and its possible impact on ancient Egyptian civilization in the Old Kingdom Period (4600 - 4100 yrs BP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welc, Fabian; Marks, Leszek

    2014-05-01

    ). A role of these wet intervals is incontestable and they can represent a sub-pluvial episode with two peaks at about 4600 and 4200 yrs BP, presumably of regional significance for north-eastern Africa. The authors suggest to name this relatively wet period the Saqqara Sub-pluvial. Based on the present knowledge, the extremely dynamic terminal phase of the second peak of the Saqqara Sub-pluvial and the following sudden desertification noted in deposits at archaeological sites in Saqqara and in the adjoining area (Abusir, Giza) should be roughly correlated with global climatic perturbation of the 3rd Bond Event or 4.2 ka Rapid Climate Change. The climate change in that time resulted in a collapse of the Egyptian civilization but also in rapid depopulation of Palestine, disintegration of the Acadian Empire in Mesopotamia and the Harappa Civilization in northwest India. Mechanism of this climate change is investigated within the project funded by National Science Centre in Poland (decision no. DEC-2012/05/B/ST10/00558).

  1. Three Dimensional Spatial and Temporal Evolution of Rheology in Orogens: A Field Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Solar, G.

    2001-12-01

    To understand mountain building, we require knowledge of behavior and mechanics of deformation of lithosphere materials. Based on deformation experiments at high-strain-rates, including work by Mervyn Paterson, and data from field studies of rocks inferred to have been melt-bearing during deformation at natural strain rates, melt-bearing rocks generally are weaker than those at subsolidus conditions. Further, we require knowledge of how material behavior changes in 3-d during mountain building as geotherms evolve and rocks melt and melt migrates and ponds at shallower levels. Data to address this issue come from the field, where relations among melt flow (continuous vs. cyclic), rheological transitions [brittle-viscous transition zone (BVTZ) and anatectic front (AF)] and deformation (viscous vs. brittle) yield natural constraints for use in dynamic models of orogenesis. In the Acadian Orogen of New England, based on high-precision ages, Lower Paleozoic rocks were deformed synchronously with greenschist-granulite facies metamorphism and emplacement of plutons. Based on geochemistry, migmatites are residual and peraluminous leucogranite was derived from a similar source, implying a genetic relation. In middle crust, below the BVTZ [in part below the AF (in migmatite)] deformation involved non-coaxial non-plane strain flow in which the inclined vorticity vector was stretched along its length and deformation partitioned into steeply inclined S-L and L>>S tectonite zones. Metamorphic field gradient is of low dP/dT type, P-T paths are clockwise and thermal peak was late syntectonic, reflecting regionally elevated thermal gradients and pluton-driven thermal pulses. In migmatite, leucosome relations with tectonite fabrics and dilatant shear surfaces, and sheets and cylinders of cumulate-dominated granite, suggest cyclic failure and batch melt transport by shear surface and channel flow (conditional open-system behavior). Below the AF, differential stress is low and if melt

  2. Quality of water from shallow wells in the rice-growing area in southwestern Louisiana, 1999 through 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tollett, Roland W.; Fendick, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    In 1999-2001, the U.S. Geological Survey installed and sampled 27 shallow wells in the rice-growing area in southwestern Louisiana as part of the Acadian-Pontchartrain Study Unit of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The purpose of this report is to describe the waulity of water from shallow wells in the rice-growing area and to relate that water quality to natural and anthropogenic activities, particularly rice agriculture. Ground-water samples were analyzed for general ground-water properties and about 150 water-quality constituents, including major inorganic ions, trace elements, nutrients, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), pesticides, radon, chloroflourocarbons, and selected stable isotopes. Dissolved solids concentrations for 17 wells exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency secondary minimum containment level of 500 milligrams per liter (mg/L) for drinking water. Concentrations for major pesticides generally were less than the maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Two major inorganic ions, sulfate and chloride, and two trace elements, iron and manganese, had concentrations that were greater than the secondary maximum containment levels. Three nutrient concentrations were greater than 2 mg/L, a level that might indicate contamination from human activities, and one nutrient concentration (that for nitrite plus nitrite as nitrogen) was greater than the maximum contaminant level of 10 mg/L for drinking water. The median concentration for DOC was 0.5 mg/L, indicating naturally-occurring DOC conditions in the study area. Thirteen pesticides and 7 pesticide degradation products were detected in 14 of the 27 wells sampled. Bentazon, 2, 4-D, and molinate (three rice herbicides) were detected in water from four, one, and one wells, respectively, and malathion (a rice insecticide) was deteced in water fromone well. Low-level concentrations and few detections of nutrients and pesticides indicated that ground-water quality was affected slightly

  3. The mechanism of ascent and emplacement of granite magma during transpression: a syntectonic granite paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Solar, G. S.

    1999-10-01

    We propose a model for syntectonic ascent and emplacement of granite magma based on structural relations in part of the northern Appalachians. In the study area in western Maine, strain was distributed heterogeneously during Devonian Acadian transpression. Metasedimentary rocks (migmatites at high grades) record two contrasting types of finite strain in zones that alternate across strike. Rocks in both types of zones have a penetrative, moderately-to-steeply NE-plunging mineral elongation lineation defined by bladed muscovite (fibrolite/sillimanite at high grades). In `straight' belts of enhanced deformation rocks have S > L fabrics that record apparent flattening-to-plane strain (apparent flattening zones, AFZs), but rocks between these belts have L > S fabrics that record apparent constriction (apparent constriction zones, ACZs). At metamorphic grades above the contemporary solidus, rocks in AFZs developed stromatic structure in migmatite, which suggests that percolative flow of melt occurred along the evolving flattening fabric. Stromatic migmatites are intruded by concordant to weakly discordant, m-scale composite sheet-like bodies of granite to suggest magma transport in planar conduits through the AFZ rocks. Inhomogeneous migmatite is found in the intervening ACZs, which suggests migration of partially molten material through these zones en masse, probably by melt-assisted granular flow. Inhomogeneous migmatites are intruded by irregular m-scale bodies of granite that vary from elongate to sub-circular in plan view and seem cylindrical in three dimensions. These bodies apparently plunge to the northeast, parallel to the regional mineral elongation lineation, to suggest magma transport in pipe-like conduits through the ACZ rocks. We postulate that the form of magma ascent conduits was deformation-controlled, and was governed by the contemporaneous strain partitioning. Magma ascent in planar and pipe-like conduits through migmatites is possible because oblique

  4. Did a whole-crustal hydrothermal system generate the Irish Zn-Pb orefield?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, J. Stephen; Badenszki, Eszter; Chew, David; Kronz, Andreas; O'Rourke, Helen; Whitehouse, Martin; Menuge, Julian; van den Berg, Riana

    2016-04-01

    Current models[1] for the genesis of the giant Irish Carboniferous-hosted Zn-Pb orefield propose shallow (<10 km depth) hydrothermal circulation within Lower Palaeozoic basement rocks of the Iapetus Suture Zone as the main metal source. However several lines of evidence, e.g., from He[2], S[2,3] and Os[4] isotopes, and the possible role of contemporary volcanism[5] point to deeper, including mantle, fluid source(s) and/or pathways. The Iapetus Suture Zone in Ireland is uniquely favoured to evaluate the scale of hydrothermal circulation because of the presence there of granulite-facies lower crustal xenoliths at four widely separated localities. These were carried to the surface from ~22-28km (and deeper levels) by Lower Carboniferous alkali basaltic lavas and diatremes[6,7]. They provide the only possible direct samples of the lower crust and are of appropriate age. U-Pb zircon geochronology demonstrates that the xenoliths experienced high temperature (>700°C) metamorphism and melting during the Acadian orogeny at ~390Ma and during separate episodes of extension at ~ 381-373Ma and ~362Ma. Sm-Nd garnet dating shows that the lower crust remained hot or was re-heated to ~600°C at ~341Ma during Lower Carboniferous volcanism, also associated with extension and, in part, coincident with the mineralization[1]. Isotopic data from the xenoliths correspond closely to Sr and Nd isotopic analyses of gangue calcite[8] and galena Pb[9] isotopic data from the major ore deposits. While Zn contents of the xenoliths permit them to be metal sources, their mineralogy and texture provide an enriched template and a plausible extraction mechanism. In situ analyses of modally-abundant biotite and garnet show significant enrichment in Zn (and other relevant metals) as well as order of magnitude depletion of Zn during retrograde alteration, providing a metal-release mechanism and pointing to a hydrothermal fluid system operating at least to depths of ~ 25km. References [1] Wilkinson, J

  5. Correlation between the Palaeozoic structures from West Iberian and Grand Banks margins using inversion of magnetic anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Elsa A.; Miranda, J. M.; Luis, J. F.; Galdeano, A.

    2000-05-01

    The Ibero-Armorican Arc (IAA) is a huge geological structure of Pre-Cambrian origin, tightened during hercynian times and deeply affected by the opening of the Atlantic Ocean and the Bay of Biscay. Its remnants now lie in Iberia, north-western France and the Canadian Grand Banks margins. The qualitative correlation between these three blocks has been attempted by several authors (e.g. Lefort, J.P., 1980. Un 'Fit' structural de l'Atlantique Nord: arguments geologiques pour correler les marqueurs geophysiques reconnus sur les deux marges. Mar. Geol. 37, 355-369; Lefort, J.P., 1983. A new geophysical criterion to correlate the Acadian and Hercynian orogenies of Western Europe and Eastern America. Mem. Geol. Soc. Am. 158, 3-18; Galdeano, A., Miranda, J.M., Matte, P., Mouge, P., Rossignol, C., 1990. Aeromagnetic data: A tool for studying the Variscan arc of Western Europe and its correlation with transatlantic structures. Tectonophysics 177, 293-305) using magnetic anomalies, mainly because they seem to preserve the hercynian zonation, in spite of the strong thermal and mechanical processes that took place during rifting and ocean spreading. In this paper, we present a new contribution to the study of the IAA structure based on the processing of a compilation of magnetic data from Iberia and Grand Banks margins. To interpret the magnetic signature, a Fourier-domain-based inversion technique was applied, considering a layer with a constant thickness of 10 km, and taking into account only the induced field. The digital terrain model was derived from ETOPO5 (ETOPO5, 1986. Relief map of the earth's surface. EOS 67, 121) and TerrainBase (TerrainBase, 1995. In: Row III, L.W., Hastings, D.A., Dunbar, P.K. (Eds.), Worldwide Digital Terrain Data, Documentation Manual, CD-ROM Release 1.0. GEODAS-NGDC Key to Geophysical Records. Documentation N. 30, April) databases. The pseudo-susceptibility distribution obtained was repositioned for the 156.5 Ma epoch, using the Srivastava and

  6. Geology of the Stroudsburg quadrangle and Adjacent areas, Pennsylvania--New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Epstein, Jack Burton

    1971-01-01

    The Stroudsburg area is within the Valley and Ridge and Great Valley physiographic provinces, Northampton and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania, and Warren County, New Jersey. The northeast-trending subparallel valleys and ridges resulted from erosion of folded heterogeneous sedimentary rocks. These are Middle Ordovician to Middle Devonian in age and are more than 17,000 feet thick. Deposition of a thick flysch sequence (Martinsburg Formation of Ordovician age) accompanied onset of Taconic orogenesis. It was followed by deposition of a thick molasse sequence of Silurian and Early Devonian age (continental and marginal-marine clastics--Shawangunk Formation and Bloomsburg Red Beds--overlain by predominantly marginal-marine and subtidal limestone, dolomite, shale, and sandstone--Poxono Island Formation through Oriskany Group). Basin deepening and gradual shallowing occurred during Esopus through Mahantango deposition, heralding the Acadian clastic wedge exposed north of the Stroudsburg area. Interpretation of sedimentary structures and regional stratigraphic relations suggest that the Silurian and Devonian rocks were deposited in the following environments: A1luviated coastal plain (meandering and braided streams), tidal flats (supratidal and intertidal), barrier zone, and neritic zone (upper and lower). The rock stratigraphic units have been grouped into four lithotectonic units, each having a different style of deformation. Folds produced in these rocks are disharmonic, and it is believed that each rock sequence is set off from units above and below by decollements, or zones of detachment. Movement was northwest into the Appalachian basin, primarily by gravitational sliding. The contact between the Shawangunk Formation of Silurian age and Martinsburg Formation of Ordovician age, is one zone of detachment as well as an angular unconformity. Deformational effects of the Middle to Late Ordovician Taconic orogeny are elusive, but it appears that the folds and most minor

  7. Dissolution Mediated Boron and Carbon Storage during Exhumation of HP Metapelites: Examples from New Hampshire Tourmaline-Graphite Intergrowths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvez, M.; Rumble, D.; Cody, G. D.; Sverjensky, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamic of light elements (e.g. C,B) in subduction zones is a complex process ultimately governed by variables such as P, T, fH2 and pH. Interface phenomena at scales from the outcrop to intergranular surfaces play key chemical and mechanical roles on this dynamic (e.g. Galvez et al. 2013). We report here a petrological study of hydrated borosilicate tourmaline intergrown with graphite formed at the contact between igneous intrusives and high grade micaschists in New Hampshire graphite deposits (Rumble and Hoering, 1986). Our study includes Raman scattering, SEM, microprobe analysis and thermodynamic modeling, focusing on the Franklin Pierce and Walpole outcrops. Both localities experienced HP-HT metamorphism during the Acadian orogeny as well as complex metasomatic process during exhumation. The tourmaline-graphite intergrowths are structurally localized at and around contacts between an aplite sill and micaschists - biotite-muscovite-garnet-sillimanite-plagioclase-quartz-ilmenite - (Franklin Pierce), or along shear zones (Walpole) in veins. Tourmalines are dravitic in composition (i.e. Na, Mg rich with minor vacancy and Li content 0.2/0.1 a.p.f.u) and contain multiple primary tubular mixed fluid-solid inclusions containing graphite, quartz and gaseous CO2 and CH4. Sharp optical and compositional radial zonations are observed from core to rim in sections along and perpendicular to the c-axis. Blue-green cores are enriched in Mg and Ca (1.5/0.1 a.p.f.u respectively) whereas rims are enriched in Fe, Na and Ti (0.9/0.6/0.1 a.p.f.u respectively). Alternative interpretations in terms of sector zoning or compositional variability of the mineralizing fluid will be discussed. The carbonaceous material (CM) occurs primarily as flakes directly replacing biotite present in wall rocks. The structural ordering of CM, of unambiguous abiotic origin, reveals a material possessing the 3 dimensional structure of hexagonal graphite. Our results are critically compared to

  8. The eastern extent of the Variscan belt in SE Poland and W Ukraine revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzywiec, Piotr; Mazur, Stanisław; Gągała, Łukasz; Kufrasa, Mateusz; Hatcher, Robert D., Jr.; Buffenmyer, Vinton; Kurovets, Ihor

    2015-04-01

    tectonic models for the W Ukraine demonstrates the continuity of structural style between the RKB and the Biłgoraj- Rawa Ruska Block, the along strike extension of the RKB toward the SE. The minimum thin-skinned shortening in the RKB and the LB is ~15-20 km. This has been transferred from the SW which testifies for the Variscan emplacement of the MM onto the margin of the EEC. A continuity of the basal detachment between the MM, LU, RKB and the LB is a consequence. This is supported by analogy with the western Variscan belt, such as the Ardennes or the Appalachians. This similarity is strengthened by seismic evidence for the Early Devonian "Acadian" unconformity in the thrust sheets of the RKB. Our results provide a basis for a new regional model of the Variscan frontal deformation, situated hundreds of kilometres farther E than usually believed, and unequivocally encroaching on the EEC margin.

  9. Assessment and Management of Dead-Wood Habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, Joan

    2007-01-01

    ., 2001). In Oregon and Washington, approximately 150 species of wildlife are reported to use dead wood in forests (O'Neil et al., 2001). Forty-seven sensitive and special-status species are associated with dead wood (Appendix A). These are key species for management consideration because concern over small or declining populations is often related to loss of suitable dead-wood habitat (Marshall et al., 1996). Primary excavators (woodpeckers) also are often the focus of dead-wood management, because they perform keystone functions in forest ecosystems by creating cavities for secondary cavity-nesters (Martin and Eadie, 1999; Aubry and Raley, 2002). A diverse guild of secondary cavity-users (including swallows, bluebirds, several species of ducks and owls, ash-throated flycatcher, flying squirrel, bats, and many other species) is unable to excavate dead wood, and therefore relies on cavities created by woodpeckers for nesting sites. Suitable nest cavities are essential for reproduction, and their availability limits population size (Newton, 1994). Thus, populations of secondary cavity-nesters are tightly linked to the habitat requirements of primary excavators. Although managers often focus on decaying wood as habitat for wildlife, the integral role dead wood plays in ecological processes is an equally important consideration for management. Rose et al. (2001) provide a thorough review of the ecological functions of dead wood in Pacific Northwest forests, briefly summarized here. Decaying wood functions in: soil development and productivity, nutrient cycling, nitrogen fixation, and carbon storage. From ridge tops, to headwater streams, to estuaries and coastal marine ecosystems, decaying wood is fundamental to diverse terrestrial and aquatic food webs. Wildlife species that use dead wood for cover or feeding are linked to these ecosystem processes through a broad array of functional roles, including facilitation of decay and trophic interactions with other org

  10. Vascular Plant and Vertebrate Inventory of Tumacacori National Historical Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, Brian F.; Albrecht, Eric W.; Halvorson, William L.; Schmidt, Cecilia A.; Anning, Pamela; Docherty, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary This report summarizes the results of the first comprehensive biological inventory of Tumacacori National Historical Park (NHP) in southern Arizona. These surveys were part of a larger effort to inventory vascular plants and vertebrates in eight National Park Service units in Arizona and New Mexico. From 2000 to 2003 we surveyed for vascular plants and vertebrates (fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals) at Tumacacori NHP to document presence of species within the administrative boundaries of the park's three units. Because we used repeatable study designs and standardized field techniques, these inventories can serve as the first step in a long-term monitoring program. We recorded 591 species at Tumacacori NHP, significantly increasing the number of known species for the park (Table 1). Species of note in each taxonomic group include: * Plants: second record in Arizona of muster John Henry, a non-native species that is ranked a 'Class A noxious weed' in California; * Amphibian: Great Plains narrow-mouthed toad; * Reptiles: eastern fence lizard and Sonoran mud turtle; * Birds: yellow-billed cuckoo, green kingfisher, and one observation of the endangered southwestern willow flycatcher; * Fishes: four native species including an important population of the endangered Gila topminnow in the Tumacacori Channel; * Mammals: black bear and all four species of skunk known to occur in Arizona. We recorded 79 non-native species (Table E.S.1), many of which are of management concern, including: Bermudagrass, tamarisk, western mosquitofish, largemouth bass, bluegill, sunfish, American bullfrog, feral cats and dogs, and cattle. We also noted an abundance of crayfish (a non-native invertebrate). We review some of the important non-native species and make recommendations to remove them or to minimize their impacts on the native biota of the park. Based on the observed species richness, Tumacacori NHP possesses high biological diversity of plants, fish

  11. Part I: Neoacadian to Alleghanian foreland basin development and provenance in the central appalachian orogen, pine mountain thrust sheet Part II: Structural configuration of a modified Mesozoic to Cenozoic forearc basin system, south-central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Peter Benjamin

    Foreland and forearc basins are large sediment repositories that form in response to tectonic loading and lithospheric flexure during orogenesis along convergent plate boundaries. In addition to their numerous valuable natural resources, these systems preserve important geologic information regarding the timing and intensity of deformation, uplift and erosion history, and subsidence history along collisional margins, and, in ancient systems, may provide more macroscopic information regarding climate, plate motion, and eustatic sea level fluctuations. This thesis presents two studies focused in the Paleozoic Appalachian foreland basin system along the eastern United States and in the Mesozoic to Cenozoic Matanuska forearc basin system in south-central Alaska. Strata of the Appalachian foreland basin system preserve the dynamic history of orogenesis and sediment dispersal along the east Laurentian margin, recording multiple episodes of deformation and basin development during Paleozoic time. A well-exposed, >600 m thick measured stratigraphic section of the Pine Mountain thrust sheet at Pound Gap, Kentucky affords one of the most complete exposures of Upper Devonian through Middle Pennsylvanian strata in the basin. These strata provide a window into which the foreland basin's development during two major collisional events known as the Acadian-Neoacadian and the Alleghanian orogenies can be observed. Lithofacies analysis of four major sedimentary successions observed in hanging wall strata record the upward transition from (1) a submarine deltaic fan complex developed on a distal to proximal prodelta in Late Devonian to Middle Mississippian time, to (2) a Middle to Late Mississippian carbonate bank system developed on a slowly subsiding, distal foreland ramp, which was drowned by (3) Late Mississippian renewed clastic influx to a tidally influenced, coastal deltaic complex to fluvial delta plain system unconformably overlain by (4) a fluvial braided river complex

  12. Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Jacobi; John Fountain; Stuart Loewenstein; Edward DeRidder; Bruce Hart

    2007-03-31

    (rhombochasms) are consistent with strike-slip motion (oblique) along ENE-striking faults as a result of Taconic peripheral bulge and later collisional stresses. Later orogenic effects from possibly the Acadian, and certainly the Alleghanian, are also present. Although the core does not exhibit significant zones of high porosity, rubble zones and fault zones observed on an accompanying FMI log were apparently the sources of gas production that resulted in this well being a good producer in spite of the low matrix porosity.

  13. Continental break-up and collision in the Neoproterozoic and Palaeozoic — A tale of Baltica and Laurentia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torsvik, T. H.; Smethurst, M. A.; Meert, J. G.; Van der Voo, R.; McKerrow, W. S.; Brasier, M. D.; Sturt, B. A.; Walderhaug, H. J.

    1996-06-01

    a short and rapid excursion to lower latitudes in the Late Vendian, remained mostly in intermediate to high southerly latitudes and closer to the Gondwana margin until Early Ordovician times. In Early Ordovician times, Arenig-Llanvirn platform trilobites show a broad distinction between the continents of Laurentia/Siberia/North China Block (Bathyurid), Baltica (Ptychopygine/ Megalaspid) and the areas of NW Gondwana/Avalonia/Armorica (Calymenacean-Dalmanitacean). During the Ordovician, Baltica rotated and moved northward, approaching close enough to Laurentia by the late Caradoc for trilobite and brachiopod spat to cross the intervening Iapetus Ocean. Docking appears to have been irregular both in time and manner: the collision between Scotland/Greenland and western Norway resulted in the early Scandian Orogeny in the Silurian (c. 425 Ma), but further south, there is evidence of late Silurian impingement with subduction of Avalonian continental crust (in England and Ireland) below the eastern edge of Laurentia until the Emsian. In the northern Appalachians the main time of collision appears to have been during the Emsian/Eifellian Acadian Orogeny. Recent analyses invalidates the traditional concept of a sustained orthogonal relationship between Baltica and Laurentia across a single Iapetus Ocean throughout the Caledonide evolution. The active margin of Baltica (Scandinavian Caledonides) faced Siberia during the Late Cambrian and Early Ordovician with oceanic separation between these landmasses in the order of 1200-1500 km. This may explain the local occureences of Siberia-Laurentian type Bathyarid tribobite faunas in Central Norwegian Caledonian nappes, earlier interpreted as Laurentia-Baltica trilobite mixing. Subsequent counterclockwise rotation of Baltica transferred the Caledonian margin in the direction of Laurentia by Silurian times, when the two continents once again started to collide to form Euramerica. This rotation, along with the strongly asymmetric

  14. Final integrated trip report: site visits to Area 50, Andersen Air Force Base, Guam National Wildlife Refuge, War in the Pacific National Historical Park, Guam, Rota and Saipan, CNMI, 2004-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Steven C.; Pratt, Linda W.

    2006-01-01

    Limestone forests are the most diverse natural plant communities of Guam. Like other natural vegetation types, these forests have a long history of anthropogenic disturbances, being altered and shaped by humans for more than 4,000 years. Although this occupation represents a relatively long human influence in comparison to other Pacific islands, animals associated with humans, such as commensal rodents, arrived in these islands beginning only 1,000 years ago, and larger mammals, such as pigs (Sus scrofa), may not have arrived until European contact. Limestone forests, which also occur on several other Mariana Islands, developed in the presence of frequent tropical storms and are therefore well adapted to this type of natural disturbance regime. However, recent human activities including large scale clearing and conversion combined with the presence of high levels of alien herbivores and seed predators, and the loss of ecological services provided by the former native avifauna may be causing the decline of Guam's forests. Limestone forests on northern Guam, much like those of other Mariana Islands, were heavily cleared for the construction of military installations during World War II. The accidental introduction of the Brown Tree Snake (Boiga irregularis; BTS) around this same period subsequently accelerated the disappearance of Guam's native avifauna and other endemic terrestrial vertebrates, and with them, seed dispersal, pollination, and the predatory regulation of herbivorous insects. Guam and the Mariana Islands contained a high proportion (32 pecent) of endemic bird species, with 4 forms endemic to Guam alone: the now extinct Guam Flycatcher (Myiagra freycineti), and Guam Bridled White-eye (Zosterops conspicillatpicillata), one of three island endemic subspecies from the Marianas; Guam rail (Rallus owstonii); and Guam Kingfisher (Todiramphus cinnamominus cinnamominus), an island endemic subspecies of the regionally endemic Micronesian Kingfisher. Guam once

  15. Assessment and management of dead-wood habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, Joan

    2007-01-01

    Oregon and Washington, approximately 150 species of wildlife are reported to use dead wood in forests (O’Neil et al., 2001). Forty-seven sensitive and special-status species are associated with dead wood (Appendix A). These are key species for management consideration because concern over small or declining populations is often related to loss of suitable dead-wood habitat (Marshall et al., 1996). Primary excavators (woodpeckers) also are often the focus of dead-wood management, because they perform keystone functions in forest ecosystems by creating cavities for secondary cavity-nesters (Martin and Eadie, 1999; Aubry and Raley, 2002). A diverse guild of secondary cavity-users (including swallows, bluebirds, several species of ducks and owls, ash-throated flycatcher, flying squirrel, bats, and many other species) is unable to excavate dead wood, and therefore relies on cavities created by woodpeckers for nesting sites. Suitable nest cavities are essential for reproduction, and their availability limits population size (Newton, 1994). Thus, populations of secondary cavity-nesters are tightly linked to the habitat requirements of primary excavators. Although managers often focus on decaying wood as habitat for wildlife, the integral role dead wood plays in ecological processes is an equally important consideration for management. Rose et al. (2001) provide a thorough review of the ecological functions of dead wood in Pacific Northwest forests, briefly summarized here. Decaying wood functions in: soil development and productivity, nutrient cycling, nitrogen fixation, and carbon storage. From ridge tops, to headwater streams, to estuaries and coastal marine ecosystems, decaying wood is fundamental to diverse terrestrial and aquatic food webs. Wildlife species that use dead wood for cover or feeding are linked to these ecosystem processes through a broad array of functional roles, including facilitation of decay and trophic interactions with other organisms (Marcot, 2002